WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological species identification

  1. Biological identification and determination of optimum growth conditions for four species ofNavicula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiaobo; PANG Shaojun; LIU Feng; SHAN Tifeng; LI Jing

    2014-01-01

    Four species in the genus Navicula were isolated using the serial dilution method. Based on scanning elec-tron microscopy (SEM) and sequence comparisons of two segments of genes (small ribosomal subunit and large subunit of Rubisco), the species were identified asNavicula perminuta,N. pseudacceptata,N. vara, andN. rhynchocephala. Based on phylogenetic analysis and culture trials,there was a close relationship betweenN. perminutaandN. vara. Growth of these species was evaluated using measurements of optical density at 680 nm (OD680) under various environmental factors. Results showed that the optimum culture conditions were 25°C, 50-100 μmol photons m-2 s-1, pH 8.0, and salinities from 25 to 30. However, the favor-able salinity forN. perminuta was surprisingly high at 35. Nutrient requirement analysis demonstrated that growth ofNavicula depended on the availability of SiO32-. Their relative growth rates (RGR) peaked at the highest tested level (0.25 mmol/L). The optimal concentrations of NO3-and PO43- were 3.6 mmol/L and 0.18 mmol/L, respectively. Culture of theseNavicula species for abalone or sea cucumber aquaculture should take these factors into consideration.

  2. Progress of DNA-based Methods for Species Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhen; ZHANG Su-hua; WANG Zheng; BIAN Ying-nan; LI Cheng-tao

    2015-01-01

    Species identification of biological samples is widely used in such fields as forensic science and food industry. A variety of accurate and reliable methods have been developed in recent years. The cur-rent reviewshows common target genes and screening criteria suitable for species identification, and de-scribed various DNA-based molecular biology methods about species identification. Additionally, it dis-cusses the future development of species identification combined with real-time PCR and sequencing technologies.

  3. Identification: psychoanalytic and biological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, David D

    2006-01-01

    In recent attempts to bring psychoanalysis into greater contact with other sciences, a number of works have explicated neural science concepts and phenomena--affect, memory, consciousness--for the psychoanalyst. These efforts have helped analysts build a more scientific foundation for their theory and practice. A related task remains--namely, to take psychoanalytic concepts and see how they relate to other sciences. The concept of identification has a long history in psychoanalytic theory. It is seen in parent-child interactions, in teaching and mentoring relationships, and in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. Neuropsychology and evolutionary biology have explored the phylogenetic precursors of identification, while genetics and infant observation provide insights into individual processes of identification. Finally, neuroscience, particularly recent studies of mirror neurons, offers information about the biological mechanisms of imitation and the relationship of imitation to identification. Findings from these sciences are presented in an effort to further the psychoanalytic understanding of identification, especially its biological underpinnings. PMID:16602344

  4. Identification of malassezia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindo A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia spp. are lipophilic unipolar yeasts recognized as commensals of skin that may be pathogenic under certain conditions. The genus Malassezia now comprises of seven species. This study was aimed at using a simple practical approach to speciate Malassezia yeasts from clinical material. Seventy skin scrapings from patients with pityriasis versicolor infection, positive in 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH, were cultured onto modified Dixon′s agar (mDixon′s agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA and incubated at 32ºC. Speciation was done on the basis of Gram stain morphology, catalase test, and utilization of Tweens. Out of 70 scrapings 48 (68.75% showed growth on mDixon′s agar. The commonest isolate was M. sympodialis (28, 58% followed by M. globosa (19, 40% and one isolate was (2% of M. restricta. M. sympodialis was the commonest species affecting our population and there was no isolation of M. obtusa, M. slooffiae, M. pachydermatis and M. furfur.

  5. Identification and evaluation of Trichogramma parasitoids for biological pest control

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, I.M.M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Egg parasitoids of the genus Trichogramma are used as biological control agents against lepidopterous pests. From the 180 species described world-wide, only 5 have large scale application. The development of better methods to select other Trichogramma species/strains is necessary for a more effective use of these wasps against target pests. The main aim of this thesis is to investigate criteria and methods for identification and selection of Trichogramma species/strains for biological control...

  6. Molecular biological identification of Babesia, Theileria, and Anaplasma species in cattle in Egypt using PCR assays, gene sequence analysis and a novel DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ashker, Maged; Hotzel, Helmut; Gwida, Mayada; El-Beskawy, Mohamed; Silaghi, Cornelia; Tomaso, Herbert

    2015-01-30

    In this preliminary study, a novel DNA microarray system was tested for the diagnosis of bovine piroplasmosis and anaplasmosis in comparison with microscopy and PCR assay results. In the Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt, 164 cattle were investigated for the presence of piroplasms and Anaplasma species. All investigated cattle were clinically examined. Blood samples were screened for the presence of blood parasites using microscopy and PCR assays. Seventy-one animals were acutely ill, whereas 93 were apparently healthy. In acutely ill cattle, Babesia/Theileria species (n=11) and Anaplasma marginale (n=10) were detected. Mixed infections with Babesia/Theileria spp. and A. marginale were present in two further cases. A. marginale infections were also detected in apparently healthy subjects (n=23). The results of PCR assays were confirmed by DNA sequencing. All samples that were positive by PCR for Babesia/Theileria spp. gave also positive results in the microarray analysis. The microarray chips identified Babesia bovis (n=12) and Babesia bigemina (n=2). Cattle with babesiosis were likely to have hemoglobinuria and nervous signs when compared to those with anaplasmosis that frequently had bloody feces. We conclude that clinical examination in combination with microscopy are still very useful in diagnosing acute cases of babesiosis and anaplasmosis, but a combination of molecular biological diagnostic assays will detect even asymptomatic carriers. In perspective, parallel detection of Babesia/Theileria spp. and A. marginale infections using a single microarray system will be a valuable improvement.

  7. Target identification strategies in plant chemical biology

    OpenAIRE

    Dejonghe, Wim; Russinova, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    The current needs to understand gene function in plant biology increasingly require more dynamic and conditional approaches opposed to classic genetic strategies. Gene redundancy and lethality can substantially complicate research, which might be solved by applying a chemical genetics approach. Now understood as the study of small molecules and their effect on biological systems with subsequent target identification, chemical genetics is a fast developing field with a strong history in pharma...

  8. Printed Identification Key or Web-Based Identification Guide: An Effective Tool for Species Identification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Edison E. dela Cruz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Species identification is often done with the aid of traditional dichotomous keys. This printed material is based on one’s decision between two alternatives, which is followed by another pair of alternatives until the final species name is reached. With the advent of internet technology, the use of an online database offers an updatable and accumulative approach to species identification. It can also be accessed anytime, and this is very useful for fast-changing groups of organisms. In this paper, we report the preference of sophomore Bachelor of Science (B.Sc. in Microbiology students to two identification guides as a tool in taxonomy. We wish to test our hypothesis that today’s students will prefer to use web-based ID guides over printed dichotomous keys. We also describe how these printed dichotomous key and web-based ID guides were used by the students as one of their laboratory activities in the course Biology of Algae and Fungi.  

  9. Biological and ecological traits of marine species

    OpenAIRE

    Costello, M.J.; Claus, S.; Dekeyzer, S; Vandepitte, L.; Ó Tuama, É.; Lear, D.; Tyler-Walters, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the utility and availability of biological and ecological traits for marine species so as to prioritise the development of a world database on marine species traits. In addition, the ‘status’ of species for conservation, that is, whether they are introduced or invasive, of fishery or aquaculture interest, harmful, or used as an ecological indicator, were reviewed because these attributes are of particular interest to society. Whereas traits are an enduring characteristic of...

  10. BIOLOGICAL NANOROBOT ARCHITECTURE FOR MEDICAL TARGET IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Paul and Dipti*

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work has an innovative approach for the development of biological nanorobots with sensors for medicine. The biological nanorobots operate in a virtual environment based on random, thermal and chemical control techniques. The biological nanorobot architecture model has biological nano bioelectronics as the basis for manufacturing integrated system devices with embedded biological nano biosensors and actuators, which facilitates its application for medical target identification and drug delivery. The biological nanorobot interaction with the described workspace shows how these biological nanorobots detect the target area and supply the drug. Therefore, our work addresses the control and the architecture design for developing practical molecular machines. Advances in nanotechnology are enabling manufacturing nanosensors and actuators through nano bioelectronics and biologically inspired devices. Analysis of integrated system modeling is one important aspect for supporting nanotechnology in the fast development towards one of the most challenging new fields of science: molecular machines. The use of 3D simulation can provide interactive tools for addressing nanorobot choices on sensing, hardware architecture design, manufacturing approaches, and control methodology investigation.

  11. Litchi Flavonoids: Isolation, Identification and Biological Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Jiangrong Li; Yueming Jiang

    2007-01-01

    The current status of the isolation, identification, biological activity, utilization and development prospects of flavonoids found in litchi fruit pericarp (LFP) tissues is reviewed. LFP tissues account for approximately 15% by weight of the whole fresh fruit and are comprised of significant amount of flavonoids. The major flavonoids in ripe LFP include flavonols and anthocyanins. The major flavanols in the LFP are reported to be procyanidin B4, procyanidin B2 and epicatechin, while cyanindi...

  12. A universal algorithm for genome-wide in silicio identification of biologically significant gene promoter putative cis-regulatory-elements; identification of new elements for reactive oxygen species and sucrose signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Matt; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2006-02-01

    Short motifs of many cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can be found in the promoters of most Arabidopsis genes, and this raises the question of how their presence can confer specific regulation. We developed a universal algorithm to test the biological significance of CREs by first identifying every Arabidopsis gene with a CRE and then statistically correlating the presence or absence of the element with the gene expression profile on multiple DNA microarrays. This algorithm was successfully verified for previously characterized abscisic acid, ethylene, sucrose and drought responsive CREs in Arabidopsis, showing that the presence of these elements indeed correlates with treatment-specific gene induction. Later, we used standard motif sampling methods to identify 128 putative motifs induced by excess light, reactive oxygen species and sucrose. Our algorithm was able to filter 20 out of 128 novel CREs which significantly correlated with gene induction by either heat, reactive oxygen species and/or sucrose. The position, orientation and sequence specificity of CREs was tested in silicio by analyzing the expression of genes with naturally occurring sequence variations. In three novel CREs the forward orientation correlated with sucrose induction and the reverse orientation with sucrose suppression. The functionality of the predicted novel CREs was experimentally confirmed using Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures transformed with short promoter fragments or artificial promoters fused with the GUS reporter gene. Our genome-wide analysis opens up new possibilities for in silicio verification of the biological significance of newly discovered CREs, and allows for subsequent selection of such CREs for experimental studies.

  13. Functional biology of sympatric krill species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2016-01-01

    Here we compare the functional biology of the sympatric krill species, Meganyctiphanes norvegica and Thysanoessa inermis. For M. norvegica, we investigated functional responses on diatoms and copepods, together with prey size spectra on plankton ,400 mm and copepods in the size range 500–3220 mm...

  14. SPECIES IDENTIFICATION OF MEAT BY ELECTROPHORETIC METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Pospiech

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrophoretic methods can be used to identify meat of various animal species. The protein electrophoresis, especially the IEF of the sarcoplasmic proteins, is a well-established technique for species identification of raw fish and is used in the control of seafood authenticity. However, in the case of the analysis of heat-processed fish, the method is applicable only to those species which possess characteristic patterns of the heat-stable parvalbumins. Heat-denatured fish muscle proteins may be solubilised by urea or sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS and separated by urea-IEF or SDS-PAGE, respectively. The comparison of these two methods allowed to conclude that, basically, each of them can be used for species identification of heated fishery products. However, extensively washed products may be preferentially analysed by the SDS-PAGE, because most of the parvalbumins are washed out leaving mainly myosins. On the other hand, the IEF method may be preferred for the differentiation of closely related species rich in parvalbumins isoforms. It is evident from the literature data that species-specific protein separations yield proteins of low molecular weight made up of three light chains of myosin (14-23 kDa, troponin (19-30 kDa and parvalbumin (about 12 kDa. Investigations showed that the SDS-PAGE method can be used to identify meats of: cattle, sheep, lambs, goats, red deer and rabbits. The technique allowed researchers to identify the following myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic muscle proteins: myosin and actin, α-actinin, tropomyosin, troponin. SDS-PAGE allowed the identification of myofibrillar proteins taking into account their molecular weights which was not possible with the assistance of the PAGIF because too many protein bands were obtained. It was possible to obtain differences in the separation of proteins characteristic for certain species, e.g. beef, resulting from the presence of sin-gle myofibrillar proteins.

  15. Species identification key of Korean mammal hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunok; Choi, Tae-Young; Woo, Donggul; Min, Mi-Sook; Sugita, Shoei; Lee, Hang

    2014-05-01

    The hair microstructures of Korean terrestrial mammals from 23 species (22 wild and one domestic) were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to construct a hair identification key. The hairs were examined using the medulla structures and cuticular scales of guard hairs from the dorsal regions of mature adult animals. All cuticular scale structures in the hair of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Insectivora showed the petal pattern, and those of Artiodactyla and Chiroptera showed the wave pattern and coronal pattern, respectively. Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Carnivora showed multicellular, and Insectivora and Artiodactyla showed unicellular regular, mesh or columnar in the medulla structures, respectively. Chiroptera did not show the medulla structures in their hair. We found that it is possible to distinguish between species and order based on general appearance, medulla structures and cuticular scales. Thus, we constructed a hair identification key with morphological characteristics from each species. This study suggests that hair identification keys could be useful in fields, such as forensic science, food safety and foraging ecology.

  16. Identification and Biological Characterization of Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis Isolated from a Patient with Tegumentary Leishmaniasis in Goiás, a Nonendemic Area for This Species in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alause da Silva Pires

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize clinical field isolates of Leishmania spp. obtained from patients with American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis (ATL who live in Goiás state, Brazil. The presumed areas of infection were in Goiás, Tocantins, and Pará states. Three isolates of parasites were identified as L. (Viannia braziliensis and one as L. (V. guyanensis. The in vitro growth profiles were found to be similar for all parasites. Nevertheless, in C57BL/6 mice, L. (V. guyanensis infection was better controlled than L. (V. braziliensis. Yet in C57BL/6 mice deficient in interferon gamma, L. (V. guyanensis lesions developed faster than those caused by L. (V. braziliensis isolates. In BALB/c mice, the development of lesions was similar for isolates from both species; however, on the 11th week of infection, amastigotes could not be observed in macrophages from L. (V. guyanensis-infected mice. Thus, L. (V. guyanensis can be circulating in Goiás, a state where autochthonous cases of this species had not yet been reported. Considering the difficulties to differentiate L. (V. guyanensis from L. (V. braziliensis at the molecular, morphological, and clinical (human and murine models levels, the presence of L. (V. guyanensis infections is possibly underestimated in several regions of Brazil.

  17. Biological variation in Trichinella species and genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolas-Fernández, F

    2003-06-01

    At present, the genus Trichinella comprises seven species of which five have encapsulated muscle larvae (T. spiralis, T. nativa, T. britovi, T. nelsoni and T. murrelli) and two do not (T. pseudospiralis and T. papuae) plus three genotypes of non-specific status (T6, T8 and T9). The diagnostic characteristics of these species are based on biological, biochemical and genetic criteria. Of biological significance is variation observed among species and isolates in parameters such as infectivity and immunogenicity. Infectivity of Trichinella species or isolates is determined, among other considerations, by the immune status of the host in response to species- or isolate-specific antigens. Common and particular antigens determine the extent of protective responses against homologous or heterologous challenge. The kinetics of isotype, cytokine and inflammatory responses against T. spiralis infections are isolate-dependent. Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis induce different dose-dependent T-cell polarizations in the early host response, with T. spiralis initially preferentially promoting Th1-type responses before switching to Th2 and T. pseudospiralis driving Th2-type responses from the outset. PMID:12756064

  18. The Identification of Haemonchus Species and Diagnosis of Haemonchosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarlenga, D S; Hoberg, E P; Tuo, W

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis is often equated with identification or detection when discussing parasitic diseases. Unfortunately, these are not necessarily mutually exclusive activities; diseases and infections are generally diagnosed and organisms are identified. Diagnosis is commonly predicated upon some clinical signs; in an effort to determine the causative agent, identification of genera and species is subsequently performed. Both identification and diagnosis play critical roles in managing an infection, and involve the interplay of direct and indirect methods of detection, particularly in light of the complex and expanding problem of drug-resistance in parasites. Accurate and authoritative identification that is cost- and time-effective, based on structural and molecular attributes of specimens, provides a foundation for defining parasite diversity and changing patterns of geographical distribution, host association and emergence of disease. Most techniques developed thus far have been grounded in assumptions based on strict host associations between Haemonchus contortus and small ruminants, that is, sheep and goats, and between Haemonchus placei and bovids. Current research and increasing empirical evidence of natural infections in the field demonstrates that this assumption misrepresents the host associations for these species of Haemonchus. Furthermore, the capacity of H. contortus to utilize a considerably broad spectrum of ungulate hosts is reflected in our understanding of the role of anthropogenic forcing, the 'breakdown' of ecological isolation, global introduction and host switching as determinants of distribution. Nuanced insights about distribution, host association and epidemiology have emerged over the past 30years, coincidently with the development of increasingly robust means for parasite identification. In this review and for the sake of argument, we would like to delineate the diagnosis of haemonchosis from the identification of the specific pathogen. As a

  19. 9 CFR 114.4 - Identification of biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of biological products... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.4 Identification of biological products. Suitable tags or labels...

  20. Molecular genetic strategies for species identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper probes into the molecular genetic mechanism of the formation of species, subspecies and variety in evolving progression, and brings forward 5 criteria of an ideal strategy in species identification: stating the specific characteristics at species, subspecies and variety level without any interference of too high polymorphism at individual or population level; keys should be distributed as 0 or 1, e. g. yes or no; satisfying re-peatability and simple operation; high veracity and reliability; adaptability to widely various specimen. Respec-tively, this paper reviews two strategies focusing on detecting the fragment length polymorphism and base re-placement and lays out some detail methods under above strategies. It demonstrates that it is not possible to solve all species problems by pursuing identification with only a single gene or DNA fragment. Only based on thorough consideration of all strategies, a method or combined several methods could bring satisfying reliability. For advanced focuses, it requires not only development and optimization of methods under above strategies, but also new originality of creative strategies.

  1. A molecular biological study on the identification of the molecular species of DNA polymerases for repairing radiation-damaged DNA and the factors modifying the mutation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming at prevention and treatment of radiation damages, the authors have been investigating DNA damages by X-ray and its repairing mechanism, however, the molecular species of DNA polymerase which mediate the repairing could not been identified by biochemical methods using various inhibitors because of their low specificity. Therefore, in this study, anti-sense oligonucleotides for DNA polymerase α, δ and ε were obtained by chemical synthesis and transduced into human fibroblast cell, NB1RGB by three methods; endocytotic method, electroporation method and lipofection method. For the first method, the addition of those peptides into the cell culture at 5 μM inhibited the polymerase activity by up to 30% and it was economically difficult to use at higher concentrations than it. For the electroporation method, different conditions were tested in the respects of initial potential, time constant and buffer, but the uptake of thimidine was scarcely decreased in the surviving cells, suggesting that the surviving rate would be short in the cells electroporated with those anti-sense peptides. For the lipofection method, among several cationic lipids tested, lipofectamine significantly enlarged the decrease of thymidine uptake by anti-sense δ, however it was considered that its application to DNA repairing is difficult because lipofectamine is strongly cytotoxic. Therefore, construction of a vector which allows to express anti-sense RNA in those cells is undertaken. (M.N.)

  2. Reliable identification at the species level of Brucella isolates with MALDI-TOF-MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lista, F.; Reubsaet, F.A.G.; Santis, R. de; Parchen, R.R.; Jong, A.L. de; Kieboom, J.; Laaken, A.L. van der; Voskamp-Visser, I.A.I.; Fillo, S.; Jansen, H.J. de; Plas, J. van der; Paauw, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The genus Brucella contains highly infectious species that are classified as biological threat agents. The timely detection and identification of the microorganism involved is essential for an effective response not only to biological warfare attacks but also to natural outbreaks. Matrix

  3. The changing epitome of species identification - DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmal Ali, M; Gyulai, Gábor; Hidvégi, Norbert; Kerti, Balázs; Al Hemaid, Fahad M A; Pandey, Arun K; Lee, Joongku

    2014-07-01

    The discipline taxonomy (the science of naming and classifying organisms, the original bioinformatics and a basis for all biology) is fundamentally important in ensuring the quality of life of future human generation on the earth; yet over the past few decades, the teaching and research funding in taxonomy have declined because of its classical way of practice which lead the discipline many a times to a subject of opinion, and this ultimately gave birth to several problems and challenges, and therefore the taxonomist became an endangered race in the era of genomics. Now taxonomy suddenly became fashionable again due to revolutionary approaches in taxonomy called DNA barcoding (a novel technology to provide rapid, accurate, and automated species identifications using short orthologous DNA sequences). In DNA barcoding, complete data set can be obtained from a single specimen irrespective to morphological or life stage characters. The core idea of DNA barcoding is based on the fact that the highly conserved stretches of DNA, either coding or non coding regions, vary at very minor degree during the evolution within the species. Sequences suggested to be useful in DNA barcoding include cytoplasmic mitochondrial DNA (e.g. cox1) and chloroplast DNA (e.g. rbcL, trnL-F, matK, ndhF, and atpB rbcL), and nuclear DNA (ITS, and house keeping genes e.g. gapdh). The plant DNA barcoding is now transitioning the epitome of species identification; and thus, ultimately helping in the molecularization of taxonomy, a need of the hour. The 'DNA barcodes' show promise in providing a practical, standardized, species-level identification tool that can be used for biodiversity assessment, life history and ecological studies, forensic analysis, and many more. PMID:24955007

  4. Litchi Flavonoids: Isolation, Identification and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueming Jiang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The current status of the isolation, identification, biological activity, utilization and development prospects of flavonoids found in litchi fruit pericarp (LFP tissues is reviewed. LFP tissues account for approximately 15% by weight of the whole fresh fruit and are comprised of significant amount of flavonoids. The major flavonoids in ripe LFP include flavonols and anthocyanins. The major flavanols in the LFP are reported to be procyanidin B4, procyanidin B2 and epicatechin, while cyanindin-3-rutinside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-rutinosde and quercetin-3-glucoside are identified as the important anthocyanins. Litchi flavanols and anthocyanins exhibit good potential antioxidant activity. The hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion scavenging activities of procyanidin B2 are greater than those of procyanidin B4 and epicatechin, while epicatechin has the highest α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH· scavenging activity. In addition to the antioxidant activity, LFP extract displays a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on human breast cancer, which could be attributed, in part, to its inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells through upregulation and down-regulation of multiple genes. Furthermore, various anticancer activities are observed for epicatechin, procyanidin B2, procyanidin B4 and the ethyl acetate fraction of LFP tissue extracts. Procyanidin B4 and the ethyl acetate fraction show a stronger inhibitory effect on HELF than MCF-7 proliferation, while epicatechin and procyanidin B2 have lower cytotoxicities towards MCF-7 and HELF than paclitaxel. It is therefore suggested that flavonoids from LFP might be potentially useful components for functional foods and/or anti-breast cancer drugs.

  5. Species identification of skins and development of sheep wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    markers mapped to the reference genome. The resolution of sheep mitochondrial DNA is, however, too low to generate detailed information of sheep population history and therefore nuclear DNA should be the focus in the future. Three studies focused on the species identification of skins. Traditional species...... PCR is still a valuable tool for species identification. For samples from degrading enviroments, such as the Danish bogs, Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing was proven to be a reliable method for species identification. Moreover, MS-based peptide sequencing provided information of the age...

  6. Identification of Bombus species based on wing venation structure

    OpenAIRE

    Kozmus, Peter; Virant-Doberlet, Meta; Meglič, Vladimir; Dovč, Peter

    2011-01-01

    International audience About 250 bumblebee species in 15 subgenera are known in the world. Identification of some species is difficult due to small morphological differences. In this study, wing venation patterns were analysed to obtain characters for species identification. Four hundred and sixty-nine bumblebees from 121 localities in Slovenia and 61 imported individuals were included in the analyses. The coordinates of 19 vein junctions on the forewings were measured and used in the calc...

  7. Wood Species Identification, A Challenge of Scientific Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina TIMAR

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Wood species identification is an important step in the scientific approach of conservation of the wooden cultural heritage. The paper refers to the microscopic identification of the wooden species for two artisanal objects, investigated for conservation purposes. A previous macroscopic analysis of these objects, after thorough cleaning of the surfaces offered some basic information on the possible wood species involved, but due to the degradation of the support this was not conclusive for some elements of these objects, so that relevant samples were taken out, prepared and investigated. The identified wooden species were: poplar (Populus spp, sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus, fir and beech (Fagus sylvatica. This identification was based on the microscopic keys of wood identification, reference microscopic slides of the respective wood species and microscopic measurements followed by data processing employing the ImageJ software.

  8. Systems for Detection and Identification of Biological Aerosols (Review Paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Švabenska

    2012-01-01

    Easy and inexpensive manufacturing of biological weapons, their complicated detection, expensive protection, difficult treating of affected individuals, selective impact only for people, animals or plants, are all factors making an effective defense against biological warfare agents very difficult. The aim of this study is an introduction to the systems for the detection and identification of biological aerosols containing dangerous bioagents. The basic techniques used for detection and ident...

  9. Identification of campylobacteria isolated from Danish broilers by phenotypic tests and species-specific PCR assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wainø, M; Bang, Dan; Lund, Marianne;

    2003-01-01

    To validate a phenotypic Campylobacter species identification method employed to identify campylobacters in broilers by comparison with campylobacterial species identification using various species-specific PCR analyses.......To validate a phenotypic Campylobacter species identification method employed to identify campylobacters in broilers by comparison with campylobacterial species identification using various species-specific PCR analyses....

  10. AFSC/ABL: Juvenile rockfish DNA species identification

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Many pelagic juvenile rockfish (Sebastes) were collected in juvenile salmonid surveys in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) from 1998 to 2002. Often species identification of...

  11. Molecular identification of Paragonimus species by DNA pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-06-01

    DNA pyrosequencing for PCR amplicons is an attractive strategy for the identification of microorganisms because of its short time performance for large number of samples. In this study, the primers targeting the fragment of ITS2 region of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were newly developed for pyrosequencing-based identification of 6 Paragonimus species, Paragonimus bangkokensis, Paragonimus harinasutai, Paragonimus heterotremus, Paragonimus macrorchis, Paragonimus siamensis and Paragonimus westermani. Pyrosequencing determination of 39 nucleotides of partial ITS2 region could discriminate 6 Paragonimus species, and could also detect intra-species genetic variation of P. macrorchis. This DNA pyrosequencing-based identification can be a valuable tool to improve species-level identification of Paragonimus in the endemic areas.

  12. Eddy Current Probe for Biological Structures Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new eddy current probe for conductivity measurement of biological structures was presented. The probe operation principle is based on the differential pick-up. After theoretical analysis results of experiments have been presented. For experiments fruits and meat, have been used. (author)

  13. Taxonomic identification of algae (morphological and molecular): species concepts, methodologies, and their implications for ecological bioassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoylov, Kalina M

    2014-06-01

    Algal taxonomy is a key discipline in phycology and is critical for algal genetics, physiology, ecology, applied phycology, and particularly bioassessment. Taxonomic identification is the most common analysis and hypothesis-testing endeavor in science. Errors of identification are often related to the inherent problem of small organisms with morphologies that are difficult to distinguish without research-grade microscopes and taxonomic expertise in phycology. Proposed molecular approaches for taxonomic identification from environmental samples promise rapid, potentially inexpensive, and more thorough culture-independent identification of all algal species present in a sample of interest. Molecular identification has been used in biodiversity and conservation, but it also has great potential for applications in bioassessment. Comparisons of morphological and molecular identification of benthic algal communities are improved by the identification of more taxa; however, automated identification technology does not allow for the simultaneous analysis of thousands of samples. Currently, morphological identification is used to verify molecular taxonomic identities, but with the increased number of taxa verified in algal gene libraries, molecular identification will become a universal tool in biological studies. Thus, in this report, successful application of molecular techniques related to algal bioassessment is discussed.

  14. Current laboratory methods for biological threat agent identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchal, E A; Teska, J D; Ludwig, G V; Shoemaker, D R; Ezzell, J W

    2001-09-01

    The authors present an integrated approach for the identification of biological threat agents. The methods used have been used extensively in field exercises and during response to incidents of biological terrorism. A diagnostic system, which integrates the clinical diagnosis or medical intelligence with immunodiagnostic tests, rapid gene amplification assays, and standard culture, provides results of the highest quality and confidence. In the future, selected reagents and technologies will be distributed through a network of civilian and military laboratories. PMID:11572145

  15. Automated identification of animal species in camera trap images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, X.; Wang, J.; Kays, R.; Jansen, P.A.; Wang, T.; Huang, T.

    2013-01-01

    Image sensors are increasingly being used in biodiversity monitoring, with each study generating many thousands or millions of pictures. Efficiently identifying the species captured by each image is a critical challenge for the advancement of this field. Here, we present an automated species identif

  16. Phylogenetic and biological species diversity within the Neurospora tetrasperma complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menkis, A.; Bastiaans, E.; Jacobson, D.J.; Johannesson, H.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the evolutionary history of the morphologically recognized filamentous ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma, and to reveal the genetic and reproductive relationships among its individuals and populations. We applied both phylogenetic and biological species rec

  17. Dealing with the identification of protein species in ancient amphorae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallongeville, Sophie; Garnier, Nicolas; Casasola, Dario Bernal; Bonifay, Michel; Rolando, Christian; Tokarski, Caroline

    2011-03-01

    This manuscript deals with the identification of protein residues in amphorae, including particularly identification of protein species. The work described was performed on fishes, the anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and bonito (Sarda sarda) species frequently found in the Mediterranean area. Based on proteomic techniques, the analytical strategy was adapted to analysis of protein residues from tiny ceramic fragments. The major difficulty was to extract proteins and limit their hydrolysis during the sample preparation; consequently, multiple soft extraction techniques were evaluated. The most valuable results were obtained using a solution containing high amounts of denaturing agents, urea and thiourea, reducing agent, dithiothreitol, and detergent, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The analysis using nano liquid chromatography-nano electrospray ionization double quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of up to 200 proteins for the anchovy and bonito species, among which 73 peptides were found to be fish-specific. Because bonito and anchovy species are not documented and fully sequenced in genomic databases, the preliminary protein identification was realized via sequence homology to other fish sequenced species. Amino acid substitutions of peptides were assigned on the basis of the interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry spectra using de novo sequencing; these peptides, not reported up to now in databases, constitute species-specific markers. The method developed was finally applied to an archaeological sample replica impregnated with a mixture of fish tissue from both species; this experiment successfully led to the identification of 17 fish proteins, including 33 fish-specific peptides. This work shows that the analytical method developed has great potential for the identification of protein species in complex archaeological samples. PMID:20890751

  18. Phytochemistry and biological activities of Phlomis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sgaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Kilani, Soumaya; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-09-01

    The genus Phlomis L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family and encompasses 100 species native to Turkey, North Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a popular herbal tea enjoyed for its taste and aroma. Phlomis species are used to treat various conditions such as diabetes, gastric ulcer, hemorrhoids, inflammation, and wounds. This review aims to summarize recent research on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of the genus Phlomis, with particular emphasis on its ethnobotanical uses. The essential oil of Phomis is composed of four chemotypes dominated by monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene and linalool), sesquiterpenes (germacrene D and beta-caryophyllene), aliphalic compounds (9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid methyl ester), fatty acids (hexadecanoic acid) and other components (trans-phytol, 9,12,15-octadecatrien-1-ol). Flavonoids, iridoids and phenylethyl alcohol constitute the main compounds isolated from Phlomis extracts. The pharmacological activities of some Phlomis species have been investigated. They are described according to antidiabetic, antinociceptive, antiulcerogenic, protection of the vascular system, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. PMID:19563875

  19. Identification and evaluation of Trichogramma parasitoids for biological pest control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, I.M.M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Egg parasitoids of the genus Trichogramma are used as biological control agents against lepidopterous pests. From the 180 species described world-wide, only 5 have large scale application. The development of better methods to select other Trichogramma species/strains is necessary for a more effectiv

  20. Identification of Enterococcus sp. in GIT of Broiler Chickens after Application of Biological Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Nováková

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was a rapid detection and identification of Enterococcus sp. in various segments of chicken gastrointestinal tract by polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis. As a biological material were used broiler chickens Hybro. They were fattening by the combined probiotic preparation for elimination of pathogens and better utilization of feed. In our study, the identification of Enterococcus species was based on the superoxid dismutase gene (sodA. Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis were determined in all samples (100% occurence. Occurence of Enterococcus gallinarum was 87.5% and Enterococcus cecorum was 0%.

  1. Aspects of Biology and Development of Xiphinema americanum and Related Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbrendt, J M; Brown, D J

    1993-09-01

    Identification of Xiphinema americanum-group nematodes is based on relatively subtle morphological and morphometric differences, many of which overlap. The significance and importance of these separations cannot be assessed without a basic understanding of the biological differences between species. Currently, information is accumulating on Xiphinema biology, development, and genetics that will help to confirm or refute the current systematics of species in this group. Recently, it was demonstrated that Xiphinema species pass through either three or four juvenile stages before becoming adults. This new and fundamental information divides the genus and the X. americanum group into subgroups based on their developmental evolution and provides new insight into the taxonomy and systematic positions of the species.

  2. Molecular identification of Prorocentrum (Dinophyceae) species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A fragment of a large sub-unit ribosomal DNA (LrDNA) of 12 strains of Prorocentrum species was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were digested by 3 restriction endonucleases (Cfo I, Hae Ⅲ, and RSA I) and then resolved in agarose gels. Results show that different species had different RFLP patterns, except for P. arcuatum (ME 131), which had the same pattern to P. micans (ME160 and 04).The same fragment of 19 strains of the genus was also amplified and subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). 11 different patterns were resolved. Different cultures of a same species had the same pattern. The results of RFLP and DGGE analyses showed that eight newly isolated epibenthic Prorocentrum species were different from each other, and also from other cultured ones examined in this study. P arcuatum (ME132) could not be differentiated from P. micans (ME160 and 04), it was probably mis-identified, since they are quite different morphologically. P. redfieldii (ME138) could also not be distinguished form P. triestinium (ME132), it should be regarded as a synonym of P. triestinium. Unexpectedly, a restriction site was found in P.micans, compared with previous sequence data.

  3. Key to the identification of scorpion species from Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Toscano-Gadea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a key for the recognition of species of scorpions found in Uruguay. It also provides information on its behavior, biology, distribution and medical importance.

  4. Species identification of archaeological skin objects from Danish bogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth; Mannering, Ulla;

    2014-01-01

    species used for the production of skin garments. Until recently, species identification of archaeological skin was primarily performed by light and scanning electron microscopy or the analysis of ancient DNA. However, the efficacy of these methods can be limited due to the harsh, mostly acidic...... environment of peat bogs leading to morphological and molecular degradation within the samples. We compared species assignment results of twelve archaeological skin samples from Danish bogs using Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing, against results obtained using light and scanning electron...... microscopy. While it was difficult to obtain reliable results using microscopy, MS enabled the identification of several species-diagnostic peptides, mostly from collagen and keratins, allowing confident species discrimination even among taxonomically close organisms, such as sheep and goat. Unlike previous...

  5. Testing four proposed barcoding markers for the identification of species within Ligustrum L.(Oleaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing GU; Jun-Xia SU; Ruo-Zhu LIN; Rui-Qi LI; Pei-Gen XIAO

    2011-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a biological technique that uses short and standardized genes or DNA regions to facilitate species identification. DNA barcoding has been used successfully in several animal and plant groups. Ligustrum (Oleaceae) species occur widely throughout the world and are used as medicinal plants in China. Therefore, the accurate identification of species in this genus is necessary. Four potential DNA barcodes, namely the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and three chloroplast (cp) DNA regions (rbcL, marK, and trnH-psbA),were used to differentiate species within Ligustrum. BLAST, character-based method, tree-based methods and TAXONDNA analysis were used to investigate the molecular identification capabilities of the chosen markers for discriminating 92 samples representing 20 species of this genus. The results showed that the ITS sequences have the most variable information, followed by trnH-psbA, matK, and rbcL. All sequences of the four regions correctly identified the species at the genus level using BLAST alignment. At the species level, the discriminating power of rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA and ITS based on neighbor-joining (NJ) trees was 36.8%, 38.9%, 77.8%, and 80%,respectively. Using character-based and maximum parsimony (MP) tree methods together, the discriminating ability of trnH-psbA increased to 88.9%. All species could be differentiated using ITS when combining the NJ tree method with character-based or MP tree methods. Overall, the results indicate that DNA barcoding is an effective molecular identification method for Ligustrum species. We propose the nuclear ribosomal ITS as a plant barcode for plant identification and trnH-psbA as a candidate barcode sequence.

  6. A near-infrared spectroscopy routine for unambiguous identification of cryptic ant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzner, Martin-Carl; Wagner, Herbert C; Peskoller, Andrea; Moder, Karl; Dowell, Floyd E; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C; Steiner, Florian M

    2015-01-01

    Species identification-of importance for most biological disciplines-is not always straightforward as cryptic species hamper traditional identification. Fibre-optic near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a rapid and inexpensive method of use in various applications, including the identification of species. Despite its efficiency, NIRS has never been tested on a group of more than two cryptic species, and a working routine is still missing. Hence, we tested if the four morphologically highly similar, but genetically distinct ant species Tetramorium alpestre, T. caespitum, T. impurum, and T. sp. B, all four co-occurring above 1,300 m above sea level in the Alps, can be identified unambiguously using NIRS. Furthermore, we evaluated which of our implementations of the three analysis approaches, partial least squares regression (PLS), artificial neural networks (ANN), and random forests (RF), is most efficient in species identification with our data set. We opted for a 100% classification certainty, i.e., a residual risk of misidentification of zero within the available data, at the cost of excluding specimens from identification. Additionally, we examined which strategy among our implementations, one-vs-all, i.e., one species compared with the pooled set of the remaining species, or binary-decision strategies, worked best with our data to reduce a multi-class system to a two-class system, as is necessary for PLS. Our NIRS identification routine, based on a 100% identification certainty, was successful with up to 66.7% of unambiguously identified specimens of a species. In detail, PLS scored best over all species (36.7% of specimens), while RF was much less effective (10.0%) and ANN failed completely (0.0%) with our data and our implementations of the analyses. Moreover, we showed that the one-vs-all strategy is the only acceptable option to reduce multi-class systems because of a minimum expenditure of time. We emphasise our classification routine using fibre-optic NIRS

  7. DNA barcoding: complementing morphological identification of mosquito species in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Abigail; Chiang, Lee-Pei; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige C; Tan, Cheong-Huat; Pang, Sook-Cheng; Lee, Ruth; Lee, Kim-Sung; Ng, Lee-Ching; Lam-Phua, Sai-Gek

    2014-01-01

    Background Taxonomy that utilizes morphological characteristics has been the gold standard method to identify mosquito species. However, morphological identification is challenging when the expertise is limited and external characters are damaged because of improper specimen handling. Therefore, we explored the applicability of mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene-based DNA barcoding as an alternative tool to identify mosquito species. In the present study, we compared the ...

  8. [Identification of fish species based on ribosomal DNA ITS2 locus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wan-An

    2010-04-01

    To prevent illegal fishing and sale, the most difficult problem is identification of marketed fish species, especially the parts that are difficult to be differentiated with morphological method (e.g., larval, eggs, scales, meat, products etc. To assist conservation and management of fishery resources, this paper reported a molecular genetic approach based on ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus. The method includes two steps: (1) the order general primers were designed according to the conservative nature of 5.8SrRAN and 28SrRNA genes within an order, and the DNA ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus fragment were then amplified and sequenced. (2) The species-specific ladders and the species-specific primers for each species were designed according to the sequencing results. The map of molecular taxonomy was constructed. This approach employs multiplex PCR that is formatted for fish species identification. We tested 210 single-species samples and 40 mix-species samples from different regions of China. The approach distinguished accurately and sensitively samples from each of the five species. This genetic and molecular approach will be useful for fish conservation, assessment, management and exploitation, strengthen in law enforcement of fishery manager, combat rare and endangered fish smuggling, and prevent commercial fraud and biological invasion by harmful nonnative species.

  9. Real-time bioacoustics monitoring and automated species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mitchell Aide

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, animal species diversity and abundance is assessed using a variety of methods that are generally costly, limited in space and time, and most importantly, they rarely include a permanent record. Given the urgency of climate change and the loss of habitat, it is vital that we use new technologies to improve and expand global biodiversity monitoring to thousands of sites around the world. In this article, we describe the acoustical component of the Automated Remote Biodiversity Monitoring Network (ARBIMON, a novel combination of hardware and software for automating data acquisition, data management, and species identification based on audio recordings. The major components of the cyberinfrastructure include: a solar powered remote monitoring station that sends 1-min recordings every 10 min to a base station, which relays the recordings in real-time to the project server, where the recordings are processed and uploaded to the project website (arbimon.net. Along with a module for viewing, listening, and annotating recordings, the website includes a species identification interface to help users create machine learning algorithms to automate species identification. To demonstrate the system we present data on the vocal activity patterns of birds, frogs, insects, and mammals from Puerto Rico and Costa Rica.

  10. Interpretation of the biological species concept from interspecific hybridization of two Helicoverpa species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ChenZhu

    2007-01-01

    The biological species concept defines species in terms of interbreeding. Interbreeding between species is prevented by reproductive isolation mechanisms. Based on our results of interspecific hybridization between Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa assulta, reproductive isolation mechanisms of the two species are analyzed. A combination of prezygotic factors (absent sex attraction and physical incompatibility of the genitalia) and postzygotic factors (female absence and partial sterility in F1 hybrids) causes reproductive isolation of the two species. In addition, the role of interspecific hybridization in speciation is discussed.

  11. Inter- and intraspecies identification of Bartonella (Rochalimaea) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, V; Raoult, D

    1995-06-01

    Species of the genus Rochalimaea, recently renamed Bartonella, are of a growing medical interest. Bartonella quintana was reported as the cause of trench fever, endocarditis, and bacillary angiomatosis. B. henselae has been implicated in symptoms and infections of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, such as fever, endocarditis, and bacillary angiomatosis, and is involved in the etiology of cat scratch disease. Such a wide spectrum of infections makes it necessary to obtain an intraspecies identification tool in order to perform epidemiological studies. B. vinsonii, B. elizabethae, seven isolates of B. quintana, and four isolates of B. henselae were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after restriction with the infrequently cutting endonucleases NotI, EagI, and SmaI. Specific profiles were obtained for each of the four Bartonella species. Comparison of genomic fingerprints of isolates of the same species showed polymorphism in DNA restriction patterns, and a specific profile was obtained for each isolate. A phylogenetic analysis of the B. quintana isolates was obtained by using the Dice coefficient, UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method of arithmetic averages), and Package Philip programming. Amplification by PCR and subsequent sequencing using an automated laser fluorescent DNA sequencer (Pharmacia) was performed on the intergenic spacer region (ITS) between the 16 and 23S rRNA genes. It was found that each B. henselae isolate had a specific sequence, while the B. quintana isolates fell into only two groups. When endonuclease restriction analysis of the ITS PCR product was done, three enzymes, TaqI, HindIII, and HaeIII, allowed species identification of Bartonella spp. Restriction fragment length polymorphism after PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS may be useful for rapid species identification, and PFGE could be an efficient method for isolate identification.

  12. Inter- and intraspecies identification of Bartonella (Rochalimaea) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, V; Raoult, D

    1995-06-01

    Species of the genus Rochalimaea, recently renamed Bartonella, are of a growing medical interest. Bartonella quintana was reported as the cause of trench fever, endocarditis, and bacillary angiomatosis. B. henselae has been implicated in symptoms and infections of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, such as fever, endocarditis, and bacillary angiomatosis, and is involved in the etiology of cat scratch disease. Such a wide spectrum of infections makes it necessary to obtain an intraspecies identification tool in order to perform epidemiological studies. B. vinsonii, B. elizabethae, seven isolates of B. quintana, and four isolates of B. henselae were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after restriction with the infrequently cutting endonucleases NotI, EagI, and SmaI. Specific profiles were obtained for each of the four Bartonella species. Comparison of genomic fingerprints of isolates of the same species showed polymorphism in DNA restriction patterns, and a specific profile was obtained for each isolate. A phylogenetic analysis of the B. quintana isolates was obtained by using the Dice coefficient, UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method of arithmetic averages), and Package Philip programming. Amplification by PCR and subsequent sequencing using an automated laser fluorescent DNA sequencer (Pharmacia) was performed on the intergenic spacer region (ITS) between the 16 and 23S rRNA genes. It was found that each B. henselae isolate had a specific sequence, while the B. quintana isolates fell into only two groups. When endonuclease restriction analysis of the ITS PCR product was done, three enzymes, TaqI, HindIII, and HaeIII, allowed species identification of Bartonella spp. Restriction fragment length polymorphism after PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS may be useful for rapid species identification, and PFGE could be an efficient method for isolate identification. PMID:7650189

  13. Molecular identification of species in Juglandaceae:A tiered method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Guo XIANG; Jing-Bo ZHANG; An-Ming LU; Rui-Qi LI

    2011-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a method of species identification and recognition using DNA sequence data. A tiered or multilocus method has been recommended for barcoding plant species. In this study, we sampled 196 individuals representing 9 genera and 54 species of Juglandaceae to investigate the utility of the four potential barcoding loci (rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS)). Our results show that all four DNA regions are easy to amplify and sequence. In the four tested DNA regions, ITS has the most variable information, and rbcL has the least. At generic level, seven of nine genera can be efficiently identified by matK. At species level, ITS has higher interspecific p-distance than the trnH-psbA region. Difficult to align in the whole family, ITS showed heterogeneous variability among different genera. Except for the monotypic genera (Cyclocarya, Annamocarya, Platycarya), ITS appeared to have limited power for species identification within the Carya and Engelhardia complex, and have no power for Juglans or Pterocarya. Overall, our results confirmed that a multilocus tiered method for plant barcoding was applicable and practicable. With higher priority, matK is proposed as the first-tier DNA region for genus discrimination, and the second locus at species level should have enough stable variable characters.

  14. Secondary metabolites and biological properties of Gesneriaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdan, Maria Helena; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves

    2012-12-01

    The family Gesneriaceae comprises ca. 150 genera and 3000 species, distributed in the tropics around the world. It is constituted of herbs, lianas, or shrubs, frequently with ornamental potential, due to the beauty of their flowers. Some species have been used in traditional medicine, mainly against fever, cough, colds, snakebite, pains, and infectious and inflammatory diseases. Although Gesneriaceae are a large family, only few species were chemically investigated, and this took place mainly in the last decade. In the present work, chemical and pharmacological studies on Gesneriaceae are reviewed based on original articles published. Altogether 300 compounds have been reported in Gesneriaceae species, including flavonoids, terpenes and steroids, phenolic glucosides, simple phenolics, quinones, lignans, xanthones, and compounds with unusual skeletons. Several species had been used in folk medicine, and some constituents have shown biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflamatory, antioxidant, and antitumor properties.

  15. METHODS FOR FISH SPECIES IDENTIFICATION IN FOOD PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubica Mrázová

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The need for identification of fishery products in food is currently ongoing issue for both consumers and producers of food. Consumer interest is driven in one the healthy diet, which prefers fish products, as an indispensable ingredient food and on the other hand, is a potential allergen causing health problems in humans allergic to fish protein. Allergy is a phenomenon that significantly affects human health, as well as overall life expectancy of an individual. The large number of fish species are known to trigger allergic reactions directly food intake or inhalation of fumes only, depending on the sensitivity orgamizmu. Large quantity of fish allergens are proteins from the stock protein to enzymes. Methods used for species identifications of fish in food products are PCR sequencing, multiplex PCR, PCR-RFLP, PCR-SSCP, RAPD, real-time PCR. doi:10.5219/25

  16. Sequence-identification of Candida species isolated from candidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Naeimeh; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Ghahri, Mohammad; Sadrossadati, Seyedeh Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida species are the most prevalent cause of invasive fungal infections such as candidemia. Candidemia is a lethal fungal infection among immunocompromised patients worldwide. Main pathogen is Candida albicans but a global shift in epidemiology toward non-albicans species have reported. Species identification is imperative for good management of candidemia as a fatal infection. The aim of the study is to identify Candida spp. obtained from candidemia and determination of mortality rate among this population. Materials and Methods: The study was performed during February 2014 to March 2015 in Tehran, Iran. Two-hundred and four blood cultures were evaluated for fungal bloodstream infection. Identification of isolates was carried out using phenotypic tests and polymerase chain reaction sequencing technique. Results: Twenty-two out of 204 patients (10.8%) had candidemia. Candida parapsilosis was the most prevalent species (45.4%), followed by C. albicans (31.8%) and Candida glabrata (22.7%). Male to female sex ratio was 8/14. Conclusions: The emergence of resistant strains of Candida species should be considered by physicians to decrease the mortality of this fatal fungal infection by appropriate treatment. PMID:27713871

  17. Testing four barcoding markers for species identification of Potamogetonaceae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yuan DU; Alitong QIMIKE; Chun-Feng YANG; Jin-Ming CHEN; Qing-Feng WANG

    2011-01-01

    The pondweeds (Potamogetonaceae) are among the most important plant groups in the aquatic environment. Owing to their high morphological and ecological diversity, species identification of this aquatic family remains problematic. DNA barcoding involves sequencing a standard DNA region and has been shown to be a powerful tool for species identification. In the present study, we tested four barcoding markers (rbcL, matK, internal transcribed spacer (ITS), and trnH-psbA) in 15 Potamogeton species and two Stuckenia species, representing most species of the Potamogetonaceae in China. The results show that all four regions can distinguish and support the newly proposed genera of Stuckenia from Potamogeton. Using ITS and trnH-psbA, significant interspecific genetic variability was shown. However, intraspecific genetic variability of trnH-psbA is high and so it is not suitable for barcoding in Potamogetonaceae. The ITS and matK regions showed good discrimination. However, matK was not easy to sequence using universal primers. The best performing single locus was ITS, making it a potentially useful DNA barcode in Potamogetonaceae.

  18. STBase: one million species trees for comparative biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M McMahon

    Full Text Available Comprehensively sampled phylogenetic trees provide the most compelling foundations for strong inferences in comparative evolutionary biology. Mismatches are common, however, between the taxa for which comparative data are available and the taxa sampled by published phylogenetic analyses. Moreover, many published phylogenies are gene trees, which cannot always be adapted immediately for species level comparisons because of discordance, gene duplication, and other confounding biological processes. A new database, STBase, lets comparative biologists quickly retrieve species level phylogenetic hypotheses in response to a query list of species names. The database consists of 1 million single- and multi-locus data sets, each with a confidence set of 1000 putative species trees, computed from GenBank sequence data for 413,000 eukaryotic taxa. Two bodies of theoretical work are leveraged to aid in the assembly of multi-locus concatenated data sets for species tree construction. First, multiply labeled gene trees are pruned to conflict-free singly-labeled species-level trees that can be combined between loci. Second, impacts of missing data in multi-locus data sets are ameliorated by assembling only decisive data sets. Data sets overlapping with the user's query are ranked using a scheme that depends on user-provided weights for tree quality and for taxonomic overlap of the tree with the query. Retrieval times are independent of the size of the database, typically a few seconds. Tree quality is assessed by a real-time evaluation of bootstrap support on just the overlapping subtree. Associated sequence alignments, tree files and metadata can be downloaded for subsequent analysis. STBase provides a tool for comparative biologists interested in exploiting the most relevant sequence data available for the taxa of interest. It may also serve as a prototype for future species tree oriented databases and as a resource for assembly of larger species phylogenies

  19. Improving Remote Species Identification through Efficient Training Data Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A. Baldeck

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant species identification and mapping based on remotely-sensed spectral signatures is a challenging task with the potential to contribute enormously to ecological studies. Success in this task rests upon the appropriate collection and use of costly field-based training data, and researchers are in need of ways to improve collection efficiency based on quantitative evidence. Using imaging spectrometer data collected by the Carnegie Airborne Observatory for hundreds of field-identified tree crowns in Kruger National Park, South Africa, we developed woody plant species classification models and evaluated how classification accuracy increases with increasing numbers of training crowns. First, we show that classification accuracy must be estimated while respecting the crown as the basic unit of data; otherwise, accuracy will be overestimated and the amount of training data needed to perform successful classification will be underestimated. We found that classification accuracy and the number of training crowns needed to perform successful classification varied depending on the number and spectral separability of species in the model. We also used a modified Michaelis-Menten function to describe the empirical relationship between training crowns and model accuracy, and show how this function may be useful for predicting accuracy. This framework can assist researchers in designing field campaigns to maximize the efficiency of field data collection, and thus the amount of biodiversity information gained from remote species identification models.

  20. PCR-Based Identification of Oral Streptococcal Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Dawson, Deborah V.; Cao, Huojun; Levy, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The microbial etiology of dental caries is still debated. Among the hypothesized contributors are the “low pH streptococci,” a designation given to unusually acid proficient strains among the primary plaque colonizers S. oralis, S. mitis, S. gordonii, and S. anginosus. However, accurate assignment of species is difficult among the oral streptococci. Our objective was to develop a streamlined method for identifying strains of S. oralis and S. mitis from plaque samples so that they could be analyzed in a separate study devoted to low pH streptococci and caries. Two independent PCR amplifications of a locus highly conserved among streptococci were used for presumptive species identification. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was used to measure accuracy. Sensitivity was 100% for selecting S. oralis and S. mitis among the clones sampled. Specificity was good except for the most closely related species that could not be reliably distinguished even by MLSA. The results with S. oralis and S. mitis were used to identify new primer sets that expanded the utility of the approach to other oral streptococcal species. These novel primer sets offer a convenient means of presumptive identification that will have utility in many studies where large scale, in-depth genomic analyses are not practical. PMID:27703479

  1. Identification of Pacific rockfish (Sebastes) species by isoelectric focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, R C

    1983-07-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) is currently the most reliable method available for the identification of fish species. The high resolution of this method usually allows discrimination between even closely related species. One genus, the Sebastes, does present a problem however. Using both low and high resolution, IEF is unable to differentiate several species. Disc electrophoresis, used in an AOAC official final action method, does not differentiate the rockfish reliably. Using IEF, identical protein patterns were obtained for Pacific Ocean perch (Sebastes alutus), Bocaccio rockfish (S. paucispinis), and yelloweye rockfish (S. ruberrimus). A second group, comprised of silvergray rockfish (S. brevispinis), yellowtail rockfish (S. flavidus), black rockfish (S. melanops), and canary rockfish (S. pinniger), also has identical protein patterns. Widow rockfish (S. entomelas) and chilipepper rockfish (S. goodei) each had a unique pattern, different from the above 2 groups and from each other. The actual taxonomic relationships of these rockfish species are not clear and further work with IEF may help in this regard. Users of IEF and disc electrophoresis for identification purposes should be aware of this problem when working with the Sebastes.

  2. Biological review of 82 species of coral petitioned to be included in the Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Russell E.; Birkeland, Charles; Eakin, C. Mark; McElhany, Paul; Miller, Margaret W.; Patterson, Matt; Piniak, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    list 83 coral species as threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The petition was based on a predicted decline in available habitat for the species, citing anthropogenic climate change and ocean acidification as the lead factors among the various stressors responsible for the potential decline. The NMFS identified 82 of the corals as candidate species, finding that the petition provided substantive information for a potential listing of these species. The NMFS established a Biological Review Team (BRT) to prepare this Status Review Report that examines the status of these 82 candidate coral species and evaluates extinction risk for each of them. This document makes no recommendations for listing, as that is a separate evaluation to be conducted by the NMFS.

  3. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups.

  4. Putting the biological species concept to the test: using mating networks to delimit species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lélia Lagache

    Full Text Available Although interfertility is the key criterion upon which Mayr's biological species concept is based, it has never been applied directly to delimit species under natural conditions. Our study fills this gap. We used the interfertility criterion to delimit two closely related oak species in a forest stand by analyzing the network of natural mating events between individuals. The results reveal two groups of interfertile individuals connected by only few mating events. These two groups were largely congruent with those determined using other criteria (morphological similarity, genotypic similarity and individual relatedness. Our study, therefore, shows that the analysis of mating networks is an effective method to delimit species based on the interfertility criterion, provided that adequate network data can be assembled. Our study also shows that although species boundaries are highly congruent across methods of species delimitation, they are not exactly the same. Most of the differences stem from assignment of individuals to an intermediate category. The discrepancies between methods may reflect a biological reality. Indeed, the interfertility criterion is an environment-dependant criterion as species abundances typically affect rates of hybridization under natural conditions. Thus, the methods of species delimitation based on the interfertility criterion are expected to give results slightly different from those based on environment-independent criteria (such as the genotypic similarity criteria. However, whatever the criterion chosen, the challenge we face when delimiting species is to summarize continuous but non-uniform variations in biological diversity. The grade of membership model that we use in this study appears as an appropriate tool.

  5. Karyotype and identification of sex in two endangered crane species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodpasture, C.; Seluja, G.; Gee, G.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory procedure for sex identification of monomorphic birds was developed using modern cytological methods of detecting chromosome abnormalities in human amniotic fluid samples. A pin feather is taken from a pre-fledging bird for tissue culture and karyotype analysis. Through this method, the sex was identified and the karyotype described of the whooping crane (Grus americana) and the Mississippi sandhill crane (G. canadensis pulla). Giemsa-stained karyotypes of these species showed an identical chromosome constitution with 2n = 78 + 2. However, differences in the amount of centromeric heterochromatin were observed in the Mississippi sandhill crane when compared to the whooping crane C-banded karyotype.

  6. Animal Species Identification by PCR – RFLP of Cytochrome b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Minarovič

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available An alternative DNA detection system is based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of a segment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Subsequent cleavage by a restriction enzymes gives rise to a specie-specific pattern on an agarose gel. We used five animal species (Mustela vison, Mustela putorius furo, Sus scrofa domesticus, Oryctolagus cuninculus, Anser anser. Length of PCR product was 359 bp and we used universal primers. Restriction fragment length polymorphism was analyzed by using the restriction endonuclease AluI. Results of cleavage were visualized by using electrophoresis and UV transiluminator. Every animal specie has a unique combination of restriction fragments i.e. Mustela vison 81 bp, 109 bp and 169 bp, Mustela putorius furo 169 bp and 190 bp, Sus scrofa domesticus 115 bp and 244 bp, Oryctolagus cunninculus is not cleaved by AluI so it has whole 359 bp fragment on agarose gel, Anser anser 130 bp and 229 bp. The results suggest that the method of PCR - RFLP is rapid and simple method for identification of species. PCR – RFLP can reliably identify chosen species. Application of genetic methods is very useful for breeding of livestock and protection of biodiversity.

  7. Genetic relatedness versus biological compatibility between Aspergillus fumigatus and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugui, Janyce A; Peterson, Stephen W; Figat, Abigail; Hansen, Bryan; Samson, Robert A; Mellado, Emilia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2014-10-01

    Aspergillus section Fumigati contains 12 clinically relevant species. Among these Aspergillus species, A. fumigatus is the most frequent agent of invasive aspergillosis, followed by A. lentulus and A. viridinutans. Genealogical concordance and mating experiments were performed to examine the relationship between phylogenetic distance and mating success in these three heterothallic species. Analyses of 19 isolates from section Fumigati revealed the presence of three previously unrecognized species within the broadly circumscribed species A. viridinutans. A single mating type was found in the new species Aspergillus pseudofelis and Aspergillus pseudoviridinutans, but in Aspergillus parafelis, both mating types were present. Reciprocal interspecific pairings of all species in the study showed that the only successful crosses occurred with the MAT1-2 isolates of both A. parafelis and A. pseudofelis. The MAT1-2 isolate of A. parafelis was fertile when paired with the MAT1-1 isolates of A. fumigatus, A. viridinutans, A. felis, A. pseudoviridinutans, and A. wyomingensis but was not fertile with the MAT1-1 isolate of A. lentulus. The MAT1-2 isolates of A. pseudofelis were fertile when paired with the MAT1-1 isolate of A. felis but not with any of the other species. The general infertility in the interspecies crossings suggests that genetically unrelated species are also biologically incompatible, with the MAT1-2 isolates of A. parafelis and A. pseudofelis being the exception. Our findings underscore the importance of genealogical concordance analysis for species circumscription, as well as for accurate species identification, since misidentification of morphologically similar pathogens with differences in innate drug resistance may be of grave consequences for disease management.

  8. Molecular Identification of a Species in Genus Nannochloropsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Si; PAN Kehou; ZHU Baohua; MA Xiaolei; LIANG Xin; YANG Guanpin

    2011-01-01

    Nannochloropsis is a genus of marine eukaryotic unicellular algae,which belongs to class Eustigmatophyceae.The species of Nannochloropsis which are fine rotifer feed and rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are economically important.Species in this genus are usually 2-5μm in size and are morphologically similar,which makes their identification difficult.We obtained a monoclone of Nannochloropsis with plating method in this study.DNA was extracted and the quality was determined by restriction enzyme digestion and spectrophotometer analysis.The DNA extracted was used to amplify the sequences of 18S ribosomal RNA gene,ITS region of ribosomal RNA transcription unit and rbcL gene.The phylogenetic analysis was carried out by constructing the neighbor-joining trees with Tamura-Nei distances.The phylogenetic analysis showed that the monoclone is N.oceanica.

  9. In situ PCR for detection and identification of fungal species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, Lene; Oliver, Richard P.; Johansen, Bo

    2002-01-01

    PCR and DNA sequence analysis have become standard tools for identification, detection and phylogenetic analysis of fungi. A large number of species are incapable of growth in the laboratory, making the preparation of pure DNA problematical. The amplification of DNA samples from impure material...... is subject to misinterpretation if more than one species is present. To overcome this problem, we designed an in situ PCR technique that links PCR amplification to the light microscopic image. The amplified tissue is stained, thus confirming which morphotype has been amplified. The PCR product can...... then be sequenced. We tested the technique on fixed Blumeria graminis spores and mycelia using primers derived from the sequence of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (bkal). This is the first report of in situ PCR on phytopathogenic fungal material. This technique allows positive...

  10. Pictorial identification key for species of Sarcophagidae (Diptera) of potential forensic importance in southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Karine Pinto e Vairo; Cátia Antunes de Mello-Patiu; Claudio J.B. de Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Pictorial identification key for species of Sarcophagidae (Diptera) of potential forensic importance in southern Brazil. Species of the subfamily Sarcophaginae are important to forensic entomology due to their necrophagous habits. This contribution presents a pictorial key for the identification of 22 Sarcophaginae species in 10 genera that are commonly found in southern Brazil. Photographs of the main structures used in species identification, mainly from the male terminalia, are provided.Ch...

  11. Identification of weed species with hyperaccumulative characteristics of heavy metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Shuhe; ZHOU Qixing

    2004-01-01

    In order to promote the effective and economic remediation of soils contaminated with single Cd and Cd combined with Ph, Cu and Zn, a field-screening study on weed hyperaccumulators was carried out on the basis of field pot-culture experiments used to determine characteristics of weed plants enduring and accumulating heavy metals. In this study, 54 weed species belonging to 20 families from agricultural fields of the Shengyang suburbs were tested. The results showed that Taraxracum mongolicum, Solanum nigrum and Conyza canadensis could strongly tolerate single Cd and Cd-Pb-Cu-Zn combined pollution, had high Cd-accumulative ability, and generally possessed basic characteristics of hyperaccumulators. Because there are synergic and antagonistic effects among Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn, singlefactor pollution tests should be done as well as combined pollution tests during the identification of hyperaccumulators to ensure the efficiency of phytoremediation and the practical significance of hyperaccumulators identified. The field pot-culture experiment should be a new tentative method to screen out accumulative and tolerant species in view of its obvious advantages such as simple operation, low cost, and easy identification of investigated plants.

  12. Emerging Bacterial Infection: Identification and Clinical Significance of Kocuria Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandi, Venkataramana; Palange, Padmavali; Vaish, Ritu; Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Kale, Vinod; Kandi, Maheshwar Reddy; Bhoomagiri, Mohan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Recently there have been reports of gram-positive cocci which are morphologically similar to both Staphylococci and the Micrococci. These bacteria have been identified as Kocuria species with the help of automated identification system and other molecular methods including 16S rRNA (ribosomal ribonucleic acid) evaluation. Kocuria belongs to the family Micrococcaceae which also includes Staphylococcus species and Micrococcus species. Isolation and clinical significance of these bacteria from human specimens warrant great caution as it does not necessarily confirm infection due to their ubiquitous presence, and as a normal flora of skin and mucous membranes in human and animals. Most clinical microbiology laboratories ignore such bacteria as laboratory and specimen contaminants. With increasing reports of infections associated with these bacteria, it is now important for clinical microbiologists to identify and enumerate the virulence and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of such bacteria and assist clinicians in improving the patient care and management. We review the occurrence and clinical significance of Kocuria species. PMID:27630804

  13. DNA barcoding for species Identification in prepared fishery products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANNA MOTTOLA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering that seafood mislabeling has been widely reported throughout the world and that the authentication of food components is one of the key issues in food quality, the aim of this study was to use DNA barcoding to investigate the prevalence of mislabeling among fresh prepared fishery products from markets and supermarkets located in Apulia (SE Italy. The study reveals a high occurrence of species mislabeling (42% in the prepared fillet products, further evidence of the need for increased traceability and assessment of the authenticity of food products. Given the increasing demand for transparency in the food industry and the enforcement of proper labeling have provided a driving force for the development of suitable analytical methodologies for species identification. There is therefore a great need to develop fast and reliable methods to identify meat species and to quantify their levels in seafood products, in order to ensure product quality and thus to protect consumers. The study provides further evidence that molecular investigations based on DNA barcoding may be one of the most powerful tools for the assessment of species identity, food traceability, safety and fraud.

  14. Easy identification of leishmania species by mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussama Mouri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cutaneous leishmaniasis is caused by several Leishmania species that are associated with variable outcomes before and after therapy. Optimal treatment decision is based on an accurate identification of the infecting species but current methods to type Leishmania isolates are relatively complex and/or slow. Therefore, the initial treatment decision is generally presumptive, the infecting species being suspected on epidemiological and clinical grounds. A simple method to type cultured isolates would facilitate disease management. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed MALDI-TOF spectra of promastigote pellets from 46 strains cultured in monophasic medium, including 20 short-term cultured isolates from French travelers (19 with CL, 1 with VL. As per routine procedure, clinical isolates were analyzed in parallel with Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST at the National Reference Center for Leishmania. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Automatic dendrogram analysis generated a classification of isolates consistent with reference determination of species based on MLST or hsp70 sequencing. A minute analysis of spectra based on a very simple, database-independent analysis of spectra based on the algorithm showed that the mutually exclusive presence of two pairs of peaks discriminated isolates considered by reference methods to belong either to the Viannia or Leishmania subgenus, and that within each subgenus presence or absence of a few peaks allowed discrimination to species complexes level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Analysis of cultured Leishmania isolates using mass spectrometry allows a rapid and simple classification to the species complex level consistent with reference methods, a potentially useful method to guide treatment decision in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  15. Clinical implications of species identification in monomicrobial Aeromonas bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Jung Wu

    Full Text Available Advances in Aeromonas taxonomy have led to the reclassification of aeromonads. Hereon, we aimed to re-evaluate the characteristics of Aeromonas bacteremia, including those of a novel species, Aeromonas dhakensis.A retrospective study of monomicrobial Aeromonas bacteremia at a medical center in southern Taiwan from 2004-2011 was conducted. Species identification was based on rpoB sequencing. Of bacteremia of 153 eligible patients, A. veronii (50 isolates, 32.7%, A. dhakensis (48, 31.4%, A. caviae (43, 28.1%, and A. hydrophila (10, 6.5% were the principal causative species. A. dhakensis and A. veronii bacteremia were mainly community-acquired and presented as primary bacteremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, or skin and soft-tissue infection, whereas A. caviae was associated with hospital-onset bacteremia. The distribution of the AmpC β-lactamase and metallo-β-lactamase genes was species-specific: bla(AQU-1, bla(MOX, or bla(CepH was present in A. dhakensis, A. caviae, or A. hydrophila, respectively, and bla(CphA was present in A. veronii, A. dhakensis, and A. hydrophila. The cefotaxime resistance rates of the A. caviae, A. dhakensis, and A. hydrophila isolates were higher than that of A. veronii (39.5%%, 25.0%, and 30% vs. 2%, respectively. A. dhakensis bacteremia was linked to the highest 14-day sepsis-related mortality rate, followed by A. hydrophila, A. veronii, and A. caviae bacteremia (25.5%, 22.2%, 14.0%, and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.048. Multivariate analysis revealed that A. dhakensis bacteremia, active malignancies, and a Pitt bacteremia score ≥ 4 was an independent mortality risk factor.Characteristics of Aeromonas bacteremia vary between species. A. dhakensis prevalence and its associated poor outcomes suggest it an important human pathogen.

  16. Measuring management success for protected species: Looking beyond biological outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn D Bisack

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the ocean ecosystem, including the human component, is such that a single fishery may require multiple policy instruments to support recovery and conservation of protected species, in addition to those for fisheries management. As regulations multiply, the need for retrospective analysis and evaluation grows in order to inform future policy. To accurately evaluate policy instruments, clear objectives and their link to outcomes are necessary, as well as identifying criteria to evaluate outcomes. The Northeast United States sink gillnet groundfish fishery provides a case study of the complexity of regulations and policy instruments implemented under the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act to address bycatch of marine mammals. The case study illustrates a range of possible objectives for the policy instruments including biological, economic, social-normative and longevity factors. We highlight links between possible objectives, outcomes and criteria for the four factors, as well as areas for consideration when undertaking ex-post analyses. To support learning from past actions, we call for a coordinated effort involving multiple disciplines and jurisdictions to undertake retrospective analyses and evaluations of key groups of policy instruments used for protected species.

  17. Development of species-specific SCAR markers for identification of three medicinal species of Phyllanthus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piyada THEERAKULPISUT; Nantawan KANAWAPEE; Duangkamol MAENSIRI; Sumontip BUNNAG; Pranom CHANTARANOTHAI

    2008-01-01

    Phyllanthus amarus Schum.& Thonn.has been widely used in traditional medicine in Thailand as an antipyretic.a diuretic.to treat liver diseases and viml infections.Two closely related species,P. debills L.and P.urinaria KIein ex Willd.,with different and less effective medicinal properties,are less commonly used.These three species are similar in morphology and often Occur in overlapping populations in nature.The latter two species can easily be mistaken for P.amarus and collected for medicinal uses, which can lead to undesirable results.DNA fingerprints of these species were obtained using RAPD-PCR techniques.RAPD markers specific for each species were identified.Primers for highly specific sequence-characterized-amplified-regions (SCAR) were then designed from nucleotide sequences of specific RAPD markers.These primers efficiently amplified SCAR markers of 408,501 and 319 bp unique to P.amarus,P.debilis and P.urinaria respectively.This method of plant identification Was rapid and highly specific when tested against DNA of several closely related species and was able to amplify specific markers from mixed DNA samples.

  18. Nordic-Baltic Student Teachers' Identification of and Interest in Plant and Animal Species: The Importance of Species Identification and Biodiversity for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmberg, Irmeli; Berg, Ida; Jeronen, Eila; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Norrgård-Sillanpää, Pia; Persson, Christel; Vilkonis, Rytis; Yli-Panula, Eija

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of species, interest in nature, and nature experiences are the factors that best promote interest in and understanding of environmental issues, biodiversity and sustainable life. The aim of this study is to investigate how well student teachers identify common local species, their interest in and ideas about species identification, and…

  19. Identification of Orchidaceae species from Northern West of Syria based on chloroplast DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, N; Nabulsi, I; Kamary, Y

    2010-08-01

    The plant family Orchidaceae has a great economic value (ornamental and medical uses, beside the aromatic features). Traditionally, identification of orchid species has relied heavily on morphological features. These features, however, are either not variable enough between species or too plastic to be used for identification at the species level. DNA-based markers could be the alternative strategy towards an accurate and robust identification of those species. Since the chloroplast DNA has a lower level of evolution compared to the nuclear genome, an attempt was made in this study to investigate polymorphism in the chloroplast DNA among orchid species distributed in North-West region of Syria using Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (CAPS) technique for developing markers for the diagnosis of targeted species. CAPS analysis was carried out on 34 orchid samples that represent all species observed in the region. Universal primers were used to amplify targeted chloroplast regions. Generated PCR products were digested with various restriction enzymes. CAPS results revealed high polymorphism among species examined. This polymorphism was suffiecient for the diagnosis of all of those species apart from five species (Ophrys fuciflora (one sample), Oph. bornmuelleri, Ophrys sp., Oph. scolopax and Oph. argolica). Availability of such species-specific markers would ensure more authentic identification of orchid species compared to morphological characters and can be regarded as a valuable tool to guide in conservation programs of orchid species in Syria. CAPS data generated were converted to an identification key for orchid species studied.

  20. Reproductive biology of the Iberian species of Potentilla L. (Rosaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillén, Antonio

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Several processes related to the reproductive biology of the Iberian species of the genus Potentilla L. subg. Trichothalamus (Spreng. Rchb., Comarum (L. Syme and Fragariastrum (Heist. ex Fabr. Rchb. are studied. We provide data concerning compatibility, agamospermy and hybridization along with pollination and fruit dispersal. No agamospermy mechanisms were found in any of the taxa, nor were there signs of any hybridization, although potential signs of self-incompatibility were detected. Regarding to pollination, a marked tendency toward autogamy was observed in certain groups. Finally, some mechanisms for the release and dispersal of diaspores are described in relation to diaspore and flower receptacle morphology.Se exponen los resultados del estudio de algunos mecanismos de la biología reproductiva en las especies ibéricas de Potentilla L. subg. Trichothalamus (Spreng. Rchb., Comarum (L. Syme y Fragariastrum (Heist. ex Fabr. Rchb. Se aportan datos que afectan a la compatibilidad, agamospermia e hybridización a lo largo de las fases de polinización y dispersión del fruto. No se observaron mecanismos de agamospermia en ninguno de los táxones estudiados ni tampoco se comprobó hibridación alguna, aunque se detectaron signos potenciales de autoincompatibilidad. Relacionado con la polinización, se observó en ciertos grupos una clara tendencia a la autogamia. Se describen, por último, algunos mecanismos de liberación y dispersión de diásporas, que están relacionados con la morfología de la propia diáspora y del receptáculo floral.

  1. Nordic-Baltic Student Teachers' Identification of and Interest in Plant and Animal Species: The Importance of Species Identification and Biodiversity for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmberg, Irmeli; Berg, Ida; Jeronen, Eila; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Norrgård-Sillanpää, Pia; Persson, Christel; Vilkonis, Rytis; Yli-Panula, Eija

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of species, interest in nature, and nature experiences are the factors that best promote interest in and understanding of environmental issues, biodiversity and sustainable life. The aim of this study is to investigate how well student teachers identify common local species, their interest in and ideas about species identification, and their perceptions of the importance of species identification and biodiversity for sustainable development. Totally 456 student teachers for primary schools were tested using an identification test and a questionnaire consisting of fixed and open questions. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used to get a more holistic view of students' level of knowledge and their preferred learning methods. The student teachers' ability to identify very common species was low, and only 3 % were able to identify most of the tested species. Experiential learning outdoors was suggested by the majority of students as the most efficient learning method, followed by experiential learning indoors, project work and experimental learning. They looked upon the identification of plants and animals as `important' or `very important' for citizens today and for sustainable development. Likewise, they looked upon biodiversity as `important' or `very important' for sustainable development. Our conclusion is that teaching and learning methods for identification and knowledge of species and for education of biodiversity and sustainable development should always include experiential and project-based methods in authentic environments.

  2. [Identification of Microalgae Species Using Visible/Near Infrared Transmission Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-yan; Shao, Yong-ni; Jiang, Lu-lu; Guo, An-que; Pan, Jian; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    At present, the identification and classification of the microalgae and its biochemical analysis have become one of the hot spots on marine biology research. Four microalgae species, including Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Nannochloropsis oculata, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, were chosen as the experimental materials. Using an established spectral acquisition system, which consists of a portable USB 4000 spectrometer having transmitting and receiving fiber bundles connected by a fiber optic probe, a halogen light source, and a computer, the Vis/NIR transmission spectral data of 120 different samples of the microalgae with different concentration gradients were collected, and the spectral curves of fourmicroalgae species were pre-processed by different pre-treatment methods (baseline filtering, convolution smoothing, etc. ). Based on the pre-treated effects, SPA was applied to select effective wavelengths (EWs), and the selected EWs were introduced as inputs to develop and compare PLS, Least Square Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM), Extreme Learning Machine (ELM)models, so as to explore the feasibility of using Vis/NIR transmission spectroscopy technology for the rapid identification of four microalgae species in situ. The results showed that: the effect of Savitzky-Golay smoothing was much better than the other pre-treatment methods. Six EWs selected in the spectraby SPA were possibly relevant to the content of carotenoids, chlorophyll in the microalgae. Moreover, the SPA-PLS model obtained better performance than the Full-Spectral-PLS model. The average prediction accuracy of three methods including SPA-LV-SVM, SPA-ELM, and SPA-PLS were 80%, 85% and 65%. The established method in this study may identify four microalgae species effectively, which provides a new way for the identification and classification of the microalgae species. The methodology using Vis/NIR spectroscopy with a portable optic probe would be applicable to a diverse range of microalgae

  3. Biological control of alien and invasive species in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agricultural production in Europe faces many challenges including limited availability of water, nitrogen input and fossil fuels. It is necessary, therefore, to identify methods of production and new technologies to increase the efficiency of the primary systems, guaranteeing amount of food, quality, safety and eco-sustainability . One of the most important aspects, though often undervalued in relation to the food chain, is the adversity of biological management of agricultural crops due to pests, pathogens or fitomizi with potential invasive already present in the territory or of recent origin alien. In this context, two main objectives should be implemented at the same time reduce production losses and protect the agro-ecosystem. To meet these expectations, as of January 1, 2015 all farms in the European Union countries are bound to the application of the Integrated Defense principles, as indicated by the Directive on the sustainable use of plant protection products (128/09 / EC) .In response to this and other new entomological emergencies plant health and medical-veterinary entomologist researchers of the Laboratory sustainable management of Agro-Ecosystems in ENEA, have directed their research towards the development of innovative systems for the sustainable control of invasive species of insects is in the agricultural sector that health.

  4. Morphological and Molecular Identification of Three Ceriodaphnia Species (Cladocera: Daphniidae from Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Australian Ceriodaphnia (Cladocera: Daphniidae are examined using morphological attributes and two mitochondrial DNA (COI and 16s and one nuclear DNA (28s gene fragments to differentiate the species. The sequence data supports the existence of three species, that is, C. dubia, one reinstated species C. spinata Henry, 1919, and one new species C. sp. 1. Morphological characteristics were also able to accurately separate the three species. Furthermore, genetic analysis of COI sequences from Ceriodaphnia supported three clades. The high degree of correlation between morphological and molecular identification in this study indicates that mitochondrial markers, COI and 16s, are appropriate molecular markers for species discrimination and identification of Ceriodaphnia.

  5. Phytochemical and biological evaluation of some Sargassum species from Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdinezhad, Negin; Ghannadi, Alireza; Yegdaneh, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Sea algae are widely consumed in the world. There are several seaweeds including brown algae which are authorized for human consumption. These plants contain important phytochemical constituents and have various potential biological activities. The present study investigated the presence of phytochemical constituents and total phenolic quantity of the seaweeds Sargassum angustifolium, Sargassum oligocystum and Sargassum boveanum. Cytotoxicity of seaweeds was tested against HT-29, HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines. Antioxidant potential of these 3 Sargassum species was also analyzed. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazil. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant compounds in these Sargassum species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. Sargassum angustifolium had the highest content of total phenolics (0.061 mg/g) and showed the highest antioxidant activity (IC50 = 0.231). Cytotoxic results showed that all species could inhibit cell growth effectively, especially MCF-7 cell line (IC50 = 67.3, 56.9, 60.4 for S. oligocystum, S. angustifolium and S. boveanum respectively). Considerable phytochemicals and moderate cytotoxic activity of S. angustifolium, S. oligocystum and S. boveanum make them appropriate candidate for further studies and identification of their bioactive principles. PMID:27499794

  6. Phytochemical and biological evaluation of some Sargassum species from Persian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Mehdinezhad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sea algae are widely consumed in the world. There are several seaweeds including brown algae which are authorized for human consumption. These plants contain important phytochemical constituents and have various potential biological activities. The present study investigated the presence of phytochemical constituents and total phenolic quantity of the seaweeds Sargassum angustifolium, Sargassum oligocystum and Sargassum boveanum. Cytotoxicity of seaweeds was tested against HT-29, HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines. Antioxidant potential of these 3 Sargassum species was also analyzed. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazil. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant compounds in these Sargassum species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. Sargassum angustifolium had the highest content of total phenolics (0.061 mg/g and showed the highest antioxidant activity (IC50 = 0.231. Cytotoxic results showed that all species could inhibit cell growth effectively, especially MCF-7 cell line (IC50 = 67.3, 56.9, 60.4 for S. oligocystum, S. angustifolium and S. boveanum respectively. Considerable phytochemicals and moderate cytotoxic activity of S. angustifolium, S. oligocystum and S. boveanum make them appropriate candidate for further studies and identification of their bioactive principles.

  7. Integrated quantification and identification of aldehydes and ketones in biological samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, David; Meinema, Anne C; Permentier, Hjalmar; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The identification of unknown compounds remains to be a bottleneck of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics screening experiments. Here, we present a novel approach which facilitates the identification and quantification of analytes containing aldehyde and ketone groups in biological samples by

  8. Comparing Multiple Criteria for Species Identification in Two Recently Diverged Seabirds

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Militão; Elena Gómez-Díaz; Antigoni Kaliontzopoulou; Jacob González-Solís

    2014-01-01

    Correct species identification is a crucial issue in systematics with key implications for prioritising conservation effort. However, it can be particularly challenging in recently diverged species due to their strong similarity and relatedness. In such cases, species identification requires multiple and integrative approaches. In this study we used multiple criteria, namely plumage colouration, biometric measurements, geometric morphometrics, stable isotopes analysis (SIA) and genetics (mtDN...

  9. EVALUATION OF VITEK 2 SYSTEM FOR CLINICAL IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA SPECIES AND THEIR ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY TEST

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan,, V.; Ram Murugan

    2016-01-01

    BJECTIVES 1. To evaluate the Vitek 2 system for clinical identification of Candida species and their antifungal susceptibility test; 2. To study the incidence of various types of Candida species in this part of Tamilnadu. METHODS Samples collected from different wards were subjected for culture, isolation and identification of Candida Species and Antifungal Susceptibility testing by Vitek System. Vitek 2 test was carried out in Apollo Specialty Hospital Lab Services, Madurai....

  10. Probabilistic identification of cerebellar cortical neurones across species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Van Dijck

    Full Text Available Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our

  11. Identification of a potential fungal species by 18S rDNA for ligninases production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhan, M; Santos, S N; Melo, I S; Yan, N; Sain, M

    2013-12-01

    Fungal species for ligninases production was investigated by 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Two primer sets were chosen to amplify a major part of the 18S rDNA, which resulted in intense PCR product of approximately 550-820 bp in size per sample. The results suggest that the 18S rDNA-based approach is a useful tool for identification of unknown potential fungal species for ligninases production. The isolated fungal species produces mainly manganese peroxidase (MnP). The enzyme oxidized a variety of the usual MnP substrates, including lignin related polyphenols. Time course studies showed that maximum production of ligninolytic enzymes MnP (64 IU L⁻¹), lignin peroxidase (26.35 IU L⁻¹), and laccase (5.44 IU L⁻¹), respectively, were achieved after 10 days of cultivation under optimum conditions. Furthermore, the biological decolorization of Remazol Brilliant Blue R dye following 10 days of cultivation was 94 %. NCBI BLAST was used to search for closest matched sequences in the GenBank database and based on sequence homology the first BLAST hit was Dothioraceae sp. LM572 with accession number EF060858.1. PMID:23744034

  12. Taxonomy, biology, and clinical aspects of Fusarium species.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, P E; Dignani, M.C.; Anaissie, E J

    1994-01-01

    There are several taxonomic systems available for identifying Fusarium species. The philosophy used in each taxonomic system is discussed as well as problems encountered in working with Fusarium species in culture. Fusarium species are toxigenic, and the mycotoxins produced by these organisms are often associated with animal and human diseases. The implications for the association of the carcinogens, fumonisins, produced by Fusarium moniliforme and other Fusarium species with human diseases a...

  13. Identification of bacterial species by untargeted NMR spectroscopy of the exo-metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palama, T L; Canard, I; Rautureau, G J P; Mirande, C; Chatellier, S; Elena-Herrmann, B

    2016-08-01

    Identification of bacterial species is a crucial bottleneck for clinical diagnosis of infectious diseases. Quick and reliable identification is a key factor to provide suitable antibiotherapies and avoid the development of multiple-drug resistance. We propose a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics strategy for rapid discrimination and identification of several bacterial species that relies on untargeted metabolic profiling of supernatants from bacterial culture media. We show that six bacterial species (Gram negative: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis; Gram positive: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus) can be well discriminated from multivariate statistical analysis, opening new prospects for NMR applications to microbial clinical diagnosis. PMID:27349704

  14. The species concept as an emergent property of population biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael W

    2011-03-01

    Resurgent interest in the genetics of population divergence and speciation coincides with recent critical evaluation of species concepts and proposals for species delimitation. An important result of these parallel trends is a slight but important conceptual shift in focus away from species diagnoses based on prior species concepts or definitions, and toward analyses of the processes acting on lineages of metapopulations that eventually lead to differences recognizable as species taxa. An advantage of this approach is that it identifies quantitative metapopulation differences in continuous variables, rather than discrete entities that do or do not conform to a prior species concept, and species taxa are recognized as an emergent property of population-level processes. The tension between species concepts and diagnosis versus emergent recognition of species taxa is at least as old as Darwin, and is unlikely to be resolved soon in favor of either view, because the products of both approaches (discrete utilitarian taxon names for species, process-based understanding of the origins of differentiated metapopulations) continue to have important applications.

  15. Focus stacking technique in identification of forensically important Chrysomya species (Diptera: Calliphoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha A. Elleboudy

    2016-09-01

    Recommendations: Further studies on the blowfly species that occur in Egypt and documentation of their key for identification are recommended to facilitate the diverse applications of these important insects in forensic investigations.

  16. DNA barcoding for the identification of sand fly species (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Angélica Contreras Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available Sand flies include a group of insects that are of medical importance and that vary in geographic distribution, ecology, and pathogen transmission. Approximately 163 species of sand flies have been reported in Colombia. Surveillance of the presence of sand fly species and the actualization of species distribution are important for predicting risks for and monitoring the expansion of diseases which sand flies can transmit. Currently, the identification of phlebotomine sand flies is based on morphological characters. However, morphological identification requires considerable skills and taxonomic expertise. In addition, significant morphological similarity between some species, especially among females, may cause difficulties during the identification process. DNA-based approaches have become increasingly useful and promising tools for estimating sand fly diversity and for ensuring the rapid and accurate identification of species. A partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene subunit I (COI is currently being used to differentiate species in different animal taxa, including insects, and it is referred as a barcoding sequence. The present study explored the utility of the DNA barcode approach for the identification of phlebotomine sand flies in Colombia. We sequenced 700 bp of the COI gene from 36 species collected from different geographic localities. The COI barcode sequence divergence within a single species was <2% in most cases, whereas this divergence ranged from 9% to 26.6% among different species. These results indicated that the barcoding gene correctly discriminated among the previously morphologically identified species with an efficacy of nearly 100%. Analyses of the generated sequences indicated that the observed species groupings were consistent with the morphological identifications. In conclusion, the barcoding gene was useful for species discrimination in sand flies from Colombia.

  17. Raman microspectroscopy for species identification and mapping within bacterial biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Beier, Brooke D; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A new method of mapping multiple species of oral bacteria in intact biofilms has been developed, using the optical technique of confocal Raman microscopy. A species classification algorithm, developed on dried biofilms, was used to analyze spectra of hydrated biofilms containing two microbial species central to dental health: Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans. The algorithm transferred successfully to the hydrated environment, correctly identifying the species of origin of sing...

  18. DNA barcoding for the identification of sand fly species (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae) in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Gutiérrez, María Angélica; Vivero, Rafael J; Vélez, Iván D; Porter, Charles H; Uribe, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Sand flies include a group of insects that are of medical importance and that vary in geographic distribution, ecology, and pathogen transmission. Approximately 163 species of sand flies have been reported in Colombia. Surveillance of the presence of sand fly species and the actualization of species distribution are important for predicting risks for and monitoring the expansion of diseases which sand flies can transmit. Currently, the identification of phlebotomine sand flies is based on morphological characters. However, morphological identification requires considerable skills and taxonomic expertise. In addition, significant morphological similarity between some species, especially among females, may cause difficulties during the identification process. DNA-based approaches have become increasingly useful and promising tools for estimating sand fly diversity and for ensuring the rapid and accurate identification of species. A partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene subunit I (COI) is currently being used to differentiate species in different animal taxa, including insects, and it is referred as a barcoding sequence. The present study explored the utility of the DNA barcode approach for the identification of phlebotomine sand flies in Colombia. We sequenced 700 bp of the COI gene from 36 species collected from different geographic localities. The COI barcode sequence divergence within a single species was sand flies from Colombia.

  19. Identification and analysis of copine/BONZAI proteins among evolutionarily diverse plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Baohong; Hong, Xuexue; Ding, Yuan; Wang, Xiang; Liu, He; Hua, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Copines are evolutionarily conserved calcium-dependent membrane-binding proteins with potentially critical biological functions. In plants, the function of these proteins has not been analyzed except for in Arabidopsis thaliana where they play critical roles in development and disease resistance. To facilitate functional studies of copine proteins in crop plants, genome-wide identification, curation, and phylogeny analysis of copines in 16 selected plant species were conducted. All the identified 32 plant copines have conserved features of the two C2 domains (C2A and C2B) and the von Willebrand factor A (vWA) domain. Different from animal and protozoa copines, plant copines have glycine at the second residue potentially acquiring a unique protein myristoylation modification. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that copine was present as one copy when evolving from green algae to basal flowering plants, and duplicated before the divergence of monocots and dicots. In addition, gene expression and protein localization study of rice copines suggests both conserved and different properties of copines in dicots and monocots. This study will contribute to uncovering the role of copine genes in different plant species. PMID:27484220

  20. Confocal Raman microscopy for identification of bacterial species in biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Implemented through a confocal microscope, Raman spectroscopy has been used to distinguish between biofilm samples of two common oral bacteria species, Streptococcus sanguinis and mutans, which are associated with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Biofilms of these species are studied as a model of dental plaque. A prediction model has been calibrated and validated using pure biofilms. This model has been used to identify the species of transferred and dehydrated samples (much like a plaque scraping) as well as hydrated biofilms in situ. Preliminary results of confocal Raman mapping of species in an intact two-species biofilm will be shown.

  1. Rapid species identification of fresh and processed scallops by multiplex PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Marín, Alan; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Food control policies regarding to seafood label authenticity have become a global issue due to increased incidence of species substitution or mislabelling. Proper species-level identification in processed scallop products is hindered by the lack of morphological characters such as their valves. In order to identify four commercially important scallop species (Argopecten purpuratus, A. irradians, Mizuhopecten yessoensis, Pecten albicans) a species-specific multiplex PCR reaction is described ...

  2. Molecular basis for identification of species/isolates of gastrointestinal nematode parasites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed M; Singh MN; Bera AK; Bandyopadhyay S; Bhattacharya D

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal(GI)parasitism is the most serious constraint throughout the world in small ruminants which causes significant production loss in animals.GI parasites are major contributor to reduce productivity in terms of meat, milk and wool in animals. Control ofGI parasite is done primarily by anthelmintic treatment where choice and schedule of treatment is done after identification and quantitation of individual parasite. Identification ofGI parasites is done through microscopic method by identifying specific morphological characteristics of egg and larva (L3). Since most of parasite eggs are having similar morphological characteristics, identification up to species level through microscopy is not possible in most of cases. To address this issue, molecular techniques are the viable alternative for identification of species as well as molecular level differences within a species (isolates) of parasites. DifferentDNA based molecular techniquesviz.PCR, AFLP, RAPD, RFLP, PCR-SSCP, real timePCR, DNAmicroarrayetc. have been used for identification and to assess the genetic diversity among parasite population. For identification of species, the characteristic sequence of genomicDNAof different species should differ to allow the delineation of species, but at the same time, no/minor variation within the species should exist. In contrast, for purpose of identifying population variants (strains/isolates), a considerable degree of variation in the sequence should exist within a species. Various target regions, including nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA) or repetitiveDNA elements (microsatellite loci), which show considerable variation in the number of repeats within individuals have been employed to achieve the identification of parasites species or strain.

  3. Identification of a biological signature for schizophrenia in serum

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, E.; Guest, P C; Rahmoune, H.; Harris, L W; Wang, L; Leweke, F M; Rothermundt, M; Bogerts, B; Koethe, D; Kranaster, L; Ohrmann, P; Suslow, T; McAllister, G; Spain, M.; Barnes, A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Biomarkers are now used in many areas of medicine but are still lacking for psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia (SCZ). We have used a multiplex molecular profiling approach to measure serum concentrations of 181 proteins and small molecules in 250 first and recent onset SCZ, 35 major depressive disorder (MDD), 32 euthymic bipolar disorder (BPD), 45 Asperger syndrome and 280 control subjects. Preliminary analysis resulted in identification of a signature comprised ...

  4. [Advances in studies on chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Qian-Jun; Kang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Qing-Di

    2013-12-01

    The chemical constituents isolated from Desmodium species (Leguminosae) included terpenoids, flavonoids, steroids, alkaloids compounds. Modem pharmacological studies have showed that the Desmodium species have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, diuretic, antipyretic, analgesic and choleretic activity. This article mainly has reviewed the research advances of chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species since 2003. PMID:24791478

  5. Species identification of strains belonging to genus Citrobacter using the biochemical method and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolínská, Renáta; Spanělová, Petra; Dřevínek, Michal; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Zemličková, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Strains of genus Citrobacter (152 isolates from 1950 to 1988 deposited in the Czech National Collection of Type Cultures, Prague) were re-classified using biological and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) methods. One-hundred thirty-six strains (ca. 90 %) were identified to the species level using the biological method with evaluation by Farmer matrix. MALDI-TOF MS exhibited better identification capability, the data being more compact; the method was unambiguously successful in typing 145 (95 %) strains. Comparison of the results of identification by the two methods revealed differences (for 12 samples) in identified species which, considering all biochemical and/or MS characteristics, could be attributed to the natural variability of strains and close relation of the misidentified species (all of them belonged to the Citrobacter freundii complex). Taking into account all the above data, both methods can be considered reliable; however, the MALDI-TOF MS exhibits higher accuracy, efficiency, and rapidity.

  6. Guide and keys for the identification of Syllidae (Annelida, Phyllodocida) from the British Isles (reported and expected species)

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Guillermo; Worsfold, Tim M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In November 2012, a workshop was carried out on the taxonomy and systematics of the family Syllidae (Annelida: Phyllodocida) at the Dove Marine Laboratory, Cullercoats, Tynemouth, UK for the National Marine Biological Analytical Quality Control (NMBAQC) Scheme. Illustrated keys for subfamilies, genera and species found in British and Irish waters were provided for participants from the major national agencies and consultancies involved in benthic sample processing. After the workshop, we prepared updates to these keys, to include some additional species provided by participants, and some species reported from nearby areas. In this paper, we provide the revised keys to enable rapid identification of Syllidae from the seas around Britain and Ireland. One new combination, Palposyllis propeweismanni, is proposed. PMID:25878521

  7. Mistaking geography for biology: inferring processes from species distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Dan L; Cardillo, Marcel; Rosauer, Dan F; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2014-10-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a rapid proliferation of statistical methods that infer evolutionary and ecological processes from data on species distributions. These methods have led to considerable new insights, but they often fail to account for the effects of historical biogeography on present-day species distributions. Because the geography of speciation can lead to patterns of spatial and temporal autocorrelation in the distributions of species within a clade, this can result in misleading inferences about the importance of deterministic processes in generating spatial patterns of biodiversity. In this opinion article, we discuss ways in which patterns of species distributions driven by historical biogeography are often interpreted as evidence of particular evolutionary or ecological processes. We focus on three areas that are especially prone to such misinterpretations: community phylogenetics, environmental niche modelling, and analyses of beta diversity (compositional turnover of biodiversity).

  8. In silico identification of conserved microRNAs in large number of diverse plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeeswaran Guru

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are recently discovered small non-coding RNAs that play pivotal roles in gene expression, specifically at the post-transcriptional level in plants and animals. Identification of miRNAs in large number of diverse plant species is important to understand the evolution of miRNAs and miRNA-targeted gene regulations. Now-a-days, publicly available databases play a central role in the in-silico biology. Because, at least ~21 miRNA families are conserved in higher plants, a homology based search using these databases can help identify orthologs or paralogs in plants. Results We searched all publicly available nucleotide databases of genome survey sequences (GSS, high-throughput genomics sequences (HTGS, expressed sequenced tags (ESTs and nonredundant (NR nucleotides and identified 682 miRNAs in 155 diverse plant species. We found more than 15 conserved miRNA families in 11 plant species, 10 to14 families in 10 plant species and 5 to 9 families in 29 plant species. Nineteen conserved miRNA families were identified in important model legumes such as Medicago, Lotus and soybean. Five miRNA families – miR319, miR156/157, miR169, miR165/166 and miR394 – were found in 51, 45, 41, 40 and 40 diverse plant species, respectively. miR403 homologs were found in 16 dicots, whereas miR437 and miR444 homologs, as well as the miR396d/e variant of the miR396 family, were found only in monocots, thus providing large-scale authenticity for the dicot- and monocot-specific miRNAs. Furthermore, we provide computational and/or experimental evidence for the conservation of 6 newly found Arabidopsis miRNA homologs (miR158, miR391, miR824, miR825, miR827 and miR840 and 2 small RNAs (small-85 and small-87 in Brassica spp. Conclusion Using all publicly available nucleotide databases, 682 miRNAs were identified in 155 diverse plant species. By combining the expression analysis with the computational approach, we found that 6 miRNAs and 2

  9. MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF THUNNUS GENUS FOUR SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pepe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate identification of similar fish species is necessary to prevent illegal substitution and is imposed by labeling regulations in UE countries (1. The genus Thunnus comprises many species of different quality and commercial value. The increasing trade of fish preparations of the species included in this genus and the consequent loss of the external anatomical and morphological features enables fraudulent substitutions. This study reports data relating to the proteomic analysis of four tuna species (T. thynnus, T. alalunga, T. albacares, T. obesus. Sarcoplasmic proteins were studied by mono and two dimensional electrophoresis. The most significant proteins for the characterization of the species were analyzed by mass spectrometric techniques. As reported in a previous study (2, an accurate identification of the species seems possible, owing to the polymorphism displayed by the species of the Thunnus genus.

  10. DNA Barcoding of Neotropical Sand Flies (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae): Species Identification and Discovery within Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Israel de Souza; Chagas, Bruna Dias das; Rodrigues, Andressa Alencastre Fuzari; Ferreira, Adelson Luiz; Rezende, Helder Ricas; Bruno, Rafaela Vieira; Falqueto, Aloisio; Andrade-Filho, José Dilermando; Galati, Eunice Aparecida Bianchi; Shimabukuro, Paloma Helena Fernandes; Brazil, Reginaldo Peçanha; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been an effective tool for species identification in several animal groups. Here, we used DNA barcoding to discriminate between 47 morphologically distinct species of Brazilian sand flies. DNA barcodes correctly identified approximately 90% of the sampled taxa (42 morphologically distinct species) using clustering based on neighbor-joining distance, of which four species showed comparatively higher maximum values of divergence (range 4.23-19.04%), indicating cryptic diversity. The DNA barcodes also corroborated the resurrection of two species within the shannoni complex and provided an efficient tool to differentiate between morphologically indistinguishable females of closely related species. Taken together, our results validate the effectiveness of DNA barcoding for species identification and the discovery of cryptic diversity in sand flies from Brazil.

  11. Genome- and transcriptome-assisted development of nuclear insertion/deletion markers for Calanus species (Copepoda: Calanoida) identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolina, I.; Kollias, S.; Poortvliet, M.;

    2014-01-01

    Copepods of the genus Calanus are key zooplankton species in temperate to arctic marine ecosystems. Despite their ecological importance, species identification remains challenging. Furthermore, the recent report of hybrids among Calanus species highlights the need for diagnostic nuclear markers t...

  12. Wing pattern morphology of three closely related Melitaea (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae species reveals highly inaccurate external morphology-based species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Jugovic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wing morphology of the three closely related species of Melitaea – M. athalia (Rottemburg, 1775, M. aurelia (Nickerl, 1850 and M. britomartis Assmann, 1847 – co-occurring in the Balkans (SE Europe was investigated in detail through visual inspection, morphometric analysis and multivariate statistical analysis. Results are compared to recent phylogenetic studies, searching for concordant patterns and discrepancies between the two approaches. The morphology of the genitalic structures is also compared with the results of the other two approaches. The main conclusions are as follows: (1 small albeit significant differences in wing morphology exist among the three species and (2 while the structure of male genitalia and phylogenetic position of the three species are concordant, they are (3 in discordance with the wing morphology. The present study represents another example where identification based on external morphology would lead to highly unreliable determinations, hence identification based on phylogenetic studies and/or genitalia is strongly recommended not only for the three studied species but also more broadly within the genus. Furthermore, we show that some of the characters generally used in the identification of these three Melitaea species should be avoided in future.

  13. Molecular identification of two closely related species of mealybugs of the genus Planococcus (Pseudococcidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphological identification of the mealybug species Planococcus citri (Risso) and P. minor (Maskell), two serious agricultural pests, is often complicated by the existence of intermediate forms and a lack of knowledge of the intraspecific variation that occurs in each species. In this paper, we hav...

  14. Identification of Bacteria and Determination of Biological Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; La Duc, Myron T.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of planetary protection research is to develop superior strategies for inactivating resistance bearing micro-organisms like Rummeli - bacillus stabekisii. By first identifying the particular physiologic pathway and/or structural component of the cell/spore that affords it such elevated tolerance, eradication regimes can then be designed to target these resistance-conferring moieties without jeopardizing the structural integrity of spacecraft hardware. Furthermore, hospitals and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of sterilization processes. The spores of Rummelibacillus stabekisii, which are far more resistant to many of such perturbations, could likely serve as a more significant biological indicator for potential survival than those being used currently.

  15. Identification of biological microparticles using ultrafast depletion spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Courvoisier, François; Bonacina, Luigi; Boutou, Véronique; Guyon, Laurent; Bonnet, Christophe; Thuillier, Benoit; Extermann, Jérôme; Roth, Matthias; Rabitz, Herschel; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    We show how an ultrafast pump–pump excitation induces strong fluorescence depletion in biological samples, such as bacteria-containing droplets, in contrast with fluorescent interferents, such as polycyclic aromatic compounds, despite similar spectroscopic properties. Application to the optical remote discrimination of biotic versus non-biotic particles is proposed. Further improvement is required to allow the discrimination of one pathogenic among other non-pathogenic micro-organisms. This i...

  16. Identification of Bifurcations from Observations of Noisy Biological Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Salvi, Joshua D; Hudspeth, A J

    2016-01-01

    Hair bundles are biological oscillators that actively transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical signals in the auditory, vestibular, and lateral-line systems of vertebrates. A bundle's function can be explained in part by its operation near a particular type of bifurcation, a qualitative change in behavior. By operating near different varieties of bifurcation, the bundle responds best to disparate classes of stimuli. We show how to determine the identity of and proximity to distinct bifurcations despite the presence of substantial environmental noise.

  17. Inferring biological networks by sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Mangan, Niall M.; Brunton, Steven L.; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Inferring the structure and dynamics of network models is critical to understanding the functionality and control of complex systems, such as metabolic and regulatory biological networks. The increasing quality and quantity of experimental data enable statistical approaches based on information theory for model selection and goodness-of-fit metrics. We propose an alternative method to infer networked nonlinear dynamical systems by using sparsity-promoting $\\ell_1$ optimization to select a sub...

  18. Species and hybrid identification of sturgeon caviar: a new molecular approach to detect illegal trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscari, E; Barmintseva, A; Pujolar, J M; Doukakis, P; Mugue, N; Congiu, L

    2014-05-01

    Overexploitation of wild populations due to the high economic value of caviar has driven sturgeons to near extinction. The high prices commanded by caviar on world markets have made it a magnet for illegal and fraudulent caviar trade, often involving low-value farmed caviar being sold as top-quality caviar. We present a new molecular approach for the identification of pure sturgeon species and hybrids that are among the most commercialized species in Europe and North America. Our test is based on the discovery of species-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ribosomal protein S7, supplemented with the Vimentin gene and the mitochondrial D-loop. Test validations performed in 702 specimens of target and nontarget sturgeon species demonstrated a 100% identification success for Acipenser naccarii, A. fulvescens, A. stellatus, A. sinensis and A. transmontanus. In addition to species identification, our approach allows the identification of Bester and AL hybrids, two of the most economically important hybrids in the world, with 80% and 100% success, respectively. Moreover, the approach has the potential to identify many other existing sturgeon hybrids. The development of a standardized sturgeon identification tool will directly benefit trade law enforcement, providing the tools to monitor and regulate the legal trade of caviar and protect sturgeon stocks from illicit producers and traders, hence contributing to safeguarding this group of heavily threatened species. PMID:24219811

  19. LINNAEUS: A species name identification system for biomedical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenadic Goran

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The task of recognizing and identifying species names in biomedical literature has recently been regarded as critical for a number of applications in text and data mining, including gene name recognition, species-specific document retrieval, and semantic enrichment of biomedical articles. Results In this paper we describe an open-source species name recognition and normalization software system, LINNAEUS, and evaluate its performance relative to several automatically generated biomedical corpora, as well as a novel corpus of full-text documents manually annotated for species mentions. LINNAEUS uses a dictionary-based approach (implemented as an efficient deterministic finite-state automaton to identify species names and a set of heuristics to resolve ambiguous mentions. When compared against our manually annotated corpus, LINNAEUS performs with 94% recall and 97% precision at the mention level, and 98% recall and 90% precision at the document level. Our system successfully solves the problem of disambiguating uncertain species mentions, with 97% of all mentions in PubMed Central full-text documents resolved to unambiguous NCBI taxonomy identifiers. Conclusions LINNAEUS is an open source, stand-alone software system capable of recognizing and normalizing species name mentions with speed and accuracy, and can therefore be integrated into a range of bioinformatics and text-mining applications. The software and manually annotated corpus can be downloaded freely at http://linnaeus.sourceforge.net/.

  20. Multiplex PCR and RFLP approaches for identification of rabbitfish (Siganus) species using mitochondrial gene regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravago-Gotanco, R G; Manglicmot, M T; Pante, M J R

    2010-07-01

    Molecular assays are described for the identification of six rabbitfish (Siganus) species. A multiplex PCR assay using primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome b region simultaneously identifies four species: Siganus canaliculatus, S. fuscescens, S. javus, and S. spinus. Subsequent RFLP assays of multiplex amplicons differentiate between S. virgatus and S. corallinus based on diagnostic fragments from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I region. Assays were validated with known specimens demonstrating accuracy of the molecular identification. Applied to morphologically indistinguishable early developmental stages, these assays can facilitate studies on species-specific spatio-temporal patterns of larval dispersal and population connectivity to aid fishery management.

  1. Wildlife DNA Forensic in Curbing Illegal Wildlife Trade: Specie Identification from Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Ved P Kumar; Dhyanendra Kumar; Goyal, Surendra P.

    2014-01-01

    Species identification in wildlife forensics is the one of the major concern to enforce law and curbing illegal wildlife trade. Among all the available analytical teqniques DNA based species identification is the most robust and acceptable evidence in the court of law. We analysed cytochrome b and 12S rRNA mtDNA fragments to identify species from three different seizures. DNA based analysis of Cyt b and 12S rRNA has identified three seizures as Hog deer, Chital and Swamp deer.

  2. Toward the laboratory identification of [O,N,S,S] isomers: Implications for biological NO chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayari, Tarek; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Francisco, Joseph S.; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-06-01

    Benchmark ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the stable isomers of [O,N,S,S]. These computations are carried out using coupled cluster (RCCSD(T)) and explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods (RCCSD(T)-F12). In addition to the already known cis isomer of SSNO, nine other stable forms are predicted. The most stable isomer is cis-OSNS. Nine structures are chain bent-bent with relatively large dipole moments which make them detectable, as cis-SSNO, by infrared, far-infrared, and microwave spectroscopies. We found also a C2v isomer (NS2O). Since these species are strongly suggested to play an important role as intermediates during the bioactive reaction products of the NO/H2S interaction, the rotational and vibrational spectroscopic parameters are presented to help aid the in vivo identification and assignment of these spectra. Results from this work show that [O,N,S,S] may play key roles during nitric oxide transport and deliver in biological media, as well as, provide an explanation for the weak characteristic of disulfide bridges within proteins.

  3. Structure and biological activity of chemically modified nisin A species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rollema, Harry S.; Metzger, Jörg W.; Both, Paula; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Siezen, Roland J.

    1996-01-01

    Nisin, a 34-residue peptide bacteriocin, contains the less common amino acids lanthionine, β-methyllanthionine, dehydroalanine (Dha), and dehydrobutyrine (Dhb). Several chemically modified nisin A species were purified by reverse-phase HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional NMR and electrospray m

  4. Tualatin River - Invasive Species Identification, Control and Monitoring 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Project goals were to train volunteers to conduct invasive species mapping using GPS and GIS technology. Volunteers were able to map 450 acres on the Atflati Unit...

  5. Rapid and reliable identification of waterborne Legionella species by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Thorsten; Melzl, Holger; Gessner, André

    2016-08-01

    Detection and enumeration of Legionella bacteria in drinking water is regulated in Germany by ISO 11731-2. The mandatory method for species identification employs parallel subculturing of suspicious colonies on selective media requiring the handling of a large number of cultivation plates. After changes to the drinking water quality regulation in Germany in 2012 the demand for Legionella contamination testing increased drastically. A more reliable, faster and less laborious method for species identification is therefore desirable. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization followed by time of flight detection mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) promises an accelerated identification of bacteria with high reliability and reduced expenditure. Our study shows that MS-based species identification results are in full concordance with cultural and biochemical detection and differentiation and that valuable additional information can be gained, even though the ISO regulation demands an extended incubation period for primary bacterial cultures that is actually in contrast to the prerequisites of the MALDI Biotyper system. In addition, the established identification algorithm is very economical and improves time-to-result. Based on our findings, the amendment of MALID-TOF MS identification to ISO11731-2 as an alternative identification method should be taken into consideration. PMID:27260989

  6. Barcode of life: Advancing species identification and discovery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, D.

    approach overlooks morphologically cryptic taxa, which are seen very commonly in many groups. 3. Since morphological keys are often effective only for a particular life stage or gender, many individuals in their early stages of development can.... DNA barcoding is a technique that uses a short gene sequence from a standardized region of the genome as a diagnostic ?biomarker? for the species. Different species have different DNA barcodes making it possible to use barcodes to (i) identify...

  7. Fish species diversity, and the biology and ecology of common fish species in Lake Albert

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Lake Albert contributes about 10% to the national fish production. It supports a multi-species fishery based on endemic species. To local fishermen, Lake Albert is a lifeline providing food and income.

  8. Life cycle and biological parameters of several Brazilian Amazon fish species

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffino, M.L.; Isaac, V.J.

    1995-01-01

    This contribution summarizes knowledge on the biology (population dynamics, reproduction, ecology) of 25 fish species from the Lower Amazon, Brazil, based on data from a Brazilian-German field project (IARA) and a review of the literature.

  9. Environmental monitoring using next generation sequencing: rapid identification of macroinvertebrate bioindicator species

    OpenAIRE

    Carew, Melissa E.; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Metzeling, Leon; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Invertebrate communities are central to many environmental monitoring programs. In freshwater ecosystems, aquatic macroinvertebrates are collected, identified and then used to infer ecosystem condition. Yet the key step of species identification is often not taken, as it requires a high level of taxonomic expertise, which is lacking in most organizations, or species cannot be identified as they are morphologically cryptic or represent little known groups. Identifying species usin...

  10. Advances in DNA metabarcoding for food and wildlife forensic species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Martijn; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Gravendeel, Barbara; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Scholtens, Ingrid; Peelen, Tamara; Prins, Theo W; Kok, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Species identification using DNA barcodes has been widely adopted by forensic scientists as an effective molecular tool for tracking adulterations in food and for analysing samples from alleged wildlife crime incidents. DNA barcoding is an approach that involves sequencing of short DNA sequences from standardized regions and comparison to a reference database as a molecular diagnostic tool in species identification. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made towards developing DNA metabarcoding strategies, which involves next-generation sequencing of DNA barcodes for the simultaneous detection of multiple species in complex samples. Metabarcoding strategies can be used in processed materials containing highly degraded DNA e.g. for the identification of endangered and hazardous species in traditional medicine. This review aims to provide insight into advances of plant and animal DNA barcoding and highlights current practices and recent developments for DNA metabarcoding of food and wildlife forensic samples from a practical point of view. Special emphasis is placed on new developments for identifying species listed in the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) appendices for which reliable methods for species identification may signal and/or prevent illegal trade. Current technological developments and challenges of DNA metabarcoding for forensic scientists will be assessed in the light of stakeholders' needs. PMID:27178552

  11. The Influence of the Academic Conservation Biology Literature on Endangered Species Recovery Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Hudgens, Brian R.; Moyle, Leonie C.; John Stinchcombe; Bloch, Philip L.; Sathya Chinnadurai; Morris, William F.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the volume of the academic conservation biology literature, there is little evidence as to what effect this work is having on endangered species recovery efforts. Using data collected from a national review of 136 endangered and threatened species recovery plans, we evaluated whether recovery plans were changing in response to publication trends in four areas of the academic conservation biology literature: metapopulation dynamics, population viability analysis, conservation corridors...

  12. [Biology, species biodiversity and distribution of Trichinella nematodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskwa, Bozena

    2006-01-01

    From the time of the discovery of Trichinella larvae in 1835 until the middle of the next century it was commonly assumed that all trichinellosis was caused by a single species Trichinella spiralis. This species is an intracellular parasite in both a larva and an adult stage. The L1 larvae live in a modified skeletal muscles. The adult worms occupy a membrane-bound portion of columnar epitelium, living as intramulticellular parasite. More than century later T. spiralis have been reported from more than 150 different naturally or experimentally infected hosts and demonstrated worldwide distribution in domestic and/or sylvatic animals. Up to date, Trichinella genus comprised eight species (T. spiralis, T. nativa, T. britovi, T. murrelli, T. nelsoni, T. pseudospiralis, T. papuae and T. zimbabwensisi) and three additional genotypic variants that have not yet to be taxonomically defined (T6, T8, T9). Molecular markers revealed that Trichinella T6 is related to T. nativa, Trichinella T8 related to T. britovi. Two main clades are recognized in the genus Trichinella: the first encapsulated in host muscle tissue and the second--non-encapsulated. In this paper the history of Trichinella spp. discovery, their life cycle, taxonomy and phylogeny have been reviewed. PMID:17432238

  13. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry - a rapid method for the identification of dermatophyte species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Pietro; Erhard, Marcel; Simon, Jan C; Muylowa, Grace K; Herrmann, Jürgen; Rataj, Waldemar; Gräser, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Altogether 285 dermatophyte isolates of 21 different species - including both Trichophyton rubrum and T. interdigitale, but also eight additional Trichophyton species, Microsporum canis and seven other Microsporum species, as well as Epidermophyton floccosum and Arthroderma spp. - were analyzed using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and the AnagnosTec 'SARAMIS' (Spectral Archiving and Microbial Identification System) software. In addition, sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA was performed for a high number of the tested strains. Sufficient agreement was found between the results obtained with standard identification methods and those with the MALDI-TOF MS for species identification of dermatophytes. A mass spectra database was constructed which contained the species identifications of all 285 isolates. The results were confirmed for 164 of the isolates by sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA. Statistical analysis of all 285 dermatophyte strains showed that conventional identification matched the results of MALDI-TOF MS for 78.2% of the isolates tested. In the case of the 164 isolates for which the identifications were confirmed by PCR, the results of their conventional diagnosis and MALDI-TOF MS were in agreement for only 68.9 % (113 of 164 strains) of the test isolates. In contrast, there was agreement of 99.3 % or 98.8 % in the identifications obtained with PCR and MALDI-TOF MS techniques (283/285 or 162/164). The two exceptions were isolates that proved to be T. violaceum which could not be identified by the MALDI-TOF MS technique. In conclusion, the MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy represents a fast and very specific method for species differentiation of dermatophytes grown in culture. PMID:22574631

  14. Identification of Bifurcations from Observations of Noisy Biological Oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Joshua D; Ó Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A J

    2016-08-23

    Hair bundles are biological oscillators that actively transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical signals in the auditory, vestibular, and lateral-line systems of vertebrates. A bundle's function can be explained in part by its operation near a particular type of bifurcation, a qualitative change in behavior. By operating near different varieties of bifurcation, the bundle responds best to disparate classes of stimuli. We show how to determine the identity of and proximity to distinct bifurcations despite the presence of substantial environmental noise. Using an improved mechanical-load clamp to coerce a hair bundle to traverse different bifurcations, we find that a bundle operates within at least two functional regimes. When coupled to a high-stiffness load, a bundle functions near a supercritical Hopf bifurcation, in which case it responds best to sinusoidal stimuli such as those detected by an auditory organ. When the load stiffness is low, a bundle instead resides close to a subcritical Hopf bifurcation and achieves a graded frequency response-a continuous change in the rate, but not the amplitude, of spiking in response to changes in the offset force-a behavior that is useful in a vestibular organ. The mechanical load in vivo might therefore control a hair bundle's responsiveness for effective operation in a particular receptor organ. Our results provide direct experimental evidence for the existence of distinct bifurcations associated with a noisy biological oscillator, and demonstrate a general strategy for bifurcation analysis based on observations of any noisy system.

  15. Identification of Bifurcations from Observations of Noisy Biological Oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Joshua D; Ó Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A J

    2016-08-23

    Hair bundles are biological oscillators that actively transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical signals in the auditory, vestibular, and lateral-line systems of vertebrates. A bundle's function can be explained in part by its operation near a particular type of bifurcation, a qualitative change in behavior. By operating near different varieties of bifurcation, the bundle responds best to disparate classes of stimuli. We show how to determine the identity of and proximity to distinct bifurcations despite the presence of substantial environmental noise. Using an improved mechanical-load clamp to coerce a hair bundle to traverse different bifurcations, we find that a bundle operates within at least two functional regimes. When coupled to a high-stiffness load, a bundle functions near a supercritical Hopf bifurcation, in which case it responds best to sinusoidal stimuli such as those detected by an auditory organ. When the load stiffness is low, a bundle instead resides close to a subcritical Hopf bifurcation and achieves a graded frequency response-a continuous change in the rate, but not the amplitude, of spiking in response to changes in the offset force-a behavior that is useful in a vestibular organ. The mechanical load in vivo might therefore control a hair bundle's responsiveness for effective operation in a particular receptor organ. Our results provide direct experimental evidence for the existence of distinct bifurcations associated with a noisy biological oscillator, and demonstrate a general strategy for bifurcation analysis based on observations of any noisy system. PMID:27558723

  16. DNA barcoding in Atlantic Forest plants: what is the best marker for Sapotaceae species identification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Vinicius Vivas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic Forest is a phytogeographic domain with a high rate of endemism and large species diversity. The Sapotaceae is a botanical family for which species identification in the Atlantic Forest is difficult. An approach that facilitates species identification in the Sapotaceae is urgently needed because this family includes threatened species and valuable timber species. In this context, DNA barcoding could provide an important tool for identifying species in the Atlantic Forest. In this work, we evaluated four plant barcode markers (matK, rbcL, trnH-psbA and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region -ITS in 80 samples from 26 species of Sapotaceae that occur in the Atlantic Forest. ITS yielded the highest average interspecific distance (0.122, followed by trnH-psbA (0.019, matK (0.008 and rbcL (0.002. For species discrimination, ITS provided the best results, followed by matK, trnH-psbA and rbcL. Furthermore, the combined analysis of two, three or four markers did not result in higher rates of discrimination than obtained with ITS alone. These results indicate that the ITS region is the best option for molecular identification of Sapotaceae species from the Atlantic Forest.

  17. METHODS FOR FISH SPECIES IDENTIFICATION IN FOOD PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ľubica Mrázová; Matúš Ondrejka; Ľubomír Belej; Jozef Čapla; Jozef Golian; Radoslav Židek; Lenka Maršálková; Pavol Bajzík

    2010-01-01

    The need for identification of fishery products in food is currently ongoing issue for both consumers and producers of food. Consumer interest is driven in one the healthy diet, which prefers fish products, as an indispensable ingredient food and on the other hand, is a potential allergen causing health problems in humans allergic to fish protein. Allergy is a phenomenon that significantly affects human health, as well as overall life expectancy of an individual. The large...

  18. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius. PMID:27658593

  19. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius. PMID:27658593

  20. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Hee Jae Shin; Muhammad Abdul Mojid Mondol; Mohammad Tofazzal Islam

    2013-01-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activi...

  1. Evaluation of Orius species for biological control of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Tommasini, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Key words: Thysanoptera, Frankliniella occidentalis, Heteroptera, Orius leavigatu, Orius majusculu, Orius niger, Orius insidiosus, Biology, Diapause, Biological control.The overall aim of this research was to develop a biological control programme for F. occidentalis through the selection of an efficient beneficial arthropod. First, a general review of the literature about thrips pest species in Europe and in particular of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Western Flower Thrips) was made...

  2. Identification, Discrimination, and Discovery of Species of Marine Planktonic Ostracods Using DNA Barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Lisa M; Angel, Martin V; Blachowiak-Samolyk, Katarzyna; Hopcroft, Russell R; Bucklin, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Ostracoda (Crustacea; Class Ostracoda) is a diverse, frequently abundant, and ecologically important component of the marine zooplankton assemblage. There are more than 200 described species of marine planktonic ostracods, many of which (especially conspecific species) can be identified only by microscopic examination and dissection of fragile morphological characters. Given the complexity of species identification and increasing lack of expert taxonomists, DNA barcodes (short DNA sequences for species discrimination and identification) are particularly useful and necessary. Results are reported from analysis of 210 specimens of 78 species of marine planktonic ostracods, including two novel species, and 51 species for which barcodes have not been previously published. Specimens were collected during 2006 to 2008 from the Atlantic, Indian, and Southern Oceans, Greenland Sea and Gulf of Alaska. Samples were collected from surface to 5,000 m using various collection devices. DNA sequence variation was analyzed for a 598 base-pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Kimura-2-Parameter (K2P) genetic distances within described species (mean = 0.010 ± 0.017 SD) were significantly smaller than between species (0.260 + 0.080), excluding eight taxa hypothesized to comprise cryptic species due to morphological variation (especially different size forms) and/or collection from different geographic regions. These taxa showed similar K2P distance values within (0.014 + 0.026) and between (0.221 ± 0.068) species. All K2P distances > 0.1 resulted from comparisons between identified or cryptic species, with no overlap between intra- and interspecific genetic distances. A Neighbor Joining tree resolved nearly all described species analyzed, with multiple sequences forming monophyletic clusters with high bootstrap values (typically 99%). Based on taxonomically and geographically extensive sampling and analysis (albeit with small sample sizes

  3. Population biology of coral trout species in eastern Torres Strait: Implications for fishery management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ashley J.; Currey, Leanne M.; Begg, Gavin A.; Murchie, Cameron D.; Ballagh, Aaron C.

    2008-09-01

    Coral trout ( Plectropomus spp.) are the main target species for commercial fishers in the eastern Torres Strait Reef Line Fishery (ETS RLF). The four species of coral trout known to occur in Torres Strait: Plectropomus leopardus, Plectropomus maculatus, Plectropomus areolatus and Plectropomus laevis are currently managed as a single species in Torres Strait, as there is no species-specific biological information available for the region which could be used to assess whether species differ in their response to fishing pressure. The aim of our study was to determine whether it is appropriate (biologically) to manage coral trout in the ETS RLF as a single species group or whether different management arrangements are required for some species. We used catch data and biological data from samples collected by commercial fishers to examine the distribution within Torres Strait and estimate a range of biological parameters for P. leopardus, P. maculatus and P. areolatus. Insufficient P. laevis samples were collected to reliably examine this species. Results indicated that the population biology, particularly the reproductive biology, of P. areolatus was substantially different to both P. leopardus and P. maculatus. Although it is difficult to predict the response to fishing, P. areolatus may be more vulnerable to fishing than P. leopardus and P. maculatus, due to the larger size at sex change observed for this species and the very low proportion of males protected by the current minimum size limit. Therefore, while the common management arrangements for P. leopardus and P. maculatus appear to be adequate for these species, separate management arrangements are needed for the sustainable harvest of P. areolatus populations in the ETS. Specifically, we recommend the introduction of a maximum size limit for P. areolatus, in addition to the current minimum size limit, which may allow a proportion of males some protection from fishing.

  4. Identification of sympatric bat species by the echolocation calls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-eight echolocation calls of 63 free-flying individuals of five bat species (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum,Myotis formosus,Myotis ikonnikovi,Myotis daubentoni and Murina leucogaster)were recorded (by ultrasonic bat detector (D980)) in Zhi'an village of Jilin Province,China.According to the frequency-time spectra,these calls were categorized into two types:FM/CF (constant frequency) / FM (R.ferrumequinum) and FM (frequency modulated)(M.formosus,M.ikonnikovi,M.daubentoni and M.leucogaster).Sonograms of the calls of R.ferrumequinum could easily be distinguished from those of the other four species.For the calls of the remaining four species,six echolocation call parameters,including starting frequency,ending frequency,peak frequency duration,longest inter-pulse interval and shortest inter-pulse interval,were examined by stepwise discriminant analysis.The results show that 84.1% of calls were correctly classified,which indicates that these parameters of echolocation calls play an important role in identifying bat species.These parameters can be used to test the accuracy of general predictions based on bats' morphology in the same forest and can provide essential information for assessing patterns of bat habitat use.

  5. Direct identification of pure penicillium species using image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dørge, Thorsten Carlheim; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2000-01-01

    recording. Isolates of nine different species of the genus Penicillium have been selected for the purpose. After incubation for 7 days, the fungal colonies are digitized using a very accurate digital camera. Prior to the image analysis each image is corrected for self-illumination, thereby gaining a set...

  6. Molecular identification of python species: development and validation of a novel assay for forensic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavaglia, Sherryn A; Tobe, Shanan S; Donnellan, Stephen C; Henry, Julianne M; Linacre, Adrian M T

    2015-05-01

    Python snake species are often encountered in illegal activities and the question of species identity can be pertinent to such criminal investigations. Morphological identification of species of pythons can be confounded by many issues and molecular examination by DNA analysis can provide an alternative and objective means of identification. Our paper reports on the development and validation of a PCR primer pair that amplifies a segment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene that has been suggested previously as a good candidate locus for differentiating python species. We used this DNA region to perform species identification of pythons, even when the template DNA was of poor quality, as might be the case with forensic evidentiary items. Validation tests are presented to demonstrate the characteristics of the assay. Tests involved the cross-species amplification of this marker in non-target species, minimum amount of DNA template required, effects of degradation on product amplification and a blind trial to simulate a casework scenario that provided 100% correct identity. Our results demonstrate that this assay performs reliably and robustly on pythons and can be applied directly to forensic investigations where the presence of a species of python is in question.

  7. Asymptotic Fitness Distribution in the Bak-Sneppen Model of Biological Evolution with Four Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlemm, Eckhard

    2012-08-01

    We suggest a new method to compute the asymptotic fitness distribution in the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution. As applications we derive the full asymptotic distribution in the four-species model, and give an explicit linear recurrence relation for a set of coefficients determining the asymptotic distribution in the five-species model.

  8. Asymptotic fitness distribution in the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution with four species

    OpenAIRE

    Schlemm, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    We suggest a new method to compute the asymptotic fitness distribution in the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution. As applications we derive the full asymptotic distribution in the four-species model, and give an explicit linear recurrence relation for a set of coefficients determining the asymptotic distribution in the five-species model.

  9. Identification of different bacterial species in biofilms using confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is used to discriminate between different species of bacteria grown in biofilms. Tests are performed using two bacterial species, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans, which are major components of oral plaque and of particular interest due to their association with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Dehydrated biofilms of these species are studied as a simplified model of dental plaque. A prediction model based on principal component analysis and logistic regression is calibrated using pure biofilms of each species and validated on pure biofilms grown months later, achieving 96% accuracy in prospective classification. When biofilms of the two species are partially mixed together, Raman-based identifications are achieved within ~2 μm of the boundaries between species with 97% accuracy. This combination of spatial resolution and predication accuracy should be suitable for forming images of species distributions within intact two-species biofilms.

  10. DNA Barcoding of Malagasy Rosewoods: Towards a Molecular Identification of CITES-Listed Dalbergia Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassold, Sonja; Lowry, Porter P; Bauert, Martin R; Razafintsalama, Annick; Ramamonjisoa, Lolona; Widmer, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Illegal selective logging of tropical timber is of increasing concern worldwide. Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot and home to some of the world's most sought after tropical timber species. Malagasy rosewoods belong to the genus Dalbergia (Fabaceae), which is highly diverse and has a pantropical distribution, but these timber species are among the most threatened as a consequence of intensive illegal selective logging and deforestation. Reliable identification of Dalbergia species from Madagascar is important for law enforcement but is almost impossible without fertile plant material, which is often unavailable during forest inventories or when attempting to identify logged trees of cut wood. DNA barcoding has been promoted as a promising tool for species identification in such cases. In this study we tested whether DNA barcoding with partial sequences of three plastid markers (matK, rbcL and trnL (UAA)) can distinguish between Dalbergia from Madagascar and from other areas of its distributional range, and whether Malagasy species can be distinguished from one another. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Malagasy Dalbergia species studied form two monophyletic groups, each containing two subgroups, only one of which corresponds to a single species. We characterized diagnostic polymorphisms in the three DNA barcoding markers that allow rapid discrimination between Dalbergia from Madagascar and from other areas of its distribution range. Species identification success based on individual barcoding markers or combinations was poor, whereas subgroup identification success was much higher (up to 98%), revealing both the value and limitations of a DNA barcoding approach for the identification of closely related Malagasy rosewoods. PMID:27362258

  11. Use of molecular methods in identification of Candida Species and evaluation of fluconazole resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Yalinay Cirak

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of one of the molecular typing methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction following by RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in the identification of Candida species and then to differentiate the identified azole susceptible and resistant Candida albicans strains by using AP-PCR (arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction. The identification of Candida species by PCR and RFLP analysis was based on the size and primary structural variation of rDNA intergenic spacer regions (ITS. Forty-four clinical Candida isolates comprising 5 species were included to the study. The amplification products were digested individually with 3 different restriction enzymes: HaeIII, DdeI, and BfaI. All the isolates tested yielded the expected band patterns by PCR and RFLP analysis. The results obtained from this study demonstrate that Candida species can be differentiated as C. albicans and non-C. albicans strains only by using HaeIII restriction enzyme and BfaI maintains the differentiation of these non-C. albicans species. After identification Candida species with RFLP analysis, C. albicans strains were included to the AP-PCR test. By using AP-PCR, fluconazole susceptible and resistant strains were differentiated. Nine fluconazole susceptible and 24 fluconazole resistant C. albicans were included to the study. Fluconazole resistant strains had more bands when evaluating with the agarose gel electrophoresis but there were no specific discriminatory band patterns to warrant the differentiation of the resistance. The identification of Candida species with the amplification of intergenic spacer region and RFLP analysis is a practical, short, and a reliable method when comparing to the conventional time-consuming Candida species identification methods. The fluconazole susceptibility testing with AP-PCR seems to be a promising method but further studies must be performed for more specific results.

  12. DNA Barcoding of Malagasy Rosewoods: Towards a Molecular Identification of CITES-Listed Dalbergia Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Porter P.; Bauert, Martin R.; Razafintsalama, Annick; Ramamonjisoa, Lolona; Widmer, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Illegal selective logging of tropical timber is of increasing concern worldwide. Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot and home to some of the world’s most sought after tropical timber species. Malagasy rosewoods belong to the genus Dalbergia (Fabaceae), which is highly diverse and has a pantropical distribution, but these timber species are among the most threatened as a consequence of intensive illegal selective logging and deforestation. Reliable identification of Dalbergia species from Madagascar is important for law enforcement but is almost impossible without fertile plant material, which is often unavailable during forest inventories or when attempting to identify logged trees of cut wood. DNA barcoding has been promoted as a promising tool for species identification in such cases. In this study we tested whether DNA barcoding with partial sequences of three plastid markers (matK, rbcL and trnL (UAA)) can distinguish between Dalbergia from Madagascar and from other areas of its distributional range, and whether Malagasy species can be distinguished from one another. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Malagasy Dalbergia species studied form two monophyletic groups, each containing two subgroups, only one of which corresponds to a single species. We characterized diagnostic polymorphisms in the three DNA barcoding markers that allow rapid discrimination between Dalbergia from Madagascar and from other areas of its distribution range. Species identification success based on individual barcoding markers or combinations was poor, whereas subgroup identification success was much higher (up to 98%), revealing both the value and limitations of a DNA barcoding approach for the identification of closely related Malagasy rosewoods. PMID:27362258

  13. A multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous identification of three mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccaggi, D L; Krüger, K; Pietersen, G

    2008-02-01

    Molecular species identification is becoming more wide-spread in diagnostics and ecological studies, particularly with regard to insects for which morphological identification is difficult or time-consuming. In this study, we describe the development and application of a single-step multiplex PCR for the identification of three mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) associated with grapevine in South Africa: Planococcus ficus (vine mealybug), Planococcus citri (citrus mealybug) and Pseudococcus longispinus (longtailed mealybug). Mealybugs are pests on many commercial crops, including grapevine, in which they transmit viral diseases. Morphological identification of mealybug species is usually time-consuming, requires a high level of taxonomic expertise and usually only adult females can be identified. The single-step multiplex PCR developed here, based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO I) gene, is rapid, reliable, sensitive, accurate and simple. The entire identification protocol (including DNA extraction, PCR and electrophoresis) can be completed in approximately four hours. Successful DNA extraction from laboratory and unparasitized field-collected individuals stored in absolute ethanol was 97%. Specimens from which DNA could be extracted were always correctly identified (100% accuracy). The technique developed is simple enough to be implemented in any molecular laboratory. The principles described here can be extended to any organism for which rapid, reliable identification is needed.

  14. Species-Specific Detection and Identification of Fusarium Species Complex, the Causal Agent of Sugarcane Pokkah Boeng in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenyue Lin; Shiqiang Xu; Youxiong Que; Jihua Wang; Comstock, Jack C.; Jinjin Wei; McCord, Per H.; Baoshan Chen; Rukai Chen; Muqing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pokkah boeng disease caused by the Fusarium species complex results in significant yield losses in sugarcane. Thus, the rapid and accurate detection and identification of the pathogen is urgently required to manage and prevent the spreading of sugarcane pokkah boeng. METHODS: A total of 101 isolates were recovered from the pokkah boeng samples collected from five major sugarcane production areas in China throughout 2012 and 2013. The causal pathogen was identified by morphological...

  15. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  16. Microbe-ID: an open source toolbox for microbial genotyping and species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabima, Javier F; Everhart, Sydney E; Larsen, Meredith M; Weisberg, Alexandra J; Kamvar, Zhian N; Tancos, Matthew A; Smart, Christine D; Chang, Jeff H; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2016-01-01

    Development of tools to identify species, genotypes, or novel strains of invasive organisms is critical for monitoring emergence and implementing rapid response measures. Molecular markers, although critical to identifying species or genotypes, require bioinformatic tools for analysis. However, user-friendly analytical tools for fast identification are not readily available. To address this need, we created a web-based set of applications called Microbe-ID that allow for customizing a toolbox for rapid species identification and strain genotyping using any genetic markers of choice. Two components of Microbe-ID, named Sequence-ID and Genotype-ID, implement species and genotype identification, respectively. Sequence-ID allows identification of species by using BLAST to query sequences for any locus of interest against a custom reference sequence database. Genotype-ID allows placement of an unknown multilocus marker in either a minimum spanning network or dendrogram with bootstrap support from a user-created reference database. Microbe-ID can be used for identification of any organism based on nucleotide sequences or any molecular marker type and several examples are provided. We created a public website for demonstration purposes called Microbe-ID (microbe-id.org) and provided a working implementation for the genus Phytophthora (phytophthora-id.org). In Phytophthora-ID, the Sequence-ID application allows identification based on ITS or cox spacer sequences. Genotype-ID groups individuals into clonal lineages based on simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for the two invasive plant pathogen species P. infestans and P. ramorum. All code is open source and available on github and CRAN. Instructions for installation and use are provided at https://github.com/grunwaldlab/Microbe-ID. PMID:27602267

  17. Species identification of invasive yeasts including Candida in Pakistan: limitations of phenotypic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Joveria; Jabeen, Kauser; Saeed, Noureen; Zafar, Afia; Brandt, Mary Eleanor; Hasan, Rumina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare phenotypic and genotypic methods of yeast identification. Methods The in-vitro cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2006 to May 2009. Invasive yeasts isolated at the clinical microbiology laboratory at the Aga Khan University (AKU), Karachi, Pakistan, were identified. Speciation by phenotypic and molecular methods was compared. All yeasts isolated during the study period from blood and other invasive sites were identified using standard methods. Isolates were shipped to Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, for identification by Luminex flow cytometric multianalyte profiling (xMAP) system. Ribosomal ITS2 DNA sequencing was performed on isolates not identified by Luminex. Result Of the 214 invasive yeasts evaluated, Candida species were 209 (97.7%) while the frequency of non-Candida species was 5 (2.3%). Overall agreement between phenotypic and molecular identification was 81.3%, 90.3% amongst the more common Candida species, and only 38.8% amongst the uncommon yeasts. Conclusion Phenotypic methods of identification proved adequate for common Candida species, but were deficient in recognising rare Candida and non-Candida yeasts, highlighting the importance of molecular methods for identification. PMID:23866432

  18. Identification of Propionibacteria to the species level using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, B

    2013-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and artificial neural networks (ANN's) were used to identify species of Propionibacteria strains. The aim of the study was to improve the methodology to identify species of Propionibacteria strains, in which the differentiation index D, calculated based on Pearson's correlation and cluster analyses were used to describe the correlation between the Fourier transform infrared spectra and bacteria as molecular systems brought unsatisfactory results. More advanced statistical methods of identification of the FTIR spectra with application of artificial neural networks (ANN's) were used. In this experiment, the FTIR spectra of Propionibacteria strains stored in the library were used to develop artificial neural networks for their identification. Several multilayer perceptrons (MLP) and probabilistic neural networks (PNN) were tested. The practical value of selected artificial neural networks was assessed based on identification results of spectra of 9 reference strains and 28 isolates. To verify results of isolates identification, the PCR based method with the pairs of species-specific primers was used. The use of artificial neural networks in FTIR spectral analyses as the most advanced chemometric method supported correct identification of 93% bacteria of the genus Propionibacterium to the species level.

  19. Identification of biologically recycled continental materials in banded iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The controversy on the origin of banded iron formations (BIFs) has lasted for many decades. Studies prior to the 1970s suggested that Fe in BIFs was supplied from continental riverine inputs[1], but discovery of midocean ridge hydrothermal systems in the 1970s and identification of positive Eu anomaly in BIF samples led to an alternative model where hydrothermal vents provided Fe in BIFs[2]. Although the latter model has became widely accepted, it should be noted that interpretations of Fe sources for BIFs using the abundance and isotopic composition of rare earth elements (REEs) are based on an assumption that transport and deposition of REEs and Fe were coupled. We address the question of Fe sources and pathways for BIFs by combining stable Fe isotopes with radiogenic Nd isotopes as well as REE measurements to test proposals that Fe in BIFs was hydrothermally sourced. The samples investigated are from a type section of the Dales Gorge member of the 2.5 Ga Brockman Iron Formation, the world's most extensive Superior-type BIF that represents the climax of BIF deposition in the geologic record. Large variations were observed in both Fe and Nd isotope compositions of the BIF samples, and there is a positive correlation between the bulk rock ɛNd and δ56Fe values. In addition, there is a negative corelation between ɛNd and Sm/Nd ratios. In order to explain the observed correlations in those isotopic and elemental data, a two-component model, where mixing between a high ɛNd, low Sm/Nd hydrothermal endmember and a low ɛNd, low δ56Fe, but high Sm/Nd continental endmember occurred prior to deposition of the BIF, is required. The low-δ56Fe, high-Sm/Nd endmember is best explained by microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in the coastal sediments, which fractionated Fe isotopes and REEs and released these components back to water column that were ultimately precipitated in BIFs. The range and distribution of ɛNdvalues in the BIF samples suggest that the amount

  20. Floral and pollination biology of three sympatric Vaccinium (Ericaceae) species in the Upper Ardennes, Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquemart, Anne-Laure; Thompson, JD

    1996-01-01

    Comparative studies of the reproductive biology and pollination ecology of closely related species allow us to test several ideas related to the evolution of selfing taxa from outcrossing ancestors. The existence of closely related species in the same habitat provides a particularly useful opportunity to examine this issue. A variety of floral traits likely to be associated with the reproductive system of three sympatric Vaccinium species (V. myrtillus, V. vitis-idaea, and V. uliginosum) were...

  1. Identification of lectin-binding proteins in Chlamydia species.

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, A F; Kuo, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Lectin-binding proteins of chlamydiae were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. All three Chlamydia species tested expressed two proteins when whole-elementary-body lysates were reacted with the biotinylated lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin. The protein with a molecular mass of 18 kilodaltons (kDa) responded strongly compared with a higher-molecular-mass protein that varied from 27 to 32 kDa with each chlamydia strain tested. Among six l...

  2. Identification of the Trichinella species by PCR method

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilev Saša; Cvetković Jelena; Radović Ivana; Sofronić-Milosavljević Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Serbia is country with a high prevalence of Trichinella infection in pigs, which continues to be a serious human health problem. In Serbia, only a few isolates of Trichinella found in pork have been genetically specified to date, and all were proven as T. spiralis. New data shows that in the sylvatic cycle in Serbia, at least in the Belgrade district, more than one Trichinella species co-exist (T. spiralis and T. britovi). Increased awareness of the possibl...

  3. DNA barcoding for species Identification in prepared fishery products

    OpenAIRE

    ANNA MOTTOLA; PATRIZIA MARCHETTI; MARILISA BOTTARO; ANGELA DI PINTO

    2014-01-01

    Considering that seafood mislabeling has been widely reported throughout the world and that the authentication of food components is one of the key issues in food quality, the aim of this study was to use DNA barcoding to investigate the prevalence of mislabeling among fresh prepared fishery products from markets and supermarkets located in Apulia (SE Italy). The study reveals a high occurrence of species mislabeling (42%) in the prepared fillet products, further evidence of the need for incr...

  4. Identification of different species of Bacillus isolated from Nisargruna Biogas Plant by FTIR, UV-Vis and NIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S. B.; Bhattacharya, K.; Nayak, S.; Mukherjee, P.; Salaskar, D.; Kale, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Definitive identification of microorganisms, including pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, is extremely important for a wide variety of applications including food safety, environmental studies, bio-terrorism threats, microbial forensics, criminal investigations and above all disease diagnosis. Although extremely powerful techniques such as those based on PCR and microarrays exist, they require sophisticated laboratory facilities along with elaborate sample preparation by trained researchers. Among different spectroscopic techniques, FTIR was used in the 1980s and 90s for bacterial identification. In the present study five species of Bacillus were isolated from the aerobic predigester chamber of Nisargruna Biogas Plant (NBP) and were identified to the species level by biochemical and molecular biological (16S ribosomal DNA sequence) methods. Those organisms were further checked by solid state spectroscopic absorbance measurements using a wide range of electromagnetic radiation (wavelength 200 nm to 25,000 nm) encompassing UV, visible, near Infrared and Infrared regions. UV-Vis and NIR spectroscopy was performed on dried bacterial cell suspension on silicon wafer in specular mode while FTIR was performed on KBr pellets containing the bacterial cells. Consistent and reproducible species specific spectra were obtained and sensitivity up to a level of 1000 cells was observed in FTIR with a DTGS detector. This clearly shows the potential of solid state spectroscopic techniques for simple, easy to implement, reliable and sensitive detection of bacteria from environmental samples.

  5. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bertolini

    Full Text Available The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43% in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97 and lower for avian species (0.70. PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

  6. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Ghionda, Marco Ciro; D'Alessandro, Enrico; Geraci, Claudia; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon) as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43%) in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97) and lower for avian species (0.70). PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

  7. Potentials of single-cell biology in identification and validation of disease biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Furong; Wang, Diane C; Lu, Jiapei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-09-01

    Single-cell biology is considered a new approach to identify and validate disease-specific biomarkers. However, the concern raised by clinicians is how to apply single-cell measurements for clinical practice, translate the message of single-cell systems biology into clinical phenotype or explain alterations of single-cell gene sequencing and function in patient response to therapies. This study is to address the importance and necessity of single-cell gene sequencing in the identification and development of disease-specific biomarkers, the definition and significance of single-cell biology and single-cell systems biology in the understanding of single-cell full picture, the development and establishment of whole-cell models in the validation of targeted biological function and the figure and meaning of single-molecule imaging in single cell to trace intra-single-cell molecule expression, signal, interaction and location. We headline the important role of single-cell biology in the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers with a special emphasis on understanding single-cell biological functions, e.g. mechanical phenotypes, single-cell biology, heterogeneity and organization of genome function. We have reason to believe that such multi-dimensional, multi-layer, multi-crossing and stereoscopic single-cell biology definitely benefits the discovery and development of disease-specific biomarkers.

  8. Identification of Culex (Melanoconion) species of the United States using female cibarial armature (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martin R; Savage, Harry M

    2009-07-01

    Species within the subgenus Culex (Melanoconion) Theobald are the primary enzootic vectors of viruses in the Venezuelan equine encephalitis complex including Everglades virus, and probable enzootic vectors of eastern equine encephalitis and West Nile viruses. Adult females of this subgenus are often difficult or impossible to identify to species based on external morphological characters. The use of female cibarial armature allows for the identification of field-collected adult female specimens of Culex (Melanoconion). The cibarial armatures are described and illustrated for all species from the United States and a key to species using this character is presented.

  9. Microarray for Identification of the Chiropteran Host Species of Rabies Virus in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Furukawa-Stoffer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Species identification through genetic barcoding can augment traditional taxonomic methods, which rely on morphological features of the specimen. Such approaches are especially valuable when specimens are in poor condition or comprise very limited material, a situation that often applies to chiropteran (bat specimens submitted to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency for rabies diagnosis. Coupled with phenotypic plasticity of many species and inconclusive taxonomic keys, species identification using only morphological traits can be challenging. In this study, a microarray assay with associated PCR of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene was developed for differentiation of 14 bat species submitted to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency from 1985–2012 for rabies diagnosis. The assay was validated with a reference collection of DNA from 153 field samples, all of which had been barcoded previously. The COI gene from 152 samples which included multiple specimens of each target species were successfully amplified by PCR and accurately identified by the microarray. One sample that was severely decomposed failed to amplify with PCR primers developed in this study, but amplified weakly after switching to alternate primers and was accurately typed by the microarray. Thus, the chiropteran microarray was able to accurately differentiate between the 14 species of Canadian bats targeted. This PCR and microarray assay would allow unequivocal identification to species of most, if not all, bat specimens submitted for rabies diagnosis in Canada.

  10. Identification problem for stochastic models with application to carcinogenesis, cancer detection and radiation biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Hanin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A general framework for solving identification problem for a broad class of deterministic and stochastic models is discussed. This methodology allows for a unified approach to studying identifiability of various stochastic models arising in biology and medicine including models of spontaneous and induced Carcinogenesis, tumor progression and detection, and randomized hit and target models of irradiated cell survival. A variety of known results on parameter identification for stochastic models is reviewed and several new results are presented with an emphasis on rigorous mathematical development.

  11. Molecular Identification of Nosema species in East Azerbaijan province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmaraii, N.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nosema is a genus of microsporidia, which have significant negative impacts on honeybees. The aim of thisstudy is the epidemiological evaluation and molecular characterization of Nosema spices in various countiesof East-Azerbaijan province (Northwest of Iran. 387 samples were collected from colonies maintained invarious counties of East-Azerbaijan province. Samples after preparation were examined by a lightmicroscope for presence of Nosema spores. PCR method (SSUrRNA gene was used to differentiatebetween Nosema apis (N. apis and N. ceranae. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Totalinfection prevalence of the microscopic evaluation and PCR tests were 225 (58.1% and 260 (67.1%respectively, total validity of PCR test against the microscopic test was computed equal to 1.1 in this case.Disease distribution in various counties of study area was variable and N. ceranae was the only Nosema species found to infect honeybees. The one species presence and different distribution of Nosema positive samples in various counties of East-Azerbaijan province may be due to multiple reasons. Furthermore,epidemiological information helps us to improve disease management practices in the studied area, apply new hygiene policy and reduce extra costs of production.

  12. Development and optimization of a new MALDI-TOF protocol for identification of the Sporothrix species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Santos, Cledir; Sampaio, Paula; Romeo, Orazio; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Pais, Célia; Lima, Nelson; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2015-01-01

    Accurate species identification of the Sporothrix schenckii complex is essential, since identification based only on phenotypic characteristics is often inconclusive due to phenotypic variability within the species. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for species identification of 70 environmental and clinical isolates of the Sporothrix complex. A reference database was established for MALDI-TOF MS-based species identification according to minor adjustments in the manufacturer's guidelines. The MALDI-TOF MS clearly distinguished strains of Sporothrix brasiliensis, Sporothrix globosa, Sporothrix mexicana, S. schenckii, Sporothrix luriei and Sporothrix pallida, enabling identification of all isolates at the species level, as confirmed by partial calmodulin gene sequence analyses. The present methodology is simple, reliable, rapid and highly suitable for routine identification in clinical mycology laboratories and culture collections, particularly for updating and reclassifying of deposited Sporothrix isolates.

  13. The fur Gene as a New Phylogenetic Marker for Vibrionaceae Species Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Microbial taxonomy is essential in all areas of microbial science. The 16S rRNA gene sequence is one of the main phylogenetic species markers; however, it does not provide discrimination in the family Vibrionaceae, where other molecular techniques allow better interspecies resolution. Although...... from its use were in agreement with those observed for 16S rRNA analysis and MLSA. Furthermore, we developed a fur PCR sequencing-based method that allowed identification of Vibrio species. The discovery of the phylogenetic power of the fur gene and the development of a PCR method that can be used...... an in silico approach based on genomes from 103 Vibrionaceae strains, we demonstrate here the high resolution of the fur gene in the identification of Vibrionaceae species and its usefulness as a phylogenetic marker. The fur gene showed within-species similarity higher than 95%, and the relationships inferred...

  14. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for human-dog-cat species identification and nuclear DNA quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthaswamy, S; Premasuthan, A; Ng, J; Satkoski, J; Goyal, V

    2012-03-01

    In the United States, human forensic evidence collected from crime scenes is usually comingled with biomaterial of canine and feline origins. Knowledge of the concentration of nuclear DNA extracted from a crime scene biological sample and the species from which the sample originated is essential for DNA profiling. The ability to accurately detect and quantify target DNA in mixed-species samples is crucial when target DNA may be overwhelmed by non-target DNA. We have designed and evaluated a species-specific (human, dog and cat) nuclear DNA identification assay based on the TaqMan(®) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technology that can simultaneously detect and measure minute quantities of DNA specific to either humans, dogs and/or cats. The fluorogenic triplex assay employs primers and hydrolysis probes that target the human TH01 locus as well as the dog and cat Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) sequences in a species-specific manner. We also demonstrate that the assay is a highly sensitive, reliable and robust method for identifying and quantifying mixed-species templates of human-dog-cat origin with as little as 0.4 pg of human and cat nuclear DNA, respectively, and 4.0 pg of dog nuclear DNA.

  15. Identification of Erwinia species isolated from apples and pears by differential PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, I; Geider, K

    2012-04-01

    Many pathogenic and epiphytic bacteria isolated from apples and pears belong to the genus Erwinia; these include the species E. amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. billingiae, E. persicina, E. rhapontici and E. tasmaniensis. Identification and classification of freshly isolated bacterial species often requires tedious taxonomic procedures. To facilitate routine identification of Erwinia species, we have developed a PCR method based on species-specific oligonucleotides (SSOs) from the sequences of the housekeeping genes recA and gpd. Using species-specific primers that we report here, differentiation was done with conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) applying two consecutive primer annealing temperatures. The specificity of the primers depends on terminal Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that are characteristic for the target species. These PCR assays enabled us to distinguish eight Erwinia species, as well as to identify new Erwinia isolates from plant surfaces. When performed with mixed bacterial cultures, they only detected a single target species. This method is a novel approach to classify strains within the genus Erwinia by PCR and it can be used to confirm other diagnostic data, especially when specific PCR detection methods are not already available. The method may be applied to classify species within other bacterial genera.

  16. Application of thermal desorption for the identification of mercury species in solids derived from coal utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Rumayor Villamil, Marta; Díaz Somoano, Mercedes; López Antón, María Antonia; Martínez Tarazona, María Rosa

    2014-01-01

    The speciation of mercury is currently attracting widespread interest because the emission, transport, deposition and behaviour of toxic mercury species depend on its chemical form. The identification of these species in low concentrations is no easy task and it is even more complex in coal combustion products due to the fact that these products contain organic and mineral matter that give rise to broad peaks and make it difficult to carry out qualitative and quantitative analysis. In this wo...

  17. Egg forensics: an appraisal of DNA sequencing to assist in species identification of illegally smuggled eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, Megan L; White, Nicole E; Parkinson, Liza; Haile, James; Spencer, Peter B S; Bunce, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos) are charismatic birds, their plumage and capacity for learning make them highly sought after pets. The illegal trade in parrots and cockatoos poses a serious threat to the viability of native populations; in addition, species transported to non-endemic areas may potentially vector disease and genetically 'pollute' local native avifauna. To reduce the logistical difficulties associated with trafficking live birds, smugglers often transport eggs. This creates a problem for authorities in elucidating accurate species identification without the laborious task of incubation and hand rearing until a morphological identification can be made. Here, we use 99 avian eggs seized from carriers coming into and within Australia, as a result of suspected illegal trade. We investigate and evaluate the use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to accurately identify eggs to family, genus or species level. However, Identification of a species based on percentage mtDNA similarities is difficult without good representations of the inter- and intra-levels of species variation. Based on the available reference database, we were able to identify 52% of the eggs to species level. Of those, 10 species from eight genera were detected, all of which belong to the parrot (Psittacidae) and cockatoo (Cacatuidae) families. Of the remaining 48%, a further 36% of eggs were identified to genus level, and 12% identified to family level using our assignment criteria. Clearly the lack of validated DNA reference sequences is hindering our ability to accurately assign a species identity, and accordingly, we advocate that more attention needs to be paid to establishing validated, multi locus mtDNA reference databases for exotic birds that can both assist in genetic identifications and withstand legal scrutiny. PMID:21741338

  18. Ontology-based Malaria Parasite Stage and Species Identification from Peripheral Blood Smear Images

    OpenAIRE

    Makkapati, V.; Rao, R

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of malaria infection requires detectingthe presence of malaria parasite in the patient as well as identification of the parasite species. We present an image processing-basedapproach to detect parasites in microscope images of blood smear andan ontology-based classification of the stage of the parasite for identifying the species of infection. This approach is patterned after the diagnosis approach adopted by a pathologist for visual examination and hence is expect...

  19. Identification and characterization of pathogenic Pestalotiopsis species to pecan tree in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Lazarotto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to characterize and cluster isolates of Pestalotiopsis species and to identify those that are pathogenic to pecan, based on morphological and molecular characters. Pestalotiopsis spp. isolates were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS and β?tubulin regions. Identification methods were compared to indicate the key morphological characters for species characterization. Thirteen isolates were used for the pathogenicity tests. Morphological characterization was performed using the following variables: mycelial growth rate, sporulation, colony pigmentation, and conidial length and width. Ten pathogenic isolates were identified, three as -tubulin regions. Identification methods were compared to indicate the key morphological characters for species characterization. Thirteen isolates were used for the pathogenicity tests. Morphological characterization was performed using the following variables: mycelial growth rate, sporulation, colony pigmentation, and conidial length and width. Ten pathogenic isolates were identified, three as Pestalotiopsis clavispora and three as P. cocculi. The other isolates remained as an undefined species. The morphological characters were efficient for an initial separation of the isolates, which were grouped according to differences at species level, mainly colony diameter, which was identified as an important morphological describer. Beta-tubulin gene sequencing was less informative than the ITS region sequencing for species identification.

  20. Molecular and morphological identification of mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae in Brazilian vineyards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor C Pacheco da Silva

    Full Text Available Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae are pests constraining the international trade of Brazilian table grapes. They damage grapes by transmitting viruses and toxins, causing defoliation, chlorosis, and vigor losses and favoring the development of sooty mold. Difficulties in mealybug identification remain an obstacle to the adequate management of these pests. In this study, our primary aim was to identify the principal mealybug species infesting the major table grape-producing regions in Brazil, by morphological and molecular characterization. Our secondary aim was to develop a rapid identification kit based on species-specific Polymerase Chain Reactions, to facilitate the routine identification of the most common pest species. We surveyed 40 sites infested with mealybugs and identified 17 species: Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell, Dysmicoccus sylvarum Williams and Granara de Willink, Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley, Ferrisia cristinae Kaydan and Gullan, Ferrisia meridionalis Williams, Ferrisia terani Williams and Granara de Willink, Phenacoccus baccharidis Williams, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Planococcus citri (Risso, Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret, Pseudococcus cryptus Hempel, four taxa closely related each of to Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus sociabilis Hambleton, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn and Pseudococcus meridionalis Prado, and one specimen from the genus Pseudococcus Westwood. The PCR method developed effectively identified five mealybug species of economic interest on grape in Brazil: D. brevipes, Pl. citri, Ps. viburni, Ph. solenopsis and Planococcus ficus (Signoret. Nevertheless, it is not possible to assure that this procedure is reliable for taxa that have not been sampled already and might be very closely related to the target species.

  1. Molecular and morphological identification of mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Brazilian vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco da Silva, Vitor C; Bertin, Aline; Blin, Aurélie; Germain, Jean-François; Bernardi, Daniel; Rignol, Guylène; Botton, Marcos; Malausa, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are pests constraining the international trade of Brazilian table grapes. They damage grapes by transmitting viruses and toxins, causing defoliation, chlorosis, and vigor losses and favoring the development of sooty mold. Difficulties in mealybug identification remain an obstacle to the adequate management of these pests. In this study, our primary aim was to identify the principal mealybug species infesting the major table grape-producing regions in Brazil, by morphological and molecular characterization. Our secondary aim was to develop a rapid identification kit based on species-specific Polymerase Chain Reactions, to facilitate the routine identification of the most common pest species. We surveyed 40 sites infested with mealybugs and identified 17 species: Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell), Dysmicoccus sylvarum Williams and Granara de Willink, Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley), Ferrisia cristinae Kaydan and Gullan, Ferrisia meridionalis Williams, Ferrisia terani Williams and Granara de Willink, Phenacoccus baccharidis Williams, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Planococcus citri (Risso), Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret), Pseudococcus cryptus Hempel, four taxa closely related each of to Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus sociabilis Hambleton, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn) and Pseudococcus meridionalis Prado, and one specimen from the genus Pseudococcus Westwood. The PCR method developed effectively identified five mealybug species of economic interest on grape in Brazil: D. brevipes, Pl. citri, Ps. viburni, Ph. solenopsis and Planococcus ficus (Signoret). Nevertheless, it is not possible to assure that this procedure is reliable for taxa that have not been sampled already and might be very closely related to the target species.

  2. Blood species identification using Near-Infrared diffuse transmitted spectra and PLS-DA method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Zhang, Shengzhao; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Li, Hongxiao; Li, Yingxin; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Blood species identification is of great significance for blood supervision and wildlife investigations. The current methods used to identify the blood species are destructive. Near-Infrared spectroscopy method is known for its non-invasive properties. In this research, we combined Near-Infrared diffuse transmitted spectra and Partial Least Square Discrimination Analysis (PLS-DA) to identify three blood species, including macaque, human and mouse. Blind test and external test were used to assess the PLS-DA model. The model performed 100% accuracy in its identification between three blood species. This approach does not require a specific knowledge of biochemical features for each individual class but relies on a spectroscopic statistical differentiation of the whole components. This is the first time to demonstrate Near-Infrared diffuse transmitted spectra have the ability to identify the species of origin of blood samples. The results also support a good potential of absorption and scattering spectroscopy for species identification in practical applications for real-time detection.

  3. Routine phenotypic identification of bacterial species of the family Pasteurellaceae isolated from animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousse, Florence; Thomann, Andreas; Brodard, Isabelle; Korczak, Bozena M; Schlatter, Yvonne; Kuhnert, Peter; Miserez, Raymond; Frey, Joachim

    2008-11-01

    Pasteurellaceae are bacteria with an important role as primary or opportunistic, mainly respiratory, pathogens in domestic and wild animals. Some species of Pasteurellaceae cause severe diseases with high economic losses in commercial animal husbandry and are of great diagnostic concern. Because of new data on the phylogeny of Pasteurellaceae, their taxonomy has recently been revised profoundly, thus requiring an improved phenotypic differentiation procedure to identify the individual species of this family. A new and simplified procedure to identify species of Actinobacillus, Avibacterium, Gallibacterium, Haemophilus, Mannheimia, Nicoletella, and Pasteurella, which are most commonly isolated from clinical samples of diseased animals in veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is presented in the current study. The identification procedure was evaluated with 40 type and reference strains and with 267 strains from routine diagnostic analysis of various animal species, including 28 different bacterial species. Type, reference, and field strains were analyzed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs) and rpoB gene sequencing for unambiguous species determination as a basis to evaluate the phenotypic differentiation schema. Primary phenotypic differentiation is based on beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-NAD) dependence and hemolysis, which are readily determined on the isolation medium. The procedure divides the 28 species into 4 groups for which particular biochemical reactions were chosen to identify the bacterial species. The phenotypic identification procedure allowed researchers to determine the species of 240 out of 267 field strains. The procedure is an easy and cost-effective system for the rapid identification of species of the Pasteurellaceae family isolated from clinical specimens of animals. PMID:18987220

  4. Use of MALDI-TOF MS for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Species Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Concepción Mediavilla-Gradolph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained for identification by MALDI-TOF of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM isolated in clinical samples with those obtained by GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS (common mycobacteria/additional species. A total of 66 Mycobacterium isolates from various clinical specimens (mainly respiratory were tested in this study. They were identified using MALDI-TOF Bruker from strains isolated in Lowenstein, following the recommended protocol of heat inactivation and extraction, and were simultaneously analyzed through hybridization by GenoType Mycobacterium from liquid culture MGIT. Our results showed that identification by MALDI-TOF was correct in 98.4% (65/66 of NTM isolated in our clinical practice (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. abscessus, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. kansasii, and M. scrofulaceum. MALDI-TOF was found to be an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective system for identification of mycobacteria species.

  5. Collaborative Processes in Species Identification Using an Internet-Based Taxonomic Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontkanen, Jani; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick; Hartikainen-Ahia, Anu; Åhlberg, Mauri

    2016-01-01

    Visual databases are increasingly important resources through which individuals and groups can undertake species identification. This paper reports research on the collaborative processes undertaken by pre-service teacher students when working in small groups to identify birds using an Internet-based taxonomic resource. The student groups are…

  6. Advances in DNA metabarcoding for food and wildlife forensic species identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, Martijn; Arulandhu, Alfred J.; Gravendeel, Barbara; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Scholtens, Ingrid; Peelen, Tamara; Prins, Theo W.; Kok, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Species identification using DNA barcodes has been widely adopted by forensic scientists as an effective molecular tool for tracking adulterations in food and for analysing samples from alleged wildlife crime incidents. DNA barcoding is an approach that involves sequencing of short DNA sequences

  7. Forensic botany: species identification of botanical trace evidence using a multigene barcoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Corradini, Beatrice; Beduschi, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    Forensic botany can provide significant supporting evidence during criminal investigations. However, it is still an underutilized field of investigation with its most common application limited to identifying specific as well as suspected illegal plants. The ubiquitous presence of plant species can be useful in forensics, but the absence of an accurate identification system remains the major obstacle to the present inability to routinely and correctly identify trace botanical evidence. Many plant materials cannot be identified and differentiated to the species level by traditional morphological characteristics when botanical specimens are degraded and lack physical features. By taking advantage of a universal barcode system, DNA sequencing, and other biomolecular techniques used routinely in forensic investigations, two chloroplast DNA regions were evaluated for their use as "barcoding" markers for plant identification in the field of forensics. We therefore investigated the forensic use of two non-coding plastid regions, psbA-trnH and trnL-trnF, to create a multimarker system for species identification that could be useful throughout the plant kingdom. The sequences from 63 plants belonging to our local flora were submitted and registered on the GenBank database. Sequence comparison to set up the level of identification (species, genus, or family) through Blast algorithms allowed us to assess the suitability of this method. The results confirmed the effectiveness of our botanic universal multimarker assay in forensic investigations. PMID:19504263

  8. Ontology-based Malaria Parasite Stage and Species Identification from Peripheral Blood Smear Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkapati, V.; Rao, R.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of malaria infection requires detectingthe presence of malaria parasite in the patient as well as identification of the parasite species. We present an image processing-basedapproach to detect parasites in microscope images of blood smear andan ontology-based classificati

  9. Dendritic cells and skin sensitization: Biological roles and uses in hazard identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances have been made in our understanding of the roles played by cutaneous dendritic cells (DCs) in the induction of contact allergy. A number of associated changes in epidermal Langerhans cell phenotype and function required for effective skin sensitization are providing the foundations for the development of cellular assays (using DC and DC-like cells) for skin sensitization hazard identification. These alternative approaches to the identification and characterization of skin sensitizing chemicals were the focus of a Workshop entitled 'Dendritic Cells and Skin Sensitization: Biological Roles and Uses in Hazard Identification' that was given at the annual Society of Toxicology meeting held March 6-9, 2006 in San Diego, California. This paper reports information that was presented during the Workshop

  10. Comparison of API 50 CH Strips to Whole-Chromosomal DNA Probes for Identification of Lactobacillus Species

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Melinda A.; Antonio, May A. D.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2005-01-01

    The API 50 CH identification system was evaluated for the identification of 97 strains of commensal lactobacilli. This system agreed with the species-level identifications for none of the 7 reference strains and only 4 of 90 vaginal isolates identified using whole-chromosomal DNA probes.

  11. Low temperature storage test phase 2 : identification of problem species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-12-15

    The use of renewable fuels such as biodiesel, in motor vehicle fuels is expected to grow rapidly in North America as a result of governmental mandates. Biodiesel is a fuel component made from plant and animal feedstocks via a transesterification process. The fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) of biodiesel have cloud points that range from 5 degrees C to -15 degrees C. The poor low temperature performance of blends containing FAME must be understood in order to avoid operability issues. This paper presented the results of several testing programs conducted by researchers to investigate filter plugging in biodiesel fuels caused by high levels of saturated monoglycerides. The low temperature storage stability of 57 biodiesel fuels comprised of B5 and B20 made with canola methyl ester (CME), soybean methyl ester (SME), tallow methyl ester (TME) and palm methyl ester (PME) was investigated. Filter blocking tests were conducted to assess storage stability. Deposits from the blends were analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to identify the problem species. Results of the study confirmed the deleterious impact of saturated mono-glycerides in FAME on the low temperature operability of filters in fuel handling systems. 11 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs. 9 appendices.

  12. DNA barcode identification of lichen-forming fungal species in the Rhizoplaca melanophthalma species-complex (Lecanorales, Lecanoraceae, including five new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Leavitt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies using sequence data from multiple loci and coalescent-based species delimitation have revealed several species-level lineages within the phenotypically circumscribed taxon Rhizoplaca melanophthalma sensu lato. Here, we formally describe five new species within this group, R. occulta, R. parilis, R. polymorpha, R. porterii, and R. shushanii, using support from the coalescent-based species delimitation method implemented in the program Bayesian Phylogenetics and Phylogeography (BPP as the diagnostic feature distinguishing new species. We provide a reference DNA sequence database using the ITS marker as a DNA barcode for identifying species within this complex. We also assessed intraspecific genetic distances within the six R. melanophthalma sensu lato species. While intraspecific genetic distances within the five new species were less than or equal to the lowest interspecific pairwise comparison values, an overlap in genetic distances within the R. melanophthalma sensu stricto clade suggests the potential for additional phenotypically cryptic lineages within this broadly distributed lineage. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential for accurately identifying species within the R. melanophthalma group by using molecular-based identification methods.

  13. Identification of incompatibility alleles in the tetraploid species sour cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobutt, K R; Bosković, R; Cerović, R; Sonneveld, T; Ruzić, D

    2004-03-01

    The incompatibility genetics of sour cherry ( Prunus cerasus), an allotetraploid species thought to be derived from sweet cherry (diploid) and ground cherry (tetraploid), were investigated by test crossing and by analysis of stylar ribonucleases which are known to be the products of incompatibility alleles in sweet cherry. Stylar extracts of 36 accessions of sour cherry were separated electrophoretically and stained for ribonuclease activity. The zymograms of most accessions showed three bands, some two or four. Of the ten bands seen, six co-migrated with bands that in sweet cherry are attributed to the incompatibility alleles S(1), S(3), S(4), S(6, ) S(9) and S(13). 'Cacanski Rubin', 'Erdi Botermo B', 'Koros' and 'Ujfehertoi Furtos', which showed bands apparently corresponding to S(1) and S(4), were test pollinated with the sweet cherry 'Merton Late' ( S(1) S(4)). Monitoring pollen tube growth, and, in one case, fruit set, showed that these crosses were incompatible and that the four sour cherries indeed have the alleles S(1) and S(4). Likewise, test pollination of 'Marasca Piemonte', 'Marasca Savena' and 'Morello, Dutch' with 'Noble' ( S(6) S(13)) showed that these three sour cherries have the alleles S(6) and S(13). S(13) was very frequent in sour cherry cultivars, but is rare in sweet cherry cultivars, whereas with S(3) the situation is reversed. It was suggested that the other four bands are derived from ground cherry and one of these, provisionally attributed to S(B), occurred frequently in a small set of ground cherry accessions surveyed. Analysing some progenies from sour by sweet crosses by S allele-specific PCR and monitoring the success of some sweet by sour crosses were informative. They indicated mostly disomic inheritance, with sweet cherry S alleles belonging to one locus and, presumably, the ground cherry alleles to the other, and helped clarify the genomic arrangement of the alleles and the interactions in heteroallelic pollen. PMID:14689184

  14. Multiplex PCR assay for immediate identification of the infecting species in patients with mycobacterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kox, L F; Jansen, H M; Kuijper, S; Kolk, A H

    1997-01-01

    Rapid identification of infecting mycobacterial species enables appropriate medical care decisions to be made. Our aim was to demonstrate the clinical usefulness of the multiplex PCR assay, a test based on PCR, which permits direct identification of 12 mycobacterial species in clinical specimens. A total of 259 specimens from 177 patients who had clinical symptoms of mycobacterial disease but for whom there were difficulties in diagnosis were tested. Specimens were analyzed within 48 h of receipt of the sample. Mycobacteria were identified in 102 specimens; 66 specimens contained nontuberculous mycobacteria, and 36 specimens contained Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mycobacteria. The PCR assay identified the mycobacterial species in 43 (97.7%) of 44 microscopy- and culture-positive specimens and in 15 (93.8%) of 16 culture-positive, microscopy-negative specimens. It also permitted species identification in infections caused by more than one mycobacterial species. For 56 (96.5%) of the 58 specimens from patients with infections caused by opportunistic mycobacteria, the organisms were identified with the PCR assay. The test was useful also for the identification of fastidious mycobacteria, e.g., M. genavense, and those that cannot be cultured, e.g., M. leprae. After resolution of discrepant results, the sensitivity of the PCR assay was 97.9%, the specificity was 96.9%, the positive predictive value was 95.0%, and the negative predictive value was 98.7%. For culture these values were 60.8, 100, 100, and 81.0%, respectively. Thus, the multiplex PCR assay enables prompt diagnosis when rapid identification of infecting mycobacteria is necessary. PMID:9163468

  15. Rapid identification of oral Actinomyces species cultivated from subgingival biofilm by MALDI-TOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina S. Stingu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Actinomyces are a common part of the residential flora of the human intestinal tract, genitourinary system and skin. Isolation and identification of Actinomyces by conventional methods is often difficult and time consuming. In recent years, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS has become a rapid and simple method to identify bacteria. Objective: The present study evaluated a new in-house algorithm using MALDI-TOF-MS for rapid identification of different species of oral Actinomyces cultivated from subgingival biofilm. Design: Eleven reference strains and 674 clinical strains were used in this study. All the strains were preliminarily identified using biochemical methods and then subjected to MALDI-TOF-MS analysis using both similarity-based analysis and classification methods (support vector machine [SVM]. The genotype of the reference strains and of 232 clinical strains was identified by sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA. Results: The sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of all references strains confirmed their previous identification. The MALDI-TOF-MS spectra obtained from the reference strains and the other clinical strains undoubtedly identified as Actinomyces by 16S rRNA sequencing were used to create the mass spectra reference database. Already a visual inspection of the mass spectra of different species reveals both similarities and differences. However, the differences between them are not large enough to allow a reliable differentiation by similarity analysis. Therefore, classification methods were applied as an alternative approach for differentiation and identification of Actinomyces at the species level. A cross-validation of the reference database representing 14 Actinomyces species yielded correct results for all species which were represented by more than two strains in the database. Conclusions: Our results suggest that a combination of MALDI

  16. Species Shout-Outs From Abdul to Zebra: Encouraging Nonmajors to Communicate in the Biology Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina P. Colon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this learning activity, a simple verbal prompt was employed as a nonthreatening and engaging discussion starter for non-Biology majors in a biology class at a community college. By calling out the name of their favorite species, then relating new content to this organism, these “Species Shout-Outs” fostered enthusiasm among students by promoting engagement and creating relevance, all of which are important to improving higher education. This activity combined the elements of academic and social interaction, as well as active learning, which have been shown to be necessary to foster student retention through college.

  17. Molecular identification of scallop planktonic larvae using species-specific microsatellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Aibin; HU Xiaoli; BAO Lisui; LU Wei; PENG Wei; WANG Mingling; HU Jingjie

    2008-01-01

    The identification of scallop larvae is essential to understand the population structure and community dynamics and to assess the potential environmental impacts caused by scallop larvae released or escaped. However, the larvae identification by morphological characteristics is notoriously difficult, mainly due to the small size (usually being less than 150 μm) and vague morphological characteristics among different scallop species. A simple and accurate molecular method was developed to identify four economically farmed scallop species, the Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri, the noble scallop C. nobilis, the bay scallop Argopecten irradians and the Yesso scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis. The tests used the high degree of species-specific micresatellite markers, which was specified by transferability analyses, assessed by reference individuals and evaluated by BLAST searches. The sensitivity test indicated that the species-specific micresatellites were sensitive enough for the detection of 1%~2% larvae in mixed plankton samples, larvae collected from scallop hatcheries and their effluents and from the artificially controlled crosses were well identified to the species/hybrid level. The results demonstrated that the one-step PCR-based assay was technically simple, inexpensive and robust in identification analyses, and also less sensitive to initial quality of template DNA extracted from the ethanol-preserved samples for several years.

  18. Sex identification of four penguin species using locus-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peijun; Han, Jiabo; Liu, Quansheng; Zhang, Junxin; Zhang, Xianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods for sex identification are not applicable to sexually monomorphic species, leading to difficulties in the management of their breeding programs. To identify sex in sexually monomorphic birds, molecular methods have been established. Two established primer pairs (2550F/2718R and p8/p2) amplify the CHD1 gene region from both the Z and W chromosomes. Here, we evaluated the use of these primers for sex identification in four sexually monomorphic penguin species: king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus), rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome), gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua), and Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus). For all species except rockhopper penguins, primer pair 2550F/2718R resulted in two distinct CHD1Z and CHD1W PCR bands, allowing for sex identification. For rockhopper penguins, only primer pair p8/p2 yielded different CHD1Z and CHD1W bands, which were faint and similar in size making them difficult to distinguish. As a result, we designed a new primer pair (PL/PR) that efficiently determined the gender of individuals from all four penguin species. Sequencing of the PCR products confirmed that they were from the CHD1 gene region. Primer pair PL/PR can be evaluated for use in sexing other penguin species, which will be crucial for the management of new penguin breeding programs. PMID:22383375

  19. Climate warming increases biological control agent impact on a non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinmin; Siemann, Evan; He, Minyan; Wei, Hui; Shao, Xu; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Climate change may shift interactions of invasive plants, herbivorous insects and native plants, potentially affecting biological control efficacy and non-target effects on native species. Here, we show how climate warming affects impacts of a multivoltine introduced biocontrol beetle on the non-target native plant Alternanthera sessilis in China. In field surveys across a latitudinal gradient covering their full distributions, we found beetle damage on A. sessilis increased with rising temperature and plant life history changed from perennial to annual. Experiments showed that elevated temperature changed plant life history and increased insect overwintering, damage and impacts on seedling recruitment. These results suggest that warming can shift phenologies, increase non-target effect magnitude and increase non-target effect occurrence by beetle range expansion to additional areas where A. sessilis occurs. This study highlights the importance of understanding how climate change affects species interactions for future biological control of invasive species and conservation of native species.

  20. Climate warming increases biological control agent impact on a non-target species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinmin; Siemann, Evan; He, Minyan; Wei, Hui; Shao, Xu; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Climate change may shift interactions of invasive plants, herbivorous insects and native plants, potentially affecting biological control efficacy and non-target effects on native species. Here, we show how climate warming affects impacts of a multivoltine introduced biocontrol beetle on the non-target native plant Alternanthera sessilis in China. In field surveys across a latitudinal gradient covering their full distributions, we found beetle damage on A. sessilis increased with rising temperature and plant life history changed from perennial to annual. Experiments showed that elevated temperature changed plant life history and increased insect overwintering, damage and impacts on seedling recruitment. These results suggest that warming can shift phenologies, increase non-target effect magnitude and increase non-target effect occurrence by beetle range expansion to additional areas where A. sessilis occurs. This study highlights the importance of understanding how climate change affects species interactions for future biological control of invasive species and conservation of native species. PMID:25376303

  1. Identification of Sex and Female's Reproductive Stage in Commercial Fish Species through the Quantification of Ribosomal Transcripts in Gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Bartolomé, Iratxe; Diaz de Cerio, Oihane; Diez, Guzman; Cancio, Ibon

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of maturity and sex of fish stocks in European waters is a requirement of the EU Data Collection Framework as part of the policy to improve fisheries management. On the other hand, research on fish biology is increasingly focused in molecular approaches, researchers needing correct identification of fish sex and reproductive stage without necessarily having in house the histological know-how necessary for the task. Taking advantage of the differential gene transcription occurring during fish sex differentiation and gametogenesis, the utility of 5S ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA) and General transcription factor IIIA (gtf3a) in the molecular identification of sex and gametogenic stage was tested in different economically-relevant fish species from the Bay of Biscay. Gonads of 9 fish species (, Atlantic, Atlantic-chub and horse mackerel, blue whiting, bogue, European anchovy, hake and pilchard and megrim), collected from local commercial fishing vessels were histologically sexed and 5S and 18S rRNA concentrations were quantified by capillary electrophoresis to calculate a 5S/18S rRNA index. Degenerate primers permitted cloning and sequencing of gtf3a fragments in 7 of the studied species. 5S rRNA and gtf3a transcript levels, together with 5S/18S rRNA index, distinguished clearly ovaries from testis in all of the studied species. The values were always higher in females than in males. 5S/18S rRNA index values in females were always highest when fish were captured in early phases of ovary development whilst, in later vitellogenic stages, the values decreased significantly. In megrim and European anchovy, where gonads in different oogenesis stages were obtained, the 5S/18S rRNA index identified clearly gametogenic stage. This approach, to the sexing and the quantitative non-subjective identification of the maturity stage of female fish, could have multiple applications in the study of fish stock dynamics, fish reproduction and fecundity and fish biology in

  2. Identification of Sex and Female's Reproductive Stage in Commercial Fish Species through the Quantification of Ribosomal Transcripts in Gonads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iratxe Rojo-Bartolomé

    Full Text Available The estimation of maturity and sex of fish stocks in European waters is a requirement of the EU Data Collection Framework as part of the policy to improve fisheries management. On the other hand, research on fish biology is increasingly focused in molecular approaches, researchers needing correct identification of fish sex and reproductive stage without necessarily having in house the histological know-how necessary for the task. Taking advantage of the differential gene transcription occurring during fish sex differentiation and gametogenesis, the utility of 5S ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA and General transcription factor IIIA (gtf3a in the molecular identification of sex and gametogenic stage was tested in different economically-relevant fish species from the Bay of Biscay. Gonads of 9 fish species (, Atlantic, Atlantic-chub and horse mackerel, blue whiting, bogue, European anchovy, hake and pilchard and megrim, collected from local commercial fishing vessels were histologically sexed and 5S and 18S rRNA concentrations were quantified by capillary electrophoresis to calculate a 5S/18S rRNA index. Degenerate primers permitted cloning and sequencing of gtf3a fragments in 7 of the studied species. 5S rRNA and gtf3a transcript levels, together with 5S/18S rRNA index, distinguished clearly ovaries from testis in all of the studied species. The values were always higher in females than in males. 5S/18S rRNA index values in females were always highest when fish were captured in early phases of ovary development whilst, in later vitellogenic stages, the values decreased significantly. In megrim and European anchovy, where gonads in different oogenesis stages were obtained, the 5S/18S rRNA index identified clearly gametogenic stage. This approach, to the sexing and the quantitative non-subjective identification of the maturity stage of female fish, could have multiple applications in the study of fish stock dynamics, fish reproduction and fecundity and fish

  3. Evaluation of T3B fingerprinting for identification of clinical and environmental Sporothrix species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Romeo, Orazio; Pais, Célia; Criseo, Giuseppe; Sampaio, Paula; Zancope-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2015-03-01

    In this study, PCR fingerprinting using the universal primer T3B was applied to distinguish among clinical and environmental species of the Sporothrix complex, Sporothrix brasiliensis, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, S. luriei and S. schenckii sensu stricto. The T3B fingerprinting generated clearly distinct banding patterns, allowing the correct identification of all 43 clinical and environmental isolates at the species level, what was confirmed by partial calmodulin gene sequence analyses. This technique is reproducible and provides the identification of all species of the Sporothrix complex with sufficient accuracy to be applied in clinical mycology laboratories as well as in epidemiological studies in order to obtain a better understanding of the epidemiology of sporotrichosis.

  4. Expected time-invariant effects of biological traits on mammal species duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Peter D

    2015-10-20

    Determining which biological traits influence differences in extinction risk is vital for understanding the differential diversification of life and for making predictions about species' vulnerability to anthropogenic impacts. Here I present a hierarchical Bayesian survival model of North American Cenozoic mammal species durations in relation to species-level ecological factors, time of origination, and phylogenetic relationships. I find support for the survival of the unspecialized as a time-invariant generalization of trait-based extinction risk. Furthermore, I find that phylogenetic and temporal effects are both substantial factors associated with differences in species durations. Finally, I find that the estimated effects of these factors are partially incongruous with how these factors are correlated with extinction risk of the extant species. These findings parallel previous observations that background extinction is a poor predictor of mass extinction events and suggest that attention should be focused on mass extinctions to gain insight into modern species loss.

  5. Identification of Dactylopius cochineal species with high-performance liquid chromatography and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Ana; Sousa, Micaela; Hallett, Jessica; Simmonds, Monique S J; Nesbitt, Mark; Lopes, João A

    2013-10-21

    Identification of American cochineal species (Dactylopius genus) can provide important information for the study of historical works of art, entomology, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and foods. In this study, validated species of Dactylopius, including the domesticated cochineal D. coccus, were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) and submitted to multivariate data analysis, in order to discriminate the species and hence construct a reference library for a wide range of applications. Principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) models successfully provided accurate species classifications. This library was then applied to the identification of 72 historical insect specimens of unidentified species, mostly dating from the 19th century, and belonging to the Economic Botany Collection, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, England. With this approach it was possible to identify anomalies in how insects were labelled historically, as several of them were revealed not to be cochineal. Nevertheless, more than 85% of the collection was determined to be species of Dactylopius and the majority of the specimens were identified as D. coccus. These results have shown that HPLC-DAD, in combination with suitable chemometric methods, is a powerful approach for discriminating related cochineal species. PMID:23961534

  6. Next-generation sequencing for rodent barcoding: species identification from fresh, degraded and environmental samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Galan

    Full Text Available Rodentia is the most diverse order among mammals, with more than 2,000 species currently described. Most of the time, species assignation is so difficult based on morphological data solely that identifying rodents at the specific level corresponds to a real challenge. In this study, we compared the applicability of 100 bp mini-barcodes from cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 genes to enable rodent species identification. Based on GenBank sequence datasets of 115 rodent species, a 136 bp fragment of cytochrome b was selected as the most discriminatory mini-barcode, and rodent universal primers surrounding this fragment were designed. The efficacy of this new molecular tool was assessed on 946 samples including rodent tissues, feces, museum samples and feces/pellets from predators known to ingest rodents. Utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies able to sequence mixes of DNA, 1,140 amplicons were tagged, multiplexed and sequenced together in one single 454 GS-FLX run. Our method was initially validated on a reference sample set including 265 clearly identified rodent tissues, corresponding to 103 different species. Following validation, 85.6% of 555 rodent samples from Europe, Asia and Africa whose species identity was unknown were able to be identified using the BLASTN program and GenBank reference sequences. In addition, our method proved effective even on degraded rodent DNA samples: 91.8% and 75.9% of samples from feces and museum specimens respectively were correctly identified. Finally, we succeeded in determining the diet of 66.7% of the investigated carnivores from their feces and 81.8% of owls from their pellets. Non-rodent species were also identified, suggesting that our method is sensitive enough to investigate complete predator diets. This study demonstrates how this molecular identification method combined with high-throughput sequencing can open new realms of possibilities in achieving fast, accurate and inexpensive

  7. A fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR assay for accurate Pocillopora damicornis species identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Luke; Stat, Michael; Evans, Richard D.; Kennington, W. Jason

    2016-09-01

    Pocillopora damicornis is one of the most extensively studied coral species globally, but high levels of phenotypic plasticity within the genus make species identification based on morphology alone unreliable. As a result, there is a compelling need to develop cheap and time-effective molecular techniques capable of accurately distinguishing P. damicornis from other congeneric species. Here, we develop a fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay to genotype a single nucleotide polymorphism that accurately distinguishes P. damicornis from other morphologically similar Pocillopora species. We trial the assay across colonies representing multiple Pocillopora species and then apply the assay to screen samples of Pocillopora spp. collected at regional scales along the coastline of Western Australia. This assay offers a cheap and time-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing and has broad applications including studies on gene flow, dispersal, recruitment and physiological thresholds of P. damicornis.

  8. The morphological identification ofProtoperidinium (Peridiniales, Dinophyceae) species on the coasts of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ruixiang; PAN Yulong; SUN Huiying; LI Yan; MA Xin; WANG Yan

    2016-01-01

    The classification and identification forProtoperidinium species are the most difficult work during its taxonomic study. In this research, taxonomic status ofProtoperidinium was clarified by tracing its taxonomic history, 23 species belong to genusProtoperidinium on the coasts of China were preliminarily identified, and morphological description and plate patterns were given for each species. The key differences of similar species were also discussed in this study, we believe thatP. oceanicum andP. murry,P. tumidum andP. fatulipes,P. globules andP. majus are separate species;P. diabolum should be treated as the valid name instead of the reported names Peridinium globosum orPeridinium longipes; the taxonomic relationship betweenP. punctulatum andP. subinerme requires further study.

  9. Chemistry and biological activities of essential oils from Melaleuca L. species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Almeida Barbosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils from species Melaleuca genus, especially M. alternifolia (Maiden & Betche Cheel, have been widely used worldwide in various industries. This review is a contribution to Melaleuca knowledge and describes five important essential oil-producing species and two subspecies of Melaleuca in terms of their essential oil chemical composition, medicinal applications, and leaf morphoanatomy. Some relationships between essential oil composition of these species and important biological activities are presented. Useful parameters for the certification of the essential oils are also highlighted.

  10. Chemistry and Biological Activities of Essential Oils from Melaleuca L. Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Almeida Barbosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils from species Melaleuca genus, especially M. alternifolia (Maiden & Betche Cheel, have been widely used worldwide in various industries. This review is a contribution to Melaleuca knowledge and describes five important essential oil-producing species and two subspecies of Melaleuca in terms of their essential oil chemical composition, medicinal applications, and leaf morphoanatomy. Some relationships between essential oil composition of these species and important biological activities are presented. Useful parameters for the certification of the essential oils are also highlighted.

  11. Identification of five sea cucumber species through PCR-RFLP analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yingchun; Zheng, Rong; Zuo, Tao; Wang, Yuming; Li, Zhaojie; Xue, Yong; Xue, Changhu; Tang, Qingjuan

    2014-10-01

    Sea cucumbers are traditional marine food and Chinese medicine in Asia. The rapid expansion of sea cucumber market has resulted in various problems, such as commercial fraud and mislabeling. Conventionally, sea cucumber species could be distinguished by their morphological and anatomical characteristics; however, their identification becomes difficult when they are processed. The aim of this study was to develop a new convenient method of identifying and distinguishing sea cucumber species. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene ( COI) was used to identifing five sea cucumber species ( Apostichopus japonicus, Cucumaria frondosa, Thelenota ananas, Parastichopus californicus and Actinopyga lecanora). A 692 bp fragment of COI was searched for BamHI, KpnI, PstI, XbaI and Eco31I restriction sites with DNAMAN 6.0, which were then used to PCR-RFLP analysis. These five sea cucumber species can be discriminated from mixed sea cucumbers. The developed PCR-RFLP assay will facilitate the identification of sea cucumbers, making their source tracing and quality controlling feasible.

  12. A widely distributed ITS polymorphism within a biological species of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma velutipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Kuyper, T.W.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2001-01-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma velutipes consists of two biological species (BSP 16 and 17). Within BSP 17 a dikaryon was found with two divergent types of the ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1 and 2). The two ITS types segregated in monokaryotic progeny of that dikaryon, showing that

  13. Bumble bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus spp.) of interior Alaska: Species composition, distribution, seasonal biology, and parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the ecological and agricultural significance of bumble bees in Alaska, very little is known and published about this important group at the regional level. The objectives of this study were to provide baseline data on species composition, distribution, seasonal biology, and parasites of the ...

  14. Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei Near-Neighbor Species in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Ginther

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of near-neighbor species are critical to the development of robust molecular diagnostic tools for biothreat agents. One such agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, a soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis, is lacking in this area because of its genomic diversity and widespread geographic distribution. The Burkholderia genus contains over 60 species and occupies a large range of environments including soil, plants, rhizospheres, water, animals and humans. The identification of novel species in new locations necessitates the need to identify the true global distribution of Burkholderia species, especially the members that are closely related to B. pseudomallei. In our current study, we used the Burkholderia-specific recA sequencing assay to analyze environmental samples from the Darwin region in the Northern Territory of Australia where melioidosis is endemic. Burkholderia recA PCR negative samples were further characterized using 16s rRNA sequencing for species identification. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that over 70% of the bacterial isolates were identified as B. ubonensis indicating that this species is common in the soil where B. pseudomallei is endemic. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis reveals many novel branches within the B. cepacia complex, one novel B. oklahomensis-like species, and one novel branch containing one isolate that is distinct from all other samples on the phylogenetic tree. During the analysis with recA sequencing, we discovered 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the reverse priming region of B. oklahomensis. A degenerate primer was developed and is proposed for future use. We conclude that the recA sequencing technique is an effective tool to classify Burkholderia and identify soil organisms in a melioidosis endemic area.

  15. Identification of Yersinia enterocolitica at the Species and Subspecies Levels by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhm, Andrea Elisabeth; Suter, Daniel; Felleisen, Richard; Rau, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica and other Yersinia species, such as Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. bercovieri, and Y. intermedia, were differentiated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with artificial neural network analysis. A set of well defined Yersinia strains from Switzerland and Germany was used to create a method for FT-IR-based differentiation of Yersinia isolates at the species level. The isolates of Y. enterocolitica were also differentiated by FT-IR into the main biotypes (biotypes 1A, 2, and 4) and serotypes (serotypes O:3, O:5, O:9, and “non-O:3, O:5, and O:9”). For external validation of the constructed methods, independently obtained isolates of different Yersinia species were used. A total of 79.9% of Y. enterocolitica sensu stricto isolates were identified correctly at the species level. The FT-IR analysis allowed the separation of all Y. bercovieri, Y. intermedia, and Y. rohdei strains from Y. enterocolitica, which could not be differentiated by the API 20E test system. The probability for correct biotype identification of Y. enterocolitica isolates was 98.3% (41 externally validated strains). For correct serotype identification, the probability was 92.5% (42 externally validated strains). In addition, the presence or absence of the ail gene, one of the main pathogenicity markers, was demonstrated using FT-IR. The probability for correct identification of isolates concerning the ail gene was 98.5% (51 externally validated strains). This indicates that it is possible to obtain information about genus, species, and in the case of Y. enterocolitica also subspecies type with a single measurement. Furthermore, this is the first example of the identification of specific pathogenicity using FT-IR. PMID:19617388

  16. Principles for integrating reactive species into in vivo biological processes: Examples from exercise physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritelis, Nikos V; Cobley, James N; Paschalis, Vassilis; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Theodorou, Anastasios A; Kyparos, Antonios; Nikolaidis, Michalis G

    2016-04-01

    The equivocal role of reactive species and redox signaling in exercise responses and adaptations is an example clearly showing the inadequacy of current redox biology research to shed light on fundamental biological processes in vivo. Part of the answer probably relies on the extreme complexity of the in vivo redox biology and the limitations of the currently applied methodological and experimental tools. We propose six fundamental principles that should be considered in future studies to mechanistically link reactive species production to exercise responses or adaptations: 1) identify and quantify the reactive species, 2) determine the potential signaling properties of the reactive species, 3) detect the sources of reactive species, 4) locate the domain modified and verify the (ir)reversibility of post-translational modifications, 5) establish causality between redox and physiological measurements, 6) use selective and targeted antioxidants. Fulfilling these principles requires an idealized human experimental setting, which is certainly a utopia. Thus, researchers should choose to satisfy those principles, which, based on scientific evidence, are most critical for their specific research question. PMID:26721187

  17. Population and biological parameters of selected fish species from the middle Xingu River, Amazon Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, M; Giarrizzo, T; Isaac, V J

    2015-08-01

    This study estimates the main biological parameters, including growth rates, asymptotic length, mortality, consumption by biomass, biological yield, and biomass, for the most abundant fish species found on the middle Xingu River, prior to the construction of the Belo Monte Dam. The specimens collected in experimental catches were analysed with empirical equations and length-based FISAT methods. For the 63 fish species studied, high growth rates (K) and high natural mortality (M) were related to early sexual maturation and low longevity. The predominance of species with short life cycles and a reduced number of age classes, determines high rates of stock turnover, which indicates high productivity for fisheries, and a low risk of overfishing.

  18. A validated methodology for genetic identification of tuna species (genus Thunnus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Viñas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuna species of the genus Thunnus, such as the bluefin tunas, are some of the most important and yet most endangered trade fish in the world. Identification of these species in traded forms, however, may be difficult depending on the presentation of the products, which may hamper conservation efforts on trade control. In this paper, we validated a genetic methodology that can fully distinguish between the eight Thunnus species from any kind of processed tissue. METHODOLOGY: After testing several genetic markers, a complete discrimination of the eight tuna species was achieved using Forensically Informative Nucleotide Sequencing based primarily on the sequence variability of the hypervariable genetic marker mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR, followed, in some specific cases, by a second validation by a nuclear marker rDNA first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1. This methodology was able to distinguish all tuna species, including those belonging to the subgenus Neothunnus that are very closely related, and in consequence can not be differentiated with other genetic markers of lower variability. This methodology also took into consideration the presence of introgression that has been reported in past studies between T. thynnus, T. orientalis and T. alalunga. Finally, we applied the methodology to cross-check the species identity of 26 processed tuna samples. CONCLUSIONS: Using the combination of two genetic markers, one mitochondrial and another nuclear, allows a full discrimination between all eight tuna species. Unexpectedly, the genetic marker traditionally used for DNA barcoding, cytochrome oxidase 1, could not differentiate all species, thus its use as a genetic marker for tuna species identification is questioned.

  19. Development of a real-time PCR for identification of brachyspira species in human colonic biopsies.

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    Laurens J Westerman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brachyspira species are fastidious anaerobic microorganisms, that infect the colon of various animals. The genus contains both important pathogens of livestock as well as commensals. Two species are known to infect humans: B. aalborgi and B. pilosicoli. There is some evidence suggesting that the veterinary pathogenic B. pilosicoli is a potential zoonotic agent, however, since diagnosis in humans is based on histopathology of colon biopsies, species identification is not routinely performed in human materials. METHODS: The study population comprised 57 patients with microscopic evidence of Brachyspira infection and 26 patients with no histopathological evidence of Brachyspira infection. Concomitant faecal samples were available from three infected patients. Based on publically available 16S rDNA gene sequences of all Brachyspira species, species-specific primer sets were designed. DNA was extracted and tested by real-time PCR and 16S rDNA was sequenced. RESULTS: Sensitivity and specificity for identification of Brachyspira species in colon biopsies was 100% and 87.7% respectively. Sequencing revealed B. pilosicoli in 15.4% of patients, B. aalborgi in 76.9% and a third species, tentatively named "Brachyspira hominis", in 26.2%. Ten patients (12.3% had a double and two (3.1% a triple infection. The presence of Brachyspira pilosicoli was significantly associated with inflammatory changes in the colon-biopsy (p=0.028. CONCLUSIONS: This newly designed PCR allows for sub-differentiation of Brachyspira species in patient material and thus allows large-scaled surveillance studies to elucidate the pathogenicity of human Brachyspira infections. One-third of affected patients appeared to be infected with a novel species.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA SPECIES FROM CLINICAL SAMPLES AND THEIR ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND : The incidence of Candida infections has increased dramatically over the past few decades due to increase in the number of population susceptible to fungal infections. With multiple antifungal ag ents that are available and recovery of clinical isolates that exhibit inherent or developed resistance to commonly used antifungal agents, it has become imperative to do susceptibility testing routinely. The study was done to determine the predisposing fa ctors, species incidence and susceptibility pattern of Candida isolates to commonly use d antifungal agents. METHODS: A total of 108 Candida species were recovered from symptomatic clinical cases. Candida isolates were speciated by germ tube test, chlamydospore formation on corn meal agar and color produced on chromogenic media. Antifungal susceptibility test was done by disk diffusion method for nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and amphotericin - B. RESULTS: Candida albicans is the m ost frequently isolated species. However, non - albicans Candida species, taken as a group has predominated in clinical samples. Chromogenic agar medium showed good correlation in species identification in comparison with conventional germ tube test and chla mydospore formation on corn meal agar. C. albicans (41, C. tropicalis (33, C. krusei (30 and C. glabrata (04 were isolated. Candida species showed 95.4% susceptibility to amphotericin - B, 77.8% to voriconazol e, 69.4% to nystatin, 64.1% to f luconazole an d 63.9% to itraconazole. CONCLUSION : Increasing incidence of non - albicans species infection. Chromogenic medium can be used for species identification. Increasing resistance of Candida species to commonly used antifungal agents.

  1. Species-specific detection and identification of fusarium species complex, the causal agent of sugarcane pokkah boeng in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyue Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pokkah boeng disease caused by the Fusarium species complex results in significant yield losses in sugarcane. Thus, the rapid and accurate detection and identification of the pathogen is urgently required to manage and prevent the spreading of sugarcane pokkah boeng. METHODS: A total of 101 isolates were recovered from the pokkah boeng samples collected from five major sugarcane production areas in China throughout 2012 and 2013. The causal pathogen was identified by morphological observation, pathogenicity test, and phylogenetic analysis based on the fungus-conserved rDNA-ITS. Species-specific TaqMan real-time PCR and conventional PCR methods were developed for rapid and accurate detection of the causal agent of sugarcane pokkah boeng. The specificity and sensitivity of PCR assay were also evaluated on a total of 84 isolates of Fusarium from China and several isolates from other fungal pathogens of Sporisorium scitamineum and Phoma sp. and sugarcane endophyte of Acremonium sp. RESULT: Two Fusarium species (F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum that caused sugarcane pokahh boeng were identified by morphological observation, pathogenicity test, and phylogenetic analysis. Species-specific TaqMan PCR and conventional PCR were designed and optimized to target their rDNA-ITS regions. The sensitivity of the TaqMan PCR was approximately 10 pg of fungal DNA input, which was 1,000-fold over conventional PCR, and successfully detected pokkah boeng in the field-grown sugarcane. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study was the first to identify two species, F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, that were causal pathogens of sugarcane pokkah boeng in China. It also described the development of a species-specific PCR assay to detect and confirm these pathogens in sugarcane plants from mainland China. This method will be very useful for a broad range of research endeavors as well as the regulatory response and management of sugarcane pokkah boeng.

  2. Antifungal susceptibilities and identification of species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex isolated in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottonelli Stopiglia, Cheila Denise; Magagnin, Cibele Massotti; Castrillón, Mauricio Ramírez; Mendes, Sandra Denise Camargo; Heidrich, Daiane; Valente, Patricia; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic mycosis caused worldwide by the dimorphic species complex, Sporothrix schenckii. We studied 85 isolates recovered in Brazil to verify their identification and evaluate their in vitro antifungal susceptibility patterns. Based on phenotypic tests (microscopic features, ability to grow at 30°C and 37°C, colony diameters, as well as assimilation of sucrose and raffinose) and molecular assays (amplification of a fragment of the calmodulin gene), the strains were identified as S. schenckii, S. brasiliensis and S. globosa, with a predominance of S. schenckii isolates. There was 37.7% disagreement between the phenotypic and genotypic identification methodologies. In general, terbinafine was the most active drug, followed by ketoconazole and itraconazole, and the less active fluconazole and voriconazole. Five isolates (one S. globosa and four S. schenckii) were found to be itraconazole-resistant strains but, in general, there were no differences in the in vitro antifungal susceptibility profiles among the Sporothrix species.

  3. Identification of listeria species isolated in Tunisia by Microarray based assay : results of a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microarray-based assay is a new molecular approach for genetic screening and identification of microorganisms. We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay for the reliable detection and discrimination of Listeria spp. in food and clinical isolates from Tunisia. The method used in the present study is based on the PCR amplification of a virulence factor gene (iap gene). the PCR mixture contained cyanine Cy5labeled dCTP. Therefore, The PCR products were fluorescently labeled. The presence of multiple species-specific sequences within the iap gene enabled us to design different oligoprobes per species. The species-specific sequences of the iap gene used in this study were obtained from genBank and then aligned for phylogenetic analysis in order to identify and retrieve the sequences of homologues of the amplified iap gene analysed. 20 probes were used for detection and identification of 22 food isolates and clinical isolates of Listeria spp (L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovi), L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, and L. grayi). Each bacterial gene was identified by hybridization to oligoprobes specific for each Listeria species and immobilized on a glass surface. The microarray analysis showed that 5 clinical isolates and 2 food isolates were identified listeria monocytogenes. Concerning the remaining 15 food isolates; 13 were identified listeria innocua and 2 isolates could not be identified by microarray based assay. Further phylogenetic and molecular analysis are required to design more species-specific probes for the identification of Listeria spp. Microarray-based assay is a simple and rapid method used for Listeria species discrimination

  4. Identification of conserved drought-adaptive genes using a cross-species meta-analysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Shaar-Moshe, Lidor; Hübner, Sariel; Peleg, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Drought is the major environmental stress threatening crop-plant productivity worldwide. Identification of new genes and metabolic pathways involved in plant adaptation to progressive drought stress at the reproductive stage is of great interest for agricultural research. Results We developed a novel Cross-Species meta-Analysis of progressive Drought stress at the reproductive stage (CSA:Drought) to identify key drought adaptive genes and mechanisms and to test their evolutionary c...

  5. Oral Actinomyces Species in Health and Disease: Identification, Occurence and Importance of Early Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkonen, Nanna

    2007-01-01

    The genus Actinomyces consists of a heterogeneous group of gram-positive, mainly facultatively anaerobic or microaerobic rods showing various degrees of branching. In the oral cavity, streptococci and Actinomyces form a fundamental component of the indigenous microbiota, being among initial colonizers in polymicrobial biofilms. The significance of the genus Actinomyces is based on the capability of species to adhere to surfaces such as on teeth and to co-aggregate with other bacteria. Identif...

  6. Morphological and molecular identification of species of the Obsoletus group (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Achim; Kristensen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    in a stereomicroscope. Culicoides obsoletus, Culicoides scoticus, Culicoides chiopterus, and Culicoides dewulfi all belonging to subgenus Avaritia are common in collections in northern Europe. C. obsoletus and C. scoticus often make up more than 50% of the total catch of biting midges. Separation of the females...... identification of the Obsoletus group females. In conclusion, the females of all four species of the Obsoletus group can be separated by a quick morphological method under the stereomicroscope....

  7. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson M; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 10(6) copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  8. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson M.; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 106 copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  9. Rapid identification of emerging human-pathogenic Sporothrix species with rolling circle amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Messias Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 x 10 6 copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0, supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies.

  10. Identification of Staphylococcus species with the API STAPH-IDENT system.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The API STAPH-IDENT system was compared with conventional methods for the identification of 14 Staphylococcus species. Conventional methods included the Kloos and Schleifer simplified scheme and DNA-DNA hybridization. The API STAPH-IDENT strip utilizes a battery of 10 miniaturized biochemical tests, including alkaline phosphatase, urease, beta-glucosidase, beta-glucuronidase, and beta-galactosidase activity, aerobic acid formation from D-(+)-mannose, D-mannitol, D-(+)-trehalose, and salicin, ...

  11. Evaluation of 11 PCR assays for species-level identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Jordan, Penelope J.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the sensitivity and specificity of 11 PCR assays described for the species identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by using 111 type, reference, and field strains of C. jejuni, C. coli, and Campylobacter lari. For six assays, an additional 21 type strains...... representing related Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter species were also included. PCR tests were initially established in the laboratory by optimizing conditions with respect to five type and reference strains of C. jejuni, C. coli, and C. lari. One PCR test for C. coli failed to give appropriate...

  12. BOX-PCR-based identification of bacterial species belonging to Pseudomonas syringae: P. viridiflava group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abi S.A. Marques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic characteristics and genetic fingerprints of a collection of 120 bacterial strains, belonging to Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato group, P. viridiflava and reference bacteria were evaluated, with the aim of species identification. The numerical analysis of 119 nutritional characteristics did not show patterns that would help with identification. Regarding the genetic fingerprinting, the results of the present study supported the observation that BOX-PCR seems to be able to identify bacterial strains at species level. After numerical analyses of the bar-codes, all pathovars belonging to each one of the nine described genomospecies were clustered together at a distance of 0.72, and could be separated at genomic species level. Two P. syringae strains of unknown pathovars (CFBP 3650 and CFBP 3662 and the three P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains were grouped in two extra clusters and might eventually constitute two new species. This genomic species clustering was particularly evident for genomospecies 4, which gathered P. syringae pvs. atropurpurea, coronafaciens, garçae, oryzae, porri, striafaciens, and zizaniae at a noticeably low distance.

  13. EVALUATION OF VITEK 2 SYSTEM FOR CLINICAL IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA SPECIES AND THEIR ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BJECTIVES 1. To evaluate the Vitek 2 system for clinical identification of Candida species and their antifungal susceptibility test; 2. To study the incidence of various types of Candida species in this part of Tamilnadu. METHODS Samples collected from different wards were subjected for culture, isolation and identification of Candida Species and Antifungal Susceptibility testing by Vitek System. Vitek 2 test was carried out in Apollo Specialty Hospital Lab Services, Madurai. The cost per test is Rs. 200 (Subsidized rate. The expenses for the lab tests (Vitek were borne by the author himself. RESULTS 124 samples were collected from urine, sputum, blood, pus and wounds. Candida albicans formed 43% of the samples. Among the 57% of Non-Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis formed 42%, Candida krusei formed 6%, Candida guilliermondii formed 4%, Candida inconspicua, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida rugosa and Candida lusitaniae formed 1% each. Candida albicans and C. tropicalis showed high sensitivity to Voriconazole, Flucytosine, Amphotericin B and Fluconazole. CONCLUSION Candida tropicalis was identified as the most common Candida non-albicans species. Candida albicans and C. tropicalis showed high sensitivity to Voriconazole, Flucytosine, Amphotericin B and Fluconazole. This study was helpful to treat Candida albicans and Non-Candida albicans species patients accurately and earlier by Vitek method.

  14. Rapid plant identification using species- and group-specific primers targeting chloroplast DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Wallinger

    Full Text Available Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae, the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory.

  15. Rapid plant identification using species- and group-specific primers targeting chloroplast DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallinger, Corinna; Juen, Anita; Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory. PMID:22253728

  16. Identification of mealybug pest species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Egypt and France, using a DNA barcoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Rabou, S; Shalaby, H; Germain, J-F; Ris, N; Kreiter, P; Malausa, T

    2012-10-01

    Pseudococcidae (mealybugs) is a large taxonomic group, including a number of agronomic pests. Taxonomic identification of mealybug species is a recurrent problem and represents a major barrier to the establishment of adequate pest management strategies. We combined molecular analysis of three DNA markers (28S-D2, cytochrome oxidase I and internal transcribed spacer 2) with morphological examination, for the identification of 176 specimens collected from 40 mealybug populations infesting various crops and ornamental plants in Egypt and France. This combination of DNA and morphological analyses led to the identification of 17 species: seven in Egypt (Planococcus citri (Risso), Planococcus ficus (Signoret), Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Green), Ferrisia virgata (Cockerell), Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison and Saccharicoccus sacchari (Cockerell)) and 11 in France (Planococcus citri, Pseudococcus viburni Signoret, Pseudococcus longispinus (Targioni-Tozzetti), Pseudococcus comstocki (Kuwana), Rhizoecus amorphophalli Betrem, Trionymus bambusae (Green), Balanococcus diminutus (Leonardi), Phenacoccus madeirensis Green, Planococcus vovae (Nasonov), Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell) and Phenacoccus aceris Signoret), Pl. citri being found in both countries. We also found genetic variation between populations considered to belong to the same species, justifying further investigation of the possible occurrence of complexes of cryptic taxa.

  17. [Flower species identification and coverage estimation based on hyperspectral remote sensing data in Hulunbeier grassland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Ying-Ying; Fan, Wen-Jie; Xu, Xi-Ru; Yan, Bin-Yan; Wang, Huan-Jiong; Liu, Yuan

    2011-10-01

    Monitoring grassland species and area real-timely and accurately is of great significance in species diversity research, as well as in sustainable development of ecosystem. Flowers have their own unique spectral characteristics. Compared with the nutrient stage, species are more easily identified by florescence. So, florescence is a critical period for identification. In the present paper, spectral differences among such flowers as Galium verum Linn., Hemerocallis citrina Baroni, Serratula centauroides Linn., Clematis hexapetala Pall., Lilium concolor var. pulchellum, Lilium pumilum and Artemisia frigida Willd. Sp. Pl. were found, along with identification methods, by analyzing canopies spectra and parametrizing characteristics. Verification results showed that when the coverage of flowers was greater than 10%, the accuracy of identification methods would be higher than 90%. On this basis, linear unmixing model was adopted to calculate the area of flowers in quadrates. Results showed that linear unmixing model was an effective method for estimating the coverage of flowers in grassland because the accuracy was about 4%. PMID:22250555

  18. Biological control of invasive plant species: a reassessment for the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seastedt, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    The science of finding, testing and releasing herbivores and pathogens to control invasive plant species has achieved a level of maturity and success that argues for continued and expanded use of this program. The practice, however, remains unpopular with some conservationists, invasion biologists, and stakeholders. The ecological and economic benefits of controlling densities of problematic plant species using biological control agents can be quantified, but the risks and net benefits of biological control programs are often derived from social or cultural rather than scientific criteria. Management of invasive plants is a 'wicked problem', and local outcomes to wicked problems have both positive and negative consequences differentially affecting various groups of stakeholders. The program has inherent uncertainties; inserting species into communities that are experiencing directional or even transformational changes can produce multiple outcomes due to context-specific factors that are further confounded by environmental change drivers. Despite these uncertainties, biological control could play a larger role in mitigation and adaptation strategies used to maintain biological diversity as well as contribute to human well-being by protecting food and fiber resources. PMID:25303317

  19. Biological control of invasive plant species: a reassessment for the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seastedt, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    The science of finding, testing and releasing herbivores and pathogens to control invasive plant species has achieved a level of maturity and success that argues for continued and expanded use of this program. The practice, however, remains unpopular with some conservationists, invasion biologists, and stakeholders. The ecological and economic benefits of controlling densities of problematic plant species using biological control agents can be quantified, but the risks and net benefits of biological control programs are often derived from social or cultural rather than scientific criteria. Management of invasive plants is a 'wicked problem', and local outcomes to wicked problems have both positive and negative consequences differentially affecting various groups of stakeholders. The program has inherent uncertainties; inserting species into communities that are experiencing directional or even transformational changes can produce multiple outcomes due to context-specific factors that are further confounded by environmental change drivers. Despite these uncertainties, biological control could play a larger role in mitigation and adaptation strategies used to maintain biological diversity as well as contribute to human well-being by protecting food and fiber resources.

  20. Species identification using genetic tools: the value of nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequences in whale conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbi, S R; Cipriano, F

    1998-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis is a powerful tool for identifying the source of samples thought to be derived from threatened or endangered species. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from retail whale meat markets has shown consistently that the expected baleen whale in these markets, the minke whale, makes up only about half the products analyzed. The other products are either unregulated small toothed whales like dolphins or are protected baleen whales such as humpback, Bryde's, fin, or blue whales. Independent verification of such mtDNA identifications requires analysis of nuclear genetic loci, but this is technically more difficult than standard mtDNA sequencing. In addition, evolution of species-specific sequences (i.e., fixation of sequence differences to produce reciprocally monophyletic gene trees) is slower in nuclear than in mitochondrial genes primarily because genetic drift is slower at nuclear loci. When will use of nuclear sequences allow forensic DNA identification? Comparison of neutral theories of coalescence of mitochondrial and nuclear loci suggests a simple rule of thumb. The "three-times rule" suggests that phylogenetic sorting at nuclear loci is likely to produce species-specific sequences when mitochondrial alleles are reciprocally monophyletic and the branches leading to the mtDNA sequences of a species are three times longer than the average difference observed within species. A preliminary test of the three-times rule, which depends on many assumptions about the species and genes involved, suggests that blue and fin whales should have species-specific sequences at most neutral nuclear loci, whereas humpback and fin whales should show species-specific sequences at fewer nuclear loci. Partial sequences of actin introns from these species confirm the predictions of the three-times rule and show that blue and fin whales are reciprocally monophyletic at this locus. These intron sequences are thus good tools for the identification of these species

  1. Tmesiphantes mirim sp. nov. (Araneae: Theraphosidae from the Atlantic Forest of Bahia, Brazil, biogeographical notes and identification keys for species of the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Fabiano-da-Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Tmesiphantes Simon, 1892 is described and illustrated, based on eight male specimens collected at the Una Biological Reserve, southern state of Bahia, Brazil. It is distinguished by the morphology of male palpal bulb and tibial apophysis. The new species is very small and is the smallest theraphosid described to date (body length 5.5 mm. It is distinguished from congeners by the size, which vary from 12 mm (T. riopretano to 23.8 mm (T. nubilus in other species of the genus, aspect of palpal bulb, sternal posterior sigillae close to sternal margin and by the aspect of tibial apophysis which lacks the prolateral branch. Tmesiphantes presently comprises nine species. Sixth have been described for the southern region of Bahia, a well known area of endemism in the Atlantic Forest. Identification keys for Tmesiphantes males and females are presented.

  2. Genetic identification of two species of Pleuronichthys byDNA barcoding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; ZHANG Yan; GAO Tianxiang; LI Pengfei; XU Hanxiang

    2011-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a new method for biological taxonomy,offering the ability to identify species from fragments in any life-history stage.Pleuronichthys cornutus and P.japonicus are two morphologically similar species.Pleuronichthys japonicus has never been found previously in China.However,in this study,we identified both species using DNA barcoding (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)),the mtDNA control region and cytochrome b.The results reveal that:1) intraspecific variation in the DNA barcode is much less than interspecific variation; 2) the two morphologically similar species were placed into separate clades distinguishable by high bootstrap values; 3) COI barcodes are more powerful for identifying the two species than the other two mtDNA fragments.

  3. Morphology of caterpillars and pupae of European Maculinea species (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) with an identification table

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliwinska, Ewa B.; Nowicki, Piotr; Nash, David Richard;

    2006-01-01

    the caterpillars of these species for effective conservation. We present the morphology of the larvae and pupae of these three species, and a simple key to their identification. Inter-specific differences among larvae and pupae, and within-species differences among larval instars, are underlined in order to enable...

  4. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jae Shin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed.

  5. Forensic timber identification: a case study of a CITES listed species, Gonystylus bancanus (Thymelaeaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kevin Kit Siong; Lee, Soon Leong; Tnah, Lee Hong; Nurul-Farhanah, Zakaria; Ng, Chin Hong; Lee, Chai Ting; Tani, Naoki; Diway, Bibian; Lai, Pei Sing; Khoo, Eyen

    2016-07-01

    Illegal logging and smuggling of Gonystylus bancanus (Thymelaeaceae) poses a serious threat to this fragile valuable peat swamp timber species. Using G. bancanus as a case study, DNA markers were used to develop identification databases at the species, population and individual level. The species level database for Gonystylus comprised of an rDNA (ITS2) and two cpDNA (trnH-psbA and trnL) markers based on a 20 Gonystylus species database. When concatenated, taxonomic species recognition was achieved with a resolution of 90% (18 out of the 20 species). In addition, based on 17 natural populations of G. bancanus throughout West (Peninsular Malaysia) and East (Sabah and Sarawak) Malaysia, population and individual identification databases were developed using cpDNA and STR markers respectively. A haplotype distribution map for Malaysia was generated using six cpDNA markers, resulting in 12 unique multilocus haplotypes, from 24 informative intraspecific variable sites. These unique haplotypes suggest a clear genetic structuring of West and East regions. A simulation procedure based on the composition of the samples was used to test whether a suspected sample conformed to a given regional origin. Overall, the observed type I and II errors of the databases showed good concordance with the predicted 5% threshold which indicates that the databases were useful in revealing provenance and establishing conformity of samples from West and East Malaysia. Sixteen STRs were used to develop the DNA profiling databases for individual identification. Bayesian clustering analyses divided the 17 populations into two main genetic clusters, corresponding to the regions of West and East Malaysia. Population substructuring (K=2) was observed within each region. After removal of bias resulting from sampling effects and population subdivision, conservativeness tests showed that the West and East Malaysia databases were conservative. This suggests that both databases can be used independently

  6. Forensic timber identification: a case study of a CITES listed species, Gonystylus bancanus (Thymelaeaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kevin Kit Siong; Lee, Soon Leong; Tnah, Lee Hong; Nurul-Farhanah, Zakaria; Ng, Chin Hong; Lee, Chai Ting; Tani, Naoki; Diway, Bibian; Lai, Pei Sing; Khoo, Eyen

    2016-07-01

    Illegal logging and smuggling of Gonystylus bancanus (Thymelaeaceae) poses a serious threat to this fragile valuable peat swamp timber species. Using G. bancanus as a case study, DNA markers were used to develop identification databases at the species, population and individual level. The species level database for Gonystylus comprised of an rDNA (ITS2) and two cpDNA (trnH-psbA and trnL) markers based on a 20 Gonystylus species database. When concatenated, taxonomic species recognition was achieved with a resolution of 90% (18 out of the 20 species). In addition, based on 17 natural populations of G. bancanus throughout West (Peninsular Malaysia) and East (Sabah and Sarawak) Malaysia, population and individual identification databases were developed using cpDNA and STR markers respectively. A haplotype distribution map for Malaysia was generated using six cpDNA markers, resulting in 12 unique multilocus haplotypes, from 24 informative intraspecific variable sites. These unique haplotypes suggest a clear genetic structuring of West and East regions. A simulation procedure based on the composition of the samples was used to test whether a suspected sample conformed to a given regional origin. Overall, the observed type I and II errors of the databases showed good concordance with the predicted 5% threshold which indicates that the databases were useful in revealing provenance and establishing conformity of samples from West and East Malaysia. Sixteen STRs were used to develop the DNA profiling databases for individual identification. Bayesian clustering analyses divided the 17 populations into two main genetic clusters, corresponding to the regions of West and East Malaysia. Population substructuring (K=2) was observed within each region. After removal of bias resulting from sampling effects and population subdivision, conservativeness tests showed that the West and East Malaysia databases were conservative. This suggests that both databases can be used independently

  7. Identification of a thienopyrimidine derivatives target by a kinome and chemical biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chulho; Yang, Jee Sun; Han, Gyoonhee

    2015-09-01

    Target identification through chemical biology has been considered one of the most efficient approaches for drug discovery. Thienopyrimidine derivatives were designed to discover potent IκB kinase β (IKKβ) inhibitors based on a known IKKβ inhibitor library. Most of the thienopyrimidine derivatives inhibited nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which are downstream of the NF-κB signaling pathway, but not IKKβ. To identify the appropriate targets of thienopyrimidine analogues, chemical biology approaches, including text mining and a subsequent kinase panel assay from the kinome profiling were used. Based on the results, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 was found to be the target for thienopyrimidine derivatives, and was confirmed to be a potent inhibitor for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:26186885

  8. DNA-based Simultaneous Identification of Three Terminalia Species Targeting Adulteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonal; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various parts of three Terminalia species, namely, Terminalia arjuna (stem bark), Terminalia bellirica (fruit), and Terminalia chebula (fruit) are widely known for their therapeutic principles and other commercial values. However, stem bark of T. bellirica and T. chebula along with Terminalia tomentosa are reported as adulterants of T. arjuna. Correct botanical identification is very critical for safe and effective herbal drugs. DNA-based identification approaches are advancing the conventional methods and sometime proved more beneficial. Objective: The purpose of the study was to develop polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to ascertain the identity of T. arjuna herbal material as well as detection of mixing of other three Terminalia species. Materials and Methods: DNA from stem barks samples were isolated and subjected to ITS region amplification and sequencing. Sequences were compared for polymorphic nucleotides determination to develop species-specific primers. Final primers were selected on the basis of in silico analysis and experimentally validated. PCR assays for botanical identification of Terminalia species were developed. Sensitivity testing and assay validation were also performed. Results: The PCR assays developed for Terminalia species were resulted in definite amplicons of the corresponding species. No cross-reactivity of the primers was detected. Sensitivity was found enough to amplify as low as 2 ng of DNA. Mixing of DNA in various concentrations for validation also proved the sensitivity of assay to detect original botanicals in the mixture. The developed methods proved very specific and sensitive to authenticate Arjuna bark to develop evidence-based herbal medicines. SUMMARY Internal transcribed spacer-based species-specific polymerase chain reaction.(PCR) assays were developed to authenticate Terminalia arjuna stem bark and to identify substitution/adulteration of Terminalia bellirica

  9. Systematics of the Trichoderma harzianum species complex and the re-identification of commercial biocontrol strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaverri, Priscila; Branco-Rocha, Fabiano; Jaklitsch, Walter; Gazis, Romina; Degenkolb, Thomas; Samuels, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum is known as a cosmopolitan, ubiquitous species associated with a wide variety of substrates. It is possibly the most commonly used name in agricultural applications involving Trichoderma, including biological control of plant diseases. While various studies have suggested that T. harzianum is a species complex, only a few cryptic species are named. In the present study the taxonomy of the T. harzianum species complex is revised to include at least 14 species. Previously named species included in the complex are T. guizhouense, T. harzianum, and T. inhamatum. Two new combinations are proposed, T. lentiforme and T. lixii. Nine species are described as new, T. afarasin, T. afroharzianum, T. atrobrunneum, T. camerunense, T. endophyticum, T. neotropicale, T. pyramidale, T. rifaii and T. simmonsii. We isolated Trichoderma cultures from four commercial biocontrol products reported to contain T. harzianum. None of the biocontrol strains were identified as T. harzianum s. str. In addition, the widely applied culture 'T. harzianum T22' was determined to be T. afroharzianum. Some species in the T. harzianum complex appear to be exclusively endophytic, while others were only isolated from soil. Sexual states are rare. Descriptions and illustrations are provided. A secondary barcode, nuc translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) is needed to identify species in this complex.

  10. An identification key to species in the mali complex of Aphelinus (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea with descriptions of three new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Hopper

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Aphelinus mali complex consists of eleven described species. Monophyly of this complex is well supported by a combination of traits: (1 a single complete row of setae proximal to the linea calva of the fore wing, with a few additional setae in the angle between this row and the marginal vein; (2 linea calva open (no setae at its posterior edge; (3 head and body dark except for parts of the metasoma; (4 meso- and metacoxae dark; (5 metafemur pale, (6 metatibia dark. Species within the complex have been distinguished by color and shape of antennal segments (particularly the third funicular segment, color of legs and metasoma, and relative length of ovipositor versus mesotibia. We provide a key for identifying species in the mali complex, and describe three new species, Aphelinus glycinis sp. n., Aphelinus rhamni sp. n., and Aphelinus coreae sp. n. from material in laboratory cultures originally reared from soybean aphid in China and Korea as candidates for biological control of soybean aphid, Aphis glycines.

  11. Identification of distinct physiochemical properties of toxic prefibrillar species formed by A{beta} peptide variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeransson, Anna-Lena, E-mail: anngo@ifm.liu.se [Division of Molecular Biotechnology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University (Sweden); Nilsson, K. Peter R., E-mail: petni@ifm.liu.se [Division of Organic Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University (Sweden); Kagedal, Katarina, E-mail: katarina.kagedal@liu.se [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University (Sweden); Brorsson, Ann-Christin, E-mail: anki@ifm.liu.se [Division of Molecular Biotechnology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University (Sweden)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of toxic prefibrillar A{beta} species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence measurements using a combined set of fluorophores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology studies using transmission electron microscopy. -- Abstract: The formation of amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) aggregates at an early stage during the self-assembly process is an important factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The toxic effect is believed to be exerted by prefibrillar species of A{beta}. It is therefore important to identify which prefibrillar species are toxic and characterize their distinct properties. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro aggregation behavior of A{beta}-derived peptides possessing different levels of neurotoxic activity, using fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy. The toxicity of various A{beta} aggregates was assessed by using cultures of human neuroblastoma cells. Through combined use of the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonate (ANS) and the novel luminescent probe pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid (p-FTAA), we were able to identify those A{beta} peptide-derived prefibrillar species which exhibited cellular toxicity. In particular, species, which formed early during the aggregation process and showed strong p-FTAA and ANS fluorescence, were the species that possessed toxic activities. Moreover, by manipulating the aggregation conditions, it was possible to change the capacity of the A{beta} peptide to form nontoxic versus toxic species.

  12. A tool for real-time acoustic species identification of delphinid whistles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Julie N; Rankin, Shannon; Barlow, Jay; Lammers, Marc O

    2007-07-01

    The ability to identify delphinid vocalizations to species in real-time would be an asset during shipboard surveys. An automated system, Real-time Odontocete Call Classification Algorithm (ROCCA), is being developed to allow real-time acoustic species identification in the field. This Matlab-based tool automatically extracts ten variables (beginning, end, minimum and maximum frequencies, duration, slope of the beginning and end sweep, number of inflection points, number of steps, and presence/absence of harmonics) from whistles selected from a real-time scrolling spectrograph (ISHMAEL). It uses classification and regression tree analysis (CART) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) to identify whistles to species. Schools are classified based on running tallies of individual whistle classifications. Overall, 46% of schools were correctly classified for seven species and one genus (Tursiops truncatus, Stenella attenuata, S. longirostris, S. coeruleoalba, Steno bredanensis, Delphinus species, Pseudorca crassidens, and Globicephala macrorhynchus), with correct classification as high as 80% for some species. If classification success can be increased, this tool will provide a method for identifying schools that are difficult to approach and observe, will allow species distribution data to be collected when visual efforts are compromised, and will reduce the time necessary for post-cruise data analysis. PMID:17614515

  13. Identification multiplex assay of 19 terrestrial mammal species present in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón-Laca, Ana; Linacre, Adrian M T; Gleeson, Dianne M; Tobe, Shanan S

    2013-12-01

    An identification assay has been developed that allows accurate detection of 19 of the most common terrestrial mammals present in New Zealand (cow, red deer, goat, dog, horse, hedgehog, cat, tammar wallaby, mouse, weasel, ferret, stoat, sheep, rabbit, Pacific rat, Norway rat, ship rat, pig, and brushtail possum). This technique utilizes species-specific primers that, combined in a multiplex PCR, target small fragments of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Each species, except hedgehog, produces two distinctive species-specific fragments, making the assay self-confirmatory and enabling the identification of multiple species simultaneously in DNA mixtures. The multiplex assay detects as little as 100 copies of mitochondrial DNA, which makes it a very reliable tool for degraded and trace samples. Reliability, accuracy, reproducibility, and sensitivity tests to validate the technique were performed. The technique featured here enabled a prompt response in a predation specific event, but can also be useful for wildlife management and conservation, pest incursions detection, forensic, and industrial purposes in a very simple and cost-effective manner.

  14. Identification of four squid species by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Feng, Junli; Liu, Shasha; Zhang, Yanping; Jiang, Xiaona; Dai, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Squids are distributed worldwide, including many species of commercial importance, and they are often made into varieties of flavor foods. The rapid identification methods for squid species especially their processed products, however, have not been well developed. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) systems based on specific primers and TaqMan probes have been established for rapid and accurate identification of four common squid species (Ommastrephes bartramii, Dosidicus gigas, Illex argentinus, Todarodes pacificus) in Chinese domestic market. After analyzing mitochondrial genes reported in GenBank, the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene was selected for O. bartramii detection, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for D. gigas and T. Pacificus detection, ATPase subunit 6 (ATPase 6) gene for I. Argentinus detection, and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S rDNA) gene for designing Ommastrephidae-specific primers and probe. As a result, all the TaqMan systems are of good performance, and efficiency of each reaction was calculated by making standard curves. This method could detect target species either in single or mixed squid specimen, and it was applied to identify 12 squid processed products successfully. Thus, it would play an important role in fulfilling labeling regulations and squid fishery control. PMID:26772407

  15. Identification of goose, mule duck, chicken, turkey, and swine in foie gras by species-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Miguel A; García, Teresa; González, Isabel; Asensio, Luis; Mayoral, Belén; López-Calleja, Inés; Hernández, Pablo E; Martín, Rosario

    2003-03-12

    A specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) has been developed for the identification of goose (Anser anser), mule duck (Anas platyrhynchos x Cairina moschata), chicken (Gallus gallus), turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), and swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) in foie gras. A forward common primer was designed on a conserved DNA sequence in the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA), and reverse primers were designed to hybridize on species-specific DNA sequences of each species considered. The different sizes of the species-specific amplicons, separated by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed clear identification of goose, mule duck, chicken, turkey, and swine in foie gras. Analysis of experimental mixtures demonstrated that the detection limit of the assay was approximately 1% for each species analyzed. This genetic marker can be very useful for the accurate identification of these species, avoiding mislabeling or fraudulent species substitution in foie gras.

  16. Biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for all species and subspecies of Australian bird

    OpenAIRE

    Garnett, Stephen T.; Duursma, Daisy E.; Ehmke, Glenn; Guay, Patrick-Jean; Stewart, Alistair; Szabo, Judit K.; Weston, Michael A; Bennett, Simon; Crowley, Gabriel M.; Drynan, David; Dutson, Guy; Fitzherbert, Kate; Donald C Franklin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a dataset of biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for every species and subspecies of Australian bird, 2056 taxa or populations in total. Version 1 contains 230 fields grouped under the following headings: Taxonomy & nomenclature, Phylogeny, Australian population status, Conservation status, Legal status, Distribution, Morphology, Habitat, Food, Behaviour, Breeding, Mobility and Climate metrics. It is envisaged that the dataset will be updated periodically w...

  17. Climate warming increases biological control agent impact on a non-target species

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xinmin; Siemann, Evan; He, Minyan; Wei, Hui; Shao, Xu; Ding, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Climate change may shift interactions of invasive plants, herbivorous insects and native plants, potentially affecting biological control efficacy and non-target effects on native species. Here, we show how climate warming affects impacts of a multivoltine introduced biocontrol beetle on the non-target native plant Alternanthera sessilis in China. In field surveys across a latitudinal gradient covering their full distributions, we found beetle damage on A. sessilis increased with rising tempe...

  18. Portuguese Thymbra and Thymus species volatiles: chemical composition and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, A C; Barroso, J G; Pedro, L G; Salgueiro, L; Miguel, M G; Faleiro, M L

    2008-01-01

    Thymbra capitata and Thymus species are commonly known in Portugal as thyme and they are currently used as culinary herbs, as well as for ornamental, aromatizing and traditional medicinal purposes. The present work reports on the state of the art on the information available on the taxonomy, ethnobotany, cell and molecular biology of the Portuguese representatives of these genera and on the chemotaxonomy and antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of their essential oils and other volatile-containing extracts. PMID:19075695

  19. New records of Protura (Entognatha, Arthropoda) from Romania, with an identification key to the Romanian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrubovych, Julia; Fiera, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Romanian Protura were studied based on 175 specimens collected from Romania, along with bibliographic data. The main publication on the Romanian proturans was written by M.A. Ionescu (1951), who described 13 species mainly from soil and forest litter from 15 collecting points. The current paper represents the first study at a national level. Faunal data on Protura were obtained from 22 sites, mostly from forests of the Romanian Carpathians and also from a peri-urban area of Bucharest, which had not been studied before. As a result, the Romanian Protura fauna now consists of 27 known taxa in 6 genera and 4 families. Of the 27 taxa, 15 species are new records for Romanian fauna. An identification key to the Romanian Protura species is provided.

  20. [Biology of Tetranychus mexicanus (McGregor) (Acari: Tetranychidae) on three species of Annonaceae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Josilene M; Gondim, Manoel G C; Lofego, Antônio C

    2010-01-01

    The mite Tetranychus mexicanus (McGregor) is considered a pest of a variety of plant species in the Americas. Although this mite apparently causes economic damage to Annonaceae, little is known about its biology. Here we studied the biology of T. mexicanus on soursop (Annona muricata), sweetsop (Annona squamosa) and araticum (Annona coriaceae). The first two species are the most important economical Annonaceae species in northeast Brazil; araticum is commonly found in the region, but not commercially explored. The mites were collected in the field from leaves of A. muricata and maintained in the laboratory for six months on detached leaves of A. muricata, A. squamosa and A. coriaceae, respectively, before observations started. Tetranychus mexicanus developed more slowly on A. squamosa than on the two other hosts, but oviposition was considerably lower on A. coriaceae. As indicated by the calculated life table parameters, biotic potential was higher on A. muricata than on the other hosts. Despite the observed differences in the T. mexicanus biology on the different evaluated hosts, development and reproduction were satisfactory in all of the hosts used.

  1. Integrated quantification and identification of aldehydes and ketones in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, David; Meinema, Anne C; Permentier, Hjalmar; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-05-20

    The identification of unknown compounds remains to be a bottleneck of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics screening experiments. Here, we present a novel approach which facilitates the identification and quantification of analytes containing aldehyde and ketone groups in biological samples by adding chemical information to MS data. Our strategy is based on rapid autosampler-in-needle-derivatization with p-toluenesulfonylhydrazine (TSH). The resulting TSH-hydrazones are separated by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) and detected by electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight (ESI-QqTOF) mass spectrometry using a SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical Fragment-Ion Spectra) data-independent high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) approach. Derivatization makes small, poorly ionizable or retained analytes amenable to reversed phase chromatography and electrospray ionization in both polarities. Negatively charged TSH-hydrazone ions furthermore show a simple and predictable fragmentation pattern upon collision induced dissociation, which enables the chemo-selective screening for unknown aldehydes and ketones via a signature fragment ion (m/z 155.0172). By means of SWATH, targeted and nontargeted application scenarios of the suggested derivatization route are enabled in the frame of a single UHPLC-ESI-QqTOF-HR-MS workflow. The method's ability to simultaneously quantify and identify molecules containing aldehyde and ketone groups is demonstrated using 61 target analytes from various compound classes and a (13)C labeled yeast matrix. The identification of unknowns in biological samples is detailed using the example of indole-3-acetaldehyde. PMID:24745975

  2. Clinical Identification of Common Species of Dermatophytes by PCR and PCR-RFLP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁娟; 李家文; 刘志香; 谭志建

    2004-01-01

    To find a fast and efficient way of identifying seven common dermatophytes in clinical practice, we used the techniques of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) targeting Topoisomerase Ⅱ gene. The DNA of 7 dermatophytes, along with Candida albicans, Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus flavus were amplified by consensus primer dPsD1. They were then subjected to a second PCR with primers dPsD2 and species-specific primers PsT and PsME separately. 6 of the products generated by dPsD2 were digested with restriction enzyme Hinc Ⅱ. DNA fragments of 3390 bp and 2380 bp was amplified by using consensus primer dPsD1 and dPsD2 from the genomic DNA of each dermatophyte species separately. By combining the results of the two species-specific primer sets (PsT and PsME), all species of dermatophyte yielded unique sizes-set of PCR products expect for T. mentagrophytes and T. tonsurans.From the restriction profiles of Hinc Ⅱ , 6 of the 7 dermatophytoses were diagnosed to species level including T. mentagrophytes and T. tonsurans. By combining the results of the PCR and PCRRFLP, the 7 common dermatophytes can be identified to species level. It is conclude that the multiplex PCR and PCR-RFLP identification targeting the DNA topoisomerase Ⅱ gene is rapid and efficient.

  3. Assessing DNA barcoding as a tool for species identification and data quality control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yi Shen

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number of sequences of diverse species submitted to GenBank has grown explosively and not infrequently the data contain errors. This problem is extensively recognized but not for invalid or incorrectly identified species, sample mixed-up, and contamination. DNA barcoding is a powerful tool for identifying and confirming species and one very important application involves forensics. In this study, we use DNA barcoding to detect erroneous sequences in GenBank by evaluating deep intraspecific and shallow interspecific divergences to discover possible taxonomic problems and other sources of error. We use the mitochondrial DNA gene encoding cytochrome b (Cytb from turtles to test the utility of barcoding for pinpointing potential errors. This gene is widely used in phylogenetic studies of the speciose group. Intraspecific variation is usually less than 2.0% and in most cases it is less than 1.0%. In comparison, most species differ by more than 10.0% in our dataset. Overlapping intra- and interspecific percentages of variation mainly involve problematic identifications of species and outdated taxonomies. Further, we detect identical problems in Cytb from Insectivora and Chiroptera. Upon applying this strategy to 47,524 mammalian CoxI sequences, we resolve a suite of potentially problematic sequences. Our study reveals that erroneous sequences are not rare in GenBank and that the DNA barcoding can serve to confirm sequencing accuracy and discover problems such as misidentified species, inaccurate taxonomies, contamination, and potential errors in sequencing.

  4. Culture-based identification of pigmented Porphyromonas and Prevotella species in primary endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Anuradha; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; Somannavar, Pradeep D; Ingalagi, Preeti; Bhat, Kishore

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most common species isolated from primary endodontic infections are black-pigmented bacteria. These species are implicated in apical abscess formation due to their proteolytic activity and are fastidious in nature. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the presence and identification of various pigmented Porphyromonas and Prevotella species in the infected root canal through culture-based techniques. Methods. Thirty-one patients with primary endodontic infections were selected. Using sterile paper points, samples were collected from the root canals after access opening and prior to obturation, which were cultured using blood and kanamycin blood agar. Subsequently, biochemical test was used to identify the species and the results were analyzed using percentage comparison analysis, McNemar and chi-squared tests, Wilcoxon match pair test and paired t-test. Results. Out of 31 samples 26 were positive for black-pigmented organisms; the predominantly isolated species were Prevotella followed by Porphyromonas. In Porphyromonas only P. gingivalis was isolated. One of the interesting features was isolation of P. gingivalis through culture, which is otherwise very difficult to isolate through culture. Conclusion . The presence of Prevotella and Porphyromonas species suggests that a significant role is played by these organisms in the pathogenesis of endodontic infections. PMID:27651878

  5. The effect of recording and analysis bandwidth on acoustic identification of delphinid species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Julie N.; Rankin, Shannon; Barlow, Jay

    2004-11-01

    Because many cetacean species produce characteristic calls that propagate well under water, acoustic techniques can be used to detect and identify them. The ability to identify cetaceans to species using acoustic methods varies and may be affected by recording and analysis bandwidth. To examine the effect of bandwidth on species identification, whistles were recorded from four delphinid species (Delphinus delphis, Stenella attenuata, S. coeruleoalba, and S. longirostris) in the eastern tropical Pacific ocean. Four spectrograms, each with a different upper frequency limit (20, 24, 30, and 40 kHz), were created for each whistle (n=484). Eight variables (beginning, ending, minimum, and maximum frequency; duration; number of inflection points; number of steps; and presence/absence of harmonics) were measured from the fundamental frequency of each whistle. The whistle repertoires of all four species contained fundamental frequencies extending above 20 kHz. Overall correct classification using discriminant function analysis ranged from 30% for the 20-kHz upper frequency limit data to 37% for the 40-kHz upper frequency limit data. For the four species included in this study, an upper bandwidth limit of at least 24 kHz is required for an accurate representation of fundamental whistle contours..

  6. The Relation between Biological Consequences and Temperature on Some Non-Mammalian Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of reports on the effects of temperature is still increasing because of the temperature is one of the most encountered stressful factors in the environment, thus it deemed important to survey the literatures for effects of temperature on the biological consequences. The objective of this review was to establish the thermoregulatory response and adaptation of some non-mammalian species during temperature. Although, there was relative scarcity of information on the relation between oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes during temperature, this review great interest to elicit this relation in non-mammalian species. Here, this review suggests that, the increase in the oxidative stress due to temperature may be a reason for such decrease and exhaustion of antioxidant enzymes and a sequence of cellular injury or death, because of increased endogenous production of the free radicals. However, there was exception in this hypothesis because this argument is still ambiguous because of the difficulties of the direct observation of the active oxygen species in the biological systems due to their short lifetime. Taken together, because of one of the most important functions of heat shock protein is to protect the organisms from the deleterious effects of temperature, thus, it can be hypothesized that the formation of heat shock protein and antioxidant enzymes may be related to the changes in the levels of free radicals in non-mammalian species during temperature.

  7. The Influence of the Academic Conservation Biology Literature on Endangered Species Recovery Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Hudgens

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the volume of the academic conservation biology literature, there is little evidence as to what effect this work is having on endangered species recovery efforts. Using data collected from a national review of 136 endangered and threatened species recovery plans, we evaluated whether recovery plans were changing in response to publication trends in four areas of the academic conservation biology literature: metapopulation dynamics, population viability analysis, conservation corridors, and conservation genetics. We detected several changes in recovery plans in apparent response to publication trends in these areas (e.g., the number of tasks designed to promote the recovery of an endangered species shifted, although these tasks were rarely assigned a high priority. Our results indicate that, although the content of endangered species recovery plans changes in response to the literature, results are not uniform across all topics. We suggest that academic conservation biologists need to address the relative importance of each topic for conservation practice in different settings. [See Erratum

  8. Comparative identification of Candida species isolated from animals using phenotypic and PCR-RFLP methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadăş George Cosmin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify 58 Candida sp. strains isolated from animals using the Chromatic Candida test, the API 20 C AUX system, and polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. The Chromatic Candida test was able to identify only C. albicans and C. krusei. The API 20 C AUX system and PCR-RFLP had similar specificity for the identification of Candida strains. In case of both methods, Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species - 22 (37.93% strains, followed by Candida krusei - 17 (29.31% strains, Candida famata - 10 (17.24% strains, Candida parapsilosis - five (8.62% strains, and Candida kefyr - four (6.89% strains. PCR-RFLP represents a reliable, quick and relatively inexpensive genotyping method, recommended for rapid identification of Candida spp.

  9. Chemical constituents and biological activities of species of Justicia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geone M. Corrêa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Acanthaceae family is an important source of therapeutic drugs, and the ethnopharmacological knowledge of this family requires urgent documentation as several of its species are near extinction. Justicia is the largest genus of Acanthaceae, with approximately 600 species. The present work provides a review addressing the chemistry and pharmacology of the genus Justicia. In addition, the biological activities of compounds isolated from the genus are also covered. The chemical and pharmacological information in the present work may inspire new biomedical applications for the species of Justicia, considering atom economy, the synthesis of environmentally benign products without producing toxic by-products, the use of renewable sources of raw materials, and the search for processes with maximal efficiency of energy.

  10. Identification of Meloidogyne species associated with upland ornamentals plants in Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefany Solano-González

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify nematodes species of the genus Meloidogyne associated with upland ornamental plants. We sampled ten ornamental species in a commercial nursery in San Isidro, Heredia, Costa Rica between 2011-2012. Morphometric measurements of the stylet length, the tail length, and the hyaline region of J2s, as well as perineal patterns of egg-carrying females were used for identification, Genomic DNA was extracted from single J2s and molecular analyses were performed by amplifying the intergenic region between cytochrome oxidase subunit II of the COII and the long subunit of the ARN ribosomal genes by PCR-RFLP. Combining these methods allowed identification of five species of nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne (M. arenaria, M. hapla, M. hispanica, M. incognita and M. javanica, and new restriction enzyme patterns were reported for M. hapla and M. javanica using AluI. Additionally, a preliminary report of M. hispanica was described by sequencing the 28S and 18S regions.

  11. Development of species-specific primers for rapid identification of Debaryomyces hansenii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Gil de Prado, Elena; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2015-01-16

    In this work, we developed a specific PCR assay for Debaryomyces hansenii strains that uses a putative homologous PAD1 region (729 bp) present in this yeast species as a target. The amplification of this sequence with the D. hansenii specific primer pair (DhPADF/DhPADR) was found to be a rapid, specific and an affordable method enabling identification of D. hansenii from other yeast strains. Primers were tested in almost 100 strains, 49 strains from Type Culture Collection belonging to the genus Debaryomyces and to other yeast species commonly found in foods or related genera. These primers were able to discriminate between closely related species of Debaryomyces, such as Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces subglobosus, with a 100% detection rate for D. hansenii. Also, the method was tested in 45 strains from different foods. Results confirmed the specificity of the PCR method and detected two earlier misidentifications of D. hansenii strains obtained by RFLP analysis of the 5.8S ITS rDNA region. Subsequently we confirmed by sequencing the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA that these strains belonged to D. fabryi. We call attention in this work to the fact that the RFLPs of the 5.8S ITS rDNA profiles of D. hansenii, D. fabryi and D. subglobosus are the same and this technique will thus lead to incorrect identifications. PMID:25462930

  12. Identification of the biologically active liquid chemistry induced by a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Kristian; Williams, Paul; Dalluge, Joe; Gaens, Wouter Van; Aboubakr, Hamada; Bischof, John; von Woedtke, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Masur, Kai; Bruggeman, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of interaction of cold nonequilibrium plasma jets with mammalian cells in physiologic liquid is reported. The major biological active species produced by an argon RF plasma jet responsible for cell viability reduction are analyzed by experimental results obtained through physical, biological, and chemical diagnostics. This is complemented with chemical kinetics modeling of the plasma source to assess the dominant reactive gas phase species. Different plasma chemistries are obtained by changing the feed gas composition of the cold argon based RF plasma jet from argon, humidified argon (0.27%), to argon/oxygen (1%) and argon/air (1%) at constant power. A minimal consensus physiologic liquid was used, providing isotonic and isohydric conditions and nutrients but is devoid of scavengers or serum constituents. While argon and humidified argon plasma led to the creation of hydrogen peroxide dominated action on the mammalian cells, argon-oxygen and argon-air plasma created a very different biological action and was characterized by trace amounts of hydrogen peroxide only. In particular, for the argon-oxygen (1%), the authors observed a strong negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation and metabolism. This effect was distance dependent and showed a half life time of 30 min in a scavenger free physiologic buffer. Neither catalase and mannitol nor superoxide dismutase could rescue the cell proliferation rate. The strong distance dependency of the effect as well as the low water solubility rules out a major role for ozone and singlet oxygen but suggests a dominant role of atomic oxygen. Experimental results suggest that O reacts with chloride, yielding Cl2(-) or ClO(-). These chlorine species have a limited lifetime under physiologic conditions and therefore show a strong time dependent biological activity. The outcomes are compared with an argon MHz plasma jet (kinpen) to assess the differences between these (at least seemingly) similar plasma sources

  13. BAR expressolog identification: expression profile similarity ranking of homologous genes in plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rohan V; Nahal, Hardeep K; Breit, Robert; Provart, Nicholas J

    2012-09-01

    Large numbers of sequences are now readily available for many plant species, allowing easy identification of homologous genes. However, orthologous gene identification across multiple species is made difficult by evolutionary events such as whole-genome or segmental duplications. Several developmental atlases of gene expression have been produced in the past couple of years, and it may be possible to use these transcript abundance data to refine ortholog predictions. In this study, clusters of homologous genes between seven plant species - Arabidopsis, soybean, Medicago truncatula, poplar, barley, maize and rice - were identified. Following this, a pipeline to rank homologs within gene clusters by both sequence and expression profile similarity was devised by determining equivalent tissues between species, with the best expression profile match being termed the 'expressolog'. Five electronic fluorescent pictograph (eFP) browsers were produced as part of this effort, to aid in visualization of gene expression data and to complement existing eFP browsers at the Bio-Array Resource (BAR). Within the eFP browser framework, these expression profile similarity rankings were incorporated into an Expressolog Tree Viewer to allow cross-species homolog browsing by both sequence and expression pattern similarity. Global analyses showed that orthologs with the highest sequence similarity do not necessarily exhibit the highest expression pattern similarity. Other orthologs may show different expression patterns, indicating that such genes may require re-annotation or more specific annotation. Ultimately, it is envisaged that this pipeline will aid in improvement of the functional annotation of genes and translational plant research.

  14. Identification of Malassezia species from pityriasis versicolor lesions with a new multiplex PCR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuran, Emre; Karaarslan, Aydın; Karasartova, Djursun; Turegun, Buse; Sahin, Fikret

    2014-02-01

    Despite the fact that a range of molecular methods have been developed as tools for the diagnosis of Malassezia species, there are several drawbacks associated with them, such as inefficiency of differentiating all the species, high cost, and questionable reproducibility. In addition, most of the molecular methods require cultivation to enhance sensitivity. Therefore, alternative methods eliminating cultivation and capable of identifying species with high accuracy and reliability are needed. Herein, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was especially developed for the detection of eleven Malassezia species. The multiplex PCR was standardized by incorporating a consensus forward primer, along with Malassezia species-specific reverse primers considering the sizes of the PCR products. In the method, the multiplex-PCR primer content is divided into three parts to circumvent the problem of increased nonspecific background resulting from the use of a large number of primers. DNA extraction protocol described by Harju and colleagues was modified using liquid nitrogen instead of -80 °C to break down the yeast membrane. By a modified extraction procedure followed by multiplex PCR and electrophoresis, the method enables identification and differentiation of Malassezia species from both of the samples obtained directly from skin and yeast colonies grown in culture. Fifty-five patients who were confirmed with pityriasis versicolor were enrolled in the study. Multiplex PCR detected and differentiated all 55 samples obtained directly from the patients' skin. However, 50 out of 55 samples yielded Malassezia colony in the culture. In addition, eight of 50 colonies were misdiagnosed or not completely differentiated by conventional methods based on the sequence analysis of eight colonies. The method is capable of identifying species with high accuracy and reliability. In addition, it is simple, quick, and cost-effective. More importantly, the method works

  15. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marol Serhat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. Methods A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar.

  16. DNA barcoding and development of species-specific markers for the identification of tea mosquito bugs (Miridae: Heteroptera) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebijith, K B; Asokan, R; Kumar, N K Krishna; Srikumar, K K; Ramamurthy, V V; Bhat, P Shivarama

    2012-10-01

    Rapid, accurate, and timely identification of insects as a group is important and challenging worldwide, as they outnumber all other animals in number and diversity. DNA barcoding is a method for the identification of species in a wide range of animal taxa, which uses the 5' region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase-I (CO-I). Yet another easy, accurate, and economical method of species discrimination is by developing species-specific markers, which produce specific amplicon for the species in question. The method is handy because it is not limited by life stages, sex, polymorphism, and other factors. Herein, we measured the usefulness of CO-I for the species discrimination of mirids in India viz. Helopeltis antonii Signoret, H. thievora Waterhouse, H. bradyi Waterhouse, and Pachypeltis maesarum Kirkaldy in their various life stages. Furthermore, our study showed the utility of species-specific markers in differentiating H. antonii (295) and H. bradyi (514) regardless of their life stages. Analysis of CO-I gene revealed <1% intraspecific divergence for all four species examined, whereas the interspecific distances ranged from 7 to 13%. This study showed that the DNA barcode and species-specific markers will aid the identification of mirids in India and will stand as a decisive tool in formulating integrated pest management (IPM) strategy, quick identification of invasive and cryptic species, haplotypes, biotypes, and other factors, if any. PMID:23068182

  17. Morphological identification and COI barcodes of adult flies help determine species identities of chironomid larvae (Diptera, Chironomidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Establishing reliable methods for the identification of benthic chironomid communities is important due to their significant contribution to biomass, ecology and the aquatic food web. Immature larval specimens are more difficult to identify to species level by traditional morphological methods than their fully developed adult counterparts, and few keys are available to identify the larval species. In order to develop molecular criteria to identify species of chironomid larvae, larval and adult chironomids from Western Lake Erie were subjected to both molecular and morphological taxonomic analysis. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) barcode sequences of 33 adults that were identified to species level by morphological methods were grouped with COI sequences of 189 larvae in a neighbor-joining taxon-ID tree. Most of these larvae could be identified only to genus level by morphological taxonomy (only 22 of the 189 sequenced larvae could be identified to species level). The taxon-ID tree of larval sequences had 45 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, defined as clusters with >97% identity or individual sequences differing from nearest neighbors by >3%; supported by analysis of all larval pairwise differences), of which seven could be identified to species or ‘species group’ level by larval morphology. Reference sequences from the GenBank and BOLD databases assigned six larval OTUs with presumptive species level identifications and confirmed one previously assigned species level identification. Sequences from morphologically identified adults in the present study grouped with and further classified the identity of 13 larval OTUs. The use of morphological identification and subsequent DNA barcoding of adult chironomids proved to be beneficial in revealing possible species level identifications of larval specimens. Sequence data from this study also contribute to currently inadequate public databases relevant to the Great Lakes region, while the neighbor

  18. Morphological identification and COI barcodes of adult flies help determine species identities of chironomid larvae (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, A J; Vasquez, A A; Hudson, P; Fujimoto, M; Ram, J L

    2016-02-01

    Establishing reliable methods for the identification of benthic chironomid communities is important due to their significant contribution to biomass, ecology and the aquatic food web. Immature larval specimens are more difficult to identify to species level by traditional morphological methods than their fully developed adult counterparts, and few keys are available to identify the larval species. In order to develop molecular criteria to identify species of chironomid larvae, larval and adult chironomids from Western Lake Erie were subjected to both molecular and morphological taxonomic analysis. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) barcode sequences of 33 adults that were identified to species level by morphological methods were grouped with COI sequences of 189 larvae in a neighbor-joining taxon-ID tree. Most of these larvae could be identified only to genus level by morphological taxonomy (only 22 of the 189 sequenced larvae could be identified to species level). The taxon-ID tree of larval sequences had 45 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, defined as clusters with >97% identity or individual sequences differing from nearest neighbors by >3%; supported by analysis of all larval pairwise differences), of which seven could be identified to species or 'species group' level by larval morphology. Reference sequences from the GenBank and BOLD databases assigned six larval OTUs with presumptive species level identifications and confirmed one previously assigned species level identification. Sequences from morphologically identified adults in the present study grouped with and further classified the identity of 13 larval OTUs. The use of morphological identification and subsequent DNA barcoding of adult chironomids proved to be beneficial in revealing possible species level identifications of larval specimens. Sequence data from this study also contribute to currently inadequate public databases relevant to the Great Lakes region, while the neighbor

  19. Development of species-specific primers for rapid identification of Debaryomyces hansenii

    OpenAIRE

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva María; Gil de Prado, Elena; Martínez Peinado, José; Siloniz Jiménez, María Isabel de

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we developed a specific PCR assay for Debaryomyces hansenii strains that uses a putative homologous PAD1 region (729 bp) present in this yeast species as a target. The amplification of this sequence with the D. hansenii specific primer pair (DhPADF/DhPADR) was found to be a rapid, specific and an affordable method enabling identification of D. hansenii from other yeast strains. Primers were tested in almost 100 strains, 49 strains from Type Culture Collection belonging to the ge...

  20. Satellite tracking of sympatric marine megafauna can inform the biological basis for species co-management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gredzens

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Systematic conservation planning is increasingly used to identify priority areas for protection in marine systems. However, ecosystem-based approaches typically use density estimates as surrogates for animal presence and spatial modeling to identify areas for protection and may not take into account daily or seasonal movements of animals. Additionally, sympatric and inter-related species are often managed separately, which may not be cost-effective. This study aims to demonstrate an evidence-based method to inform the biological basis for co-management of two sympatric species, dugongs and green sea turtles. This approach can then be used in conservation planning to delineate areas to maximize species protection. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: Fast-acquisition satellite telemetry was used to track eleven dugongs and ten green turtles at two geographically distinct foraging locations in Queensland, Australia to evaluate the inter- and intra-species spatial relationships and assess the efficacy of existing protection zones. Home-range analysis and bathymetric modeling were used to determine spatial use and compared with existing protection areas using GIS. Dugong and green turtle home-ranges significantly overlapped in both locations. However, both species used different core areas and differences existed between regions in depth zone use and home-range size, especially for dugongs. Both species used existing protection areas in Shoalwater Bay, but only a single tracked dugong used the existing protection area in Torres Strait. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Fast-acquisition satellite telemetry can provide evidence-based information on individual animal movements to delineate relationships between dugongs and green turtles in regions where they co-occur. This information can be used to increase the efficacy of conservation planning and complement more broadly based survey information. These species also use similar habitats, making complimentary co

  1. Species identification of Chinese medicinal plant Fallopia multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson by suppression subtraction hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chuan-Jin; Zhao, Shu-Jin; Shao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Fallopia multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson, a traditional Chinese medicinal plant, has been extensively used in preparations of herbal medicine, health products and personal hygiene products. However, the clinical safety and efficiency of F. multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson is impaired because of the existence of various adulterants. In this study, genomic DNA (gDNA) suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) was used to authenticate F. multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson from its adulterants. First, differential gDNA fragments between F. multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson and its most closely related species F. multiflora var. ciliinervis (Nakai) Yonek. & H. Ohashi by SSH were identified. The differential fragments were then hybridized with arrays constructed from multiple whole genomes of several species (adulterants and/or closely related plants) to screen for the unique gDNA fragments representing F. multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson. The unique gDNA fragments could be used to design species-specific primers for the identification of F. multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson. Using SSH, we obtained four differential gDNA fragments, and four pairs of primers were designed. The designed primers could differentiate F. multiflora (Thunb.) Haraldson from its adulterants and/or closely related species via PCR. The results confirmed that the SSH is an efficient method for screening and designing species-specific primers. PMID:23633031

  2. Toxicity and symptomatic identification of species involved in snakebites in the Indian subcontinent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites, being the major occupational hazard for farm workers, claim a large number of lives in the Indian subcontinent. During the course of medical management, identification of the biting species is given a low priority, resorting to prescription of polyvalent anti-snake venom. Whereas the World Health Organization (WHO recommends monospecific anti-snake venom instead of polyvalent anti-snake venom. Thus, it is essential to identify the aggressor species either by a visual inspection or by the symptoms of the victim. Along with the four deadly venomous species (cobra, krait, Russell's viper, and saw-scaled viper, there are a number of other species of medical importance, whose venoms and bites have not been paid much attention. Thus, a misclassification resulting into erroneous treatment cannot be ruled out. This paper discusses the nature, constitution, and toxicity of venoms and their possible toxic effects on victims of snakebites. An attempt has also been made to categorize the distinctive symptoms due to the bites of the four major venomous species and their severity grading.

  3. Development of a monoclonal antibody detection assay for species-specific identification of abalone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, Andreas L; Luijx, Thomas; Fenemore, Bartha; Sweijd, Neville A; Cook, Peter A

    2002-10-01

    Species identification based on biochemical and molecular techniques has a broad range of applications. These include compliance enforcement, the management and conservation of marine organisms, and commercial quality control. Abalone poaching worldwide and illegal trade in abalone products have increased mainly because of the attractive prices obtained and caused a sharp decline in stocks. Alleged poachers have been acquitted because of lack of evidence to correctly identify species. Therefore, a robust method is required that would identify tissue of abalone origin to species level. The aim of this study was to develop immunologic techniques, using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, to identify 10 different abalone species and subspecies from South Africa, the United States, Australia, and Japan. The combination of 3 developed monoclonal antibodies to South African abalone (Haliotis midae) enabled differentiation between most of the 10 species including the subspecies H. diversicolor supertexta and H. diversicolor diversicolor. In a novel approach, using antibodies of patients with allergy to abalone, the differentiation of additional subspecies, H. discus discus and H. discus hannai, was possible. A field-based immunoassay was developed to identify confiscated tissue of abalone origin. PMID:14961238

  4. Testing the potential of proposed DNA barcodes for species identification of Zingiberaceae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin- Chun SHI; Yu-Lin LIN; Cai-Xiang XIE; Zhong-Zhi QIAN; Shi-Lin CHEN; Jin ZHANG; Jian-Ping HAN; Jing-Yuan SONG; Hui YAO; Ying-Jie ZHU; Jia-Chun LI; Zhen-Zhong WANG; Wei XIAO

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) recommended the combination of rbcL and matK as the plant barcode based on assessments of recoverability, sequencing quality, and levels of species discrimination. Subsequently, based on a study of more than 6600 samples belonging to 193 families from seven phyla, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 2 locus was proposed as a universal barcode sequence for all major plant taxa used in traditional herbal medicine. Neither of these two studies was based on a detailed analysis of a particular family. Here, Zingiberaceae plants, including many closely related species, were used to compare the genetic divergence and species identification efficiency of ITS2, rbcL, matK, psbK-psbI, trnH-psbA, and rpoB.The results indicate that ITS2 has the highest interspecific divergence and significant differences between inter- and intraspecific divergence, whereas matK and rbcL have much lower divergence values. Among 260 species belongingto 30 genera in Zingiberaceae, the discrimination ability of the ITS2 locus was 99.5% at the genus level and 73.1% at the species level. Thus, we propose that ITS2 is the preferred DNA barcode sequence for identifying Zingiberaceae plants.

  5. Species identification of Crassostrea and Ostrea oysters by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 5S rRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Ismael; Rebordinos, Laureana; Diaz, Edgardo

    2006-01-01

    A specific multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the identification of Crassostrea angulata, C. gigas, Ostrea edulis, and O. stentina oyster species. Universal primers were used for the amplification of complete repetition units of 5S rDNA in each of the 4 species. The alignment of the obtained sequences was the basis for the specific design of species-specific primers (ED1, ED2, ST1, ST2, CR1, and CR2) located in the nontranscribed spacer regions. The different sizes of the species-specific amplicons, separated by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed identification of Crassostrea and Ostrea species. A multiplex PCR with a set of the 6 designed primers showed that they did not interfere with each other and bound specifically to the DNA target. This genetic marker can be very useful for traceability of the species, application in the management of oyster cultures, and conservation of the genetic resources of the species. PMID:16512239

  6. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  7. Combination of ARDRA and RAPD genotyping techniques in identification of Acinetobacter spp. genomic species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong ZHANG; Yuqing CHEN; Yingchun TANG; Kouxing ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    A total of 10 non-repetitive multi-drug-resist-ant Acinetobacter strains were collected. With reference to A. calcoaceticus (ATCC23055), A. baumannii (ATCC19606), A. lwoffii (ATCC17986), and A. junii (NCTC5866), DNA fingerprint technique, amplified ribo-somal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), and random amplified polymorphism DNA (RAPD) were carried out to identify the genomic species of Acinetobacter spp. The distances between them were calculated by the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic (UPGMA). Genotypes ofAcinetobacter spp. were effectively classified and an A. junii together with nine A. baumannii isolates was genomically identified. The combination of ARDRA and RAPD DNA-fingerprint technique shows high com-plementarity, and could be a useful tool in Acinetobacter genomic species identification.

  8. Molecular identification of Aspergillus and Eurotium species isolated from rice and their toxin-producing ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, D; Zainal Abidin, M A; Tan, Y H; Kamaruzaman, S

    2011-01-01

    Thirty milled rice samples were collected from retailers in 4 provinces of Malaysia. These samples were evaluated for Aspergillus spp. infection by direct plating on malt extract salt agar (MESA). All Aspergillus holomorphs were isolated and identified using nucleotide sequences of ITS 1 and ITS 2 of rDNA. Five anamorphs (Aspergillus flavus, A. oryzae, A. tamarii, A. fumigatus and A. niger) and 5 teleomorphs (Eurotium rubrum, E. amstelodami, E. chevalieri, E. cristatum and E. tonophilum) were identified. The PCR-sequencing based technique for sequences of ITS 1 and ITS 2 is a fast technique for identification of Aspergillus and Eurotium species, although it doesn't work flawlessly for differentiation of Eurotium species. All Aspergillus and Eurotium isolates were screened for their ability to produce aflatoxin and ochratoxin A (OTA) by HPLC and TLC techniques. Only A. flavus isolate UPM 89 was able to produce aflatoxins B1 and B2. PMID:22168015

  9. An algorithm and program for finding sequence specific oligo-nucleotide probes for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tautz Diethard

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of species or species groups with specific oligo-nucleotides as molecular signatures is becoming increasingly popular for bacterial samples. However, it shows also great promise for other small organisms that are taxonomically difficult to tract. Results We have devised here an algorithm that aims to find the optimal probes for any given set of sequences. The program requires only a crude alignment of these sequences as input and is optimized for performance to deal also with very large datasets. The algorithm is designed such that the position of mismatches in the probes influences the selection and makes provision of single nucleotide outloops. Program implementations are available for Linux and Windows.

  10. Species composition,distribution patterns and ecological functions of biological soil crusts in the Gurbantunggut Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most important biological factors that maintain the stability of the largest fixed and semi-fixed desert in China,the Gurbantunggut Desert,the biological soil crusts (BSCs) develop well and play critical ecological roles in the desert ecosystem. In this paper,we briefly summarize our research findings since 2002 including species composition,distribution pattern and ecological functions of BSCs in the desert. Our results indicate abundant species diversity of BSCs in the Gurbantunggut Desert in comparison to other deserts in China. At the scales of sand dune or whole desert,the distribution patterns of BSCs are location-specific. The existence of BSCs in this desert could:(1) accelerate the formation of desert soil and the weathering of minerals; (2) accumulate organic matter in surface soil through related species in soil crusts; (3) enhance the abilities of sand surface to resist wind erosion; (4) influence seed germination of vascular plants; and (5) enhance the production of dew deposition on sandy soil surface.

  11. Assessment of Trichogramma species (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae for biological control in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Alvarenga Soares

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cassava is the sixth most important crop in the world, and it is attacked by many pests, such as Erinnyis ello (L. (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae. This lepidopteran pest has natural enemies that can efficiently control its population, such as Trichogramma spp. (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae. The objective of this research was to assess the flight capacity, parasitism and emergence of Trichogramma pretiosum, T. marandobai and T. demoraesi and to select the most efficient species among them for biological control programs. The flight capacity of these species was assessed in test units consisting of a plastic PVC cylinder with a rigid, transparent plastic circle on the upper portion of the cylinder and an extruded polystyrene disk to close the bottom of the cylinder. A tube was placed in each test unit containing a card with 300 Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae eggs that had been parasitised by Trichogramma. These cards were later assessed to determine the parasitism rate and adult emergence of these natural enemies. Trichogramma pretiosum presented the highest flight capacity (68 ± 5%, parasitism (74 ± 2% and percentage of adults emerged (91 ± 3% in the laboratory, making this species suitable for mass rearing and release in biological control programs.

  12. Comparative biology of decellularized lung matrix: Implications of species mismatch in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Jenna L; Gard, Ashley L; Gerhold, Kristin A; Wilcox, Elise C; Liu, Angela; Schwan, Jonas; Le, Andrew V; Baevova, Pavlina; Dimitrievska, Sashka; Zhao, Liping; Sundaram, Sumati; Sun, Huanxing; Rittié, Laure; Dyal, Rachel; Broekelmann, Tom J; Mecham, Robert P; Schwartz, Martin A; Niklason, Laura E; White, Eric S

    2016-09-01

    Lung engineering is a promising technology, relying on re-seeding of either human or xenographic decellularized matrices with patient-derived pulmonary cells. Little is known about the species-specificity of decellularization in various models of lung regeneration, or if species dependent cell-matrix interactions exist within these systems. Therefore decellularized scaffolds were produced from rat, pig, primate and human lungs, and assessed by measuring residual DNA, mechanical properties, and key matrix proteins (collagen, elastin, glycosaminoglycans). To study intrinsic matrix biologic cues, human endothelial cells were seeded onto acellular slices and analyzed for markers of cell health and inflammation. Despite similar levels of collagen after decellularization, human and primate lungs were stiffer, contained more elastin, and retained fewer glycosaminoglycans than pig or rat lung scaffolds. Human endothelial cells seeded onto human and primate lung tissue demonstrated less expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule and activation of nuclear factor-κB compared to those seeded onto rodent or porcine tissue. Adhesion of endothelial cells was markedly enhanced on human and primate tissues. Our work suggests that species-dependent biologic cues intrinsic to lung extracellular matrix could have profound effects on attempts at lung regeneration. PMID:27344365

  13. The Value of Molecular vs. Morphometric and Acoustic Information for Species Identification Using Sympatric Molossid Bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gager, Yann; Tarland, Emilia; Lieckfeldt, Dietmar; Ménage, Matthieu; Botero-Castro, Fidel; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Kraus, Robert H. S.; Ludwig, Arne; Dechmann, Dina K. N.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental condition for any work with free-ranging animals is correct species identification. However, in case of bats, information on local species assemblies is frequently limited especially in regions with high biodiversity such as the Neotropics. The bat genus Molossus is a typical example of this, with morphologically similar species often occurring in sympatry. We used a multi-method approach based on molecular, morphometric and acoustic information collected from 962 individuals of Molossus bondae, M. coibensis, and M. molossus captured in Panama. We distinguished M. bondae based on size and pelage coloration. We identified two robust species clusters composed of M. molossus and M. coibensis based on 18 microsatellite markers but also on a more stringently determined set of four markers. Phylogenetic reconstructions using the mitochondrial gene co1 (DNA barcode) were used to diagnose these microsatellite clusters as M. molossus and M. coibensis. To differentiate species, morphological information was only reliable when forearm length and body mass were combined in a linear discriminant function (95.9% correctly identified individuals). When looking in more detail at M. molossus and M. coibensis, only four out of 13 wing parameters were informative for species differentiation, with M. coibensis showing lower values for hand wing area and hand wing length and higher values for wing loading. Acoustic recordings after release required categorization of calls into types, yielding only two informative subsets: approach calls and two-toned search calls. Our data emphasizes the importance of combining morphological traits and independent genetic data to inform the best choice and combination of discriminatory information used in the field. Because parameters can vary geographically, the multi-method approach may need to be adjusted to local species assemblies and populations to be entirely informative. PMID:26943355

  14. Tree species traits influence soil physical, chemical, and biological properties in high elevation forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Ayres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that plants often have species-specific effects on soil properties. In high elevation forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains, North America, areas that are dominated by a single tree species are often adjacent to areas dominated by another tree species. Here, we assessed soil properties beneath adjacent stands of trembling aspen, lodgepole pine, and Engelmann spruce, which are dominant tree species in this region and are distributed widely in North America. We hypothesized that soil properties would differ among stands dominated by different tree species and expected that aspen stands would have higher soil temperatures due to their open structure, which, combined with higher quality litter, would result in increased soil respiration rates, nitrogen availability, and microbial biomass, and differences in soil faunal community composition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed soil physical, chemical, and biological properties at four sites where stands of aspen, pine, and spruce occurred in close proximity to one-another in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado. Leaf litter quality differed among the tree species, with the highest nitrogen (N concentration and lowest lignin:N in aspen litter. Nitrogen concentration was similar in pine and spruce litter, but lignin:N was highest in pine litter. Soil temperature and moisture were highest in aspen stands, which, in combination with higher litter quality, probably contributed to faster soil respiration rates from stands of aspen. Soil carbon and N content, ammonium concentration, and microbial biomass did not differ among tree species, but nitrate concentration was highest in aspen soil and lowest in spruce soil. In addition, soil fungal, bacterial, and nematode community composition and rotifer, collembolan, and mesostigmatid mite abundance differed among the tree species, while the total abundance of nematodes, tardigrades, oribatid mites, and prostigmatid

  15. Evaluation of the Yeast Traffic Light PNA FISH probes for identification of Candida species from positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leslie; Le Febre, Kara M; Deml, Sharon M; Wohlfiel, Sherri L; Wengenack, Nancy L

    2012-04-01

    The Yeast Traffic Light PNA FISH kit (YTL) correctly identified Candida spp. in 207/216 (96%) positive blood cultures. Discordant results were seen with known cross-reacting species and cultures containing Candida lambica and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The YTL provides rapid, reliable identification of the five common Candida species found in blood cultures.

  16. Evaluation of the usefulness of modified biological fingerprints in chest radiographs for patient recognition and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoichiro; Matsunobu, Yusuke; Morishita, Junji

    2016-07-01

    We have been developing an image-searching method to identify misfiled images in a PACS server. Developing new biological fingerprints (BFs) that would reduce the influence of differences in positioning and breathing phases to improve the performance of recognition is desirable. In our previous studies, the whole lung field (WLF) that included the shadows of the body and lungs was affected by differences in positioning and/or breathing phases. In this study, we showed the usefulness of a circumscribed lung with a rectangular region of interest and the upper half of a chest radiograph as modified BFs. We used 200 images as hypothetically misfiled images. The cross-correlation identifies the resemblance between the BFs in the misfiled images and the corresponding BFs in the database images. The modified BFs indicated better results than did WLF in a receiver operating characteristic analysis; therefore, they could be used as identifiers for patient recognition and identification. PMID:27132238

  17. Review-An overview of Pistacia integerrima a medicinal plant species: Ethnobotany, biological activities and phytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Yamin; Zia, Muhammad; Qayyum, Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Pistacia integerrima with a common name crab's claw is an ethnobotanically important tree native to Asia. Traditionally plant parts particularly its galls have been utilized for treatment of cough, asthma, dysentery, liver disorders and for snake bite. Plant mainly contains alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins and sterols in different parts including leaf, stem, bark, galls and fruit. A number of terpenoids, sterols and phenolic compounds have been isolated from Pistacia integerrima extracts. Plant has many biological activities including anti-microbial, antioxidant, analgesic, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity due to its chemical constituents. This review covers its traditional ethnomedicinal uses along with progresses in biological and phytochemical evaluation of this medicinally important plant species and aims to serve as foundation for further exploration and utilization. PMID:26004708

  18. Review-An overview of Pistacia integerrima a medicinal plant species: Ethnobotany, biological activities and phytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Yamin; Zia, Muhammad; Qayyum, Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Pistacia integerrima with a common name crab's claw is an ethnobotanically important tree native to Asia. Traditionally plant parts particularly its galls have been utilized for treatment of cough, asthma, dysentery, liver disorders and for snake bite. Plant mainly contains alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins and sterols in different parts including leaf, stem, bark, galls and fruit. A number of terpenoids, sterols and phenolic compounds have been isolated from Pistacia integerrima extracts. Plant has many biological activities including anti-microbial, antioxidant, analgesic, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity due to its chemical constituents. This review covers its traditional ethnomedicinal uses along with progresses in biological and phytochemical evaluation of this medicinally important plant species and aims to serve as foundation for further exploration and utilization.

  19. Identification of co-occurring Branchinecta fairy shrimp species from encysted embryos using multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, A.G.; Wood, D.A.; Simovich, M.; Bohonak, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Morphological identification of many fairy shrimp species is difficult because distinguishing characters are restricted to adults. We developed two multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays that differentiate among three Branchinecta fairy shrimp with distributional overlap in southern California vernal pools. Two of the species are federally listed as threatened. Molecular identification of Branchinecta from cysts allows for species surveys to be conducted during the dry season, expanding the timeframe for population assessment and providing a less intrusive method of sampling sensitive vernal pool habitats. ?? Published 2009. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Species identification and selection to develop agroforestry at Lake Toba Catchment Area (LTCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NURHENI WIJAYANTO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wijayanto N (2011 Species identification and selection to develop agroforestry at Lake Toba Catchment Area (LTCA. Biodiversitas 12: 52-58. In order to improve land productivity surrounding the LTCA, the existing ITTO project tries to establish agroforestry system. The system will be designed to meet consideration of both sides. on one side is to generate the people awareness of the forest and land rehabilitation, and on the other side is to support the poverty reduction. The aims of this research are: species identification and selection to develop agroforestry at LTCA. Data collecting was carried out with: interview, group discussion, field observation, divining manual study, and PRA. The diversity of the available crop kind shows the number of choices to be developed by the farmer. The farmers generally have the economic objective to develop agroforestry, including increase in net income, risk reduction, increase in environmental service, and the wealth and savings accumulation. Various types of agricultural crops, plantations and forest trees were found in LTCA. They can be the basis for building a wide variety of agroforestry systems.

  1. The reproductive biology of two epibenthic species of Antarctic notothenild fish of the genus Trematomus

    OpenAIRE

    La Mesa, M.; Caputo, V; Eastman, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Trematomus eulepidotus and T. loennbergii are two of the most common epibenthic fish in the waters of the High Antarctic continental shelf. Since the reproductive biology of these species has not been studied in the Ross Sea, we provide a macroscopic and histological analysis of the reproductive effort and gonadal development in both sexes. Most samples were collected during benthic trawl surveys in the south-western Ross Sea in the 1996 and 1997 summer seasons. The aim of the study was to de...

  2. Use of Wood Characters in the Identification of Selected Timber Species in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniyi Akanni JAYEOLA

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Ten popular timber species belonging to seven families in Nigeria were identified in the Herbarium. Wood samples of each species were studied anatomically in search of stable taxonomic micromorphological attributes. Characters of the treachery elements, in particular, the vessel; fibre and ray structure; intercellular canal and phloem parenchyma are diagnostic among the species. The invariable presence of non-septate fibres in Afzelia africana (Sm. and Milicia excelsa (Welsh. and C. C. Berg. delimits them from other woods which all posses septate fibres. Occurrence of tyloses in the metaxylem of Cordia millenii (Bak., Antiaris toxicaria(Lesch., Tectona grandis (L. F., Terminalia ivorensis (A. Chev. and Triplochiton scleroxylon (K. Schum. separates them from Anogeissus leiocarpus (Guill. and Perr., Khaya ivorensis (A. Chev. and Mansonia altissima (A. Chev.. A detailed study of the wood structure of the commercial Nigerian timber species may provide an invaluable tool for determination, identification of fragments and thereby assisting in promoting quality assurance as well as detecting adulteration in wood trade and detecting camouflage and substitution of CITES-listed trees.

  3. Clinical significance, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular identification of Nocardia species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrán, Ana; Villuendas, M Cruz; Rezusta, Antonio; Pereira, Javier; Revillo, M José; Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia is an opportunistic pathogen that causes respiratory infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiology, clinical significance and antimicrobial susceptibility of Nocardia species isolated from eight children with cystic fibrosis. The isolated species were identified as Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, Nocardia pneumoniae, Nocardia veterana and Nocardia wallacei. N. farcinica was isolated in three patients and all of them presented lung affectation with a chronic colonization and pneumonia. N. farcinica showed resistance against gentamicin, tobramycin, cefotaxime, but was susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and amikacin. N. transvalensis, which was isolated from two patients, showed an association with chronic colonization. N. transvalensis was resistant to tobramycin and amikacin, but susceptible to ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cefotaxime. N. veterana, N. pneumoniae and N. wallacei were isolated from three different patients and appeared in transitory lung colonization. N. veterana and N. pneumoniae were susceptible to imipenem, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, tobramycin, and cefotaxime. N. wallacei was resistant to amikacin, tobramycin, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and susceptible to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime. All the isolates were identified up to species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The presence of Nocardia in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis is not always an indication of an active infection; therefore, the need for a treatment should be evaluated on an individual basis. The detection of multidrug-resistant species needs molecular identification and susceptibility testing, and should be performed for all Nocardia infections. PMID:27155949

  4. Detection and identification of Rickettsia species in Ixodes tick populations from Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katargina, Olga; Geller, Julia; Ivanova, Anna; Värv, Kairi; Tefanova, Valentina; Vene, Sirkka; Lundkvist, Åke; Golovljova, Irina

    2015-09-01

    A total of 1640 ticks collected in different geographical parts of Estonia were screened for the presence of Rickettsia species DNA by real-time PCR. DNA of Rickettsia was detected in 83 out of 1640 questing ticks with an overall prevalence of 5.1%. The majority of the ticks infected by rickettsiae were Ixodes ricinus (74 of 83), while 9 of the 83 positive ticks were Ixodes persulcatus. For rickettsial species identification, a part of the citrate synthase gltA gene was sequenced. The majority of the positive samples were identified as Rickettsia helvetica (81 out of 83) and two of the samples were identified as Rickettsia monacensis and Candidatus R. tarasevichiae, respectively. Genetic characterization based on the partial gltA gene showed that the Estonian sequences within the R. helvetica, R. monacensis and Candidatus R. tarasevichiae species demonstrated 100% similarity with sequences deposited in GenBank, originating from Rickettsia species distributed over large territories from Europe to Asia.

  5. Molecular identification and population dynamics of two species of Pemphigus (Homoptera: Pemphidae) on cabbage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naiqi Chen; Tong-Xian Liu; Mamoudou Sétamou; J. Victor French; Eliezer S. Louzada

    2009-01-01

    The poplar petiole gall aphid, Pemphiguspopulitransversus Riley, has been one of the major pests on cruciferous vegetable in the Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of Texas since the late 1940s. It normally migrates from poplar trees to cruciferous vegetables in the fall, and migrates back to the trees in early spring of the coming year. Some root-feeding aphids were found on cruciferous vegetables in late spring and early summer in 1998 and the following years. Those aphids have been identified as Pemphigus obesinymphae Moran. This discovery completely changed the current knowledge about the root-feeding aphids on cruciferous vegetables in the LRGV. Due to their small size, morphological and feeding similarities between P. populitransversus and P. obesinymphae, their identification and distinction are difficult. In this study, random amplification ofpolymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) were used to distinguish these two species over a period of time when the two species occurred together, or separately, in cabbage fields. The two species occurred on cabbage at different times of the year, and overlapped from October to June. From May to October, both species migrated to their primary hosts. The apterous aphids found on cabbage in winter contained mainly P. obesinymphae, whereas in early spring more apterous P. populitransversus were recovered. The root-feeding aphids would feed on cabbage plants as long as this host was available even during the hot, dry summer in the LRGV, although their populations were generally low. Both RAPD and AFLP techniques were efficient in discriminating the two species that showed obviously genetic variability. These molecular techniques confirmed the existence of the two aphid species in apterous samples collected from the soil in cabbage fields in the LRGV, and the results performed by RAPD were confirmed by AFLP. Furthermore, the results suggest that RAPD technique was a better choice despite its

  6. Species identification of tephritids across a broad taxonomic range using ribosomal D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International trade and passenger travel are significant factors in the spread of economically important fruit fly species. The risk of accidental introduction via infested fruit is high, and in New Zealand the recent Medfly incursion in Auckland demonstrated the reality of this threat (Frampton, 2000). There are no economically important species of fruit fly established in New Zealand at present, but 31 are considered high risk in terms of their potential colonisation (refer to the Biosecurity (Notifiable Organisms) Amendment Order 1997). These are amongst a background of non-pest and low risk pest species that may also arrive in fruit from neighbouring countries or trading partners. Quarantine officials closely monitor fruit fly host material at the New Zealand borders (Frampton, 2000). In terms of the action to be taken should an infestation be discovered, there is significant benefit from being able to accurately identify species from the immature life stages, or at least to distinguish the high and low risk groups (Armstrong et al. 1997a). The need for this quarantine application was also highlighted by White (1996) at the previous fruit fly symposium in Sand Keys, Florida, where he summarised the advances made in larval taxonomy over the last decade. Despite this, morphological keys such as those of Steck et al. (1990) and White and Elson Harris (1992), are still only available for about a third of ca. 250 pest species. For those species, even so, identification is not easy and only possible for good quality late instar larvae; there are no morphological characters for early instars or eggs. Until recently in New Zealand, the identification of immature life stages depended entirely on rearing through to adults. This was time consuming and often unsuccessful (Armstrong et al. 1997b). A rapid molecular technique has since been described as a feasible alternative or supplementary quarantine tool (Armstrong et al. 1997a). The method is based on the polymerase

  7. Interaction of chemical species with biological regulation of the metabolism of essential trace elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, W. [Center of Life and Food Sciences, Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    Variations in the chemical speciation of dietary trace elements can result in the provision of different amounts of these micronutrients to the organism and might thus induce interactions with trace-element metabolism. The chemical species of Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn can interact with other components of the diet even before reaching the site of absorption, e.g. by formation of poorly soluble complexes with phytic acid. This might considerably modify the amount of metabolically available trace elements; differences between absorptive capacity per se toward dietary species seems to be less important. Homeostasis usually limits the quantities of Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn transported from the gut into the organism, and differences between dietary species are largely eliminated at this step. There is no homeostatic control of absorption of Se and I, and organisms seem to be passively exposed to influx of these micronutrients irrespective of dietary speciation. Inside the organism the trace elements are usually converted into a metabolically recognizable form, channeled into their biological functions, or submitted to homeostatically controlled excretion. Some dietary species can, however, be absorbed as intact compounds. As long as the respective quantities of trace elements are not released from their carriers, they are not recognized properly by trace element metabolism and might induce tissue accumulation, irrespective of homeostatic control. (orig.)

  8. Impacts of climate warming on hybrid zone movement: Geographically diffuse and biologically porous "species borders"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Mark Scriber

    2011-01-01

    The ecology and evolutionary biology of insect-plant associations has realized extensive attention, especially during the past 60 years. The classifications (categorical designations) of continuous variation in biodiversity, ranging from global patterns (e.g., latitudinal gradients in species richness/diversity and degree of herbivore feeding specialization) to localized insect-plant associations that span the biospectrum from polyphenisms,polymorphisms, biotypes, demes, host races, to cryptic species, remain academically contentious. Semantic and biosystematic (taxonomical) disagreements sometimes detract from more important ecological and evolutionary processes that drive diversification, the dynarnics of gene flow and local extinctions. This review addresses several aspects of insect specialization, host-associated divergence and ecological (including "hybrid") speciation,with special reference to the climate warming impacts on species borders of hybridizing swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae). Interspecific hybrid introgression may result in collapse of multi-species communities or increase species numbers via homoploid hybrid speeiation. We may see diverging, merging, or emerging genotypes across hybrid zones,all part of the ongoing processes of evolution. Molecular analyses of genetic mosaics and genomic dynamics with "divergence hitchhiking", combined with ecological, ethological and physiological studies of "species porosity", have already begun to unveil some answers for some important ecological/evolutionary questions. (i) How rapidly can host-associated divergence lead to new species (and why doesn't it always do so, e.g., resulting in "incomplete" speciation)? (ii) How might "speeiation genes" function, and how/where would we find them? (iii) Can oscillations from specialists to generalists and back to specialists help explain global diversity in herbivorous insects? (iv) How could recombinant interspecific hybridization lead to divergence and

  9. Identification of aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species of economic importance in Kenya using DNA barcodes and PCR-RFLP-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinyanjui, G; Khamis, F M; Mohamed, S; Ombura, L O; Warigia, M; Ekesi, S

    2016-02-01

    Aphids are among pests of economic importance throughout the world. Together with transmitting plant viruses, aphids are capable of inflicting severe crop production losses. They also excrete honeydew that favours the growth of sooty mold which reduces the quality of vegetables and fruits and hence their market values. Rapid and accurate identification of aphids to the species level is a critical component in effective pest management and plant quarantine systems. Even though morphological taxonomy has made a tremendous impact on species-level identifications, polymorphism, morphological plasticity and immature stages are among the many challenges to accurate identification. In addition, their small size, presence of cryptic species and damaged specimens dictate the need for a strategy that will ensure timely and accurate identification. In this study, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)-based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene and DNA barcoding were applied to identify different aphid species collected from different agro-ecological zones of Kenya. Three restriction enzymes RsaI, AluI and Hinf1 produced patterns that allowed unambiguous identification of the species except Aphis craccivora and Aphis fabae. Analyses of the barcode region indicated intraspecific and interspecific sequence divergences of 0.08 and 6.63%, respectively. DNA barcoding identified all species, including the morphologically indistinguishable A. craccivora and A. fabae and separated two subspecies of A. fabae. Based on these results, both PCR-RFLPs and DNA barcoding could provide quick and accurate tools for identification of aphid species within Aphididae subsequently aiding in effective pest management programmes and enhance plant quarantine systems. PMID:26490301

  10. Biology of Fopius arisanus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in Two Species of Fruit Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, M Z; Loeck, A E; Nörnberg, S D; Bernardi, D; Nava, D E

    2016-01-01

    Fopius arisanus (Sonan, 1932) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an egg-larval parasitoid used in control programs of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann). In Brazil, C. capitata and Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) are considered the main tephritid pests of exotic and indigenous fruits. The objective of this study was to study the biology of F. arisanus in C. capitata and A. fraterculus Eggs of the two fruit fly species were used to determine the parasitism rate, number of offspring, emergence rate, sex ratio, adult weight and longevity of male and female F. arisanus These biological parameters were used to develop a fertility life table. We observed higher parasitism and emergence rates of adults, a shorter duration of the egg-adult period and a sex ratio biased to females when F. arisanus was reared in eggs of C. capitata than in those of A. fraterculus However, adults of F. arisanus from eggs of A. fraterculus were heavier and had greater longevity than those obtained from C. capitata eggs. The fertility life table showed better biological and reproductive performance for F. arisanus reared in eggs of C. capitata, although eggs of A. fraterculus also provided positive values for population increase. PMID:27638954

  11. Little walking leaves from southeast Ecuador: biology and taxonomy of Typophyllum species (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae, Pterochrozinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Eight katydid species of the leaf-mimicking specialist genus Typophyllum were found in the southeast of Ecuador in an area comprising part of the eastern Andean cordillera and foothills toward the Cordillera del Cóndor in elevations between 850 and 3000 m. They are described along with the peculiar calling songs and other interesting aspects of their biology. Three of these species are new: T. morrisi sp. nov., T. onkiosternum sp. nov. and T. vignoni sp. nov. A fourth species represented by a single male is possibly new as well. In males and females of a species considered as identical with T. egregium Hebard 1924, which was previously known from a unique female specimen, was found a remarkable variation of coloration, in addition to the striking sexual dimorphism typical for the genus, with the females being twice as large as the small males. The latter is related to the curious mating behaviour, which is documented for this species and T. erosifolium Walker 1870. The two other species found in the region are T. bolivari Vignon 1925 and T. mortuifolium Walker 1870. The calling songs of four species were recorded. In T. erosifolium and T. morrisi sp. nov. the sounds are almost pure sine waves at the lower boundary of ultrasound. In T. egregium and T. onkiosternum sp. nov. the spectrum of the carrier frequency is broader, which might be related to lower and denser vegetation at higher elevation. Based on the intraspecific variety found in T. egregium and T. erosifolium, which includes variation in tegmina shape and venation pattern, are established several syonymies among Typophyllum species from western South America. T. erosifolium is found to be identical with T. peruvianum Pictet 1888 syn. nov. Additionally are considered identical T. inflatum Vignon 1925 and T. gibbosusm Vignon 1925 syn. nov., T. trigonum Vignon 1925 and T. quadriincisum Vignon 1925 syn. nov., and finally T. lacinipenne Enderlein 1917 and T. acutum Vignon 1925 syn. nov. and T. undulatum

  12. The Effective of Different Excitation Wavelengths on the Identification of Plant Species Based on Fluorescence LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Gong, Wei; Shi, Shuo; Du, Lin; Sun, Jia; Song, Shalei

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) served as an active technology has been widely used in many field, and it is closely related to excitation wavelength (EW). The objective of this investigation is to discuss the performance of different EWs of LIF LiDAR in identifying plant species. In this study, the 355, 460 and 556 nm lasers were utilized to excite the leaf fluorescence and the fluorescence spectra were measured by using the LIF LiDAR system built in the laboratory. Subsequently, the principal component analysis (PCA) with the help of support vector machine (SVM) was utilized to analyse fluorescence spectra. For the three EWs, the overall identification rates of the six plant species were 80 %, 83.3 % and 90 %. Experimental results demonstrated that 556 nm excitation light source is superior to 355 and 460 nm for the classification of the plant species for the same genus in this study. Thus, an appropriate excitation wavelength should be considered when the LIF LiDAR was utilized in the field of remote sensing based on the LIF technology.

  13. Identification of meat species by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Gonca; Velioglu, Hasan Murat; Sezer, Banu; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to identify meat species by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Elemental composition differences between meat species were used for meat identification. For this purpose, certain amounts of pork, beef and chicken were collected from different sources and prepared as pellet form for LIBS measurements. The obtained LIBS spectra were evaluated with some chemometric methods, and meat species were qualitatively discriminated with principal component analysis (PCA) method with 83.37% ratio. Pork-beef and chicken-beef meat mixtures were also analyzed with partial least square (PLS) method quantitatively. Determination coefficient (R(2)) and limit of detection (LOD) values were found as 0.994 and 4.4% for pork adulterated beef, and 0.999 and 2.0% for chicken adulterated beef, respectively. In the light of the findings, it was seen that LIBS can be a valuable tool for quality control measurements of meat as a routine method. PMID:27179147

  14. Crop species identification using machine vision of computer extracted individual leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo Neto, João; Meyer, George E.

    2005-11-01

    An unsupervised method for plant species identification was developed which uses computer extracted individual whole leaves from color images of crop canopies. Green canopies were isolated from soil/residue backgrounds using a modified Excess Green and Excess Red separation method. Connected components of isolated green regions of interest were changed into pixel fragments using the Gustafson-Kessel fuzzy clustering method. The fragments were reassembled as individual leaves using a genetic optimization algorithm and a fitness method. Pixels of whole leaves were then analyzed using the elliptic Fourier shape and Haralick's classical textural feature analyses. A binary template was constructed to represent each selected leaf region of interest. Elliptic Fourier descriptors were generated from a chain encoding of the leaf boundary. Leaf template orientation was corrected by rotating each extracted leaf to a standard horizontal position. This was done using information provided from the first harmonic set of coefficients. Textural features were computed from the grayscale co-occurrence matrix of the leaf pixel set. Standardized leaf orientation significantly improved the leaf textural venation results. Principle component analysis from SAS (R) was used to select the best Fourier descriptors and textural indices. Indices of local homogeneity, and entropy were found to contribute to improved classification rates. A SAS classification model was developed and correctly classified 83% of redroot pigweed, 100% of sunflower 83% of soybean, and 73% of velvetleaf species. An overall plant species correct classification rate of 86% was attained.

  15. Antigenic cross-reactivity and species-specific identification of Pseudocerastes persicus fieldi snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nihal M; El-Kady, Ebtsam M

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we recognized progressively high immunological cross-reactivity between Pseudocerastes persicus fieldi (Pf) venom and six other medically important Egyptian snake venoms belonging to families Viperidae and Elapidae. Antibodies with a range of bonding strengths were shown to be involved in such cross-reactivity. Two strategies have been tried to access specificity; (i) using affinity purified species-specific anti-Pf antivenom antibodies, (ii) conducting the assay in the presence of ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN). The discrimination power of the prepared species-specific antivenom was demonstrated by its ability to detect Pf venom over a range of Pf concentrations (2.5 ng-2.5 μg) in a variety of body fluids. The assay could distinguish circulating Pf antigens from other viper antigens in the whole blood of experimentally envenomed mice. What seems promising in our work is the use of the chaotrope, NH4SCN, which renders the reaction medium more favorable for the specific homologous antigen-antibody interactions, primarily via preventing lower avid antibodies to share and, to a bit lesser extent, by decreasing non-specific absorbance signals frequently encountered with ELISA assays. The ELISA described herein may be useful for clinicians for identification of snake bites inflicted by Pf snake species. Balancing between specificity and sensitivity has to be considered for best results. PMID:27319296

  16. A contribution to the identification of charcoal origin in Brazil II - Macroscopic characterization of Cerrado species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THAÍS A.P. GONÇALVES

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Cerrado is the richest savanna in the world. It is also one of the biomes more threatened in the country and a hotspot for conservation priorities. The main causes of deforestation in Cerrado are agricultural practices, livestock and charcoal production. Although charcoal has a minor impact, its consumption represents the deforestation of 16.000 Km² of the Cerrado. To contribute for the biomes's conservation it is very important to improve forestry supervision. Thus, in this work we present the macroscopic characterization of charcoal from 25 Cerrado's species. We simulate the real conditions of forest controllers by using the magnifications of 10x, 25x and 65x. Likewise, the charcoals micrographs are all of transverse sections due to the larger amount of anatomical information. We also analyzed texture, brightness, vitrification, ruptures and some special features. The species present several differences in their anatomical structure. Although some of them are very unique, this work does not intent to identify charcoals only by macroscopic analyses. But it might give directions to future identification of genera or species. It also provides knowledge for government agents to verify the documents of forestry origin by fast analyzing a sample of charcoal itself.

  17. A contribution to the identification of charcoal origin in Brazil II - Macroscopic characterization of Cerrado species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Thaís A P; Nisgoski, Silvana; Oliveira, Julia S; Marcati, Carmen R; Ballarin, Adriano W; Muñiz, Graciela I B

    2016-05-13

    The Brazilian Cerrado is the richest savanna in the world. It is also one of the biomes more threatened in the country and a hotspot for conservation priorities. The main causes of deforestation in Cerrado are agricultural practices, livestock and charcoal production. Although charcoal has a minor impact, its consumption represents the deforestation of 16.000 Km² of the Cerrado. To contribute for the biomes's conservation it is very important to improve forestry supervision. Thus, in this work we present the macroscopic characterization of charcoal from 25 Cerrado's species. We simulate the real conditions of forest controllers by using the magnifications of 10x, 25x and 65x. Likewise, the charcoals micrographs are all of transverse sections due to the larger amount of anatomical information. We also analyzed texture, brightness, vitrification, ruptures and some special features. The species present several differences in their anatomical structure. Although some of them are very unique, this work does not intent to identify charcoals only by macroscopic analyses. But it might give directions to future identification of genera or species. It also provides knowledge for government agents to verify the documents of forestry origin by fast analyzing a sample of charcoal itself. PMID:27192198

  18. Use of Molecular Diagnostic Tools for the Identification of Species Responsible for Snakebite in Nepal: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjib Kumar; Kuch, Ulrich; Höde, Patrick; Bruhse, Laura; Pandey, Deb P.; Ghimire, Anup; Chappuis, François; Alirol, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Snakebite is an important medical emergency in rural Nepal. Correct identification of the biting species is crucial for clinicians to choose appropriate treatment and anticipate complications. This is particularly important for neurotoxic envenoming which, depending on the snake species involved, may not respond to available antivenoms. Adequate species identification tools are lacking. This study used a combination of morphological and molecular approaches (PCR-aided DNA sequencing from swabs of bite sites) to determine the contribution of venomous and non-venomous species to the snakebite burden in southern Nepal. Out of 749 patients admitted with a history of snakebite to one of three study centres, the biting species could be identified in 194 (25.9%). Out of these, 87 had been bitten by a venomous snake, most commonly the Indian spectacled cobra (Naja naja; n = 42) and the common krait (Bungarus caeruleus; n = 22). When both morphological identification and PCR/sequencing results were available, a 100% agreement was noted. The probability of a positive PCR result was significantly lower among patients who had used inadequate “first aid” measures (e.g. tourniquets or local application of remedies). This study is the first to report the use of forensic genetics methods for snake species identification in a prospective clinical study. If high diagnostic accuracy is confirmed in larger cohorts, this method will be a very useful reference diagnostic tool for epidemiological investigations and clinical studies. PMID:27105074

  19. Development of a polymerase chain reaction assay for species identification of goose and mule duck in foie gras products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrı X0301 Guez, Miguel A; Garcı X0301 A, Teresa; González, Isabel; Asensio, Luis; Mayoral, Belén; López-Calleja, Inés; Hernández, Pablo E; Martı X0301 N, Rosario

    2003-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of a conserved region of the α-actin gene has been used for the specific identification of goose (Anser anser) and mule duck (Anas platyrhynchos×Cairina moschata) foie gras. Universal primers were used for the amplification of a DNA fragment containing three introns and four exons of the α-actin gene in goose and mule duck. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragments was necessary for the design of forward species-specific primers in the goose and mule duck α-actin genes. The use of species-specific forward primers, together with a reverse universal primer, produced amplicons of different length, allowing clear identification of goose and mule duck foie gras samples. Analysis of experimental mixtures demonstrated that 1% of duck can be easily detected in goose foie gras using the PCR method developed here. This genetic marker can be very useful for the accurate identification of these two species in foie gras products.

  20. Myxozoans as biological tags for stock identification of the Argentine hake, Merluccius hubbsi (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantatore, D M P; Irigoitia, M M; Holzer, A S; Timi, J T

    2016-05-01

    Myxozoans have been successfully used as tags for fish stock identification around the world. However, few studies using myxozoan tags have been carried out in the Southern Atlantic, a region with complex oceanography that constitutes a potentially suitable scenario for testing the utility of myxozoans as indicators. Its usefulness was tested using six samples of Merluccius hubbsi in two different regions of the Argentine Sea. Generalized linear models were performed to assess the effects of fish size and sex, and year and region of capture and selected using the Information Theoretic approach. Three myxozoan species were recorded: Kudoa rosenbuschi, Myxoproteus meridionalis and Fabespora sp. Results of modelling species individually showed differential capabilities for detecting geographical population structure at different spatial scales, with K. rosenbuschi and Fabespora sp. allowing the discrimination of northern and southern stocks, but Fabespora sp. also as a promissory indicator of intrapopulation sub-structure due to different migratory routes during non-reproductive periods. This work confirms that myxozoans offer a set of suitable markers at different spatial scales, which can be selected individually or in any combination, depending on the geographical extent of the study, constituting tools adaptable to the objectives of further research on fish population structure.

  1. Occurrence, pathways and implications of biological production of reactive oxygen species in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Voelker, B. M.; Lamborg, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a critical role in the redox cycling of both toxic (e.g., Hg) and nutrient (e.g., Fe) metals. Despite the discovery of extracellular ROS production in various microbial cultures, including fungi, algae and bacteria, photo-dependent processes are generally considered as the predominant source of ROS in natural waters. Here we show that biological production of ROS is ubiquitous and occurs at a significant rate in freshwater and brackish water environments. Water samples were collected from three freshwater and one brackish water ponds in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, periodically from 2012 to 2014. Production of O2- and H2O2 were measured in dark incubations of natural water using a chemiluminescent and a colorimetric probe, respectively. Rates of biological ROS production were obtained by comparing unfiltered with 0.2-μm filtered samples. The role of biological activity in ROS production was confirmed by the cessation of ROS production upon addition of formaldehyde. In surface water, production rates of O2- ranged from undetectable to 96.0 ± 30.0 nmol L-1 h-1, and production rates of H2O2 varied between 9.9 ± 1.3 nmol L-1 h-1 and 145.6 ± 11.2 nmol L-1 h-1. The maximum production rates of both ROS were observed in mid-summer 2013, which coincides with peak biological activity. ROS production in the water from aphotic zone was greater than in the water from photic zone. Thus, non-light dependent biological processes are likely the major contributors to ROS production in this system. Moreover, O2- production appeared to be enhanced by NADH and inhibited by proteinase-K, suggesting the possible involvement of NADH oxidoreductases in this process. The potential role of different microbial communities in ROS production, and the implications of biological ROS production for mercury speciation will also be discussed.

  2. Biological control through intraguild predation: case studies in pest control, invasive species and range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampfylde, C J; Lewis, M A

    2007-04-01

    Intraguild predation (IGP), the interaction between species that eat each other and compete for shared resources, is ubiquitous in nature. We document its occurrence across a wide range of taxonomic groups and ecosystems with particular reference to non-indigenous species and agricultural pests. The consequences of IGP are complex and difficult to interpret. The purpose of this paper is to provide a modelling framework for the analysis of IGP in a spatial context. We start by considering a spatially homogeneous system and find the conditions for predator and prey to exclude each other, to coexist and for alternative stable states. Management alternatives for the control of invasive or pest species through IGP are presented for the spatially homogeneous system. We extend the model to include movement of predator and prey. In this spatial context, it is possible to switch between alternative stable steady states through local perturbations that give rise to travelling waves of extinction or control. The direction of the travelling wave depends on the details of the nonlinear intraguild interactions, but can be calculated explicitly. This spatial phenomenon suggests means by which invasions succeed or fail, and yields new methods for spatial biological control. Freshwater case studies are used to illustrate the outcomes.

  3. Proliferation of diversified clostridial species during biological soil disinfestation incorporated with plant biomass under various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowlick, Subrata; Takehara, Toshiaki; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji; Ueki, Atsuko

    2013-09-01

    Biological soil disinfestation (BSD) involves the anaerobic decomposition of plant biomass by microbial communities leading to control of plant pathogens. We analyzed bacterial communities in soil of a model experiment of BSD, as affected by biomass incorporation under various conditions, to find out the major anaerobic bacterial groups which emerged after BSD treatments. The soil was treated with Brassica juncea plants, wheat bran, or Avena strigosa plants, irrigated at 20 or 30 % moisture content and incubated at 25-30 °C for 17 days. The population of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae incorporated at the start of the experiment declined markedly for some BSD conditions and rather high concentrations of acetate and butyrate were detected from these BSD-treated soils. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis based on the V3 region of 16S rRNA gene sequences from the soil DNA revealed that bacterial profiles greatly changed according to the treatment conditions. Based on the clone library analysis, phylogenetically diverse clostridial species appeared exceedingly dominant in the bacterial community of BSD soil incorporated with Brassica plants or wheat bran, in which the pathogen was suppressed completely. Species in the class Clostridia such as Clostridium saccharobutylicum, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium xylanovorans, Oxobacter pfennigii, Clostridium pasteurianum, Clostridium sufflavum, Clostridium cylindrosporum, etc. were commonly recognized as closely related species of the dominant clone groups from these soil samples. PMID:23132344

  4. Cornuvesica: A little known mycophilic genus with a unique biology and unexpected new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincowitz, Seonju; Duong, Tuan A; Wilhelm de Beer, Z; Wingfield, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the biology of the monotypic genus Cornuvesica (Microascales), apart from that isolates are notoriously difficult to culture on artificial media. A recent collection of material resembling this genus from freshly made wounds on Gmelina arborea in Indonesia, provided an opportunity to reconsider all available material of Cornuvesica falcata, type species of the genus. In addition to morphological comparisons, multigene phylogenetic analyses were made using sequences of the SSU, ITS, LSU and TEF-1α genes. Our results showed that the holotype of Cor. falcata from pine in Canada differed from all other material previously considered to represent this species and also from the new Indonesian collections. The collections considered represented three additional species that we describe here as new. Three New Zealand isolates and an isolate from UK were respectively described as Cor. acuminata and Cor. crypta, while the Indonesian isolates were described as Cor. magnispora. Phylogenies based on the SSU and LSU data sets showed that Cornuvesica spp. do not belong in the Ceratocystidaceae as previously suggested, but represent a distinct lineage in the Microascales that has yet to be named. Results showed that culture filtrates from other fungi or ferric chloride markedly stimulated the growth of Cor. magnispora. PMID:26058537

  5. The reproductive biology of Sophora fernandeziana (Leguminosae), a vulnerable endemic species from Isla Robinson Crusoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardello, Gabriel; Aguilar, Ramiro; Anderson, Gregory J

    2004-02-01

    Sophora fernandeziana is the only legume endemic to Isla Robinson Crusoe (Archipelago Juan Fernández, Chile); it is uncommon and becoming rare. Although its preservation status is listed as "vulnerable," as with many species, little is known of its reproductive biology. Flowering phenology, floral morphology, nectar features, breeding system, and visitors were analyzed in two populations. Flowering is from late winter to early spring. Flowers last 6 d and have a number of ornithophilous features. A floral nectary begins to secrete highly concentrated nectar 48 h after flowers open. Nectar secretion increases as the flower ages but culminates in active nectar reabsorption as the flower senesces. Nectar production is negatively affected by nectar removal. Self-pollen germinates and tubes grow down the style. However, pollen tubes were only observed to enter the ovaries in open pollinated styles, suggesting the possibility of an ovarian self-incompatibility mechanism. Both sexes of the two hummingbird species that inhabit the island are regular visitors. Low fruit and seed set, low genetic diversity, and a shrinking number of populations all contribute to increased concern about the future of this species-and perhaps the hummingbirds that depend on it.

  6. Sea cucumber species identification of family Caudinidae from Surabaya based on morphological and mitochondrial DNA evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad Hilman Fu'adil; Pidada, Ida Bagus Rai; Sugiharto, Widyatmoko, Johan Nuari; Irawan, Bambang

    2016-03-01

    Species identification and taxonomy of sea cucumber remains a challenge problem in some taxa. Caudinidae family of sea cucumber was comerciallized in Surabaya, and it was used as sea cucumber chips. Members of Caudinid sea cucumber have similiar morphology, so it is hard to identify this sea cucumber only from morphological appearance. DNA barcoding is useful method to overcome this problem. The aim of this study was to determine Caudinid specimen of sea cucumber in East Java by morphological and molecular approach. Sample was collected from east coast of Surabaya, then preserved in absolute ethanol. After DNA isolation, Cytochrome Oxydase I (COI) gene amplification was performed using Echinoderm universal primer and PCR product was sequenced. Sequencing result was analyzed and identified in NCBI database using BLAST. Results showed that Caudinid specimen in have closely related to Acaudina molpadioides sequence in GenBank with 86% identity. Morphological data, especially based on ossicle, also showed that the specimen is Acaudina molpadioides.

  7. Isolation and identification of Acanthamoeba species from natural water sources in the northeastern part of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammaratana, Thani; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Boonmars, Thidarut

    2016-04-01

    Acanthamoeba are found in the environment, particularly in water, all over the world. The genus is currently classified into 20 different genotypes, T1-T20. In this study, 63 natural water samples from 11 provinces in northeast Thailand were collected and cultured on non-nutrient agar plates. Positive samples by culture were subsequently analyzed by molecular methods. The identification of Acanthamoeba was based on morphological features and molecular techniques using PCR and DNA sequencing. The results showed that 10 samples out of 63 were positive (15.9 %). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that seven samples were T4, one sample was similar to T3, and the other two samples were similar to T5. This is the first report demonstrating the contamination of Acanthamoeba species in natural water sources in northeast Thailand. PMID:26779920

  8. Simultaneous Identification of Neutral and Anionic Species in Complex Mixtures without Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Chen, Lily; Swager, Timothy M

    2016-01-18

    A chemosensory system is reported that operates without the need for separation techniques and is capable of identifying anions and structurally similar bioactive molecules. In this strategy, the coordination of analytes to a metal complex with an open binding cleft generates "static structures" on the NMR timescale. Unique signals are created by strategically placing fluorine atoms in close proximity to bound analytes so that small structural differences induce distinct (19)F NMR shifts that can be used to identify each analyte. The utility of this method is illustrated by quantifying caffeine levels in coffee, by identifying ingredients in tea and energy drinks, and by discriminating between multiple biogenic amines with remote structural differences six carbon atoms away from the binding site. We further demonstrate the simultaneous identification of multiple neutral and anionic species in a complex mixture. PMID:26756442

  9. DNA-Based Characterization and Identification of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senés-Guerrero, Carolina; Schüßler, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate symbionts of most land plants. They have great ecological and economic importance as they can improve plant nutrition, plant water supply, soil structure, and plant resistance to pathogens. We describe two approaches for the DNA-based characterization and identification of AMF, which both can be used for single fungal spores, soil, or roots samples and resolve closely related AMF species: (a) Sanger sequencing of a 1.5 kb extended rDNA-barcode from clone libraries, e.g., to characterize AMF isolates, and (b) high throughput 454 GS-FLX+ pyrosequencing of a 0.8 kb rDNA fragment, e.g., for in-field monitoring. PMID:26791499

  10. Collaborative processes in species identification using an internet-based taxonomic resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontkanen, Jani; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick; Hartikainen-Ahia, Anu; Åhlberg, Mauri

    2016-01-01

    Visual databases are increasingly important resources through which individuals and groups can undertake species identification. This paper reports research on the collaborative processes undertaken by pre-service teacher students when working in small groups to identify birds using an Internet-based taxonomic resource. The student groups are conceptualised as 'knowledge-building communities' working in a 'joint problem space' comprising the collective knowledge of the participants interacting with the taxonomic database. Collaborative group work and associated dialogue were recorded with digital video. The recordings were analysed for the categories of dialogue and the categories of knowledge used by the students as they interacted with the taxonomic database and how they drew on their previous experiences of identifying birds. The outcomes are discussed in the context of the interplay of individual and social processes and the interplay between abstraction and lived experience in the joint problem space.

  11. Oligonucleotide indexing of DNA barcodes: identification of tuna and other scombrid species in food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botti Sara

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA barcodes are a global standard for species identification and have countless applications in the medical, forensic and alimentary fields, but few barcoding methods work efficiently in samples in which DNA is degraded, e.g. foods and archival specimens. This limits the choice of target regions harbouring a sufficient number of diagnostic polymorphisms. The method described here uses existing PCR and sequencing methodologies to detect mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms in complex matrices such as foods. The reported application allowed the discrimination among 17 fish species of the Scombridae family with high commercial interest such as mackerels, bonitos and tunas which are often present in processed seafood. The approach can be easily upgraded with the release of new genetic diversity information to increase the range of detected species. Results Cocktail of primers are designed for PCR using publicly available sequences of the target sequence. They are composed of a fixed 5' region and of variable 3' cocktail portions that allow amplification of any member of a group of species of interest. The population of short amplicons is directly sequenced and indexed using primers containing a longer 5' region and the non polymorphic portion of the cocktail portion. A 226 bp region of CytB was selected as target after collection and screening of 148 online sequences; 85 SNPs were found, of which 75 were present in at least two sequences. Primers were also designed for two shorter sub-fragments that could be amplified from highly degraded samples. The test was used on 103 samples of seafood (canned tuna and scomber, tuna salad, tuna sauce and could successfully detect the presence of different or additional species that were not identified on the labelling of canned tuna, tuna salad and sauce samples. Conclusions The described method is largely independent of the degree of degradation of DNA source and can thus be applied to

  12. Identification of Cryptosporidium Species in Fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certad, Gabriela; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Gantois, Nausicaa; Hammouma-Ghelboun, Ourida; Pottier, Muriel; Guyot, Karine; Benamrouz, Sadia; Osman, Marwan; Delaire, Baptiste; Creusy, Colette; Viscogliosi, Eric; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Aliouat-Denis, Cecile Marie; Follet, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea in a wide range of vertebrates including humans, is increasingly recognized as a parasite of a diverse range of wildlife species. However, little data are available regarding the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in wild aquatic environments, and more particularly in edible freshwater fish. To evaluate the prevalence of Cryptosporidiumspp. in fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France, 41 entire fish and 100 fillets (cuts of fish flesh) were collected from fishery suppliers around the lake. Nested PCR using degenerate primers followed by sequence analysis was used. Five fish species were identified as potential hosts of Cryptosporidium: Salvelinus alpinus, Esox lucius, Coregonus lavaretus, Perca fluviatilis, and Rutilus rutilus. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was found in 15 out of 41 fish (37%), distributed as follows: 13 (87%) C. parvum, 1 (7%) C. molnari, and 1 (7%) mixed infection (C. parvum and C. molnari). C. molnari was identified in the stomach, while C. parvum was found in the stomach and intestine. C. molnari was also detected in 1 out of 100 analyzed fillets. In order to identify Cryptosporidium subtypes, sequencing of the highly polymorphic 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) was performed. Among the C. parvum positive samples, three gp60 subtypes were identified: IIaA15G2R1, IIaA16G2R1, and IIaA17G2R1. Histological examination confirmed the presence of potential developmental stages of C. parvum within digestive epithelial cells. These observations suggest that C. parvum is infecting fish, rather than being passively carried. Since C. parvum is a zoonotic species, fish potentially contaminated by the same subtypes found in terrestrial mammals would be an additional source of infection for humans and animals, and may also contribute to the contamination of the environment with this parasite. Moreover, the risk of human transmission is strengthened by the

  13. Identification of Cryptosporidium Species in Fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Leman in France.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Certad

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea in a wide range of vertebrates including humans, is increasingly recognized as a parasite of a diverse range of wildlife species. However, little data are available regarding the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in wild aquatic environments, and more particularly in edible freshwater fish. To evaluate the prevalence of Cryptosporidiumspp. in fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman in France, 41 entire fish and 100 fillets (cuts of fish flesh were collected from fishery suppliers around the lake. Nested PCR using degenerate primers followed by sequence analysis was used. Five fish species were identified as potential hosts of Cryptosporidium: Salvelinus alpinus, Esox lucius, Coregonus lavaretus, Perca fluviatilis, and Rutilus rutilus. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was found in 15 out of 41 fish (37%, distributed as follows: 13 (87% C. parvum, 1 (7% C. molnari, and 1 (7% mixed infection (C. parvum and C. molnari. C. molnari was identified in the stomach, while C. parvum was found in the stomach and intestine. C. molnari was also detected in 1 out of 100 analyzed fillets. In order to identify Cryptosporidium subtypes, sequencing of the highly polymorphic 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60 was performed. Among the C. parvum positive samples, three gp60 subtypes were identified: IIaA15G2R1, IIaA16G2R1, and IIaA17G2R1. Histological examination confirmed the presence of potential developmental stages of C. parvum within digestive epithelial cells. These observations suggest that C. parvum is infecting fish, rather than being passively carried. Since C. parvum is a zoonotic species, fish potentially contaminated by the same subtypes found in terrestrial mammals would be an additional source of infection for humans and animals, and may also contribute to the contamination of the environment with this parasite. Moreover, the risk of human transmission is strengthened by

  14. Plant seed species identification from chemical fingerprints: a high-throughput application of direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Ashton D; Cody, Robert B; Dane, A John; Musah, Rabi A

    2015-09-01

    Plant species identification based on the morphological features of plant parts is a well-established science in botany. However, species identification from seeds has largely been unexplored, despite the fact that the seeds contain all of the genetic information that distinguishes one plant from another. Using seeds of genus Datura plants, we show here that the mass spectrum-derived chemical fingerprints for seeds of the same species are similar. On the other hand, seeds from different species within the same genus display distinct chemical signatures, even though they may contain similar characteristic biomarkers. The intraspecies chemical signature similarities on the one hand, and interspecies fingerprint differences on the other, can be processed by multivariate statistical analysis methods to enable rapid species-level identification and differentiation. The chemical fingerprints can be acquired rapidly and in a high-throughput manner by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) analysis of the seeds in their native form, without use of a solvent extract. Importantly, knowledge of the identity of the detected molecules is not required for species level identification. However, confirmation of the presence within the seeds of various characteristic tropane and other alkaloids, including atropine, scopolamine, scopoline, tropine, tropinone, and tyramine, was accomplished by comparison of the in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation patterns of authentic standards, to the fragmentation patterns observed in the seeds when analyzed under similar in-source CID conditions. The advantages, applications, and implications of the chemometric processing of DART-MS derived seed chemical signatures for species level identification and differentiation are discussed.

  15. Identification of Malassezia Species Isolated from Patients with Pityriasis Versicolor Using PCR-RFLP Method in Markazi Province, Central Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Didehdar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lipophilic yeasts of Malassezia species are members of the normal skin microbial that are cause of pityriasis versicolor. Pityriasis versicolor is a common superficial fungal infection with world-wide distribution. The phenotypic methods for identification of Malassezia species usually are time consuming and unreliable to differentiate newly identified species. But DNA-based techniques rapidly and accurately identified Malassezia species. The purpose of this study was isolation and identification of Malassezia Species from patients with pityriasis versicolor by molecular methods in Markazi Province, Central Iran in 2012.Mycologic examinations including direct microscopy and culture were performed on clinical samples. DNA extraction was performed from colonies. The ITS1 region of rDNA from isolates of Malassezia species were amplified by PCR reaction. The PCR were digested by Cfo I enzyme.From 70 skin samples, were microscopically positive for Malassezia elements, 60 samples were grown on culture medium (85.7%. Using PCR-RFLP method, that was performed on 60 isolates, 37(61.6% M. globosa, 14(23.3% M. furfur, 5(8.4% M. sympodialis and 4(6.7% M. restrictawere identified. In one case was isolated M. globosa along with M. restricta.The PCR-RFLP method is a useful and reliable technique for identification of differentiation of Malas-sezia species.

  16. Mitochondrial Flash: Integrative Reactive Oxygen Species and pH Signals in Cell and Organelle Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guohua; Wang, Xianhua; Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Cheng, Heping; Dirksen, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Recent breakthroughs in mitochondrial research have advanced, reshaped, and revolutionized our view of the role of mitochondria in health and disease. These discoveries include the development of novel tools to probe mitochondrial biology, the molecular identification of mitochondrial functional proteins, and the emergence of new concepts and mechanisms in mitochondrial function regulation. The discovery of “mitochondrial flash” activity has provided unique insights not only into real-time visualization of individual mitochondrial redox and pH dynamics in live cells but has also advanced understanding of the excitability, autonomy, and integration of mitochondrial function in vivo. Recent Advances: The mitochondrial flash is a transient and stochastic event confined within an individual mitochondrion and is observed in a wide range of organisms from plants to Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. As flash events involve multiple transient concurrent changes within the mitochondrion (e.g., superoxide, pH, and membrane potential), a number of different mitochondrial targeted fluorescent indicators can detect flash activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that flash events reflect integrated snapshots of an intermittent mitochondrial process arising from mitochondrial respiration chain activity associated with the transient opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Critical Issues: We review the history of flash discovery, summarize current understanding of flash biology, highlight controversies regarding the relative roles of superoxide and pH signals during a flash event, and bring forth the integration of both signals in flash genesis. Future Directions: Investigations using flash as a biomarker and establishing its role in cell signaling pathway will move the field forward. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 534–549. PMID:27245241

  17. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  18. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  19. Calibrating snakehead diversity with DNA barcodes: expanding taxonomic coverage to enable identification of potential and established invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Natasha R; Steinke, Dirk; Hanner, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Detecting and documenting the occurrence of invasive species outside their native range requires tools to support their identification. This can be challenging for taxa with diverse life stages and/or problematic or unresolved morphological taxonomies. DNA barcoding provides a potent method for identifying invasive species, as it allows for species identification at all life stages, including fragmentary remains. It also provides an efficient interim taxonomic framework for quantifying cryptic genetic diversity by parsing barcode sequences into discontinuous haplogroup clusters (typical of reproductively isolated species) and labelling them with unique alphanumeric identifiers. Snakehead fishes are a diverse group of opportunistic predators endemic to Asia and Africa that may potentially pose significant threats as aquatic invasive species. At least three snakehead species (Channa argus, C. maculata, and C. marulius) are thought to have entered North America through the aquarium and live-food fish markets, and have established populations, yet their origins remain unclear. The objectives of this study were to assemble a library of DNA barcode sequences derived from expert identified reference specimens in order to determine the identity and aid invasion pathway analysis of the non-indigenous species found in North America using DNA barcodes. Sequences were obtained from 121 tissue samples representing 25 species and combined with public records from GenBank for a total of 36 putative species, which then partitioned into 49 discrete haplogroups. Multiple divergent clusters were observed within C. gachua, C. marulius, C. punctata and C. striata suggesting the potential presence of cryptic species diversity within these lineages. Our findings demonstrate that DNA barcoding is a valuable tool for species identification in challenging and under-studied taxonomic groups such as snakeheads, and provides a useful framework for inferring invasion pathway analysis.

  20. Calibrating snakehead diversity with DNA barcodes: expanding taxonomic coverage to enable identification of potential and established invasive species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha R Serrao

    Full Text Available Detecting and documenting the occurrence of invasive species outside their native range requires tools to support their identification. This can be challenging for taxa with diverse life stages and/or problematic or unresolved morphological taxonomies. DNA barcoding provides a potent method for identifying invasive species, as it allows for species identification at all life stages, including fragmentary remains. It also provides an efficient interim taxonomic framework for quantifying cryptic genetic diversity by parsing barcode sequences into discontinuous haplogroup clusters (typical of reproductively isolated species and labelling them with unique alphanumeric identifiers. Snakehead fishes are a diverse group of opportunistic predators endemic to Asia and Africa that may potentially pose significant threats as aquatic invasive species. At least three snakehead species (Channa argus, C. maculata, and C. marulius are thought to have entered North America through the aquarium and live-food fish markets, and have established populations, yet their origins remain unclear. The objectives of this study were to assemble a library of DNA barcode sequences derived from expert identified reference specimens in order to determine the identity and aid invasion pathway analysis of the non-indigenous species found in North America using DNA barcodes. Sequences were obtained from 121 tissue samples representing 25 species and combined with public records from GenBank for a total of 36 putative species, which then partitioned into 49 discrete haplogroups. Multiple divergent clusters were observed within C. gachua, C. marulius, C. punctata and C. striata suggesting the potential presence of cryptic species diversity within these lineages. Our findings demonstrate that DNA barcoding is a valuable tool for species identification in challenging and under-studied taxonomic groups such as snakeheads, and provides a useful framework for inferring invasion pathway

  1. Calibrating snakehead diversity with DNA barcodes: expanding taxonomic coverage to enable identification of potential and established invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Natasha R; Steinke, Dirk; Hanner, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Detecting and documenting the occurrence of invasive species outside their native range requires tools to support their identification. This can be challenging for taxa with diverse life stages and/or problematic or unresolved morphological taxonomies. DNA barcoding provides a potent method for identifying invasive species, as it allows for species identification at all life stages, including fragmentary remains. It also provides an efficient interim taxonomic framework for quantifying cryptic genetic diversity by parsing barcode sequences into discontinuous haplogroup clusters (typical of reproductively isolated species) and labelling them with unique alphanumeric identifiers. Snakehead fishes are a diverse group of opportunistic predators endemic to Asia and Africa that may potentially pose significant threats as aquatic invasive species. At least three snakehead species (Channa argus, C. maculata, and C. marulius) are thought to have entered North America through the aquarium and live-food fish markets, and have established populations, yet their origins remain unclear. The objectives of this study were to assemble a library of DNA barcode sequences derived from expert identified reference specimens in order to determine the identity and aid invasion pathway analysis of the non-indigenous species found in North America using DNA barcodes. Sequences were obtained from 121 tissue samples representing 25 species and combined with public records from GenBank for a total of 36 putative species, which then partitioned into 49 discrete haplogroups. Multiple divergent clusters were observed within C. gachua, C. marulius, C. punctata and C. striata suggesting the potential presence of cryptic species diversity within these lineages. Our findings demonstrate that DNA barcoding is a valuable tool for species identification in challenging and under-studied taxonomic groups such as snakeheads, and provides a useful framework for inferring invasion pathway analysis. PMID

  2. Identification and Characterization of Lysobacter enzymogenes as a Biological Control Agent Against Some Fungal Pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Guo-liang; HU Bai-shi; JIANG Ying-hua; LIU Feng-quan

    2009-01-01

    Strain OH11, a Gram-negative, nonspore forming, rod-shaped bacterium with powerful antagonistic activity, was isolated from rhizosphere of green pepper in Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences of China and characterized to determine its taxonomic position. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain OH11 belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria and had the highest degree of sequence similarity to Lysobacter enzymogenes strain C3 (AY074793) (99%), Lysobacter enzyrnogenes strain N4-7 (U89965) (99%), Lysobacter antibioticus strain (AB019582) (97%), and Lysobacter gummosus strain (AB16136) (97%). Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain OH11 possesses a quinine system with Q-8 as the predominant compound and C15:0 iso,C17:1 iso w9c as the predominant iso-branched fatty acids,all of which corroborated the assignment of strain OH11 to the genus Lysobacter. Results of DNA-DNA hybridization and physiological and biochemical tests clearly showed that strain OH11 was classified as Lysobacter enzymogenes. Strain OH11 could produce protease, chitinase, and β-1,3-glucanase. It showed strong in vitro antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia scletotiorum, and several other phytopathogenic fungi. This is the first report of identification and characterization of Lysobacter enzymogenes as a biological control agent of plant diseases in China.

  3. Identification of cadmium in biological samples using neutron activation analysis with radiochemistry separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chile's 7500 km coastline of the Southern Pacific ocean, with about 4500 km of continental coastline that contains a variety of different geographical zones. This variety means that there is a great diversity of marine resources such as fish, shellfish and seaweeds. The utilization of these resources has been increasing in recent years making this sector an economically important one. The catch as of May 2002 came to 1.9 million tons and exports of the different species amounted to US$611.5 million as of April. But this important economic resource is being threatened by the technical demands imposed by importing countries, mainly the specific requirements for sanitary certification for fishery export products, depending on the markets of destination. The chemical element cadmium is one of the most strictly controlled elements due some shellfish accumulate a large amount of this element and to its high toxicity. The Chilean standard's analytical procedures for cadmium determination in hydro biological products, which must be met by laboratories that certify and control these products for export, are now being evaluated. Through its Chemical Metrology Unit, the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission is strongly supporting this sector by preparing the secondary reference or control materials, and it has developed and implemented nuclear analytical methods for the certification of these materials, which will be used mostly in collaborative studies. This work describes the methodology developed for the determination of cadmium in biological samples, particularly in shellfish and fish (author)

  4. Use of morphological differences for the identification of two picarel species Spicara flexuosa and Spicara maena (Pisces: Centracanthidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. MINOS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The recognition and identification of the two species of Spicara genus (Spicara flexuosa, picarel and Spicara maena, blotched picarel is difficult, due to a systematic confusion until now. In the present work a number of external morphometric features (ten body ratios are evaluated for their diagnostic possibilities. According to Principal Component Analysis results, the body ratios head length to standard length, head height to head length and the ratios of two body heights, indicated that these characters were not related to the maturity stage of the species. The discriminant analysis based on the above body ratios, indicated rather high level of discrimination (83.2% of the examined samples in two species. The results are discussed, and possibilities of improvement in the identification methodology for the two species are proposed.

  5. Environmental isolation, biochemical identification, and antifungal drug susceptibility of Cryptococcus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Luis Iost Teodoro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The incidence of opportunistic fungal infections has increased in recent years and is considered an important public health problem. Among systemic and opportunistic mycoses, cryptococcosis is distinguished by its clinical importance due to the increased risk of infection in individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus. Methods To determine the occurrence of pathogenic Cryptococcus in pigeon excrement in the City of Araraquara, samples were collected from nine environments, including state and municipal schools, abandoned buildings, parks, and a hospital. The isolates were identified using classical tests, and susceptibility testing for the antifungal drugs (fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B independently was also performed. After collection, the excrement samples were plated on Niger agar and incubated at room temperature. Results A total of 87 bird dropping samples were collected, and 66.6% were positive for the genus Cryptococcus. The following species were identified: Cryptococcus neoformans (17.2%, Cryptococcus gattii (5.2%, Cryptococcus ater (3.5%, Cryptococcus laurentti (1.7%, and Cryptococcus luteolus (1.7%. A total of 70.7% of the isolates were not identified to the species level and are referred to as Cryptococcus spp. throughout the manuscript. Conclusions Although none of the isolates demonstrated resistance to antifungal drugs, the identification of infested areas, the proper control of birds, and the disinfection of these environments are essential for the epidemiological control of cryptococcosis.

  6. Identification of Aspergillus species in Central Europe able to produce G-type aflatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, Nikolett; Despot, Daniela Jakšić; Palágyi, Andrea; Kiss, Noémi; Kocsubé, Sándor; Szekeres, András; Kecskeméti, Anita; Bencsik, Ottó; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Klarić, Maja Šegvić; Varga, János

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of potential aflatoxin producing fungi was examined in various agricultural products and indoor air in Central European countries including Hungary, Serbia and Croatia. For species identification, both morphological and sequence based methods were applied. Aspergillus flavus was detected in several samples including maize, cheese, nuts, spices and indoor air, and several isolates were able to produce aflatoxins. Besides, three other species of Aspergillus section Flavi, A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus were also isolated from cheese, maize and indoor air, respectively. This is the first report on the occurrence of A. nomius and A. pseudonomius in Central Europe. All A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus isolates were able to produce aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. The A. nomius isolate came from cheese produced very high amounts of aflatoxins (above 1 mg ml⁻¹). All A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus isolates produced much higher amounts of aflatoxin G1 then aflatoxin B1. Further studies are in progress to examine the occurrence of producers of these highly carcinogenic mycotoxins in agricultural products and indoor air in Central Europe.

  7. Plasma polymerization chemistry of unsaturated hydrocarbons: neutral species identification by mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, X.; Houssiau, L.

    2014-08-01

    Radio frequency discharges ignited in low-pressure and pure hydrocarbon gases were investigated by mass spectrometry. The plasma process was applied to four unsaturated monomers: styrene C8H8, benzene C6H6, ethylene C2H4 and acetylene C2H2. The remote mass spectrometer location restricted species identification to neutral closed-shell molecules in their respective plasmas. Among the peaks in the mass spectra, those directly due to neutrals produced in the plasma were determined following a successful two-step methodology. Firstly, the use of low electron impact energy limited the fragmentation and strongly simplified the cracking patterns. Secondly, attribution of peaks directly due to neutrals was confirmed or ruled out by systematically measuring their appearance potential. In the case of styrene, not less than 48 new molecules were detected. The discussion of the observed stable by-products in each discharge suggested several radicals responsible for their production. Comparing the set of species among the four plasmas showed that the repeated addition of intermediates with one or two carbon atoms and with low H content dominated the chemistry. Under our conditions of intermediate to high W/FM (power over mass flow ratio), the gas-phase plasma polymerization then preferentially occurred through significant fragmentation and recombination. Finally, the measured appearance potentials during plasma provided estimation for the threshold ionization energy of several highly unsaturated hydrocarbons, useful for modeling.

  8. Identification of Aspergillus species in Central Europe able to produce G-type aflatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, Nikolett; Despot, Daniela Jakšić; Palágyi, Andrea; Kiss, Noémi; Kocsubé, Sándor; Szekeres, András; Kecskeméti, Anita; Bencsik, Ottó; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Klarić, Maja Šegvić; Varga, János

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of potential aflatoxin producing fungi was examined in various agricultural products and indoor air in Central European countries including Hungary, Serbia and Croatia. For species identification, both morphological and sequence based methods were applied. Aspergillus flavus was detected in several samples including maize, cheese, nuts, spices and indoor air, and several isolates were able to produce aflatoxins. Besides, three other species of Aspergillus section Flavi, A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus were also isolated from cheese, maize and indoor air, respectively. This is the first report on the occurrence of A. nomius and A. pseudonomius in Central Europe. All A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus isolates were able to produce aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. The A. nomius isolate came from cheese produced very high amounts of aflatoxins (above 1 mg ml⁻¹). All A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus isolates produced much higher amounts of aflatoxin G1 then aflatoxin B1. Further studies are in progress to examine the occurrence of producers of these highly carcinogenic mycotoxins in agricultural products and indoor air in Central Europe. PMID:26344029

  9. GeneWeaver: data driven alignment of cross-species genomics in biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Erich; Bubier, Jason A; Reynolds, Timothy; Langston, Michael A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2016-01-01

    The GeneWeaver data and analytics website (www.geneweaver.org) is a publically available resource for storing, curating and analyzing sets of genes from heterogeneous data sources. The system enables discovery of relationships among genes, variants, traits, drugs, environments, anatomical structures and diseases implicitly found through gene set intersections. Since the previous review in the 2012 Nucleic Acids Research Database issue, GeneWeaver's underlying analytics platform has been enhanced, its number and variety of publically available gene set data sources has been increased, and its advanced search mechanisms have been expanded. In addition, its interface has been redesigned to take advantage of flexible web services, programmatic data access, and a refined data model for handling gene network data in addition to its original emphasis on gene set data. By enumerating the common and distinct biological molecules associated with all subsets of curated or user submitted groups of gene sets and gene networks, GeneWeaver empowers users with the ability to construct data driven descriptions of shared and unique biological processes, diseases and traits within and across species. PMID:26656951

  10. Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Salmonella species Isolated from Washing and Rinsed Water of Broilers in Pluck Shops

    OpenAIRE

    Tuhin-Al-Ferdous; S.M. Lutful Kabir; M. Mansurul Amin; K.M. Mahmud Hossain

    2013-01-01

    The study was designed with a view to isolate, identifies and characterizes Salmonella species from washing and rinsed water of broilers in pluck shops at Sreepur of Gazipur district in Bangladesh during the period from December 2011 to May 2012. A total of 30 samples collected from the different layers of drums of pluck shops’ were subjected to bacterial isolation and identification by using cultural and biochemical techniques. Furthermore, the isolated Salmonella species were characterized ...

  11. Determination of 16S rRNA Sequences of Enterococci and Application to Species Identification of Nonmotile Enterococcus gallinarum Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Robin; Piper, Kerryl E.; Rouse, Mark S; Steckelberg, James M.; Uhl, Jim R.; Kohner, Peggy; Hopkins, Marlene K.; Cockerill, Franklin R.; Kline, Bruce C.

    1998-01-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences of enterococcal species E. faecium, E. faecalis, E. gallinarum, E. casseliflavus/flavescens, E. dispar, E. pseudoavium, E. sulfureus, E. malodoratus, E. raffinosus, E. cecorum, E. hirae, E. saccharolyticus, E. seriolicida, E. mundtii, E. avium, E. durans, E. columbae, and E. solitarius are presented herein. These data were utilized to confirm the species identification of two nonmotile E. gallinarum isolates which had been previously phenotypically identified as E. faec...

  12. Chemical and Biological Analyses of the Essential Oils and Main Constituents of Piper Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Laura Leon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils obtained from leaves of Piper duckei and Piper demeraranum by hydrodistillation were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main constituents found in P. demeraranum oil were limonene (19.3% and β-elemene (33.1% and in P. duckei oil the major components found were germacrene D (14.7% and trans-caryophyllene (27.1%. P. demeraranum and P. duckei oils exhibited biological activity, with IC50 values between 15 to 76 μg mL−1 against two Leishmania species, P. duckei oil being the most active. The cytotoxicity of the essential oils on mice peritoneal macrophage cells was insignificant, compared with the toxicity of pentamidine. The main mono- and sesquiterpene, limonene (IC50 = 278 μM and caryophyllene (IC50 = 96 μM, were tested against the strains of Leishmania amazonensis, and the IC50 values of these compounds were lower than those found for the essential oils of the Piper species. The HET-CAM test was used to evaluate the irritation potential of these oils as topical products, showing that these oils can be used as auxiliary medication in cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis, with less side effects and lower costs.

  13. EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL EFFICACY OF TRICHODERMA SPECIES ISOLATES AGAINST ALTERNARIA LEAF SPOT DISEASE OF SESAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Lubaina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria leaf spot disease is a major threat to sesame (Sesamum orientale L. caused by Alternari asesami. Induced resistance is an alternative to systemic disease resistance response of plants. The present study aims to evaluate Trichoderma species efficacy as biocontrol via induction of resistance against A. sesami in sesame species. During in vitro bio control test, T. harzianum colonize and parallely inhibit the growth of the fungal pathogen. Expression of various defence related enzymes observed in sesame induce resistance against the pathogen infection in the host. T. harzianum coupled with inoculation of A. sesami enhance the remarkable induction of defence enzyme such as peroxidase (POX, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL and also the phenolic content compared with the control. The enzyme activity increased from 48 h of sampling and peaked at 72 h and then decreased after 72 h. In greenhouse and field experiments, soil treatment with a powder formulation of T. harzianum two weeks before planting or at the time of planting reduced significantly the incidence of diseases on both the wild and cultivar Thilarani.The results demonstrate that T. harzianumcan be successfully applied as a biological control against Alternaria leaf spot disease in sesame.

  14. Biological control of rice brown spot with native isolates of three Trichoderma species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Khalili

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Brown spot caused by Bipolaris oryzae is an important rice disease in Southern coast of Caspian Sea, the major rice growing region in Iran. A total of 45 Trichoderma isolates were obtained from rice paddy fields in Golestan and Mazandaran provinces which belonged to Trichoderma harzianum, T. virens and T. atroviride species. Initially, they were screened against B. oryzae by antagonism tests including dual culture, volatile and nonvolatile metabolites and hyperparasitism. Results showed that Trichoderma isolates can significantly inhibit mycelium growth of pathogen in vitro by producing volatile and nonvolatile metabolites Light microscopic observations showed no evidence of mycoparasitic behaviour of the tested isolates of Trichoderma spp. such as coiling around the B. oryzae. According to in vitro experiments, Trichoderma isolates were selected in order to evaluate their efficacy in controlling brown spot in glasshouse using seed treatment and foliar spray methods. Concerning the glasshouse tests, two strains of T. harzianum significantly controlled the disease and one strain of T. atroviride increased the seedling growth. It is the first time that the biological control of rice brown spot and increase of seedling growth with Trichoderma species have been studied in Iran.

  15. Identification of cephalopod species from the North and Baltic Seas using morphology, COI and 18S rDNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Katharina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We morphologically analyzed 79 cephalopod specimens from the North and Baltic Seas belonging to 13 separate species. Another 29 specimens showed morphological features of either Alloteuthis mediaor Alloteuthis subulata or were found to be in between. Reliable identification features to distinguish between A. media and A. subulata are currently not available. The analysis of the DNA barcoding region of the COI gene revealed intraspecific distances (uncorrected p) ranging from 0 to 2.13 % (average 0.1 %) and interspecific distances between 3.31 and 22 % (average 15.52 %). All species formed monophyletic clusters in a neighbor-joining analysis and were supported by bootstrap values of ≥99 %. All COI haplotypes belonging to the 29 Alloteuthis specimens were grouped in one cluster. Neither COI nor 18S rDNA sequences helped to distinguish between the different Alloteuthis morphotypes. For species identification purposes, we recommend the use of COI, as it showed higher bootstrap support of species clusters and less amplification and sequencing failure compared to 18S. Our data strongly support the assumption that the genus Alloteuthis is only represented by a single species, at least in the North Sea. It remained unclear whether this species is A. subulata or A. media. All COI sequences including important metadata were uploaded to the Barcode of Life Data Systems and can be used as reference library for the molecular identification of more than 50 % of the cephalopod fauna known from the North and Baltic Seas.

  16. Identification of forensically important blow fly species (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in China by mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin-Lai Liu; Li Yang; Kun-Lu Wu; Ling-mei Lan; Jiang-Feng Wang; Yao-Qing Chen; Ji-Feng Cai; Yun-Feng Chang; Yan Gu; Ya-Dong Guo; Xing-Hua Wang; Ji-FangWeng; Ming Zhong; Xiang Wang

    2011-01-01

    Unambiguous and rapid sarcosaphagous insect species identification is an essential requirement for forensic investigations. Although some insect species are difficult to classify morphologically, they can be effectively identified using molecular methods based on similarity with abundant authenticated reference DNA sequences in local databases.However, local databases are still relatively incomplete in China because of the large land area with distinct regional conditions. In this study, 75 forensically important blow flies were collected from 23 locations in 16 Chinese provinces, and a 278-bp segment of the cytochrome oxidase subunit Ⅰ gene of all specimens was successfully sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequenced segments showed that all Calliphorid specimens were properly assigned into nine species with relatively strong supporting values, thus indicating that the 278-bp cytochrome oxidase subunit one region is suitable for identification of Calliphorid species. The clear difference between intraspecific threshold and interspecific divergence confirmed the potential of this region for Calliphorid species identification,especially for distinguishing between morphologically similar species. Intraspecific geographic variations were observed in Lucilia sericata (Meigen, 1826) and Lucilia caesar (Linnaeus, 1758).

  17. Evaluation of Orius species for biological control of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tommasini, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Key words: Thysanoptera, Frankliniella occidentalis, Heteroptera, Orius leavigatu, Orius majusculu, Orius niger, Orius insidiosus, Biology, Diapause, Biological control.The overall aim of this research was to develop a biological control programme for F. occidentalis through the selection of

  18. Aqueous Extracts of Selected Potentilla Species Modulate Biological Activity of Human Normal Colon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduch, Roman; Wiater, Adrian; Locatelli, Marcello; Pleszczyńska, Malgorzata; Tomczyk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Potentilla L. (Rosaceae) species have been used in traditional and in folk medicine for many years. This study characterized the activity of extracts from aerial parts of selected Potentilla species: P. argentea, P. anserina, P. grandiflora and P. erecta as well as one species of closely related to the genus Potentilla, Drymocallis rupestris (syn. P. rupestris). The biological activities were analyzed using MTT, NR and DPPH assays on CCD 841 CoTr and CCD-18Co cells. Moreover, cell morphology and cytoskeletal actin F-filaments organization and IL-6 and IL-10 levels by ELISA were analyzed after 24 h of incubation. Potentilla extracts at dose levels between 25 and 250 µg/mL were analyzed. For ELISA, 15 µg/mL and 30 μg/mL were chosen. When mitochondrial succinyl dehydrogenase activity was tested (MTT assay) only extract obtained from P. erecta at lower concentrations (up to 125 µg/mL) suppressed metabolism of myofibroblasts, while epithelial cells mitochondrial enzyme activity increased after incubation with all extracts. In Neutral Red (NR) method cellular membrane disturbance of both cell cultures was found after D. rupestris and P. grandiflora addition. Moreover, strong influence on epithelial cells was also found for P. anserina. All extracts showed similar, concentration-dependent free radical scavenging (DPPH) effect. Potentilla extracts, especially at lower concentration, decreased IL-6 production in myofibroblasts but the level of the cytokine was found to be stable in epithelial cells. IL-10 analysis revealed that P. argentea, D. rupestris, P. erecta extracts decrease cytokine level in myofibroblasts, while only when higher concentration were applied, decreased cytokine level produced by epithelial cells was found. F-actin filaments staining revealed that Potentilla extracts significantly influence on cellular cytoskeleton organization. Potentilla extracts influence on cells of human colon wall lining modulating the main features of them (viability

  19. DNA-based identification of forensically important species of Sarcophagidae (Insecta: Diptera) from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoleão, K S; Mello-Patiu, C A; Oliveira-Costa, J; Takiya, D M; Silva, R; Moura-Neto, R S

    2016-01-01

    Sarcophagidae, or flesh flies, are of great importance in forensic entomology, but their effective application requires precise taxonomic identification, which relies almost exclusively on characteristics of the male genitalia. Given that female flies and larvae are most abundant in animal carcasses or on corpses, precise morphological identification can be difficult; therefore, DNA sequencing can be an additional tool for use in taxonomic identification. This paper analyzes part of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene from three Sarcophagidae species of forensic importance in the City of Rio de Janeiro: Oxysarcodexia fluminensis, Peckia chrysostoma, and Peckia intermutans. COI fragments of 400 bp from 36 specimens of these three species were sequenced. No intraspecific differences were found among specimens of O. fluminensis, but P. chrysostoma and P. intermutans each had two haplotypes, ranging from 0 to 0.7%. The interspecific divergence was 8.5-11.6%, corroborating previously reported findings. PMID:27173314

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic applications for the differentiation and species-level identification of achromobacter for clinical diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomila, Margarita; Prince-Manzano, Claudia; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Busquets, Antonio; Erhard, Marcel; Martínez, Deny L; Lalucat, Jorge; Moore, Edward R B

    2014-01-01

    The Achromobacter is a genus in the family Alcaligenaceae, comprising fifteen species isolated from different sources, including clinical samples. The ability to detect and correctly identify Achromobacter species, particularly A. xylosoxidans, and differentiate them from other phenotypically similar and genotypically related Gram-negative, aerobic, non-fermenting species is important for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as for nosocomial and other opportunistic infections. Traditional phenotypic profile-based analyses have been demonstrated to be inadequate for reliable identifications of isolates of Achromobacter species and genotypic-based assays, relying upon comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses are not able to insure definitive identifications of Achromobacter species, due to the inherently conserved nature of the gene. The uses of alternative methodologies to enable high-resolution differentiation between the species in the genus are needed. A comparative multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four selected 'house-keeping' genes (atpD, gyrB, recA, and rpoB) assessed the individual gene sequences for their potential in developing a reliable, rapid and cost-effective diagnostic protocol for Achromobacter species identifications. The analysis of the type strains of the species of the genus and 46 strains of Achromobacter species showed congruence between the cluster analyses derived from the individual genes. The MLSA gene sequences exhibited different levels of resolution in delineating the validly published Achromobacter species and elucidated strains that represent new genotypes and probable new species of the genus. Our results also suggested that the recently described A. spritinus is a later heterotypic synonym of A. marplatensis. Strains were analyzed, using whole-cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), as an alternative phenotypic profile-based method with the potential to

  1. Genotypic and phenotypic applications for the differentiation and species-level identification of achromobacter for clinical diagnoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Gomila

    Full Text Available The Achromobacter is a genus in the family Alcaligenaceae, comprising fifteen species isolated from different sources, including clinical samples. The ability to detect and correctly identify Achromobacter species, particularly A. xylosoxidans, and differentiate them from other phenotypically similar and genotypically related Gram-negative, aerobic, non-fermenting species is important for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, as well as for nosocomial and other opportunistic infections. Traditional phenotypic profile-based analyses have been demonstrated to be inadequate for reliable identifications of isolates of Achromobacter species and genotypic-based assays, relying upon comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses are not able to insure definitive identifications of Achromobacter species, due to the inherently conserved nature of the gene. The uses of alternative methodologies to enable high-resolution differentiation between the species in the genus are needed. A comparative multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA of four selected 'house-keeping' genes (atpD, gyrB, recA, and rpoB assessed the individual gene sequences for their potential in developing a reliable, rapid and cost-effective diagnostic protocol for Achromobacter species identifications. The analysis of the type strains of the species of the genus and 46 strains of Achromobacter species showed congruence between the cluster analyses derived from the individual genes. The MLSA gene sequences exhibited different levels of resolution in delineating the validly published Achromobacter species and elucidated strains that represent new genotypes and probable new species of the genus. Our results also suggested that the recently described A. spritinus is a later heterotypic synonym of A. marplatensis. Strains were analyzed, using whole-cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, as an alternative phenotypic profile-based method with the

  2. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and identification of mycotoxigenic Penicillium species using conserved genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of conserved genes and sequence analysis provides a very powerful tool for the identification of toxigenic as well as non-toxigenic Penicillium species. Sequences are obtained by amplification of the gene fragment, sequencing via capillary electrophoresis of d...

  3. Molecular species identification of Central European ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae using nuclear rDNA expansion segments and DNA barcodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raupach Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of vast numbers of unknown organisms using DNA sequences becomes more and more important in ecological and biodiversity studies. In this context, a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene has been proposed as standard DNA barcoding marker for the identification of organisms. Limitations of the COI barcoding approach can arise from its single-locus identification system, the effect of introgression events, incomplete lineage sorting, numts, heteroplasmy and maternal inheritance of intracellular endosymbionts. Consequently, the analysis of a supplementary nuclear marker system could be advantageous. Results We tested the effectiveness of the COI barcoding region and of three nuclear ribosomal expansion segments in discriminating ground beetles of Central Europe, a diverse and well-studied invertebrate taxon. As nuclear markers we determined the 18S rDNA: V4, 18S rDNA: V7 and 28S rDNA: D3 expansion segments for 344 specimens of 75 species. Seventy-three species (97% of the analysed species could be accurately identified using COI, while the combined approach of all three nuclear markers provided resolution among 71 (95% of the studied Carabidae. Conclusion Our results confirm that the analysed nuclear ribosomal expansion segments in combination constitute a valuable and efficient supplement for classical DNA barcoding to avoid potential pitfalls when only mitochondrial data are being used. We also demonstrate the high potential of COI barcodes for the identification of even closely related carabid species.

  4. Detection and identification of human Plasmodium species with real-time quantitative nucleic acid sequence-based amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.F. Mens; G.J. Schoone; P.A. Kager; H.D.F.H. Schallig

    2006-01-01

    Background: Decisions concerning malaria treatment depend on species identification causing disease. Microscopy is most frequently used, but at low parasitaemia (< 20 parasites/mu l) the technique becomes less sensitive and time consuming. Rapid diagnostic tests based on Plasmodium antigen detection

  5. A PCR-based method for identification of bifidobacteria from the human alimentary tract at the species level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Maathuis, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was developed for the identification of isolates of Bifidobacterium at the species level. Using two Bifidobacterium-specific primers directed against the 16S ribosomal gene (Bif164 and Bif662), a PCR product was obtained from the type strains of 12 diff

  6. [Development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction method for the identification of Candida species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ağca, Harun; Dalyan Cilo, Burcu; Özmerdiven, Gülşah Ece; Sağlam, Sezcan; Ener, Beyza

    2015-01-01

    Candida species are one of the major causes of nosocomial infections and are the fourth most common agent involved in bloodstream infections. The impact of non-albicans Candida species is increasing, however C.albicans is still the most common species. Since the antifungal susceptibility pattern among Candida spp. may be different, rapid diagnosis and identification of non-albicans Candida spp. are important for the determination of antifungal agents that will be used for treatment. The aim of the study was to describe a real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) assay that rapidly detects, identifies and quantitates Candida species from blood culture samples. A total of 50 consecutive positive blood culture bottles (BACTEC, Beckton Dickinson, USA) identified at our laboratory between June-November 2013, were included in the study. Reference strains of Candida spp. (C.albicans ATCC 10231, C.glabrata ATCC 90030, C.tropicalis ATCC 1021, C.krusei ATCC 6258, C.parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. dubliniensis CD36) grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar were used for quality control. BACTEC bottles that were positive for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were also studied to search the cross-reactivity. A commercial kit (Zymo Research, USA) was used for DNA extraction. Real-time PCR was performed on LightCycler 480 (Roche, Germany) with primers and probes specific for 18S rRNA of Candida species. Twenty microlitres of the reaction mix contained 2 μl of extracted DNA, 2 μl of LightCycler Fast Start DNA Master Probe (Roche Diagnostics, Germany), 2 μl of MgCl(2) (5 mmol), 2 μl of 10x PCR buffer (Roche Diagnostics, Germany), 0.5 μl of each primer (0.01 nmol/μl) and 1 μl of each probe (0.1 μmol/μl) (TibMolBiol, Germany). Amplification was performed using the following conditions; 95°C for 10 mins and 50 cycles of denaturation at 95°C for 10 secs, annealing at 62°C for 10 secs and polymerisation at 72°C for 20 secs. A melting curve was

  7. Understanding the biology and ecology of vulnerable plant species: case study with tetratheca juncea occurring over coal leases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Mulligan; Sean Bellairs; F.V. Bartier; C.L. Gross; D. Bowen

    2001-06-01

    Tetratheca juncea Smith (Tremandraceae) is a vulnerable species listed under the NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act (Schedule 2, TSC Act 1995), and in the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.Researchers at the Universities of Queensland, New England and Newcastle established A collaborative research program investigated the reproductive and establishment biology of T juncea. Breeding systems, seed biology and mycorrhizal associations were investigated to determine factors limiting the reproductive output of the species. Native bees necessary for pollination were not detected in 100 hours of observation. The three key ramifications from this study of T. juncea's ecology is that: a pollinator is required for high seed yields; fire is required for germination; and a mycorrhizal partner is required for plant longevity. These findings indicate that translocations of the species cannot be recommended as there is a lack of knowledge about many factors that are critical for the persistence of the species. A fire management plan will need to cater for all obligate ecological requirements. The results of this study have been used to develop a flowchart on the biological procedures that need to be considered when a threatened flora species is found on a site. The results from this study are also considered to be a relevant guide for managing populations of other species of Tetratheca, many of which are also rare or threatened.

  8. A cost-effective self-sensing biosensor for detection of biological species at ultralow concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faegh, Samira; Jalili, Nader; Yavuzcetin, Ozgur; Nagesha, Dattatri; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2013-06-01

    Detection of ultrasmall masses and identification of biological molecules have been made possible as a result of advances in nanotechnology. Development of biosensing tools has significantly contributed to high-throughput diagnosis and analytical sensing exploiting high affinity of biomolecules. MicroCantilever (MC)-based detection has emerged as a promising biosensing tool for offering label-free and cost-effective sensing capabilities. One of the main criteria determining the success of each biosensor is the capability of the sensing platform to operate in aqueous media. Although being characterized with high sensitivity and simplicity, MCs do not provide an effective tool for measurement of marker proteins in liquid media due to large hydrodynamic damping and losses in the surrounding liquid. In this study, we describe two approaches to high sensitivity biomolecular detection using piezoelectric microcantilevers. (i) Immobilized Mass Detection in Air using electro-mechanical resonance: a unique self-sensing measurement technique is reported utilizing a self-sensing circuit consisting of a piezoelectric MC to address the mentioned limitation. The capability of the self-sensing measurement technique was first verified by detecting ultrasmall biological masses immobilized over the surface of MC by monitoring the shift in fundamental mechanical resonance frequency of the system in air and comparing it with optical-based measurement. This was further utilized for calibration of mass detection in liquid media. (ii) Immobilized Mass Detection in Liquid using the electrical self-sensing circuit's resonance: Once the capability to detect adsorbed mass was verified, the self-sensing platform was implemented to detect different concentrations of target molecule (glucose in this study) in liquid media by adopting the highly sensitive resonance frequency of the whole circuit instead of the mechanical response of MC. Molecular binding occurring over the surface of MC changes

  9. Comparison of Vitek-2 automated identification system and PCR-ITS for species characterization of clinical isolates of Candida spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Matias Higashi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Serious infections caused by genus Candida have become a challenge in the diagnostic question, in order to detect and identify the etiologic agent of agile, precise and standardized form in manner clinical laboratories. The prediction of susceptibility to antifungal agents, and the need to generate epidemiological data highlight the importance of routine identification of yeast species involved in infections. Among the 200 Candida species already described, C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. krusei and C. lusitaniae are most often related with infections in humans. All of the phenotypic methods of identification of Candida have limitations, especially the characterization of the species not C. albicans, however, the application of molecular methods may reflect the increased cost and spent time for obtain results on laboratory. In order to evaluate the implementation of the automated system Vitek 2 ID - YST (bioMerieux combined with the use of chromogenic agar in the routine identification of Candida species were tested 44 isolates from invasive infection by inoculation of chromogenic agar and automated panel and realization DNA amplification for the internal transcribed spacer regions of rRNA 1 and 2 (ITS - PCR. Oligonucleotides specific species were used and the size of the amplified product was correlated to other results. The automated system identified 95.4 % of the isolates when in association with colonial features observed in chromogenic medium, however, the use of PCR -ITS or more sensitive methodologies would be needed to solve the other results, ambiguous and erroneous.

  10. ENTOMOPATHOGENIC FUNGUS SPECIES BEAUVERIA BASSIANA (BALS. AND METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE (METSCH. USED AS MYCOINSECTICIDE EFFECTIVE IN BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF IPS TYPOGRAPHUS (L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mudrončeková

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural world is overloaded with chemical substances. Undesirable effects and the resistance of vermin opens a new way for biological control of pathogenic species of animals. Ips typographus (L. is overgrowth across Central Europe. Its natural habitat are forest communities, where chemical spraying is forbidden or restricted. The natural bioregulators of this cosmopolitan pest are entomopathogenic fungi of Hypocreales species. In this study, we focused on two types of entomopathogenic fungi – Beauveria bassiana (BALS. and Metarhizium anisopliae (METSCH.. They are suitable for biological control because they are attacking a wide range of pathogenic insects in agro-systems. Entomopathogenic fungi were isolated from soil samples and dead infected insects. The samples collected from different sites of the High Tatras. In our experiments, we followed infectivity and mortality of selected isolates of entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana (BALS. and Metarhizium anisopliae (METSCH.. The gDNA of isolates was used for identification and we put them to the analysis of specific DNA segments by amplified PCR method. Results of experiments show the high pathogenicity of entomopathogenic fungi strains. Beauveria bassiana (BALS. caused 99% mortality and Metarhizium anisopliae (METSCH. reached 97%. Infectivity followed by Beauveria bassiana (BALS. reached 92% and Metarhizium anisopliae (METSCH. 90%. For the purpose of limiting the numbers of populations of harmful pest is essential the ability of entomopathogenic fungi to infect, kill the host, and remain in a natural environment without disturbing the biota.

  11. 76 FR 64074 - Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops and Protected Species Safe Handling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA670 Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification... Shark Identification workshop scheduled for November 17, 2011, in Charleston, SC, has been changed. This.... Atlantic Shark Identification workshops are mandatory for Atlantic Shark Dealer permit holders or...

  12. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  13. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification.

  14. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  15. Multilocus sequence typing method for identification and genotypic classification of pathogenic Leptospira species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machang'u Robert S

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leptospira are the parasitic bacterial organisms associated with a broad range of mammalian hosts and are responsible for severe cases of human Leptospirosis. The epidemiology of leptospirosis is complex and dynamic. Multiple serovars have been identified, each adapted to one or more animal hosts. Adaptation is a dynamic process that changes the spatial and temporal distribution of serovars and clinical manifestations in different hosts. Serotyping based on repertoire of surface antigens is an ambiguous and artificial system of classification of leptospiral agents. Molecular typing methods for the identification of pathogenic leptospires up to individual genome species level have been highly sought after since the decipherment of whole genome sequences. Only a few resources exist for microbial genotypic data based on individual techniques such as Multiple Locus Sequence Typing (MLST, but unfortunately no such databases are existent for leptospires. Results We for the first time report development of a robust MLST method for genotyping of Leptospira. Genotyping based on DNA sequence identity of 4 housekeeping genes and 2 candidate genes was analyzed in a set of 120 strains including 41 reference strains representing different geographical areas and from different sources. Of the six selected genes, adk, icdA and secY were significantly more variable whereas the LipL32 and LipL41 coding genes and the rrs2 gene were moderately variable. The phylogenetic tree clustered the isolates according to the genome-based species. Conclusion The main advantages of MLST over other typing methods for leptospires include reproducibility, robustness, consistency and portability. The genetic relatedness of the leptospires can be better studied by the MLST approach and can be used for molecular epidemiological and evolutionary studies and population genetics.

  16. Rapid molecular identification of Listeria species by use of real-time PCR and high-resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Dazhi; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Fang, Weijia; Ye, Julian; Wu, Fang; Ding, Gangqiang

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Listeria species via a molecular method is critical for food safety and clinical diagnosis. In this study, an assay integrating real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis was developed and assessed for rapid identification of six Listeria species. The ssrA gene, which encodes a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is conserved and common to all bacterial phyla, contains a variable domain in Listeria spp. Therefore, Q-PCR and a HRM profile were applied to characterize this gene. Fifty-three Listeria species and 45 non-Listeria species were detected using one primer set, with an accuracy of 100% in reference to conventional methods. There was a 93.3% correction rate to 30 artificially contaminated samples. Thus, Q-PCR with melting profiling analysis proved able to identify Listeria species accurately. Consequently, this study demonstrates that the assay we developed is a functional tool for rapidly identifying six Listeria species, and has the potential for discriminating novel species food safety and epidemiological research.

  17. Recognition and identification of bumblebee species in the Bombus lucorum-complex (Hymenoptera, Apidae – A review and outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas Bossert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of cryptic species represents one of the major challenges in current taxonomy and affects our understanding of global diversity. In practice, the process from discovery to acceptance in the scientific community can take an extensive length of time. A prime example is the traditionally difficult taxonomy of the cryptic bumblebee species belonging to the Bombus lucorum-complex. The status of the three European species in the group – Bombus lucorum and the closely related Bombus cryptarum and Bombus magnus – has recently become widely accepted, primarily due to investigations of nucleotide sequences and marking pheromones. In contrast, doubts prevail concerning the validity of species identification based on morphology. As a consequence, our knowledge of the species is muddled in a mire of unreliable and confusing literature data from a large number of authors over the centuries. To clarify this issue, this paper provides a recapitulation of the historical literature and highlights the milestones in the process of species recognition. Further, the possibility of a morphologically based species identification is discussed in the context of new molecular data. Finally, this review outlines the current challenges and provides directions for future issues.

  18. Conservation biology of Chionodoxa lochiae and Scilla morrisii (Asparagaceae): Two priority bulbous plant species of the European Union in Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    Marios Andreou; Costas Kadis; Pinelopi Delipetrou; Kyriacos Georghiou

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data regarding conservation biology of Chionodoxa lochiae and Scilla morrisii; two threatened endemic plants of Cyprus, which are included as priority species in Annex II of the Habitats Directive. The population size and geographical distribution of the species were monitored for three years. C. lochiae was recorded in ten locations and S. morrisii was recorded in five locations. C. lochiae occurs in Pinus forests with/without Quercus alnifolia understory or in forest mar...

  19. Reproductive biology of three gadiform fish species through the Mediterranean deep-sea range (147-1850 m)

    OpenAIRE

    Rotllant, Guiomar; Massutí, Enric; Morales-Nin, Beatriz; Moranta, Joan; Sardà, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of deep-sea reproductive biology is slight and interpretations of reproductive strategies in deep-sea fishes are controversial. Since the Mediterranean is a fairly stable and constant sea, we might expect a consistent pattern of reproduction of deep-sea species. Three gadiforms species with a succesive bathymetric and an ecological and economical importance in the Mediterranean fishing industry, Phycis blennoides, Mora moro and Lepidion lepidion, were selected for the present study....

  20. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-03-01

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors. PMID:26978389

  1. The Bergen multifrequency analyzer (BMA): A new toolbox for acoustic categorization and species identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona, Egil; Korneliussen, Rolf; Knudsen, Hans Petter; Rang, Kjell; Eliassen, Inge; Heggelund, Yngve; Patel, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    Multifrequency split-beam echo sounders with nearly identical and overlapping acoustic beams have been regularly used in acoustic surveys for fish stock abundance estimation. Calibrated raw data from up to six simultaneously working echo sounders at 18, 38, 70, 120, 200, and 364 kHz were applied for developing a new processing tool for real-time acoustic target categorization and acoustic species identification. The system now handles raw data from the Simrad EK500 and EK60 split-beam echo sounders, and performs a stepwise, modular sequence of analysis, like bottom detection, noise quantification and removal, target categorization, and school detection in near-real time. Direct generation of new, synthetic echograms, based upon the measured frequency response of the targets, is also one of the most useful features of the system. This information may significantly increase the accuracy of acoustic survey estimates of fish and zooplankton. New routines for noise removal, target categorization, and school detection will be presented, as well as new methods for training and building the artificial experience of the analyzer.

  2. A comparison of the application of a biological and phenetic species concept in the Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex within a phylogenetic framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanen, Duur Kornelis; Kuyper, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented to derive an operational phenetic species concept for the Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex in northwestern Europe. The complex was found to consist of at least 22 biological species (intercompatibility groups; ICGs). Almost none of these biological species could be recognised...... criterion of monophyly and allowing paraphyletic groupings of biological species as phenetic species would result in the recognition of three phenetic species. A tree, with the five ICGs of the previously defined morphospecies H. crustuliniforme (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) constrained as a monophyletic group, can...... not be rejected. This constrained tree, together with the relaxed criterion that allows for paraphyletic groupings of biological species, leads to the recognition of four phenetic species, viz. H. crustuliniforme, H. helodes, H. incarnatulum and H. velutipes. These phenetic species are described and a...

  3. Biological identifications through mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers: the case of commercially important crabs from Indian EEZ

    OpenAIRE

    Cubelio, Sherine Sonia; Bineesh, K. K.; Raj, K.; Tewari, Suraj; Gopalakrishnan, Achamveettil; Valaparambil, Saidumohammad Basheer; Lakra, Wazir Singh

    2010-01-01

    The ability of a 600- 700 base pair section of mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers (COI, 16S & ITS-I) to provide species level identifications has been demonstrated for large taxonomic assemblages of animals such as insects, birds, fishes and crustaceans. In the Indian context, there had been no comprehensive attempt to determine the molecular sytematics, evolutionary relationships or phylogeny within the crabs of genera Scylla, Portunus and Charybdis which suppor...

  4. Feather barbs as a good source of mtDNA for bird species identification in forensic wildlife investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speller Camilla F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to accurately identify bird species is crucial for wildlife law enforcement and bird-strike investigations. However, such identifications may be challenging when only partial or damaged feathers are available for analysis. Results By applying vigorous contamination controls and sensitive PCR amplification protocols, we found that it was feasible to obtain accurate mitochondrial (mtDNA-based species identification with as few as two feather barbs. This minimally destructive DNA approach was successfully used and tested on a variety of bird species, including North American wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo, Canada goose (Branta canadensis, blue heron (Ardea herodias and pygmy owl (Glaucidium californicum. The mtDNA was successfully obtained from 'fresh' feathers, historic museum specimens and archaeological samples, demonstrating the sensitivity and versatility of this technique. Conclusions By applying appropriate contamination controls, sufficient quantities of mtDNA can be reliably recovered and analyzed from feather barbs. This previously overlooked substrate provides new opportunities for accurate DNA species identification when minimal feather samples are available for forensic analysis.

  5. Identification of Eastern United States Reticulitermes Termite Species via PCR-RFLP, Assessed Using Training and Test Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Garrick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reticulitermes termites play key roles in dead wood decomposition and nutrient cycling in forests. They also damage man-made structures, resulting in considerable economic loss. In the eastern United States, five species (R. flavipes, R. virginicus, R. nelsonae, R. hageni and R. malletei have overlapping ranges and are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Here we present a molecular tool for species identification. It is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of a section of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene, followed by a three-enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay, with banding patterns resolved via agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay was designed using a large set of training data obtained from a public DNA sequence database, then evaluated using an independent test panel of Reticulitermes from the Southern Appalachian Mountains, for which species assignments were determined via phylogenetic comparison to reference sequences. After refining the interpretive framework, the PCR-RFLP assay was shown to provide accurate identification of four co-occurring species (the fifth species, R. hageni, was absent from the test panel, so accuracy cannot yet be extended to training data. The assay is cost- and time-efficient, and will help improve knowledge of Reticulitermes species distributions.

  6. The Human Release Hypothesis for biological invasions: human activity as a determinant of the abundance of invasive plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Heike; Brandt, Patric; Fischer, Joern; Welk, Erik; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Research on biological invasions has increased rapidly over the past 30 years, generating numerous explanations of how species become invasive. While the mechanisms of invasive species establishment are well studied, the mechanisms driving abundance patterns (i.e. patterns of population density and population size) remain poorly understood. It is assumed that invasive species typically have higher abundances in their new environments than in their native ranges, and patterns of invasive species abundance differ between invaded regions. To explain differences in invasive species abundance, we propose the Human Release Hypothesis. In parallel to the established Enemy Release Hypothesis, this hypothesis states that the differences in abundance of invasive species are found between regions because population expansion is reduced in some regions through continuous land management and associated cutting of the invasive species. The Human Release Hypothesis does not negate other important drivers of species invasions, but rather should be considered as a potentially important complementary mechanism. We illustrate the hypothesis via a case study on an invasive rose species, and hypothesize which locations globally may be most likely to support high abundances of invasive species. We propose that more extensive empirical work on the Human Release Hypothesis could be useful to test its general applicability. PMID:25352979

  7. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well. (topical review)

  8. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2012-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well.

  9. Application of mtDNA Polymorphism in Species Identification of Sarcosaphagous Insects%mtDNA多态性在嗜尸性昆虫种类鉴定中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李响; 蔡继峰

    2011-01-01

    Species identification of sarcosaphagous insects is one of the important steps in forensic research based on the knowledge of entomology. Recent studies reveal that the application of molecular biology, especially the mtDNA sequences analysis, works well in the species identification of sarcosaphagous insects.The molecular biology characteristics, structures, polymorphism of mtDNA of sarcosaphagons insects, and the recent studies in species identification of sarcosaphagous insects are reviewed in this article.%嗜尸性昆虫的种类鉴定是利用昆虫学知识进行法医学研究的重要步骤之一.近年来研究表明,利用分子生物学技术,特别是线粒体DNA(mitochondrial DNA,mtDNA)序列分析技术对嗜尸性昆虫进行种类鉴别,能够得到较好的效果.本文对嗜尸性昆虫mtDNA的分子生物学特性、结构以及嗜尸性昆虫种类鉴定中常用的mtDNA序列等研究进展进行了综述.

  10. Signaling pathways for stress responses and adaptation in Aspergillus species: stress biology in the post-genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Kazutoshi; Abe, Keietsu; Gomi, Katsuya

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi in terms of industrial use and because of their pathogenic or toxin-producing features. The genomes of several Aspergillus species have become publicly available in this decade, and genomic analyses have contributed to an integrated understanding of fungal biology. Stress responses and adaptation mechanisms have been intensively investigated using the accessible genome infrastructure. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have been highlighted as being fundamentally important in fungal adaptation to a wide range of stress conditions. Reverse genetics analyses have uncovered the roles of MAPK pathways in osmotic stress, cell wall stress, development, secondary metabolite production, and conidia stress resistance. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the stress biology of Aspergillus species, illuminating what we have learned from the genomic data in this "post-genomic era." PMID:27007956

  11. Bioinformatics resource manager v2.3: an integrated software environment for systems biology with microRNA and cross-species analysis tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilton Susan C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are noncoding RNAs that direct post-transcriptional regulation of protein coding genes. Recent studies have shown miRNAs are important for controlling many biological processes, including nervous system development, and are highly conserved across species. Given their importance, computational tools are necessary for analysis, interpretation and integration of high-throughput (HTP miRNA data in an increasing number of model species. The Bioinformatics Resource Manager (BRM v2.3 is a software environment for data management, mining, integration and functional annotation of HTP biological data. In this study, we report recent updates to BRM for miRNA data analysis and cross-species comparisons across datasets. Results BRM v2.3 has the capability to query predicted miRNA targets from multiple databases, retrieve potential regulatory miRNAs for known genes, integrate experimentally derived miRNA and mRNA datasets, perform ortholog mapping across species, and retrieve annotation and cross-reference identifiers for an expanded number of species. Here we use BRM to show that developmental exposure of zebrafish to 30 uM nicotine from 6–48 hours post fertilization (hpf results in behavioral hyperactivity in larval zebrafish and alteration of putative miRNA gene targets in whole embryos at developmental stages that encompass early neurogenesis. We show typical workflows for using BRM to integrate experimental zebrafish miRNA and mRNA microarray datasets with example retrievals for zebrafish, including pathway annotation and mapping to human ortholog. Functional analysis of differentially regulated (p Conclusions BRM provides the ability to mine complex data for identification of candidate miRNAs or pathways that drive phenotypic outcome and, therefore, is a useful hypothesis generation tool for systems biology. The miRNA workflow in BRM allows for efficient processing of multiple miRNA and mRNA datasets in a single

  12. Species distribution modeling in the tropics: problems, potentialities, and the role of biological data for effective species conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayuela, L.; Golicher, J.D.; Newton, A.C.; Kolb, M.; Alburquerque, de F.S.; Arets, E.J.M.M.; Alkemade, J.R.M.; Pérez, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we aim to investigate the problems and potentialities of species distribution modeling (SDM) as a tool for conservation planning and policy development and implementation in tropical regions. We reviewed 123 studies published between 1995 and 2007 in five of the leading journals in eco

  13. PCR Identification for Equus przewalsrii Species%普氏野马物种的PCR鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑小龙; 王群; 岳志芹; 朱来华; 梁成珠; 邓明俊; 肖西志; 姜帆; 于业锋

    2013-01-01

    为建立鉴定普氏野马的PCR方法,根据线粒体D-Loop区序列,设计了针对普氏野马的特异性扩增引物,通过优化反应体系和扩增条件,建立了能够鉴定普氏野马的PCR方法。该方法检测灵敏度较高,可扩增10-3 ng的DNA ,与蒙古马、伊犁马、哈萨克马、阿拉伯马、驴、骡、牛和羊等动物均不发生交叉反应,具有很好的特异性。结果表明,建立的普氏野马物种鉴定的PCR方法特异性好,灵敏度较高,简单可靠,可作为普氏野马的一种有效鉴定方法,对普氏野马的保护起到重要的作用。%To develop the species-specific PCR assay for the identification of Equus przewalsrii ,primers were designed from mitochondria D-loop region after alignment of the available sequences in the GenBank database .The primers generated specific fragments of 315 bp length for Equus przewalsrii .The results showed that the PCR was established .The sensitivity analysis showed that the developed PCR could detect 10-3 ng DNA ,and no cross reaction with Mongolia horse ,Ili horse ,Kazakh horse ,Arabian horse ,Don-key ,Mule ,Bovine and Ovine .The results demonstrated that this species-specific PCR provided a useful , specific ,sensitive and simple technique to identify Equus przewalsrii .This assay could play an important role in conservation of Equus p rz ew alsrii .

  14. Identification of roots of woody species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobowski; Hole; Wolf; Bryant

    1999-03-01

    Within the last two decades, substantial progress has been made in understanding seed-bank dynamics and the contribution of the soil seed bank to a postdisturbance plant community. There has been relatively little progress, however, in understanding perennial bud-bank dynamics and the contribution of the soil bud bank to secondary succession. This lack of information is due primarily to the inability to reliably identify roots, rhizomes and lignotubers that lie dormant beneath the soil surface. This investigation addressed the issue of identification of below-ground woody structures. The first objective was to develop a method that used molecular tools to identify woody plant species from subsoil tissue samples. The second objective was to develop a key in which molecular markers served as criteria for the identification and differentiation of selected tree and shrub species common to the mountains of northeast Oregon and southeast Washington. Application of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified rbcL appears to be a reliable method to identify and differentiate 15 plants to the genus level. Two restriction enzymes, DpnII and HhaI, provided restriction site polymorphisms in the PCR product. The fragment number and length were used to develop an identification key. However, plants not analysed in this 'exploratory key' might share the same banding patterns, resulting in a false identification of unknowns. PMID:10199009

  15. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Sean; Russell, Gareth J.; Butler, Matthew J.; Selinger, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling), it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS) data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos). Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion), and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km2 cells) and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture sessions, which

  16. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Harris

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling, it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos. Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion, and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km2 cells and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture

  17. Identification of candidate B-lymphoma genes by cross-species gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van S Tompkins

    Full Text Available Comparative genome-wide expression profiling of malignant tumor counterparts across the human-mouse species barrier has a successful track record as a gene discovery tool in liver, breast, lung, prostate and other cancers, but has been largely neglected in studies on neoplasms of mature B-lymphocytes such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma (BL. We used global gene expression profiles of DLBCL-like tumors that arose spontaneously in Myc-transgenic C57BL/6 mice as a phylogenetically conserved filter for analyzing the human DLBCL transcriptome. The human and mouse lymphomas were found to have 60 concordantly deregulated genes in common, including 8 genes that Cox hazard regression analysis associated with overall survival in a published landmark dataset of DLBCL. Genetic network analysis of the 60 genes followed by biological validation studies indicate FOXM1 as a candidate DLBCL and BL gene, supporting a number of studies contending that FOXM1 is a therapeutic target in mature B cell tumors. Our findings demonstrate the value of the "mouse filter" for genomic studies of human B-lineage neoplasms for which a vast knowledge base already exists.

  18. Systems biology studies of adult paragonimus lung flukes facilitate the identification of immunodominant parasite antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha N McNulty

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Paragonimiasis is a food-borne trematode infection acquired by eating raw or undercooked crustaceans. It is a major public health problem in the far East, but it also occurs in South Asia, Africa, and in the Americas. Paragonimus worms cause chronic lung disease with cough, fever and hemoptysis that can be confused with tuberculosis or other non-parasitic diseases. Treatment is straightforward, but diagnosis is often delayed due to a lack of reliable parasitological or serodiagnostic tests. Hence, the purpose of this study was to use a systems biology approach to identify key parasite proteins that may be useful for development of improved diagnostic tests.The transcriptome of adult Paragonimus kellicotti was sequenced with Illumina technology. Raw reads were pre-processed and assembled into 78,674 unique transcripts derived from 54,622 genetic loci, and 77,123 unique protein translations were predicted. A total of 2,555 predicted proteins (from 1,863 genetic loci were verified by mass spectrometric analysis of total worm homogenate, including 63 proteins lacking homology to previously characterized sequences. Parasite proteins encoded by 321 transcripts (227 genetic loci were reactive with antibodies from infected patients, as demonstrated by immunoaffinity purification and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Serodiagnostic candidates were prioritized based on several criteria, especially low conservation with proteins in other trematodes. Cysteine proteases, MFP6 proteins and myoglobins were abundant among the immunoreactive proteins, and these warrant further study as diagnostic candidates.The transcriptome, proteome and immunolome of adult P. kellicotti represent a major advance in the study of Paragonimus species. These data provide a powerful foundation for translational research to develop improved diagnostic tests. Similar integrated approaches may be useful for identifying novel targets for drugs and vaccines in the

  19. Identification and biological activity of ovine and caprine calcitonin receptor-stimulating peptides 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christopher J; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Yandle, Timothy G; Minamino, Naoto

    2008-08-01

    We have recently reported the isolation of three new members of the calcitonin (CT) gene-related peptide family of peptides, the CT receptor (CT-R)-stimulating peptides (CRSPs). We now report the sequencing and characterization of ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2. Mature ovine and caprine CRSP-1 are identical and have strong structural homology to CRSP-1s identified to date from other species. As with other CRSP-1s, ovine/caprine CRSP-1 binds to and activates the CT-R but not the CT-like receptor (CL-R) in combination with the receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 does not activate any of these receptor-RAMP complexes. Intravenous infusions of ovine CRSP-1 to normal conscious sheep induced dose-dependent reduction in plasma total Ca levels (P=0.02) and corrected Ca levels (P=0.017) associated with increases in plasma cAMP (P=0.002). CRSP-1 reduced both plasma amino-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.006) and plasma renin activity (P=0.028). There were no significant effects observed on hemodynamic or renal indices measured. In conclusion, we have sequenced ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2 precursors. This newly identified CRSP-1 has been shown to share the structural and biological features of CRSP-1s known to date. In vivo studies confirm that ovine CRSP-1 reduces plasma Ca levels in sheep, presumably via a cAMP-mediated mechanism. By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 did not stimulate any combination of CT-R, CL-R, and RAMPs. Accession numbers of cDNA determined in this study are caprine CRSP-1, AB364646; caprine CRSP-2, AB364647; and ovine CRSP-1, AB364648.

  20. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the identification of species within the Echinococcus granulosus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Marion; Mackenstedt, Ute; Romig, Thomas

    2014-02-24

    To facilitate the specific identification of Echinococcus spp. isolates in endemic countries, a LAMP (loop-mediated isothermal amplification) assay was developed to detect the various agents known to cause cystic echinococcosis (E. granulosus s.s., E. equinus, E. ortleppi, E. canadensis and E. felidis). The infectivity of the different species and the severity of the disease in humans and livestock vary significantly among those species, and correct molecular identification of large numbers of field isolates is crucial to understand their epidemiology. However, funding constraints in many CE endemic countries often prevent PCR-based screening of field isolates. The LAMP method allows the amplification of DNA fragments under isothermal conditions which can be achieved using an ordinary waterbath, and the detection of amplification products only requires a UV light source. In the present study a LAMP assay was developed which allows the detection and differentiation of the 5 CE causing Echinococcus species. The diagnostic power was adjusted to species level, i.e. intraspecific strains (G1-3 within E. granulosus s.s., G6-10 within E. canadensis) are not discriminated. Wherever this would be necessary for epidemiological purposes, the method can be adjusted according to local requirements. The sensitivity of the assay was tested down to one fiftieth of a single protoscolex or egg, respectively. The present study describes a fast and simple method for the differentiation of CE causing Echinococcus species which can facilitate epidemiological studies in endemic countries.

  1. Four-locus phylogeny of Fusarium avenaceum and related species and their species-specific identification based on partial phosphate permease gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakheev, Alexander A; Khairulina, Dina R; Zavriev, Sergey K

    2016-05-16

    The fungus Fusarium avenaceum and its closest relatives are responsible for contamination of agricultural plants and their products by mycotoxins such as enniatins and moniliformin. Precise identification of mycotoxin producers is necessary for estimation of the accumulation risk of those compounds and for preventing the consumption of highly contaminated products. Nucleic acids amplification-based techniques proved to be the most rapid and reliable approach for pathogen diagnostics and identification. In this study partial phosphate permease gene (PHO) sequences were determined for Fusarium avenaceum (including one isolate identified as F. arthrosporioides), F. tricinctum, F. acuminatum and F. torulosum. Phylogenetic analysis of 40 isolates of those species from different climates and geographical regions of Russia and some neighboring countries based on sequences of PHO, translation elongation factor 1 alpha (TEF1α), beta-tubulin (β-TUB), enniatin synthetase (Esyn1) genes and combined data set demonstrated that the PHO gene possesses the highest rate of variability among them and can be considered as an informative marker for phylogenetic studies of these species. According to the combined data set phylogeny, the isolates of each species formed clusters with a high bootstrap support. Analysis of PHO sequences revealed a high intraspecific variability of F. avenaceum: there were 5 independent clusters on the dendrogram, including one cluster which was closer to F. torulosum than to other F. avenaceum isolates. Variable sites in PHO sequences have been used for the design of species-specific primers and a fluorescent hydrolysis probe. The specificity of the assay was shown for DNA samples extracted from 68 isolates of 23 Fusarium species. Quantitative PCR approach was applied to estimate the contamination rate of 17 naturally infected oat and barley samples, previously characterized by microbiological procedures.

  2. Identification of Taxus cuspidata Sieb. et Zucc. endophytic fungi-new species, species known and their metabolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XlANGYong; LUAn-guo; WUWen-fang

    2003-01-01

    A total of 94 isolates of endophytic fungi were isolated from the bark of 200-yr.-old Taxus cuspidata Sieb. et Zucc.in the primeval forest of the Changbai Mountain Natural Reserve, and 19 species of endophytic fungi were identified, including 10 new recorded-genus-species, 2 new species (Phomopsis Iongiscoleosporu Y. Xiang et Lu An Guo Wu Wen Fang, Coniothyrium macrospoum Y. Xiang J.X. et Lu An Guo Wu Wen Fang), 1 new varied species (Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler var. taxi Y.Xiang et Lu An Guo) and 6 known species of China (Eurotium amstelodomi Mgngin, Eurotium repens de Bary, Botrytis sp.,Penicillium citrinum Thom, Epicoccum nigrium LinK, Fusarium sp.). Through thin layer chromatography (TLC), liquid fermentation metabolite of the strains was determined, and four strains (Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler var. taxi Y. Xiang et Lu An Guo Wu Wen Fang, Botrytis sp., Eurotium amsteloodomi Mgngin, Eurotium repens de Bary) were screened out, whose metabolites reacted positively with the vanillic aldehyde that was one special taxoid developer. Among the four strains, Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler var. taxi Y. Xiang et Lu An Guo, produced one compound largely, which positively reacted with one alkaloids developer-Bismuth potassium iodide. The compound is identified as taxoids type through spectrum analysis. This demonstrates that Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler var. taxiY. Xiang et Lu An Guo can highly produce taxoids largely.

  3. 77 FR 38775 - Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops and Protected Species Safe Handling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ...: Correction In the Federal Register of June 4, 2012, in FR Doc. 2012-13466, on page 32950, in the third column... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC042 Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification... Shark Identification workshop originally scheduled for August 9, 2012, in Rosenberg, TX, has...

  4. 75 FR 54598 - Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops and Protected Species Safe Handling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ...: Need for Correction In the Federal Register of May 28, 2010, in FR Doc. 2010-12919, on page 29992, in... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XW44 Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification... cancelling the Atlantic Shark Identification workshop that was scheduled for September 2, 2010, in...

  5. Examining the effectiveness of discriminant function analysis and cluster analysis in species identification of male field crickets based on their calling songs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Jaiswara

    Full Text Available Traditional taxonomy based on morphology has often failed in accurate species identification owing to the occurrence of cryptic species, which are reproductively isolated but morphologically identical. Molecular data have thus been used to complement morphology in species identification. The sexual advertisement calls in several groups of acoustically communicating animals are species-specific and can thus complement molecular data as non-invasive tools for identification. Several statistical tools and automated identifier algorithms have been used to investigate the efficiency of acoustic signals in species identification. Despite a plethora of such methods, there is a general lack of knowledge regarding the appropriate usage of these methods in specific taxa. In this study, we investigated the performance of two commonly used statistical methods, discriminant function analysis (DFA and cluster analysis, in identification and classification based on acoustic signals of field cricket species belonging to the subfamily Gryllinae. Using a comparative approach we evaluated the optimal number of species and calling song characteristics for both the methods that lead to most accurate classification and identification. The accuracy of classification using DFA was high and was not affected by the number of taxa used. However, a constraint in using discriminant function analysis is the need for a priori classification of songs. Accuracy of classification using cluster analysis, which does not require a priori knowledge, was maximum for 6-7 taxa and decreased significantly when more than ten taxa were analysed together. We also investigated the efficacy of two novel derived acoustic features in improving the accuracy of identification. Our results show that DFA is a reliable statistical tool for species identification using acoustic signals. Our results also show that cluster analysis of acoustic signals in crickets works effectively for species

  6. Evaluation of Staf-Sistem 18-R for identification of staphylococcal clinical isolates to the species level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolomini, R; Catamo, G; Picciani, C; D'Antonio, D

    1994-03-01

    The accuracy and efficiency of Staf-Sistem 18-R (Liofilchem s.r.l., Roseto degli Abruzzi, Teramo, Italy) were compared with those of conventional biochemical methods to identify 523 strains belonging to 16 different human Staphylococcus species. Overall, 491 strains (93.9%) were correctly identified (percentage of identification, > or = 90.0), with 28 (5.4%) requiring supplementary tests for complete identification. For 14 isolates (2.8%), the strains did not correspond to any key in the codebook and could not be identified by the manufacturer's computer service. Only 18 isolates (3.4%) were misidentified. The system is simple to use, is easy to handle, gives highly reproducible results, and is inexpensive. With the inclusion of more discriminating tests and adjustment in supplementary code numbers for some species, such as Staphylococcus lugdunensis and Staphylococcus schleiferi, Staf-Sistem 18-R is a suitable alternative for identification of human coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species in microbiological laboratories. PMID:8195373

  7. Towards Plant Species Identification in Complex Samples: A Bioinformatics Pipeline for the Identification of Novel Nuclear Barcode Candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Angers-Loustau

    Full Text Available Monitoring of the food chain to fight fraud and protect consumer health relies on the availability of methods to correctly identify the species present in samples, for which DNA barcoding is a promising candidate. The nuclear genome is a rich potential source of barcode targets, but has been relatively unexploited until now. Here, we show the development and use of a bioinformatics pipeline that processes available genome sequences to automatically screen large numbers of input candidates, identifies novel nuclear barcode targets and designs associated primer pairs, according to a specific set of requirements. We applied this pipeline to identify novel barcodes for plant species, a kingdom for which the currently available solutions are known to be insufficient. We tested one of the identified primer pairs and show its capability to correctly identify the plant species in simple and complex samples, validating the output of our approach.

  8. Towards Plant Species Identification in Complex Samples: A Bioinformatics Pipeline for the Identification of Novel Nuclear Barcode Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Petrillo, Mauro; Paracchini, Valentina; Kagkli, Dafni M; Rischitor, Patricia E; Puertas Gallardo, Antonio; Patak, Alex; Querci, Maddalena; Kreysa, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of the food chain to fight fraud and protect consumer health relies on the availability of methods to correctly identify the species present in samples, for which DNA barcoding is a promising candidate. The nuclear genome is a rich potential source of barcode targets, but has been relatively unexploited until now. Here, we show the development and use of a bioinformatics pipeline that processes available genome sequences to automatically screen large numbers of input candidates, identifies novel nuclear barcode targets and designs associated primer pairs, according to a specific set of requirements. We applied this pipeline to identify novel barcodes for plant species, a kingdom for which the currently available solutions are known to be insufficient. We tested one of the identified primer pairs and show its capability to correctly identify the plant species in simple and complex samples, validating the output of our approach. PMID:26807711

  9. Identification of biological corridors in highly fragmented landscapes through GIS tools Case study Microcuenca La Bolsa, Marinilla Town

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study object is to identify biological corridors as recovery time strategy in highly fragmented landscapes through tools of Geographic Information Systems, taking as a case study of microcuenca La Balsa, Marinilla Town. GIS tools such as V- Late, allowed assessing landscape structure through statistical analysis of forest fragments of local biodiversity importance, that from a cost raster that allowed the tracing of the biological corridor using Cost weight, shortest path and a buffer width of 100 meters as optimal for the use of certain animal species such as small and medium-sized mammals and birds. This allowed us to propose the biological corridor that will allow functional linkage of strategic ecosystems of the watershed and the recovery time, preservation and protection of biodiversity in the areas. Importantly, the use of birds as indicators of biodiversity and ecosystem disruption with which you intend to measure susceptibility to fragmentation, risk status due to loss of habitat and migratory frugivorous species which are sensitive to these changes and allow monitoring by evaluating the success of the biological corridor, because although the present study took a hypothetical data, the use of these indicators are intended to establish the need to identify key species of flora and fauna that allow for monitoring and verifying the success or otherwise of posed recovery strategy.

  10. Reverse engineering and identification in systems biology: strategies, perspectives and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Villaverde, A. F.; Banga, Julio R.

    2014-01-01

    The interplay of mathematical modelling with experiments is one of the central elements in systems biology. The aim of reverse engineering is to infer, analyse and understand, through this interplay, the functional and regulatory mechanisms of biological systems. Reverse engineering is not exclusive of systems biology and has been studied in different areas, such as inverse problem theory, machine learning, nonlinear physics, (bio)chemical kinetics, control theory and optimization, among othe...

  11. Species identification of smoked and gravad fish products by sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, urea isoelectric focusing and native isoelectric focusing : a collaborative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackie, I.; Craig, A.; Etienne, M.;

    2000-01-01

    -discriminating power for the processed salmonids than SDS-PAGE. The profiles of the eel species as obtained on SDS-PAGE or urea-IEF were not affected by smoking. Urea-IEF had greater species- discriminating power than SDS-PAGE for the eel species. Native IEF was useful in providing supplementary identification...

  12. Molecular identification of species in Prunus sect.Persica (Rosaceae), with emphasis on evaluation of candidate barcodes for plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu QUAN; Shi-Liang ZHOU

    2011-01-01

    Species of Prunus L. sect. Persica are not only important fruit trees, but also popular ornamental and medicinal plants. Correct identification of seedlings, barks, or fruit kernels is sometimes required, but no reliable morphological characters are available. Nowadays, the technique of DNA barcoding has the potential to meet such requirements. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of 11 DNA loci (atpB-rbcL, trnH-psbA, trnL-F, trnS-G,atpF-H, rbcL, marK, rpoB, rpoC1, nad1, and internal transcribed spacer [ITS]) as candidate DNA barcodes for peaches, using samples from 38 populations, covering all the species in sect. Persica. On the whole, the primers worked well in this group and sequencing difficulties were met only in the case of ITS locus. Five loci (rbcL,matK, rpoB, rpoC, and nad1) have very low variation rates, whereas atpB-rbcL, atpF-H, trnH-psbA, trnL-F and trnS-G show more variability. The most variable loci, atpB-rbcL and trnH-psbA, can distinguish three of the five species. Two two-locus combinations, atpB-rbcL+trnL-F and atpB-rbcL+atpF-H, can resolve all five species. We also find that identification powers of the loci are method-dependent. The NeighborNet method shows higher species identification power than maximum parsimony, neighbor joining, and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean methods.

  13. Tree Species Traits Influence Soil Physical, Chemical, and Biological Properties in High Elevation Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Ayres, Edward; Steltzer, Heidi; Berg, Sarah; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Simmons, Breana L.; Wall, Diana H

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that plants often have species-specific effects on soil properties. In high elevation forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains, North America, areas that are dominated by a single tree species are often adjacent to areas dominated by another tree species. Here, we assessed soil properties beneath adjacent stands of trembling aspen, lodgepole pine, and Engelmann spruce, which are dominant tree species in this region and are distributed widely in North Amer...

  14. rDNA-ITS2 based species-diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for identification of sibling species of Anopheles fluviatilis in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfouli, S R Naddaf; Oshaghi, M A; Vatandoost, H; Assmar, M

    2003-01-01

    A species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using primers already designed, based on differences in the nucleotides of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2), was used to identify the species composition of the Anopheles fluviatilis complex in Iran. All the amplified DNA samples obtained from specimens collected from different areas using different collection methods yielded to a fragment of 450 bp size, a PCR product corresponding to the species denoted as Y. Some 21 ITS2 region of Iranian specimens were sequenced and compared with the already published sequence data of species Y from India. The sequence data of the Iranian specimens were 100% identical to that of the Indian specimens, and hence confirmed the PCR assay results. Species Y is presumably species T in India, which has no role in the transmission of malaria, whereas mosquitos of An. fluviatilis are known as a secondary vector in Iran. This conflict will remain to be solved by further biological and molecular studies.

  15. Integrated omics for the identification of key functionalities in biological wastewater treatment microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanasamy, Shaman; Muller, Emilie; Sheik, Abdul; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment plants harbour diverse and complex microbial communities which prominently serve as models for microbial ecology and mixed culture biotechnological processes. Integrated omic analyses (combined metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics) are currently gaining momentum towards providing enhanced understanding of community structure, function and dynamics in situ as well as offering the potential to discover novel biological functionalitie...

  16. PCR-RFLP on β-tubulin gene for rapid identification of the most clinically important species of Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Tuba; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Abastabar, Mahdi; Pasqualotto, Alessandro C; Armaki, Mojtaba Taghizadeh; Hoseinnejad, Akbar; Nabili, Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus species are important agents of life-threatening infections in immunosuppressed patients. Proper speciation in the Aspergilli has been justified based on varied fungal virulence, clinical presentations, and antifungal resistance. Accurate identification of Aspergillus species usually relies on fungal DNA sequencing but this requires expensive equipment that is not available in most clinical laboratories. We developed and validated a discriminative low-cost PCR-based test to discriminate Aspergillus isolates at the species level. The Beta tubulin gene of various reference strains of Aspergillus species was amplified using the universal fungal primers Bt2a and Bt2b. The PCR products were subjected to digestion with a single restriction enzyme AlwI. All Aspergillus isolates were subjected to DNA sequencing for final species characterization. The PCR-RFLP test generated unique patterns for six clinically important Aspergillus species, including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus clavatus and Aspergillus nidulans. The one-enzyme PCR-RFLP on Beta tubulin gene designed in this study is a low-cost tool for the reliable and rapid differentiation of the clinically important Aspergillus species.

  17. Identification of fucans from four species of sea cucumber by high temperature 1H NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nian; Chen, Shiguo; Ye, Xingqian; Li, Guoyun; Yin, Li'ang; Xue, Changhu

    2014-10-01

    Acidic polysaccharide, which has various biological activities, is one of the most important components of sea cucumber. In the present study, crude polysaccharide was extracted from four species of sea cucumber from three different geographical zones, Pearsonothuria graeffei ( Pg) from Indo-Pacific, Holothuria vagabunda ( Hv) from Norwegian Coast, Stichopus tremulu ( St) from Western Indian Ocean, and Isostichopus badionotu ( Ib) from Western Atlantic. The polysaccharide extract was separated and purified with a cellulose DEAE anion-exchange column to obtain corresponding sea cucumber fucans (SC-Fucs). The chemical property of these SC-Fucs, including molecular weight, monosaccharide composition and sulfate content, was determined. Their structure was compared simply with fourier infrared spectrum analyzer and identified with high temperature 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum analyzer (NMR) and room temperature 13C NMR. The results indicated that Fuc- Pg obtained from the torrid zone mainly contained 2,4-O-disulfated and non-sulfated fucose residue, whereas Fuc- Ib from the temperate zone contained non-, 2-O- and 2,4-O-disulfated fucose residue; Fuc- St from the frigid zone and Fuc- Hv from the torrid zone contained mainly non-sulfated fucose residue. The proton of SC-Fucs was better resolved via high temperature 1H NMR than via room temperature 1H NMR. The fingerprint of sea cucumber in different sea regions was established based on the index of anomer hydrogen signal in SC-Fucs. Further work will help to understand whether there exists a close relationship between the geographical area of sea cucumber and the sulfation pattern of SC-Fucs.

  18. Conservation biology of Chionodoxa lochiae and Scilla morrisii (Asparagaceae: Two priority bulbous plant species of the European Union in Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Andreou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data regarding conservation biology of Chionodoxa lochiae and Scilla morrisii; two threatened endemic plants of Cyprus, which are included as priority species in Annex II of the Habitats Directive. The population size and geographical distribution of the species were monitored for three years. C. lochiae was recorded in ten locations and S. morrisii was recorded in five locations. C. lochiae occurs in Pinus forests with/without Quercus alnifolia understory or in forest margins and riparian vegetation with Platanus orientalis. Favorable habitat of S. morrisii is the understory of Quercus infectoria stands and the Pistacia terebinthus-Quercus coccifera-Styrax officinalis shrubs. The distribution pattern of the species seems to follow habitat availability. Fecundity and Relative Reproductive Success of C. lochiae were stable and low, while in S. morrisii were constantly high. The lack of pollinators seems to be the main cause of the low sexual reproduction of C. lochiae. The germination strategy for both species is dependent on temperature. Some of the seeds are dormant and dormancy is broken by nitrates. The investigation of certain aspects of the biology of the two species yielded the information needed to identify the critical aspects affecting their survival and to propose sound conservation measures.

  19. Cross-species mapping of bidirectional promoters enables prediction of unannotated 5' UTRs and identification of species-specific transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Lewin Harris A; Larkin Denis M; Yang Mary Q; Piontkivska Helen; Reecy James; Elnitski Laura

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Bidirectional promoters are shared regulatory regions that influence the expression of two oppositely oriented genes. This type of regulatory architecture is found more frequently than expected by chance in the human genome, yet many specifics underlying the regulatory design are unknown. Given that the function of most orthologous genes is similar across species, we hypothesized that the architecture and regulation of bidirectional promoters might also be similar across s...

  20. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, Anderson M; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and

  1. Species-independent identification of known and novel recurrent genomic entities in multiple cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a new method for the identification of recurrent genomic entities that play a causative role in the onset of disease. Our approach is particularly amenable for the analyses highthroughput sequencing data....

  2. Cross-species mapping of bidirectional promoters enables prediction of unannotated 5' UTRs and identification of species-specific transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bidirectional promoters are shared regulatory regions that influence the expression of two oppositely oriented genes. This type of regulatory architecture is found more frequently than expected by chance in the human genome, yet many specifics underlying the regulatory design are unknown. Given that the function of most orthologous genes is similar across species, we hypothesized that the architecture and regulation of bidirectional promoters might also be similar across species, representing a core regulatory structure and enabling annotation of these regions in additional mammalian genomes. Results By mapping the intergenic distances of genes in human, chimpanzee, bovine, murine, and rat, we show an enrichment for pairs of genes equal to or less than 1,000 bp between their adjacent 5' ends ("head-to-head" compared to pairs of genes that fall in the same orientation ("head-to-tail" or whose 3' ends are side-by-side ("tail-to-tail". A representative set of 1,369 human bidirectional promoters was mapped to orthologous sequences in other mammals. We confirmed predictions for 5' UTRs in nine of ten manual picks in bovine based on comparison to the orthologous human promoter set and in six of seven predictions in human based on comparison to the bovine dataset. The two predictions that did not have orthology as bidirectional promoters in the other species resulted from unique events that initiated transcription in the opposite direction in only those species. We found evidence supporting the independent emergence of bidirectional promoters from the family of five RecQ helicase genes, which gained their bidirectional promoters and partner genes independently rather than through a duplication process. Furthermore, by expanding our comparisons from pairwise to multispecies analyses we developed a map representing a core set of bidirectional promoters in mammals. Conclusion We show that the orthologous positions of bidirectional

  3. Development of Amplified 16S Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis for Identification of Actinomyces Species and Comparison with Pyrolysis-Mass Spectrometry and Conventional Biochemical Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Val; O’Neill, G. L.; Magee, J T; Duerden, B I

    1999-01-01

    Identification of Actinomyces spp. by conventional phenotypic methods is notoriously difficult and unreliable. Recently, the application of chemotaxonomic and molecular methods has clarified the taxonomy of the group and has led to the recognition of several new species. A practical and discriminatory identification method is now needed for routine identification of clinical isolates. Amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) was applied to reference strains (n = 27) and clinic...

  4. Photocatalytic Reactive Oxygen Species Formation by Semiconductor-Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles. Toward Light-Induced Modulation of Biological Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiskopf, Nir; Ben-Shahar, Yuval; Galchenko, Michael; Carmel, Inbal; Moshitzky, Gilli; Soreq, Hermona; Banin, Uri

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor-metal hybrid nanoparticles manifest efficient light-induced spatial charge separation at the semiconductor-metal interface, as demonstrated by their use for hydrogen generation via water splitting. Here, we pioneer a study of their functionality as efficient photocatalysts for the formation of reactive oxygen species. We observed enhanced photocatalytic activity forming hydrogen peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxyl radicals upon light excitation, which was significantly larger than that of the semiconductor nanocrystals, attributed to the charge separation and the catalytic function of the metal tip. We used this photocatalytic functionality for modulating the enzymatic activity of horseradish peroxidase as a model system, demonstrating the potential use of hybrid nanoparticles as active agents for controlling biological processes through illumination. The capability to produce reactive oxygen species by illumination on-demand enhances the available peroxidase-based tools for research and opens the path for studying biological processes at high spatiotemporal resolution, laying the foundation for developing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27224678

  5. 1种华钩藤植物的分子鉴定%Molecular identification of one species of Uncaria sinensis ( Oliv.) Havil.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱爽; 周林; 杨梅宝; 黄宏靓; 孙悦; 曾常青

    2012-01-01

    Objective In order to clarify the phylogenetic relationship of one species of Uncaria sinensis(Oliv. ) Havil,molecular identification and genetic analysis were carried out by using the rDNA ITS sequence as molecular marker. Methods Molecular identification and genetic analysis were carried out with the rDNA ITS sequence as molecular marker. Total DNA was extracted with modified CTAB method and thereby rDNA ITS regions were amplified with universal primer,sequenced and phylogenetic analysed with Clustal X,BioEdit and PAUP. Results The entire rDNA ITS sequence of Uncaria was 719 bp. Sequence analysis showed that the rDNA ITS sequence was closely related to Uncaria sinensis ( Oliv. ) Havil available in GenBank and the similarity reached 99.4%. Conclusion Based on molecular biology methods of rDNA ITS region analysis, molecular identification is useful in accurate classification on Uncaria sinensis ( Oliv. ) Havil. , which provides molecular evidence of taxonomy and identification of different species in genus Uncaria.%目的 以核糖体转录间隔区( rDNA ITS)序列为分子标记,对1种华钩藤植物进行遗传分析与分子鉴定.方法 通过改良CTAB法提取样品总DNA,利用通用引物对rDNA ITS序列进行PCR扩增,经克隆、测序后,运用Clustal X、BioEdit和PAUP等软件进行序列分析和构建系统发育树.结果 测序得到样品的rDNA ITS区序列长度为719 bp,序列分析结果显示其与Genbank中已有的华钩藤[Uncaria sinensi ( Oliv.) Havil.] rDNA ITS区序列之间相似性达99.4%,并且在系统发育树中并排聚类成1支.结论 基于rDNA ITS区序列的测序分析和系统发育树构建的分子生物学方法,能够对华钩藤植物进行准确的分子鉴定,为钩藤属中药材的种类鉴定和种间分类提供分子生物学理论依据.

  6. Utilization of fluorescent probes for the quantification and identification of subcellular proteomes and biological processes regulated by lipid peroxidation products

    OpenAIRE

    Cummins, Timothy D.; Higdon, Ashlee N; Kramer, Philip A.; Chacko, Balu K; Riggs, Daniel W.; Salabei, Joshua K.; Dell’Italia, Louis J.; Zhang, Jianhua; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modifications to cellular proteins are critical in mediating redox-sensitive processes such as autophagy, the antioxidant response, and apoptosis. The proteins that become modified by reactive species are often compartmentalized to specific organelles or regions of the cell. Here, we detail protocols for identifying the subcellular protein targets of lipid oxidation and for linking protein modifications with biological responses such as autophagy. Fluorophores such as BODIPY-labeled...

  7. Noninvasive individual and species identification of jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor) and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in Belize, Central America using cross-species microsatellites and faecal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wultsch, Claudia; Waits, Lisette P; Kelly, Marcella J

    2014-11-01

    There is a great need to develop efficient, noninvasive genetic sampling methods to study wild populations of multiple, co-occurring, threatened felids. This is especially important for molecular scatology studies occurring in challenging tropical environments where DNA degrades quickly and the quality of faecal samples varies greatly. We optimized 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci for jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor) and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) and assessed their utility for cross-species amplification. Additionally, we tested their reliability for species and individual identification using DNA from faeces of wild felids detected by a scat detector dog across Belize in Central America. All microsatellite loci were successfully amplified in the three target species, were polymorphic with average expected heterozygosities of HE = 0.60 ± 0.18 (SD) for jaguars, HE = 0.65 ± 0.21 (SD) for pumas and HE = 0.70 ± 0.13 (SD) for ocelots and had an overall PCR amplification success of 61%. We used this nuclear DNA primer set to successfully identify species and individuals from 49% of 1053 field-collected scat samples. This set of optimized microsatellite multiplexes represents a powerful tool for future efforts to conduct noninvasive studies on multiple, wild Neotropical felids. PMID:24751217

  8. Cebrennus Simon, 1880 (Araneae: Sparassidae): a revisionary up-date with the description of four new species and an updated identification key for all species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The spider genus Cebrennus Simon, 1880 is revised again after thirteen years. Four new species are described: Cebrennus atlas spec. nov. from Morocco (female), C. flagellatus spec. nov. from Afghanistan (male), C. laurae spec. nov. from Canary Islands (male), and C. rechenbergi spec. nov. from Morocco (male and female). Cebrennus clercki (Audouin, 1826) comb. nov. is transferred from Philodromidae to Sparassidae and considered a nomen dubium. The holotype of C. aethiopicus Simon, 1880 is illustrated for the first time. Cebrennus tunetanus Simon, 1885 is re-described by illustrating its copulatory organs and some somatic characters, the internal duct system is shown for the first time supporting its placement in Cebrennus. An updated identification key for all species is provided. New records of Cebrennus species are listed: C. wagae (Simon, 1874) is recorded from Libya and Malta for the first time, the latter representing the first record for the entire genus from Europe. C. kochi (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1872) is recorded from Syria, C. aethiopicus from Sudan for the first time. Records from the Canary Islands and from Afghanistan extend the known generic distribution range further to the West and East. Behavioural aspects (burrowing, escaping, mating) of C. rechenbergi and partly of C. villosus (Jézéquel & Junqua, 1966) are described. Photographs of this behaviour as well as of the habitus of several species are provided. PMID:24869871

  9. The comparative reproductive biology of a tetraploid species, Hedychium villosum, and its diploid progenitor H. tenuiflorum (Zingiberaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J Y; Liu, Q; Li, Q J

    2014-05-01

    The evolutionary advantages of polyploidy may result from a number of changes in floral traits and breeding system, which may enable polyploids to exploit new habitats and become widespread. In this study, we comparatively investigated the floral biology of the tetraploid species Hedychium villosum and its diploid progenitor H. tenuiflorum, to assess reproductive divergence between the two species. The results showed that flowers of the tetraploid species last longer and produce more nectar than did diploid species. The flowering times of the two species did not overlap at all. Observations of floral visitors in natural populations demonstrated that butterflies and hawkmoths were effective pollinators of both species, but there was a significant difference in butterfly and hawkmoth assemblages between the two species. The hand-pollination experiments and pollen tube growth experiments suggested that diploid H. tenuiflorum was self-incompatible, while tetraploid H. villosum was completely self-compatible. H. villosum has a much wider distribution range and occupies more diverse habitats than H. tenuiflorum. Polyploidisation may enable tetraploid H. villosum to exploit new habitats previously unavailable to diploid H. tenuiflorum. PMID:23957369

  10. Self-Organized Criticality in the Model of Biological Evolution Describing Interaction of "Coenophilous" and " Coenophobous" Species

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Kovalev; Pis'mak, Yu. M.; Vechernin, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    The modification of the model of P.Bak and K.Sneppen of the self-organized biological evolution is proposed on the basis of a formalization of the scheme of the biosphere evolution suggested by O.V.Kovalev. This scheme is regarded as one approximating the realistic model of the ecosystem evolution. The fundamental difference between "coenophilous" species and "coenophobous" ones in respect to their reaction on the external environment is represented. The dynamics of the modified model as well...

  11. A Keystone Ant Species Provides Robust Biological Control of the Coffee Berry Borer Under Varying Pest Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan R Morris; John Vandermeer; Ivette Perfecto

    2015-01-01

    Species' functional traits are an important part of the ecological complexity that determines the provisioning of ecosystem services. In biological pest control, predator response to pest density variation is a dynamic trait that impacts the provision of this service in agroecosystems. When pest populations fluctuate, farmers relying on biocontrol services need to know how natural enemies respond to these changes. Here we test the effect of variation in coffee berry borer (CBB) density on the...

  12. Identification and Differentiation Between Hoodia gordonii Masson) Sweet ex Decne., Opuntia ficus indica (L.) P. Miller and Other Related Hoodia Species by Microscopy and PCR Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.gordonii an appetite suppressant is used extensively as botanical dietary supplement. Microscopy and molecular genetic procedure are provided for identification and differentiation between H. gordonii, O. ficus-indica and other related Hoodia species.P. ...

  13. Rapid and accurate identification of isolates of Candida species by melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decat, E.; van Mechelen, E.; Saerens, B.; Vermeulen, S.J.T.; Boekhout, T.; de Blaiser, S.; Vaneechoutte, M.; Deschaght, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid identification of clinically important yeasts can facilitate the initiation of anti-fungal therapy, since susceptibility is largely species-dependent. We evaluated melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA) as an identification too

  14. Evaluation of PNA FISH® Yeast Traffic Light in identification of Candida species from blood and non-blood culture specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic, Marina; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Tonkic, Marija

    2016-08-01

    PNA FISH(®) (peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization) Yeast Traffic Light (PNA FISH(®) YTL) assay is a commercially avaliable method for rapid identification of Candida spp. directly from positive blood cultures. This report provides a one-year experience in identification of yeasts from 25 specimens (15 positive blood cultures and 10 other clinically significant specimens) using PNA FISH(®) YTL and comparing it to VITEK 2 System. Overall, assay identification compatibility with VITEK 2 System was found among 21/25 (84%) isolates tested. Only 3/25 (12%) of the isolates were not identified, and one isolate was misidentified by the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay. Our results show that the assay is a reliable method in identification of Candida spp. not only from blood cultures, but even from other clinically significant specimens (urine cultures, catheter tip cultures, peritoneal fluid cultures) when compared to automated method like VITEK 2 System. This novel application of the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay could therefore contribute to cost savings and significant benefit to patients, as rapid information about isolated yeast species is provided.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of Atlantic representatives of the invasive Pacific coral species Tubastraea coccinea and T. tagusensis (Scleractinia, Dendrophylliidae): Implications for species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, K C C; Migotto, A E; Zilberberg, C; Lin, M F; Forsman, Z; Miller, D J; Kitahara, M V

    2016-09-30

    Members of the azooxanthellate coral genus Tubastraea are invasive species with particular concern because they have become established and are fierce competitors in the invaded areas in many parts of the world. Pacific Tubastraea species are spreading fast throughout the Atlantic Ocean, occupying over 95% of the available substrate in some areas and out-competing native endemic species. Approximately half of all known coral species are azooxanthellate but these are seriously under-represented compared to zooxanthellate corals in terms of the availability of mitochondrial (mt) genome data. In the present study, the complete mt DNA sequences of Atlantic individuals of the invasive scleractinian species Tubastraea coccinea and Tubastraea tagusensis were determined and compared to the GenBank reference sequence available for a Pacific "T. coccinea" individual. At 19,094bp (compared to 19,070bp for the GenBank specimen), the mt genomes assembled for the Atlantic T. coccinea and T. tagusensis were among the longest sequence determined to date for "Complex" scleractinians. Comparisons of genomes data showed that the "T. coccinea" sequence deposited on GenBank was more closely related to that from Dendrophyllia arbuscula than to the Atlantic Tubastraea spp., in terms of genome length and base pair similarities. This was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis, suggesting that the former was misidentified and might actually be a member from the genus Dendrophyllia. In addition, although in general the COX1 locus has a slow evolutionary rate in Scleractinia, it was the most variable region of the Tubastraea mt genome and can be used as markers for genus or species identification. Given the limited data available for azooxanthellate corals, the results presented here represent an important contribution to our understanding of phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history of the Scleractinia. PMID:27234370

  16. Molecular identification key based on PCR/RFLP for three polychaete sibling species of the genus Marenzelleria, and the species' current distribution in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, M.; Laine, A. O.; Jürss, K.; Bastrop, R.

    2008-06-01

    Studies of Marenzelleria species were often hampered by identification uncertainties when using morphological characters only. A newly developed PCR/RFLP protocol allows a more efficient discrimination of the three species Marenzelleria viridis, Marenzelleria neglecta and Marenzelleria arctia currently known for the Baltic Sea. The protocol is based on PCR amplification of two mitochondrial DNA gene segments (16S, COI) followed by digestion with restriction enzymes. As it is faster and cheaper than PCR/sequencing protocols used so far, the protocol is recommended for large-scale analyses. The markers allow an undoubted determination of species irrespective of life stage or condition of the worms in the samples. The protocol was validated on about 950 specimens sampled at more than 30 sites of the Baltic and the North Sea, and on specimens from populations of the North American east coast. Besides this test we used mitochondrial DNA sequences (16S, COI, Cytb) and starch gel electrophoresis to further investigate the distribution of the three Marenzelleria species in the Baltic Sea. The results show that M. viridis (formerly genetic type I or M. cf. wireni) occurred in the Öresund area, in the south western as well as in the eastern Baltic Sea, where it is found sympatric with M. neglecta. Allozyme electrophoresis indicated an introduction by range expansion from the North Sea. The second species, M. arctia, was only found in the northern Baltic Sea, where it sometimes occurred sympatric with M. neglecta or M. viridis. For Baltic M. arctia, the most probable way of introduction is by ship ballast water from the European Arctic. There is an urgent need for a new genetic analysis of all Marenzelleria populations of the Baltic Sea to unravel the current distribution of the three species.

  17. Unification of multi-species vertebrate anatomy ontologies for comparative biology in Uberon

    OpenAIRE

    Haendel M.A.; Balhoff J.P.; Bastian F.B.; Blackburn D.C.; Blake J.A.; Bradford Y.; Comte A.; Dahdul W.M.; Dececchi T.A.; Druzinsky R.E.; Hayamizu T.F.; Ibrahim N.; Lewis S.E.; Mabee P.M.; Niknejad A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elucidating disease and developmental dysfunction requires understanding variation in phenotype. Single-species model organism anatomy ontologies (ssAOs) have been established to represent this variation. Multi-species anatomy ontologies (msAOs; vertebrate skeletal, vertebrate homologous, teleost, amphibian AOs) have been developed to represent 'natural' phenotypic variation across species. Our aim has been to integrate ssAOs and msAOs for various purposes, including establishing ...

  18. Legume Diversity Patterns in West Central Africa: Influence of Species Biology on Distribution Models

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel de la Estrella; Mateo, Rubén G.; Wieringa, Jan J.; Barbara Mackinder; Jesús Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are used to produce predictions of potential Leguminosae diversity in West Central Africa. Those predictions are evaluated subsequently using expert opinion. The established methodology of combining all SDMs is refined to assess species diversity within five defined vegetation types. Potential species diversity is thus predicted for each vegetation type respectively. The primary aim of the new methodology is to define, in more detail, areas of sp...

  19. Identification and ecology of bacterial communities associated with necroses of three cactus species.

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, J. L.; Fogleman, J C

    1993-01-01

    To compare the bacterial communities residing in necrotic tissues of columnar cacti of the Sonoran Desert, isolates from 39 organ pipe, 19 saguaro, and 16 senita cacti were obtained. The isolates were clustered into 28 conspecific groups on the basis of their fatty acid profiles. The distributions of the individual bacterial isolates varied among cactus species. Seven of the 28 species groups were unique to a particular cactus species, whereas 8 species groups were found in all three cacti. T...

  20. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  1. Molecular Tools for Cryptic "Candida" Species Identification with Applications in a Clinical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarra, Soledad; Dudiuk, Catiana; Mancilla, Estefania; Vera Garate, Maria Veronica; Guerrero, Sergio; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    "Candida" spp. includes more than 160 species but only 20 species pose clinical problems. "C. albicans" and "C. parapsilosis" account for more than 75% of all the fungemias worldwide. In 1995 and 2005, one "C. albicans" and two "C. parapsilosis"-related species were described, respectively. Using…

  2. Evaluation of Partial 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing for Identification of Nocardia Species by Using the MicroSeq 500 System with an Expanded Database

    OpenAIRE

    Cloud, Joann L.; Patricia S Conville; Croft, Ann; Harmsen, Dag; Witebsky, Frank G.; Carroll, Karen C.

    2004-01-01

    Identification of clinically significant nocardiae to the species level is important in patient diagnosis and treatment. A study was performed to evaluate Nocardia species identification obtained by partial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing by the MicroSeq 500 system with an expanded database. The expanded portion of the database was developed from partial 5′ 16S rDNA sequences derived from 28 reference strains (from the American Type Culture Collection and the Japanese Collection of Microo...

  3. Reverse engineering and identification in systems biology: strategies, perspectives and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Alejandro F; Banga, Julio R

    2014-02-01

    The interplay of mathematical modelling with experiments is one of the central elements in systems biology. The aim of reverse engineering is to infer, analyse and understand, through this interplay, the functional and regulatory mechanisms of biological systems. Reverse engineering is not exclusive of systems biology and has been studied in different areas, such as inverse problem theory, machine learning, nonlinear physics, (bio)chemical kinetics, control theory and optimization, among others. However, it seems that many of these areas have been relatively closed to outsiders. In this contribution, we aim to compare and highlight the different perspectives and contributions from these fields, with emphasis on two key questions: (i) why are reverse engineering problems so hard to solve, and (ii) what methods are available for the particular problems arising from systems biology?

  4. Identification of viable Listeria species based on reverse transcription-multiplex PCR (RT-MPCR) and restriction digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the identification of viable Listeria species was developed based on reverse transcription-multiplex PCR (RT-MPCR) and restriction digestion. The targets for RT-MPCR were iap mRNAs whose genes are common to all Liseria species. A set of five primers was used in this study. Two of them were genus specific, and the other three were specific to L. monocytogenase, L. innocua, and L. grayi respectively. By RT-MPCR, L. monocytogenese, L. innocua, L. grayi, and a group of Listeria species, including L. ivanovii, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri, were specifically identified. To differentiate the latter three Listeria species, RT-MPCR products were subjected to digestion with HpaI and ScaI. The sensitivity of RT-MPCR in detecting Listeria species was determined to be 50 CFU/mL. RT-MPCR was found to discriminate between viable and nonviable cells and to detect viable Listeria species in a food model.

  5. COI barcode versus morphological identification of Culex ( Culex ) (Diptera: Culicidae) species: a case study using samples from Argentina and Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurito, Magdalena; de Oliveira, Tatiane MP; Almirón, Walter Ricardo; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2013-01-01

    Sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) mitochondrial gene from adults of 22 Culex ( Culex ) species from Argentina and Brazil were employed to assess species identification and to test the usefulness of COI for barcoding using the best close match (BCM) algorithm. A pairwise Kimura two-parameter distance matrix including the mean intra and interspecific distances for 71 COI barcode sequences was constructed. Of the 12 COI lineages recovered in the Neighbour-joining topology, five confirmed recognised morphological species ( Cx. acharistus , Cx. chidesteri , Cx. dolosus , Cx. lygrus and Cx. saltanensis ) with intraspecific divergences lower than 1.75%. Cx. bilineatus is formally resurrected from the synonymy of Cx. dolosus . Cx. maxi , Cx. surinamensis and the Coronator group species included were clustered into an unresolved lineage. The intraspecific distance of Cx. pipiens (3%) was almost twice the interspecific between it and Cx. quinquefasciatus (1.6%). Regarding the BCM criteria, the COI barcode successfully identified 69% of all species. The rest of the sequences, approximately 10%, 18% and 3%, remained as ambiguously, mis and unidentified, respectively. The COI barcode does not contain enough information to distinguish Culex ( Cux. ) species. PMID:24473810

  6. COI barcode versus morphological identification of Culex ( Culex (Diptera: Culicidae species: a case study using samples from Argentina and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Laurito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI mitochondrial gene from adults of 22 Culex ( Culex species from Argentina and Brazil were employed to assess species identification and to test the usefulness of COI for barcoding using the best close match (BCM algorithm. A pairwise Kimura two-parameter distance matrix including the mean intra and interspecific distances for 71 COI barcode sequences was constructed. Of the 12 COI lineages recovered in the Neighbour-joining topology, five confirmed recognised morphological species ( Cx. acharistus , Cx. chidesteri , Cx. dolosus , Cx. lygrus and Cx. saltanensis with intraspecific divergences lower than 1.75%. Cx. bilineatus is formally resurrected from the synonymy of Cx. dolosus . Cx. maxi , Cx. surinamensis and the Coronator group species included were clustered into an unresolved lineage. The intraspecific distance of Cx. pipiens (3% was almost twice the interspecific between it and Cx. quinquefasciatus (1.6%. Regarding the BCM criteria, the COI barcode successfully identified 69% of all species. The rest of the sequences, approximately 10%, 18% and 3%, remained as ambiguously, mis and unidentified, respectively. The COI barcode does not contain enough information to distinguish Culex ( Cux. species.

  7. Identification of a Novel Group of Bacteria in Sludge from a Deteriorated Biological Phosphorus Removal Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Alex T.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Filipe, Carlos; Grady, Leslie; Molin, Søren; Stahl, David A

    1999-01-01

    The microbial diversity of a deteriorated biological phosphorus removal reactor was investigated by methods not requiring direct cultivation. The reactor was fed with media containing acetate and high levels of phosphate (P/C weight ratio, 8:100) but failed to completely remove phosphate in the effluent and showed very limited biological phosphorus removal activity. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA was used to investigate the bacterial diversit...

  8. Biological and Ecological Characteristics of Terrestrial Vertebrate Species Residing in Estuaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) program is designed to assess and monitor the effects of environmental contaminants on biological...

  9. Species detection and abundance using a biosensor - Development and Testing of in-situ Biological Sensors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), http://www.mbari.org/ESP/, is an autonomous biological sensing system that conducts in situ collection and molecular...

  10. Effective identification of conserved pathways in biological networks using hidden Markov models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The advent of various high-throughput experimental techniques for measuring molecular interactions has enabled the systematic study of biological interactions on a global scale. Since biological processes are carried out by elaborate collaborations of numerous molecules that give rise to a complex network of molecular interactions, comparative analysis of these biological networks can bring important insights into the functional organization and regulatory mechanisms of biological systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we present an effective framework for identifying common interaction patterns in the biological networks of different organisms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs. Given two or more networks, our method efficiently finds the top matching paths in the respective networks, where the matching paths may contain a flexible number of consecutive insertions and deletions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on several protein-protein interaction (PPI networks obtained from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and other public databases, we demonstrate that our method is able to detect biologically significant pathways that are conserved across different organisms. Our algorithm has a polynomial complexity that grows linearly with the size of the aligned paths. This enables the search for very long paths with more than 10 nodes within a few minutes on a desktop computer. The software program that implements this algorithm is available upon request from the authors.

  11. Research status of identification of Brucella species/types%布鲁氏菌种/型鉴别的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫飞; 郑文艳; 张专才; 曲芬

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a kind of zoonosis which is caused by members of the genus Brucella. World Organization for Ani-mal Health lists it as an important infectious disease. In recent years, the morbidity of brucellosis has been rising. Application of molecular biology techniques to the research of Brucella species/types is of important significance. This article summarizes the re-search progress of identification of Brucella species/types, which provides evidence for judging and predicting epidemic dynamics, studing epidemic characteristics and making reasonable and effective prevention and control counter-measures.%布鲁菌病是由布鲁氏菌引起的一种人畜共患病,世界动物卫生组织将其列为重要传染病,近些年发病率呈上升趋势。应用分子生物学技术进行布鲁氏菌种/型分类的研究具有重要意义。本文通过总结近年来布鲁氏菌种/型鉴定的研究进展,为今后判断预测疫情动态、研究流行特点以及制定合理有效的防治对策提供重要的理论依据。

  12. Identification of mustelid species: otter ( Lutra lutra ), American mink ( Mustela vison ) and polecat ( Mustela putorius ), by analysis of DNA from faecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Jacobsen, Lene

    1999-01-01

    mustelid species. A method is described for assigning faeces to these three mustelid species, based on analysis of DNA extracted from their seats. Mustelid-specific primers were developed for PCR amplification of a part of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, and two restriction enzymes were found...... to detect species- specific sequence variation. Analysis of DNA from different faecal samples showed that the results were reproducible and that the approach provided an efficient method of species identification....

  13. Seed biology of tree species and strategies for ex situ conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The last decade has brought increased efforts to conserve genetic diversity of plants using ex situ strategies. Technologies used in genebanking originated with crop species and are now being applied to diverse species that show a wide range of storage physiologies. A diversity of germplasm, includ...

  14. Species level identification and antifungal susceptibility of yeasts isolated from various clinical specimens and evaluation of Integral System Yeasts Plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicmen, Can; Doluca, Mine; Gulat, Sinem; Gunduz, Ayriz T; Tuksavul, Fevziye

    2012-07-01

    It is essential to use easy, standard, cost-effective and accurate methods for identification and susceptibility testing of yeasts in routine practice. This study aimed to establish the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility of yeast isolates and also to evaluate the performance of the colorimetric and commercially available Integral System Yeasts Plus (ISYP). Yeast isolates (n=116) were identified by conventional methods and ISYP. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by the microdilution method according to the standards of CLSI M27-A3 and ISYP. Candida albicans (50%) was the most common species isolated, followed by C. parapsilosis (25%) (mostly in blood samples). According to the CLSI M27-S3 criteria, resistance rates for amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were 0%, 0%, 4.6%, 4.5% and 1.8%, respectively. Resistance for miconazole (MIC >1 mg/L) was found as 17.9%. Sixty-two (53.4%) of the isolates which were analyzed by ISYP showed disagreement with those identified by the conventional methods and API ID 32C identification kit or a specific identification code could not be assigned by ISYP. The performance of ISYP could be indicated as low for all antifungal drugs tested according to the ROC analysis (AUC: 0.28-0.56). As the current version of ISYP displays a poor performance, it is recommended to use the other commercial systems whose results are approved as reliable and in agreement with those of the reference methods in identification and susceptibility testing of yeasts. PMID:22842602

  15. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Lynn L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CHROMagar Candida (CaC is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata. Methods We evaluated the usefulness of CaC in the identification of C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. firmetaria, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. inconspicua, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. lusitaniae, C. norvegensis, C. parapsilosis, and C. rugosa. Results Most NAC produced colonies that were shades of pink, lavender, or ivory. Several isolates of C. firmetaria and all C. inconspicua produced colonies difficult to differentiate from C. krusei. Most C. rugosa isolates produced unique colonies with morphology like C. krusei except in a light blue-green color. C. glabrata isolates produced small dark violet colonies that could be differentiated from the pink and lavender colors produced by other species. All seventeen isolates of C. dubliniensis produced green colonies similar to those produced by C. albicans. Conclusion C. glabrata and C. rugosa appear distinguishable from other species using CaC. Some NAC, including C. firmetaria and C. inconspicua, could be confused with C. krusei using this medium.

  16. Biological Assessment of the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally Listed Threatened and Endangered Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2006-09-19

    This biological assessment considers the effects of continuing to operate Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally listed threatened or endangered species, based on current and future operations identified in the 2006 Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS; DOE In Prep.). We reviewed 40 projects analyzed in the SWEIS as well as two aspects on ongoing operations to determine if these actions had the potential to affect Federally listed species. Eighteen projects that had not already received U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) consultation and concurrence, as well as the two aspects of ongoing operations, ecological risk from legacy contaminants and the Outfall Reduction Project, were determined to have the potential to affect threatened or endangered species. Cumulative impacts were also analyzed.

  17. The biology of three Mexican-American species of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatoma recurva, Triatoma protracta and Triatoma rubida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alejandro Martínez-Ibarra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The values of biological parameters related to hatching, lifespan, the number of blood meals between moults, mortality, time lapse before the beginning of feeding, feeding time and defecation delay for each instar of three Mexican-American species of Triatominae, Triatoma recurva, Triatoma protracta (former subspecies protracta and Triatoma rubida (former subspecies uhleri, were evaluated and compared. No significant (p > 0.05 differences were recorded among the three species with respect to the average time required to hatch. This time was approximately 19 days. The average egg-to-adult development time was significantly (p < 0.05 shorter for T. rubida. The number of blood meals at each nymphal instar varied from one-five for each species. The mortality rates were higher for the first-instar nymphs of the three species studied. The mean time lapse before the beginning of feeding was between 0.3-3 min for most nymphs of all instars of each species studied. The mean feeding time was the longest for T. recurva, followed by T. protracta. The defecation delay was less than 10 min for T. recurva and T. rubida. Given these results, only T. rubida should be considered an important potential vector of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission to humans in areas of Mexico where these species exist, whereas T. recurva and T. protracta would be of secondary importance.

  18. Classification and Identification of Marine Penicillium Species Based on ITS Sequences of rDNA%利用ITS核酸序列分析鉴定海洋青霉菌

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲凌云; 田黎; 孙修勤

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of this study is to identify 6 marine fungi species by analyzing ITS nucleotide sequence, which had been primarily identified as penicillium based on morphological characteristics. [Method] The ITS regions of these species were cloned by molecule biology method and phylogenetic analyzed using ClustalX1.83 software. [Result] The ITS regions of these species were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis between the yield sequences and the ITS sequences assessed in GenBank showed that the 6 strains all belonged to penicillium. [Conclusion] The present study suggests ITS sequence analysis could not be used as an only proof, but it is a very useful supplementary tool for the classification and identification of marine penicillium combined with morphological characteristics.

  19. A biologically inspired psychometric function for accuracy of visual identification as a function of exposure duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias

    rising from zero, then peaking, and finally decaying to a somewhat sustained plateau, mimicking closely observed instantaneous firing rates of monkey visual cortex neurons. The new psychometric function fits well to experimental data in both the present study and in a previous study of single......-letter identification accuracy (Bundesen & Harms, 1999). Also, we conducted a follow-up experiment to test the ability of the psychometric functions to fit single-letter identification data, at different stimulus contrast levels; also in this experiment the new psychometric function prevailed. Further, after insertion...... into Bundesen’s Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990), the new psychometric function enables closer fits to data from a previous whole and partial report experiment....

  20. Comparison of VITEK 2 YST Card and API 20C AUX system in identification of non- albicans Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Durmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In the present study, it was aimed to compare results obtained by using VITEK 2 YST Card (bioMérieux, France with those obtained by using API 20C AUX (bioMérieux, France for identification of non- albicans Candida species, which was isolated from various clinical samples, at level of species.Materials and methods: Forty-one non-albicans Candida isolates, which were isolated from 28 urine, 10 blood and 3 vaginal swab specimens, and found to be negative by germ tube test, were identified by using VITEK 2 YST Card (bioMérieux, France. In addition, microscopic morphology was assessed in corn-meal Tween 80 agar, while carbohydrate assimilation was assessed by using commercially available API 20C AUX kit (bioMérieux, France.Results: Thirty-four isolates (82.9% were identified as identical species by these 2 systems, while different results were obtained in 7 isolates (17.1%. 5 isolates, identified as Candida glabrata by API 20C AUX system, were identified as Candida tropicalis (n=2, Candida krusei, Candida lipolitica and Candida kefyr by VITEK 2 YST Card. One other isolate, identified as C.tropicalis, was identified as Candida parapsilosis; and additional one isolate, identified as C.parapsilosis, was identified as C.tropicalis.Conclusion: It was concluded that one should be cautious in the identification of C.glabrata, in particular, C.tropicalis and C.parapsilosis, although between VITEK 2 YST Card and API 20C AUX system results was found largely similarity in identification of non-albicans Candida spp.

  1. Detection and identification of human Plasmodium species with real-time quantitative nucleic acid sequence-based amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kager Piet A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decisions concerning malaria treatment depend on species identification causing disease. Microscopy is most frequently used, but at low parasitaemia (Plasmodium antigen detection do often not allow for species discrimination as microscopy does, but also become insensitive at Methods This paper reports the development of a sensitive and specific real-time Quantitative Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (real-time QT-NASBA assays, based on the small-subunit 18S rRNA gene, to identify the four human Plasmodium species. Results The lower detection limit of the assay is 100 – 1000 molecules in vitro RNA for all species, which corresponds to 0.01 – 0.1 parasite per diagnostic sample (i.e. 50 μl of processed blood. The real-time QT-NASBA was further evaluated using 79 clinical samples from malaria patients: i.e. 11 Plasmodium. falciparum, 37 Plasmodium vivax, seven Plasmodium malariae, four Plasmodium ovale and 20 mixed infections. The initial diagnosis of 69 out of the 79 samples was confirmed with the developed real-time QT-NASBA. Re-analysis of seven available original slides resolved five mismatches. Three of those were initially identified as P. malariae mono-infection, but after re-reading the slides P. falciparum was found, confirming the real-time QT-NASBA result. The other two slides were of poor quality not allowing true species identification. The remaining five discordant results could not be explained by microscopy, but may be due to extreme low numbers of parasites present in the samples. In addition, 12 Plasmodium berghei isolates from mice and 20 blood samples from healthy donors did not show any reaction in the assay. Conclusion Real-time QT-NASBA is a very sensitive and specific technique with a detection limit of 0.1 Plasmodium parasite per diagnostic sample (50 μl of blood and can be used for the detection, identification and quantitative measurement of low parasitaemia of Plasmodium species, thus

  2. Species identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria: a comparison of two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Holm, Anette; Knudsen, Elisa;

    2011-01-01

    We compared two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Shimadzu/SARAMIS and Bruker) on a collection of consecutive clinically important anaerobic bacteria (n = 290). The Bruker system had more correct identifications to the species level...... (67.2% versus 49.0%), but also more incorrect identifications (7.9% versus 1.4%). The system databases need to be optimized to increase identification levels. However, MALDI-TOF MS in its present version seems to be a fast and inexpensive method for identification of most clinically important...... anaerobic bacteria....

  3. Flowering biology and pollen production of four species of the genus Rosa L.

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Żuraw; Aneta Sulborska; Ernest Stawiarz; Elżbieta Weryszko-Chmielewska

    2015-01-01

    Wild growing rose species are of great importance as a source of pollen for insects. Oil extracted from the petals of various Rosa species is used in perfumery, cosmetic industry, and therapeutics. In our study, we compared the flowering duration and flower lifespan, the number of stamens and pistils, the mass and size of pollen grains as well as the anatomical features of the petals of four Rosa species: R. canina, R. ×damascena, R. gallica, and R. rugosa. Moreover, we examined the pollen lo...

  4. Identification of mammalian species using the short and highly variable regions of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianhui; Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Yueqin; Liu, Zhiping; Chen, Yang; Zhao, Ziqin

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) typing is useful for the species determination of degraded samples and the nucleotide diversity of target fragments across species is crucial for the discrimination. In this study, the short and highly polymorphic regions flanked by two conserved termini were sought by the sequence alignment of mtDNA across species and two target regions located at 12S rRNA gene were characterized. Two universal primer sets were developed that appear to be effective for a wide variety of mammalian species, even for domestic birds. The two target regions could be efficiently amplified using their universal primer sets on degraded samples and provide sufficient information for species determination. Therefore, the two short and highly variable target regions might provide a high discriminative capacity and should be suitable for the species determination of degraded samples.

  5. Identification of the Main Intermediate Precursor of l-Ergothioneine Biosynthesis in Human Biological Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Sotgia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A capillary electrophoresis coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (CE–MS/MS has been used to make a qualitative determination of hercynine—the main precursor of l-ergothioneine biosynthesis—in some key human biological specimens, such as urine, whole blood, plasma, and saliva. From semiquantitative analysis results, the highest concentrations of hercynine were detected in saliva and whole blood, whereas much lower concentrations were measured in urine and plasma. Whole blood was the biological matrix with the highest concentration of l-ergothioneine followed by plasma, saliva, and urine. The antioxidant effects attributed to l-ergothioneine, along with its peculiar antioxidant mechanism, offer a possible explanation for the presence of the hercynine, as well as its concentration, in the considered biological matrices.

  6. Prevalence and Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Near-Neighbor Species in the Malabar Coastal Region of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddayelachagiri, Bhavani V.; Paul, Soumya; Nagaraj, Sowmya; Gogoi, Madhurjya; Sripathy, Murali H.; Batra, Harsh V.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of pathogens with biowarfare importance requires detection tools that specifically differentiate them from near-neighbor species. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of a fatal disease melioidosis, is one such biothreat agent whose differentiation from its near-neighbor species is always a challenge. This is because of its phenotypic similarity with other Burkholderia species which have a wide spread geographical distribution with shared environmental niches. Melioidosis is a major public health concern in endemic regions including Southeast Asia and northern Australia. In India, the disease is still considered to be emerging. Prevalence surveys of this saprophytic bacterium in environment are under-reported in the country. A major challenge in this case is the specific identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei from the growing list of species of Burkholderia genus. The objectives of this study included examining the prevalence of B. pseudomallei and near-neighbor species in coastal region of South India and development of a novel detection tool for specific identification and differentiation of Burkholderia species. Briefly, we analyzed soil and water samples collected from Malabar coastal region of Kerala, South India for prevalence of B. pseudomallei. The presumptive Burkholderia isolates were identified using recA PCR assay. The recA PCR assay identified 22 of the total 40 presumptive isolates as Burkholderia strains (22.72% and 77.27% B. pseudomallei and non-pseudomallei Burkholderia respectively). In order to identify each isolate screened, we performed recA and 16S rDNA sequencing. This two genes sequencing revealed that the presumptive isolates included B. pseudomallei, non-pseudomallei Burkholderia as well as non-Burkholderia strains. Furthermore, a gene termed D-beta hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (bdha) was studied both in silico and in vitro for accurate detection of Burkholderia genus. The optimized bdha

  7. Prevalence and Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Near-Neighbor Species in the Malabar Coastal Region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddayelachagiri, Bhavani V; Paul, Soumya; Nagaraj, Sowmya; Gogoi, Madhurjya; Sripathy, Murali H; Batra, Harsh V

    2016-09-01

    Accurate identification of pathogens with biowarfare importance requires detection tools that specifically differentiate them from near-neighbor species. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of a fatal disease melioidosis, is one such biothreat agent whose differentiation from its near-neighbor species is always a challenge. This is because of its phenotypic similarity with other Burkholderia species which have a wide spread geographical distribution with shared environmental niches. Melioidosis is a major public health concern in endemic regions including Southeast Asia and northern Australia. In India, the disease is still considered to be emerging. Prevalence surveys of this saprophytic bacterium in environment are under-reported in the country. A major challenge in this case is the specific identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei from the growing list of species of Burkholderia genus. The objectives of this study included examining the prevalence of B. pseudomallei and near-neighbor species in coastal region of South India and development of a novel detection tool for specific identification and differentiation of Burkholderia species. Briefly, we analyzed soil and water samples collected from Malabar coastal region of Kerala, South India for prevalence of B. pseudomallei. The presumptive Burkholderia isolates were identified using recA PCR assay. The recA PCR assay identified 22 of the total 40 presumptive isolates as Burkholderia strains (22.72% and 77.27% B. pseudomallei and non-pseudomallei Burkholderia respectively). In order to identify each isolate screened, we performed recA and 16S rDNA sequencing. This two genes sequencing revealed that the presumptive isolates included B. pseudomallei, non-pseudomallei Burkholderia as well as non-Burkholderia strains. Furthermore, a gene termed D-beta hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (bdha) was studied both in silico and in vitro for accurate detection of Burkholderia genus. The optimized bdha

  8. Species identification of cooked fish by urea isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis : a collaborative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehbein, H.; Kundiger, R.; Yman, I.M.;

    1999-01-01

    The suitability and reliability of urea IEF and SDS-PAGE for the identification of cooked fish flesh was tested by a collaborative study among nine laboratories. Urea IEF was performed with CleanGels as well as with ImmobilineGels, and ExcelGels were used for SDS-PAGE, enabling all three types of...... was incorrect, and with SDS-PAGE a similar result was obtained. It was concluded that methods, as now developed, are suitable for checking the species declaration of fishery products. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved...

  9. Identification of a bitter-taste receptor gene repertoire in different Lagomorphs species

    OpenAIRE

    Ana M Ferreira; Marques, Andreia T.; Luca eFontanesi; Carl-Gustaf eThulin; Elvira eSales-Baptista; Susana S. Araújo; Almeida, André M.

    2016-01-01

    The repertoires of bitter taste receptor (T2R) gene have been described for several animal species, but these data are still scarce for Lagomorphs. The aim of the present work is to identify potential repertoires of T2R in several Lagomorph species, covering a wide geographical distribution. We studied these genes in Lepus timidus, Lepus europaeus, Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus, Romerolagus diazi and Sylvilagus floridanus, using Oryctolagus cuniculus cuniculus as control species for PCR and D...

  10. Identification of a Bitter-Taste Receptor Gene Repertoire in Different Lagomorphs Species

    OpenAIRE

    Ana M Ferreira; Marques, Andreia T.; Fontanesi, Luca; Thulin, Carl-Gustaf; Sales-Baptista, Elvira; Susana S. Araújo; Almeida, André M.

    2016-01-01

    The repertoires of bitter-taste receptor (T2R) gene have been described for several animal species, but these data are still scarce for Lagomorphs. The aim of the present work is to identify potential repertoires of T2R in several Lagomorph species, covering a wide geographical distribution. We studied these genes in Lepus timidus, L. europaeus, Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus, Romerolagus diazi, and Sylvilagus floridanus, using O. cuniculus cuniculus as control species for PCR and DNA sequenci...

  11. Assessing DNA Barcoding as a Tool for Species Identification and Data Quality Control

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-Yi Shen; Xiao Chen; Murphy, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the number of sequences of diverse species submitted to GenBank has grown explosively and not infrequently the data contain errors. This problem is extensively recognized but not for invalid or incorrectly identified species, sample mixed-up, and contamination. DNA barcoding is a powerful tool for identifying and confirming species and one very important application involves forensics. In this study, we use DNA barcoding to detect erroneous sequences in GenBank by evaluating ...

  12. Identification of dipteran species of forensic entomology importance in summer season in Edirne

    OpenAIRE

    ÇOBAN, Erhan; BEYARSLAN, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    This study, performed in order to determine the dipteran species of forensic entomology importance at high temperatures, was carried out from 20 May to 12 September, 2008. The most important insect species are included particularly in Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae and Muscidae families of Diptera. Pig carrions and bovine viscera were put in iron cages inside Balkan Campus of Trakya University to monitor and identify the dipteran species attracted. Observations and sampling were performed twice...

  13. Estimating the genetic divergence and identification of three trichinella species by isoenzyme analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Šnábel V.; Malakauskas A.; Dubinský P.; Kapel C.M.O.

    2001-01-01

    Isoenzyme-based approach was applied to compare Trichinella spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis species. Among 13 enzyme systems examined, esterase (EST), malic enzyme (ME) and phosphoglucomutase (PGM) have been found as fully diagnostic, with no common allele in species studied. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), adenylate kinase (AK), hexokinase (HK), peptidase leucyl-alanine (PEP-C) and fructose-bis-phosphatase (FBP) have been capable of distinguishing the two species from resulting profile...

  14. Development of a mild mercaptoethanol extraction method for determination of mercury species in biological samples by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Feng, Weiyue; Shi, Junwen; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Motao; Li, Bai; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2007-03-30

    A mild, efficient and convenient extraction method of using 2-mercaptoethanol contained extractant solution combined with an incubator shaker for determination of mercury species in biological samples by HPLC-ICP-MS has been developed. The effects of the concentration of 2-mercaptoethanol, the composition of the extractant solution and the shaking time on the efficiency of mercury extraction were evaluated. The optimization experiments indicated that the quantitative extraction of mercury species from biological samples could be achieved by using 0.1% (v/v) HCl, 0.1% (v/v) 2-mercapoethanol and 0.15% (m/v) KCl extractant solution in an incubator shaker for shaking overnight (about 12h) at room temperature. The established method was validated by analysis of various biological certified reference materials, including NRCC DOLT-3 (dogfish liver), IAEA 436 (tuna fish), IAEA MA-B-3/TM (garfish filet), IAEA MA-M-2/TM (mussel tissue), GBW 08193 (bovine liver) and GBW 08572 (prawn). The analytical results of the reference materials were in good agreement with the certified or reference values of both methyl and total mercury, indicating that no distinguishable transformation between mercury species had occurred during the extraction and determination procedures. The limit of detection (LOD) for methyl (CH(3)Hg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) by the method are both as 0.2microg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.s) for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+) are 3.0% and 5.8%, respectively. The advantages of the developed extraction method are that (1) it is easy to operate in HPLC-ICP-MS for mercury species determination since the extracted solution can be directly injected into the HPLC column without pH adjustment and (2) the memory effect of mercury in the ICP-MS measurement system can be reduced.

  15. PCR methods in meat species identification as a tool for the verification of regional and traditional meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Spychaj

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the times of industrial food production, regional and traditional food articles provide an attractive alternative for people looking for unforgettable sensory impressions. Regional or traditional food, commonly recognized as palatable and healthy, is also, for many consumers, a unique, sentimental journey back to tastes from childhood times. A gradual increase of demand for this type of food articles as well as relatively high prices of these products may generate among unscrupulous food manufacturers a number of improper production practices, e.g. replacement of a more expensive meat by a less expensive alternative. Species composition of meat products can be verified using chromatographic, immunological, electrophoretic, or genetic methods. One of the genetic methods applied in examining the authenticity of food composition, including meat and its products, is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. This paper presents the most important techniques utilizing this technology to identify the origin of specific meat components constituting part of regional or traditional food articles. It was demonstrated that PCR techniques, in combination with species-specific primers, PCR- -RFLP, PCR-SSCP and real-time PCR, allow identification of meat species occurring independently or in mixtures with other meat species as well as meat subjected to thermal treatment or other technological processes in the course of industrial production. The only exception is the PCR-RAPD method that fails to identify meat species in the case of strong DNA degradation or in complex meat mixtures.

  16. PREVALENCE, IDENTIFICATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF VARI OUS ENTEROCOCCAL SPECIES ISOLATED IN KATIHAR DISTRICT, BIHAR WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO VRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Paul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Identification of enterococci to species level in or der to determine the species prevalent in this geographic region and al so to determine the species-specific antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. OBJECTIVE: To detect and determine glycopeptide resistance by screening for vancomycin resistant en terococci (VRE in both colonized and infected patients. METHODS: A total of 123 isolates of enterococcus species wer e recovered from various clinical and faecal samples of hospitali zed patients, from September 2010 to June 2011. Various species of enterococci were identified by st andard methods. Vancomycin susceptibility in enterococci was detected by disc d iffusion method (DDM, vancomycin screen agar method (VSAM and agar dilution method to dete rmine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. RESULTS: E. faecalis was the predominant isolate from the cl inical and faecal samples. Multidrug resistance was more in E. faecium than E. faecalis. MIC method could detect 7 VRE and 27 strains with reduced susceptibility to vancom ycin. Disk diffusion test and vancomycin screen agar failed to detect 50 % and 29.4% of resi stant strains respectively. CONCLUSION: Vancomycin resistance was also detected in less vir ulent strains of enterococcus like E. gallinarum and E. dispar. In laboratories where perfo rmance of MIC studies is not feasible, VSAM method should be preferred over the DDM for det ection of vancomycin resistance in enterococci

  17. Identification of Malassezia yeast species isolated from patients with pityriasis versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Vanessa; Tanhausen, Fernanda; Weiss, Luciana; Milan, Thais; Mezzari, Adelina; Weber, Magda Blessmann

    2011-01-01

    Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a disease with worldwide distribution. Twelve different species of Malassezia yeast have been described. The objective of this study was to determine which species of Malassezia are more prevalent in patients with pityriasis versicolor. Samples were collected by scraping the lesions of 87 patients with a clinical suspicion of pityriasis versicolor. The samples were then submitted to fungal microscopy and culture to identify the species. The species found were: Malassezia sympodialis (30%), Malassezia furfur (25.7%), Malassezia globosa (22.7%), Malassezia restricta (12.1%), Malassezia obtusa (7.6%) and Malassezia slooffiae (1.5%).

  18. A streamlined DNA tool for global identification of heavily exploited coastal shark species (genus Rhizoprionodon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danillo Pinhal

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate species-specific landings data is an essential step toward achieving sustainable shark fisheries. Globally distributed sharpnose sharks (genus Rhizoprionodon exhibit life-history characteristics (rapid growth, early maturity, annual reproduction that suggests that they could be fished in a sustainable manner assuming an investment in monitoring, assessment and careful management. However, obtaining species-specific landings data for sharpnose sharks is problematic because they are morphologically very similar to one another. Moreover, sharpnose sharks may also be confused with other small sharks (either small species or juveniles of large species once they are processed (i.e., the head and fins are removed. Here we present a highly streamlined molecular genetics approach based on seven species-specific PCR primers in a multiplex format that can simultaneously discriminate body parts from the seven described sharpnose shark species commonly occurring in coastal fisheries worldwide. The species-specific primers are based on nucleotide sequence differences among species in the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus (ITS2. This approach also distinguishes sharpnose sharks from a wide range of other sharks (52 species and can therefore assist in the regulation of coastal shark fisheries around the world.

  19. A streamlined DNA tool for global identification of heavily exploited coastal shark species (genus Rhizoprionodon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhal, Danillo; Shivji, Mahmood S; Nachtigall, Pedro G; Chapman, Demian D; Martins, Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining accurate species-specific landings data is an essential step toward achieving sustainable shark fisheries. Globally distributed sharpnose sharks (genus Rhizoprionodon) exhibit life-history characteristics (rapid growth, early maturity, annual reproduction) that suggests that they could be fished in a sustainable manner assuming an investment in monitoring, assessment and careful management. However, obtaining species-specific landings data for sharpnose sharks is problematic because they are morphologically very similar to one another. Moreover, sharpnose sharks may also be confused with other small sharks (either small species or juveniles of large species) once they are processed (i.e., the head and fins are removed). Here we present a highly streamlined molecular genetics approach based on seven species-specific PCR primers in a multiplex format that can simultaneously discriminate body parts from the seven described sharpnose shark species commonly occurring in coastal fisheries worldwide. The species-specific primers are based on nucleotide sequence differences among species in the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus (ITS2). This approach also distinguishes sharpnose sharks from a wide range of other sharks (52 species) and can therefore assist in the regulation of coastal shark fisheries around the world.

  20. 76 FR 5340 - Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops and Protected Species Safe Handling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... December 1, 2010 (75 FR 74693), in FR Doc. 2010-30238, on page 74694, in the third column, the date of the... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA061 Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification... vessel owners must bring a copy of the appropriate swordfish and/or shark permit(s), a copy of the...

  1. 77 FR 32950 - Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops and Protected Species Safe Handling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... Atlantic sharks (71 FR 58057; October 2, 2006). Dealers who attend and successfully complete a workshop are..., Release, and Identification Workshop certificate in order to renew either permit (71 FR 58057; October 2... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC042 Schedules for Atlantic Shark...

  2. 75 FR 53665 - Schedules for Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops and Protected Species Safe Handling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Atlantic sharks (71 FR 58057; October 2, 2006). Dealers who attend and successfully complete a workshop are..., and Identification Workshop certificate in order to renew either permit (71 FR 58057; October 2, 2006... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XY59 Schedules for Atlantic Shark...

  3. Helminth species diversity and biology in the bobcat, Lynx rufus (Schreber), from Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiekotter, K L

    1985-04-01

    Cestodes of 4 species and nematodes of 9 species were collected from 75 bobcats, Lynx rufus (Schreber), in Nebraska from 1977 to 1979. Of these 75, 11 were trapped from 6 border counties in 3 border states: South Dakota, 7 carcasses/3 counties; Kansas, 3/2; and Wyoming, 1/1. Helminths recovered included: Mesocestoides corti Hoeppli, 1925 (15% prevalence), Taenia rileyi Loewen, 1929 (67%), Taenia pisiformis (Bloch, 1780) Gmelin, 1790 (27%), Taenia macrocystis (Diesing, 1850) Lühe, 1910 (19%), Physaloptera praeputialis von Linstow, 1889 (55%), Physaloptera rara Hall and Wigdor, 1918 (32%), Toxascaris leonina (von Linstow, 1902) Leiper, 1907 (31%), Toxocara cati (Schrank, 1780) (39%), Ancylostoma tubaeforme (Zeder, 1800) von Linstow, 1885 (5%), Pterygodermatites (Multipectines) cahirensis (Jägerskiöld, 1909) Quentin, 1969 (1%), Vogeloides felis (Vogel, 1928) Davtian, 1933 (7%), Cylicospirura felineus (Chandler, 1925) Sandground, 1932 (12%), and Capillaria aerophila (Creplin, 1839) (4%). One bobcat was not infected; 74 had 1 to 7 species (means = 3). Simpson's index for helminth species was moderately low (0.12), indicating a relatively diverse helminth fauna. Mean levels of infection between prominent species pairs and within each species were compared with bobcat sex and age differences using Student's t-test. Mean intensity of Physaloptera praeputialis was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater than that of Toxocara cati; mean intensity of Mesocestoides corti was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater than that of all other prominent species. No significant intensity differences were indicated among bobcat sex and age categories. G-tests computed for prevalence of prominent species with bobcat age indicated no significance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Linking climate change and biological invasions: Ocean warming facilitates nonindigenous species invasions

    OpenAIRE

    Stachowicz, John J.; Terwin, Jeffrey R.; Whitlatch, Robert B.; Osman, Richard W.

    2002-01-01

    The spread of exotic species and climate change are among the most serious global environmental threats. Each independently causes considerable ecological damage, yet few data are available to assess whether changing climate might facilitate invasions by favoring introduced over native species. Here, we compare our long-term record of weekly sessile marine invertebrate recruitment with interannual variation in water temperature to assess the likely effect of climate change on the success and ...

  5. A Study on the Breeding Biology of Some Bat Species in Turkey (Mammalia: Chiroptera)

    OpenAIRE

    BAYDEMİR, Nursel AŞAN; ALBAYRAK, İrfan

    2006-01-01

    This study is based on the records of gestation and lactation periods of 17 bat species (Rousettus aegyptiacus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, R. hipposideros, R. euryale, R. blasii, Myotis myotis, M. blythii, M. emarginatus, M. nattereri, M. mystacinus, M. capaccinii, Eptesicus serotinus, Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. kuhlii, P. savii, Plecotus auritus, and Miniopterus schreibersii) caught from various localities in Turkey and of the development stages of embryos belonging to Myotis species. It ...

  6. Biological and genetic characteristics of two trichinella isolates in China; comparison with European species

    OpenAIRE

    Liu M.Y.; Zhu X.P.; Xu K.C.; Lu Q.; Boireau P.

    2001-01-01

    The most recent taxonomic revision in Trichinella genus included 10 taxa. Trichinella spiralis (Ts) is a thoroughly studied species but most of the isolates came from the Europe or American continents. Few information is available from China about the Trichinella isolates and their diversity. In this report two Chinese isolates were characterized and compared with European strains. The in vitro release of newborn larvae (NBL) was determined for the two species. NBL is observed in supernatant ...

  7. Soil nematode assemblages indicate the potential for biological regulation of pest species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Hanne; Ferris, Howard

    2016-05-01

    In concept, regulation or suppression of target nematode pest species should be enhanced when an abundance of predator species is supported by ample availability of bacterial- fungal- and non-damaging plant-feeding prey species. We selected soils from natural and managed environments that represented different levels of resource availability and disturbance. In microcosm chambers of each soil, in its natural state or after heat defaunation, we introduced test prey species not already resident in the soils (Meloidogyne incognita and Steinernema feltiae). Survival of the test prey was determined after a 5-day bioassay exposure. Across the soils tested, predator abundance and biomass were greater in undisturbed soils with plentiful resources and lower in soils from agricultural sites. Suppressiveness to the two introduced species increased with both numerical abundance and metabolic footprint of the predator assemblages. The magnitude of the increase in suppressiveness was greater at low numbers of predators then dampened to an asymptotic level at greater predator abundance, possibly determined by temporal and spatial aspects of the bioassay system and/or satiation of the predators. The more resource-limited the predators were and the higher the metabolic predator footprint, the greater the suppressiveness. The applied implications of this study are that soil suppressiveness to pest species may be enhanced by increasing resources to predators, removing chemical and physical constraints to their survival and increase, and altering management practices so that predators and target prey are co-located in time and space.

  8. Seasonal Variation of δ13C of Four Tree Species: A Biological Integrator of Environmental Variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Tao LI; Jun XIA; Le XIANG; Tao LIANG; Qi-Jing LIU

    2005-01-01

    Foliar δ13C values, an indicator of long-term intercellular carbon dioxide concentration and, thus,of long-term water use efficiency (WUE) in plants, were measured for Pinus massoniana Lamb., P. elliottii Engelm., Cunninghamia laceolata (Lamb.) Hook., and Schima superba Gardn. et Champ. in a restored forest ecosystem in the Jiazhu River Basin. Seasonal variation and the relationship between the foliar δ13Cvalues of the four species and environmental factors (monthly total precipitation, monthly average air temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, and monthly total solar radiation and evaporation)were investigated. The monthly δ13C values and WUE of the four species increased with increasing precipitation, air temperature, solar radiation, and evaporation, whereas δ13C values of the four species decreased with increasing relative humidity and atmospheric pressure. Despite significant differences in δ13C seasonal means for the four species, our results demonstrate a significant convergence in the responses of δ13C values and WUE to seasonal variations in environmental factors among the species investigated and that the δ13C signature for each species gives a strong indication of environmental variables.

  9. Biological species is the only possible form of existence for higher organisms: the evolutionary meaning of sexual reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shcherbakov Victor P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Consistent holistic view of sexual species as the highest form of biological existence is presented. The Weismann's idea that sex and recombination provide the variation for the natural selection to act upon is dominated in most discussions of the biological meaning of the sexual reproduction. Here, the idea is substantiated that the main advantage of sex is the opposite: the ability to counteract not only extinction but further evolution as well. Living systems live long owing to their ability to reproduce themselves with a high fidelity. Simple organisms (like bacteria reach the continued existence due to the high fidelity of individual genome replication. In organisms with a large genome and complex development, the achievable fidelity of DNA replication is not enough for the precise reproduction of the genome. Such species must be capable of surviving and must remain unchanged in spite of the continuous changes of their genes. This problem has no solution in the frame of asexual ("homeogenomic" lineages. They would rapidly degrade and become extinct or blurred out in the course of the reckless evolution. The core outcome of the transition to sexual reproduction was the creation of multiorganismic entity - biological species. Individual organisms forfeited their ability to reproduce autonomously. It implies that individual organisms forfeited their ability to substantive evolution. They evolve as a part of the biological species. In case of obligatory sexuality, there is no such a thing as synchronic multi-level selection. Natural selection cannot select anything that is not a unit of reproduction. Hierarchy in biology implies the functional predestination of the parts for the sake of the whole. A crucial feature of the sexual reproduction is the formation of genomes of individual organisms by random picking them over from the continuously shuffled gene pool instead of the direct replication of the ancestor's genome. A clear anti

  10. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  11. Erroneous host identification frustrates systematics and delays implementation of biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin, F.; Roversi, P.F.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Misidentifications of pests and their natural enemies and misinterpretations of pest-natural enemy associations have led to the failure of a number of biological control projects. In addition to misidentification, more complicated kinds of errors, such as mistakes in establishing host records of par

  12. Conflicting Perceptions of the Status of Field Biology and Identification Skills in UK Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulder, Raymond; Scott, Graham W.

    2016-01-01

    Reviews of the state of biology fieldwork in UK schools and universities at the beginning of the twenty-first century (Barker, Slingsby, and Tilling 2002; Smith 2004) were not entirely pessimistic; rather they suggested ways forward that might lead to an increase in fieldwork. Whether their hopes have been realised has, perhaps, been revealed by…

  13. A mixed-species microarray for identification of food spoilage bacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caspers, M.P.M.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Zuijlen, van A.C.M.; Brul, S.; Montijn, R.C.; Abee, T.; Kort, R.

    2011-01-01

    Failure of food preservation is frequently caused by thermostable spores of members of the Bacillaceae family, which show a wide spectrum of resistance to cleaning and preservation treatments. We constructed and validated a mixed-species genotyping array for 6 Bacillus species, including Bacillus su

  14. Identification of a new species, Candida subhashii, as a cause of peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, H.; Groenewald, M.; Mohan, S.; Richardson, S.; Bunn, U.; Gibas, C.F.C; Poutanen, S.; Sigler, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of fungal peritonitis from which a novel Candida species was isolated. Phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene show that the Candida species is distinct from, but related to,

  15. Identification of staphylococcus species with hyperspectral microscope imaging and classification algrorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral microscope imaging is presented as a rapid and efficient tool to classify foodborne bacteria species. The spectral data were obtained from five different species of Staphylococcus spp. with a hyperspectral microscope imaging system that provided a maximum of 89 contiguous spectral imag...

  16. Development of a real-time PCR for identification of brachyspira species in human colonic biopsies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, L.J.; Stel, H.V.; Schipper, M.E.I.; Bakker, L.J.; Neefjes-Borst, E.A.; Brande, J.M.H. van den; Boel, C.H.E.; Seldenrijk, K.A.; Siersema, P.D.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Kusters, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brachyspira species are fastidious anaerobic microorganisms, that infect the colon of various animals. The genus contains both important pathogens of livestock as well as commensals. Two species are known to infect humans: B. aalborgi and B. pilosicoli. There is some evidence suggesting

  17. UAS BASED TREE SPECIES IDENTIFICATION USING THE NOVEL FPI BASED HYPERSPECTRAL CAMERAS IN VISIBLE, NIR AND SWIR SPECTRAL RANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Näsi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned airborne systems (UAS based remote sensing offers flexible tool for environmental monitoring. Novel lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI based, frame format, hyperspectral imaging in the spectral range from 400 to 1600 nm was used for identifying different species of trees in a forest area. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this was the first research where stereoscopic, hyperspectral VIS, NIR, SWIR data is collected for tree species identification using UAS. The first results of the analysis based on fusion of two FPI-based hyperspectral imagers and RGB camera showed that the novel FPI hyperspectral technology provided accurate geometric, radiometric and spectral information in a forested scene and is operational for environmental remote sensing applications.

  18. Uas Based Tree Species Identification Using the Novel FPI Based Hyperspectral Cameras in Visible, NIR and SWIR Spectral Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsi, R.; Honkavaara, E.; Tuominen, S.; Saari, H.; Pölönen, I.; Hakala, T.; Viljanen, N.; Soukkamäki, J.; Näkki, I.; Ojanen, H.; Reinikainen, J.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned airborne systems (UAS) based remote sensing offers flexible tool for environmental monitoring. Novel lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) based, frame format, hyperspectral imaging in the spectral range from 400 to 1600 nm was used for identifying different species of trees in a forest area. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this was the first research where stereoscopic, hyperspectral VIS, NIR, SWIR data is collected for tree species identification using UAS. The first results of the analysis based on fusion of two FPI-based hyperspectral imagers and RGB camera showed that the novel FPI hyperspectral technology provided accurate geometric, radiometric and spectral information in a forested scene and is operational for environmental remote sensing applications.

  19. New Genus and species of Heteroxyidae from Brazil (Axinellida: Demospongiae: Porifera), with a revised identification key for the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, George Garcia; Pinheiro, Ulisses; Hajdu, Eduardo; Soest, Rob Van

    2016-01-01

    Alveospongia sinuosclera gen. nov. sp. nov. is described from shallow-waters off Canavieiras (Bahia, Brazil). The species bears an unusual morphology, combining saccular or alveolar, evenly perforated habit, and sinuous spiny microrhabdose microscleres. This sponge is tentatively classified within the Heteroxyidae Dendy (1905), on the basis of its confused choanosomal architecture of styles, and possession of spiny microrhabdose microscleres. Assays to generate DNA sequences from this material were unsuccessful. We emended the diagnosis of the family to include species bearing saccular/alveolar shape, microrhabdose acanthomicrostrongyles and styles/strongyles with modifications at the ends. The proposed new genus is compared to the remaining heteroxyid genera, as well as Crella (Crellidae), Batzella (Chondropsidae), Goreauiella (Astroscleridae) and Sceptrintus (Podospongiidae). A revised key for identification of Heteroxyidae genera is provided. PMID:27615873

  20. [Identification of Aloe species by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioda, Hiroko; Satoh, Kanako; Nagai, Fumiko; Okubo, Tomoko; Seto, Takako; Hamano, Tomoko; Kamimura, Hisashi; Kano, Itsu

    2003-08-01

    Juice and integument of leaves of 3 Aloe species, Aloe vera, A. ferox and A. africana, are not allowed to be used as food according to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law in Japan. On the other hand, whole leaves of A. arborescens can be used as food. The present study was designed to distinguish Aloe species by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. DNA was isolated from fresh and dried leaves of the 4 Aloe species. Five out of 32 different 10-mer primers examined were useful for analysis. By comparison of the characteristic bands of PCR products on agarose gel, it was possible to distinguish the 4 species. Thus, the botanical species of Aloe in commercial food products can be identified by RAPD analysis. PMID:14606430