WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological samples requirements

  1. High resolution x-ray microtomography of biological samples: Requirements and strategies for satisfying them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, B.W. Jr. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Rothman, S.S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    High resolution x-ray microscopy has been made possible in recent years primarily by two new technologies: microfabricated diffractive lenses for soft x-rays with about 30-50 nm resolution, and high brightness synchrotron x-ray sources. X-ray microscopy occupies a special niche in the array of biological microscopic imaging methods. It extends the capabilities of existing techniques mainly in two areas: a previously unachievable combination of sub-visible resolution and multi-micrometer sample size, and new contrast mechanisms. Because of the soft x-ray wavelengths used in biological imaging (about 1-4 nm), XM is intermediate in resolution between visible light and electron microscopies. Similarly, the penetration depth of soft x-rays in biological materials is such that the ideal sample thickness for XM falls in the range of 0.25 - 10 {mu}m, between that of VLM and EM. XM is therefore valuable for imaging of intermediate level ultrastructure, requiring sub-visible resolutions, in intact cells and subcellular organelles, without artifacts produced by thin sectioning. Many of the contrast producing and sample preparation techniques developed for VLM and EM also work well with XM. These include, for example, molecule specific staining by antibodies with heavy metal or fluorescent labels attached, and sectioning of both frozen and plastic embedded tissue. However, there is also a contrast mechanism unique to XM that exists naturally because a number of elemental absorption edges lie in the wavelength range used. In particular, between the oxygen and carbon absorption edges (2.3 and 4.4 nm wavelength), organic molecules absorb photons much more strongly than does water, permitting element-specific imaging of cellular structure in aqueous media, with no artifically introduced contrast agents. For three-dimensional imaging applications requiring the capabilities of XM, an obvious extension of the technique would therefore be computerized x-ray microtomography (XMT).

  2. Enhanced Biological Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a database of a variety of biological, reproductive, and energetic data collected from fish on the continental shelf in the northwest Atlantic Ocean....

  3. Biological Sample Monitoring Database (BSMDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Biological Sample Monitoring Database System (BSMDBS) was developed for the Northeast Fisheries Regional Office and Science Center (NER/NEFSC) to record and...

  4. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). PMID:20672388

  5. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  6. Fluorine ion transmission through thin biological samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XueJian-Ming; WangYu-Gang; 等

    1998-01-01

    F2+ beam with 3MeV is used to irradiate thin biological samples(onion inner suface membrane and kidney bean coat)in the transmission measurement ,its current density is 400-800nA/cm2,Results show that the onion samples can be broken up quickly under ion irradiating;as to kidney bean samples,about 60% of the implanted ions penetrate the samples,most of them lose part of their eneregy,fewer ions are found to be able to transmit through the sample without energy loss.SEM experiments are carried out to study sample's damage induced by the ions irradiation.

  7. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  8. Discovering biological progression underlying microarray samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qiu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In biological systems that undergo processes such as differentiation, a clear concept of progression exists. We present a novel computational approach, called Sample Progression Discovery (SPD, to discover patterns of biological progression underlying microarray gene expression data. SPD assumes that individual samples of a microarray dataset are related by an unknown biological process (i.e., differentiation, development, cell cycle, disease progression, and that each sample represents one unknown point along the progression of that process. SPD aims to organize the samples in a manner that reveals the underlying progression and to simultaneously identify subsets of genes that are responsible for that progression. We demonstrate the performance of SPD on a variety of microarray datasets that were generated by sampling a biological process at different points along its progression, without providing SPD any information of the underlying process. When applied to a cell cycle time series microarray dataset, SPD was not provided any prior knowledge of samples' time order or of which genes are cell-cycle regulated, yet SPD recovered the correct time order and identified many genes that have been associated with the cell cycle. When applied to B-cell differentiation data, SPD recovered the correct order of stages of normal B-cell differentiation and the linkage between preB-ALL tumor cells with their cell origin preB. When applied to mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation data, SPD uncovered a landscape of ESC differentiation into various lineages and genes that represent both generic and lineage specific processes. When applied to a prostate cancer microarray dataset, SPD identified gene modules that reflect a progression consistent with disease stages. SPD may be best viewed as a novel tool for synthesizing biological hypotheses because it provides a likely biological progression underlying a microarray dataset and, perhaps more importantly, the

  9. Determination of cadmium in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Katrin; Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke; Drexler, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of cadmium concentrations in biological material are performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), but also electrochemical methods, neutron activation analysis (NAA), and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). The predominant sample matrices include blood, plasma, serum, and urine, as well as hair, saliva, and tissue of kidney cortex, lung, and liver. While cadmium in blood reveals rather the recent exposure situation, cadmium in urine reflects the body burden and is an indicator for the cumulative long term exposure.After chronic exposure, cadmium accumulates in the human body and causes kidney diseases, especially lesions of proximal tubular cells. A tubular proteinuria causes an increase in urinary excretion of microproteins. Excretions of retinol binding protein (RBP), β2-microglobulin (β2-M), and α1-microglobulin are validated biomarkers for analyzing cadmium effects. For this purpose, immunological procedures such as ELISA, and radio- and latex-immunoassays are used.However, proteinuria is not specific to cadmium, but can also occur after exposure to other nephrotoxic agents or due to various kidney diseases. In summary, cadmium in urine and blood are the most specific biomarkers of cadmium exposure. A combination of parameters of exposure (cadmium in blood, cadmium in urine) and parameters of effect (e.g., β2-M, RBP) is required to reveal cadmium-induced nephrological effects. PMID:23430771

  10. PIXE and its applications to biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout this century, industrialized society has seriously affected the ecology by introducing huge amounts of pollutants into the atmosphere as well as marine and soil environments. On the other hand, it is known that these pollutants, in excess of certain levels of concentration, not only put at risk the life of living beings but may also cause the extinction of some species. It is therefore of basic importance to substantially increase quantitative determinations of trace element concentrations in biological specimens in order to assess the effects of pollutants. It is in this field that PIXE plays a key role in these studies, where its unique analytical properties are decisive. Moreover, since the importance of these research has been recognized in many countries, many scientists have been encouraged to continue or initiate new research programmes aimed to solve the worldwide pollution problem. This document presents an overview of those papers reporting the application of PIXE analysis to biological samples during this last decade of the 20th century and recounts the number of PIXE laboratories dedicating their efforts to find the clues of the biological effects of the presence of pollutants introduced in living beings. Sample preparation methods, different kinds of samples under study and the use of complementary analytical techniques are also illustrated. (author). 108 refs

  11. The application of ESEM to biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, J E; Donald, A M, E-mail: jem60@cam.ac.u [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) differs from a conventional SEM in that a differential pumping system maintains a pressure of gas (typically H{sub 2}O) in the specimen chamber whilst the gun remains at high vacuum. Ionizing collisions between electrons and these gas molecules create positive ions which drift down onto the sample neutralising specimen charge. It is therefore possible to image insulating samples without the need for metallic coating. The presence of water vapour in the chamber also means that a high relative humidity can be maintained and samples can be imaged in a hydrated state without the need for dehydration and fixation. These features suggest that ESEM could be well suited to imaging biological samples undergoing natural biological processes. We present a proof of principle study on the closure of stomatal pores in Tradescantia andersonia leaf tissue. An imaging protocol is developed and the advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed. Images of Vicia fabaleaf tissue are also presented. Challenges include minimising beam damage and reconciling the need for an adequate physiological temperature and a low gas pressure favourable for imaging, with the thermodynamic constraints on achieving a high relative humidity.

  12. Measurement of NO in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csonka, C; Páli, T; Bencsik, P; Görbe, A; Ferdinandy, P; Csont, T

    2015-03-01

    Although the physiological regulatory function of the gasotransmitter NO (a diatomic free radical) was discovered decades ago, NO is still in the frontline research in biomedicine. NO has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes; therefore, pharmacological modulation of NO levels in various tissues may have significant therapeutic value. NO is generated by NOS in most of cell types and by non-enzymatic reactions. Measurement of NO is technically difficult due to its rapid chemical reactions with a wide range of molecules, such as, for example, free radicals, metals, thiols, etc. Therefore, there are still several contradictory findings on the role of NO in different biological processes. In this review, we briefly discuss the major techniques suitable for measurement of NO (electron paramagnetic resonance, electrochemistry, fluorometry) and its derivatives in biological samples (nitrite/nitrate, NOS, cGMP, nitrosothiols) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. We conclude that to obtain a meaningful insight into the role of NO and NO modulator compounds in physiological or pathological processes, concomitant assessment of NO synthesis, NO content, as well as molecular targets and reaction products of NO is recommended.

  13. Mars Sample Handling and Requirements Panel (MSHARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael H.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Bogard, Donald D.; Clark, Benton C.; DeVincenzi, Donald; Drake, Michael J.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Papike, James J.; Race, Margaret S.; Stahl, David

    1999-01-01

    In anticipation of the return of samples from Mars toward the end of the first decade of the next century, NASA's Office of Space Sciences chartered a panel to examine how Mars samples should be handled. The panel was to make recommendations in three areas: (1) sample collection and transport back to Earth; (2) certification of the samples as nonhazardous; and (3) sample receiving, curation, and distribution. This report summarizes the findings of that panel. The samples should be treated as hazardous until proven otherwise. They are to be sealed within a canister on Mars, and the canister is not to be opened until within a Biosafety Hazard Level 4 (BSL-4) containment facility here on Earth. This facility must also meet or exceed the cleanliness requirements of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) facility for curation of extraterrestrial materials. A containment facility meeting both these requirements does not yet exist. Hazard assessment and life detection experiments are to be done at the containment facility, while geochemical characterization is being performed on a sterilized subset of the samples released to the science community. When and if the samples are proven harmless, they are to be transferred to a curation facility, such as that at JSC.

  14. Fast x-ray fluorescence microtomography of hydrated biological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Lombi

    Full Text Available Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples.

  15. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF); Boden, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowley, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Dattoria, Vince [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Desai, Narayan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foster, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Goldstone, Robin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gregurick, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological Systems Science Division; Houghton, John [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; Izaurralde, Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Joseph, Renu [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Pritchard, Matt [British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), Oxon (United Kingdom); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Strand, Gary [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Stuart, Cory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tatusova, Tatiana [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Thomas, Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zurawski, Jason [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  16. Predicting sample size required for classification performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueroa Rosa L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supervised learning methods need annotated data in order to generate efficient models. Annotated data, however, is a relatively scarce resource and can be expensive to obtain. For both passive and active learning methods, there is a need to estimate the size of the annotated sample required to reach a performance target. Methods We designed and implemented a method that fits an inverse power law model to points of a given learning curve created using a small annotated training set. Fitting is carried out using nonlinear weighted least squares optimization. The fitted model is then used to predict the classifier's performance and confidence interval for larger sample sizes. For evaluation, the nonlinear weighted curve fitting method was applied to a set of learning curves generated using clinical text and waveform classification tasks with active and passive sampling methods, and predictions were validated using standard goodness of fit measures. As control we used an un-weighted fitting method. Results A total of 568 models were fitted and the model predictions were compared with the observed performances. Depending on the data set and sampling method, it took between 80 to 560 annotated samples to achieve mean average and root mean squared error below 0.01. Results also show that our weighted fitting method outperformed the baseline un-weighted method (p Conclusions This paper describes a simple and effective sample size prediction algorithm that conducts weighted fitting of learning curves. The algorithm outperformed an un-weighted algorithm described in previous literature. It can help researchers determine annotation sample size for supervised machine learning.

  17. Biological Sample Ambient Preservation (BioSAP) Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA's need for alternative methods for ambient preservation of human biological samples collected during extended spaceflight and planetary operations,...

  18. Uranium-233 analysis of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two liquid scintillation techniques were compared for 233U analysis: a two-phase extraction system (D2EHPA) developed by Keough and Powers, 1970, for Pu analysis; and a single-phase emulsion system (TT21) that holds the total sample in suspension with the scintillator. The first system (D2EHPA) was superior in reducing background (two- to threefold) and in accommodating a larger sample volume (fivefold). Samples containing > 50 mg/ml of slats were not extracted quantitatively by D2EHPA

  19. PIXE - Analysis for environmental and biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness and accuracy of PIXE as an analytical tool in the study of trace elements in environmental samples of the Brazilian Cerrado are discussed. The report lists actual and forthcoming publications resulting from the study. The mechanism of exchange of elements in solution in water to aerosols has been investigated. For details of the procedure the reader is referred to an earlier report

  20. Manipulation of biological samples using micro and nano techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Jaime; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2009-01-01

    The constant interest in handling, integrating and understanding biological systems of interest for the biomedical field, the pharmaceutical industry and the biomaterial researchers demand the use of techniques that allow the manipulation of biological samples causing minimal or no damage to thei...

  1. Micro and Nano Techniques for the Handling of Biological Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micro and Nano Techniques for the Handling of Biological Samples reviews the different techniques available to manipulate and integrate biological materials in a controlled manner, either by sliding them along a surface (2-D manipulation), or by gripping and moving them to a new position (3-D...

  2. Efficient Sample Preparation from Complex Biological Samples Using a Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions

    OpenAIRE

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Guckenberger, David J.; Beebe, David J.; Berry, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate...

  3. Solid-phase microextraction for the analysis of biological samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theodoridis, G; Koster, EHM; de Jong, GJ

    2000-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been introduced for the extraction of organic compounds from environmental samples. This relatively new extraction technique has now also gained a lot of interest in a broad field of analysis including food, biological and pharmaceutical samples. SPME has a num

  4. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS... bacterial vaccines; (iii) Two samples of Coccidiosis Vaccine; (iv) Eighteen samples of Rabies Vaccine... as follows: (1) Ten samples of Bacterial Master Seeds. (2) Thirteen samples of viral Master Seeds...

  5. Estimation of monosaccharide radioactivity in biological samples through osazone derivatization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F.J.; Pons, A.; Alemany, M.; Palou, A.

    1982-03-01

    A method for the quantitative estimation of radioactivity in the glucose (monosaccharide) fraction of biological samples is presented. Radioactive samples are added with cold glucose, and 1 aliquot receives a known amount of radioactive glucose as internal standard. After controlled osazone formation and three washings of the yellow precipitate, the osazones are dissolved, decolored, and their radioactivity determined through scintillation counting. The overall efficiency of recovery is 23-24% of the initial readioactivity. Each sample is corrected by the recovery of its own internal standard. There is a very close linear relationship between radioactivity present in the samples and radioactivity found, despite the use of different biological samples (rat plasma, hen egg yolk and albumen).

  6. Sampling and sample preparation methods for the analysis of trace elements in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors attempt to give a most systamtic possible treatment of the sample taking and sample preparation of biological material (particularly in human medicine) for trace analysis (e.g. neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry). Contamination and loss problems are discussed as well as the manifold problems of the different consistency of solid and liquid biological materials, as well as the stabilization of the sample material. The process of dry and wet ashing is particularly dealt with, where new methods are also described. (RB)

  7. Activation Analysis of Biological Samples of Forensic Interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In forensic (crime investigation) studies, samples of a biological origin are frequently used as evidence. Often it is necessary to compare one sample (associated with a victim or the scene of a crime) with another sample of the same general type (associated with a suspect in some way). The purpose of such comparisons is to establish, if possible, that - to a high degree of probability - the two samples have a common origin. Typically, all available relevant methods of comparison are utilized in such cases by the criminalist: microscopic examination; X-ray diffraction; infra-red, visible, and ultra-violet spectrometry; and various methods of elemental analysis. The forensic applications of high-flux thermal-neutron activation analysis (NAA) have shown great promise and are attracting considerable attention. The authors' laboratory has been engaged in such forensic NAA research and development studies for the past five years. (It also operates a non-profit Forensic Activation Analysis Service, available to all law enforcement agencies, for the NAA comparison of evidence samples involved in actual criminal cases. Samples from many actual cases have been thus examined.) In the United States, NAA results have now been successfully presented in court in some 20 actual cases. Some of the evidence-type materials of interest are non-biological; others are biological. Only the latter will be discussed in this paper. The principal evidence-type materials of a biological nature that have been examined in this laboratory by high-flux thermal-NAA to date are the following: hair, blood, faeces, urine, fingernails, skin, wood, tobacco, whisky, green plants, and marijuana. (In addition, a number of these evidence-type materials have also been studied in this laboratory by high-flux photonuclear activation analysis (PNAA); attention in this paper will be largely devoted to the thermal-NAA forensic studies.) The main topics to be reported upon in this paper are: (1) limits of

  8. Preparation of Biological Samples Containing Metoprolol and Bisoprolol for Applying Methods for Quantitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Mahu Ştefania

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension is a complex disease with many serious complications, representing a leading cause of mortality. Selective beta-blockers such as metoprolol and bisoprolol are frequently used in the management of hypertension. Numerous analytical methods have been developed for the determination of these substances in biological fluids, such as liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography. Due to the complex composition of biological fluids a biological sample pre-treatment before the use of the method for quantitative determination is required in order to remove proteins and potential interferences. The most commonly used methods for processing biological samples containing metoprolol and bisoprolol were identified through a thorough literature search using PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Willey Journals databases. Articles published between years 2005-2015 were reviewed. Protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction and solid phase extraction are the main techniques for the extraction of these drugs from plasma, serum, whole blood and urine samples. In addition, numerous other techniques have been developed for the preparation of biological samples, such as dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, carrier-mediated liquid phase microextraction, hollow fiber-protected liquid phase microextraction, on-line molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction. The analysis of metoprolol and bisoprolol in human plasma, urine and other biological fluids provides important information in clinical and toxicological trials, thus requiring the application of appropriate extraction techniques for the detection of these antihypertensive substances at nanogram and picogram levels.

  9. Toxicological Analysis of Some Drugs of Abuse in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Ciobanu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of drugs of abuse is a scourge of modern world. Abuse, drug addiction and their consequences are one of the major current problems of European society because of the significant repercussions in individual, family, social and economic level. In this context, toxicological analysis of the drugs of abuse in biological samples is a useful tool for: diagnosis of drug addiction, checking an auto-response, mandatory screening in some treatment programs, identification of a substance in the case of an overdose, determining compliance of the treatment. The present paper aims to address the needs of healthcare professionals involved in drugs addiction treatment through systematic presentation of information regarding their toxicological analysis. Basically, it is a tool that help you to select the suitable biological sample and the right collecting time, as well as the proper analysis technique, depending on the purpose of analysis, pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drugs of abuse, available equipment and staff expertise.

  10. Incubation Station for the Bacterial Growth Study in Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Rafael Duharte Rodríguez; Ibrain Ceballo Acosta; Carmen B. Busoch Morlán; Ángel Regueiro Gómez

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the designing and characterization of a prototype of laboratory incubator as support of Microbiology research, in particular for the research of the bacterial growth in biological samples through optic methods (Turbidimetry) and electrometric measurements of bioimpedance. It shows the results of simulation and experimentation of the design proposed for the canals of measurement of the variables: temperature and humidity, with a high linearity from the adequate selection of the...

  11. Toxicological Analysis of Some Drugs of Abuse in Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Marie Ciobanu; Daniela Baconi; Cristian Bălălău; Carolina Negrei; Miriana Stan; Maria Bârcă

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of drugs of abuse is a scourge of modern world. Abuse, drug addiction and their consequences are one of the major current problems of European society because of the significant repercussions in individual, family, social and economic level. In this context, toxicological analysis of the drugs of abuse in biological samples is a useful tool for: diagnosis of drug addiction, checking an auto-response, mandatory screening in some treatment programs, identification of a substance ...

  12. Measurement of n-alkanals and hydroxyalkenals in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, A E; Walker, M K; Cheeseman, K H; Slater, T F

    1993-09-01

    A modified method was developed to measure nM levels of a range of n-alkanals and hydroxyalkenals in biological samples such as blood plasma and tissue homogenates and also in Folch lipid extracts of these samples. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and desferrioxamine (Desferal) were added to samples to prevent artifactual peroxidation. Aldehydes were reacted with 1,3-cyclohexanedione (CHD), cleaned up by solid-phase extraction on a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge and the fluorescent decahydroacridine derivatives resolved by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gradient elution. A wider range of aldehydes was detected in lipid extracts of plasma and liver homogenate compared to whole (unextracted) samples. Human plasma contained nM levels of acetaldehyde, propanal, butanal, pentanal, hexanal, and heptanal. 4-Hydroxynonenal (0.93 nmol/g) and alkanals with two to six carbons (up to 7.36 nmol/g) were detected in rat liver. Recovery of aldehydes added to whole plasma or to lipid extracts of plasma was dependent on carbon chain length, varying from 95% for acetaldehyde to 8% for decanal. Recovery from biological samples was significantly less than that of standards taken through the Sep-Pak clean-up procedure, suggesting that aldehydes can bind to plasma protein and lipid components. PMID:8406128

  13. Direct analysis of biological samples by total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue M, Marco P. [Unidad de Analisis Instrumental, Departamento de Quimica y Suelos, Decanato de Agronomia, Universidad Centro-occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Apartado Postal 4076, Cabudare 3023 (Venezuela)]. E-mail: luemerumarco@yahoo.es; Hernandez-Caraballo, Edwin A. [Instituto Venezolano-Andino para la Investigacion Quimica (IVAIQUIM), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela)

    2004-08-31

    The technique of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is well suited for the direct analysis of biological samples due to the low matrix interferences and simultaneous multi-element nature. Nevertheless, biological organic samples are frequently analysed after digestion procedures. The direct determination of analytes requires shorter analysis time, low reactive consumption and simplifies the whole analysis process. On the other hand, the biological/clinical samples are often available in minimal amounts and routine studies require the analysis of large number of samples. To overcome the difficulties associated with the analysis of organic samples, particularly of solid ones, different procedures of sample preparation and calibration to approach the direct analysis have been evaluated: (1) slurry sampling, (2) Compton peak standardization, (3) in situ microwave digestion, (4) in situ chemical modification and (5) direct analysis with internal standardization. Examples of analytical methods developed by our research group are discussed. Some of them have not been previously published, illustrating alternative strategies for coping with various problems that may be encountered in the direct analysis by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

  14. Incubation Station for the Bacterial Growth Study in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rafael Duharte Rodríguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the designing and characterization of a prototype of laboratory incubator as support of Microbiology research, in particular for the research of the bacterial growth in biological samples through optic methods (Turbidimetry and electrometric measurements of bioimpedance. It shows the results of simulation and experimentation of the design proposed for the canals of measurement of the variables: temperature and humidity, with a high linearity from the adequate selection of the corresponding sensors and the analogue components of every canal, controlled with help of a microcontroller AT89C51 (ATMEL with adequate benefi ts for this type of application.

  15. Microsystem strategies for sample preparation in biological detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Bennett, Dawn Jonita (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD); Manginell, Monica; Okandan, Murat; Acrivos, Andreas (The City College of New York, NY); Brozik, Susan Marie; Khusid, Boris (New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ)

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this LDRD was to develop microdevice strategies for dealing with samples to be examined in biological detection systems. This includes three sub-components: namely, microdevice fabrication, sample delivery to the microdevice, and sample processing within the microdevice. The first component of this work focused on utilizing Sandia's surface micromachining technology to fabricate small volume (nanoliter) fluidic systems for processing small quantities of biological samples. The next component was to develop interfaces for the surface-micromachined silicon devices. We partnered with Micronics, a commercial company, to produce fluidic manifolds for sample delivery to our silicon devices. Pressure testing was completed to examine the strength of the bond between the pressure-sensitive adhesive layer and the silicon chip. We are also pursuing several other methods, both in house and external, to develop polymer-based fluidic manifolds for packaging silicon-based microfluidic devices. The second component, sample processing, is divided into two sub-tasks: cell collection and cell lysis. Cell collection was achieved using dielectrophoresis, which employs AC fields to collect cells at energized microelectrodes, while rejecting non-cellular particles. Both live and dead Staph. aureus bacteria have been collected using RF frequency dielectrophoresis. Bacteria have been separated from polystyrene microspheres using frequency-shifting dielectrophoresis. Computational modeling was performed to optimize device separation performance, and to predict particle response to the dielectrophoretic traps. Cell lysis is continuing to be pursued using microactuators to mechanically disrupt cell membranes. Novel thermal actuators, which can generate larger forces than previously tested electrostatic actuators, have been incorporated with and tested with cell lysis devices. Significant cell membrane distortion has been observed, but more experiments need to be

  16. Explaining Choice and Share of Category Requirements of Biologic Meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Verhoef (Peter); K. Vlagsma-Brangule (Kristine)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we examine factors determining choice and consumption of biologic or organic meat. In our model explaining choice and share of category requirements, we consider economic/marketing variables (quality, price, and distribution), emotions (fear, empathy, andguilt), social norm

  17. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J; Sopko, V; Jakubek, J [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F, E-mail: jiri.dammer@utef.cvut.cz [Biological center of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Entomology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-15

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1{mu}m, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  18. The measurement of radioactive microspheres in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the distribution of radioactive microspheres are used in investigations of regional coronary blood flow, but the size and shape of the heart varies for different test animals, and the organ is frequently divided into smaller pieces for studies of regional perfusion. Errors are introduced by variations in the distribution of the radioactive source and the amount of Compton scatter in different samples. A technique has therefore been developed to allow the counting of these tissue samples in their original form, and correction factors have been derived to inter-relate the various counting geometries thus encountered. Dogs were injected with microspheres labelled with 141Ce, 51Cr or 85Sr. The tissue samples did not require remodelling to fit a standard container, and allowance was made for the inhomogeneous distribution in the blood samples. The activities in the centrifuged blood samples were correlated with those from the tissue samples by a calibration procedure involving comparisons of the counts from samples of microspheres embedded in sachets of gelatine, and similar samples mixed with blood and then centrifuged. The calibration data have indicated that 51Cr behaves anomalously, and its use as a label for microspheres may introduce unwarranted errors. A plane cylindrical 10 x 20 cm NaI detector was used, and a 'worst case' correction of 20% was found to be necessary for geometry effects. The accuracy of this method of correlating different geometries was tested by remodelling the same tissue sample into different sizes and comparing the results, and the validity of the technique was supported by agreement of the final results with previously published data. (U.K.)

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of bosentan in biological samples after a liquid-liquid microextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajedi-Amin, Sanaz; Assadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Panahi-Azar, Vahid; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Khoubnasabjafari, Maryam; Ansarin, Khalil; Jouyban-Gharamaleki, Vahid; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Microextraction processes with UV-Vis measurement have been developed and validated for analysis of bosentan in biological samples. Methods:In this work, liquid–liquid microextraction procedures (DLLME & USAEME) were employed for cleanup, pre-concentration, and determination of bosentan in biological samples by UV-Vis spectroscopy at 270 nm. The method was validated and applied to the determination of bosentan in spiked serum, exhaled breath condensate and urine samples. Results:Various experimental factors including type of extraction and dispersive solvents and their volumes, pH, sonication time and centrifuging time were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method was linear in the range of 1.0–5.0 μg.mL-1, with coefficient of determination (R2) of > 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.07 mg.L-1. Recovery of the target analyte in biological samples was 106.2%. The method could be easily applied for higher concentration of bosentan and needs more improvement for application in the pharmacokinetic investigations where more sensitive methods are required. Conclusion:A simple, low cost, precise and accurate spectrophotometric analysis of bosentan in biological samples after liquid-liquid microextraction were developed and validated for routine analyses. PMID:26929923

  20. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J., E-mail: jiri.dammer@lf1.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Salmovská 1, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Hospital Na Bulovce, Department of Radiological Physics, Budinova 2, 180 81 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F. [Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 31, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Benes, J. [Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Salmovská 1, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Sopko, V. [Hospital Na Bulovce, Department of Radiological Physics, Budinova 2, 180 81 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Gelbic, I. [Biology Centre, AS CR, Institute of Entomology, Department of Biochemistry and Physiology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-01

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system.

  1. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system

  2. Pressure pulse induced-damage in live biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rankin S.M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Developing a cellular and molecular understanding of the nature of traumatic and post-traumatic effects of blast on live biological samples is critical for improving clinical outcomes. To analyze the effects of blast waves upon the cellular structures and the underlying physiological and biochemical changes, we have constructed an experimental platform capable of delivering compression waves, of amplitudes relevant to blast, to cell suspensions in a contained environment. Initial characterization of the system shows that cell cultures can be subjected to high-intensity compression waves up to 15 MPa in pressure and duration of 80 ± 10μs. Studies of mouse mesenchymal stem cells subjected to two different pressure impulses were analysed by cell counting, cell viability assays and microscopic evaluation: the experiments present evidence suggestive of increased levels of damage and loss of cellular integrity compared to uncompressed cell cultures.

  3. Digital holography microscopy in 3D biologic samples analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is used a setup for Digital Holography Microscopy (MHD) for 3D biologic samples reconstruction. The phase contrast image reconstruction is done by using the Double propagation Method. The system was calibrated and tested by using a micrometric scale and pure phase object respectively. It was simulated the human red blood cell (erythrocyte) and beginning from the simulated hologram the digital 3D phase image for erythrocytes it was calculated. Also there was obtained experimental holograms of human erythrocytes and its corresponding 3D phase images, being evident the correspondence qualitative and quantitative between these characteristics in the simulated erythrocyte and in the experimentally calculated by DHM in both cases.

  4. Digital holography microscopy in 3D biologic samples analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardo, J O; Palacios, F; Palacios, G F; Sanchez, A [Department of Physics, University of Oriente (Cuba); Muramatsu, M [Department of General Physics, University of Sao Paulo - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gesualdi, M [Engineering center, Models and Applied Social Science, UFABC - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Font, O [Department of Bio-ingeniering, University of Oriente - Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Valin, J L [Mechanics Department, ISPJAE, Habana (Cuba); Escobedo, M; Herold, S [Department of Computation, University of Oriente (Cuba); Palacios, D F, E-mail: frpalaciosf@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear physics, University of Simon BolIva (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-01-01

    In this work it is used a setup for Digital Holography Microscopy (MHD) for 3D biologic samples reconstruction. The phase contrast image reconstruction is done by using the Double propagation Method. The system was calibrated and tested by using a micrometric scale and pure phase object respectively. It was simulated the human red blood cell (erythrocyte) and beginning from the simulated hologram the digital 3D phase image for erythrocytes it was calculated. Also there was obtained experimental holograms of human erythrocytes and its corresponding 3D phase images, being evident the correspondence qualitative and quantitative between these characteristics in the simulated erythrocyte and in the experimentally calculated by DHM in both cases.

  5. Microfluidic solutions enabling continuous processing and monitoring of biological samples: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, Marc; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2016-07-27

    The last decade has witnessed tremendous advances in employing microfluidic solutions enabling Continuous Processing and Monitoring of Biological Samples (CPMBS), which is an essential requirement for the control of bio-processes. The microfluidic systems are superior to the traditional inline sensors due to their ability to implement complex analytical procedures, such as multi-step sample preparation, and enabling the online measurement of parameters. This manuscript provides a backgound review of microfluidic approaches employing laminar flow, hydrodynamic separation, acoustophoresis, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, magnetophoresis and segmented flow for the continuous processing and monitoring of biological samples. The principles, advantages and limitations of each microfluidic approach are described along with its potential applications. The challenges in the field and the future directions are also provided.

  6. Explaining Choice and Share of Category Requirements of Biologic Meat

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, Peter; Vlagsma-Brangule, Kristine

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we examine factors determining choice and consumption of biologic or organic meat. In our model explaining choice and share of category requirements, we consider economic/marketing variables (quality, price, and distribution), emotions (fear, empathy, andguilt), social norms, environmental variables (environmental concern, green behavior, and perceived consumer effectiveness) as main antecedents of the choice and share of categoryrequirements of bio-meat. We also con...

  7. Transuranium analysis methodologies for biological and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical procedures for the most abundant transuranium nuclides in the environment (i.e., plutonium and, to a lesser extent, americium) are available. There is a lack of procedures for doing sequential analysis for Np, Pu, Am, and Cm in environmental samples, primarily because of current emphasis on Pu and Am. Reprocessing requirements and waste disposal connected with the fuel cycle indicate that neptunium and curium must be considered in environmental radioactive assessments. Therefore it was necessary to develop procedures that determine all four of these radionuclides in the environment. The state of the art of transuranium analysis methodology as applied to environmental samples is discussed relative to different sample sources, such as soil, vegetation, air, water, and animals. Isotope-dilution analysis with 243Am (239Np) and 236Pu or 242Pu radionuclide tracers is used. Americium and curium are analyzed as a group, with 243Am as the tracer. Sequential extraction procedures employing bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)orthophosphoric acid (HDEHP) were found to result in lower yields and higher Am--Cm fractionation than ion-exchange methods

  8. The NYC native air sampling pilot project: using HVAC filter data for urban biological incident characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackelsberg, Joel; Leykam, Frederic M; Hazi, Yair; Madsen, Larry C; West, Todd H; Faltesek, Anthony; Henderson, Gavin D; Henderson, Christopher L; Leighton, Terrance

    2011-09-01

    Native air sampling (NAS) is distinguished from dedicated air sampling (DAS) devices (eg, BioWatch) that are deployed to detect aerosol disseminations of biological threat agents. NAS uses filter samples from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in commercial properties for environmental sampling after DAS detection of biological threat agent incidents. It represents an untapped, scientifically sound, efficient, widely distributed, and comparably inexpensive resource for postevent environmental sampling. Calculations predict that postevent NAS would be more efficient than environmental surface sampling by orders of magnitude. HVAC filter samples could be collected from pre-identified surrounding NAS facilities to corroborate the DAS alarm and delineate the path taken by the bioaerosol plume. The New York City (NYC) Native Air Sampling Pilot Project explored whether native air sampling would be acceptable to private sector stakeholders and could be implemented successfully in NYC. Building trade associations facilitated outreach to and discussions with property owners and managers, who expedited contact with building managers of candidate NAS properties that they managed or owned. Nominal NAS building requirements were determined; procedures to identify and evaluate candidate NAS facilities were developed; data collection tools and other resources were designed and used to expedite candidate NAS building selection and evaluation in Manhattan; and exemplar environmental sampling playbooks for emergency responders were completed. In this sample, modern buildings with single or few corporate tenants were the best NAS candidate facilities. The Pilot Project successfully demonstrated that in one urban setting a native air sampling strategy could be implemented with effective public-private collaboration.

  9. Direct observation of unstained wet biological samples by scanning-electron generation X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Analytical tools of nanometre-scale resolution are indispensable in the fields of biology, physics and chemistry. One suitable tool, the soft X-ray microscope, provides high spatial resolution of visible light for wet specimens. For biological specimens, X-rays of water-window wavelength between carbon (284 eV; 4.3 nm) and oxygen (540 eV; 2.3 nm) absorption edges provide high-contrast imaging of biological samples in water. Among types of X-ray microscope, the transmission X-ray microscope using a synchrotron radiation source with diffractive zone plates offers the highest spatial resolution, approaching 15-10nm. However, even higher resolution is required to measure proteins and protein complexes in biological specimens; therefore, a new type of X-ray microscope with higher resolution that uses a simple light source is desirable. Here we report a novel scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM) that demonstrates direct imaging of unstained wet biological specimens. We deposited wet yeasts in the space between two silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) films. A scanning electron beam of accelerating voltage 5 keV and current 1.6 nA irradiates the titanium (Ti)-coated Si(3)N(4) film, and the soft X-ray signal from it is detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. The SGXM can theoretically achieve better than 5 nm resolution. Our method can be utilized easily for various wet biological samples of bacteria, viruses, and protein complexes.

  10. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological

  11. Entropic Sampling and Natural Selection in Biological Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, M. Y.; Lee, H. Y.; Kim, D.; Park, S H

    1996-01-01

    With a view to connecting random mutation on the molecular level to punctuated equilibrium behavior on the phenotype level, we propose a new model for biological evolution, which incorporates random mutation and natural selection. In this scheme the system evolves continuously into new configurations, yielding non-stationary behavior of the total fitness. Further, both the waiting time distribution of species and the avalanche size distribution display power-law behaviors with exponents close...

  12. Application of scanning electrochemical microscopy to biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, C.(Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan); Kwak, J.; Bard, A J

    1990-01-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinen...

  13. The scope of detector Medipix2 in micro-radiography of biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J., E-mail: jiri.dammer@utef.cvut.cz [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ-12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F. [Biology Centre of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Entomology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Jakubek, J. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ-12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Skrabal, P. [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Nam. Sitna 3105, CZ-272 01 Kladno (Czech Republic); Sopko, V.; Vavrik, D. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ-12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2011-05-15

    We present our experimental setup devoted to high resolution X-ray micro-radiography that is suitable for imaging of small biological samples. The photon source is a FeinFocus micro-focus X-ray tube. The single photon counting pixel device Medipix2 serves as imaging area. Recently used imaging detectors as radiography films or scintillator detectors, cannot visualize required information about inner structure of scanned sample. Detectors Medipix2 do not suffer from so-called dark current noise and work in unlimited dynamic range. These features of detectors confer high quality and high contrast of final images. The radiographic imaging with detectors Medipix2 represents non-invasive and non-destructive method of investigation. Hereby, we demonstrate results of micro-radiographic study of internal structures of tiny biological samples. In addition to morphological and anatomical studies, we would like to present preliminary study of dynamic processes inside of organisms using micro-radiographic video-capturing.

  14. Alteration of biological samples in speciation analysis of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Christian; Wenda, Nadine; Richter, Andrea; Kyriakopoulos, Antonios

    2007-10-01

    For investigations of metalloproteins by speciation analysis, the integrity of the protein-metal complexes before and during separation is crucial. Knowledge about potential alterations of the samples is thus essential to avoid misinterpretations of the analytical results. Chromatographic element profiles of different cytosolic samples from animal tissues were measured repeatedly to estimate the sample stability. The dependence of the signals on the dwell time of the sample in an autosampling device at 4 degrees C for a period of 10 h was observed. Alterations in the element content of different metal-containing fractions were quantified by means of recovery values. Some metalloprotein fractions (e.g. approximately 27-kDa arsenic, approximately 27-kDa iron and different zinc fractions) were stable or only minor alterations were observed and for their investigation an autosampling device is therefore suitable. However, most of the other metalloprotein fractions, especially nickel-containing proteins, showed major alterations: these samples should therefore be analysed immediately after preparation or directly after thawing.

  15. Analysis of biological slurry samples by total x-ray fluorescence after in situ microwave digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological slurry samples were analyzed by total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) after an in situ microwave digestion procedure on the quartz reflector. This method lead to the removal of the matrix by the digestion and permits the enrichment of the analites by using sample amounts higher than those normally used in TXRF for the thin layer requirement since the organic matrix is removed. In consequence, the pre-concentration of sample is performed and the detection capability is increased by a quasi direct method. The samples analyzed were the international IAEA blood standard, the SRM bovine liver 1577-a standard and fresh onion tissues. Slurries were prepared in three ways: a.- weighing a sample amount on the reflector and adding suprapure nitric acid and internal standard followed by microwave digestion, b.-weighing a sample amount and water with an appropriate concentration of the internal standard in an Eppendorf vial, taking then an aliquot to the quartz reflector for microwave digestion with suprapure nitric acid, c.- weighing a sample amount of fresh tissue, homogenising with high speed homegenator to obtain a slurry sample which can be diluted in an ependorf vial with water an the internal standard. Then an aliquot is taken to the reflector for microwave digestion with suprapure nitric acid. Further details of sample preparation procedures will be discussed during presentation. The analysis was carried out in a Canberra spectrometer using the Kalpha lines of the Ag and Mo tubes. The elements Ca, K, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Mn, Rb, Br, Sr were determined. The effect of the preparation procedure was evaluated by the accuracy and precision of the results for each element and the percent of recovery. (author)

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of silver nanoparticles in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huiyuan; Xing, Baoshan; Hamlet, Leigh C; Chica, Andrea; He, Lili

    2016-06-01

    Growing concerns over the potential release and threat of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to environmental and biological systems urge researchers to investigate their fate and behavior. However, current analytical techniques cannot meet the requirements for rapidly, sensitively and reliably probing AgNPs in complex matrices. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has shown great capability for rapid detection of AgNPs based on an indicator molecule that can bind on the AgNP surface. The objective of this study was to exploit SERS to detect AgNPs in environmental and biological samples through optimizing the Raman indicator for SERS. Seven indicator molecules were selected and determined to obtain their SERS signals at optimal concentrations. Among them, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE), crystal violet and ferric dimethyl-dithiocarbamate (ferbam) produced the highest SERS intensities. Further experiments on binding competition between each two of the three candidates showed that ferbam had the highest AgNPs-binding ability. The underlying mechanism lies in the strong binding affinity of ferbam with AgNPs via multiple sulfur atoms. We further validated ferbam to be an effective indicator for SERS detection of as low as 0.1mg/L AgNPs in genuine surface water and 0.57 mg/L in spinach juice. Moreover, limited interference on SERS detection of AgNPs was found from environmentally relevant inorganic ions, organic matter, inorganic particles, as well as biologically relevant components, demonstrating the ferbam-assisted SERS is an effective and sensitive method to detect AgNPs in complex environmental and biological samples. PMID:26956173

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of silver nanoparticles in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huiyuan; Xing, Baoshan; Hamlet, Leigh C; Chica, Andrea; He, Lili

    2016-06-01

    Growing concerns over the potential release and threat of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to environmental and biological systems urge researchers to investigate their fate and behavior. However, current analytical techniques cannot meet the requirements for rapidly, sensitively and reliably probing AgNPs in complex matrices. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has shown great capability for rapid detection of AgNPs based on an indicator molecule that can bind on the AgNP surface. The objective of this study was to exploit SERS to detect AgNPs in environmental and biological samples through optimizing the Raman indicator for SERS. Seven indicator molecules were selected and determined to obtain their SERS signals at optimal concentrations. Among them, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE), crystal violet and ferric dimethyl-dithiocarbamate (ferbam) produced the highest SERS intensities. Further experiments on binding competition between each two of the three candidates showed that ferbam had the highest AgNPs-binding ability. The underlying mechanism lies in the strong binding affinity of ferbam with AgNPs via multiple sulfur atoms. We further validated ferbam to be an effective indicator for SERS detection of as low as 0.1mg/L AgNPs in genuine surface water and 0.57 mg/L in spinach juice. Moreover, limited interference on SERS detection of AgNPs was found from environmentally relevant inorganic ions, organic matter, inorganic particles, as well as biologically relevant components, demonstrating the ferbam-assisted SERS is an effective and sensitive method to detect AgNPs in complex environmental and biological samples.

  18. Application of scanning electrochemical microscopy to biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C; Kwak, J; Bard, A J

    1990-03-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinensis leaf (which show open stomata structures) immersed in aqueous solution are shown. Scans of the upper surface of an elodea leaf in the dark and under irradiation, where the tip reaction is the reduction of oxygen produced by photosynthesis, demonstrate the possibility of obtaining information about the distribution of reaction sites on the substrate surface. PMID:2308933

  19. Soft Robotic Grippers for Biological Sampling on Deep Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kevin C.; Becker, Kaitlyn P.; Phillips, Brennan; Kirby, Jordan; Licht, Stephen; Tchernov, Dan; Gruber, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article presents the development of an underwater gripper that utilizes soft robotics technology to delicately manipulate and sample fragile species on the deep reef. Existing solutions for deep sea robotic manipulation have historically been driven by the oil industry, resulting in destructive interactions with undersea life. Soft material robotics relies on compliant materials that are inherently impedance matched to natural environments and to soft or fragile organisms. We demonstrate design principles for soft robot end effectors, bench-top characterization of their grasping performance, and conclude by describing in situ testing at mesophotic depths. The result is the first use of soft robotics in the deep sea for the nondestructive sampling of benthic fauna.

  20. Use of STM for analysis of surfaces of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permjakov, N. K.; Ananyan, M. A.; Luskinovich, P. N.; Sorokovoi, V. I.; Saveliev, S. V.

    1999-04-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) was used to image the cell surfaces of the olfactory organ of the shark Carcharhinus longimanus and ectoderm of the frog Xenopus laevis blastulae of 1024 stages, as well as human low-density lipoproteins surface. The samples from two of these objects were prepared by using traditional techniques for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The lipoprotein samples were prepared by drying in the air. A comparison of the STM images with the earlier obtained SEM images indicates that there are some earlier unknown details of the surface structures of receptor microvilli and support cell membranes of the olfactory organ of the shark. There was found a fold of membrane on the surface of the ectodermal frog embryo cells, which covered yolk granules. STM images of the lipoprotein surface were obtained without increasing conductivity treatment.

  1. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  2. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation

  3. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavpetič, P., E-mail: primoz.vavpetic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, K. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, L. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, N. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pongrac, P. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Plant Physiology, University of Bayreuth, Universitätstr. 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pelicon, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm{sup 2} and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  4. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope. PMID:26860298

  5. A comparison of quantitative reconstruction techniques for PIXE-tomography analysis applied to biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, D.G., E-mail: dgbeasley@ctn.ist.utl.pt [IST/C2TN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [IST/C2TN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Barberet, Ph.; Bourret, S.; Devès, G.; Gordillo, N.; Michelet, C. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Le Trequesser, Q. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Marques, A.C. [IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Seznec, H. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Silva, R.C. da [IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal)

    2014-07-15

    The tomographic reconstruction of biological specimens requires robust algorithms, able to deal with low density contrast and low element concentrations. At the IST/ITN microprobe facility new GPU-accelerated reconstruction software, JPIXET, has been developed, which can significantly increase the speed of quantitative reconstruction of Proton Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) data. It has a user-friendly graphical user interface for pre-processing, data analysis and reconstruction of PIXE-T and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T). The reconstruction of PIXE-T data is performed using either an algorithm based on a GPU-accelerated version of the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximisation (MLEM) method or a GPU-accelerated version of the Discrete Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm (DISRA) (Sakellariou (2001) [2]). The original DISRA, its accelerated version, and the MLEM algorithm, were compared for the reconstruction of a biological sample of Caenorhabditis elegans – a small worm. This sample was analysed at the microbeam line of the AIFIRA facility of CENBG, Bordeaux. A qualitative PIXE-T reconstruction was obtained using the CENBG software package TomoRebuild (Habchi et al. (2013) [6]). The effects of pre-processing and experimental conditions on the elemental concentrations are discussed.

  6. Broad Consent For Research With Biological Samples: Workshop Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Christine; Eckstein, Lisa; Berkman, Ben; Brock, Dan; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Greely, Hank; Hansson, Mats G.; Hull, Sara; Kim, Scott; Lo, Bernie; Pentz, Rebecca; Rodriguez, Laura; Weil, Carol; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Wendler, David

    2016-01-01

    Different types of consent are used to obtain human biospecimens for future research. This variation has resulted in confusion regarding what research is permitted, inadvertent constraints on future research, and research proceeding without consent. The NIH Clinical Center’s Department of Bioethics held a workshop to consider the ethical acceptability of addressing these concerns by using broad consent for future research on stored biospecimens. Multiple bioethics scholars, who have written on these issues, discussed the reasons for consent, the range of consent strategies, gaps in our understanding, and concluded with a proposal for broad initial consent coupled with oversight and, when feasible, ongoing provision of information to donors. The manuscript describes areas of agreement as well as areas that need more research and dialogue. Given recent proposed changes to the Common Rule, and new guidance regarding storing and sharing data and samples, this is an important and timely topic. PMID:26305750

  7. Comparative analysis of toxin detection in biological and enviromental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogert, Robert A.; Burans, James; O'Brien, Tom; Ligler, Frances S.

    1994-03-01

    The basic recognition schemes underlying the principles of standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay (RIA) protocols are increasingly being adapted for use with new detection devices. A direct comparison was made using a fiber optic biosensor that employs evanescent wave detection and an ELISA using avidin-biotin. The assays were developed for the detection of Ricinus communis agglutinin II, also known as ricin or RCA60. Detection limits between the two methods were comparable for ricin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), however results in complex samples differed slightly. In PBS, sensitivity for ricin was 1 ng/ml using the fiber optic device and 500 pg/ml using the ELISA. The fiber optic sensor could not detect ricin directly in urine or serum spiked with 5 ng/ml ricin, however, the ELISA showed detection but at reduced levels to the PBS control.

  8. Biology and thermal requirements of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavaresco, Alvimar [EPAGRI, Estacao Experimetal de Canoinhas, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: alvimarbavaresco@bol.com.br; Garcia, Mauro S.; Gruetzmacher, Anderson D.; Foresti, Josemar; Ringenberg, Rudiney [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade

    2002-01-15

    The biology of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) was studied under different temperatures and its thermal requirements were determined, aiming to aid the rearing of this insect in the laboratory. Embryonic and post-embryonic periods were evaluated at seven different temperatures (14, 18, 22, 25, 28, 30 and 32 deg C) under environmental chamber conditions, with 14h photophase. The caterpillars were reared on an artificial diet containing white bean, soybean meal, yeast extract, wheat germ and powder milk as source of protein. The extent of the embryonic period decreased with the increase of temperature within the 14 deg C to 25 deg C temperature range, remaining constant between 28 deg C and 32 deg C. For the other phases (caterpillar, pre-pupa and pupa) an inverse relationship between temperature and duration was observed within the 14 deg C to 30 deg C temperature range, extending to 32 deg C for pupae. Duration of pupal phase for males was larger than for females resulting in asynchronous adult emergence. The temperature thresholds for the embryonic, larval, pre-pupal, pupal periods and total cycle were 9.34 deg C, 11.65 deg C, 9.65 deg C, 11.08 deg C and 11.23 deg C, with thermal constants of 62,73 degree-days (DD), 254.61DD, 33.42DD, 177.55DD and 525.11DD, respectively. Evaluating the pupal phase alone, the threshold temperatures were 11.25 deg C for males and 10.81deg C for females, with thermal constants of 188.26DD for males and 165.47DD for females. For total cycle, the threshold temperature and the thermal constant for males were 11.28 deg C and 535.85DD, whereas for females the same variables had values of 11.15 deg C and 513.17DD. So, the most adequate temperature for the development of S. cosmioides is within the range of 25 deg C and 28 deg C, where 9.6 to 11.7 generations of the insect can be annually obtained, in laboratory conditions. (author)

  9. Biology and thermal requirements of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biology of Spodoptera cosmioides (Walk.) was studied under different temperatures and its thermal requirements were determined, aiming to aid the rearing of this insect in the laboratory. Embryonic and post-embryonic periods were evaluated at seven different temperatures (14, 18, 22, 25, 28, 30 and 32 deg C) under environmental chamber conditions, with 14h photophase. The caterpillars were reared on an artificial diet containing white bean, soybean meal, yeast extract, wheat germ and powder milk as source of protein. The extent of the embryonic period decreased with the increase of temperature within the 14 deg C to 25 deg C temperature range, remaining constant between 28 deg C and 32 deg C. For the other phases (caterpillar, pre-pupa and pupa) an inverse relationship between temperature and duration was observed within the 14 deg C to 30 deg C temperature range, extending to 32 deg C for pupae. Duration of pupal phase for males was larger than for females resulting in asynchronous adult emergence. The temperature thresholds for the embryonic, larval, pre-pupal, pupal periods and total cycle were 9.34 deg C, 11.65 deg C, 9.65 deg C, 11.08 deg C and 11.23 deg C, with thermal constants of 62,73 degree-days (DD), 254.61DD, 33.42DD, 177.55DD and 525.11DD, respectively. Evaluating the pupal phase alone, the threshold temperatures were 11.25 deg C for males and 10.81deg C for females, with thermal constants of 188.26DD for males and 165.47DD for females. For total cycle, the threshold temperature and the thermal constant for males were 11.28 deg C and 535.85DD, whereas for females the same variables had values of 11.15 deg C and 513.17DD. So, the most adequate temperature for the development of S. cosmioides is within the range of 25 deg C and 28 deg C, where 9.6 to 11.7 generations of the insect can be annually obtained, in laboratory conditions. (author)

  10. Mercury speciation and total trace element determination of low-biomass biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Vivien F; Jackson, Brian P; Chen, Celia Y

    2008-12-01

    Current approaches to mercury speciation and total trace element analysis require separate extraction/digestions of the sample. Ecologically important aquatic organisms--notably primary consumers such as zooplankton, polychaetes and amphipods--usually yield very low biomass for analysis, even with significant compositing of multiple organisms. Individual organisms in the lower aquatic food chains (mussels, snails, oysters, silversides, killifish) can also have very low sample mass, and analysis of whole single organisms is important to metal uptake studies. A method for the determination of both methyl Hg and total heavy metal concentrations (Zn, As, Se, Cd, Hg, Pb) in a single, low-mass sample of aquatic organisms was developed. Samples (2 to 50 mg) were spiked with enriched with (201)MeHg and (199)Hg, then leached in 4 M HNO(3) at 55 degrees C for extraction of MeHg. After 16 h, an aliquot (0.05 mL) was removed to determine mercury species (methyl and inorganic Hg) by isotope dilution gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The leachate was then acidified to 9 M HNO(3) and digested in a microwave at 150 degrees C for 10 min, and total metal concentrations were determined by collision cell ICP-MS. The method was validated by analyzing five biological certified reference materials. Average percent recoveries for Zn, As, Se, Cd, MeHg, Hg(total) and Pb were 99.9%, 103.5%, 100.4%, 103.3%, 101%, 97.7%, and 97.1%, respectively. The correlation between the sum of MeHg and inorganic Hg from the speciation analysis and total Hg by conventional digestion of the sample was determined for a large sample set of aquatic invertebrates (n = 285). Excellent agreement between the two measured values was achieved. This method is advantageous in situations where sample size is limited, and where correlations between Hg species and other metals are required in the same sample. The method also provides further validation of speciation data, by

  11. Sample preparation strategies for food and biological samples prior to nanoparticle detection and imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Löschner, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    microscopy (TEM) proved to be necessary for trouble shooting of results obtained from AFFF-LS-ICP-MS. Aqueous and enzymatic extraction strategies were tested for thorough sample preparation aiming at degrading the sample matrix and to liberate the AgNPs from chicken meat into liquid suspension. The resulting...... for the meat sample extracts and the corresponding neat AgNP suspension, and rendered sizing by way of calibration with AgNPs as sizing standards inaccurate. In order to gain further insight into the sizes of the separated AgNPs, or their possible dissolved state, fractions of the AFFF eluate were collected......-ICP-MS analysis of their content of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was tested and compared with enzymatic sample preparation [3]. The results showed that the same results, with respect to the obtained number-based size distribution for AuNPs, were obtained for the two preparation methods. In contrast, the alkaline...

  12. Robotic, MEMS-based Multi Utility Sample Preparation Instrument for ISS Biological Workstation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a multi-functional, automated sample preparation instrument for biological wet-lab workstations on the ISS. The instrument is based on a...

  13. Detection of heavy metals in biological samples through anodic stripping voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Buzea, Vlad; Florescu, Monica; Badea, Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    The toxicological aspects due to the presence of heavy metals in biological samples impose to have accurate and rapid methods for their detection. This paper is aimed to review approaches to anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) determination of several heavy metals (lead, cadmium, copper, mercury, zinc) in biological matrices (blood, urine, saliva, tissue sample). Analytical performances (LOD, data linearity range, sensitivity) of the reviewed methods were presented for several electrochemical ...

  14. Identification of cadmium in biological samples using neutron activation analysis with radiochemistry separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chile's 7500 km coastline of the Southern Pacific ocean, with about 4500 km of continental coastline that contains a variety of different geographical zones. This variety means that there is a great diversity of marine resources such as fish, shellfish and seaweeds. The utilization of these resources has been increasing in recent years making this sector an economically important one. The catch as of May 2002 came to 1.9 million tons and exports of the different species amounted to US$611.5 million as of April. But this important economic resource is being threatened by the technical demands imposed by importing countries, mainly the specific requirements for sanitary certification for fishery export products, depending on the markets of destination. The chemical element cadmium is one of the most strictly controlled elements due some shellfish accumulate a large amount of this element and to its high toxicity. The Chilean standard's analytical procedures for cadmium determination in hydro biological products, which must be met by laboratories that certify and control these products for export, are now being evaluated. Through its Chemical Metrology Unit, the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission is strongly supporting this sector by preparing the secondary reference or control materials, and it has developed and implemented nuclear analytical methods for the certification of these materials, which will be used mostly in collaborative studies. This work describes the methodology developed for the determination of cadmium in biological samples, particularly in shellfish and fish (author)

  15. 40 CFR 141.22 - Turbidity sampling and analytical requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the water distribution system at least once per day, for the purposes of making turbidity measurements... existed under the circumstances of this option. Turbidity measurements shall be made as directed in § 141... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Turbidity sampling and...

  16. Sample validity in biological trace element and organic nutrient research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of the art of the biological trace element investigations is overviewed. Questions of biological validity, such as the influence of the 'status of sampling' of human subjects on the concentrations of selected elements are studied. Analytical validity problems, e.g. stability of Cd, Hg and Pb concentration in selected specimens, stability of selected organic nutrients in NBS SRMs, etc. are also discussed. Finally, it is concluded that the development of new biological reference materials should take into account the multidisciplinary demands of biological trace element investigations. (author) 20 refs.; 6 tables

  17. 75 FR 59935 - Investigational New Drug Safety Reporting Requirements for Human Drug and Biological Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... ``E2A Clinical Safety Data Management: Definitions and Standards for Expedited Reporting'' (60 FR 11284... 0910-AG13 Investigational New Drug Safety Reporting Requirements for Human Drug and Biological Products... safety reporting for human biological products: Laura Rich, Center for Biologics Evaluation and...

  18. Determination of uranium in seawater, biological samples and sediments using laser induced fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium has been determined in seawater, biological samples and sediments using laser induced fluorescence spectrometry (LIFS). The biological samples and sediments are digested with a mixture of HNO3, HClO4 and HF. The conductivity of the seawater should be below 5.0 mS and the pH of the sample should be in the range 6.5-9.0. The volume of the reagent used to enhance the fluorescence intensity was 0.5 ml. Comparison with other methods was favorable, LIFS being rapid, simple and sensitive, and well suited to environmental monitoring. (author)

  19. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office (BER),

    2009-09-30

    In May 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BER-funded research over the subsequent three to five years. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. Chief among them: scientific progress in BER-funded research is limited by current allocations of computational resources. Additionally, growth in mission-critical computing -- combined with new requirements for collaborative data manipulation and analysis -- will demand ever increasing computing, storage, network, visualization, reliability and service richness from NERSC. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. It also presents a number of"case studies" as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BER. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this"case study" format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and 3-5 year computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel,"multi-core" environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years.

  20. Neutron beam preparation with Am-Be source for analysis of biological samples with PGNAA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material analysis with prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) requires a proper geometrical arrangement for equipments in laboratory. Application of PGNAA in analysis of biological samples, due to small size of sample, needs attention to the dimension of neutron beam. In our work, neutron source has been made of 241Am-Be type. Activity of 241Am was 20 Ci which lead to neutron source strength of 4.4 x 107 neutrons per second. Water has been considered as the basic shielding material for the neutron source. The effect of various concentration of boric acid in the reduction of intensity of fast and thermal components of the neutron beam and gamma ray has been investigated. Gamma ray is produced by (α, n) reaction in Am-Be source (4.483 MeV), neutron capture by hydrogen (2.224 MeV), and neutron capture by boron (0.483 MeV). Various types of neutron and gamma ray dosimeters have been employed including BF3 and NE-213 detectors to detect fast and thermal neutrons. BGO scintillation detector has been used for gamma ray spectroscopy. It is shown that the gamma and neutron radiation dose due to direct beam is of the same magnitude as the dose due to radiation scattered in the laboratory ambient. It is concluded that 14 kg boric acid dissolved in 1,000 kg water is the optimum solution to surround the neutron source. The experimental results have been compared with Monte Carlo simulation. (author)

  1. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples. PMID:27245345

  2. Recent advances in particle-induced X-ray emission analysis applied to biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers reporting the application of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis to biological samples continue to appear regularly in the literature. The majority of these papers deal with blood, hair, and other common body organs while a few deal with biological samples from the environnment. A variety of sample preparation methods have been demonstrated, a number of which are improvements, refinements and extensions of the thick- and thin-sample preparation methods reported in the early development of PIXE. While many papers describe the development of PIXE techniques some papers are now describing applications of the methods to serious biological problems. The following two factors may help to stimulate more consistant use of the PIXE method. First, each PIXE facility should be organized to give rapid sample processing and should have available several sample preparation and handling methods. Second, those with the skill to use PIXE methods need to become closely associated with researches knowledge able in medical and biological sciences and they also need to become more involved in project planning and sample handling. (orig.)

  3. Membrane materials for storing biological samples intended for comparative nanotoxicological testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelkin, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The study is aimed at identifying the samples of most promising membrane materials for storing dry specimens of biological fluids (Dried Blood Spots, DBS technology). Existing sampling systems using cellulose fiber filter paper have a number of drawbacks such as uneven distribution of the sample spot, dependence of the spot spreading area on the individual biosample properties, incomplete washing-off of the sample due to partially inconvertible sorption of blood components on cellulose fibers, etc. Samples of membrane materials based on cellulose, polymers and glass fiber with applied biosamples were studied using methods of scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and surface-wetting measurement. It was discovered that cellulose-based membrane materials sorb components of biological fluids inside their structure, while membranes based on glass fiber display almost no interaction with the samples and biological fluid components dry to films in the membrane pores between the structural fibers. This characteristic, together with the fact that membrane materials based on glass fiber possess sufficient strength, high wetting properties and good storage capacity, attests them as promising material for dry samples of biological fluids storage systems.

  4. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities. PMID:26922394

  5. Chemometric and Statistical Analyses of ToF-SIMS Spectra of Increasingly Complex Biological Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, E S; Wu, L; Fortson, S L; Nelson, D O; Kulp, K S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing and classifying molecular variation within biological samples is critical for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new insights including improved disease understanding. Towards these ends, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to examine increasingly complex samples of biological relevance, including monosaccharide isomers, pure proteins, complex protein mixtures, and mouse embryo tissues. The complex mass spectral data sets produced were analyzed using five common statistical and chemometric multivariate analysis techniques: principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), and decision tree analysis by recursive partitioning. PCA was found to be a valuable first step in multivariate analysis, providing insight both into the relative groupings of samples and into the molecular basis for those groupings. For the monosaccharides, pure proteins and protein mixture samples, all of LDA, PLSDA, and SIMCA were found to produce excellent classification given a sufficient number of compound variables calculated. For the mouse embryo tissues, however, SIMCA did not produce as accurate a classification. The decision tree analysis was found to be the least successful for all the data sets, providing neither as accurate a classification nor chemical insight for any of the tested samples. Based on these results we conclude that as the complexity of the sample increases, so must the sophistication of the multivariate technique used to classify the samples. PCA is a preferred first step for understanding ToF-SIMS data that can be followed by either LDA or PLSDA for effective classification analysis. This study demonstrates the strength of ToF-SIMS combined with multivariate statistical and chemometric techniques to classify increasingly complex biological samples

  6. Correlation of mRNA and protein in complex biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Tobias; Güell, Marc; Serrano, Luis

    2009-12-17

    The correlation between mRNA and protein abundances in the cell has been reported to be notoriously poor. Recent technological advances in the quantitative analysis of mRNA and protein species in complex samples allow the detailed analysis of this pathway at the center of biological systems. We give an overview of available methods for the identification and quantification of free and ribosome-bound mRNA, protein abundances and individual protein turnover rates. We review available literature on the correlation of mRNA and protein abundances and discuss biological and technical parameters influencing the correlation of these central biological molecules.

  7. Presence of pesticide residues in water, sediment and biological samples taken from aquatic environments in Honduras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to detect the presence of persistent pesticides in water, sediment and biological samples taken from aquatic environments in Honduras during the period 1995-98. Additionally, the LC50 for 2 fungicides and 2 insecticides on post-larval Penaeus vannamei was determined in static water bioassays. A total of 80 water samples, 16 sediment samples and 7 biological samples (fish muscle tissue) were analyzed for detection of organochlorine and organophosphate pesticide residues. The results of sample analyses indicate a widespread contamination of Honduran continental and coastal waters with organochlorine pesticides. Most detections were of low (50 values and were therefore found to be much more toxic to the post-larval shrimp than the fungicides tridemorph and propiconazole. (author)

  8. On the accuracy of protein determination in large biological samples by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been developed for the determination of nitrogen and thus total protein in large volume biological samples or the whole body of small animals. In the present work, the accuracy of nitrogen determination by PGNAA in phantoms of known composition as well as in four raw ground meat samples of about 1 kg mass was examined. Dumas combustion and Kjeldahl techniques were also used for the assessment of nitrogen concentration in the meat samples. No statistically significant differences were found between the concentrations assessed by the three techniques. The results of this work demonstrate the applicability of PGNAA for the assessment of total protein in biological samples of 0.25-1.5 kg mass, such as a meat sample or the body of small animal even in vivo with an equivalent radiation dose of about 40 mSv

  9. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy of biological samples on highly transparent carbon nanomembranes

    CERN Document Server

    Rhinow, Daniel; Weber, Nils-Eike; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Hampp, Norbert; Turchanin, Andrey; 10.1016/j.ultramic.2011.01.028

    2011-01-01

    Ultrathin carbon nanomembranes (CNM) comprising crosslinked biphenyl precursors have been tested as support films for energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) of biological specimens. Due to their high transparency CNM are ideal substrates for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) of stained and unstained biological samples. Virtually background-free elemental maps of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and ferritin have been obtained from samples supported by ~ 1 nm thin CNM. Furthermore, we have tested conductive carbon nanomembranes (cCNM) comprising nanocrystalline graphene, obtained by thermal treatment of CNM, as supports for cryoEM of ice-embedded biological samples. We imaged ice-embedded TMV on cCNM and compared the results with images of ice-embedded TMV on conventional carbon film (CC), thus analyzing the gain in contrast for TMV on cCNM in a quantitative manner. In addition we have developed a method for the preparation of vitrified specimens, sus...

  10. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the final pool of harvested material or samples of each subculture of cells used to prepare the... completed product or samples of the final pool of harvested material or samples of each subculture of cells... cells or each subculture of primary cells used to prepare a biological product shall be shown free...

  11. On multielement analysis of biological samples with the aid of neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A main objective of this study was elucidation of problems of sampling and sample preparation methods for multielement analysis of environmental and biological specimens. Another was assessment of the potentials of multielement neutron activation analysis (NAA) in environmental and biological research. In an attempt to explain the great differences in the elemental concentration ranges between biopsy and autopsy samples as reported in the literature, it was shown that post mortem changes induce great variations in the apparent elemental composition of autopsy specimens resulting in serious systematic errors. Applications of NAA to analysis of tissues of experimental animals, human tissues in health and disease, and environmental samples are illustrated with several examples. The suitability of NAA for routine analysis of elements such as Cr, Mo and Se, which are difficult to determine by other methods has been specially discussed. (author)

  12. Tomographic imaging of transparent biological samples using the pyramid phase microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We show how a pyramid phase microscope can be used to obtain tomographic information of the spatial variation of refractive index in biological samples using the Radon transform. A method that uses the information provided by the phase microscope for axial and lateral repositioning of the sample when it rotates is also described. Its application to the reconstruction of mouse embryos in the blastocyst stage is demonstrated.

  13. Total Integrated Sample Preparation for Microfluidic Immunoassays in Complex Biological Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Apori, Akwasi Asare

    2011-01-01

    A high-throughput protein analysis platform with integrated sample preparation is developed to address the identified technology gaps in biomarker validation, clinical and point-of-care diagnostics. The goals of the technology are to automate and integrate protein sample preparation with electrokinetic separations, implement immunoassays capable of processing raw biological fluids, and perform high-throughput protein assays targeted for disease diagnosis.Integration of multiple functions is ...

  14. Photothermal method using a pyroelectric sensor for thermophysical characterization of agricultural and biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandas, A.; Dadarlat, Dorin; Chirtoc, Mihai; Jalink, Henk; Bicanic, Dane D.; Paris, D.; Antoniow, Jean S.; Egee, Michel; Ungureanu, Costica

    1998-07-01

    The photopyroelectric method in different experimental configurations was used for thermophysical characterization of agricultural and biological samples. The study appears important due to the relation of thermal parameters to the quality of foodstuffs (connected to their preservation, storage and adulteration), migration profiles in biodegradable packages, and the mechanism of desiccation tolerance of seeds. Results are presented on the thermal parameters measurement and their dependence on temperature and water content for samples such as: honey, starch, seeds.

  15. A self-contained polymeric cartridge for automated biological sample preparationa

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Guolin; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Xie, Hong; Chiew, Deon; Hsieh, Tseng-Ming; Ali, Emril Mohamed; Lun Looi, Xing; Li, Mo-Huang; Ying, Jackie Y.

    2011-01-01

    Sample preparation is one of the most crucial processes for nucleic acids based disease diagnosis. Several steps are required for nucleic acids extraction, impurity washes, and DNA/RNA elution. Careful sample preparation is vital to the obtaining of reliable diagnosis, especially with low copies of pathogens and cells. This paper describes a low-cost, disposable lab cartridge for automatic sample preparation, which is capable of handling flexible sample volumes of 10 μl to 1 ml. This plastic ...

  16. Integrated quantification and identification of aldehydes and ketones in biological samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, David; Meinema, Anne C; Permentier, Hjalmar; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The identification of unknown compounds remains to be a bottleneck of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics screening experiments. Here, we present a novel approach which facilitates the identification and quantification of analytes containing aldehyde and ketone groups in biological samples by

  17. Phytochemical analysis and biological evaluation of selected African propolis samples from Cameroon and Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papachroni, D.; Graikou, K.; Kosalec, I.; Damianakos, H.; Ingram, V.J.; Chinou, I.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was the chemical analysis of four selected samples of African propolis (Congo and Cameroon) and their biological evaluation. Twenty-one secondary metabolites belonging to four different chemical groups were isolated from the 70% ethanolic extracts of propolis and their st

  18. Robust identification of noncoding RNA from transcriptomes requires phylogenetically-informed sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stinus Lindgreen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding RNAs are integral to a wide range of biological processes, including translation, gene regulation, host-pathogen interactions and environmental sensing. While genomics is now a mature field, our capacity to identify noncoding RNA elements in bacterial and archaeal genomes is hampered by the difficulty of de novo identification. The emergence of new technologies for characterizing transcriptome outputs, notably RNA-seq, are improving noncoding RNA identification and expression quantification. However, a major challenge is to robustly distinguish functional outputs from transcriptional noise. To establish whether annotation of existing transcriptome data has effectively captured all functional outputs, we analysed over 400 publicly available RNA-seq datasets spanning 37 different Archaea and Bacteria. Using comparative tools, we identify close to a thousand highly-expressed candidate noncoding RNAs. However, our analyses reveal that capacity to identify noncoding RNA outputs is strongly dependent on phylogenetic sampling. Surprisingly, and in stark contrast to protein-coding genes, the phylogenetic window for effective use of comparative methods is perversely narrow: aggregating public datasets only produced one phylogenetic cluster where these tools could be used to robustly separate unannotated noncoding RNAs from a null hypothesis of transcriptional noise. Our results show that for the full potential of transcriptomics data to be realized, a change in experimental design is paramount: effective transcriptomics requires phylogeny-aware sampling.

  19. Analysis of parallel optical sampling rate and ADC requirements in digital coherent receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorences Riesgo, Abel; Galili, Michael; Peucheret, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We comprehensively assess analog-to-digital converter requirements in coherent digital receiver schemes with parallel optical sampling. We determine the electronic requirements in accordance with the properties of the free running local oscillator....

  20. Fast quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quadri-wave interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of polarized spatially coherent illumination to perform linear retardance imaging and measurements of semi-transparent biological samples using a quantitative phase imaging technique [1]. Quantitative phase imaging techniques [2-5] are used in microscopy for the imaging of semi-transparent samples and gives information about the optical path difference (OPD). The strength of those techniques is their non-invasive (the sample is not labelled) and fast approach. However, this high contrast is non-specific and cannot be linked to specific properties of the sample. To overcome this limitation, we propose to use polarized light in combination with QPI. Indeed, anisotropy has been used to reveal ordered fibrous structures in biological samples without any staining or labelling with polarized light microscopy [6-8]. Recent studies have shown polarimetry as a potential diagnostic tool for various dermatological diseases on thick tissue samples [9]. Particularly, specific collagen fibers spatial distribution has been demonstrated to be a signature for the optical diagnosis and prognosis of cancer in tissues [10]. In this paper, we describe a technical improvement of our technique based on high-resolution quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) and liquid crystal retarder to perform quantitative linear birefringence measurements on biological samples. The system combines a set of quantitative phase images with different excitation polarizations to create birefringence images. These give information about the local retardance and orientation of biological anisotropic components. We propose using a commercial QWLSI [11] (SID4Bio, Phasics SA, Saint Aubin, France) directly plugged onto a lateral video port of an inverted microscope (TE2000-U, Nikon, Japan). We are able to take retardance images in less than 1 second which allows us to record dynamic phenomena (living cells study) and make high speed acquisitions to reconstruct tissues virtual

  1. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Masato, E-mail: hoshino@spring8.or.jp; Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tsukube, Takuro [Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital, 1-3-1 Wakinohamakaigandori, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-0073 (Japan); Yagi, Naoto [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-10-08

    Quantitative measurements of biological fresh samples based on three-dimensional densitometry using X-ray phase contrast tomography are presented. X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching.

  2. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative measurements of biological fresh samples based on three-dimensional densitometry using X-ray phase contrast tomography are presented. X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching

  3. Effects of different temperature treatments on biological ice nuclei in snow samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kazutaka; Maki, Teruya; Kakikawa, Makiko; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Matsuki, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    The heat tolerance of biological ice nucleation activity (INA) depends on their types. Different temperature treatments may cause varying degrees of inactivation on biological ice nuclei (IN) in precipitation samples. In this study, we measured IN concentration and bacterial INA in snow samples using a drop freezing assay, and compared the results for unheated snow and snow treated at 40 °C and 90 °C. At a measured temperature of -7 °C, the concentration of IN in untreated snow was 100-570 L-1, whereas the concentration in snow treated at 40 °C and 90 °C was 31-270 L-1 and 2.5-14 L-1, respectively. In the present study, heat sensitive IN inactivated by heating at 40 °C were predominant, and ranged 23-78% of IN at -7 °C compared with untreated samples. Ice nucleation active Pseudomonas strains were also isolated from the snow samples, and heating at 40 °C and 90 °C inactivated these microorganisms. Consequently, different temperature treatments induced varying degrees of inactivation on IN in snow samples. Differences in the concentration of IN across a range of treatment temperatures might reflect the abundance of different heat sensitive biological IN components.

  4. Electromembrane extraction as a rapid and selective miniaturized sample preparation technique for biological fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Seip, Knut Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    This special report discusses the sample preparation method electromembrane extraction, which was introduced in 2006 as a rapid and selective miniaturized extraction method. The extraction principle is based on isolation of charged analytes extracted from an aqueous sample, across a thin film...... of organic solvent, and into an aqueous receiver solution. The extraction is promoted by application of an electrical field, causing electrokinetic migration of the charged analytes. The method has shown to perform excellent clean-up and selectivity from complicated aqueous matrices like biological fluids....... Technical aspects of electromembrane extraction, important extraction parameters as well as a handful of examples of applications from different biological samples and bioanalytical areas are discussed in the paper....

  5. Toward greener analytical techniques for the absolute quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Mangelings, Debby

    2015-09-10

    Peptide-based biopharmaceuticals represent one of the fastest growing classes of new drug molecules. New reaction types included in the synthesis strategies to reduce the rapid metabolism of peptides, along with the availability of new formulation and delivery technologies, resulted in an increased marketing of peptide drug products. In this regard, the development of analytical methods for quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples is of utmost importance. From the sample preparation step to their analysis by means of chromatographic or electrophoretic methods, many difficulties should be tackled to analyze them. Recent developments in analytical techniques emphasize more and more on the use of green analytical techniques. This review will discuss the progresses in and challenges observed during green analytical method development for the quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples. PMID:25864956

  6. Simultaneous determination of arsenic and selenium in biological samples by HG-AFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hanwen; Liu, Zhanfeng; Shi, Hongmei [Hebei University, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Baoding (China); Wu, Wenjuan [Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shijiazhuang 050051 (China); Li, Liqing [Hebei University, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Baoding (China); Taishan College, Department of Chemistry, Shan Dong Taian (China)

    2005-06-01

    A new method is proposed for simultaneous determination of traces of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in biological samples by hydride-generation double-channel non-dispersive atomic-fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) from tartaric acid media. The effects of analytical conditions on fluorescence signal intensity were investigated and optimized. Interferences from coexisting ions were evaluated. Under optimum conditions linear response ranges above 20 {mu}g L{sup -1} for As and 32 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Se were obtained with detection limits of 0.13 and 0.12 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The precision for elevenfold determination of As at the 4 {mu}g L{sup -1} level and of Se at the 8 {mu}g L{sup -1} level were 2.7 and 1.9% (RSD), respectively. Recoveries of 92.5-95.5% for As and 101.2-108.4% for Se were obtained for four biological samples and two certified biological reference materials. The proposed method has the advantages of simple operation, high sensitivity, and high efficiency; it was successfully used for simultaneous determination of As and Se in biological samples. (orig.)

  7. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the analysis of biological samples and pharmaceutical drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossipov, K.; Seregina, I. F.; Bolshov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in the analysis of biological samples (whole blood, serum, blood plasma, urine, tissues, etc.) and pharmaceutical drugs. The shortcomings of this method related to spectral and non-spectral interferences are manifested in full measure in determination of the target analytes in these complex samples strongly differing in composition. The spectral interferences are caused by similarity of masses of the target component and sample matrix components. Non-spectral interferences are related to the influence of sample matrix components on the physicochemical processes taking place during formation and transportation of liquid sample aerosols into the plasma, on the value and spatial distribution of plasma temperature and on the transmission of the ion beam from the interface to mass spectrometer detector. The review is devoted to analysis of different mechanisms of appearance of non-spectral interferences and to ways for their minimization or elimination. Special attention is paid to the techniques of biological sample preparation, which largely determine the mechanisms of the influence of sample composition on the results of element determination. The ways of lowering non-spectral interferences by instrumental parameter tuning and application of internal standards are considered. The bibliography includes 189 references.

  8. Will Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer Provide Biological Samples for Research Purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley A Harris

    Full Text Available Little is known about the response rates for biological sample donation and attitudes towards control recruitment, especially in younger women. The goals of this pilot study were to determine in women recently diagnosed with breast cancer, the proportion of cases willing to provide biological samples and for purposes of control recruitment, contact information for friends or colleagues.A population-based sample of breast cancer cases (n = 417, 25-74 years was recruited from the Ontario Cancer Registry in 2010 and self-administered questionnaires were completed to determine willingness to provide samples (spot or 24-hr urine, saliva, blood and contact information for friends/colleagues for control recruitment. Using Χ2 analyses of contingency tables we evaluated if these proportions varied by age group (<45 and 45+ and other factors such as ethnicity, education, income, body mass index (BMI, smoking status and alcohol consumption.Cases were willing to provide blood samples, by visiting a clinic (62% or by having a nurse visit the home (61%. Moreover, they would provide saliva (73%, and morning or 24-hr urine samples (66% and 52%. Younger cases (≤45 were 3 times (OR more likely more than older cases to agree to collect morning urine (95% CI: 1.15-8.35. Only 26% of cases indicated they would provide contact information of friends or work colleagues to act as controls. Educated cases were more likely to agree to provide samples, and cases who consumed alcohol were more willing to provide contact information. Ethnicity, income, BMI and smoking had little effect on response rates.Reasonable response rates for biological sample collection should be expected in future case controls studies in younger women, but other methods of control selection must be devised.

  9. 40 CFR 141.23 - Inorganic chemical sampling and analytical requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., then the system is out of compliance immediately. Any sample below the method detection limit shall be... Inorganic and Organic Constituents in Water and Fluvial Sediment, Open File Report 93-125, 1993; For Methods... Requirements § 141.23 Inorganic chemical sampling and analytical requirements. Community water systems...

  10. Constructing Database for Drugs and its Application to Biological Sample by HPTLC and GC/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Y.C.; Park, S.W.; Lim, M.A.; Baeck, S.K.; Park, S.Y.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, J.S. [National Institute of Scientific investigation, Seoul (Korea); Lho, D.S. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    For the identification of unknown drugs in biological samples, we attempted rapid high performance thin layer chromatographic method which is sensitive and selective chromatographic analysis of high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) with automated TLC sampler and ultra-violet (UV) scanner. We constructed HPTLC database (DB) on two hundred five drugs by using the data of Rf values and UV spectra (scan 200-360 nm) as well as gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) DB on ninety six drugs by using the data of relative retention time (RRT) on lidocain and mass spectra. After extracting drugs in geological sample by solid phase extraction (Clean Screen ZSDAU020), we applied them to HPTLC and GC/MS DB. Drugs, especially extracted from biological samples, showed good matching ratio to HPTLC DB and these drugs were confirmed by GC/MS. In conclusion, this DB system is thought to be very useful method for the screening of unknown drugs in biological samples. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  11. Critique of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant off-gas sampling requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Off-gas sampling and monitoring activities needed to support operations safety, process control, waste form qualification, and environmental protection requirements of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) have been evaluated. The locations of necessary sampling sites have been identified on the basis of plant requirements, and the applicability of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference sampling equipment to these HWVP requirements has been assessed for all sampling sites. Equipment deficiencies, if present, have been described and the bases for modifications and/or alternative approaches have been developed

  12. Radioisotope Sample Measurement Techniques in Medicine and Biology. Proceedings of the Symposium on Radioisotope Sample Measurement Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical and biological applications of radioisotopes depend on two basically different types of measurements, those on living subjects in vivo and those on samples in vitro. The International Atomic Energy Agency has in the past held several meetings on in vivo measurement techniques, notably whole-body counting and radioisotope scanning. The present volume contains the Proceedings of the first Symposium the Agency has organized to discuss the various aspects of techniques for sample measurement in vitro. The range of these sample measurement techniques is very wide. The sample may weigh a few milligrams or several hundred grams, and may be in the gaseous, liquid or solid state. Its radioactive content may consist of a single, known radioisotope or several unknown ones. The concentration of radioactivity may be low, medium or high. The measurements may be made manually or automatically and any one of the many radiation detectors now available may be used. The 53 papers presented at the Symposium illustrate the great variety of methods now in use for radioactive- sample measurements. The first topic discussed is gamma-ray spectrometry, which finds an increasing number of applications in sample measurements. Other sections of the Proceedings deal with: the use of computers in gamma-ray spectrometry and multiple tracer techniques; recent developments in activation analysis where both gamma-ray spectrometry and computing techniques are applied; thin-layer and paper radio chromatographic techniques for use with low energy beta-ray emitters; various aspects of liquid scintillation counting techniques in the measurement of alpha- and beta-ray emitters, including chemical and colour quenching; autoradiographic techniques; calibration of equipment; and standardization of radioisotopes. Finally, some applications of solid-state detectors are presented; this section may be regarded as a preview of important future developments. The meeting was attended by 203 participants

  13. 40 CFR 80.1348 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements § 80.1348 What gasoline sample retention...

  14. Correction of radiation absorption on biological samples using Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marcelo O.; Conti, Claudio de Carvalho; dos Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to correct the absorbed radiation (the mass attenuation coefficient curve) in low energy (E gamma-ray source of 241Am (59.54 keV) also applied to certified biological samples of milk powder, hay powder and bovine liver (NIST 1557B). In addition, six methods of effective atomic number determination were used as described in literature to determinate the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C), in order to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those obtained using the transmission method. The experimental results were in good agreement with transmission values suggesting that the method to correct radiation absorption presented in this paper is adequate for biological samples.

  15. Electroanalytical Determination of Danofloxacin in Biological Samples Using Square Wave Voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirley Vanessa Boone

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The voltammetric behavior of danofloxacin (DFX has been studied, in aqueous solution, on a glassy carbon electrode using square wave voltammetry (SWV as electroanalytical technique. After optimization of the experimental conditions, DFX was analyzed in spiked biologic samples using a Britton-Robinson buffer with pH = 5.0 as the supporting electrolyte. Oxidation occurs at 0.98 V vs. Ag/AgCl in a two-electron process controlled by adsorption of the electrogenerated products on the electrode surface. A acceptable recovery was obtained for assay of spiked biologic samples, with value of 98.7% for the swine urine and 95.3 % for the bovine urine.

  16. Assessment of the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.

    2010-07-01

    New differential linear coherent scattering coefficient, μ CS, data for four biological tissue types (fat pork, tendon chicken, adipose and fibroglandular human breast tissues) covering a large momentum transfer interval (0.07≤ q≤70.5 nm -1), resulted from combining WAXS and SAXS data, are presented in order to emphasize the need to update the default data-base by including the molecular interference and the large-scale arrangements effect. The results showed that the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient demonstrates influence of the large-scale arrangement, mainly due to collagen fibrils for tendon chicken and fibroglandular breast samples, and triacylglycerides for fat pork and adipose breast samples at low momentum transfer region. While, at high momentum transfer, the μ CS reflects effects of molecular interference related to water for tendon chicken and fibroglandular samples and, fatty acids for fat pork and adipose samples.

  17. Assessment of the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient of biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, A.L.C.; Antoniassi, M. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, 14040-901 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, 14040-901 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-07-21

    New differential linear coherent scattering coefficient, {mu}{sub CS}, data for four biological tissue types (fat pork, tendon chicken, adipose and fibroglandular human breast tissues) covering a large momentum transfer interval (0.07{<=}q{<=}70.5 nm{sup -1}), resulted from combining WAXS and SAXS data, are presented in order to emphasize the need to update the default data-base by including the molecular interference and the large-scale arrangements effect. The results showed that the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient demonstrates influence of the large-scale arrangement, mainly due to collagen fibrils for tendon chicken and fibroglandular breast samples, and triacylglycerides for fat pork and adipose breast samples at low momentum transfer region. While, at high momentum transfer, the {mu}{sub CS} reflects effects of molecular interference related to water for tendon chicken and fibroglandular samples and, fatty acids for fat pork and adipose samples.

  18. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Sean; Russell, Gareth J.; Butler, Matthew J.; Selinger, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling), it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS) data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos). Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion), and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km2 cells) and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture sessions, which

  19. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Harris

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling, it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos. Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion, and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km2 cells and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture

  20. Correction of radiation absorption on biological samples using Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Marcelo O., E-mail: marcelocefetrj@gmail.com [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, PEN/COPPE/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Basic Disciplines Department, CEFET-RJ Uned Nova Iguacu, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Conti, Claudio de Carvalho [Radiation Protection and Dosimetry Institute, CNEN/IRD, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anjos, Marcelino J. dos [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, PEN/COPPE/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Physics Institute, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo T. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, PEN/COPPE/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to correct the absorbed radiation (the mass attenuation coefficient curve) in low energy (E < 30 keV) applied to a biological matrix based on the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio and the effective atomic number. For calibration, scattering measurements were performed on standard samples of radiation produced by a gamma-ray source of {sup 241}Am (59.54 keV) also applied to certified biological samples of milk powder, hay powder and bovine liver (NIST 1557B). In addition, six methods of effective atomic number determination were used as described in literature to determinate the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C), in order to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those obtained using the transmission method. The experimental results were in good agreement with transmission values suggesting that the method to correct radiation absorption presented in this paper is adequate for biological samples.

  1. Preconcentration and determination of heavy metals in water, sediment and biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirkhanloo Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple, sensitive and accurate column preconcentration method was developed for the determination of Cd, Cu and Pb ions in river water, urine and sediment samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the retention of the analytes on a mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM column from buffered sample solutions and then their elution from the column with nitric acid. Several parameters, such as pH of the sample solution, volume of the sample and eluent and flow rates of the sample were evaluated. The effects of diverse ions on the preconcentration were also investigated. The recoveries were >95 %. The developed method was applied to the determination of trace metal ions in river water, urine and sediment samples, with satisfactory results. The 3δ detection limits for Cu, Pb and Cd were found to be 2, 3 and 0.2 μg dm−3, respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of the copper, lead and cadmium contents in real samples, i.e., river water and biological samples.

  2. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for the Demolition of the Masonry Block for the 108-F Biological Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) has been prepared to clearly define the sampling and analysis activities to be performed in support of the demolition and disposition (or disposal) of the 108-F Biological Laboratory masonry block walls

  3. Biological rhythms, metabolic syndrome and current depressive episode in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fernanda Pedrotti; Jansen, Karen; Mondin, Thaíse Campos; Cardoso, Taiane de Azevedo; Magalhães, Pedro Vieira da Silva; Kapczinski, Flavio; Frey, Benicio N; Oses, Jean Pierre; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Wiener, Carolina David

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the disruption in biological rhythms and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in individuals with depressive episode. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study with a representative sample of 905 young adults. Current depressive episode were confirmed by a psychologist using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI)-Plus. Self-reported biological rhythms were assessed using the Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN). MetS was defined using modified NCEP/ATPIII criteria. Significant main effects of current depressive episode (p<0.001, η(2)=0.163) and MetS (p=0.001, η(2)=0.011) were observed on total BRIAN score. There was a significant interaction between depression and MetS in total biological rhythm scores (p=0.002, η(2)=0.011) as well as sleep (p=0.001, η(2)=0.016) and social domains (p<0.001, η(2)=0.014). In the depressive group, subjects with MetS had a higher disruption in total BRIAN scores (p=0.010), sleep domain (p=0.004), social domain (p=0.005) and in the eating pattern domain approached the level of significance (p=0.098), when compared to subjects with no MetS. The results of the present study showed that self-reported disruptions in biological rhythms are associated with key components of the MetS in community adults with MDD. The understanding of the complex interactions between biological rhythms, MetS and depression are important in the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27343724

  4. Potentiometric detection in UPLC as an easy alternative to determine cocaine in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daems, Devin; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Covaci, Adrian; Hamidi-Asl, Ezat; Van Camp, Guy; Nagels, Luc J

    2015-07-01

    The analytical methods which are often used for the determination of cocaine in complex biological matrices are a prescreening immunoassay and confirmation by chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. We suggest an ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography combined with a potentiometric detector, as a fast and practical method to detect and quantify cocaine in biological samples. An adsorption/desorption model was used to investigate the usefulness of the potentiometric detector to determine cocaine in complex matrices. Detection limits of 6.3 ng mL(-1) were obtained in plasma and urine, which is below the maximum residue limit (MRL) of 25 ng mL(-1). A set of seven plasma samples and 10 urine samples were classified identically by both methods as exceeding the MRL or being inferior to it. The results obtained with the UPLC/potentiometric detection method were compared with the results obtained with the UPLC/MS method for samples spiked with varying cocaine concentrations. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.997 for serum (n =7) and 0.977 for urine (n =8). As liquid chromatography is an established technique, and as potentiometry is very simple and cost-effective in terms of equipment, we believe that this method is potentially easy, inexpensive, fast and reliable.

  5. Offer of rapid testing and alternative biological samples as practical tools to implement HIV screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Di Perri, Giovanni; Tiberi, Simon; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lillo, Flavia B

    2009-10-01

    Implementation of HIV testing has the objective to increase screening, identify and counsel persons with infection, link them to clinical services and reduce transmission. Rapid tests and/or alternative biological samples (like oral fluid) give the option for a better general consent in approaching screening, immediate referral of HIV positives to medical treatment and partner notification. We tested the performance characteristics of an oral fluid-based rapid HIV test (Rapidtest HIV lateral flow-Healthchem diag. LLC) in comparison with routinely utilized methods in a selected population of known positive (N = 121) or negative (N = 754) subjects. The sensitivity of the rapid test was 99.1% (one false negative sample) and the specificity 98.8%. Five negatives showed a faint reactivity, 3 of these were reactive also in the reference test, one with a p24 only reaction in Western blot. If these 3 samples were excluded from the analysis the specificity increases to 99.2%. Results from our study confirm that, although a continuous improvement of the test performance is still needed to minimize false negative and positive results, rapid test and alternative biological samples may contribute to HIV prevention strategies by reaching a larger population particularly when and where regular screening procedures are difficult to obtain. PMID:20128446

  6. Demonstration Exercise of a Validated Sample Collection Method for Powders Suspected of Being Biological Agents in Georgia 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    August 7, 2006 the state of Georgia conducted a collaborative sampling exercise between the Georgia National Guard 4th Civil Support Team Weapons of Mass Destruction (CST-WMD) and the Georgia Department of Human Resources Division of Public Health demonstrating a recently validated bulk powder sampling method. The exercise was hosted at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) at Glynn County, Georgia and involved the participation of the Georgia Emergency Management Agency (GEMA), Georgia National Guard, Georgia Public Health Laboratories, the Federal Bureau of Investigation Atlanta Office, Georgia Coastal Health District, and the Glynn County Fire Department. The purpose of the exercise was to demonstrate a recently validated national sampling standard developed by the American Standards and Test Measures (ASTM) International; ASTM E2458 Standard Practice for Bulk Sample Collection and Swab Sample Collection of Visible Powders Suspected of Being Biological Agents from Nonporous Surfaces. The intent of the exercise was not to endorse the sampling method, but to develop a model for exercising new sampling methods in the context of existing standard operating procedures (SOPs) while strengthening operational relationships between response teams and analytical laboratories. The exercise required a sampling team to respond real-time to an incident cross state involving a clandestine bio-terrorism production lab found within a recreational vehicle (RV). Sample targets consisted of non-viable gamma irradiated B. anthracis Sterne spores prepared by Dugway Proving Ground. Various spore concentration levels were collected by the ASTM method, followed by on- and off-scene analysis utilizing the Center for Disease Control (CDC) Laboratory Response Network (LRN) and National Guard Bureau (NGB) CST mobile Analytical Laboratory Suite (ALS) protocols. Analytical results were compared and detailed surveys of participant evaluation comments were examined. I will present

  7. A review on determination of steroids in biological samples exploiting nanobio-electroanalytical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saurabh K; Chandra, Pranjal; Goyal, Rajendra N; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2013-01-31

    The applications of nanomaterial modified sensors, molecularly imprinting polymer based, aptamer based, and immunosensors have been described in the determination of steroids using electroanalytical techniques. After a brief description of the steroids and assays in biological fluids, the principles of electrochemical detection with the advantages and the limitations of the various sensors are presented. The nanomaterial modified sensors catalyze the oxidation/reduction of steroids and are suitable for sensing them in environmental samples and biological fluids. The determination of steroids based on their reduction has been found more useful in comparison to oxidation as the common metabolites present in the biological fluids do not undergo reduction in the usual potential window and hence, do not interfere in the determination. The sensors based on immunosensors and aptamers were found more sensitive and selective for steroid determination. Conducting polymer modified bio-sensors and microchip devices are suggested as possible future prospects for the ultra sensitive and simultaneous determination of steroids and their metabolites in various samples.

  8. Mapping molecular orientational distributions for biological sample in 3D (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    HE, Wei; Ferrand, Patrick; Richter, Benjamin; Bastmeyer, Martin; Brasselet, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Measuring molecular orientation properties is very appealing for scientists in molecular and cell biology, as well as biomedical research. Orientational organization at the molecular scale is indeed an important brick to cells and tissues morphology, mechanics, functions and pathologies. Recent work has shown that polarized fluorescence imaging, based on excitation polarization tuning in the sample plane, is able to probe molecular orientational order in biological samples; however this applies only to information in 2D, projected in the sample plane. To surpass this limitation, we extended this approach to excitation polarization tuning in 3D. The principle is based on the decomposition of any arbitrary 3D linear excitation in a polarization along the longitudinal z-axis, and a polarization in the transverse xy-sample plane. We designed an interferometer with one arm generating radial polarization light (thus producing longitudinal polarization under high numerical aperture focusing), the other arm controlling a linear polarization in the transverse plane. The amplitude ratio between the two arms can vary so as to get any linear polarized excitation in 3D at the focus of a high NA objective. This technique has been characterized by polarimetry imaging at the back focal plane of the focusing objective, and modeled theoretically. 3D polarized fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated on actin stress fibers in non-flat cells suspended on synthetic polymer structures forming supporting pillars, for which heterogeneous actin orientational order could be identified. This technique shows a great potential in structural investigations in 3D biological systems, such as cell spheroids and tissues.

  9. Closer to the native state. Critical evaluation of cryo-techniques for Transmission Electron Microscopy: preparation of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielanczyk, Lukasz; Matysiak, Natalia; Michalski, Marek; Buldak, Rafal; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Over the years Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has evolved into a powerful technique for the structural analysis of cells and tissues at various levels of resolution. However, optimal sample preservation is required to achieve results consistent with reality. During the last few decades, conventional preparation methods have provided most of the knowledge about the ultrastructure of organelles, cells and tissues. Nevertheless, some artefacts can be introduced at all stagesofstandard electron microscopy preparation technique. Instead, rapid freezing techniques preserve biological specimens as close as possible to the native state. Our review focuses on different cryo-preparation approaches, starting from vitrification methods dependent on sample size. Afterwards, we discuss Cryo-Electron Microscopy Of VItreous Sections (CEMOVIS) and the main difficulties associated with this technique. Cryo-Focused Ion Beam (cryo-FIB) is described as a potential alternative for CEMOVIS. Another post-processing route for vitrified samples is freeze substitution and embedding in resin for structural analysis or immunolocalization analysis. Cryo-sectioning according to Tokuyasu is a technique dedicated to high efficiency immunogold labelling. Finally, we introduce hybrid techniques, which combine advantages of primary techniques originally dedicated to different approaches. Hybrid approaches permit to perform the study of difficult-to-fix samples and antigens or help optimize the sample preparation protocol for the integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy (iLEM) technique.

  10. Monitoring prion protein expression in complex biological samples by SERS for diagnostic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) allows a new insight into the analysis of cell physiology. In this work, the difficulty of producing suitable substrates that, besides permitting the amplification of the Raman signal, do not interact with the biological material causing alteration, has been overcome by a combined method of hydrothermal green synthesis and thermal annealing. The SERS analysis of the cell membrane has been performed with special attention to the cellular prion protein PrPC. In addition, SERS has also been used to reveal the prion protein-Cu(II) interaction in four different cell models (B104, SH-SY5Y, GN11, HeLa), expressing PrPC at different levels. A significant implication of the current work consists of the intriguing possibility of revealing and quantifying prion protein expression in complex biological samples by a cheap SERS-based method, replacing the expensive and time-consuming immuno-assay systems commonly employed.

  11. Practical Guide to Using Cryoprotectants in Biological Sample Preparation at Cryogenic temperature for Electron Microscopic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-Reum Je

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cryo-fixation enables the preservation of the fine structures of intracellular organelles in a condition that is as close to their native state as possible compared with chemical fixation and room temperature processing. Fixation is the initial step for biological sample preparation in electron microscopy. This step is critically important because the goals of electron microscopic observation are fundamentally dependent on well-preserved specimens resulting from this fixation. In the present work, key components of cryo-fixation, cryoprotectants, are tested with various cell types of interest. The results show that dextran can be easily adapted for use with animal cells and cyanobacteria, whereas 1-hexadecene is applicable to plant and yeast cells. The current report provides useful information on the preparation of cryo-fixed biological specimens using high pressure freezing and freeze-substitution aimed at electron microscopic observation.

  12. H2S Analysis in Biological Samples Using Gas Chromatography with Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a metabolite and signaling molecule in biological tissues that regulates many physiological processes. Reliable and sensitive methods for H2S analysis are necessary for a better understanding of H2S biology and for the pharmacological modulation of H2S levels in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the use of gas chromatography coupled to sulfur chemiluminescence detection to measure the rates of H2S production and degradation by tissue homogenates at physiologically relevant concentrations of substrates. This method allows separation of H2S from other sulfur compounds and provides sensitivity of detection to ~15 pg (or 0.5 pmol) of H2S per injected sample. PMID:25725519

  13. Analytical approaches for assaying metallodrugs in biological samples: recent methodological developments and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timerbaev, Andrei; Sturup, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Contemporary medicine increasingly relies on metal-based drugs and correspondingly growing in importance is the monitoring of the drugs and their metabolites in biological samples. Over the last decade, a range of analytical techniques have been developed in order to improve administration strategies for clinically approved compounds and understand pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and metabolism of new drugs so as ultimately to make their clinical development more effective. This paper gives an overview of various separation and detection methods, as well as common sample preparation strategies, currently in use to achieve the intended goals. The critical discussion of existing analytical technologies encompasses notably their detection capability, ability to handle biological matrices with minimum pretreatment, sample throughput, and cost efficiency. The main attention is devoted to those applications that are progressed to real-world biosamples and selected examples are given to illustrate the overall performance and applicability of advanced analytical systems. Also emphasized is the emerging role of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), both as a standalone instrument (for determination of metals originating from drug compounds) and as an element-specific detector in combinations with liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis (for drug metabolism studies). An increasing number of academic laboratories are using ICP-MS technology today, and this review will focus on the analytical possibilities of ICP-MS which would before long provide the method with the greatest impact on the clinical laboratory. PMID:21838702

  14. Rapid methods to detect organic mercury and total selenium in biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Niladri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organic mercury (Hg is a global pollutant of concern and selenium is believed to afford protection against mercury risk though few approaches exist to rapidly assess both chemicals in biological samples. Here, micro-scale and rapid methods to detect organic mercury ( Results For organic Hg, samples are digested using Tris-HCl buffer (with sequential additions of protease, NaOH, cysteine, CuSO4, acidic NaBr followed by extraction with toluene and Na2S2O3. The final product is analyzed via commercially available direct/total mercury analyzers. For Se, a fluorometric assay has been developed for microplate readers that involves digestion (HNO3-HClO4 and HCl, conjugation (2,3-diaminonaphthalene, and cyclohexane extraction. Recovery of organic Hg (86-107% and Se (85-121% were determined through use of Standard Reference Materials and lemon shark kidney tissues. Conclusions The approaches outlined provide an easy, rapid, reproducible, and cost-effective platform for monitoring organic Hg and total Se in biological samples. Owing to the importance of organic Hg and Se in the pathophysiology of Hg, integration of such methods into established research monitoring efforts (that largely focus on screening total Hg only will help increase understanding of Hg's true risks.

  15. Bayesian model comparison and parameter inference in systems biology using nested sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Nick; Morris, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Inferring parameters for models of biological processes is a current challenge in systems biology, as is the related problem of comparing competing models that explain the data. In this work we apply Skilling's nested sampling to address both of these problems. Nested sampling is a Bayesian method for exploring parameter space that transforms a multi-dimensional integral to a 1D integration over likelihood space. This approach focuses on the computation of the marginal likelihood or evidence. The ratio of evidences of different models leads to the Bayes factor, which can be used for model comparison. We demonstrate how nested sampling can be used to reverse-engineer a system's behaviour whilst accounting for the uncertainty in the results. The effect of missing initial conditions of the variables as well as unknown parameters is investigated. We show how the evidence and the model ranking can change as a function of the available data. Furthermore, the addition of data from extra variables of the system can deliver more information for model comparison than increasing the data from one variable, thus providing a basis for experimental design. PMID:24523891

  16. Bayesian model comparison and parameter inference in systems biology using nested sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Pullen

    Full Text Available Inferring parameters for models of biological processes is a current challenge in systems biology, as is the related problem of comparing competing models that explain the data. In this work we apply Skilling's nested sampling to address both of these problems. Nested sampling is a Bayesian method for exploring parameter space that transforms a multi-dimensional integral to a 1D integration over likelihood space. This approach focuses on the computation of the marginal likelihood or evidence. The ratio of evidences of different models leads to the Bayes factor, which can be used for model comparison. We demonstrate how nested sampling can be used to reverse-engineer a system's behaviour whilst accounting for the uncertainty in the results. The effect of missing initial conditions of the variables as well as unknown parameters is investigated. We show how the evidence and the model ranking can change as a function of the available data. Furthermore, the addition of data from extra variables of the system can deliver more information for model comparison than increasing the data from one variable, thus providing a basis for experimental design.

  17. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  18. The correlation of arsenic levels in drinking water with the biological samples of skin disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com; Arain, Muhammad Balal [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: bilal_ku2004@yahoo.com; Baig, Jameel Ahmed [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: jab_mughal@yahoo.com; Jamali, Muhammad Khan [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mkhanjamali@yahoo.com; Afridi, Hassan Imran [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: hassanimranafridi@yahoo.com; Jalbani, Nusrat [Pakistan Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, University Road Karachi-75280 (Pakistan)], E-mail: nusratjalbani_21@yahoo.com; Sarfraz, Raja Adil [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: rajaadilsarfraz@gmail.com; Shah, Abdul Qadir [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: aqshah07@yahoo.com; Niaz, Abdul [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)], E-mail: niazchemist2k6@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15

    Arsenic (As) poisoning has become a worldwide public health concern. The skin is quite sensitive to As and skin lesions are the most common and earliest nonmalignant effects associated to chronic As exposure. In 2005-2007, a survey was carried out on surface and groundwater arsenic contamination and relationships between As exposure via the drinking water and related adverse health effects (melanosis and keratosis) on villagers resides on the banks of Manchar lake, southern part of Sindh, Pakistan. We screened the population from arsenic-affected villages, 61 to 73% population were identified patients suffering from chronic arsenic toxicity. The effects of As toxicity via drinking water were estimated by biological samples (scalp hair and blood) of adults (males and females), have or have not skin problem (n = 187). The referent samples of both genders were also collected from the areas having low level of As (< 10 {mu}g/L) in drinking water (n = 121). Arsenic concentration in drinking water and biological samples were analyzed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The range of arsenic concentrations in lake surface water was 35.2-158 {mu}g/L, which is 3-15 folds higher than World Health Organization [WHO, 2004. Guidelines for drinking-water quality third ed., WHO Geneva Switzerland.]. It was observed that As concentration in the scalp hair and blood samples were above the range of permissible values 0.034-0.319 {mu}g As/g for hair and < 0.5-4.2 {mu}g/L for blood. The linear regressions showed good correlations between arsenic concentrations in water versus hair and blood samples of exposed skin diseased subjects (R{sup 2} = 0.852 and 0.718) as compared to non-diseased subjects (R{sup 2} = 0.573 and 0.351), respectively.

  19. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode–sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50–400 g l−1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m−1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m−1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality. (paper)

  20. 3D nanoscale imaging of biological samples with laboratory-based soft X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehlinger, Aurélie; Blechschmidt, Anne; Grötzsch, Daniel; Jung, Robert; Kanngießer, Birgit; Seim, Christian; Stiel, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In microscopy, where the theoretical resolution limit depends on the wavelength of the probing light, radiation in the soft X-ray regime can be used to analyze samples that cannot be resolved with visible light microscopes. In the case of soft X-ray microscopy in the water-window, the energy range of the radiation lies between the absorption edges of carbon (at 284 eV, 4.36 nm) and oxygen (543 eV, 2.34 nm). As a result, carbon-based structures, such as biological samples, posses a strong absorption, whereas e.g. water is more transparent to this radiation. Microscopy in the water-window, therefore, allows the structural investigation of aqueous samples with resolutions of a few tens of nanometers and a penetration depth of up to 10μm. The development of highly brilliant laser-produced plasma-sources has enabled the transfer of Xray microscopy, that was formerly bound to synchrotron sources, to the laboratory, which opens the access of this method to a broader scientific community. The Laboratory Transmission X-ray Microscope at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) runs with a laser produced nitrogen plasma that emits radiation in the soft X-ray regime. The mentioned high penetration depth can be exploited to analyze biological samples in their natural state and with several projection angles. The obtained tomogram is the key to a more precise and global analysis of samples originating from various fields of life science.

  1. 40 CFR 80.335 - What gasoline sample retention requirements apply to refiners and importers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... certify that the procedures meet the requirements of the ASTM procedures required under 40 CFR 80.330. (d... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline sample retention... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline...

  2. 76 FR 36019 - Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... or other material (e.g., bulk material or active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), in-process material... November 20, 1973 (38 FR 32048), we reorganized and republished the biologics regulations, which included... requirements. On March 11, 1976 (41 FR 10427) and March 2, 1979 (44 FR 11754), we updated Sec. 610.12...

  3. Imaging material properties of biological samples with a Force Feedback Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luca; Newman, Emily; Zubieta, Chloe; Chevrier, Joel; Comin, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical properties of biological samples have been imaged with a force feedback microscope. The force, force gradient and the dissipation are simultaneously measured quantitatively from solely the knowledge of the spring constant. The results are preliminary but demonstrate that the method can be used to measure material properties, it is robust and produce quantitative high force resolution measurements of interaction characteristics. The small stiffness and oscillation of the cantilever results in an vibrational energy much smaller than the thermal energy, reducing the interaction to a minimum. Because the lever is over-damped, the excitation frequency can be chosen arbitrarily.

  4. Non-destructive high-resolution thermal imaging techniques to evaluate wildlife and delicate biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavers, C; Franklin, P; Franklin, P; Plowman, A; Sayers, G; Bol, J; Shepard, D; Fields, D, E-mail: brnc-radarcomms1@nrta.mod.u [Sensors Team, Plymouth University at Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, Devon (United Kingdom) and Paignton Zoological Park, Paignton, Devon (United Kingdom); Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc., 845 Livernoise St, Ferndale, MI (United States); Buckfast Butterfly and Otter Sanctuary, Buckfast, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Thermal imaging cameras now allows routine monitoring of dangerous yet endangered wildlife in captivity. This study looks at the potential applications of radiometrically calibrated thermal data to wildlife, as well as providing parameters for future materials applications. We present a non-destructive active testing technique suitable for enhancing imagery contrast of thin or delicate biological specimens yielding improved thermal contrast at room temperature, for analysis of sample thermal properties. A broad spectrum of animals is studied with different textured surfaces, reflective and emissive properties in the infra red part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some surface features offer biomimetic materials design opportunities.

  5. Separation Technique for the Determination of Highly Polar Metabolites in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Iwasaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics is a new approach that is based on the systematic study of the full complement of metabolites in a biological sample. Metabolomics has the potential to fundamentally change clinical chemistry and, by extension, the fields of nutrition, toxicology, and medicine. However, it can be difficult to separate highly polar compounds. Mass spectrometry (MS, in combination with capillary electrophoresis (CE, gas chromatography (GC, or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC is the key analytical technique on which emerging "omics" technologies, namely, proteomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics, are based. In this review, we introduce various methods for the separation of highly polar metabolites.

  6. Evaluation of Botanical Reference Materials for the Determination of Vanadium in Biological Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Damsgaard, Else

    1982-01-01

    Three botanical reference materials prepared by the National Bureau of Standards have been studied by neutron activation analysis to evaluate their suitability with respect to the determination of vanadium in biological samples. Various decomposition methods were applied in connection with chemic....... A reference value of 1.15 mg/kg of this material is recommended, based on results from 3 different methods. All three materials are preferable to SRM 1571 Orchard Leaves, while Bowen's Kale remains the material of choice because of its lower concentration....

  7. Sample sizing of biological materials analyzed by energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Jose D.S.; Franca, Elvis J.; Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Almeida, Marcio E.S.; Hazin, Clovis A., E-mail: dan-paiva@hotmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: maensoal@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Analytical portions used in chemical analyses are usually less than 1g. Errors resulting from the sampling are barely evaluated, since this type of study is a time-consuming procedure, with high costs for the chemical analysis of large number of samples. The energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence - EDXRF is a non-destructive and fast analytical technique with the possibility of determining several chemical elements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide information on the minimum analytical portion for quantification of chemical elements in biological matrices using EDXRF. Three species were sampled in mangroves from the Pernambuco, Brazil. Tree leaves were washed with distilled water, oven-dried at 60 deg C and milled until 0.5 mm particle size. Ten test-portions of approximately 500 mg for each species were transferred to vials sealed with polypropylene film. The quality of the analytical procedure was evaluated from the reference materials IAEA V10 Hay Powder, SRM 2976 Apple Leaves. After energy calibration, all samples were analyzed under vacuum for 100 seconds for each group of chemical elements. The voltage used was 15 kV and 50 kV for chemical elements of atomic number lower than 22 and the others, respectively. For the best analytical conditions, EDXRF was capable of estimating the sample size uncertainty for further determination of chemical elements in leaves. (author)

  8. Phytochemical analysis and biological evaluation of selected African propolis samples from Cameroon and Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachroni, Danai; Graikou, Konstantia; Kosalec, Ivan; Damianakos, Harilaos; Ingram, Verina; Chinou, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was the chemical analysis of four selected samples of African propolis (Congo and Cameroon) and their biological evaluation. Twenty-one secondary metabolites belonging to four different chemical groups were isolated from the 70% ethanolic extracts of propolis and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral evidence. Three triterpenes and two diprenyl-flavonoids were identified from Congo propolis, which has been investigated for the first time, while thirteen triterpenes, three diprenyl-flavonoids, two monoterpenic alcohols and one fatty acid ester have been identified from Cameroon propolis samples. To our knowledge, the identified diprenyl-flavonoids, as well as five of the isolated and determined triterpenes, are reported for the first time in propolis. Moreover, the total polyphenol content was estimated in all extracts and the antimicrobial activities of all four extracts were studied against six Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and three pathogenic fungi, showing an interesting antibacterial profile.

  9. Towards a new method for the quantification of metabolites in the biological sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantification of metabolites is a key step in drug development. The aim of this Ph.D. work was to study the feasibility of a new method for this quantification, in the biological sample, without the drawbacks (cost, time, ethics) of the classical quantification methods based on metabolites synthesis or administration to man of the radiolabelled drug. Our strategy consists in determining the response factor, in mass spectrometry, of the metabolites. This approach is based on tritium labelling of the metabolites, ex vivo, by isotopic exchange. The labelling step was studied with deuterium. Metabolites of a model drug, recovered from in vitro or urinary samples, were labelled by three ways (Crab tree's catalyst ID2, deuterated trifluoroacetic acid or rhodium chloride ID20). Then, the transposition to tritium labelling was studied and the first results are very promising for the ultimate validation of the method. (author)

  10. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other 14C-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples

  11. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, F.; Palou, A.; Pons, A.

    1987-07-15

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other UC-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples.

  12. 4D x-ray phase contrast tomography for repeatable motion of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography based on a grating interferometer was applied to fast and dynamic measurements of biological samples. To achieve this, the scanning procedure in the tomographic scan was improved. A triangle-shaped voltage signal from a waveform generator to a Piezo stage was used for the fast phase stepping in the grating interferometer. In addition, an optical fiber coupled x-ray scientific CMOS camera was used to achieve fast and highly efficient image acquisitions. These optimizations made it possible to perform an x-ray phase contrast tomographic measurement within an 8 min scan with density resolution of 2.4 mg/cm3. A maximum volume size of 13 × 13 × 6 mm3 was obtained with a single tomographic measurement with a voxel size of 6.5 μm. The scanning procedure using the triangle wave was applied to four-dimensional measurements in which highly sensitive three-dimensional x-ray imaging and a time-resolved dynamic measurement of biological samples were combined. A fresh tendon in the tail of a rat was measured under a uniaxial stretching and releasing condition. To maintain the freshness of the sample during four-dimensional phase contrast tomography, the temperature of the bathing liquid of the sample was kept below 10° using a simple cooling system. The time-resolved deformation of the tendon and each fascicle was measured with a temporal resolution of 5.7 Hz. Evaluations of cross-sectional area size, length of the axis, and mass density in the fascicle during a stretching process provided a basis for quantitative analysis of the deformation of tendon fascicle.

  13. Separation and enrichment of trace ractopamine in biological samples by uniformly-sized molecularly imprinted polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya Li; Qiang Fua; Meng Liu; Yuan-Yuan Jiao; Wei Du; Chong Yu; Jing Liu; Chun Chang; Jian Lu

    2012-01-01

    In order to prepare a high capacity packing material for solid-phase extraction with specific recognition ability of trace ractopamine in biological samples, uniformly-sized, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared by a multi-step swelling and polymerization method using methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker, and toluene as a porogen respectively. Scanning electron microscope and specific surface area were employed to identify the characteristics of MIPs. Ultraviolet spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Scatchard analysis and kinetic study were performed to interpret the specific recognition ability and the binding process of MIPs. The results showed that, compared with other reports, MIPs synthetized in this study showed high adsorption capacity besides specific recognition ability. The adsorption capacity of MIPs was 0.063 mmol/g at 1 mmol/L ractopamine concentra- tion with the distribution coefficient 1.70. The resulting MIPs could be used as solid-phase extraction materials for separation and enrichment of trace ractopamine in biological samples.

  14. Preparation of chitosan grafted graphite composite for sensitive detection of dopamine in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Thangavelu, Kokulnathan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Gnanaprakasam, P; Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2016-10-20

    The accurate detection of dopamine (DA) levels in biological samples such as human serum and urine are essential indicators in medical diagnostics. In this work, we describe the preparation of chitosan (CS) biopolymer grafted graphite (GR) composite for the sensitive and lower potential detection of DA in its sub micromolar levels. The composite modified electrode has been used for the detection of DA in biological samples such as human serum and urine. The GR-CS composite modified electrode shows an enhanced oxidation peak current response and low oxidation potential for the detection of DA than that of electrodes modified with bare, GR and CS discretely. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated GR-CS composite modified electrode shows the DPV response of DA in the linear response ranging from 0.03 to 20.06μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the sensor were estimated as 0.0045μM and 6.06μA μM(-1)cm(-2), respectively. PMID:27474582

  15. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz [Islamic Azad University, Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran)

    2006-11-15

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 {mu}g g{sup -1} and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. (orig.)

  16. Label-free three-dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  17. Label-free three dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  18. An inexpensive and portable microvolumeter for rapid evaluation of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, John K; Wcislo, William T

    2010-08-01

    We describe an improved microvolumeter (MVM) for rapidly measuring volumes of small biological samples, including live zooplankton, embryos, and small animals and organs. Portability and low cost make this instrument suitable for widespread use, including at remote field sites. Beginning with Archimedes' principle, which states that immersing an arbitrarily shaped sample in a fluid-filled container displaces an equivalent volume, we identified procedures that maximize measurement accuracy and repeatability across a broad range of absolute volumes. Crucial steps include matching the overall configuration to the size of the sample, using reflected light to monitor fluid levels precisely, and accounting for evaporation during measurements. The resulting precision is at least 100 times higher than in previous displacement-based methods. Volumes are obtained much faster than by traditional histological or confocal methods and without shrinkage artifacts due to fixation or dehydration. Calibrations using volume standards confirmed accurate measurements of volumes as small as 0.06 microL. We validated the feasibility of evaluating soft-tissue samples by comparing volumes of freshly dissected ant brains measured with the MVM and by confocal reconstruction.

  19. Preparative divergent flow IEF without carrier ampholytes for separation of complex biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastna, Miroslava; Slais, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Efficient separation method is a crucial part of the process in which components of highly complex biological sample are identified and characterized. Based on the principles of recently newly established electrophoretic method called divergent flow IEF (DF IEF), we have tested the DF IEF instrument which is able to operate without the use of background carrier ampholytes. We have verified that during separation and focusing of sample consisting of high numbers of proteins (yeast lysate and wheat flour extract), the pH gradient of preparative DF IEF can be created by autofocusing of the sample components themselves without any addition of carrier ampholytes. In DF IEF, the proteins are separated, desalted and concentrated in one step. The fractions of yeast lysate sample, collected at the DF IEF output and subjected to gel IEF, contained the zones of proteins gradually covering the pI values from 3.7 to 8.5. In our experimental arrangement, the highest number of proteins has been found in fractions with pI values around 5.3 as detected by polyacrylamide gel IEF with CBB staining. During DF IEF, the selected protein bands have been concentrated up to 16.8-fold.

  20. Definition of nearly zero-energy building requirements based on a large building sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the recast of the Energy Performance Building Directive, Member States must give an exact definition for nearly zero-energy buildings to be introduced from 2018/2020. The requirement system stipulating the sustainable development of the building sector is usually based on the analysis of a few reference buildings, combining energy efficiency measures and HVAC systems. The risk of this method is that depending on the assumptions either the requirements do not provide sufficient incentives for energy saving measures and renewables or the requirements cannot be fulfilled with rational solutions in many cases. Our method is based on the artificial generation of a large building sample, where the buildings are defined by geometric and other parameters. Due to the large number of combinations, the effect of many variables appear in the results, with the deviations reflecting the sensitivity of the energy balance. The requirements are set based on some fundamental considerations and the statistical analysis of the sample. The method is demonstrated on the example of setting the requirements for residential buildings in Hungary. The proposed requirements are validated against the common European targets. The suggested method is suitable for developing building energy regulation threshold values, certification schemes or benchmarking values. - Highlights: • We analyse the European nearly zero-energy building definition. • We present a method for setting requirements based on a large building sample. • We demonstrate the method for residential buildings in Hungary. • We compare the results with the European targets

  1. Estimation of the fraction of biologically active methyl tert-butyl ether degraders in a heterogeneous biomass sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waul, Christopher Kevin; Arvin, Erik; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    The fraction of biologically active methyl tert-butyl ether degraders in reactors is just as important for prediction of removal rates as knowledge of the kinetic parameters. The fraction of biologically active methyl tert-butyl ether degraders in a heterogeneous biomass sample, taken from a packed...

  2. The study of trace element distribution in biological samples with NAA for human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one day representative mixed diet of an adult Korean was collected from the data based on the food intake of 108 healthy subjects between the ages 20 and 50. Sampling for the Korean total diet was carried out by the way of using a market basket study based on the Korean standard food consumption scheme reported by the Korean Nutrition Society. Average consumption frequency of different food items for a one day representative mixed diet of an adult Korean and the amount of each item to prepare a one day Korean representative total diet are surveyed. The analytical methods involve both instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation techniques developed for the determination of the elements Cs, I, Sr, Th and U in various kinds of food samples. Concentrations of trace elements including 5 important elements for radiological protection, U, Th, Cs, Sr and I in the Korean total diet and the 4 most frequently consumed Korean foodstuffs have been analyzed by neutron activation analysis. Detection limits for U, Th, Sr and I were improved to ppb levels by radiochemical separation after neutron irradiation. Five biological NIST reference materials were also analyzed for quality control of the analysis. Seventeen trace elements in the Korean total diet and four Korean representative foodstuffs were also analyzed quantitatively by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The elemental distributions in supplemental healthy food and Korean and Chinese origin oriental medicine were also identified. The amount of trace elements ingested with the hair analysis of oriental medicine takers were estimated. The amounts of trace elements inhaled with the analysis of foundry air, blood and hair of foundry workers were also estimated. The basic estimation method in view of health and environment with the neutron activation analysis of biological samples such as foods and hair was established with the result. Nationwide usage system of the NAA facility in Hanaro in many different and

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  4. Troubleshooting digital macro photography for image acquisition and the analysis of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepinsh, Edgars; Kuka, Janis; Dambrova, Maija

    2013-01-01

    For years, image acquisition and analysis have been an important part of life science experiments to ensure the adequate and reliable presentation of research results. Since the development of digital photography and digital planimetric methods for image analysis approximately 20 years ago, new equipment and technologies have emerged, which have increased the quality of image acquisition and analysis. Different techniques are available to measure the size of stained tissue samples in experimental animal models of disease; however, the most accurate method is digital macro photography with software that is based on planimetric analysis. In this study, we described the methodology for the preparation of infarcted rat heart and brain tissue samples before image acquisition, digital macro photography techniques and planimetric image analysis. These methods are useful in the macro photography of biological samples and subsequent image analysis. In addition, the techniques that are described in this study include the automated analysis of digital photographs to minimize user input and exclude the risk of researcher-generated errors or bias during image analysis.

  5. Rare earth analysis in human biological samples by atomic absorption using electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of Sc and seven rare earth elements, Nd, Sm, Dy, Ho, Eu, Tm, and Yb, in biological samplesby atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis (AAS) using electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytic graphite tube is shown to be rapid, precise and accurate. The technique utilizes the method of standard additions and linear regression analysis to determine results from peak area data. Inter-elemental interferences are negligible. The elements found sensitive enough for this type of analysis are, in order of decreasing sensitivity, Yb, Eu, Tm, Dy, Sc, Ho, Sm and Nd. The determination in these types of materials of Gd and elements less sensitive to AAS detection than Gd does not appear to be feasible. Results are presented on the concentrations of these elements in 41 samples from human subjects, cows and vegetables with normal environmental exposure to the rare earth elements. The composite percent mean deviation in peak-area readings for all samples and all elements examined was 4%. The mean standard error in the results among samples was about 6.5%

  6. A new kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of major metabolite of heroin in biological samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Reza Shishehbore; Ali Sheibani; Ehsan Mirparizi

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a simple,rapid and selective catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) as major metabolite of heroin in biological samples.The method is based upon the catalytic effect of 6-MAM on the oxidation of Janus Green by bromate in acid media.The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of Janus Green at 618 nm.The dependence of sensitivity on the reaction variables was studied.Under optimum conditions,two linear calibration curves over the range 0.1-1.0 μg mL-1 and 1.0-34.0 μg mL-1 of 6-MAM were obtained.The detection limit was 1.2 × 10-2 μg mL-1 of 6-MAM.The relative standard deviations for six replicate determinations of 0.8 and 5.0 μg mL 1 of 6-MAM were 1.4 and 1.1% respectively.The effect of various species commonly associated with heroin in real samples was also investigated.The proposed method was successfully applied in human urine and serum samples with satisfactory results.

  7. Ultrasensitive techniques for measurement of uranium in biological samples and the nephrotoxicity of uranium: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.; Weber, J.R. (eds.)

    1988-04-01

    Edited transcripts are provided of two public meetings sponsored by the Division of Radiation Programs and Earth Sciences of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Occupational Radiation Protection Branch. The first meeting, held on December 3, 1985, included nine presentations covering ultrasensitive techniques for measurement of uranium in biological specimens. Topics included laser-spectrometric techniques for uranium bioassay, correlation of urinary uranium samples with air sampling results in industrial settings, delayed neutron counting, laser-kinetic phosphometry, isotope dilution mass spectrometry, resonance ionization spectroscopy, fission track analysis, laser-induced fluorescence, and costs of sampling and processing. The nine presentations of the second meeting dealt with the nephrotoxicity of uranium. Among the topics presented were the physiology of the kidney, the effects of heavy metals on the kidney, animal studies in uranium nephrotoxicity, comparisons of kidney histology in nine humans, renal effects in uranium mill workers, renal damage from different uranium isotopes, and Canadian studies on uranium toxicity. Discussions following the presentations are included in the edited transcripts. 30 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. A data-independent acquisition workflow for qualitative screening of new psychoactive substances in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinyua, Juliet; Negreira, Noelia; Ibáñez, María; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Hernández, Félix; Covaci, Adrian; van Nuijs, Alexander L N

    2015-11-01

    Identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) is challenging. Developing targeted methods for their analysis can be difficult and costly due to their impermanence on the drug scene. Accurate-mass mass spectrometry (AMMS) using a quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) analyzer can be useful for wide-scope screening since it provides sensitive, full-spectrum MS data. Our article presents a qualitative screening workflow based on data-independent acquisition mode (all-ions MS/MS) on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to QTOFMS for the detection and identification of NPS in biological matrices. The workflow combines and structures fundamentals of target and suspect screening data processing techniques in a structured algorithm. This allows the detection and tentative identification of NPS and their metabolites. We have applied the workflow to two actual case studies involving drug intoxications where we detected and confirmed the parent compounds ketamine, 25B-NBOMe, 25C-NBOMe, and several predicted phase I and II metabolites not previously reported in urine and serum samples. The screening workflow demonstrates the added value for the detection and identification of NPS in biological matrices.

  9. Monitoring prion protein expression in complex biological samples by SERS for diagnostic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manno, D; Filippo, E; Fiore, R; Serra, A [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Urso, E; Rizzello, A; Maffia, M [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Universita del Salento, Lecce (Italy)

    2010-04-23

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) allows a new insight into the analysis of cell physiology. In this work, the difficulty of producing suitable substrates that, besides permitting the amplification of the Raman signal, do not interact with the biological material causing alteration, has been overcome by a combined method of hydrothermal green synthesis and thermal annealing. The SERS analysis of the cell membrane has been performed with special attention to the cellular prion protein PrP{sup C}. In addition, SERS has also been used to reveal the prion protein-Cu(II) interaction in four different cell models (B104, SH-SY5Y, GN11, HeLa), expressing PrP{sup C} at different levels. A significant implication of the current work consists of the intriguing possibility of revealing and quantifying prion protein expression in complex biological samples by a cheap SERS-based method, replacing the expensive and time-consuming immuno-assay systems commonly employed.

  10. Trace Level Arsenic Quantification through Cloud Point Extraction: Application to Biological and Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempahanumakkagari Suresh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive solvent-free extraction protocol for the quantification of arsenic at trace level has been described. It is based on the reaction of arsenic (V with molybdate in acidic medium in presence of antimony (III and ascorbic acid as a reducing agent to form a blue-colored arsenomolybdenum blue complex. The complex has been extracted into surfactant phase using Triton X-114, and its absorbance was measured at 690 nm. The detection limit, working range, and the relative standard deviation were found to be 1 ng mL−1, 10–200 ng mL−1, and 1.2%, respectively. The effect of common ions was studied, and the method has been applied to determine trace levels of As(III and As(V from a variety of samples like environmental, biological, and commercially procured chemicals.

  11. Determination of rhenium in biological and environmental samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical neutron activation procedures using liquid-liquid extraction with tetraphenylarsonium chloride in chloroform from 1 M HCl and solid extraction with ALIQUAT 336 incorporated in a polyacrylonitrile binding matrix from 0.1 M HCl were developed for accurate determination of rhenium in biological and environmental samples at the sub-ng.g-1 level. Concentrations of Re in the range of 0.1 to 2.4 ng.g-1 were determined in several botanical reference materials (RM), while in a RM of road dust a value of approx. 10 ng.g-1 was found. Significantly elevated values of Re, up to 90 ng.g-1, were found in seaweed (brown algae). Results for Re in the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus in which elevated 99Tc values had previously been determined suggest possible competition between Re and Tc in the accumulation process. (author)

  12. Selective spectrofluorimetric determination of zinc in biological samples by Flow Injection Analysis (FIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Perez Conde, C.; Gutierrez, A.; Camara, C. (Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Analitica)

    1992-03-01

    The automatization of a spectrofluorimetric method for the determination of zinc at trace level is described. It is based on the formation of the fluorescent complex Zn(II)-5,7-dibromo-8-quinolinol (Zn(II)-DBQ) followed by extraction into diethylether using flow injection analysis. The optimum fluorescent emission is reached in hexamethylenetetramine (H{sub 2}MTA{sup +}/HMTA) buffer pH 6.0. A membrane phase separator was used. The calibration graph is linear up to 1.5 {mu}g/ml of Zn(II). The proposed method (detection limit 3 ng/ml) is very selective and has been successfully applied to determine Zn(II) in biological samples, tap waters and various food items. (orig.).

  13. Integrated quantification and identification of aldehydes and ketones in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, David; Meinema, Anne C; Permentier, Hjalmar; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-05-20

    The identification of unknown compounds remains to be a bottleneck of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics screening experiments. Here, we present a novel approach which facilitates the identification and quantification of analytes containing aldehyde and ketone groups in biological samples by adding chemical information to MS data. Our strategy is based on rapid autosampler-in-needle-derivatization with p-toluenesulfonylhydrazine (TSH). The resulting TSH-hydrazones are separated by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) and detected by electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight (ESI-QqTOF) mass spectrometry using a SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical Fragment-Ion Spectra) data-independent high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) approach. Derivatization makes small, poorly ionizable or retained analytes amenable to reversed phase chromatography and electrospray ionization in both polarities. Negatively charged TSH-hydrazone ions furthermore show a simple and predictable fragmentation pattern upon collision induced dissociation, which enables the chemo-selective screening for unknown aldehydes and ketones via a signature fragment ion (m/z 155.0172). By means of SWATH, targeted and nontargeted application scenarios of the suggested derivatization route are enabled in the frame of a single UHPLC-ESI-QqTOF-HR-MS workflow. The method's ability to simultaneously quantify and identify molecules containing aldehyde and ketone groups is demonstrated using 61 target analytes from various compound classes and a (13)C labeled yeast matrix. The identification of unknowns in biological samples is detailed using the example of indole-3-acetaldehyde. PMID:24745975

  14. Determination of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents in biological and environmental samples: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telgmann, Lena [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany); Sperling, Michael [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany); European Virtual Institute for Speciation Analysis (EVISA), Münster (Germany); Karst, Uwe, E-mail: uk@uni-muenster.de [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany)

    2013-02-18

    Highlights: ► All major methods for the analysis of Gd-based MRI contrast agents are discussed. ► Biological and environmental samples are covered. ► Pharmacokinetics and species transformation can be investigated. ► The figures of merit as limit of detection and analysis time are described. -- Abstract: The development of analytical methods and strategies to determine gadolinium and its complexes in biological and environmental matrices is evaluated in this review. Gadolinium (Gd) chelates are employed as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the 1980s. In general they were considered as safe and well-tolerated, when in 2006, the disease nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was connected to the administration of MRI contrast agents based on Gd. Pathogenesis and etiology of NSF are yet unclear and called for the development of several analytical methods to obtain elucidation in this field. Determination of Gd complex stability in vitro and in vivo, as well as the quantification of Gd in body fluids like blood and urine was carried out. Separation of the Gd chelates was achieved with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). For detection, various methods were employed, including UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A second challenge for analysts was the discovery of high concentrations of anthropogenic Gd in surface waters draining populated areas. The source could soon be determined to be the increasing administration of Gd complexes during MRI examinations. Identification and quantification of the contrast agents was carried out in various surface and groundwater samples to determine the behavior and fate of the Gd chelates in the environment. The improvement of limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) was and still is the goal of past and ongoing

  15. Magnetically responsive polycaprolactone nanoparticles for progesterone screening in biological and environmental samples using gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Nezhadali, Azizollah; Khatibi, Aram-Dokht

    2016-08-01

    A new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite nanocomposite was fabricated and used as a sorbent for magnetically mediated PCL microspheres solid-phase extraction (MM-PCL-SPE) followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for monitoring of progesterone (PGN) hormone in biological and environmental matrices, namely blood serum, tap water, urine, and hospital wastewater. The nanomagnetite core of the sorbent was synthesized by a co-precipitation method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were then microencapsulated with PCL microspheres using emulsion polymerization. The nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The magnetite sorbent can be effectively dispersed in aqueous solution and attracted to an external magnetic field. The MM-PCL-SPE process for PGN assay involved (a) dispersion of the sorbent in the donor phase aqueous solution with sonication, (b) exposure to a magnetic field to collect sorbent that had adsorbed the analyte, and (c) solvent desorption of extracted PGN for GC-FID analysis. The work demonstrates the usefulness of MM-PCL-SPE in the rapid and sensitive monitoring of trace amounts of PGN in real samples. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 1.00 and 3.30 ng/mL, respectively. The relative recoveries in real samples were adequate. Linearity was observed over a wide range of 2.2-10,000.0 ng/mL in aqueous media and urine and 0.01-70.0 μg/mL in blood serum. Graphical Abstract In this research new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite microspheres were developed as an efficient sorbent for solid-phase extraction of progesterone hormone in biological and environmental matrices. PMID:27299775

  16. Solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatographic quantitation of quinfamide in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J M; Jung, C H; Alarcón, A; Barreda, A

    2000-09-15

    This paper describes a high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the assay of quinfamide and its main metabolite, 1-(dichloroacetyl)-1,2,3,4,-tetrahydro-6-quinolinol, in plasma, urine and feces. It requires 1 ml of biological fluid, an extraction using Sep-Pack cartridges and acetonitrile for drug elution. Analysis was performed on a CN column (5 microm) using water-acetonitrile-methanol (40:50:10) as a mobile phase at 269 nm. Results showed that the assay was linear in the range between 0.08 and 2.0 microg/ml. The limit of quantitation was 0.08 microg/ml. Maximum assay coefficient of variation was 14%. Recovery obtained in plasma, urine and feces ranged from 82% to 98%.

  17. SAMPLING AND CALIBRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR OPTICAL REFLECTANCE SOIL PROPERTY SENSORS FOR KOREAN PADDY SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optical diffuse reflectance sensing has potential for rapid and reliable on-site estimation of soil properties. For good results, proper calibration to measured soil properties is required. One issue is whether it is necessary to develop calibrations using samples from the specific area or areas (e....

  18. Sample Size Requirements for Assessing Statistical Moments of Simulated Crop Yield Distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, N.; Finger, R.; Klein, T.; Calanca, P.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic crop growth models are becoming increasingly important in agricultural research and are extensively used in climate change impact assessments. In such studies, statistics of crop yields are usually evaluated without the explicit consideration of sample size requirements. The purpose of t

  19. Microscopic linear liquid streams in vacuum: Injection of solvated biological samples into X-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microscopic linear liquid free-streams offer a means of gently delivering biological samples into a probe beam in vacuum while maintaining the sample species in a fully solvated state. By employing gas dynamic forces to form the microscopic liquid stream (as opposed to a conventional solid-walled convergent nozzle), liquid free-streams down to 300 nm diameter have been generated. Such 'Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzles' (GDVN) are ideally suited to injecting complex biological species into an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) to determine the structure of the biological species via Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SFX). GDVN injector technology developed for this purpose is described.

  20. Introduction of a cryosectioning-ToF-SIMS instrument for analysis of non-dehydrated biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, J.; Beumer, A.; Lipinsky, D.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2006-07-01

    Tof-SIMS and laser-SNMS are becoming increasingly important tools for analysing the elemental and molecular distribution in biological samples. We have developed the prototype of an in-vacuum cryosectioning instrument directly attached to a ToF-SIMS/laser-SNMS instrument, which allows preparing and analyzing frozen non-dehydrated biological samples. Due to unavoidable effects during the handling, storing, and preparation of frozen samples, even inside the vacuum, it must be ensured that the analyzed surface is from the sample and not a preparation artefact. To this effect, a model structure, similar to the biological samples and with a defined chemical composition, was analyzed under varying thermal treatment before and during analysis, respectively, in order to identify a balance between evaporating and subliming adsorbed materials and the effect of freeze-drying on the measured signal.

  1. 3D surface scan of biological samples with a Push-broom Imaging Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Hruska, Zuzana; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2013-08-01

    The food industry is always on the lookout for sensing technologies for rapid and nondestructive inspection of food products. Hyperspectral imaging technology integrates both imaging and spectroscopy into unique imaging sensors. Its application for food safety and quality inspection has made significant progress in recent years. Specifically, hyperspectral imaging has shown its potential for surface contamination detection in many food related applications. Most existing hyperspectral imaging systems use pushbroom scanning which is generally used for flat surface inspection. In some applications it is desirable to be able to acquire hyperspectral images on circular objects such as corn ears, apples, and cucumbers. Past research describes inspection systems that examine all surfaces of individual objects. Most of these systems did not employ hyperspectral imaging. These systems typically utilized a roller to rotate an object, such as an apple. During apple rotation, the camera took multiple images in order to cover the complete surface of the apple. The acquired image data lacked the spectral component present in a hyperspectral image. This paper discusses the development of a hyperspectral imaging system for a 3-D surface scan of biological samples. The new instrument is based on a pushbroom hyperspectral line scanner using a rotational stage to turn the sample. The system is suitable for whole surface hyperspectral imaging of circular objects. In addition to its value to the food industry, the system could be useful for other applications involving 3-D surface inspection.

  2. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence, imaging and elemental mapping from biological samples

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D V Rao; M Swapna; R Cesareo; A Brunetti; T Akatsuka; T Yuasa; T Takeda; G E Gigante

    2011-02-01

    The present study utilized the new hard X-ray microspectroscopy beamline facility, X27A, available at NSLS, BNL, USA, for elemental mapping. This facility provided the primary beam in a small spot of the order of ∼ 10 m, for focussing. With this spatial resolution and high flux throughput, the synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescent intensities for Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ti and Cu were measured using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector. The sample is scanned in a `step-and-repeat’ mode for fast elemental mapping measurements and generated elemental maps at 8, 10 and 12 keV, from a small animal shell (snail). The accumulated trace elements, from these biological samples, in small areas have been identified. Analysis of the small areas will be better suited to establish the physiology of metals in specific structures like small animal shell and the distribution of other elements.

  3. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji H Harada

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults.Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53-3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake.

  4. Application of ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of tramadol in biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sheibani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple and rapid ion mobility spectrometry (IMS method has been described for the determination of tramadol. The operating instrumental parameters that could influence IMS were investigated and optimized (temperature; injection: 220 and IMS cell: 190°C, flow rate; carrier: 300 and drift: 600 mL/minute, voltage; corona: 2300 and drift: 7000 V, pulse width: 100 μs. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curves were linear within two orders of magnitude with R2 ≥ 0.998 for the determination of tramadol in human plasma, saliva, serum, and urine samples. The limits of detection and the limits of quantitation were between 0.1 and 0.3 and 0.3 and 1 ng/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviations were between 7.5 and 8.8%. The recovery results (90–103.9% indicate that the proposed method can be applied for tramadol analysis in different biological samples.

  5. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues

  6. Phosphorus in biological standards and samples by thermal neutron irradiation and β-counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nondestructive NAA method based on the reaction 31P(n,γ)32P (T1/2 = 14.23 d) has been developed where the product nucleus, a pure β-emitter with end point energy 1.71 MeV is measured by using an end window G.M counter and an Al filter of 27 mg x cm-2. 32P was identified by measuring Eβ using Feather's analysis and its half-life was found to be 15.3±0.2 days in standard reference materials (SRMs) and samples. For most reference materials (RMs) from NIST (USA) and IAEA (Vienna), our values agree within ±5% of the certified values. A variety of biological samples have also been analyzed and our values are in the range; medicinal herbs (n 43), 0.29-5.23 mg/g; bhasmas (n = 19), 0.09-51.4 mg/g; vegetables (n = 8), 1.85-5.73 mg/g; lentils (n = 6), 2.1-5.5 mg/g; flours (n = 6), 1.3-3.3 mg/g; vegetarian diet (n = 5), 2.41-2.90 mg/g; fish (n = 43), 3.61-36.8 mg/g; human and animal milk (n = 6), 1.24-7.95 mg/g; commercial milk powders (n = 14), 2.76-11.9 mg/g; water from various sources (n = 14), 1-417 μg/l; human and animal blood (n = 9), 1.00-15.0 mg/g; cancerous and healthy breast tissue (n = 60), 1.00-8.63 mg/g; human hair (n = 43), 0.12-5.81 mg/g, where n is the number of samples analyzed. The method is simple, fast, and nondestructive and provides data within ±5% error limit with a detection limit of 0.1 mg/g. (author)

  7. Generation of parameters required for estimation of organically bound tritium in plant samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of estimation of model parameters, required for calculation of Organically Bound Tritium, namely fractional water content (WCp) and water equivalent factor (WEQp) of a few plant samples commonly observed at Kaiga site. Paper also presents the results of estimation of exchangeable and non exchangeable hydrogen atoms present in those plant samples. Fractional water content of leafy vegetables varied from 0.76 to 0.95, that of fruit samples varied from 0.72 to 0.96, that of leafy vegetable sample varied from 0.69 to 0.97 and that of cereals varied from 0.04 to 0.29. Water equivalent factor is found to be more or less constant irrespective of the sample type. The total hydrogen content in the dry matter is more or less constant even though relative concentration of various constituents such as protein, fat and carbohydrate are different for different types of samples. The carbon bound hydrogen atoms in the dry matter are more than those bound to atoms other than carbon in the samples considered in this work. (author)

  8. In-focus electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated biological samples with a Boersch phase plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, B.; Rhinow, D.; Walter, A.; Schroeder, R. [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Benner, G.; Majorovits, E.; Matijevic, M.; Niebel, H. [Carl Zeiss NTS GmbH, D-73447 Oberkochen (Germany); Mueller, H.; Haider, M. [CEOS GmbH, Englerstr. 26, 69126 Heidleberg (Germany); Lacher, M.; Schmitz, S.; Holik, P. [Caesar Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, D-53175 Bonn (Germany); Kuehlbrandt, W., E-mail: werner.kuehlbrandt@mpibp-frankfurt.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    We report the implementation of an electrostatic Einzel lens (Boersch) phase plate in a prototype transmission electron microscope dedicated to aberration-corrected cryo-EM. The combination of phase plate, C{sub s} corrector and Diffraction Magnification Unit (DMU) as a new electron-optical element ensures minimal information loss due to obstruction by the phase plate and enables in-focus phase contrast imaging of large macromolecular assemblies. As no defocussing is necessary and the spherical aberration is corrected, maximal, non-oscillating phase contrast transfer can be achieved up to the information limit of the instrument. A microchip produced by a scalable micro-fabrication process has 10 phase plates, which are positioned in a conjugate, magnified diffraction plane generated by the DMU. Phase plates remained fully functional for weeks or months. The large distance between phase plate and the cryo sample permits the use of an effective anti-contaminator, resulting in ice contamination rates of <0.6 nm/h at the specimen. Maximal in-focus phase contrast was obtained by applying voltages between 80 and 700 mV to the phase plate electrode. The phase plate allows for in-focus imaging of biological objects with a signal-to-noise of 5-10 at a resolution of 2-3 nm, as demonstrated for frozen-hydrated virus particles and purple membrane at liquid-nitrogen temperature. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We implement an electrostatic Boersch phase plate into a dedicated prototypical TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase contrast aberration-corrected electron microscope (PACEM) includes a diffraction magnification unit (DMU). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DMU minimizes obstruction of low spatial frequencies by the phase plate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-focus phase contrast generation is demonstrated for frozen-hydrated biological specimens.

  9. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination. PMID:26671943

  10. A self-contained polymeric cartridge for automated biological sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guolin; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Xie, Hong; Chiew, Deon; Hsieh, Tseng-Ming; Ali, Emril Mohamed; Lun Looi, Xing; Li, Mo-Huang; Ying, Jackie Y

    2011-09-01

    Sample preparation is one of the most crucial processes for nucleic acids based disease diagnosis. Several steps are required for nucleic acids extraction, impurity washes, and DNA/RNA elution. Careful sample preparation is vital to the obtaining of reliable diagnosis, especially with low copies of pathogens and cells. This paper describes a low-cost, disposable lab cartridge for automatic sample preparation, which is capable of handling flexible sample volumes of 10 μl to 1 ml. This plastic cartridge contains all the necessary reagents for pathogen and cell lysis, DNA/RNA extraction, impurity washes, DNA/RNA elution and waste processing in a completely sealed cartridge. The entire sample preparation processes are automatically conducted within the cartridge on a desktop unit using a pneumatic fluid manipulation approach. Reagents transportation is achieved with a combination of push and pull forces (with compressed air and vacuum, respectively), which are connected to the pneumatic inlets at the bottom of the cartridge. These pneumatic forces are regulated by pinch valve manifold and two pneumatic syringe pumps within the desktop unit. The performance of this pneumatic reagent delivery method was examined. We have demonstrated the capability of the on-cartridge RNA extraction and cancer-specific gene amplification from 10 copies of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The on-cartridge DNA recovery efficiency was 54-63%, which was comparable to or better than the conventional manual approach using silica spin column. The lab cartridge would be suitable for integration with lab-chip real-time polymerase chain reaction devices in providing a portable system for decentralized disease diagnosis. PMID:22662036

  11. Analytical methods for the quantification of bisphenol A, alkylphenols, phthalate esters, and perfluoronated chemicals in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Ito, Rie

    2014-01-01

    Our modern society has created a large number of chemicals that are used for the production of everyday commodities including toys, food packaging, cosmetic products, and building materials. We enjoy a comfortable and convenient lifestyle with access to these items. In addition, in specialized areas, such as experimental science and various medical fields, laboratory equipment and devices that are manufactured using a wide range of chemical substances are also extensively employed. The association between human exposure to trace hazardous chemicals and an increased incidence of endocrine disease has been recognized. However, the evaluation of human exposure to such endocrine disrupting chemicals is therefore imperative, and the determination of exposure levels requires the analysis of human biological materials, such as blood and urine. To obtain as much information as possible from limited sample sizes, highly sensitive and reliable analytical methods are also required for exposure assessments. The present review focuses on effective analytical methods for the quantification of bisphenol A (BPA), alkylphenols (APs), phthalate esters (PEs), and perfluoronated chemicals (PFCs), which are chemicals used in the production of everyday commodities. Using data obtained from liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and LC/MS/MS analyses, assessments of the risks to humans were also presented based on the estimated levels of exposure to PFCs. PMID:24420241

  12. Analysis of inorganic elements in biological samples of C57BL/6J mouse strain using INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research for new medicine, vaccines and other products of interest in health area, for any disease, requires several in vivo tests using animal models on experiments for clinical analysis of actions in organism, focusing on the relation between these and the responses or reactions to their use, allowing or not their use in human being. The present investigation deals with the determination of elements concentration (Ca, Cl, K, Mg and Na) of clinical relevance in kidney and liver of C57BL/6J mice strain using the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis technique. Particularly, the C57BL/6J strain is one of the most widely used mice genetically modified for human disease studies. The biological samples were collected from 2 month old adult mice bred in the Biotherium (animal breeding) of UNIFESP (Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brasil) and at Human Genome Research Center (University of Sao Paulo, Brasil) and Biotechnology Center (IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brasil). The measurements were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN. These data will allow researchers to optimize their studies, both in terms of cost and time, by knowing the basal reference values in blood and organs of this strain. Additionally, this analytical procedure meets the needs of the world tendency that emphasizes the requirements to propose alternative methods for clinical research that contribute to animal welfare. (author)

  13. Analysis of inorganic elements in biological samples of C57BL/6J mouse strain using INAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metairon, Sabrina; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Suzuki, Miriam F.; Kovacs, Luciana, E-mail: metairon@usp.br, E-mail: czamboni@ipen.br, E-mail: mfsuzuki@ipen.br, E-mail: lukovacs@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bueno Junior, Carlos R., E-mail: carmao11@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IB/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Centro de Estudos do Genoma Humano

    2013-07-01

    The research for new medicine, vaccines and other products of interest in health area, for any disease, requires several in vivo tests using animal models on experiments for clinical analysis of actions in organism, focusing on the relation between these and the responses or reactions to their use, allowing or not their use in human being. The present investigation deals with the determination of elements concentration (Ca, Cl, K, Mg and Na) of clinical relevance in kidney and liver of C57BL/6J mice strain using the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis technique. Particularly, the C57BL/6J strain is one of the most widely used mice genetically modified for human disease studies. The biological samples were collected from 2 month old adult mice bred in the Biotherium (animal breeding) of UNIFESP (Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brasil) and at Human Genome Research Center (University of Sao Paulo, Brasil) and Biotechnology Center (IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brasil). The measurements were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN. These data will allow researchers to optimize their studies, both in terms of cost and time, by knowing the basal reference values in blood and organs of this strain. Additionally, this analytical procedure meets the needs of the world tendency that emphasizes the requirements to propose alternative methods for clinical research that contribute to animal welfare. (author)

  14. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants

  15. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

  16. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INNE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Lot 104-108, Tingkat 1, Block A, Taman Pertiwi Indah, Jalan Kangar-Alor Star, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Yusop, M H M [Halal Products Research Institute, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Bari, M F [School of Materials Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, Seriab 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Islam, Kh N [Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hasan, M F, E-mail: uda@unimap.edu.my [Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-13

    We used 40 {+-} 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 {sup 0}C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 {mu}g ml{sup -1} swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  17. Fast screening of ketamine in biological samples based on molecularly imprinted photonic hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A novel label-free colorimetric chemosensor: with the increase in the concentration of ketamine, the Bragg diffraction peak of MIPHs gradually shifted to the longer wavelength region. Accompanying the peak shift, the color change of MIPHs was also observed obviously: from green to red. Highlights: ► We developed the label-free colorimetric MIPHs for handy and fast screening of ketamine. ► The obvious color change of MIPHs was observed upon ketamine. ► The MIPHs exhibited good sensing abilities in an aqueous environment. ► The sensing mechanisms of the water-compatible MIPHs were investigated. ► The MIPHs were employed to screening ketamine in real biological samples. -- Abstract: A novel label-free colorimetric chemosensor was developed for handy and fast screening of ketamine with high sensitivity and specificity based on molecularly imprinted photonic hydrogels (MIPHs) that combined the colloidal-crystal with molecular imprinting technique. The unique inverse opal arrays with a thin polymer wall in which the imprinted nanocavities of ketamine moleculars distributed allowed high sensitive, quick responsive, specific detection of the target analyte, and good regenerating ability in an aqueous environment. Due to the hierarchical inverse opal structural characteristics, the specific ketamine molecular recognition process can induce obvious swelling of the MIPHs to be directly transferred into visually perceptible optical signal (change in color) which can be detected by the naked eye through Bragg diffractive shifts of ordered macroporous arrays. In order to enhance the recognition ability in aqueous environments, the MIPHs were designed as water-compatible and synthesized in a water–methanol system. The molecular recognition mechanisms were investigated. The proposed MIPHs were successfully employed to screen trace level ketamine in human urine and saliva samples, exhibiting high sensitivity, rapid response, and specificity in the

  18. Electronic noses for monitoring benzene occupational exposure in biological samples of Egyptian workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab I. Mohamed

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Benzene is commonly emitted in several industries, leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposure hazards. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it is still a component of petroleum products and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued higher occupational exposures in industrial settings in developing countries. Materials and Methods: We investigated the potential use of an electronic nose (e-nose to monitor the headspace volatiles in biological samples from benzene-exposed Egyptian workers and non-exposed controls. The study population comprised 150 non-smoking male workers exposed to benzene and an equal number of matching non-exposed controls. We determined biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk including: benzene in exhaled air and blood; and its urinary metabolites such as phenol and muconic acid using gas chromatography technique and a portable e-nose. Results: The average benzene concentration measured in the ambient air of the workplace of all studied industrial settings in Alexandria, Egypt; was 97.56±88.12 μg/m3 (range: 4.69–260.86 μg/m3. Levels of phenol and muconic acid were signifi cantly (p < 0.001 higher in both blood and urine of benzene-exposed workers as compared to non-exposed controls. Conclusions: The e-nose technology has successfully classifi ed and distinguished benzene-exposed workers from non-exposed controls for all measured samples of blood, urine and the exhaled air with a very high degree of precision. Thus, it will be a very useful tool for the low-cost mass screening and early detection of health hazards associated with the exposure to benzene in the industry.

  19. Fast screening of ketamine in biological samples based on molecularly imprinted photonic hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Liang [Department of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing (China); Meng, Pinjia, E-mail: mengpinjia@163.com [Department of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing (China); Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Yanji [Department of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing (China)

    2013-04-10

    Graphical abstract: A novel label-free colorimetric chemosensor: with the increase in the concentration of ketamine, the Bragg diffraction peak of MIPHs gradually shifted to the longer wavelength region. Accompanying the peak shift, the color change of MIPHs was also observed obviously: from green to red. Highlights: ► We developed the label-free colorimetric MIPHs for handy and fast screening of ketamine. ► The obvious color change of MIPHs was observed upon ketamine. ► The MIPHs exhibited good sensing abilities in an aqueous environment. ► The sensing mechanisms of the water-compatible MIPHs were investigated. ► The MIPHs were employed to screening ketamine in real biological samples. -- Abstract: A novel label-free colorimetric chemosensor was developed for handy and fast screening of ketamine with high sensitivity and specificity based on molecularly imprinted photonic hydrogels (MIPHs) that combined the colloidal-crystal with molecular imprinting technique. The unique inverse opal arrays with a thin polymer wall in which the imprinted nanocavities of ketamine moleculars distributed allowed high sensitive, quick responsive, specific detection of the target analyte, and good regenerating ability in an aqueous environment. Due to the hierarchical inverse opal structural characteristics, the specific ketamine molecular recognition process can induce obvious swelling of the MIPHs to be directly transferred into visually perceptible optical signal (change in color) which can be detected by the naked eye through Bragg diffractive shifts of ordered macroporous arrays. In order to enhance the recognition ability in aqueous environments, the MIPHs were designed as water-compatible and synthesized in a water–methanol system. The molecular recognition mechanisms were investigated. The proposed MIPHs were successfully employed to screen trace level ketamine in human urine and saliva samples, exhibiting high sensitivity, rapid response, and specificity in the

  20. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  1. State of the art of environmentally friendly sample preparation approaches for determination of PBDEs and metabolites in environmental and biological samples: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Paula; Lana, Nerina B; Ríos, Juan M; García-Reyes, Juan F; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2016-01-28

    Green chemistry principles for developing methodologies have gained attention in analytical chemistry in recent decades. A growing number of analytical techniques have been proposed for determination of organic persistent pollutants in environmental and biological samples. In this light, the current review aims to present state-of-the-art sample preparation approaches based on green analytical principles proposed for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metabolites (OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs) in environmental and biological samples. Approaches to lower the solvent consumption and accelerate the extraction, such as pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and ultrasound-assisted extraction, are discussed in this review. Special attention is paid to miniaturized sample preparation methodologies and strategies proposed to reduce organic solvent consumption. Additionally, extraction techniques based on alternative solvents (surfactants, supercritical fluids, or ionic liquids) are also commented in this work, even though these are scarcely used for determination of PBDEs. In addition to liquid-based extraction techniques, solid-based analytical techniques are also addressed. The development of greener, faster and simpler sample preparation approaches has increased in recent years (2003-2013). Among green extraction techniques, those based on the liquid phase predominate over those based on the solid phase (71% vs. 29%, respectively). For solid samples, solvent assisted extraction techniques are preferred for leaching of PBDEs, and liquid phase microextraction techniques are mostly used for liquid samples. Likewise, green characteristics of the instrumental analysis used after the extraction and clean-up steps are briefly discussed.

  2. The method of radioactive tracer for measuring the amount of inorganic nanoparticles in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzulukov, Yu; Antsiferova, A.; Demin, V. A.; Demin, V. F.; Kashkarov, P.

    2015-11-01

    The method to measure the mass of inorganic nanoparticles in biological (or any other samples) using nanoparticles labeled with radioactive tracers is developed and applied to practice. The tracers are produced in original nanoparticles by radioactive activation of some of their atomic nuclei. The method of radioactive tracers demonstrates a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy equal or better than popular methods of optical and mass spectrometry, or electron microscopy and has some specific advantages. The method can be used for study of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in living organism, as well as in ecological and fundamental research. It was used in practice to study absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Se, ZnO, TiO2 as well as to study transportation of silver nanoparticles through the barriers of blood-brain, placenta and milk gland of rats. Brief descriptions of data obtained in experiments with application of this method included in the article. The method was certified in Russian Federation standard system GOST-R and recommended by the Russian Federation regulation authority ROSPOTREBNADZOR for measuring of toxicokinetic and organotropy parameters of nanoparticles.

  3. Substrate-zymography: a still worthwhile method for gelatinases analysis in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Serena; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Oriente, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Di Carlo, Angelina

    2016-08-01

    Matrix metallo-proteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases, capable of degrading all the molecular components of extracellular matrix. A class of MMPs is gelatinases which includes gelatinase A or MMP-2 (72 kDa) and gelatinase B or MMP-9 (92 kDa), which have been shown to play critical roles in pathophysiology of many human disease and, in particular, cancer progression. For these reasons they obtained a great interest as potential non-invasive biomarker in providing useful clinical information in cancer diagnosis and therapy. A sensitive and unexpensive method for analysis of gelatinases is the gelatine zymography, which allows to measure the relative amounts of active and inactive enzymes in body fluids and tissue extracts. The procedure involves the electrophoretic separation of proteins under denaturing but non reducing conditions through a polyacrylamide gel containing a synthetic substrate (gelatin). The aim of this mini-review has been to describe the general principles of gelatine zymography technique, underling the main advantages and disadvantages. Even though an improvement of this method is necessary for a better applicability in laboratory medicine, gelatine zymography represents the most convenient method to detect the activity of the different gelatinases from a wide range of biological samples. PMID:26641968

  4. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  5. Development of novel separation techniques for biological samples in capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.T.

    1994-07-27

    This dissertation includes three different topics: general introduction of capillary electrophoresis (CE); gradient in CE and CE in biological separations; and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) for DNA separation. Factors such as temperature, viscosity, pH, and the surface of capillary walls affecting the separation performance are demonstrated. A pH gradient between 3.0 and 5.2 is useful to improve the resolution among eight different organic acids. A flow gradient due to the change in the concentration of surfactant, which is able to coat to the capillary wall to change the flow rate and its direction, is also shown as a good way to improve the resolution for organic compounds. A temperature gradient caused by joule heat is shown by voltage programming to enhance the resolution and shorten the separation time for several phenolic compounds. The author also shows that self-regulating dynamic control of electroosmotic flow in CE by simply running separation in different concentrations of surfactant has less matrix effect on the separation performance. One of the most important demonstrations in this dissertation is that the author proposes on-column reaction which gives several advantages including the use of a small amount of sample, low risk of contamination, and time saving and kinetic features. The author uses this idea with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a detection mode to detect an on-column digestion of sub-ng of protein. This technique also is applied to single cell analysis in the group.

  6. Microwave-accelerated bioassay technique for rapid and quantitative detection of biological and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Syed, Maleeha F; Aslan, Kadir

    2016-01-15

    Quantitative detection of molecules of interest from biological and environmental samples in a rapid manner, particularly with a relevant concentration range, is imperative to the timely assessment of human diseases and environmental issues. In this work, we employed the microwave-accelerated bioassay (MAB) technique, which is based on the combined use of circular bioassay platforms and microwave heating, for rapid and quantitative detection of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Shiga like toxin (STX 1). The proof-of-principle use of the MAB technique with the circular bioassay platforms for the rapid detection of GFAP in buffer based on colorimetric and fluorescence readouts was demonstrated with a 900W kitchen microwave. We also employed the MAB technique with a new microwave system (called the iCrystal system) for the detection of GFAP from mice with brain injuries and STX 1 from a city water stream. Control bioassays included the commercially available gold standard bioassay kits run at room temperature. Our results show that the lower limit of detection (LLOD) of the colorimetric and fluorescence based bioassays for GFAP was decreased by ~1000 times using the MAB technique and our circular bioassay platforms as compared to the commercially available bioassay kits. The overall bioassay time for GFAP and STX 1 was reduced from 4h using commercially available bioassay kits to 10min using the MAB technique.

  7. BORRELIA BURGDORFERI DNA IN BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES FROM PATIENTS WITH SARCOIDOSIS USING THE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    连伟; 罗慰慈

    1995-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of Borretia burgdoferi DNA in biological samples from patients with sarcoidcsis. The target DNA sequence was of chromosomal origin. The amplified DNA sequence was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, PAGE with silver staining, and the identity of amplified DNA was confirmed by restriction enzyme cleavage and DNA-DNA hybridlzation with a 32P-labelled probe. The assay was sensitive to fewer than two copies of B. burgdor feri genome, even in the presence of a 104-fold excess of human eukaryotic DNA, and was also specific to different B. burgdorferl strains tested. Sera seroiogieally positive to B. burgdorferi (n=26), broncbemlveolar lavage fluid and supematant of BALF (n=26) and peripheral blood (n=9) from sarcoidosis patients were tested. The positive rate was low (4/26, 2/26, and 0/9, respectively). It was considered that DNA from B. bur gdor feri may be identified in a minority of patients with s,arcoidosis, and it may play a pathogenetic rote in such cases. More studies need to be done before advancing the hypothesis of an etiologic role of B. burgdorferi in sarcoidosis.

  8. Non-target time trend screening: a data reduction strategy for detecting emerging contaminants in biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Plassmann, Merle M.; Tengstrand, Erik; Åberg, K. Magnus; Benskin, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted mass spectrometry-based approaches for detecting novel xenobiotics in biological samples are hampered by the occurrence of naturally fluctuating endogenous substances, which are difficult to distinguish from environmental contaminants. Here, we investigate a data reduction strategy for datasets derived from a biological time series. The objective is to flag reoccurring peaks in the time series based on increasing peak intensities, thereby reducing peak lists to only those which m...

  9. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements

  10. Postmarketing safety reports for human drug and biological products; electronic submission requirements. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending its postmarketing safety reporting regulations for human drug and biological products to require that persons subject to mandatory reporting requirements submit safety reports in an electronic format that FDA can process, review, and archive. FDA is taking this action to improve the Agency's systems for collecting and analyzing postmarketing safety reports. The change will help the Agency to more rapidly review postmarketing safety reports, identify emerging safety problems, and disseminate safety information in support of FDA's public health mission. In addition, the amendments will be a key element in harmonizing FDA's postmarketing safety reporting regulations with international standards for the electronic submission of safety information.

  11. Dimensional comparison between amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy and scanning ion conductance microscopy of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonhui; Choi, MyungHoon; Jung, Goo-Eun; Rahim Ferhan, Abdul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2016-08-01

    The range of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applications for atomic force microscopy (AFM) is expanding in the biological sciences field, reflecting an increasing demand for tools that can improve our fundamental understanding of the physics behind biological systems. However, the complexity associated with applying SPM techniques in biomedical research hampers the full exploitation of its capabilities. Recently, the development of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) has overcome these limitations and enabled contact-free, high resolution imaging of live biological specimens. In this work, we demonstrate the limitation of AFM for imaging biological samples in liquid due to artifacts arising from AFM tip-sample interaction, and how SICM imaging is able to overcome those limitations with contact-free scanning. We also demonstrate that SICM measurements, when compared to AFM, show better fit to the actual dimensions of the biological samples. Our results highlight the superiority of SICM imaging, enabling it to be widely adopted as a general and versatile research tool for biological studies in the nanoscale.

  12. Dimensional comparison between amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy and scanning ion conductance microscopy of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonhui; Choi, MyungHoon; Jung, Goo-Eun; Rahim Ferhan, Abdul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2016-08-01

    The range of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applications for atomic force microscopy (AFM) is expanding in the biological sciences field, reflecting an increasing demand for tools that can improve our fundamental understanding of the physics behind biological systems. However, the complexity associated with applying SPM techniques in biomedical research hampers the full exploitation of its capabilities. Recently, the development of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) has overcome these limitations and enabled contact-free, high resolution imaging of live biological specimens. In this work, we demonstrate the limitation of AFM for imaging biological samples in liquid due to artifacts arising from AFM tip–sample interaction, and how SICM imaging is able to overcome those limitations with contact-free scanning. We also demonstrate that SICM measurements, when compared to AFM, show better fit to the actual dimensions of the biological samples. Our results highlight the superiority of SICM imaging, enabling it to be widely adopted as a general and versatile research tool for biological studies in the nanoscale.

  13. Metais pesados em amostras biológicas de bovinos Heavy metals in cattle biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Verônica de Souza

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a concentração de metais pesados no sangue (Pb, Ni e Cd, soro (Cu e Zn, pelo e leite (Pb, Ni, Cd, Cu e Zn de bovinos criados em área industrializada (com siderúrgicas e não-industrial do Estado de Minas Gerais, em amostras coletadas em duas épocas (inverno e verão, buscando avaliar a contaminação em animais em função do ambiente de exposição e da estação do ano. O local de criação dos animais afetou significativamente somente a concentração de Cu obtida nas amostras de soro, com maiores valores determinados no grupo de bovinos da região industrializada. A época de amostragem afetou a concentração dos metais Cu (soro, Zn (soro e leite, Pb (sangue e Cd (sangue e pelo, com as determinações efetuadas no verão proporcionando maiores teores do que as executadas no inverno, à exceção do Cd avaliado no pelo. Interações significativas (PThe aim of this research was to determine the heavy metals concentration in blood (Pb, Ni and Cd, serum (Cu and Zn, hair and milk (Pb, Ni, Cd, Cu and Zn of cattle raised in industrial (with steel mill and non-industrial areas in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The samples were collected during summer and winter, aiming to verify animals contamination related to environment and year season. The environment significantly influenced the concentration of Cu obtained on serum samples, with higher values for cattle from the industrialized area. The sampling time affected the concentration of Cu (serum, Zn (serum and milk, Pb (blood and Cd (blood and hair, with higher values for summer, except for Cd measured on hair. Meaningful interactions (P<0.05 between environment and year season were identified for Cu (hair and milk, Zn (hair and Ni (serum, hair and milk. The results obtained show that the presence of steel mills in a determined area does not mean, necessarily that higher concentration of heavy metals will be found in cattle biological matrices. The seasonality

  14. Production and use of mycotoxins uniformly enriched with stable isotopes for their dosage in biological samples: (3) Tools for pharmacokinetics and as internal standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharmacological studies of exogenous compounds often encounter problems: these compounds are in such infinitesimal amount in their biological matrices, that they require particular detection method. We have implemented an alternative method to the usual radioactivity, based on incorporation of stable isotopes, through the example of biosynthesis of uniformly 13C enriched mycotoxins. The isotopic cluster obtained from a 10% 13C enrichment of several mycotoxins (and their metabolites) can be easily recovered from biological tissue samples by mass spectrometry allowing an easy discrimination from natural non-enriched compounds. We illustrate such pharmacological approaches by in vitro zearalenone metabolism. Such enriched compound can also be used as internal standard with high reliability in order to quantify mycotoxins in contaminated food samples. (authors)

  15. Automated extraction of DNA from reference samples from various types of biological materials on the Qiagen BioRobot EZ1 Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Jørgensen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Johannes;

    2009-01-01

    We have validated and implemented a protocol for DNA extraction from various types of biological materials using a Qiagen BioRobot EZ1 Workstation. The sample materials included whole blood, blood from deceased, buccal cells on Omni swabs and FTA Cards, blood on FTA Cards and cotton swabs......, and muscle biopsies. The DNA extraction was validated according to EN/ISO 17025 for the STR kits AmpFlSTR« Identifiler« and AmpFlSTR« Yfiler« (Applied Biosystems). Of 298 samples extracted, 11 (4%) did not yield acceptable results. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that extraction of DNA from various types...... of biological material can be performed quickly and without the use of hazardous chemicals, and that the DNA may be successfully STR typed according to the requirements of forensic genetic investigations accredited according to EN/ISO 17025...

  16. Production and use of mycotoxins uniformly enriched with stable isotopes for their dosage in biological samples: (3) Tools for pharmacokinetics and as internal standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravin, F.; Delaforge, M.; Duca, R.C. [CNRS, URA 2096, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Bravin, F.; Delaforge, M.; Duca, R.C. [CEA Saclay, DSV, DBJC, SBFM, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Pean, M. [CEA Cadarache, DEVM, GRAP, St Paul Les Durance (France); Puel, O. [INRA, Lab Pharmacol Toxicol, UR 66, Toulouse (France)

    2007-07-01

    Pharmacological studies of exogenous compounds often encounter problems: these compounds are in such infinitesimal amount in their biological matrices, that they require particular detection method. We have implemented an alternative method to the usual radioactivity, based on incorporation of stable isotopes, through the example of biosynthesis of uniformly {sup 13}C enriched mycotoxins. The isotopic cluster obtained from a 10% {sup 13}C enrichment of several mycotoxins (and their metabolites) can be easily recovered from biological tissue samples by mass spectrometry allowing an easy discrimination from natural non-enriched compounds. We illustrate such pharmacological approaches by in vitro zearalenone metabolism. Such enriched compound can also be used as internal standard with high reliability in order to quantify mycotoxins in contaminated food samples. (authors)

  17. Humidity-controlled preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikaduki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM) has the potential to visualize the structures of micro- to sub-micrometer-sized biological particles, such as cells and organelles, at high resolution. Toward advancing structural studies on the functional states of such particles, here, we developed a system for the preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments. The system, which comprised a moist air generator, microscope, micro-injector mounted on a micromanipulator, custom-made sample preparation chamber, and flash-cooling device, allowed for the manipulation of sample particles in the relative humidity range of 20%-94%rh at 293 K to maintain their hydrated and functional states. Here, we report the details of the system and the operation procedure, including its application to the preparation of a frozen-hydrated chloroplast sample. Sample quality was evaluated through a cryogenic CXDM experiment conducted at BL29XUL of SPring-8. Taking the performance of the system and the quality of the sample, the system was suitable to prepare frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments.

  18. Latest developments and opportunities for 3D analysis of biological samples by confocal mu-XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Roberto D., E-mail: danperez@famaf.unc.edu.a [FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sanchez, Hector J. [FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Perez, Carlos A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-LNLS, POB 6192, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rubio, Marcelo [FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); CEPROCOR, Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Cordoba, 5164 Santa Maria de Punilla, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2010-02-15

    X-ray fluorescence analysis performed with a primary radiation focused in the micrometer range is known as micro-X-ray fluorescence (mu-XRF). It is characterized by a penetration depth higher than other micro-analytical methods, reaching hundreds of micrometers in biological samples. This characteristic of the X-ray beam can be employed in 3D analysis. An innovative method to perform 3D analysis by mu-XRF is the so-called confocal setup. The confocal setup consists of X-ray lenses in the excitation as well as in the detection channel. In this configuration, a micro-volume defined by the overlap of the foci of both X-ray lenses is analyzed. Scanning this micro-volume through the sample can be used to perform a study in three dimensions. At present, X-ray lenses used in confocal mu-XRF experiments are mainly glass capillaries and polycapillaries. Glass capillaries are used in the excitation channel with sources of high photon flux like synchrotron radiation. Half polycapillaries or conical polycapillary concentrators are used almost exclusively in the detection channel. Spatial resolution of the confocal mu-XRF depends on the dimensions of the foci of both X-ray lenses. The overlap of these foci forms an ellipsoid which is the probing volume of the confocal setup. The axis length of the probing volume reported in confocal mu-XRF experiments are of order of few tens of micrometer. In our confocal setup, we used a commercial glass monocapillary in the excitation channel and a monolithic half polycapillary in the detection channel. The polycapillary was home-made by means of drawing of multibundles of glass capillaries in a heating furnace. The experiment was carried out at the beamline D09B-XRF of the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, LNLS) using white beam. A model for the theoretical description of X-ray fluorescence intensity registered by confocal mu-XRF was introduced by Malzer and Kanngiebetaer [2005. A model for the

  19. Correlations among Five Variables and the Biology Performance of a Sample of Jamaican High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair-Walters, Shonette; Soyibo, Kola

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates whether or not (a) 252 Jamaican high school students (168 boys, 84 girls, 171 grade 10 and 81 grade 11 students) had favourable attitudes to biology, (b) their level of biology performance was satisfactory, (c) there were significant differences in their performance based on their gender, grade level, school-type,…

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  1. Determination of thorium and uranium in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using internal standardisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Th and U contents of six typical biological samples (for example US NIST SRMs and Japan NIES CRMs) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The internal standardisation method was adopted to compensate for non-spectroscopic interferences arising from matrix elements in the sample solution. Bismuth and Tl were chosen as the internal standards, and the effect of the matrix on the behaviour of their signals was monitored by adding several elements to the NIST human lung sample. It would appear that elements of similar mass give similar signal responses, thus In is unsuitable as the internal standard in this instance. After correction by either Bi or Tl internal standardisation, the results for the Th and U concentrations agreed well with literature values, showing that both are applicable for the determination of Th and U in biological samples. (author)

  2. Development of a biaxial compression device for biological samples: preliminary experimental results for a closed cell foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, J P; Tevelen, G; Adam, C J; Evans, J H; Pearcy, M J

    2009-07-01

    Biological tissues are subjected to complex loading states in vivo and in order to define constitutive equations that effectively simulate their mechanical behaviour under these loads, it is necessary to obtain data on the tissue's response to multiaxial loading. Single axis and shear testing of biological tissues is often carried out, but biaxial testing is less common. We sought to design and commission a biaxial compression testing device, capable of obtaining repeatable data for biological samples. The apparatus comprised a sealed stainless steel pressure vessel specifically designed such that a state of hydrostatic compression could be created on the test specimen while simultaneously unloading the sample along one axis with an equilibrating tensile pressure. Thus a state of equibiaxial compression was created perpendicular to the long axis of a rectangular sample. For the purpose of calibration and commissioning of the vessel, rectangular samples of closed cell ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) foam were tested. Each sample was subjected to repeated loading, and nine separate biaxial experiments were carried out to a maximum pressure of 204 kPa (30 psi), with a relaxation time of two hours between them. Calibration testing demonstrated the force applied to the samples had a maximum error of 0.026 N (0.423% of maximum applied force). Under repeated loading, the foam sample demonstrated lower stiffness during the first load cycle. Following this cycle, an increased stiffness, repeatable response was observed with successive loading. While the experimental protocol was developed for EVA foam, preliminary results on this material suggest that this device may be capable of providing test data for biological tissue samples. The load response of the foam was characteristic of closed cell foams, with consolidation during the early loading cycles, then a repeatable load-displacement response upon repeated loading. The repeatability of the test results demonstrated the

  3. The scientific and technical requirements for biology at Australia's Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Symposium and Workshop on Neutrons for Biology was held in the School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Melbourne, under the auspices of AINSE, Univ of Melbourne and ANSTO. Invited talks were given on the subjects of Genome, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a critical framework for understanding bio-molecular, neutron diffraction at high and low resolution, and the investigation of viruses and large-scale biological structures using neutrons. There were also talks from prominent NMR practitioners and X-ray protein crystallographers, with substantial discussion about how the various methods might fit together in the future. Significant progress was made on defining Australia's needs, which include a strong push to use SANS and reflectometry for the study of macromolecular complexes and model membranes, and a modest network of supporting infrastructure in Brisbane, Melbourne and the Sydney Basin. Specific recommendations were that the small-angle neutron scattering and reflectometry instruments in the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) be pursued with high priority, that there be no specific effort to provide high-resolution protein-crystallography facilities at the RRR, but that a watching brief be kept on instrumentation and sample-preparation technologies elsewhere. A watch be kept on inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering capabilities elsewhere, although these methods will not initially be pursued at the RRR and that should be input from this community into the design of the biochemistry/chemistry laboratories at the Replacement Research Reactor. It was also recommended that a small number of regional facilities be established (or enhanced) to allow users to perform deuteration of biomolecules. These facilities would be of significant value to the NMR and neutron scattering communities

  4. Critical tests for determination of microbiological quality and biological activity in commercial vermicompost samples of different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantina-Ievina, Lelde; Andersone, Una; Berkolde-Pīre, Dace; Nikolajeva, Vizma; Ievinsh, Gederts

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present paper was to show that differences in biological activity among commercially produced vermicompost samples can be found by using a relatively simple test system consisting of microorganism tests on six microbiological media and soilless seedling growth tests with four vegetable crop species. Significant differences in biological properties among analyzed samples were evident both at the level of microbial load as well as plant growth-affecting activity. These differences were mostly manufacturer- and feedstock-associated, but also resulted from storage conditions of vermicompost samples. A mature vermicompost sample that was produced from sewage sludge still contained considerable number of Escherichia coli. Samples from all producers contained several potentially pathogenic fungal species such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Pseudallescheria boidii, Pseudallescheria fimeti, Pseudallescheria minutispora, Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium prolificans, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, Stachybotrys chartarum, Geotrichum spp., Aphanoascus terreus, and Doratomyces columnaris. In addition, samples from all producers contained plant growth-promoting fungi from the genera Trichoderma and Mortierella. The described system can be useful both for functional studies aiming at understanding of factors affecting quality characteristics of vermicompost preparations and for routine testing of microbiological quality and biological activity of organic waste-derived composts and vermicomposts. PMID:23504062

  5. Williams Test Required Sample Size For Determining The Minimum Effective Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Agah TEKINDAL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The biological activity of a substance may be explored through a series of experiments on increased or decreased doses of such substance. One of the purposes in studies of this sort is the determination of minimum effective dose. Use of appropriate sample size has an indisputable effect on the reliability of the decisions made in studies made for this purpose. This study attempts to provide a summary of sample sizes, in different scenarios, needed by researchers during the use of Williams test by taking into consideration the number of groups in dose-response studies as well as minimal clinically significant difference, standard deviation, and the test’s power through asymptotic power analyses. Material and Methods: When Type I error was taken as 0.05, scenarios were determined in different sample sizes for each group (5 to 100 with an increase of 5 at a time and different numbers of groups (from 3 to 10, with an increase of 1 at a time. Minimal clinically significant difference refers to the difference between the control group and the experimental group. In this instance, when the control group is zero and takes a specific average value, it refers to the difference from the experimental group. In the resent study, such differences are defined from 1 to 10 with an increase of 1 at a time. For the test’s power would change when the standard deviation changed, the relevant value was changed in all scenarios from 1 to 10 with an increase of 1 at a time to explore the test’s power. Dose-response distributions are skew. In the present study, data were derived from the Poisson distribution with λ= 1 parameter that was determined in accordance with dose-response curves. Results: When changes occurring in the determined scenarios are considered, it can be said, in general, that the significant difference must be set between 1 and 3; and standard deviation must be set between 1 and 2. Conclusion: It is certain that change in the number

  6. Interaction between selenium and mercury in biological samples of Pakistani myocardial infarction patients at different stages as related to controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Talpur, Farah Naz; Kazi, Atif; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah

    2014-05-01

    It has been speculated that trace elements may a play role in the pathogenesis of heart diseases. In the present study, we aimed to assess the levels of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of myocardial infarction (MI) patients of both genders (age range 45-60 years) at the first, second, and third heart attack (n = 130), hospitalized in a cardiac ward of a civil hospital of Hyderabad City (Pakistan). For comparison, healthy age-matched referent subjects (n = 61) of both genders were also selected. Se and Hg in biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to microwave acid digestion, respectively. The validity of the methodology was checked by biological certified reference materials. During this study, 78 % of the 32 registered patients of third MI attack (aged >50 years) died. The concentration of Se was decreased in scalp hair and blood samples of MI patients, while Hg was higher in all biological samples as compared to referent subjects. Se concentration was inversely associated with the risk of MI attacks in both genders. These results add to an increasing body of evidence that Se is a protective element for cardiovascular health. PMID:24643467

  7. Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Helinor J.; Mouras, Rabah; Brown, David M.; Elfick, Alistair; Stone, Vicki

    2015-12-01

    The uptake of nanomaterials (NMs) by cells is critical in determining their potential biological impact, whether beneficial or detrimental. Thus, investigation of NM internalization by cells is a common consideration in hazard and efficacy studies. There are currently a number of approaches that are routinely used to investigate NM-cell interactions, each of which have their own advantages and limitations. Ideally, imaging modalities used to investigate NM uptake by cells should not require the NM to be labelled (e.g. with fluorophores) to facilitate its detection. We present a multimodal imaging approach employing a combination of label-free microscopies that can be used to investigate NM-cell interactions. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy was used in combination with either two-photon photoluminescence or four-wave mixing (FWM) to visualize the uptake of gold or titanium dioxide NMs respectively. Live and fixed cell imaging revealed that NMs were internalized by J774 macrophage and C3A hepatocyte cell lines (15-31 μg ml-1). Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to NMs (intratracheal instillation, 62 μg) and NMs were detected in blood and lung leucocytes, lung and liver tissue, demonstrating that NMs could translocate from the exposure site. Obtained data illustrate that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy may help overcome current challenges in the assessment of NM cellular uptake and biodistribution. It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells.

  8. State of the art of environmentally friendly sample preparation approaches for determination of PBDEs and metabolites in environmental and biological samples: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Paula; Lana, Nerina B; Ríos, Juan M; García-Reyes, Juan F; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2016-01-28

    Green chemistry principles for developing methodologies have gained attention in analytical chemistry in recent decades. A growing number of analytical techniques have been proposed for determination of organic persistent pollutants in environmental and biological samples. In this light, the current review aims to present state-of-the-art sample preparation approaches based on green analytical principles proposed for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metabolites (OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs) in environmental and biological samples. Approaches to lower the solvent consumption and accelerate the extraction, such as pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and ultrasound-assisted extraction, are discussed in this review. Special attention is paid to miniaturized sample preparation methodologies and strategies proposed to reduce organic solvent consumption. Additionally, extraction techniques based on alternative solvents (surfactants, supercritical fluids, or ionic liquids) are also commented in this work, even though these are scarcely used for determination of PBDEs. In addition to liquid-based extraction techniques, solid-based analytical techniques are also addressed. The development of greener, faster and simpler sample preparation approaches has increased in recent years (2003-2013). Among green extraction techniques, those based on the liquid phase predominate over those based on the solid phase (71% vs. 29%, respectively). For solid samples, solvent assisted extraction techniques are preferred for leaching of PBDEs, and liquid phase microextraction techniques are mostly used for liquid samples. Likewise, green characteristics of the instrumental analysis used after the extraction and clean-up steps are briefly discussed. PMID:26755134

  9. Microwave digestion using dual PTFE containers for analysis of trace elements in small amounts of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, R; Yonezawa, M; Ejima, A; Koyama, H; Satoh, H

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of trace elements in biological samples is essential to extend our knowledge on human health and disease. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) makes it possible to simultaneously determine these elements in trace amounts. Before analysis, however, biological samples such as organs and tissues must be liquefied and extra organic materials must be decomposed by acid digestion. We established a method of microwave digestion using dual PTFE containers to minimize the amount of samples. Samples (35-45 mg) of standard reference materials, bovine liver (1577a, NIST) and fish flesh (MA-A-2, IAEA), were weighed in PTFE-PFA vials and a small amount of nitric acid (0.5 ml) was added. The vials were sealed and two PTFE-PFA vials were placed in a PTFE-TFM vessel containing 6 ml of pure water. Then the vessels were placed in a rotor and the samples were digested for 38 min in a microwave oven according to a pre-set program. After the program was completed, the samples were analyzed by ICP-MS. The determined values of elements of the microwave-digested samples matched the certified values of the standard reference materials. Therefore, the digestion using dual containers was successfully applied to small samples.

  10. Pumping time required to obtain tube well water samples with aquifer characteristic radon concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardo, Carla Pereira; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Linhares, Maria G.M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C., E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: help@cdtn.br, E-mail: mgml@cdtn.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radon is an inert noble gas, which comes from the natural radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in soil, rock and water. Radon isotopes emanated from radium-bearing grains of a rock or soil are released into the pore space. Radon that reaches the pore space is partitioned between the gaseous and aqueous phases. Thus, the groundwater presents a radon signature from the rock that is characteristic of the aquifer. The characteristic radon concentration of an aquifer, which is mainly related to the emanation, is also influenced by the degree of subsurface degassing, especially in the vicinity of a tube well, where the radon concentration is strongly reduced. Looking for the required pumping time to take a tube well water sample that presents the characteristic radon concentration of the aquifer, an experiment was conducted in an 80 m deep tube well. In this experiment, after twenty-four hours without extraction, water samples were collected periodically, about ten minutes intervals, during two hours of pumping time. The radon concentrations of the samples were determined by using the RAD7 Electronic Radon Detector from Durridge Company, a solid state alpha spectrometric detector. It was realized that the necessary time to reach the maximum radon concentration, that means the characteristic radon concentration of the aquifer, is about sixty minutes. (author)

  11. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  12. A New Sample Substrate for Imaging and Correlating Organic and Trace Metal Composition in Biological Cells and Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller,L.; Wang, Q.; Smith, R.; Zhong, H.; Elliott, D.; Warren, J.

    2007-01-01

    Many disease processes involve alterations in the chemical makeup of tissue. Synchrotron-based infrared (IR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopes are becoming increasingly popular tools for imaging the organic and trace metal compositions of biological materials, respectively, without the need for extrinsic labels or stains. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) provides chemical information on the organic components of a material at a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of 2-10 {mu}m in the mid-infrared region. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe is a complementary technique used to probe trace element content in the same systems with a similar spatial resolution. However to be most beneficial, it is important to combine the results from both imaging techniques on a single sample, which requires precise overlap of the IR and X-ray images. In this work, we have developed a sample substrate containing a gold grid pattern on its surface, which can be imaged with both the IR and X-ray microscopes. The substrate consists of a low trace element glass slide that has a gold grid patterned on its surface, where the major and minor parts of the grid contain 25 and 12 nm gold, respectively. This grid pattern can be imaged with the IR microscope because the reflectivity of gold differs as a function of thickness. The pattern can also be imaged with the SXRF microprobe because the Au fluorescence intensity changes with gold thickness. The tissue sample is placed on top of the patterned substrate. The grid pattern's IR reflectivity image and the gold SXRF image are used as fiducial markers for spatially overlapping the IR and SXRF images from the tissue. Results show that IR and X-ray images can be correlated precisely, with a spatial resolution of less than one pixel (i.e., 2-3 microns). The development of this new tool will be presented along with applications to paraffin-embedded metalloprotein crystals, Alzheimer's disease

  13. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning. (paper)

  14. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, T.; Maeyama, T.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Fukunishi, N.; Fukasaku, K.; Takagi, S.; Noda, S.; Himeno, R.; Hayashi, S.

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning.

  15. How Parents Influence School Grades: Hints from a Sample of Adoptive and Biological Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendy; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2007-01-01

    Using the biological and adoptive families in the Minnesota-based Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study, we investigated the associations among genetic and environmental influences on IQ, parenting, parental expectations for offspring educational attainment, engagement in school, and school grades. All variables showed substantial genetic…

  16. Determination of the Biologically Relevant Sampling Depth for Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessments (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technical paper provides defensible approximations for what the depth of the biologically active zone, or “biotic zone” is within certain environments. The methods used in this study differ somewhat between Part 1 (Terrestrial Biotic Zone) and Part 2 (Aquatic Biotic Zone). ...

  17. A review of the known biological characteristics of the Great Meteor East site together with a sampling programme for a biological site assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Existing biological information on GME is reviewed. In common with most other oceanic areas there is very little data available from depths below 2000m. There is virtually no direct benthic information and none at all on the midwater/benthic boundary layer. Existing data from a wider geographic area are relevant to GME but the applicability of such data varies according to the hydrography. A sampling programme is outlined which will allow a comprehensive quantitative and qualitative assessment of the midwater and benthic ecosystems. Particular attention will be paid to the interactions between benthic and midwater communities just above the sea floor. (author)

  18. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography of Respiratory Quinones for Microbial Community Analysis in Environmental and Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Koichi Fujie; Hiroyuki Daimon; Yoichi Atsuta; Muhammad Hanif

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysi...

  19. Cone-beam x-ray phase contrast tomography of biological samples; Optimization of contrast, resolution and field of view

    OpenAIRE

    Bartels, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional information of entire objects can be obtained by the remarkable technique of computed tomography (CT). In combination with phase sensitive X-ray imaging high contrast for soft tissue structures can be achieved as opposed to CT based on classical radiography. In this work biological samples ranging from micrometer sized single cells over multi-cellular nerve tissue to entire millimeter sized organs are investigated by use of cone-beam propagationbased X-ray phase contrast. Op...

  20. X-ray-induced photo-chemistry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pushie, M. Jake; Nienaber, Kurt; Hackett, Mark J.; Ascone, Isabella; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Aitken, Jade B.; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Christopher; Lay, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray-induced photo-chemistry of metal sites within biological molecules is a concern for X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and other techniques in which samples are illuminated with X-rays. The effects of X-ray-induced photo-chemistry are reviewed and the methods used to mitigate these in X-ray absorption spectroscopy are outlined.

  1. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tsukube, Takuro; Yagi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and m...

  2. Preparation of Biological Samples Containing Metoprolol and Bisoprolol for Applying Methods for Quantitative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Corina Mahu Ştefania; Monica Hăncianu; Luminiţa Agoroaei; Anda Cristina Coman Băbuşanu; Elena Butnaru

    2015-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a complex disease with many serious complications, representing a leading cause of mortality. Selective beta-blockers such as metoprolol and bisoprolol are frequently used in the management of hypertension. Numerous analytical methods have been developed for the determination of these substances in biological fluids, such as liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography. ...

  3. Biological Monitoring of human exposure to neonicotinoids using urine samples, and neonicotinoid excretion kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Harada, Kouji H; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    [Background] Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-Toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults...

  4. Capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of phytochelatins and other thiol peptides in complex biological samples derivatized with monobromobimane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rama, Mónica; Torres Vaamonde, Enrique; Abalde Alonso, Julio

    2005-02-01

    A new method to improve the analysis of phytochelatins and their precursors (cysteine, gamma-Glu-Cys, and glutathione) derivatized with monobromobimane (mBrB) in complex biological samples by capillary zone electrophoresis is described. The effects of the background electrolyte pH, concentration, and different organic additives (acetonitrile, methanol, and trifluoroethanol) on the separation were studied to achieve optimum resolution and number of theoretical plates of the analyzed compounds in the electropherograms. Optimum separation of the thiol peptides was obtained with 150 mM phosphate buffer at pH 1.60. Separation efficiency was improved when 2.5% v/v methanol was added to the background electrolyte. The electrophoretic conditions were 13 kV and capillary dimensions with 30 cm length from the inlet to the detector (38 cm total length) and 50 microm inner diameter. The injection was by pressure at 50 mbar for 17 s. Under these conditions, the separation between desglycyl-peptides and phytochelatins was also achieved. We also describe the optimum conditions for the derivatization of biological samples with mBrB to increase electrophoretic sensitivity and number of theoretical plates. The improved method was shown to be simple, reproducible, selective, and accurate in measuring thiol peptides in complex biological samples, the detection limit being 2.5 microM glutathione at a wavelength of 390 nm.

  5. Metabolomics identifies a biological response to chronic low-dose natural uranium contamination in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Stéphane; Favé, Gaëlle; Maillot, Matthieu; Manens, Line; Delissen, Olivia; Blanchardon, Eric; Banzet, Nathalie; Defoort, Catherine; Bott, Romain; Dublineau, Isabelle; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Charles; Souidi, Maâmar

    2013-01-01

    Because uranium is a natural element present in the earth's crust, the population may be chronically exposed to low doses of it through drinking water. Additionally, the military and civil uses of uranium can also lead to environmental dispersion that can result in high or low doses of acute or chronic exposure. Recent experimental data suggest this might lead to relatively innocuous biological reactions. The aim of this study was to assess the biological changes in rats caused by ingestion of natural uranium in drinking water with a mean daily intake of 2.7 mg/kg for 9 months and to identify potential biomarkers related to such a contamination. Subsequently, we observed no pathology and standard clinical tests were unable to distinguish between treated and untreated animals. Conversely, LC-MS metabolomics identified urine as an appropriate biofluid for discriminating the experimental groups. Of the 1,376 features detected in urine, the most discriminant were metabolites involved in tryptophan, nicotinate, and nicotinamide metabolic pathways. In particular, N-methylnicotinamide, which was found at a level seven times higher in untreated than in contaminated rats, had the greatest discriminating power. These novel results establish a proof of principle for using metabolomics to address chronic low-dose uranium contamination. They open interesting perspectives for understanding the underlying biological mechanisms and designing a diagnostic test of exposure.

  6. Impact of processing method on recovery of bacteria from wipes used in biological surface sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Autumn S; Da Silva, Sandra M; Olson, Nathan D; Filliben, James J; Morrow, Jayne B

    2012-08-01

    Environmental sampling for microbiological contaminants is a key component of hygiene monitoring and risk characterization practices utilized across diverse fields of application. However, confidence in surface sampling results, both in the field and in controlled laboratory studies, has been undermined by large variation in sampling performance results. Sources of variation include controlled parameters, such as sampling materials and processing methods, which often differ among studies, as well as random and systematic errors; however, the relative contributions of these factors remain unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the relative impacts of sample processing methods, including extraction solution and physical dissociation method (vortexing and sonication), on recovery of Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Burkholderia thailandensis and Escherichia coli) bacteria from directly inoculated wipes. This work showed that target organism had the largest impact on extraction efficiency and recovery precision, as measured by traditional colony counts. The physical dissociation method (PDM) had negligible impact, while the effect of the extraction solution was organism dependent. Overall, however, extraction of organisms from wipes using phosphate-buffered saline with 0.04% Tween 80 (PBST) resulted in the highest mean recovery across all three organisms. The results from this study contribute to a better understanding of the factors that influence sampling performance, which is critical to the development of efficient and reliable sampling methodologies relevant to public health and biodefense.

  7. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  8. Ficolin-2 reveals different analytical and biological properties dependent on different sample handling procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Bay, Jakob T; Munthe-Fog, Lea;

    2013-01-01

    recurrent observations of deviations in Ficolin-2 properties between different blood sample procedures, we decided to investigate this closer. Blood samples from ten healthy donors were collected in various serum and plasma tubes and Ficolin-2 properties were evaluated by different ELISA setups. We found...... that serum prepared from tubes containing the clot activator silica used as a standard technique in many routine laboratories held a significantly lower concentration of Ficolin-2 as compared to the other sample types. Furthermore, Ficolin-2 binding and complement activation potential in this type of serum...... mediated formation of the terminal complement complex was observed under the applied assay conditions. In conclusion, our results show that Ficolin-2 is a promiscuous molecule and that care should be taken during sampling, handling and matrix chosen for measurement of Ficolin-2 levels and activity....

  9. Environmental contaminants in water, sediment and biological samples from Playa Lakes in southeastern New Mexico - 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water, bird tissue, and invertebrates were collected from 10 playa lakes in Southeastern New Mexico in 1991 and 1992. These samples were analyzed for a...

  10. Measurement frequency and sampling spatial domains required to characterize turbidity and salinity events in the Guadalquivir estuary (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Contreras

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Estuaries are complex systems in which long water quality data series are not always available at the proper scale. Data proceeding from several water quality networks, with different measuring frequencies (monthly, weekly and 15 min and different numbers of sampling points, were compared throughout the main channel of the Guadalquivir estuary. Higher frequency of turbidity sampling in the upper estuary is required. In the lower estuary, sampling points help to find out the ETM, and higher frequency sampling of EC is required because of the effect of the tidal and river components. This could be a feedback for the implementation of monitoring networks in estuaries.

  11. Study of performance characteristics of a radiochemical method to determine uranium in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper is described a methodology to calculate detection limit (Ld), quantification level (Lq) and minimum detectable activity (MDA) in a radiochemical method for determination of uranium in urine samples. The concentration is measured by fluorimetry and alpha gross activity using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The calculation of total propagated uncertainty on a spike sample is presented. Furthermore, the major sources of uncertainty and percentage contribution in both measurements are assessed. (author)

  12. Protease inhibitors as possible pitfalls in proteomic analyses of complex biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Clifton, James; Huang, Feilei; Rucevic, Marijana; Cao, Lulu; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2011-01-01

    Sample preparation, especially protein and peptide fractionation prior to identification by mass spectrometry (MS) are typically applied to reduce sample complexity. The second key element in this process is proteolytic digestion that is performed mostly by trypsin. Optimization of this step is an important factor in order to achieve both speed and better performance of proteomic analysis, and tryptic digestion prior to the MS analysis is topic of many studies. To date, only few studies pay a...

  13. Supercritical fluid extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography of respiratory quinones for microbial community analysis in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA) detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ) and menaquinones (MK) without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost) and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces). PMID:22391598

  14. Supercritical fluid extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography of respiratory quinones for microbial community analysis in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-05

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA) detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ) and menaquinones (MK) without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost) and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces).

  15. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography of Respiratory Quinones for Microbial Community Analysis in Environmental and Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Fujie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ and menaquinones (MK without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces.

  16. Measurement of the unstained biological sample by a novel scanning electron generation X-ray microscope based on SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-08-01

    We introduced a novel X-ray microscope system based on scanning electron microscopy using thin film, which enables the measurement of unstained biological samples without damage. An unstained yeast sample was adsorbed under a titanium (Ti)-coated silicon nitride (Si3N4) film 90 nm thick. The X-ray signal from the film was detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. With an electron beam at 2.6 kV acceleration and 6.75 nA current, the yeast image is obtained using the X-ray PD. The image is created by soft X-rays from the Ti layer. The Ti layer is effective in generating the characteristic 2.7-nm wavelength X-rays by the irradiation of electrons. Furthermore, we investigated the electron trajectory and the generation of the characteristic X-rays within the Ti-coated Si3N4 film by Monte Carlo simulation. Our system can be easily utilized to observe various unstained biological samples of cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  17. Development of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for the PIXE analysis of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of 3-dimensional microscopy techniques offering a spatial resolution of 1 μm or less has opened a large field of investigation in Cell Biology. Amongst them, an interesting advantage of ion beam micro-tomography is its ability to give quantitative results in terms of local concentrations in a direct way, using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXET) combined to Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIMT) Tomography. After a brief introduction of existing reconstruction techniques, we present the principle of the DISRA code, the most complete written so far, which is the basis of the present work. We have modified and extended the DISRA algorithm by considering the specific aspects of biologic specimens. Moreover, correction procedures were added in the code to reduce noise in the tomograms. For portability purpose, a Windows graphic interface was designed to easily enter and modify experimental parameters used in the reconstruction, and control the several steps of data reduction. Results of STIMT and PIXET experiments on reference specimens and on human cancer cells will be also presented. (author)

  18. Diffraction enhanced imaging and x-ray fluorescence microtomography for analyzing biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, H.S.; Pereira, G.R.; Lopes, R.T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear-COPPE/UFRJ-RJ (Brazil); Anjos, M.J. [Instituto de Fisica-UERJ-RJ (Brazil); Faria, P. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer-INCa-RJ (Brazil); Kellermann, G.; Perez, C.A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-Campinas-SP (Brazil); Tirao, G. [Faculdad de Mat. Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF), UNC. Cordoba (Argentina); Mazzaro, I. [Laboratorio de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao-UFPR-Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Giles, C. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia Aplicada e Raios X-UNICAMP-Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-15

    In this work, breast tissue samples were investigated in order to verify the distribution of certain elements by x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XRFCT) correlated with the characteristics and pathology of each tissue observed by diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The DEI system can show details in low attenuation tissues. It is based on the contrast imaging obtained by extinction, diffraction and refraction characteristics and can improve reduction in false positive and false negative diagnoses. XRFCT allows mapping of all elements within the sample, since even a minute fluorescence signal can be detected. DEI imaging techniques revealed the complex structure of the disease, confirmed by the histological section, and showed microstructures in all planes of the sample. The XRFCT showed the distribution of Zn, Cu and Fe at higher concentration. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of biological samples for specimen banking and biomonitoring by nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a pilot program for environmental specimen banking, human livers and marine mussels (Mytilus edulis) were sampled, analyzed and banked. Nuclear methods played a major role in the evaluation of the samples by providing concentration data for up to 37 major, mineral, and trace elements. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was complemented by neutron-capture prompt gamma activation analysis, radiochemical separations and, for the mussels, by instrumental X-ray fluorescence analysis. A cryogenic homogenization procedure was applied for sample preparation and evaluated. Assessment of accuracy was made by analyzing Standard Reference Materials and by intercomparing the techniques. Results are reported for 66 individual human liver specimens, collected at three locations in the United States, and for batches of 65 mussels from a collection made at Narragansett Bay, RI. 19 references, 23 figures, 4 tables

  20. Sampling strategies and post-processing methods for increasing the time resolution of organic aerosol measurements requiring long sample-collection times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modini, Rob L.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    The composition and properties of atmospheric organic aerosols (OAs) change on timescales of minutes to hours. However, some important OA characterization techniques typically require greater than a few hours of sample-collection time (e.g., Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy). In this study we have performed numerical modeling to investigate and compare sample-collection strategies and post-processing methods for increasing the time resolution of OA measurements requiring long sample-collection times. Specifically, we modeled the measurement of hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) concentrations at a polluted urban site in Mexico City, and investigated how to construct hourly resolved time series from samples collected for 4, 6, and 8 h. We modeled two sampling strategies - sequential and staggered sampling - and a range of post-processing methods including interpolation and deconvolution. The results indicated that relative to the more sophisticated and costly staggered sampling methods, linear interpolation between sequential measurements is a surprisingly effective method for increasing time resolution. Additional error can be added to a time series constructed in this manner if a suboptimal sequential sampling schedule is chosen. Staggering measurements is one way to avoid this effect. There is little to be gained from deconvolving staggered measurements, except at very low values of random measurement error (< 5 %). Assuming 20 % random measurement error, one can expect average recovery errors of 1.33-2.81 µg m-3 when using 4-8 h-long sequential and staggered samples to measure time series of concentration values ranging from 0.13-29.16 µg m-3. For 4 h samples, 19-47 % of this total error can be attributed to the process of increasing time resolution alone, depending on the method used, meaning that measurement precision would only be improved by 0.30-0.75 µg m-3 if samples could be collected over 1 h instead of 4 h. Devising a

  1. Analysis of mercury and selenium in biological samples by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, hair samples from populations suspected of contamination by mercury, in the localities of Serra do Navio, Vila Nova and Tartarugalzinho, in the State of Amapa, were analyzed. Hair samples of children under odontopediatric treatment were also analyzed for mercury, in order to study the possibility of transfer of mercury from the dental amalgam and also to obtain data of hair mercury in a control population of children. Another step of the work was the development of a method for the determination of selenium, by using the short-lived radioisotope 77mSe. After the certification of the method it was applied to the analysis of hair, nails and a vitamin supplement. A comparison was made with the results obtain ed by using the long-lived radioisotope of selenium, 75Se. The results obtained for mercury in the hair samples of populations living in the State of Amapa have shown that the mercury concentrations in these populations are much higher than in the controls. As for the hair samples of children under treatment with mercury amalgam, no significant differences were found in the concentrations of mercury after the treatment. On the other hand, these data were important to obtain data for a control population of children. The results obtained by using the radioisotope 77mSe showed that the method developed was suitable for the analyzed matrixes and the results were similar to the ones obtained by employing the usual AANI method, with the radioisotope 75Se. (author)

  2. Automatic sampling for unbiased and efficient stereological estimation using the proportionator in biological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardi, Jonathan Eyal; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    2008-01-01

    cerebellum, total number of orexin positive neurons in transgenic mice brain, and estimating the absolute area and the areal fraction of β islet cells in dog pancreas.  The proportionator was at least eight times more efficient (precision and time combined) than traditional computer controlled sampling....

  3. Contrastive analysis of hedges in a sample of Chinese and English molecular biology papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaofang

    2004-10-01

    Hedge is defined as the expression of provisionalness and possibility that makes scientific messages tentative, vague, and imprecise, thereby reducing the force of claims scientists make. Linguistic study of hedges began in the early 1970s in generative semantics. Since then, the focus has shifted from seeking linguistic properties in spoken discourse to analyzing its pragmatic functions in written contextual communication. The purpose of this paper was to analyze hedges in Chinese and English scientific articles from the perspective of contrastive pragmatics. Based on a contextual analysis of 5 Chinese and 5 English scientific articles, selected randomly, from two journals in molecular biology--Science in China and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, there were significant differences between Chinese and English scientific articles in use of hedges.

  4. Is routine karyotyping required in prenatal samples with a molecular or metabolic referral?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooper, A.J.A.; Pieters, J.J.; Faas, B.H.W.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Burgt, C.J.A.M. van der; Zondervan, H.A.; Smits, A.P.T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: As a routine, karyotyping of invasive prenatal samples is performed as an adjunct to referrals for DNA mutation detection and metabolic testing. We performed a retrospective study on 500 samples to assess the diagnostic value of this procedure. These samples included 454 (90.8%) chorionic

  5. 40 CFR 86.109-94 - Exhaust gas sampling system; Otto-cycle vehicles not requiring particulate emission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas sampling system; Otto... Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.109-94 Exhaust gas sampling system; Otto-cycle vehicles not requiring...

  6. A Sensitive Cell-Based Assay to Measure the Doxycycline Concentration in Biological Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Kleibeuker; X. Zhou; M. Centlivre; N. Legrand; M. Page; N. Almond; B. Berkhout; A.T. Das

    2009-01-01

    Doxycycline (DOX) is widely used as a pharmacological agent and as an effector molecule in inducible gene expression systems. For most applications, it is important to determine whether the DOX concentration reaches the level required for optimal efficacy. We developed a sensitive bioassay for measu

  7. Development of a micro-XRF system for biological samples based on proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploykrachang, K.; Hasegawa, J.; Kondo, K.; Fukuda, H.; Oguri, Y.

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a micro-XRF system based on a proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-ray (QMXR) microbeam for in vivo measurement of biological samples. A 2.5-MeV proton beam impinged normally on a Cu foil target that was slightly thicker than the proton range. The emitted QMXR behind the Cu target was focused with a polycapillary X-ray half lens. For application to analysis of wet or aquatic samples, we prepared a QMXR beam with an incident angle of 45° with respect to the horizontal plane by using a dipole magnet in order to bend the primary proton beam downward by 45°. The focal spot size of the QMXR microbeam on a horizontal sample surface was evaluated to be 250 × 350 μm by a wire scanning method. A microscope camera with a long working distance was installed perpendicular to the sample surface to identify the analyzed position on the sample. The fluorescent radiation from the sample was collected by a Si-PIN photodiode X-ray detector. Using the setup above, we were able to successfully measure the accumulation and distribution of Co in the leaves of a free-floating aquatic plant on a dilute Co solution surface.

  8. Development of a micro-XRF system for biological samples based on proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploykrachang, K., E-mail: ploykrachang.k.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Hasegawa, J. [Department of Energy Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kondo, K.; Fukuda, H.; Oguri, Y. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    We have developed a micro-XRF system based on a proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-ray (QMXR) microbeam for in vivo measurement of biological samples. A 2.5-MeV proton beam impinged normally on a Cu foil target that was slightly thicker than the proton range. The emitted QMXR behind the Cu target was focused with a polycapillary X-ray half lens. For application to analysis of wet or aquatic samples, we prepared a QMXR beam with an incident angle of 45° with respect to the horizontal plane by using a dipole magnet in order to bend the primary proton beam downward by 45°. The focal spot size of the QMXR microbeam on a horizontal sample surface was evaluated to be 250 × 350 μm by a wire scanning method. A microscope camera with a long working distance was installed perpendicular to the sample surface to identify the analyzed position on the sample. The fluorescent radiation from the sample was collected by a Si-PIN photodiode X-ray detector. Using the setup above, we were able to successfully measure the accumulation and distribution of Co in the leaves of a free-floating aquatic plant on a dilute Co solution surface.

  9. Development of a micro-XRF system for biological samples based on proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a micro-XRF system based on a proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-ray (QMXR) microbeam for in vivo measurement of biological samples. A 2.5-MeV proton beam impinged normally on a Cu foil target that was slightly thicker than the proton range. The emitted QMXR behind the Cu target was focused with a polycapillary X-ray half lens. For application to analysis of wet or aquatic samples, we prepared a QMXR beam with an incident angle of 45° with respect to the horizontal plane by using a dipole magnet in order to bend the primary proton beam downward by 45°. The focal spot size of the QMXR microbeam on a horizontal sample surface was evaluated to be 250 × 350 μm by a wire scanning method. A microscope camera with a long working distance was installed perpendicular to the sample surface to identify the analyzed position on the sample. The fluorescent radiation from the sample was collected by a Si-PIN photodiode X-ray detector. Using the setup above, we were able to successfully measure the accumulation and distribution of Co in the leaves of a free-floating aquatic plant on a dilute Co solution surface

  10. Simultaneous determination of trace levels of ethylmercury and methylmercury in biological samples and vaccines using sodium tetra(n-propyl)borate as derivatizing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibicar, Darija; Logar, Martina; Horvat, Nusa; Marn-Pernat, Andreja; Ponikvar, Rafael; Horvat, Milena

    2007-05-01

    Because of increasing awareness of the potential neurotoxicity of even low levels of organomercury compounds, analytical techniques are required for determination of low concentrations of ethylmercury (EtHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples. An accurate and sensitive method has been developed for simultaneous determination of methylmercury and ethylmercury in vaccines and biological samples. MeHg and EtHg were isolated by acid leaching (H2SO4-KBr-CuSO4), extraction of MeHg and EtHg bromides into an organic solvent (CH2Cl2), then back-extraction into Milli-Q water. MeHg and EtHg bromides were derivatized with sodium tetrapropylborate (NaBPr4), collected at room temperature on Tenax, separated by isothermal gas chromatography (GC), pyrolysed, and detected by cold-vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS). The repeatability of results from the method was approximately 5-10% for EtHg and 5-15% for MeHg. Detection limits achieved were 0.01 ng g-1 for EtHg and MeHg in blood, saliva, and vaccines and 5 ng g-1 for EtHg and MeHg in hair. The method presented has been shown to be suitable for determination of background levels of these contaminants in biological samples and can be used in studies related to the health effects of mercury and its species in man. This work illustrates the possibility of using hair and blood as potential biomarkers of exposure to thiomersal.

  11. Organochlorine pesticides in sediment and biological samples from the coastal lagoons of Nicaragua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was carried out on the Pacific coast of Nicaragua to investigate the contamination of the coastal lagoons with residues of agricultural pesticides. Samples were taken during 1995 from the areas of Estero Real, Padre Ramos, Maderas Negras, Naranjo and Paso Caballos, and during 1996 from Aposentillo to Estero Barquito - Posoltega River. Analysis of the samples of sediment and aquatic life (fishes, oysters and bivalves) showed that they were contaminated with organochlorine pesticides. The pesticides found in the highest concentrations were toxaphene (1,734 μg.kg-1) and p,p-DDE (275 μg kg-1). These data indicate widespread contamination of the ecosystem with organochlorine pesticides in the main Pacific coastal lagoons of Nicaragua, resulting from intensive agricultural use of pesticides during the past decades. The contamination has been carried from the agricultural areas to the coastal lagoons by the rivers passing through the cultivated areas. (author)

  12. Label-free quantification of Tacrolimus in biological samples by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menotta, Michele, E-mail: michele.menotta@uniurb.it [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino “Carlo Bo” via Saffi 2, Urbino (Italy); Biagiotti, Sara [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino “Carlo Bo” via Saffi 2, Urbino (Italy); Streppa, Laura [Physics Laboratory, CNRS-ENS, UMR 5672, Lyon (France); Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, CNRS-ENS Lyon, UMR 5239, IFR128, Lyon (France); Rossi, Luigia; Magnani, Mauro [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino “Carlo Bo” via Saffi 2, Urbino (Italy)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • Tacrolimus is a potent immunosuppressant drug that has to be continually monitored. • We present an atomic force microscope approach for quantification of Tacrolimus in blood samples. • Detection and quantification have been successfully achieved. - Abstract: In the present paper we describe an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based method for the quantitative analysis of FK506 (Tacrolimus) in whole blood (WB) samples. Current reference methods used to quantify this immunosuppressive drug are based on mass spectrometry. In addition, an immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA) has been developed and is widely used in clinic, even though it shows a small but consistent overestimation of the actual drug concentration when compared with the mass spectrometry method. The AFM biosensor presented herein utilises the endogen drug receptor, FKBP12, to quantify Tacrolimus levels. The biosensor was first assayed to detect the free drug in solution, and subsequently used for the detection of Tacrolimus in blood samples. The sensor was suitable to generate a dose–response curve in the full range of clinical drug monitoring. A comparison with the clinically tested ELISA assay is also reported.

  13. Electrochemical Analysis of Antichemotherapeutic Drug Zanosar in Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples by Differential Pulse Polarography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennupalle Nageswara Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical reduction of zanosar was investigated systematically by direct current polarography, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse polarography (DPP. A simple DPP technique was proposed for the direct quantitative determination of anticancer drug zanosar in pharmaceutical formulation and spiked human urine samples for the first time. The reduction potential was −0.28 V versus Ag/AgCl with a hanging mercury drop electrode in Britton-Robinson buffer as supporting electrolyte. The dependence of the intensities of currents and potentials on pH, concentration, scan rate, deposition time, and nature of the supporting electrolyte was investigated. The calibration curve was found to be linear with the following equation: y=0.4041x+0.012, with a correlation coefficient of 0.992 (R2 over a concentration range from 1.0×10-7 M to 1.0×10-3 M. In the present investigation, the achieved limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantization (LQD were 7.42×10-8 M and 2.47×10-8 M; respectively. Excipients did not interfere with the determination of zanosar in pharmaceutical formulation and spiked urine samples. Precision and accuracy of the developed method were checked by recovery studies in pharmaceutical formulation and spiked human urine samples.

  14. Determination of lead in biological samples of children with different physiological consequences using cloud point extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Faheem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Ullah, Naeem; Afridi, Hassan Imran

    2013-06-01

    In present study, lead (Pb) level in biological samples of children with physiological disorders (liver, bone, and gastrointestinal; age ranged 1-10 years) have been assessed. For comparison purpose, age-matched healthy children were also selected. Cloud point extraction (CPE) was employed for preconcentration of Pb in acid-digested biological samples prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Dithizone (diphenylthiocarbazone) and nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 (TX-114) were used as complexing reagent and extractant, respectively. The effects of several experimental variables on proposed CPE were evaluated. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the observed detection limit (LOD) and the enhancement factor (EF) were 0.08 μg L(-1) and 53, respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of 10 μg L(-1) Pb was 3.4 %. It was observed that children with liver-, bone-, and gastrointestinal-related disorders had three- to fourfold higher Pb level in blood and scalp hair samples. PMID:23625698

  15. Interaction of cadmium and zinc in biological samples of smokers and chewing tobacco female mouth cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul, E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Wadhwa, Sham Kumar, E-mail: wadhwashamkumar@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Afridi, Hassan Imran, E-mail: hassanimranafridi@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Kazi, Naveed, E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com [Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Baig, Jamil Ahmed, E-mail: jab_mughal@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Shah, Abdul Qadir, E-mail: aqshah07@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Kolachi, Nida Fatima [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Arain, Muhammad Balal, E-mail: bilal_ku2004@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics and Basic Sciences, NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi 75270 (Pakistan)

    2010-04-15

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that zinc (Zn) deficiency and high accumulation of cadmium (Cd) may be associated with increased risk of cancer. The incidence of mouth cancer has increased among females, who possess habits of chewing tobacco with gradients (areca nut and betel quid) and smoking tobacco in Pakistan. In present study, we measured the concentration of Cd and Zn in 96 mouth cancer patients (MCPs) and 110 female controls/referents (67 smoker and chewing tobacco), while 43 have none of smoking and chewing tobacco habits, belongs to different cities of Pakistan. Both controls and patients have same age group (ranged 35-65 years), socio-economic status, localities and dietary habits. The Zn and Cd were determined by flame/graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer, prior to microwave assisted acid digestion method. The Cd/Zn ratio in both biological samples was also calculated. The results of this study showed that the mean value of Zn was lower, while the mean concentration of Cd was higher in the blood and scalp hair samples of MCPs as compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). The controls chewing and smoking tobacco have high level of Cd in both biological samples as compared to those have not smoking or chewing tobacco (p < 0.012). The Cd/Zn ratio was higher in MCPs than control subjects. This study is compelling evidence in support of positive associations between cadmium, cigarette smoking, deficiency of Zn and cancer risk.

  16. Determination of lead in biological samples of children with different physiological consequences using cloud point extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Faheem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Ullah, Naeem; Afridi, Hassan Imran

    2013-06-01

    In present study, lead (Pb) level in biological samples of children with physiological disorders (liver, bone, and gastrointestinal; age ranged 1-10 years) have been assessed. For comparison purpose, age-matched healthy children were also selected. Cloud point extraction (CPE) was employed for preconcentration of Pb in acid-digested biological samples prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Dithizone (diphenylthiocarbazone) and nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 (TX-114) were used as complexing reagent and extractant, respectively. The effects of several experimental variables on proposed CPE were evaluated. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the observed detection limit (LOD) and the enhancement factor (EF) were 0.08 μg L(-1) and 53, respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of 10 μg L(-1) Pb was 3.4 %. It was observed that children with liver-, bone-, and gastrointestinal-related disorders had three- to fourfold higher Pb level in blood and scalp hair samples.

  17. Correlation of Arsenic Levels in Smokeless Tobacco Products and Biological Samples of Oral Cancer Patients and Control Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Kamboh, Muhammad A

    2015-12-01

    It has been extensively reported that chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) can lead to cancers of oral cavity. In present study, the relationship between arsenic (As) exposure via chewing/inhaling different SLT products in oral cancer patients have or/not consumed SLT products was studied. The As in different types of SLT products (gutkha, mainpuri, and snuff) and biological (scalp hair and blood) samples of different types of oral cancer patients and controls were analyzed. Both controls and oral cancer patients have same age group (ranged 30-60 years), socio-economic status, localities, and dietary habits. The concentrations of As in SLT products and biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by certified reference materials. The resulted data of present study indicates that the concentration of As was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients than those of controls (p0.01). The intake of As via consuming different SLT may have synergistic effects, in addition to other risk factors associated with oral cancer.

  18. Sensor structure concepts for the analysis or local radiation exposure of biological samples at terahertz and millimeter wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornuf, Fabian; Dörr, Roland; Lämmle, David; Schlaak, Helmut F.; Krozer, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    We have studied several sensor concepts for biomedical applications operating in the millimeter wave and terahertz range. On one hand, rectangular waveguide structure were designed and extended with microfluidic channels. In this way a simple analysis of aqueous solutions at various waveguide bands is possible. In our case, we focused on the frequency range between 75 GHz and 110 GHz. On the other hand, planar sensor structures for aqueous solutions have been developed based on coplanar waveguides. With these planar sensors it is possible to concentrate the interaction volume on small sensor areas, which achieve a local exposure of the radiation to the sample. When equipping the sensor with microfluidic structures the sample volume could be reduced significantly and enabled a localized interaction with the sensor areas. The sensors are designed to exhibit a broadband behavior up to 300 GHz. Narrow-band operation can also be achieved for potentially increased sensitivity by using resonant structures. Several tests with Glucose dissolved in water show promising results for the distinction of different glucose levels at millimeter wave frequencies. The planar structures can also be used for the exposure of biological cells or cell model systems like liposomes with electromagnetic radiation. Several studies are planned to distinguish on one hand the influence of millimeter wave exposure on biological systems and also to have a spectroscopic method which enables the analysis of cell processes, like membrane transport processes, with millimeter wave and terahertz frequencies by focusing the electric field directly on the analyzing sample.

  19. Interaction of cadmium and zinc in biological samples of smokers and chewing tobacco female mouth cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that zinc (Zn) deficiency and high accumulation of cadmium (Cd) may be associated with increased risk of cancer. The incidence of mouth cancer has increased among females, who possess habits of chewing tobacco with gradients (areca nut and betel quid) and smoking tobacco in Pakistan. In present study, we measured the concentration of Cd and Zn in 96 mouth cancer patients (MCPs) and 110 female controls/referents (67 smoker and chewing tobacco), while 43 have none of smoking and chewing tobacco habits, belongs to different cities of Pakistan. Both controls and patients have same age group (ranged 35-65 years), socio-economic status, localities and dietary habits. The Zn and Cd were determined by flame/graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer, prior to microwave assisted acid digestion method. The Cd/Zn ratio in both biological samples was also calculated. The results of this study showed that the mean value of Zn was lower, while the mean concentration of Cd was higher in the blood and scalp hair samples of MCPs as compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). The controls chewing and smoking tobacco have high level of Cd in both biological samples as compared to those have not smoking or chewing tobacco (p < 0.012). The Cd/Zn ratio was higher in MCPs than control subjects. This study is compelling evidence in support of positive associations between cadmium, cigarette smoking, deficiency of Zn and cancer risk.

  20. Correlation of Arsenic Levels in Smokeless Tobacco Products and Biological Samples of Oral Cancer Patients and Control Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Kamboh, Muhammad A

    2015-12-01

    It has been extensively reported that chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) can lead to cancers of oral cavity. In present study, the relationship between arsenic (As) exposure via chewing/inhaling different SLT products in oral cancer patients have or/not consumed SLT products was studied. The As in different types of SLT products (gutkha, mainpuri, and snuff) and biological (scalp hair and blood) samples of different types of oral cancer patients and controls were analyzed. Both controls and oral cancer patients have same age group (ranged 30-60 years), socio-economic status, localities, and dietary habits. The concentrations of As in SLT products and biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by certified reference materials. The resulted data of present study indicates that the concentration of As was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients than those of controls (p0.01). The intake of As via consuming different SLT may have synergistic effects, in addition to other risk factors associated with oral cancer. PMID:25975948

  1. Non-target time trend screening: a data reduction strategy for detecting emerging contaminants in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassmann, Merle M; Tengstrand, Erik; Åberg, K Magnus; Benskin, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Non-targeted mass spectrometry-based approaches for detecting novel xenobiotics in biological samples are hampered by the occurrence of naturally fluctuating endogenous substances, which are difficult to distinguish from environmental contaminants. Here, we investigate a data reduction strategy for datasets derived from a biological time series. The objective is to flag reoccurring peaks in the time series based on increasing peak intensities, thereby reducing peak lists to only those which may be associated with emerging bioaccumulative contaminants. As a result, compounds with increasing concentrations are flagged while compounds displaying random, decreasing, or steady-state time trends are removed. As an initial proof of concept, we created artificial time trends by fortifying human whole blood samples with isotopically labelled standards. Different scenarios were investigated: eight model compounds had a continuously increasing trend in the last two to nine time points, and four model compounds had a trend that reached steady state after an initial increase. Each time series was investigated at three fortification levels and one unfortified series. Following extraction, analysis by ultra performance liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry, and data processing, a total of 21,700 aligned peaks were obtained. Peaks displaying an increasing trend were filtered from randomly fluctuating peaks using time trend ratios and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The first approach was successful in flagging model compounds spiked at only two to three time points, while the latter approach resulted in all model compounds ranking in the top 11 % of the peak lists. Compared to initial peak lists, a combination of both approaches reduced the size of datasets by 80-85 %. Overall, non-target time trend screening represents a promising data reduction strategy for identifying emerging bioaccumulative contaminants in biological samples. Graphical abstract

  2. Non-target time trend screening: a data reduction strategy for detecting emerging contaminants in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassmann, Merle M; Tengstrand, Erik; Åberg, K Magnus; Benskin, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Non-targeted mass spectrometry-based approaches for detecting novel xenobiotics in biological samples are hampered by the occurrence of naturally fluctuating endogenous substances, which are difficult to distinguish from environmental contaminants. Here, we investigate a data reduction strategy for datasets derived from a biological time series. The objective is to flag reoccurring peaks in the time series based on increasing peak intensities, thereby reducing peak lists to only those which may be associated with emerging bioaccumulative contaminants. As a result, compounds with increasing concentrations are flagged while compounds displaying random, decreasing, or steady-state time trends are removed. As an initial proof of concept, we created artificial time trends by fortifying human whole blood samples with isotopically labelled standards. Different scenarios were investigated: eight model compounds had a continuously increasing trend in the last two to nine time points, and four model compounds had a trend that reached steady state after an initial increase. Each time series was investigated at three fortification levels and one unfortified series. Following extraction, analysis by ultra performance liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry, and data processing, a total of 21,700 aligned peaks were obtained. Peaks displaying an increasing trend were filtered from randomly fluctuating peaks using time trend ratios and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The first approach was successful in flagging model compounds spiked at only two to three time points, while the latter approach resulted in all model compounds ranking in the top 11 % of the peak lists. Compared to initial peak lists, a combination of both approaches reduced the size of datasets by 80-85 %. Overall, non-target time trend screening represents a promising data reduction strategy for identifying emerging bioaccumulative contaminants in biological samples. Graphical abstract

  3. Identifying Variables Responsible for Clustering in Discriminant Analysis of Data from Infrared Microspectroscopy of a Biological Sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Francis L.; German, Matthew J.; Wit, Ernst; Fearn, Thomas; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Pollock, Hubert M.

    2007-01-01

    In the biomedical field, infrared (IR) spectroscopic studies can involve the processing of data derived from many samples, divided into classes such as category of tissue (e.g., normal or cancerous) or patient identity. We require reliable methods to identify the class-specific information on which

  4. Computational approaches and metrics required for formulating biologically realistic nanomaterial pharmacokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of nanomaterial pharmacokinetics is in its infancy, with major advances largely restricted by a lack of biologically relevant metrics, fundamental differences between particles and small molecules of organic chemicals and drugs relative to biological processes involved in disposition, a scarcity of sufficiently rich and characterized in vivo data and a lack of computational approaches to integrating nanomaterial properties to biological endpoints. A central concept that links nanomaterial properties to biological disposition, in addition to their colloidal properties, is the tendency to form a biocorona which modulates biological interactions including cellular uptake and biodistribution. Pharmacokinetic models must take this crucial process into consideration to accurately predict in vivo disposition, especially when extrapolating from laboratory animals to humans since allometric principles may not be applicable. The dynamics of corona formation, which modulates biological interactions including cellular uptake and biodistribution, is thereby a crucial process involved in the rate and extent of biodisposition. The challenge will be to develop a quantitative metric that characterizes a nanoparticle's surface adsorption forces that are important for predicting biocorona dynamics. These types of integrative quantitative approaches discussed in this paper for the dynamics of corona formation must be developed before realistic engineered nanomaterial risk assessment can be accomplished. (paper)

  5. Computational approaches and metrics required for formulating biologically realistic nanomaterial pharmacokinetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, Jim E.; Scoglio, Caterina; Sahneh, Faryad D.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    The field of nanomaterial pharmacokinetics is in its infancy, with major advances largely restricted by a lack of biologically relevant metrics, fundamental differences between particles and small molecules of organic chemicals and drugs relative to biological processes involved in disposition, a scarcity of sufficiently rich and characterized in vivo data and a lack of computational approaches to integrating nanomaterial properties to biological endpoints. A central concept that links nanomaterial properties to biological disposition, in addition to their colloidal properties, is the tendency to form a biocorona which modulates biological interactions including cellular uptake and biodistribution. Pharmacokinetic models must take this crucial process into consideration to accurately predict in vivo disposition, especially when extrapolating from laboratory animals to humans since allometric principles may not be applicable. The dynamics of corona formation, which modulates biological interactions including cellular uptake and biodistribution, is thereby a crucial process involved in the rate and extent of biodisposition. The challenge will be to develop a quantitative metric that characterizes a nanoparticle's surface adsorption forces that are important for predicting biocorona dynamics. These types of integrative quantitative approaches discussed in this paper for the dynamics of corona formation must be developed before realistic engineered nanomaterial risk assessment can be accomplished.

  6. Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Labbe, Nicole [ORNL; Wagner, Rebekah J. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2013-01-01

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  7. Personal air sampling and biological monitoring of occupational exposure to the soil fumigant cis-1,3-dichloropropene

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, E.J.; Verplanke, A.J.W.; Boogaard, P J; Bloemen, L.J.; Sittert, van, N.J.; Christian, F.E.; Stokkentreeff, M; Dijksterhuis, A.; Mulder, A.; Wolff, de, F.A.; K¿hler, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess exposure of commercial application workers to the nematocide cis-1,3-dichloropropene (cis-DCP).
METHODS—The study was conducted during the annual application season, August to 15 November, in the starch potato growing region in The Netherlands. 14 Application workers collected end of shift urine samples on each fumigation day (n=119). The mercapturic acid metabolite N-acetyl-S-(cis-3-chloro-2-propenyl)-L-cysteine (cis-DCP-MA) in urine was used for biological monitoring of...

  8. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Heske, C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft s-rays that coverst the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite is slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved...

  9. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved...

  10. Spectrophotometric determination of copper(II) in pharmaceutical, biological and water samples by 4-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-salicylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, E. Y.; Seleim, M. M.; El-Zohry, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    A highly sensitive method is proposed to determine copper(II) ions by forming a stable complex through their interaction with 4-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-salicylic acid (BTAS) at room temperature and pH of about 5.0. The complex gave a maximum absorption at λ = 485 nm with a molar absorptivity coefficient of 2.35·104 l/(mol·cm). The linear range for the copper determination is 0.63-5.04 mg/l. The method can be applied to determine copper ions in different biological specimens like some drugs and water samples.

  11. Formalin-induced fluorescence reveals cell shape and morphology in biological tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Leischner

    Full Text Available Ultramicroscopy is a powerful tool to reveal detailed three-dimensional structures of large microscopical objects. Using high magnification, we observed that formalin induces fluorescence more in extra-cellular space and stains cellular structures negatively, rendering cells as dark objects in front of a bright background. Here, we show this effect on a three-dimensional image stack of a hippocampus sample, focusing on the CA1 region. This method, called FIF-Ultramicroscopy, allows for the three-dimensional observation of cellular structures in various tissue types without complicated staining techniques.

  12. [Mercury determination in prehispanic Colombian biological samples: first experiences and investigation perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo, Alvaro J; Romero, William M; Silva, Elizabeth; Villamil de García, Gladys; Ortiz, Jaime E

    2002-03-01

    Mercury is useful as a tracer of environmental pollution levels. We measured mercury levels in hair from two human mummies (XII and XIV centuries, respectively) and from a stag (Odocoileus virginianus). The total and inorganic mercury levels found in the samples were very low. This findings indicated a minimal exposure to mercury in food and its absence in the atmosphere. Mercury levels can be used to explore the relationship between humans and environment, especially after metallurgy appeared, and to assess environmental contamination in different periods.

  13. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, Helene, E-mail: helene.rahn@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [ENT-Department, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftungsprofessur), University Hospital Erlangen, Waldstraße 1, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Trahms, Lutz [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestraße 2-12, Berlin 10587 (Germany); Odenbach, Stefan [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XµCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XµCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-µCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XµCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration. - Highlights: • Local cancer treatments are promising in reducing negative side effects occurring during conventional chemotherapy. • The nanoparticles play an important role in delivering drugs to the designated area during local cancer treatments as magnetic drug targeting. • We study the nanoparticles distribution in tumor tissue after magnetic drug targeting with X-ray computed tomography. • We achieved a 3-dimensional quantification of the nanoparticles content in tumor tissue out of digital tomographic data.

  14. Analysis of Turbulence Datasets using a Database Cluster: Requirements, Design, and Sample Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneveau, Charles

    2007-11-01

    The massive datasets now generated by Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent flows create serious new challenges. During a simulation, DNS provides only a few time steps at any instant, owing to storage limitations within the computational cluster. Therefore, traditional numerical experiments done during the simulation examine each time slice only a few times before discarding it. Conversely, if a few large datasets from high-resolution simulations are stored, they are practically inaccessible to most in the turbulence research community, who lack the cyber resources to handle the massive amounts of data. Even those who can compute at that scale must run simulations again forward in time in order to answer new questions about the dynamics, duplicating computational effort. The result is that most turbulence datasets are vastly underutilized and not available as they should be for creative experimentation. In this presentation, we discuss the desired features and requirements of a turbulence database that will enable its widest access to the research community. The guiding principle of large databases is ``move the program to the data'' (Szalay et al. ``Designing and mining multi-terabyte Astronomy archives: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,'' in ACM SIGMOD, 2000). However, in the case of turbulence research, the questions and analysis techniques are highly specific to the client and vary widely from one client to another. This poses particularly hard challenges in the design of database analysis tools. We propose a minimal set of such tools that are of general utility across various applications. And, we describe a new approach based on a Web services interface that allows a client to access the data in a user-friendly fashion while allowing maximum flexibility to execute desired analysis tasks. Sample applications will be discussed. This work is performed by the interdisciplinary ITR group, consisting of the author and Yi Li(1), Eric Perlman(2), Minping Wan(1

  15. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, O; Weinhardt, L; Blum, M; Weigand, M; Umbach, E; Bär, M; Heske, C; Denlinger, J; Chuang, Y-D; McKinney, W; Hussain, Z; Gullikson, E; Jones, M; Batson, P; Nelles, B; Follath, R

    2009-06-01

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as (30 x 3000) microm2, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min. PMID:19566192

  16. New Approach to Purging Monitoring Wells: Lower Flow Rates Reduce Required Purging Volumes and Sample Turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is generally accepted that monitoring wells must be purged to access formation water to obtain “representative” ground water quality samples. Historically anywhere from 3 to 5 well casing volumes have been removed prior to sample collection to evacuate the standing well water...

  17. k0-INAA application at IPEN Neutron Activation Laboratory by using the k0-IAEA program: biological sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results obtained in the application of the k0-standardization method at LAN-IPEN for biological matrices analysis, by using the k0-IAEA software, provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), are presented. The flux parameters f and a of the IEA-R1 reactor were determined for the pneumatic irradiation facility and for one selected irradiation position, 24B/shelf2, for short and long irradiations, respectively. In order to obtain these parameters, the bare triple-monitor method with 197Au-96Zr-94Zr was used. In order to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the methodology, the biological reference materials Peach Leaves (NIST SRM 1547), Mixed Polish Herbs (INCT-MPH-2) e Tomato Leaves (NIST SRM 1573a) were analyzed. The statistical criteria Relative Errors (bias, %), Coefficient of Variation (CV) and U-score were applied to the obtained results (mean of six replicates). The relative errors (bias, %) in relation to certified values, were, for most elements, in the range of 0 e 30. The Coefficients of Variation were below 20%, showing a good reproducibility of the results. The U-score test showed that all results, except Na in Peach Leaves and in Tomato Leaves, were within 95% confidence interval. These results point out to a promising use of the k0-INAA method at LAN-IPEN for biological sample analysis. (author)

  18. Development of an improved immunoassay for detection of sorLA in cells and biological samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Olav Michael; Thakurta, Ishita Guha; West, Mark J.

    bead releases singlet oxygen which triggers a series of chemical reactions in the acceptor beads causing a sharp peak of light emission at 615 nm. A series of experiments were designed to optimize the assay by conjugation of the beads to various anti-sorLA antibodies, cross titrations of the antibodies......, spike and recovery experiments to check matrix interference, signal to noise ratio determined for the counts, and comparison of our novel immunoassay in terms of sensitivity with existing methods. Results: Our results show that as compared to traditional methods, AlphaLISA is a sensitive and rapid assay......, which can be automated suitably for determination of sorLA in large sample batches. It also shows high recovery and signal to noise ratio. Conclusions: The results support the development of an improved method for measuring sorLA quantitatively, which could further prove as an important tool...

  19. Determination of boron in biological samples for the needs of neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring the actual concentration of 10B in a patient's blood is a prerequisite for determining the start and length of patient irradiation. The Prompt Gamma Ray Analysis (PGRA) method enables this nuclide to be determined rapidly and reliably within the region of 1 to 100 ppm. In this method, the characteristic line at 478 keV from the nuclear reaction 10B+n → 7Li+α+γ during sample exposure to thermal neutrons is used to determine boron. The facility which has been built up for this purpose comprises, in particular, a large-volume semiconductor detector for recording gamma rays emerging from the radiative neutron capture on the target

  20. Simulated radioactive decontamination of biological samples using a portable DNA extraction instrument for rapid DNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Dalpé, Claude

    2016-02-01

    A portable DNA extraction instrument was evaluated for its ability to decontaminate blood and saliva samples deposited on different surfaces (metal, plastic and glass) contaminated with stable isotopes of cobalt (Co), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) as equivalents to their radiogenic (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr isotopes, respectively, that could be released during a nuclear weapon accident or a radiological dispersal device (RDD) detonation. Despite the very high contamination levels tested in this study, successful removal of greater than 99.996% of the Co, Cs, Sr contaminants was achieved based on inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and neutron activation analyses carried out on all liquids (including DNA eluates) and solid waste produced during automated DNA extraction. The remaining amounts of Co, Cs and Sr in the DNA eluates, when converted to dose rates (corresponding to (60)Co, (137)Cs and (90)Sr), were determined to be below the recommended dose limits for the general public in most of the scenarios tested. The presence of Co, Cs and Sr contaminants in the cell lysates had no adverse impact on the binding of DNA onto the magnetic DNA IQ™ beads. DNA yields were similar to uncontaminated controls. The remaining Co, Cs and Sr in the DNA eluates did not interfere with real-time PCR DNA quantification. In addition, the quality of the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler(®) profiles derived in 26min using an accelerated protocol was very good and comparable to controls. This study emphasizes the use of an accelerated process involving a portable DNA extraction instrument to significantly reduce radioactive dose rates to allow contaminated samples to be processed safely in a forensic mobile laboratory to expedite the identification of individuals potentially involved in the dispersal of nuclear or other radioactive materials. PMID:26773226

  1. A bench-top K X-ray fluorescence system for quantitative measurement of gold nanoparticles for biological sample diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, K.; Guazzoni, C.; Castoldi, A.; Royle, G.

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles can be targeted to biomarkers to give functional information on a range of tumour characteristics. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques offer potential quantitative measurement of the distribution of such heavy metal nanoparticles. Biologists are developing 3D tissue engineered cellular models on the centimetre scale to optimise targeting techniques of nanoparticles to a range of tumour characteristics. Here we present a high energy bench-top K-X-ray fluorescence system designed for sensitivity to bulk measurement of gold nanoparticle concentration for intended use in such thick biological samples. Previous work has demonstrated use of a L-XRF system in measuring gold concentrations but being a low energy technique it is restricted to thin samples or superficial tumours. The presented system comprised a high purity germanium detector and filtered tungsten X-ray source, capable of quantitative measurement of gold nanoparticle concentration of thicker samples. The developed system achieved a measured detection limit of between 0.2 and 0.6 mgAu/ml, meeting specifications of biologists and being approximately one order of magnitude better than the detection limit of alternative K-XRF nanoparticle detection techniques. The scatter-corrected K-XRF signal of gold was linear with GNP concentrations down to the detection limit, thus demonstrating potential in GNP concentration quantification. The K-XRF system demonstrated between 5 and 9 times less sensitivity than a previous L-XRF bench-top system, due to a fundamental limitation of lower photoelectric interaction probabilities at higher K-edge energies. Importantly, the K-XRF technique is however less affected by overlying thickness, and so offers future potential in interrogating thick biological samples.

  2. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water, sediment, soil, and biological samples from different industrial areas in Zhejiang, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junxia; Lin, Zhenkun [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Lin, Kuangfei [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology/State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Chunyan [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Zhang, Wei [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology/State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, Shanghai 200237 (China); Cui, Changyuan [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Lin, Junda [Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Dong, Qiaoxiang, E-mail: dqxdong@163.com [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Huang, Changjiang, E-mail: cjhuang5711@163.com [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined PBDE concentrations in various matrices from different industrial areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated PBDE levels were found in areas with low-voltage electrical manufactures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Areas with e-waste recycling activities also had higher PBDE concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PBDE content and composition in water samples varied from one area to another. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PBDE composition in sediment/soil and biological samples was predominated by BDE-209. - Abstract: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used extensively in electrical and electronic products, but little is known about their distribution in the environment surrounding the manufacturing factories. This study reports PBDE contamination in various matrices from the location (Liushi, Zhejiang province) that produces more than 70% of the low-voltage electrical appliances in China. Additionally, PBDE contamination was compared with other industries such as the e-waste recycling business (Fengjiang) in the same region. Specifically, we measured seven PBDE congeners (BDEs - 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, and 209) in water, sediment, soil, plant, and animal tissues from four different areas in this region. The present study revealed elevated PBDE concentrations in all matrices collected from Liushi and Fengjiang in comparison with highly industrialized areas without significant PBDE contamination sources. In water samples, there were large variations of PBDE content and composition across different areas. In sediment/soil and biological samples, BDE-209 was the predominant congener and this could be due to the abundant usage of deca-BDE mixtures in China. Our findings provide the very first data on PBDE contamination in the local environments surrounding the electronics industry, and also reveal widespread PBDE contamination in highly industrialized coastal regions of China.

  3. A Modified Alderman-Grant Coil makes possible an efficient cross-coil probe for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Christopher V.; Yang, Yuan; Glibowicka, Mira; Wu, Chin H.; Park, Sang Ho; Deber, Charles M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-11-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a cross-coil double-resonance probe for solid-state NMR experiments on lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are described. The outer coil is a Modified Alderman-Grant Coil (MAGC) tuned to the 1H frequency. The inner coil consists of a multi-turn solenoid coil that produces a B 1 field orthogonal to that of the outer coil. This results in a compact nested cross-coil pair with the inner solenoid coil tuned to the low frequency detection channel. This design has several advantages over multiple-tuned solenoid coil probes, since RF heating from the 1H channel is substantially reduced, it can be tuned for samples with a wide range of dielectric constants, and the simplified circuit design and high inductance inner coil provides excellent sensitivity. The utility of this probe is demonstrated on two electrically lossy samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) that are particularly difficult for conventional NMR probes. The 72-residue polypeptide embedding the transmembrane helices 3 and 4 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (residues 194-241) requires a high salt concentration in order to be successfully reconstituted in phospholipid bicelles. A second application is to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement applied to the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bicelles where the resistance to sample heating enables high duty cycle solid-state NMR experiments to be performed.

  4. Cloud-point extraction, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace quantities of copper in food, water and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Ayman A; Amin, Alaa S

    2014-01-01

    A new, simple and sensitive cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration and determination of copper(II) ion in food, water and biological samples. The analyte was complexed with a new synthesized reagent, 2-amino-4-(m-tolylazo)pyridine-3-ol (ATAP) as a new complexing agent and Triton X-114 as the surfactant. After centrifugation, dilution of the surfactant-rich phase with 0.4 mL of ethanol acidified with 1.0M HNO3 was performed after phase separation, and the copper contents were measured by spectrophotometry at λmax 608 nm. The influence of analytical parameters including concentration of complexing agent, Triton X-114, pH, equilibration temperature and time, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. The analytical characteristics of the method (e.g. linear range, molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity, optimum Ringbom concentration ranges limits of detection and quantification, preconcentration factor, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 4.0-115 ng mL(-1) of Cu(II) ion. The detection and quantification limits of the method were 1.20 and 3.94 ng mL(-1) of Cu(II) ion, respectively. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied for determination of copper in food, water and biological samples.

  5. Use of cloud-point preconcentration for spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of antimony in biological and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharjawy, Abdel-Azeem M; Amin, Alaa S

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a cloud-point extraction process using the micelle-mediated extraction method for simultaneous preconcentration and determination of Sb(III) and Sb(V) species in biological and environmental samples as a prior preconcentration step to their spectrophotometric determination. The analytical system is based on the selective reaction between Sb(III) and 3-dichloro-6-(3-carboxy-2-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo)quinoxaline (DCHNAQ) in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and potassium iodide at pH 4.5. Total Sb concentration was determined after reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in the presence of potassium iodide and ascorbic acid. The optimal reaction conditions and extraction were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limits of detection and quantification, linear range, preconcentration, improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity for Sb(III) was obeyed in the range of 0.2-20 ng ml(-1). The detection and quantification limits for the determination of Sb(III) were 0.055 and 0.185 ng ml(-1), respectively. The method has a lower detection limit and wider linear range, inexpensive instrument, and low cost, and is more sensitive compared with most other methods. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also studied. The method was applied to the determination of Sb(III) in the presence of Sb(V) and total antimony in blood plasma, urine, biological, and water samples.

  6. Development of a mild mercaptoethanol extraction method for determination of mercury species in biological samples by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Feng, Weiyue; Shi, Junwen; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Motao; Li, Bai; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2007-03-30

    A mild, efficient and convenient extraction method of using 2-mercaptoethanol contained extractant solution combined with an incubator shaker for determination of mercury species in biological samples by HPLC-ICP-MS has been developed. The effects of the concentration of 2-mercaptoethanol, the composition of the extractant solution and the shaking time on the efficiency of mercury extraction were evaluated. The optimization experiments indicated that the quantitative extraction of mercury species from biological samples could be achieved by using 0.1% (v/v) HCl, 0.1% (v/v) 2-mercapoethanol and 0.15% (m/v) KCl extractant solution in an incubator shaker for shaking overnight (about 12h) at room temperature. The established method was validated by analysis of various biological certified reference materials, including NRCC DOLT-3 (dogfish liver), IAEA 436 (tuna fish), IAEA MA-B-3/TM (garfish filet), IAEA MA-M-2/TM (mussel tissue), GBW 08193 (bovine liver) and GBW 08572 (prawn). The analytical results of the reference materials were in good agreement with the certified or reference values of both methyl and total mercury, indicating that no distinguishable transformation between mercury species had occurred during the extraction and determination procedures. The limit of detection (LOD) for methyl (CH(3)Hg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) by the method are both as 0.2microg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.s) for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+) are 3.0% and 5.8%, respectively. The advantages of the developed extraction method are that (1) it is easy to operate in HPLC-ICP-MS for mercury species determination since the extracted solution can be directly injected into the HPLC column without pH adjustment and (2) the memory effect of mercury in the ICP-MS measurement system can be reduced.

  7. Radioreceptor assay for analysis of fentanyl and its analogs in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alburges, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The assay is based on the competition of these drugs with ({sup 3}H) fentanyl for opioid receptors in membrane preparations of rat forebrain in vitro. The binding in stereospecific, reversible and saturable. Scatchard plots of saturation suggest the presence of high and low affinity binding sites. Morphine and hydromorphone complete with ({sup 3}H)fentanyl for the opioid receptor, but other morphine-like compounds were relatively weak displacers of ({sup 3}H)fentanyl. Many other commonly abused drugs do not compete with ({sup 3}H)fentanyl for the opioid receptors. Urine samples from animals injected with fentanyl, ({plus minus})-cis-3-methylfentanyl, alpha-methylfentanyl, butyrylfentanyl and benzylfentanyl were analyzed by radioreceptor assay, radioimmunoassay, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Urinary analysis of fentanyl showed a good correlation with these three methods; however, discrepancies were observed in the analysis of fentanyl analogs. This radioreceptor assay is well-suited as an initial assay for the detection of active analogs of fentanyl in urine with good correlation with other techniques in the analysis of fentanyl; however, there is substantial disagreement between techniques in the quantitation of fentanyl analogs. The implications of these discrepancies are discussed.

  8. Rapid determination of amino acids in biological samples using a monolithic silica column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanting; Funatsu, Takashi; Tsunoda, Makoto

    2012-05-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method in which fluorescence detection is used for the simultaneous determination of 21 amino acids is proposed. Amino acids were derivatized with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) and then separated on a monolithic silica column (MonoClad C18-HS, 150 mm×3 mm i.d.). A mixture of 25 mM citrate buffer containing 25 mM sodium perchlorate (pH 5.5) and acetonitrile was used as the mobile phase. We found that the most significant factor in the separation was temperature, and a linear temperature gradient from 30 to 49°C was used to control the column temperature. The limits of detection and quantification for all amino acids ranged from 3.2 to 57.2 fmol and 10.8 to 191 fmol, respectively. The calibration curves for the NBD-amino acid had good linearity within the range of 40 fmol to 40 pmol when 6-aminocaproic acid was used as an internal standard. Using only conventional instruments, the 21 amino acids could be analyzed within 10 min. This method was found to be suitable for the quantification of the contents of amino acids in mouse plasma and adrenal gland samples.

  9. Signal and Image Processing of Optical Coherence Tomography at 1310 nm Wavelength for Non Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Rao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OCT is a recently developed optical interferometric technique for non-invasive diagnostic medical imaging in vivo; the most sensitive optical imaging modality.OCT finds its application in ophthalmology, blood flow estimation and cancer diagnosis along with many non biomedical applications. The main advantage of OCT is its high resolution which is in µm range and depth of penetration in mm range. Unlike other techniques like X rays and CT scan, OCT does not comprise any x ray source and therefore no radiations are involved. This research work discusses the basics of spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT, experimental setup, data acquisition and signal processing involved in OCT systems. Simulation of OCT involving modelling and signal processing, carried out on Lab VIEW platform has been discussed. Using the experimental setup, some of the non biomedical samples have been scanned. The signal processing and image processing of the scanned data was carried out in MATLAB and Lab VIEW, some of the results thus obtained have been discussed in the end.

  10. Sensitive ergotamine determination in pharmaceuticals and biological samples using cloud point preconcentration and spectrofluorimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien C; Fernández, Liliana P; Gómez, María Roxana

    2013-03-20

    A new cloud point extraction (CPE) method for ergotamine analysis using fluorimetric detection is described. Ergotamine from an aqueous solution was preconcentrated into a smaller surfactant-rich phase using nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenylether (PONPE 7.5). Differently from the conventional CPE procedure in which the resulting surfactant-rich phase is diluted by a fluidificant before its analysis, in this method the fluorescence measurements were carried out directly onto the undiluted surfactant-rich phase. The high viscosity provided by the undiluted surfactant rich phase greatly improved the fluorescence emission of ergotamine, leading to a total enhancement factor of 1325. This spectral advantage plus the preconcentration factor achieved, contributed to the method sensitivity allowing the ergotamine determination at trace level concentration. Under optimal experimental conditions, a linear calibration curve was obtained from 3.81×10(-7) to 1.10μgmL(-1), with detection and quantification limits of 0.11 and 0.38pgmL(-1), respectively. The accuracy and versatility of the present methodology were proved by analyzing ergotamine in real samples of different natures such as pharmaceuticals, urine and saliva. PMID:23473254

  11. Polythiophene-Chitosan Magnetic Nanocomposite as a Highly Efficient Medium for Isolation of Fluoxetine from Aqueous and Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizbakhsh, Alireza; Sarrafi, Amir Hossein Mohsen; Ehteshami, Shokooh

    2016-01-01

    Polythiophene/chitosan magnetic nanocomposite as an adsorbent of magnetic solid phase extraction was proposed for the isolation of fluoxetine in aqueous and biological samples prior to fluorescence detection at 246 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles, chitosan and polythiophene magnetic nanocomposite, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR, TGA, and EDAX. The separation of the target analyte from the aqueous solution containing the fluoxetine and polythiophene/chitosan magnetic nanocomposite was simply achieved by applying external magnetic field. The main factors affecting the extraction efficiency including desorption conditions, extraction time, ionic strength, and sample solution pH were optimized. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained as 10 min for extraction time, 25 mg for sorbent amount, 50 mL for initial sample volume, methanol as desorption solvent, 1.5 mL for desorption solvent volume, 3 min for desorption time, and being without salt addition. Under the optimum conditions, good linearity was obtained within the range of 15-1000 μg L(-1) for fluoxetine, with correlation coefficients 0.9994. Furthermore, the method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoxetine in urine and human blood plasma samples. Compared with other methods, the current method is characterized with highly easy, fast separation and low detection limits. PMID:27672478

  12. The composite insect trap: an innovative combination trap for biologically diverse sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Russo

    Full Text Available Documentation of insect diversity is an important component of the study of biodiversity, community dynamics, and global change. Accurate identification of insects usually requires catching individuals for close inspection. However, because insects are so diverse, most trapping methods are specifically tailored to a particular taxonomic group. For scientists interested in the broadest possible spectrum of insect taxa, whether for long term monitoring of an ecosystem or for a species inventory, the use of several different trapping methods is usually necessary. We describe a novel composite method for capturing a diverse spectrum of insect taxa. The Composite Insect Trap incorporates elements from four different existing trapping methods: the cone trap, malaise trap, pan trap, and flight intercept trap. It is affordable, resistant, easy to assemble and disassemble, and collects a wide variety of insect taxa. Here we describe the design, construction, and effectiveness of the Composite Insect Trap tested during a study of insect diversity. The trap catches a broad array of insects and can eliminate the need to use multiple trap types in biodiversity studies. We propose that the Composite Insect Trap is a useful addition to the trapping methods currently available to ecologists and will be extremely effective for monitoring community level dynamics, biodiversity assessment, and conservation and restoration work. In addition, the Composite Insect Trap will be of use to other insect specialists, such as taxonomists, that are interested in describing the insect taxa in a given area.

  13. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of origin of the MCS may be used if approved by APHIS. (c) The MCS and either each subculture of... sources of cells in the batch. (d) The MCS and either each subculture used to prepare a biological product... not be used. If bacteria or fungi are found in a subculture, the subculture shall not be used. (e)...

  14. Lead and cadmium determinations by atomic absorption technique in biological samples: blood, placenta and umbilical cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the possibility contamination of lead and cadmium in pregnant women living in the mining-smelting city of La Oroya in Peru, lead and cadmium concentrations were assessed in maternal blood (pre-birth), umbilical cord blood and placental tissue. Forty deliveries with normal evolution were evaluated between October 2002 and January 2003. Samples were analyzed by atomic absorption on a graphite furnace at the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) laboratories. Results are summarized as follows: a) Mean lead concentrations in maternal blood (MB), umbilical cord blood (UCB) and placental tissue (PT) were 27.23 μg/dL, 18.48 μg/dL and 363.97 μg/100g, respectively; b) Mean cadmium concentrations in MB, UCB and PT were 8.82 μg/dL, 12,0 μg/dL and 104,44 μg/100g, respectively; c) The correlation coefficient between lead concentration in maternal blood and umbilical cord was 0.122; d). The correlation coefficient of cadmium concentration between MB and UCB was 0.223; e). The correlation coefficient of lead concentration between MB and PT was 0.189; f). The correlation coefficient of cadmium concentration between MB and PT was 0.633. Trans-placental transport of lead was 67.84% (27,23 μg/dL in MB vs. 18.48 μg/dL in UCB); whereas in the case of cadmium, the concentration in UC (12,00 μg/dL) was greater than in MB (8.82 μg/dL.). These results could indicate that the placenta acts as a barrier trapping lead and cadmium. This barrier is efficient for lead since the concentration in cord blood is inferior to maternal blood but it is less efficient for cadmium. (author)

  15. A step-by-step protocol for assaying protein carbonylation in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Graziano; Clerici, Marco; Garavaglia, Maria Elisa; Giustarini, Daniela; Rossi, Ranieri; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2016-04-15

    Protein carbonylation represents the most frequent and usually irreversible oxidative modification affecting proteins. This modification is chemically stable and this feature is particularly important for storage and detection of carbonylated proteins. Many biochemical and analytical methods have been developed during the last thirty years to assay protein carbonylation. The most successful method consists on protein carbonyl (PCO) derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and consequent spectrophotometric assay. This assay allows a global quantification of PCO content due to the ability of DNPH to react with carbonyl giving rise to an adduct able to absorb at 366 nm. Similar approaches were also developed employing chromatographic separation, in particular HPLC, and parallel detection of absorbing adducts. Subsequently, immunological techniques, such as Western immunoblot or ELISA, have been developed leading to an increase of sensitivity in protein carbonylation detection. Currently, they are widely employed to evaluate change in total protein carbonylation and eventually to highlight the specific proteins undergoing selective oxidation. In the last decade, many mass spectrometry (MS) approaches have been developed for the identification of the carbonylated proteins and the relative amino acid residues modified to carbonyl derivatives. Although these MS methods are much more focused and detailed due to their ability to identify the amino acid residues undergoing carbonylation, they still require too expensive equipments and, therefore, are limited in distribution. In this protocol paper, we summarise and comment on the most diffuse protocols that a standard laboratory can employ to assess protein carbonylation; in particular, we describe step-by-step the different protocols, adding suggestions coming from our on-bench experience.

  16. Critical evaluation of the JDO API for the persistence and portability requirements of complex biological databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwieger Michael

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex biological database systems have become key computational tools used daily by scientists and researchers. Many of these systems must be capable of executing on multiple different hardware and software configurations and are also often made available to users via the Internet. We have used the Java Data Object (JDO persistence technology to develop the database layer of such a system known as the SigPath information management system. SigPath is an example of a complex biological database that needs to store various types of information connected by many relationships. Results Using this system as an example, we perform a critical evaluation of current JDO technology; discuss the suitability of the JDO standard to achieve portability, scalability and performance. We show that JDO supports portability of the SigPath system from a relational database backend to an object database backend and achieves acceptable scalability. To answer the performance question, we have created the SigPath JDO application benchmark that we distribute under the Gnu General Public License. This benchmark can be used as an example of using JDO technology to create a complex biological database and makes it possible for vendors and users of the technology to evaluate the performance of other JDO implementations for similar applications. Conclusions The SigPath JDO benchmark and our discussion of JDO technology in the context of biological databases will be useful to bioinformaticians who design new complex biological databases and aim to create systems that can be ported easily to a variety of database backends.

  17. Surfactant-Assisted Nanodrop Spectrophotometer Determination of Iron(III) in a Single Drop of Food, Biological, and Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Tapadia, K.; Sahin, R.; Shrivas, K.

    2016-01-01

    A surfactant-assisted nanodrop spectrophotometric (NDS) method has been developed for the determination of the iron(III) content in single drops (1 μ L) of food, biological, and or environmental sample using disodium 1-nitroso-2-naphthol-3,6-sulfonate (Nitroso-R salt) as a complexing agent and Tween-80 as non-ionic surfactant at pH 4.0. This method is based on the formation of a complex between the Fe(III) present in a sample and the Nitroso-R-salt in the presence of a surfactant to form a green-colored Fe(III)-Nitroso-R salt complex, which can be measured using a NDS method at a λ max = 710 nm. This system was found to obey Beer's law at concentrations in the range of 50-5000 μ g/L with slope, intercept and correlation coefficient values of 0.683, 0.102, and 0.986, respectively. The molar absorptivity of the complex in terms of the Fe(III) content was determined to be 4.86 × 10 5 L· mol -1 · cm -1 . The detection limit and %RSD values of the method were found to be 17 × 10-3 mg/L and ±1.3706%, respectively. This newly developed method was successfully applied to the determination of the Fe(III) content in single drops of food, biological, and environmental samples, and the results were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry.

  18. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Derivations and Verification of Plans. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K, Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques. This recommended procedure would be used as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. This document contains the outcome of the assessment.

  19. NG09 And CTBT On-Site Inspection Noble Gas Sampling and Analysis Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Tanaka, Junichi

    2010-05-01

    A provision of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) allows on-site inspections (OSIs) of suspect nuclear sites to determine if the occurrence of a detected event is nuclear in origin. For an underground nuclear explosion (UNE), the potential success of an OSI depends significantly on the containment scenario of the alleged event as well as the application of air and soil-gas radionuclide sampling techniques in a manner that takes into account both the suspect site geology and the gas transport physics. UNE scenarios may be broadly divided into categories involving the level of containment. The simplest to detect is a UNE that vents a significant portion of its radionuclide inventory and is readily detectable at distance by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The most well contained subsurface events will only be detectable during an OSI. In such cases, 37 Ar and radioactive xenon cavity gases may reach the surface through either "micro-seepage" or the barometric pumping process and only the careful siting of sampling locations, timing of sampling and application of the most site-appropriate atmospheric and soil-gas capturing methods will result in a confirmatory signal. The OSI noble gas field tests NG09 was recently held in Stupava, Slovakia to consider, in addition to other field sampling and analysis techniques, drilling and subsurface noble gas extraction methods that might be applied during an OSI. One of the experiments focused on challenges to soil-gas sampling near the soil-atmosphere interface. During withdrawal of soil gas from shallow, subsurface sample points, atmospheric dilution of the sample and the potential for introduction of unwanted atmospheric gases were considered. Tests were designed to evaluate surface infiltration and the ability of inflatable well-packers to seal out atmospheric gases during sample acquisition. We discuss these tests along with some model-based predictions regarding infiltration under different near

  20. Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal from Dairy Manure to Meet Nitrogen:Phosphorus Crop Nutrient Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Yanosek, Kristina Anne

    2002-01-01

    Over the last two decades, livestock operations have become highly concentrated due to growing trends towards larger, more confined facilities and a decrease in cropland on smaller farms. This has led to greater amounts of excess manure nutrients on farms, increasing the potential for nutrient pollution of water bodies from runoff. The purpose of this study was to determine if enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a viable alternative for managing excess manure nutrients on dairy...

  1. Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of the Donation and Use of Human Biological Samples for Research: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Patterson

    Full Text Available Human biological samples (biosamples are increasingly important in diagnosing, treating and measuring the prevalence of illnesses. For the gay and bisexual population, biosample research is particularly important for measuring the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. By determining people's understandings of, and attitudes towards, the donation and use of biosamples, researchers can design studies to maximise acceptability and participation. In this study we examine gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 46 gay and bisexual men aged between 18 and 63 recruited in commercial gay scene venues in two Scottish cities. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Most men interviewed seemed to have given little prior consideration to the issues. Participants were largely supportive of donating tissue for medical research purposes, and often favourable towards samples being stored, reused and shared. Support was often conditional, with common concerns related to: informed consent; the protection of anonymity and confidentiality; the right to withdraw from research; and ownership of samples. Many participants were in favour of the storage and reuse of samples, but expressed concerns related to data security and potential misuse of samples, particularly by commercial organisations. The sensitivity of tissue collection varied between tissue types and collection contexts. Blood, urine, semen and bowel tissue were commonly identified as sensitive, and donating saliva and as unlikely to cause discomfort. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth study of gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. While most men in this study were supportive of donating tissue for research, some clear areas of concern were identified. We suggest that these minority concerns should be accounted

  2. Historical precedence and technical requirements of biological weapons use : a threat assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, Daniel P.; Vogel, Kathleen Margaret; Gaudioso, Jennifer Marie; Hickok, Lauren T.; Jung, Danielle F.; Barnett, Natalie Beth; Frerichs, Rebecca L.; Salerno, Reynolds Mathewson

    2004-05-01

    The threat from biological weapons is assessed through both a comparative historical analysis of the patterns of biological weapons use and an assessment of the technological hurdles to proliferation and use that must be overcome. The history of biological weapons is studied to learn how agents have been acquired and what types of states and substate actors have used agents. Substate actors have generally been more willing than states to use pathogens and toxins and they have focused on those agents that are more readily available. There has been an increasing trend of bioterrorism incidents over the past century, but states and substate actors have struggled with one or more of the necessary technological steps. These steps include acquisition of a suitable agent, production of an appropriate quantity and form, and effective deployment. The technological hurdles associated with the steps present a real barrier to producing a high consequence event. However, the ever increasing technological sophistication of society continually lowers the barriers, resulting in a low but increasing probability of a high consequence bioterrorism event.

  3. Is routine karyotyping required in prenatal samples with a molecular or metabolic referral?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooper Angelique JA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a routine, karyotyping of invasive prenatal samples is performed as an adjunct to referrals for DNA mutation detection and metabolic testing. We performed a retrospective study on 500 samples to assess the diagnostic value of this procedure. These samples included 454 (90.8% chorionic villus (CV and 46 (9.2% amniocenteses specimens. For CV samples karyotyping was based on analyses of both short-term culture (STC and long-term culture (LTC cells. Overall, 19 (3.8% abnormal karyotypes were denoted: four with a common aneuploidy (trisomy 21, 18 and 13, two with a sex chromosomal aneuploidy (Klinefelter syndrome, one with a sex chromosome mosaicism and twelve with various autosome mosaicisms. In four cases a second invasive test was performed because of an abnormal finding in the STC. Taken together, we conclude that STC and LTC karyotyping has resulted in a diagnostic yield of 19 (3.8% abnormal cases, including 12 cases (2.4% with an uncertain significance. From a diagnostic point of view, it is desirable to limit uncertain test results as secondary test findings. Therefore, we recommend a more targeted assay, such as e.g. QF-PCR, as a replacement of the STC and to provide parents the autonomy to choose between karyotyping and QF-PCR.

  4. Is Mars Sample Return Required Prior to Sending Humans to Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael; Abell, Paul; Allwood, Abigail; Baker, John; Barnes, Jeff; Bass, Deborah; Beaty, David; Boston, Penny; Brinkerhoff, Will; Budney, Charles; Charles, John; Delory, Greg; Desai, Prasun; DesMarais, David; Drake, Brett; Hamilton, Victoria; Head, Jim; Heldmann, Jen; Hoffman, Steve; Kass, David; Lim, Darlene; Meyer, Michael; Munk, Michelle; Murchie, Scott; Rivkin, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Prior to potentially sending humans to the surface of Mars, it is fundamentally important to return samples from Mars. Analysis in Earth's extensive scientific laboratories would significantly reduce the risk of human Mars exploration and would also support the science and engineering decisions relating to the Mars human flight architecture. The importance of measurements of any returned Mars samples range from critical to desirable, and in all cases these samples will would enhance our understanding of the Martian environment before potentially sending humans to that alien locale. For example, Mars sample return (MSR) could yield information that would enable human exploration related to 1) enabling forward and back planetary protection, 2) characterizing properties of Martian materials relevant for in situ resource utilization (ISRU), 3) assessing any toxicity of Martian materials with respect to human health and performance, and 4) identifying information related to engineering surface hazards such as the corrosive effect of the Martian environment. In addition, MSR would be engineering 'proof of concept' for a potential round trip human mission to the planet, and a potential model for international Mars exploration.

  5. Rapid Isolation and Determination of Flavones in Biological Samples Using Zinc Complexation Coupled with High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenghe; Wang, Hecheng; Wang, Yingping; Xiao, Shengyuan

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll-type contaminants are commonly encountered in the isolation and determination of flavones of plant aerial plant parts. Heme is also a difficult background substance in whole blood analysis. Both chlorophyll and heme are porphyrin type compounds. In this study, a rapid method for isolating flavones with 5-hydroxyl or ortho-hydroxyl groups from biological samples was developed based on the different solubilities of porphyrin-metal and flavone-metal complexes. It is important that other background substances, e.g., proteins and lipids, are also removed from flavones without an additional processing. The recoveries of scutellarin, baicalin, baicalein, wogonoside and wogonin, which are the primary constituents of Scutellaria baicalensis (skullcaps) were 99.65% ± 1.02%, 98.98% ± 0.73%, 99.65% ± 0.03%, 97.59% ± 0.09% and 95.19% ± 0.47%, respectively. As a sample pretreatment procedure, this method was coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with good separation, sensitivity and linearity and was applied to determine the flavone content in different aerial parts of S. baicalensis and in dried blood spot samples. PMID:27537870

  6. Rapid Isolation and Determination of Flavones in Biological Samples Using Zinc Complexation Coupled with High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenghe Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll-type contaminants are commonly encountered in the isolation and determination of flavones of plant aerial plant parts. Heme is also a difficult background substance in whole blood analysis. Both chlorophyll and heme are porphyrin type compounds. In this study, a rapid method for isolating flavones with 5-hydroxyl or ortho-hydroxyl groups from biological samples was developed based on the different solubilities of porphyrin-metal and flavone-metal complexes. It is important that other background substances, e.g., proteins and lipids, are also removed from flavones without an additional processing. The recoveries of scutellarin, baicalin, baicalein, wogonoside and wogonin, which are the primary constituents of Scutellaria baicalensis (skullcaps were 99.65% ± 1.02%, 98.98% ± 0.73%, 99.65% ± 0.03%, 97.59% ± 0.09% and 95.19% ± 0.47%, respectively. As a sample pretreatment procedure, this method was coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with good separation, sensitivity and linearity and was applied to determine the flavone content in different aerial parts of S. baicalensis and in dried blood spot samples.

  7. Quantitation of enniatins in biological samples of Wistar rats after oral administration by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrivá, Laura; Font, Guillermina; Manyes, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The emerging Fusarium mycotoxins enniatins (ENNs) have diverse biological properties, mainly due to their ionophoric activity, and represent a potential risk to human and animal health since they are commonly found in food and feed. In vivo toxicity studies are scarce and limited to the major mycotoxins. Until now, any method for the simultaneous analysis of these compounds in plasma, serum and feces from rat has been reported. A method for the extraction and determination of ENNs A, A1, B and B1 from Wistar rat samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been developed. The method was successfully validated with satisfactory recoveries (70-106%), good intraday (rat samples that were administered a mixture of ENNs containing 1.19, 2.16, 1.03 and 1.41 mg/kg body weight of ENN A, A1, B and B1, respectively. Blood, urine and feces samples collected every 2 h during the 8-h duration of the experiment were analyzed. The administered dose of the mixture of ENNs did not cause observable adverse effects on the animals. ENNs concentrations detected in serum and urine were below LOQs. The four ENNs were detected in feces reaching the maximum concentration at 6 h after administration.

  8. Determination of the samples required of water-sensitive paper in experiments related spray technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Ballarotti Nascimento

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The raise in the numbers of samples increase the confidence level of the results. However little is know about the minimum number of water-sensitive papers cards that must be used in studies of spray technology. Thus, the aim of this paper was to determine the minimum number of water-sensitive papers cards used in spray experiments, based on the variables: percentage of coverage, number of drops per cm2 and volume median diameter (VMD. It were realized an experiment in factorial design 2x2 with five replicates, each containing 36 cards. With the objective to have variability among the treatments, the factors involveed were nozzles (TR110-01 and ULD120-015 and operational pressures (138 and 276 kPa, because the size of droplets is modified even by the nozzle as by operational pressures. As estimative precision, the mean errors assumed was 20%, 15% and 10%, that generated numbers of samples as: 7, 12 and 26, respectively, for percentage of coverage; 5, 8 and 16, respectively, for number of drops per cm2; and 1.2 and 4 respectively, for volume median diameter (VMD. Analysis of variance complemented by Tukey test at 5% probability were realized for the average of 36 cards and the average of the minimum number of papers (samples determined. Comparing statically the averages obtained in the experiment for each variable for n=36 samples and n= samples determined at 20% error, noted that the results are identical in both situations, demonstrating that spray rates and different droplet sizes influenced directly in the parameters evaluated. It is possible to conclude that the minimum number of water-sensitive papers cards per repetition (1 m2 for this experiment is 7,5, and 1 for percentage of coverage, number of droplet per cm2 and volume median diameter (VMD, respectively.

  9. Assessment of selenium and mercury in biological samples of normal and night blindness children of age groups (3-7) and (8-12) years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Talpur, Farah Naz; Kazi, Atif; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Khan, Naeemullah; Arain, Mariam Shazadi; Ali, Jamshed

    2015-03-01

    The causes of night blindness in children are multifactorial and particular consideration has been given to childhood nutritional deficiency, which is the most common problem found in underdeveloped countries. Such deficiency can result in physiological and pathological processes that in turn influence biological sample composition. This study was designed to compare the levels of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) in scalp hair, blood, and urine of night blindness children age ranged (3-7) and (8-12) years of both genders, comparing them to sex- and age-matched controls. A microwave-assisted wet acid digestion procedure was developed as a sample pretreatment for the determination of Se and Hg in biological samples of night blindness children. The proposed method was validated by using conventional wet digestion and certified reference samples of hair, blood, and urine. The Se and Hg in biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to microwave acid digestion, respectively. The concentration of Se was decreased in scalp hair and blood samples of male and female night blindness children while Hg was higher in all biological samples as compared to referent subjects. The Se concentration was inversely associated with the risk of night blindness in both genders. These results add to an increasing body of evidence that Se is a protecting element for night blindness. These data present guidance to clinicians and other professional investigating deficiency of essential micronutrients in biological samples (scalp hair and blood) of night blindness children. PMID:25655123

  10. Solvent-dependent turn-on probe for dual monitoring of Ag+ and Zn2+ in living biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A solvent-dependent probe was presented for dual monitoring of Ag+ and Zn2+. • The probe exhibited special selectivity and sensitivity at physiological range. • The mechanism was investigated both experimentally and computationally. • The probe was highly suitable for mapping Ag+ and Zn2+ in biological samples. - Abstract: A novel, solvent-dependent “off–on” probe with benzoylthiourea moiety as the functional receptor and fluorescein as the fluorophore was designed for monitoring of Ag+ in EtOH–H2O (2:8, v/v) solution and Zn2+ in CH3CN–H2O (2:8, v/v) solution at physiological range with sufficient selectivity and sensitivity. The Ag+ promoted desulfurization of thiosemicarbazide functionality in formation of the 1,3,4-oxadiazole and the coordination of Zn2+ to the O atom and N atom of the spoirolactam moiety and the S atom of the benzoylthiourea moiety were investigated to be the power that promoted the fluorescent enhancement. This probe was tested highly suitable for mapping Ag+ and Zn2+ in living human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells and microbial cell–EPS–mineral aggregates, thus, providing a wonderful candidate for tracking Ag+ and Zn2+ in biological organisms and processes

  11. Global requirements for DNA sample collections: results of a survey of 204 ethics committees in 40 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, D S; Broderick, E D; Tchelet, A; Hong, F; Mayevsky, S; Mohr, D M; Schaffer, M E; Warner, A W; Hakkulinen, P; Snapir, A

    2011-04-01

    The Industry Pharmacogenomics Working Group has an interest in attaining a better understanding of global requirements for sample collections intended for pharmacogenetics research. To have adequately powered pharmacogenetics studies representative of the clinical trial population, it is important to collect DNA samples from a majority of consenting study participants under many institutional review board/ethics committee (IRB/EC) jurisdictions. A survey was distributed to gather information from local and central IRBs/ECs. The survey included questions related to the approval of pharmacogenetics studies, collection and banking of samples, and return of data to subjects. A total of 204 responses were received from global IRBs/ECs with pharmacogenetic experience. The data show that requirements for approval of pharmacogenetic research differ between IRBs/ECs within and between countries but not between regions of the United States. A better understanding of differing requirements should facilitate global sample collection of DNA for pharmacogenetics research and may provide the basis for harmonized regulations for collection of genetic samples in the future. PMID:21346753

  12. Sample requirements and design of an inter-laboratory trial for radiocarbon laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, C.; Carmi, [No Value; Cook, G; Gulliksen, S; Harkness, D; Heinemeier, J.; McGee, E.; Naysmith, P.; G. Possnert; van der Plicht, H; VAN STRYDONCK, M; Carmi, Israel

    2000-01-01

    An on-going inter-comparison programme which is focused on assessing and establishing consensus protocols to be applied in the identification, selection and sub-sampling of materials for subsequent C-14 analysis is described. The outcome of the programme will provide a detailed quantification of the uncertainties associated with C-14 measurements including the issues of accuracy and precision. Such projects have become recognised as a fundamental aspect of continuing laboratory quality assura...

  13. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Tatiane De A.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2005-06-01

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 °C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3σB) of 6 and 40 ng g-1, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H2O2 and HNO3. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  14. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranhao, Tatiane de A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: daniel@qmc.ufsc.br; Veiga, Marcia A.M.S. da [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05513-970, CP 26077, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curtius, Adilson J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2005-06-30

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 deg. C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 deg. C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3{sigma} {sub B}) of 6 and 40 ng g{sup -1}, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3}. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  15. Development of ultrasound-assisted extraction for mercury speciation studies in biological samples using HPLC-ID-ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient and simple ultrasound-assisted extraction method has been developed to determine inorganic and methyl mercury in biological samples by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ID- ICP-MS). The operational parameters of ultrasound-assisted extraction, such as extractant composition, sonication time and extraction temperature, were optimized. The interconversion between CH3198Hg+ and 198Hg2+ during the operation was monitored by isotopic mercury-198 tracer technique. The efficiency of the extraction of inorganic and methyl mercury in biological samples was evaluated by total mercury determination using inductively coupled plasmas mass spectrometry. The best optimal extraction parameters are 30 minutes at 50 degree C for sonication using 0.05% (m/v) cysteine and 0.05% (v/v) 2-mercaptoethanol as extractant. The recovery of inorganic and methyl mercury was validated by four certified reference materials, including IAEA MA-B-3/TM tuna fish, NIST 1566a bovine liver, IAEA 350 fish mussel and GBW 07601 human hair. As for speciation study, a key point is that the original elemental speciation should be kept during the processing. Therefore, the above four certified reference materials spiked with CH3198Hg+ and 198Hg2+ were used to investigate the interconversion of methyl mercury into inorganic mercury or vice versa during the extraction. The CH3198Hg+ and 198Hg2+ were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The data show that the interconversion between CH3198Hg+ and 198Hg2+ during the operation is negligible. This extraction method is more simple and convenient than the common used ones and is more suitable for simultaneous determination of inorganic and methyl mercury by HPLC-ICP-MS technique.

  16. Sample Size Requirements for Estimation of Item Parameters in the Multidimensional Graded Response Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shengyu; Wang, Chun; Weiss, David J

    2016-01-01

    Likert types of rating scales in which a respondent chooses a response from an ordered set of response options are used to measure a wide variety of psychological, educational, and medical outcome variables. The most appropriate item response theory model for analyzing and scoring these instruments when they provide scores on multiple scales is the multidimensional graded response model (MGRM) A simulation study was conducted to investigate the variables that might affect item parameter recovery for the MGRM. Data were generated based on different sample sizes, test lengths, and scale intercorrelations. Parameter estimates were obtained through the flexMIRT software. The quality of parameter recovery was assessed by the correlation between true and estimated parameters as well as bias and root-mean-square-error. Results indicated that for the vast majority of cases studied a sample size of N = 500 provided accurate parameter estimates, except for tests with 240 items when 1000 examinees were necessary to obtain accurate parameter estimates. Increasing sample size beyond N = 1000 did not increase the accuracy of MGRM parameter estimates. PMID:26903916

  17. Sample Size Requirements for Estimation of Item Parameters in the Multidimensional Graded Response Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu eJiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Likert types of rating scales in which a respondent chooses a response from an ordered set of response options are used to measure a wide variety of psychological, educational, and medical outcome variables. The most appropriate item response theory model for analyzing and scoring these instruments when they provide scores on multiple scales is the multidimensional graded response model (MGRM. A simulation study was conducted to investigate the variables that might affect item parameter recovery for the MGRM. Data were generated based on different sample sizes, test lengths, and scale intercorrelations. Parameter estimates were obtained through the flexiMIRT software. The quality of parameter recovery was assessed by the correlation between true and estimated parameters as well as bias and root- mean-square-error. Results indicated that for the vast majority of cases studied a sample size of N = 500 provided accurate parameter estimates, except for tests with 240 items when 1,000 examinees were necessary to obtain accurate parameter estimates. Increasing sample size beyond N = 1,000 did not increase the accuracy of MGRM parameter estimates.

  18. Determination of As, Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb in biological samples by modern electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardans, Jordi, E-mail: j.sardans@creaf.uab.ca [Ecophysiological and Global Change Unit CSIC-CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain); Montes, Fernando [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), C/ Senda del Rey 9. 28040 Madrid (Spain); Penuelas, Josep [Ecophysiological and Global Change Unit CSIC-CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    of this technique that reaches figures of merit equivalent to Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Herein is presented an overview of recent advances and applications of (ETAAS) for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb in biological samples drawn from studies over the last decade.

  19. Evaluation of non-invasive biological samples to monitor Staphylococcus aureus colonization in great apes and lemurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Schaumburg

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Reintroduction of endangered animals as part of conservational programs bears the risk of importing human pathogens from the sanctuary to the natural habitat. One bacterial pathogen that serves as a model organism to analyze this transmission is Staphylococcus aureus as it can colonize and infect both humans and animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of various biological samples to monitor S. aureus colonization in great apes and lemurs. METHODS: Mucosal swabs from wild lemurs (n=25, Kirindy, Madagascar, feces, oral and genital swabs from captive chimpanzees (n=58, Ngamba and Entebbe, Uganda and fruit wadges and feces from wild chimpanzees (n=21, Taï National Parc, Côte d'Ivoire were screened for S. aureus. Antimicrobial resistance and selected virulence factors were tested for each isolate. Sequence based genotyping (spa typing, multilocus sequence typing was applied to assess the population structure of S. aureus. RESULTS: Oro-pharyngeal carriage of S. aureus was high in lemurs (72%, n=18 and captive chimpanzees (69.2%, n=27 and 100%, n=6, respectively. Wild chimpanzees shed S. aureus through feces (43.8, n=7 and fruit wadges (54.5, n=12. Analysis of multiple sampling revealed that two samples are sufficient to detect those animals which shed S. aureus through feces or fruit wadges. Genotyping showed that captive animals are more frequently colonized with human-associated S. aureus lineages. CONCLUSION: Oro-pharyngeal swabs are useful to screen for S. aureus colonization in apes and lemurs before reintroduction. Duplicates of stool and fruit wadges reliably detect S. aureus shedding in wild chimpanzees. We propose to apply these sampling strategies in future reintroduction programs to screen for S. aureus colonization. They may also be useful to monitor S. aureus in wild populations.

  20. Pre-Mission Input Requirements to Enable Successful Sample Collection by A Remote Field/EVA Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. A.; Lim, D. S. S.; Young, K. E.; Brunner, A.; Elphic, R. E.; Horne, A.; Kerrigan, M. C.; Osinski, G. R.; Skok, J. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Saint-Jacques, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team, part of the Solar System Exploration Virtual Institute (SSERVI), is a field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids, Phobos and Deimos, and beyond. In contract to other technology-driven NASA analog studies, The FINESSE WCIS activity is science-focused and, moreover, is sampling-focused with the explicit intent to return the best samples for geochronology studies in the laboratory. We used the FINESSE field excursion to the West Clearwater Lake Impact structure (WCIS) as an opportunity to test factors related to sampling decisions. We examined the in situ sample characterization and real-time decision-making process of the astronauts, with a guiding hypothesis that pre-mission training that included detailed background information on the analytical fate of a sample would better enable future astronauts to select samples that would best meet science requirements. We conducted three tests of this hypothesis over several days in the field. Our investigation was designed to document processes, tools and procedures for crew sampling of planetary targets. This was not meant to be a blind, controlled test of crew efficacy, but rather an effort to explicitly recognize the relevant variables that enter into sampling protocol and to be able to develop recommendations for crew and backroom training in future endeavors.

  1. Quantum Measurements for Graph Isomorphism Require Entanglement: Tight Results on Multiregister Fourier Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Cristopher; Moore, Cristopher; Russell, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Recently, Moore, Russell and Schulman showed that quantum measurements of single coset states in the symmetric group yield exponentially little information about the Hidden Subgroup Problem in the case relevant to Graph Isomorphism. Extending their techniques to multiregister Fourier sampling, Moore and Russell showed that entangled measurements over pairs of registers yield superpolynomially little information, and conjectured that entangled measurements over $\\Theta(n \\log n)$ registers are necessary. Here we prove this conjecture. This significantly restricts the types of possible quantum algorithms for Graph Isomorphism.

  2. Voltammetric method for sensitive determination of herbicide picloram in environmental and biological samples using boron-doped diamond film electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The voltammetric behavior and determination of picloram, a member of a pyridine herbicide family, was for the first time investigated on a boron doped diamond film electrode using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. The influence of supporting electrolyte and scan rate on the current response of picloram was examined to select the optimum experimental conditions. It was found that picloram provided one well-shaped oxidation peak at very positive potential (+1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl electrode) in strong acidic medium. At optimized differential pulse voltammetric parameters, the current response of picloram was proportionally linear in the concentration range from 0.5 to 48.07 μmol L−1 and the low limit of detection of 70 nmol L−1 as well as good repeatability (relative standard deviation of 2.6% at 10 μmol L−1 for n = 11) were obtained on unmodified boron-doped diamond film electrode. The proposed method was successfully applied in analysis of environmental (tap and natural water) and biological (human urine) samples spiked with picloram with good accuracy (relative standard deviations less than 5% for all samples, n = 5). By this way, the boron-doped diamond could introduce a green (environmentally acceptable) alternative to mercury electrodes for the monitoring of herbicides

  3. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry combination for copper(II) ion in environmental and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, Ardeshir [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ashokrollahi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Mehrorang [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Hossaini, Omid; Khanjari, Narges [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soylak, Mustafa [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-12-30

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper(II) ion in various samples. After complexation by 4-(phenyl diazenyl) benzene-1,3-diamine (PDBDM) (chrysoidine), copper(II) ions were quantitatively recovered in Triton X-114 after centrifugation. 0.5 ml of methanol acidified with 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The influence of analytical parameters including ligand, Triton X-114 and HNO{sub 3} concentrations, bath temperature, heating time, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. The effect of the matrix ions on the recovery of copper(II) ions was investigated. The detection limit (3S.D.{sub b}/m, n = 10) of 0.6 ng mL{sup -1} along with preconcentration factor of 30 and enrichment factor of 41.1 with R.S.D. of 1.0% for Cu was achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of various environmental and biological samples.

  4. Chemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Biological, Precipitate, and Water Samples from Abandoned Copper Mines in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Randolph A.; Munk, LeeAnn

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In the early 20th century, approximately 6 million metric tons of copper ore were mined from numerous deposits located along the shorelines of fjords and islands in Prince William Sound, Alaska. At the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites (fig. 1), rocks containing Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb sulfide minerals are exposed to chemical weathering in abandoned mine workings and remnant waste piles that extend into the littoral zone. Field investigations in 2003 and 2005 as well as analytical data for rock, sediment, precipitate, water, and biological samples reveal that the oxidation of sulfides at these sites is resulting in the generation of acid mine drainage and the transport of metals into the marine environment (Koski and others, 2008; Stillings and others, 2008). At the Ellamar and Threeman sites, plumes of acidic and metal-enriched water are flowing through beach gravels into the shallow offshore environment. Interstitial water samples collected from beach sediment at Ellamar have low pH levels (to ~3) and high concentrations of metals including iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, lead, and mercury. The abundant precipitation of the iron sulfate mineral jarosite in the Ellamar gravels also signifies a low-pH environment. At the Beatson mine site (the largest copper mine in the region) seeps containing iron-rich microbial precipitates drain into the intertidal zone below mine dumps (Foster and others, 2008). A stream flowing down to the shoreline from underground mine workings at Beatson has near-neutral pH, but elevated levels of zinc, copper, and lead (Stillings and others, 2008). Offshore sediment samples at Beatson are enriched in these metals. Preliminary chemical data for tissue from marine mussels collected near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson sites reveal elevated levels of copper, zinc, and lead compared to tissue in mussels from other locations in Prince William Sound (Koski and others, 2008). Three papers presenting results of this ongoing

  5. 9 CFR 113.53 - Requirements for ingredients of animal origin used for production of biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... period. All but the last subculture shall result in at least one new monolayer of at least 75 cm2. The last subculture shall meet the minimum area requirements specified in §§ 113.46 and 113.47....

  6. Stable isotope gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination of aminoethylcysteine ketimine decarboxylated dimer in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Evans, Christopher E; Denton, Travis T; Mitschke, Anja; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Pinto, John T; Khomenko, Tetyana; Szabo, Sandor; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2012-11-01

    Aminoethylcysteine ketimine decarboxylated dimer (AECK-DD; systematic name: 1,2-3,4-5,6-7,8-octahydro-1,8a-diaza-4,6-dithiafluoren-9(8aH)-one) is a previously described metabolite of cysteamine that has been reported to be present in mammalian brain, urine, plasma, and cells in culture and vegetables and to possess potent antioxidative properties. Here, we describe a stable isotope gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method for specific and sensitive determination of AECK-DD in biological samples. (13)C(2)-labeled AECK-DD was synthesized and used as the internal standard. Derivatization was carried out by N-pentafluorobenzylation with pentafluorobenzyl bromide in acetonitrile. Quantification was performed by selected reaction monitoring of the mass transitions m/z 328 to 268 for AECK-DD and m/z 330 to 270 for [(13)C(2)]AECK-DD in the electron capture negative ion chemical ionization mode. The procedure was systematically validated for human plasma and urine samples. AECK-DD was not detectable in human plasma above approximately 4nM but was present in urine samples of healthy humans at a maximal concentration of 46nM. AECK-DD was detectable in rat brain at very low levels of approximately 8pmol/g wet weight. Higher levels of AECK-DD were detected in mouse brain (∼1nmol/g wet weight). Among nine dietary vegetables evaluated, only shallots were found to contain trace amounts of AECK-DD (∼6.8pmol/g fresh tissue). PMID:22858756

  7. Analysis of proteins in biological samples by capillary sieving electrophoresis with postcolumn derivatization/laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, Takashi; Ogura, Takehito; Imasaka, Totaro

    2011-04-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated postcolumn derivatization of proteins separated by capillary sieving electrophoresis (CSE), in which naphthalene-2,3-dicarbaldehyde was employed as a fluorogenic labeling reagent. Standard proteins separated by CSE were reacted with naphthalene-2,3-dicarbaldehyde in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) which plays a role of a reducing agent in the derivatization reaction. To improve the sensitivity, we attempted the use of ethanethiol instead of 2-ME. Ethanethiol showed 1.4- to 4.5-fold lower limits of detection for proteins than 2-ME. Furthermore, we found that 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS) is a good marker for relative electrophoretic mobilities of proteins in CSE. Since APTS is a fluorescent and trivalent anion, it generates strong fluorescence and migrates faster than any of the proteins. Therefore, we employed APTS as a marker to obtain the relative electrophoretic mobilities of proteins. The present method was applied to the analyses of proteins in biological samples. Human Ewing's family tumor cell line 'RDES' was used as a sample. The cultured cells were lysed with a buffer containing Tris-HCl, NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and 2-ME. After denaturation, the lysate was directly introduced into the capillary. Several peaks, which would correspond to proteins with molecular mass ranging from 10 to 93 kDa, were found in the cell lysate. In addition, we measured a milk sample by the CSE with postcolumn derivatization. The electropherogram showed five major peaks which corresponded to α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, κ-casein, bovine serum albumin, and mixture of α- and β-casein. PMID:21449073

  8. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  9. Design and development of a miniaturised total chemical analysis system for on-line lactate and glucose monitoring in biological samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dempsey, Eithne; Diamond, Dermot; Smyth, Malcolm R.; Urban, Gerald; Jobst, Gerhard; Moser, Isabella; Verpoorte, Elisabeth M.J.; Manz, Andreas; Widmer, H. Michael; Rabenstein, Kai; Freaney, Rosemarie

    1997-01-01

    A miniaturised Total chemical Analysis System (μTAS) for glucose and lactate measurement in biological samples constructed based on an integrated microdialysis sampling and detection system. The complete system incorporates a microdialysis probe for intravascular monitoring in an ex vivo mini-shunt

  10. Regional insect inventories require long time, extensive spatial sampling and good will.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fattorini

    Full Text Available Understanding how faunistic knowledge develops is of paramount importance to correctly evaluate completeness of insect inventories and to plan future research at regional scale, yet this is an unexplored issue. Aim of this paper was to investigate the processes that lead to a complete species inventory at a regional level for a beetle family. The tenebionid beetles of Latium region (Italy were analysed as a case study representative of general situations. A comprehensive faunistic database including 3,561 records spanning from 1871 to 2010 was realized examining 25,349 museum specimens and published data. Accumulation curves and non-parametric estimators of species richness were applied to model increase in faunistic knowledge over time, through space and by collectors' number. Long time, large spatial extent and contribution of many collectors were needed to obtain a reliable species inventory. Massive sampling was not effective in recovering more species. Amateur naturalists (here called parafaunists were more efficient collectors than professional entomologists. Museum materials collected by parafaunists over long periods and large spatial extent resulted to be a cost effective source of faunistic information with small number of collected individuals. It is therefore important to valuate and facilitate the work of parafaunists as already suggested for parataxonomists. By contrast, massive collections by standardized techniques for ecological research seem to be of scarce utility in improving faunistic knowledge, but their value for faunistic studies may be enhanced if they are conducted in poorly surveyed areas.

  11. Ultra-trace determination of arsenic species in environmental waters, food and biological samples using a modified aluminum oxide nanoparticle sorbent and AAS detection after multivariate optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple and efficient method for solid phase extraction and speciation of trace quantities of arsenic. It is based on the use of functionalized aluminum oxide nanoparticles and does not require any oxidation or reduction steps. The experimental parameters affecting extraction and quantitation were optimized using fractional factorial design methods. Adsorbed arsenic was eluted from the sorbent with 1 M hydrochloric acid and determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Preconcentration factors up to 750 were achieved depending on the sample volume. Studies on potential interferences by various anions and cations showed the method to be highly selective. Under optimum conditions, the calibration plots are linear in the 5.0 to 280 ng L−1 and 8.0 to 260 ng L−1 concentration ranges for As(III) and total arsenic, respectively. The detection limits (calculated for S/N ratios of 3) are 1.81 and 1.97 ng L−1 for As(III) and total arsenic, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination and speciation of arsenic in (spiked) environmental, food and biological samples and gave good recoveries. The method was validated using a certified geological reference material. (author)

  12. Soft robotic arm inspired by the octopus: I. From biological functions to artificial requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margheri, L; Laschi, C; Mazzolai, B

    2012-06-01

    Octopuses are molluscs that belong to the group Cephalopoda. They lack joints and rigid links, and as a result, their arms possess virtually limitless freedom of movement. These flexible appendages exhibit peculiar biomechanical features such as stiffness control, compliance, and high flexibility and dexterity. Studying the capabilities of the octopus arm is a complex task that presents a challenge for both biologists and roboticists, the latter of whom draw inspiration from the octopus in designing novel technologies within soft robotics. With this idea in mind, in this study, we used new, purposively developed methods of analysing the octopus arm in vivo to create new biologically inspired design concepts. Our measurements showed that the octopus arm can elongate by 70% in tandem with a 23% diameter reduction and exhibits an average pulling force of 40 N. The arm also exhibited a 20% mean shortening at a rate of 17.1 mm s(-1) and a longitudinal stiffening rate as high as 2 N (mm s)(-1). Using histology and ultrasounds, we investigated the functional morphology of the internal tissues, including the sinusoidal arrangement of the nerve cord and the local insertion points of the longitudinal and transverse muscle fibres. The resulting information was used to create novel design principles and specifications that can in turn be used in developing a new soft robotic arm.

  13. Processes and procedures for a worldwide biological samples distribution; product assurance and logistic activities to support the mice drawer system tissue sharing event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Mario; Cotronei, Vittorio

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is a scientific payload developed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), it hosted 6 mice on the International Space Station (ISS) and re-entered on ground on November 28, 2009 with the STS 129 at KSC. Linked to the MDS experiment, a Tissue Sharing Program (TSP), was developed in order to make available to 16 Payload Investigators (PI) (located in USA, Canada, EU -Italy, Belgium and Germany -and Japan) the biological samples coming from the mice. ALTEC SpA (a PPP owned by ASI, TAS-I and local institutions) was responsible to support the logistics aspects of the MDS samples for the first MDS mission, in the frame of Italian Space Agency (ASI) OSMA program (OSteoporosis and Muscle Atrophy). The TSP resulted in a complex scenario, as ASI, progressively, extended the original OSMA Team also to researchers from other ASI programs and from other Agencies (ESA, NASA, JAXA). The science coordination was performed by the University of Genova (UNIGE). ALTEC has managed all the logistic process with the support of a specialized freight forwarder agent during the whole shipping operation phases. ALTEC formalized all the steps from the handover of samples by the dissection Team to the packaging and shipping process in a dedicated procedure. ALTEC approached all the work in a structured way, performing: A study of the aspects connected to international shipments of biological samples. A coopera-tive work with UNIGE/ASI /PIs to identify all the needs of the various researchers and their compatibility. A complete revision and integration of shipment requirements (addresses, tem-peratures, samples, materials and so on). A complete definition of the final shipment scenario in terms of boxes, content, refrigerant and requirements. A formal approach to identification and selection of the most suited and specialized Freight Forwarder. A clear identification of all the processes from sample dissection by PI Team, sample processing, freezing, tube preparation

  14. METHODS FOR DETERMINING AGITATOR MIXING REQUIREMENTS FOR A MIXING & SAMPLING FACILITY TO FEED WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN PW

    2009-08-27

    The following report is a summary of work conducted to evaluate the ability of existing correlative techniques and alternative methods to accurately estimate impeller speed and power requirements for mechanical mixers proposed for use in a mixing and sampling facility (MSF). The proposed facility would accept high level waste sludges from Hanford double-shell tanks and feed uniformly mixed high level waste to the Waste Treatment Plant. Numerous methods are evaluated and discussed, and resulting recommendations provided.

  15. Chemical derivatization for enhancing sensitivity during LC/ESI-MS/MS quantification of steroids in biological samples: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Shoujiro

    2016-09-01

    Sensitive and specific methods for the detection, characterization and quantification of endogenous steroids in body fluids or tissues are necessary for the diagnosis, pathological analysis and treatment of many diseases. Recently, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) has been widely used for these purposes due to its specificity and versatility. However, the ESI efficiency and fragmentation behavior of some steroids are poor, which lead to a low sensitivity. Chemical derivatization is one of the most effective methods to improve the detection characteristics of steroids in ESI-MS/MS. Based on this background, this article reviews the recent advances in chemical derivatization for the trace quantification of steroids in biological samples by LC/ESI-MS/MS. The derivatization in ESI-MS/MS is based on tagging a proton-affinitive or permanently charged moiety on the target steroid. Introduction/formation of a fragmentable moiety suitable for the selected reaction monitoring by the derivatization also enhances the sensitivity. The stable isotope-coded derivatization procedures for the steroid analysis are also described. PMID:26454158

  16. Programmable selected ion monitoring for quantitative analysis of biological samples with a GC-MS-computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximum sensitivity of a mass spectrometer used as a detector for a gas chromatograph can be achieved by monitoring only the ion current at a single mass per charge. However, greater confidence in the analytical results can be achieved by monitoring at least 2 ions from a compound of interest. Since a biological sample may contain several different compounds of interest, it may be desirable to monitor as many as 8 to 12 different ions so that all components may be quantified. However, the greater the number of ions monitored, the poorer the signal to noise ratio available for monitoring any given ion current. A compromise between obtaining maximum sensitivity and confidence in analytical results can be achieved by monitoring only 2 or 3 ions during any given time interval of the gas chromatogram when the corresponding compounds are expected to emerge from the GC. This procedure is illustrated with a computer (PDP-12A)-controlled dodecapole gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer with analyses of prostaglandins and biogenic amines

  17. The requirement for proper storage of nuclear and related decommissioning samples to safeguard accuracy of tritium data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeji; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E

    2012-04-30

    Large volumes of potentially tritium-contaminated waste materials are generated during nuclear decommissioning that require accurate characterisation prior to final waste sentencing. The practice of initially determining a radionuclide waste fingerprint for materials from an operational area is often used to save time and money but tritium cannot be included because of its tendency to be chemically mobile. This mobility demands a specific measurement for tritium and also poses a challenge in terms of sampling, storage and reliable analysis. This study shows that the extent of any tritium redistribution during storage will depend on its form or speciation and the physical conditions of storage. Any weakly or moderately bound tritium (e.g. adsorbed water, waters of hydration or crystallisation) may be variably lost at temperatures over the range 100-300 °C whereas for more strongly bound tritium (e.g. chemically bound or held in mineral lattices) the liberation temperature can be delayed up to 800 °C. For tritium that is weakly held the emanation behaviour at different temperatures becomes particularly important. The degree of (3)H loss and cross-contamination that can arise after sampling and before analysis can be reduced by appropriate storage. Storing samples in vapour tight containers at the point of sampling, the use of triple enclosures, segregating high activity samples and using a freezer all lead to good analytical practice. PMID:22405609

  18. FACE Analysis as a Fast and Reliable Methodology to Monitor the Sulfation and Total Amount of Chondroitin Sulfate in Biological Samples of Clinical Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Karousou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs due to their hydrophilic character and high anionic charge densities play important roles in various (pathophysiological processes. The identification and quantification of GAGs in biological samples and tissues could be useful prognostic and diagnostic tools in pathological conditions. Despite the noteworthy progress in the development of sensitive and accurate methodologies for the determination of GAGs, there is a significant lack in methodologies regarding sample preparation and reliable fast analysis methods enabling the simultaneous analysis of several biological samples. In this report, developed protocols for the isolation of GAGs in biological samples were applied to analyze various sulfated chondroitin sulfate- and hyaluronan-derived disaccharides using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE. Applications to biologic samples of clinical importance include blood serum, lens capsule tissue and urine. The sample preparation protocol followed by FACE analysis allows quantification with an optimal linearity over the concentration range 1.0–220.0 µg/mL, affording a limit of quantitation of 50 ng of disaccharides. Validation of FACE results was performed by capillary electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography techniques.

  19. The requirement for proper storage of nuclear and related decommissioning samples to safeguard accuracy of tritium data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daeji, E-mail: kimdj@kins.re.kr [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Guseong, Yuseong, Daejeon, 303-338 (Korea, Republic of); Croudace, Ian W.; Warwick, Phillip E. [GAU-Radioanalytical, University of Southampton, NOC, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of variation in tritium loss rates in concrete samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of variation in tritium loss rates under different storage conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of tritium cross-contamination rates for a range of matrix types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Storage strategies for routine waste characterisation involving tritium. - Abstract: Large volumes of potentially tritium-contaminated waste materials are generated during nuclear decommissioning that require accurate characterisation prior to final waste sentencing. The practice of initially determining a radionuclide waste fingerprint for materials from an operational area is often used to save time and money but tritium cannot be included because of its tendency to be chemically mobile. This mobility demands a specific measurement for tritium and also poses a challenge in terms of sampling, storage and reliable analysis. This study shows that the extent of any tritium redistribution during storage will depend on its form or speciation and the physical conditions of storage. Any weakly or moderately bound tritium (e.g. adsorbed water, waters of hydration or crystallisation) may be variably lost at temperatures over the range 100-300 Degree-Sign C whereas for more strongly bound tritium (e.g. chemically bound or held in mineral lattices) the liberation temperature can be delayed up to 800 Degree-Sign C. For tritium that is weakly held the emanation behaviour at different temperatures becomes particularly important. The degree of {sup 3}H loss and cross-contamination that can arise after sampling and before analysis can be reduced by appropriate storage. Storing samples in vapour tight containers at the point of sampling, the use of triple enclosures, segregating high activity samples and using a freezer all lead to good analytical practice.

  20. Scanning transmission ion microscopy mass measurements for quantitative trace element analysis within biological samples and validation using atomic force microscopy thickness measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devès, Guillaume; Cohen-Bouhacina, Touria; Ortega, Richard

    2004-10-01

    We used the nuclear microprobe techniques, micro-PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission), micro-RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) in order to perform the characterization of trace element content and spatial distribution within biological samples (dehydrated cultured cells, tissues). The normalization of PIXE results was usually expressed in terms of sample dry mass as determined by micro-RBS recorded simultaneously to micro-PIXE. However, the main limit of RBS mass measurement is the sample mass loss occurring during irradiation and which could be up to 30% of the initial sample mass. We present here a new methodology for PIXE normalization and quantitative analysis of trace element within biological samples based on dry mass measurement performed by mean of STIM. The validation of STIM cell mass measurements was obtained in comparison with AFM sample thickness measurements. Results indicated the reliability of STIM mass measurement performed on biological samples and suggested that STIM should be performed for PIXE normalization. Further information deriving from direct confrontation of AFM and STIM analysis could as well be obtained, like in situ measurements of cell specific gravity within cells compartment (nucleolus and cytoplasm).

  1. Scanning transmission ion microscopy mass measurements for quantitative trace element analysis within biological samples and validation using atomic force microscopy thickness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deves, Guillaume [Laboratoire de chimie nucleaire analytique et bioenvironnementale, UMR 5084, CNRS-Universite de Bordeaux 1, BP 120 Chemin du solarium, F33175 Gradignan cedex (France)]. E-mail: deves@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Cohen-Bouhacina, Touria [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 351, cours de la Liberation, F33405 Talence cedex (France); Ortega, Richard [Laboratoire de chimie nucleaire analytique et bioenvironnementale, UMR 5084, CNRS-Universite de Bordeaux 1, BP 120 Chemin du solarium, F33175 Gradignan cedex (France)

    2004-10-08

    We used the nuclear microprobe techniques, micro-PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission), micro-RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) in order to perform the characterization of trace element content and spatial distribution within biological samples (dehydrated cultured cells, tissues). The normalization of PIXE results was usually expressed in terms of sample dry mass as determined by micro-RBS recorded simultaneously to micro-PIXE. However, the main limit of RBS mass measurement is the sample mass loss occurring during irradiation and which could be up to 30% of the initial sample mass. We present here a new methodology for PIXE normalization and quantitative analysis of trace element within biological samples based on dry mass measurement performed by mean of STIM. The validation of STIM cell mass measurements was obtained in comparison with AFM sample thickness measurements. Results indicated the reliability of STIM mass measurement performed on biological samples and suggested that STIM should be performed for PIXE normalization. Further information deriving from direct confrontation of AFM and STIM analysis could as well be obtained, like in situ measurements of cell specific gravity within cells compartment (nucleolus and cytoplasm)

  2. Effect of sample preparation techniques on the concentrations and distributions of elements in biological tissues using µSRXRF: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine tissue sample preparation using chemical fixatives is known to preserve the morphology of the tissue being studied. A competitive method, cryofixation followed by freeze drying, involves no chemical agents and maintains the biological function of the tissue. The possible effects of both sample preparation techniques in terms of the distribution of bio-metals (calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) specifically) in human skin tissue samples was investigated. Micro synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (μSRXRF) was used to map bio-metal distribution in epidermal and dermal layers of human skin samples from various locations of the body that have been prepared using both techniques. For Ca, Cu and Zn, there were statistically significant differences between the epidermis and dermis using the freeze drying technique (p = 0.02, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). Also using the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique the levels of Ca, Cu and Zn, were significantly different between the epidermis and dermis layers (p = 0.03, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). However, the difference in levels of Fe between the epidermis and dermis was unclear and further analysis was required. The epidermis was further divided into two sub-layers, one mainly composed of the stratum corneum and the other deeper layer, the stratum basale. It was found that the difference between the distribution of Fe in the two epidermal layers using the freeze drying technique resulted in a statistically significant difference (p = 0.012). This same region also showed a difference in Fe using the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique (p < 0.01). The formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique also showed a difference between the deeper epidermal layer and the dermis (p < 0.01). It can be concluded that studies involving Ca, Cu and Zn might show similar results using both sample preparation techniques, however studies involving Fe would need more

  3. On the effect of experimental noise on the classification of biological samples using Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Sinead J.; Kerr, Laura T.; Domijan, Katarina; Hennelly, Bryan M.

    2016-04-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy is an optoelectronic technique that can be used to evaluate the chemical composition of biological samples and has been shown to be a powerful diagnostic tool for the investigation of various cancer related diseases including bladder, breast, and cervical cancer. Raman scattering is an inherently weak process with approximately 1 in 107 photons undergoing scattering and for this reason, noise from the recording system can have a significant impact on the quality of the signal, and its suitability for diagnostic classification. The main sources of noise in the recorded signal are shot noise, CCD dark current, and CCD readout noise. Shot noise results from the low signal photon count while dark current results from thermally generated electrons in the semiconductor pixels. Both of these noise sources are time dependent; readout noise is time independent but is inherent in each individual recording and results in the fundamental limit of measurement, arising from the internal electronics of the camera. In this paper, each of the aforementioned noise sources are analysed in isolation, and used to experimentally validate a mathematical model. This model is then used to simulate spectra that might be acquired under various experimental conditions including the use of different cameras, different source wavelength, and power etc. Simulated noisy datasets of T24 and RT112 cell line spectra are generated based on true cell Raman spectrum irradiance values (recorded using very long exposure times) and the addition of simulated noise. These datasets are then input to multivariate classification using Principal Components Analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis. This method enables an investigation into the effect of noise on the sensitivity and specificity of Raman based classification under various experimental conditions and using different equipment.

  4. Tripodal chelating ligand-based sensor for selective determination of Zn(II) in biological and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Mehtab, Sameena; Singh, Udai P; Aggarwal, Vaibhave

    2007-08-01

    Potassium hydrotris(N-tert-butyl-2-thioimidazolyl)borate [KTtt-Bu] and potassium hydrotris(3-tert-butyl-5-isopropyl-l-pyrazolyl)borate [KTpt-Bu,i-Pr] have been synthesized and evaluated as ionophores for preparation of a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane sensor for Zn(II) ions. The effect of different plasticizers, viz. benzyl acetate (BA), dioctyl phthalate (DOP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), tributyl phosphate (TBP), and o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (o-NPOE), and the anion excluders sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB), potassium tetrakis(p-chlorophenyl)borate (KTpClPB), and oleic acid (OA) were studied to improve the performance of the membrane sensor. The best performance was obtained from a sensor with a of [KTtt-Bu] membrane of composition (mg): [KTtt-Bu] (15), PVC (150), DBP (275), and NaTPB (4). This sensor had a Nernstian response (slope, 29.4+/-0.2 mV decade of activity) for Zn2+ ions over a wide concentration range (1.4x10(-7) to 1.0x10(-1) mol L(-1)) with a limit of detection of 9.5x10(-8) mol L(-1). It had a relatively fast response time (12 s) and could be used for 3 months without substantial change of the potential. The membrane sensor had very good selectivity for Zn2+ ions over a wide variety of other cations and could be used in a working pH range of 3.5-7.8. The sensor was also found to work satisfactorily in partially non-aqueous media and could be successfully used for estimation of zinc at trace levels in biological and environmental samples. PMID:17622519

  5. Tripodal chelating ligand-based sensor for selective determination of Zn(II) in biological and environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Singh, Ashok; Mehtab, Sameena; Singh, Udai P.; Aggarwal, Vaibhave [Indian Institute of Technology-Roorkee, Department of Chemistry, Roorkee (India)

    2007-08-15

    Potassium hydrotris(N-tert-butyl-2-thioimidazolyl)borate [KTt{sup t-Bu}] and potassium hydrotris(3-tert-butyl-5-isopropyl-l-pyrazolyl)borate [KTp{sup t-Bu,i-Pr}] have been synthesized and evaluated as ionophores for preparation of a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane sensor for Zn(II) ions. The effect of different plasticizers, viz. benzyl acetate (BA), dioctyl phthalate (DOP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), tributyl phosphate (TBP), and o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (o-NPOE), and the anion excluders sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB), potassium tetrakis(p-chlorophenyl)borate (KTpClPB), and oleic acid (OA) were studied to improve the performance of the membrane sensor. The best performance was obtained from a sensor with a of [KTt{sup t-Bu}] membrane of composition (mg): [KTt{sup t-Bu}] (15), PVC (150), DBP (275), and NaTPB (4). This sensor had a Nernstian response (slope, 29.4 {+-} 0.2 mV decade of activity) for Zn{sup 2+} ions over a wide concentration range (1.4 x 10{sup -7} to 1.0 x 10{sup -1} mol L{sup -1}) with a limit of detection of 9.5 x 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1}. It had a relatively fast response time (12 s) and could be used for 3 months without substantial change of the potential. The membrane sensor had very good selectivity for Zn{sup 2+} ions over a wide variety of other cations and could be used in a working pH range of 3.5-7.8. The sensor was also found to work satisfactorily in partially non-aqueous media and could be successfully used for estimation of zinc at trace levels in biological and environmental samples. (orig.)

  6. Expanding comparative-advantage biological market models: contingency of mutualism on partners' resource requirements and acquisition trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, Jason D; Schwartz, Mark W

    2003-05-01

    We expand the comparative-advantage biological market-modelling framework to show how differences between partners, both in their abilities to acquire two resources and in their requirements for those resources, can affect the net benefit of participating in interspecific resource exchange. In addition, the benefits derived from resource trading depend strongly on the nature of the trade-off between the acquisition of one resource and the acquisition of another, described here by the shape (linear, convex or concave) of the resource acquisition constraints of the individuals involved. Combined with previous results, these analyses provide a suite of predictions about whether or not resource exchange is beneficial for two heterospecific individuals relative to a strategy of non-interaction. The benefit derived from resource exchange depends on three factors: (i) relative differences between the partners in their resource acquisition abilities; (ii) relative differences between the partners in their resource requirements; and (iii) variation in the shape of resource acquisition trade-offs. We find that such an explicit consideration of resource requirements and acquisition abilities can provide useful and sometimes non-intuitive predictions about the benefits of resource exchange, and also which resources should be traded by which species.

  7. Target and non-target screening strategies for organic contaminants, residues and illicit substances in food , environmental and human biological samples by UHPLC-QTOF-MS

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Hernández, Félix; Díaz San Pedro, Ramón; Sancho Llopis, Juan Vicente; Ibáñez Martínez, María

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we illustrate the potential of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF MS) for large scale screening of organic contaminants in different types of samples. Thanks to the full-spectrum acquisition at satisfactory sensitivity, it is feasible to apply both (post)-target and non-target approaches for the rapid qualitative screening of organic pollutants in food, biological and environmental samples. ...

  8. Experiences performed at the C:R: Saluggia of ENEA in low-level determination of plutonium in biological and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some experiences performed at the Research Center Saluggia of ENEA concerning low-level determination of plutonium in biological and environmental samples, with discussions of practical analytical problems. The main characteristics and properties of plutonium with emphasis to aqueous solutions chemistry and environmental behaviour are also reported

  9. Letter to the editor : Design-Based Versus Model-Based Sampling Strategies: Comment on R. J. Barnes' "Bounding the Required Sample Size for Geologic Site Characterization"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruijter, de J.J.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Two fundamentally different sources of randomness exist on which design and inference in spatial sampling can be based: (a) variation that would occur on resampling the same spatial population with other sampling configurations generated by the same design, and (b) variation occurring on sampling ot

  10. Sample preparation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric determination of the zinc-70 to zinc-68 isotope ratio in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample preparation was optimized for the 70Zn:68Zn isotope ratio determinations performed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in blood, faeces and urine from human pre-term babies after oral or intravenous administration of enriched 70Zn. The preparation techniques achieved complete decomposition, matrix separation, maximum preconcentration and minimum contamination. After sample decomposition, Zn was extracted into CCl4 with ammonium pyrrolidin-1-yldithioformate and back extracted into 1.2 mol dm-3 HNO3 for analysis. Residual chloride resulting from dissolved CCl4 in the acid led to interference by 35Cl2+, and the procedure was modified to evaporate the CCl4. Extraction was unnecessary for faecal samples. Under optimized conditions the 70Zn:68Zn isotope ratio can be measured with acceptable precision (200 ng cm-3 in the analytical solution). (Author)

  11. Sample size requirements for studies of treatment effects on beta-cell function in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Lachin

    Full Text Available Preservation of β-cell function as measured by stimulated C-peptide has recently been accepted as a therapeutic target for subjects with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. In recently completed studies conducted by the Type 1 Diabetes Trial Network (TrialNet, repeated 2-hour Mixed Meal Tolerance Tests (MMTT were obtained for up to 24 months from 156 subjects with up to 3 months duration of type 1 diabetes at the time of study enrollment. These data provide the information needed to more accurately determine the sample size needed for future studies of the effects of new agents on the 2-hour area under the curve (AUC of the C-peptide values. The natural log(x, log(x+1 and square-root (√x transformations of the AUC were assessed. In general, a transformation of the data is needed to better satisfy the normality assumptions for commonly used statistical tests. Statistical analysis of the raw and transformed data are provided to estimate the mean levels over time and the residual variation in untreated subjects that allow sample size calculations for future studies at either 12 or 24 months of follow-up and among children 8-12 years of age, adolescents (13-17 years and adults (18+ years. The sample size needed to detect a given relative (percentage difference with treatment versus control is greater at 24 months than at 12 months of follow-up, and differs among age categories. Owing to greater residual variation among those 13-17 years of age, a larger sample size is required for this age group. Methods are also described for assessment of sample size for mixtures of subjects among the age categories. Statistical expressions are presented for the presentation of analyses of log(x+1 and √x transformed values in terms of the original units of measurement (pmol/ml. Analyses using different transformations are described for the TrialNet study of masked anti-CD20 (rituximab versus masked placebo. These results provide the information needed to

  12. "Shoot and Sense" Janus Micromotors-Based Strategy for the Simultaneous Degradation and Detection of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Food and Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, D; Jurado-Sánchez, B; Escarpa, A

    2016-04-01

    A novel Janus micromotor-based strategy for the direct determination of diphenyl phthalate (DPP) in food and biological samples is presented. Mg/Au Janus micromotors are employed as novel analytical platforms for the degradation of the non-electroactive DPP into phenol, which is directly measured by difference pulse voltammetry on disposable screen-printed electrodes. The self-movement of the micromotors along the samples result in the generation of hydrogen microbubbles and hydroxyl ions for DPP degradation. The increased fluid transport improves dramatically the analytical signal, increasing the sensitivity while lowering the detection potential. The method has been successfully applied to the direct analysis of DPP in selected food and biological samples, without any sample treatment and avoiding any potential contamination from laboratory equipment. The developed approach is fast (∼5 min) and accurate with recoveries of ∼100%. In addition, efficient propulsion of multiple Mg/Au micromotors in complex samples has also been demonstrated. The advantages of the micromotors-assisted technology, i.e., disposability, portability, and the possibility to carry out multiple analysis simultaneously, hold considerable promise for its application in food and biological control in analytical applications with high significance. PMID:26938969

  13. [Micro-determination of fluoride in biological samples by pyrohydrolysis and flow-injection analysis using a fluoride ion-selective electrode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, K

    1991-02-01

    An apparatus has been developed for the isolation of fluoride in biological samples through pyrohydrolysis. With this apparatus, it is possible to determine both organic and inorganic fluorocompounds with a recovery close to 100% and precision within 5%. The high recovery rate can be expected even for highly heat-resistant compounds such as CaF2, without using WO3 as a catalyst. For determination of the isolated fluoride, a separate apparatus was developed in which flow-injection analysis was used in conjunction with a fluoride ion-selective electrode as a detector. With this apparatus, fluoride in a sample solution with a volume as small as 0.2 ml, and at a concentration as low as 0.5 microgram/l, can be determined within 3 minutes with a precision of several percent. Combined use of the two apparatuses makes it possible to determine fluoride in different biological samples within 10-15 minutes with a precision of several percent, free from external contamination. By selecting suitable conditions for analysis and using a 1 g sample, it is possible to determine fluoride at a concentration as low as 5 ng/g. By employing these apparatuses, the fluoride content in different biological samples has been determine and the effectiveness of their use confirmed. PMID:2051632

  14. Development of a Univariate Membrane-Based Mid-Infrared Method for Protein Quantitation and Total Lipid Content Analysis of Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Strug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological samples present a range of complexities from homogeneous purified protein to multicomponent mixtures. Accurate qualification of such samples is paramount to downstream applications. We describe the development of an MIR spectroscopy-based analytical method offering simultaneous protein quantitation (0.25–5 mg/mL and analysis of total lipid or detergent species, as well as the identification of other biomolecules present in biological samples. The method utilizes a hydrophilic PTFE membrane engineered for presentation of aqueous samples in a dried format compatible with fast infrared analysis. Unlike classical quantification techniques, the reported method is amino acid sequence independent and thus applicable to complex samples of unknown composition. By comparison to existing platforms, this MIR-based method enables direct quantification using minimal sample volume (2 µL; it is well-suited where repeat access and limited sample size are critical parameters. Further, accurate results can be derived without specialized training or knowledge of IR spectroscopy. Overall, the simplified application and analysis system provides a more cost-effective alternative to high-throughput IR systems for research laboratories with minimal throughput demands. In summary, the MIR-based system provides a viable alternative to current protein quantitation methods; it also uniquely offers simultaneous qualification of other components, notably lipids and detergents.

  15. Gene-ontology enrichment analysis in two independent family-based samples highlights biologically plausible processes for autism spectrum disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anney, Richard J L

    2012-02-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated a range of genes from discrete biological pathways in the aetiology of autism. However, despite the strong influence of genetic factors, association studies have yet to identify statistically robust, replicated major effect genes or SNPs. We apply the principle of the SNP ratio test methodology described by O\\'Dushlaine et al to over 2100 families from the Autism Genome Project (AGP). Using a two-stage design we examine association enrichment in 5955 unique gene-ontology classifications across four groupings based on two phenotypic and two ancestral classifications. Based on estimates from simulation we identify excess of association enrichment across all analyses. We observe enrichment in association for sets of genes involved in diverse biological processes, including pyruvate metabolism, transcription factor activation, cell-signalling and cell-cycle regulation. Both genes and processes that show enrichment have previously been examined in autistic disorders and offer biologically plausibility to these findings.

  16. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. (orig.)

  17. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, C L; Brochhausen, C; Hampel, G; Iffland, D; Kuczewski, B; Otto, G; Schmitz, T; Stieghorst, C; Kratz, J V

    2012-10-01

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. PMID:22918535

  18. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, C.L. [University of Mainz, Institute for Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Institute for Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Brochhausen, C. [University of Mainz, Institute of Pathology, Mainz (Germany); Hampel, G.; Iffland, D.; Schmitz, T.; Stieghorst, C.; Kratz, J.V. [University of Mainz, Institute for Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Kuczewski, B. [Regional Council Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Otto, G. [University of Mainz, Department of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic and Transplantation Surgery, Mainz (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. (orig.)

  19. Matrix effects break the LC behavior rule for analytes in LC-MS/MS analysis of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are generally accepted as the preferred techniques for detecting and quantitating analytes of interest in biological matrices on the basis of the rule that one chemical compound yields one LC-...

  20. Determination of cobalt in biological samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after extraction with 1,5-bis (di-2-pyridylmethylene) thiocarbohydrazide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, G.; Bosch Ojeda, C.; Garcia de Torres, A.; Cano Pavon, J.M. [University of Malaga (Spain)

    1995-06-01

    A method for the determination of trace amounts of cobalt in biological samples by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization extraction conditions were evaluated from a critical study of the effects of pH, concentration of extractant, shaking time and ionic strength. The detection limit for cobalt is 0.06 ng ml{sup -1} and the calibration is linear from 0.1 to 2.5 ng ml{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements is 1.7 % for 0.5 ng ml{sup -1} of cobalt. The effect of interferences was studied and no interferences from the elements commonly found in biological materials were observed. The chief advantage of the method lies in its maximum allowable aqueous-to-organic phase volume ratio of 30:1. Results from the analysis of some certified biological reference materials are given. (authors). 14 refs., 1 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Computed partial neutron cross-sections of 51V at 14 MeV for trace elemental analysis of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the primary and secondary computed partial neutron reaction cross-sections at 14 MeV for 51V. The computations are based on the compound nucleus theory using an optical model potential and Newton's shell-dependent level density formula. The computed partial cross-sections have been compared with the available experimental values and are fairly in good agreement. These cross-sections have been used for the trace elemental analysis of biological samples like brain, muscle, liver, testes, lung, lymph nodes and blood of human subjects. The induced β-activity per gram of above biological samples per unit neutron flux have been computed for the reactions 51V(n,p)51Tisup(*) with Tsub(1/2)=5.8 min and 51V(n,α)48Scsup(*) with Tsub(1/2)=1.81 days and are tabulated. (author). 12 refs

  2. Preparation of biological samples for transmission X-ray microanalysis: a review of alternative procedures to the use of sectioned material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although transmission X-ray microanalysis of biological material has traditionally been carried out mainly on sectioned preparations, a number of alternative procedures exist. These are considered under three major headings - whole cell preparations, analysis of cell homogenates and biological fluids, and applications of the technique to microsamples of purified biochemicals. These three aspects provide a continuous range of investigative level - from the cellular to the molecular. The use of X-ray microanalysis with whole cell preparations is considered in reference to eukaryote (animal) cells and prokaryotes - where it has particular potential in environmental studies on bacteria. In the case of cell homogenates and biological fluids, the technique has been used mainly with microdroplets of animal material. The use of X-ray microanalysis with purified biochemicals is considered in relation to both particulate and non-particulate samples. In the latter category, the application of this technique for analysis of thin films of metalloprotein is particularly emphasised. It is concluded that wider use could be made of the range of preparative techniques available - both within a particular investigation, and in diverse fields of study. Transmission X-ray microanalysis has implications for environmental, physiological and molecular biology as well as cell biology

  3. A novel solid-phase microextraction method based on polymer monolith frit combining with high-performance liquid chromatography for determination of aldehydes in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Wang, Shuyu; Zhang, Ganbing; Huang, Shiqiang; Song, Dandan; Zhou, Yanping; Long, Guangdou

    2011-03-25

    In this work, a polypropylene frit with porous network structure (20 μm pole size) was first utilized as the mould of polymer monolithic material, poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (MAA-co-EDMA) monolith was synthesized within channels and macropores of the frit. A simple and sensitive solid-phase microextraction method based on polymer monolith frit coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was established and applied to analysis of hexanal and heptanal in biological samples (human urine and serum). In the method, small molecule metabolites (aldehydes) in biological samples derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), and the formed hydrazones were extracted simultaneously on the monolithic frit and thereafter ultrasound-assisted desorbed with acetonitrile as elution solvent. The experimental parameters with regard to polymerization, derivatization and extraction were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the linearity was in the range of 0.02-5.0 μmol L(-1) (r=0.9994) for both hexanal and heptanal and the limits of detection (S/N=3) were 0.81 nmol L(-1) for hexanal and 0.76 nmol L(-1) for heptanal. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) were less than 6.5% for the same monolithic frit and less than 8.9% for the different monolithic frits. Satisfactory recoveries ranging from 70.71% to 88.73% were obtained for the urine samples. The method possesses many advantages including simple setup, fast analysis, low cost, sufficient sensitivity, good biological compatibility and less organic solvent consumption. The proposed method is a useful assistant tool in the clinical early diagnosis of lung disease by monitoring aldehyde biomarker candidates in complex biological samples. PMID:21414440

  4. Determination of Nitric Oxide-Derived Nitrite and Nitrate in Biological Samples by HPLC Coupled to Nitrite Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Anguo; Duan, Tingting; Tang, Dan; Xu, Youhua; Feng, Liang; Zheng, Zhaoguang; Zhu, Jiaxiao; Wang, Rushang; Zhu, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Nitrite and nitrate are main stable products of nitric oxide, a pivotal cellular signaling molecule, in biological fluids. Therefore, accurate measurement of the two ions is profoundly important. Nitrite is difficult to be determined for a larger number of interferences and unstable in the presence of oxygen. In this paper, a simple, cost-effective and accurate HPLC method for the determination of nitrite and nitrate was developed. On the basis of the reaction that nitrite is oxidized rapidly...

  5. Polymer monolithic capillary microextraction on-line coupled with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Au and Pd in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method based on on-line polymer monolithic capillary microextraction (CME)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for the determination of trace Au and Pd in biological samples. For this purpose, poly(glycidyl methacrylate-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was prepared and functionalized with mercapto groups. The prepared monolith exhibited good selectivity to Au and Pd, and good resistance to strong acid with a long life span. Factors affecting the extraction efficiency of CME, such as sample acidity, sample flow rate, eluent conditions and coexisting ion interference were investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, 3σ) were 5.9 ng L−1 for Au and 8.3 ng L−1 for Pd, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, c = 50 ng L−1, n = 7) were 6.5% for Au and 1.1% for Pd, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of Au and Pd in human urine and serum samples with the recovery in the range of 84–118% for spiked samples. The developed on-line polymer monolithic CME-ICP-MS method has the advantages of rapidity, simplicity, low sample/reagent consumption, high sensitivity and is suitable for the determination of trace Au and Pd in biological samples with limited amount available and complex matrix. - Highlights: • An on-line CME-ICP-MS method was developed for Au and Pd analysis in human fluids. • Poly(GMA-EDMA-SH) monolith exhibited good selectivity for Au/Pd and acid-resistance. • The method is rapid, simple, and sensitive with low sample/reagents consumption

  6. Estimation of lead in biological samples of oral cancer patients chewing smokeless tobacco products by ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Arain, Asma J; Afridi, Hassan I; Arain, Muhammad B; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Arain, Mariam S

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have reported that the chewing habit of smokeless tobacco (SLT) has been associated with oral cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the trace levels of lead (Pb) in biological samples (blood, scalp hair) of oral cancer patients and referents of the same age group (range 30-60 years). As the concentrations of Pb are very low in biological samples, so a simple and efficient ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system has been developed, as a prior step to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In this procedure, the hydrophobic chelates of Pb with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) were extracted into fine droplets of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6] within a syringe while using Triton X-114 as a dispersant. Factors influencing the microextraction efficiency and determination, such as pH of the sample, volume of [C4MIM][PF6] and Triton X-114, ligand concentration, and incubation time, were studied. To validate the proposed method, certified reference materials were analyzed and the results of Pb(2+) were in good agreement with certified values. At optimum experimental values of significant variables, detection limit and enhancement factor were found to be 0.412 μg/L and 80, respectively. The coexisting ions showed no obvious negative outcome on Pb preconcentration. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily for the preconcentration of Pb(2+) in acid-digested SLT and biological samples of the study population. It was observed that oral cancer patients who consumed different SLT products have 2-3-fold higher levels of Pb in scalp hair and blood samples as compared to healthy referents (p < 0.001). While 31.4-50.8% higher levels of Pb were observed in referents chewing different SLT products as compared to nonconsumers (p < 0.01).

  7. Estimation of lead in biological samples of oral cancer patients chewing smokeless tobacco products by ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Arain, Asma J; Afridi, Hassan I; Arain, Muhammad B; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Arain, Mariam S

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have reported that the chewing habit of smokeless tobacco (SLT) has been associated with oral cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the trace levels of lead (Pb) in biological samples (blood, scalp hair) of oral cancer patients and referents of the same age group (range 30-60 years). As the concentrations of Pb are very low in biological samples, so a simple and efficient ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system has been developed, as a prior step to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In this procedure, the hydrophobic chelates of Pb with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) were extracted into fine droplets of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6] within a syringe while using Triton X-114 as a dispersant. Factors influencing the microextraction efficiency and determination, such as pH of the sample, volume of [C4MIM][PF6] and Triton X-114, ligand concentration, and incubation time, were studied. To validate the proposed method, certified reference materials were analyzed and the results of Pb(2+) were in good agreement with certified values. At optimum experimental values of significant variables, detection limit and enhancement factor were found to be 0.412 μg/L and 80, respectively. The coexisting ions showed no obvious negative outcome on Pb preconcentration. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily for the preconcentration of Pb(2+) in acid-digested SLT and biological samples of the study population. It was observed that oral cancer patients who consumed different SLT products have 2-3-fold higher levels of Pb in scalp hair and blood samples as compared to healthy referents (p < 0.001). While 31.4-50.8% higher levels of Pb were observed in referents chewing different SLT products as compared to nonconsumers (p < 0.01). PMID:25903188

  8. Public views on the donation and use of human biological samples in biomedical research: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, C.; Clotworthy, M.; Hilton, S; MaGee, C.; Robertson, M. J.; Stubbins, L.J.; Corfield, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective A mixed methods study exploring the UK general public's willingness to donate human biosamples (HBSs) for biomedical research. Setting Cross-sectional focus groups followed by an online survey. Participants Twelve focus groups (81 participants) selectively sampled to reflect a range of demographic groups; 1110 survey responders recruited through a stratified sampling method with quotas set on sex, age, geographical location, socioeconomic group and ethnicity. Main outcom...

  9. Implementación de un protocolo de actuación para toma de muestras biológicas en juicios de paternidad/Implementation of a protocol for sampling biological tasters in trials of paternity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel De La Barrera Escamilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific and technological advances in forensic research has resulted in recent years in the use of various scientific applications such as Forensic Genetic; the possibility that this area is critical to the identification of persons and the establishment of biological relationship. Since in Mexico, expert evidence on Molecular and Forensic Genetics used in in family and civil trial´s matters, in order to recognize the relationship between individuals has a little over 10 years to be used actively, it is necessary that forensic experts involved in these judgments have a sampling protocol to ensure technical and legally correct way sample collection; and ensure safekeeping and processing them in the laboratory, the aim of which is meet the new requirements of orality.

  10. The influence of psychoeducation on regulating biological rhythm in a sample of patients with bipolar II disorder: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria AD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Augusto Duarte Faria,1 Luciano Dias de Mattos Souza,2 Taiane de Azevedo Cardoso,2 Karen Amaral Tavares Pinheiro,2 Ricardo Tavares Pinheiro,2 Ricardo Azevedo da Silva,2 Karen Jansen21Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande – FURG, Rio Grande, RS, Brazil; 2Health and Behavior Postgraduate Program, Universidade Católica de Pelotas – UCPEL, Pelotas, RS, BrazilIntroduction: Changes in biological rhythm are among the various characteristics of bipolar disorder, and have long been associated with the functional impairment of the disease. There are only a few viable options of psychosocial interventions that deal with this specific topic; one of them is psychoeducation, a model that, although it has been used by practitioners for some time, only recently have studies shown its efficacy in clinical practice.Aim: To assess if patients undergoing psychosocial intervention in addition to a pharmacological treatment have better regulation of their biological rhythm than those only using medication.Method: This study is a randomized clinical trial that compares a standard medication intervention to an intervention combined with drugs and psychoeducation. The evaluation of the biological rhythm was made using the Biological Rhythm Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, an 18-item scale divided in four areas (sleep, activity, social rhythm, and eating pattern. The combined intervention consisted of medication and a short-term psychoeducation model summarized in a protocol of six individual sessions of 1 hour each.Results: The sample consisted of 61 patients with bipolar II disorder, but during the study, there were 14 losses to follow-up. Therefore, the final sample consisted of 45 individuals (26 for standard intervention and 19 for combined. The results showed that, in this sample and time period evaluated, the combined treatment of medication and psychoeducation had no statistically significant impact on the

  11. Applied research and development of neutron activation analysis - The study on human health and environment by neutron activation analysis of biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Yeon; Yoo, Jong Ik; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Sung Jun; Lee, Sang Sun; Jeon, Ki Hong; Na, Kyung Won; Kang, Sang Hun [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    With the development of the precise quantitative analytical method for the analysis of trace elements in the various biological samples such as hair and food, evaluation in view of health and environment to the trace elements in various sources which can be introduced inside human body was done. The trace elemental distribution in Korean total diet and representative food stuff was identified first. With the project the elemental distributions in supplemental healthy food and Korean and Chinese origin oriental medicine were identified. The amount of trace elements ingested with the hair analysis of oriental medicine takers were also estimated. The amounts of trace elements inhaled with the analysis of foundry air, blood and hair of foundry workers were also estimated. The basic estimation method in view of health and environment with the neutron activation analysis of biological samples such as foods and hair was established with the result. Nationwide usage system of the NAA facility in Hanaro in many different and important areas of biological area can be initiated with the results. The output of the project can support public heath, environment, and medical research area. The results can be applied for the process of micronutrients enhanced health food production and for the health safety and health status enhancement with the additional necessary data expansion and the development of various evaluation technique. 19 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs. (Author)

  12. Sampling Size Required for Determining Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Properties at Early Establishment of Second Rotation Hoop Pine Plantations in Subtropical Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Investigations into forest soils face the problem of the high level of spatial variability that is an inherent property of all forest soils. In order to investigate the effect of changes in residue management practices on soil properties in hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii Aiton ex A. Cunn.) plantations of subtropical Australia it was important to understand the intensity of sampling effort required to overcome the spatial variability induced by those changes. Harvest residues were formed into windrows to prevent nitrogen (N) losses through volatilisation and erosion that had previously occurred as a result of pile and burn operations. We selected second rotation (2R) hoop pine sites where the windrows (10-15 m apart) had been formed 1, 2 and 3 years prior to sampling in order to examine the spatial variability in soil carbon (C)and N and in potential mineralisable N (PMN) in the areas beneath and between (inter-) the windrows. We examined the implications of soil variability on the number of samples required to detect differences in means for specific soil properties,at different ages and at specified levels of accuracy. Sample size needed to accurately reflect differences between means was not affected by the position where the samples were taken relative to the windrows but differed according to the parameter to be sampled. The relative soil sampling size required for detecting differences between means of a soil property in the inter-windrow and beneath-windrow positions was highly dependent on the soil property assessed and the acceptable relative sampling error. An alternative strategy for soil sampling should be considered, if the estimated sample size exceeds 50 replications. The possible solution to this problem is collection of composite soil samples allowing a substantial reduction in the number of samples required for chemical analysis without loss in the precision of the mean estimates for a particular soil property.

  13. Fast quantification of α-lipoic acid in biological samples and dietary supplements using batch injection analysis with amperometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Pereira, Laise Nayra Dos; da Silva, Iranaldo Santos; Araújo, Thaylan Pinheiro; Tanaka, Auro Atsushi; Angnes, Lúcio

    2016-07-01

    Batch injection analysis (BIA) with amperometric detection, using a pyrolytic graphite electrode modified with cobalt phthalocyanine (PG/CoPc), was employed for determination of α-lipoic acid (ALA) in pharmaceutical product and in synthetic urine samples. The proposed BIA method is based on the application of a potential of +0.9V vs. Ag/AgCl, KCl sat, enabling quantification of ALA over a concentration range from 1.3×10(-6) to 1.0×10(-4)molL(-1), with a detection limit of 1.5×10(-8)molL(-1). A sampling rate of 180 injections per hour was attained and measurements of the reproducibility of successive injections (100µmolL(-1) ALA on the same electrode) showed a RSD of 2.11% for 40 successive injections. The new sensor was utilised for ALA quantification in a dietary pharmaceutical supplement and in synthetic urine and the results obtained for both samples were compared with parallel analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the method recommended by the United States Pharmacopeia. The results obtained were similar (at a 95% confidence level) and in the case of the synthetic urine sample (prepared with a known amount of ALA) the recovery was situated between 98.0% and 102.6%. PMID:27154671

  14. Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2008-02-11

    The radiometric methods, alpha (alpha)-, beta (beta)-, gamma (gamma)-spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, accelerator mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and glow discharge mass spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for radiation protection, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, repository of nuclear waste, tracer application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include (3)H, (14)C, (36)Cl, (41)Ca, (59,63)Ni, (89,90)Sr, (99)Tc, (129)I, (135,137)Cs, (210)Pb, (226,228)Ra, (237)Np, (241)Am, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection/sequential injection) for separation of radionuclides and automated determination of radionuclides is also discussed.

  15. Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2008-02-11

    The radiometric methods, alpha (alpha)-, beta (beta)-, gamma (gamma)-spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, accelerator mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and glow discharge mass spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for radiation protection, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, repository of nuclear waste, tracer application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include (3)H, (14)C, (36)Cl, (41)Ca, (59,63)Ni, (89,90)Sr, (99)Tc, (129)I, (135,137)Cs, (210)Pb, (226,228)Ra, (237)Np, (241)Am, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection/sequential injection) for separation of radionuclides and automated determination of radionuclides is also discussed. PMID:18215644

  16. Direct online HPLC-CV-AFS method for traces of methylmercury without derivatisation: a matrix-independent method for urine, sediment and biological tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius; Gajdosechova, Zuzana; Chen, Bin; Brownlow, Andrew; Corns, Warren T; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant which occurs in different species, with methylmercury (MeHg) being the critical compound due to its neurotoxicity and bioaccumulation through the food chain. Methods for trace speciation of MeHg are therefore needed for a vast range of sample matrices, such as biological tissues, fluids, soils or sediments. We have previously developed an ultra-trace speciation method for methylmercury in water, based on a preconcentration HPLC cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-CV-AFS) method. The focus of this work is mercury speciation in a variety of sample matrices to assess the versatility of the method. Certified reference materials were used where possible, and samples were spiked where reference materials were not available, e.g. human urine. Solid samples were submitted for commonly used digestion or extraction processes to obtain a liquid sample for injection into the analytical system. For MeHg in sediment samples, an extraction procedure was adapted to accommodate MeHg separation from high amounts of Hg(2+) to avoid an overload of the column. The recovery for MeHg determination was found to be in the range of 88-104% in fish reference materials (DOLT-2, DOLT-4, DORM-3), lobster (TORT-2), seaweed (IAEA-140/TM), sediments (ERM(®)-CC580) and spiked urine and has been proven to be robust, reliable, virtually matrix-independent and relatively cost-effective. Applications in the ultra-trace concentration range are possible using the preconcentration up to 200 mL, while for higher MeHg-containing samples, lower volumes can be applied. A comparison was carried out between species-specific isotope dilution gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SSID-GC-ICP-MS) as the gold standard and HPLC-CV-AFS for biological tissues (liver, kidney and muscle of pilot whales), showing a slope of 1.008 and R (2) = 0.97, which indicates that the HPLC-CV-AFS method achieves well-correlated results for MeHg in

  17. Using an international workshop to develop functional requirements and a Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) with which to develop a preferred concept for a Mars Sample Return (MSR) Sample Receiving Facility (SRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrublevskis, John; Guest, Michael; Bennett, Allan; Walker, James; Smith, Caroline; Baker, Robert; Grant, Colin

    COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy places very stringent requirements on Sample Return missions and `breaking the chain of contact' between Earth and the celestial body from which the sample is returned. This must be continued after return to Earth and -at the same time-any contamination or damage to the sample must be avoided until such time as it can be confirmed as not presenting a biohazard and available for subsequent curation and scientific investigation. Such a facility has never before been built and an investigation has been made to determine the requirements for a Mars Sample Return (MSR) Sample Receiving Facility (SRF) from first principles based on a Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) rather than the modification of an existing BSL-4 facility. This approach fully takes in to account cleanliness requirements to avoid sample contamination. This paper will present the results from the first part of an ESA funded study, which derived the top level functional requirements by reviewing published scientific literature from all expert domains i.e.; biocontainment, science curation, space technology, infrastructure and equipment. These functional requirements were then examined by invited attendees from all expert domains in a 2 day international workshop. From the results of the international workshop an existing Biohazard Assessment Protocol (BAP) was modified and a trade off was conducted to derive a preferred concept which allowed early indications of future technological direction of study. The results of the MSR SRF study by SEA (as well as the results of another parallel study) will be taken into account by ESA to define the requirements for a follow-on procurement action in the future. There will be a review of the results from both studies and an agreement on the requirements based on these parallel studies. Therefore, the views expressed herein should not be taken to reflect the official opinion of the European Space Agency.

  18. [Logistics of collection and transportation of biological samples and the organization of the central laboratory in the ELSA-Brasil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, Ligia G; Vidigal, Pedro G; Leite, Claudia Mendes; Castilhos, Cristina D; Pimentel, Robércia Anjos; Maniero, Viviane C; Mill, Jose Geraldo; Lotufo, Paulo A; Pereira, Alexandre C; Bensenor, Isabela M

    2013-06-01

    The ELSA (Estudo Longitudinal de Saúde do Adulto - Brazilian Longitudinal Study for Adult Health) is a multicenter cohort study which aims at the identification of risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in the Brazilian population. The paper describes the strategies for the collection, processing, transportation, and quality control of blood and urine tests in the ELSA. The study decided to centralize the tests at one single laboratory. The processing of the samples was performed at the local laboratories, reducing the weight of the material to be transported, and diminishing the costs of transportation to the central laboratory at the Universidade de São Paulo Hospital. The study included tests for the evaluation of diabetes, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, electrolyte abnormalities, thyroid hormones, uric acid, hepatic enzyme abnormalities, inflammation, and total blood cell count. In addition, leukocyte DNA, urine, plasma and serum samples were stored. The central laboratory performed approximately 375,000 tests.

  19. Monitoring of chlorsulfuron in biological fluids and water samples by molecular fluorescence using rhodamine B as fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesso, Magdalena; Escudero, Luis A; Talio, María Carolina; Fernández, Liliana P

    2016-11-01

    A new simple methodology is proposed for chlorsufuron (CS) traces quantification based upon enhancement of rhodamine B (RhB) fluorescent signal. Experimental variables that influence fluorimetric sensitivity have been studied and optimized. The zeroth order regression calibration was linear from 0.866 to 35.800µgL(-1) CS, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. At optimal experimental conditions, a limit of detection of 0.259µgL(-1) and a limit of quantification of 0.866µgL(-1) were obtained. The method showed good sensitivity and adequate selectivity and was applied to the determination of trace amounts of CS in plasma, serum and water samples with satisfactory results analyzed by ANOVA test. The proposed methodology represents an alternative to traditional chromatographic techniques for CS monitoring in complex samples, using an accessible instrument in control laboratories. PMID:27591634

  20. Quantification of chlorine in zirconium oxide and biological samples by instrumental NAA utilizing PCF of Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently studies on chlorine contents in various samples are being pursued due to its corrosive nature. Chlorine present at trace level in various finished products as well as powder is used as a raw material for production of different types of zircaloys used as structural materials in nuclear technology. As a part of quality assurance program, it is necessary to quantify chlorine accurately with suitable and simple technique. In the present work we have applied instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) utilizing its short-lived activation product (38Cl, 37 min, 1642 and 2168 keV) for its estimation. Pneumatic Carrier Facility (PCF) of Dhruva reactor, BARC was used sample irradiation of zirconium oxide dry powder, synthetic wax and IAEA RMs 1515 (Apple leaves) and Lichen 336. (author)

  1. Mouse skin tumor initiation-promotion and complete carcinogenesis bioassays: mechanisms and biological activities of emission samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Nesnow, S; Triplett, L L; Slaga, T J

    1983-01-01

    Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil shale soot, and gasoline vehicle exhaust materials have been examined by this method. The studies reported here have been constructed to compare the carcinogenic and tumorigenic potency of extracts from various particula...

  2. Determination of noble metals in biological samples by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, following cloud point extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreia Mesquita da Silva, Márcia; Lúcia Azzolin Frescura, Vera; José Curtius, Adilson

    2001-10-01

    A simple separation procedure for noble metals based on cloud point extraction is proposed. The analyte ions in aqueous acidic solution, obtained by the acid digestion of the samples, were complexed with O, O-diethyl-dithiophosphate and Triton X-114 was added as a non-ionic surfactant. By increasing the temperature up to the cloud point, a phase separation occurs, resulting in an aqueous phase and a surfactant-rich phase containing most of the analytes that were complexed. The metals in the surfactant-rich phase were determined by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The extraction conditions as well as the instrumental parameters were optimized. Enrichment factors ranging from 7 (Rh) to 60 (Pt) and limits of detection from 0.6 (Pt) to 3.0 ng l -1 (Rh) were obtained in the digested samples. The extraction was not efficient for Ir. Among the reference materials analyzed in this work, only one (SRM 2670, urine) presented recommended values for Au and Pt. Due to the non-availability of adequate CRMs, accuracy was assessed by spiking known analyte amounts to the acid digests. Recoveries close to 100% were observed for all the studied elements but Ru. Poor agreement between found and recommended values was observed for non-digested urine sample, probably due to the carrier effect of co-extracted residual matrix components. However, good agreement was reached after urine acid mineralization.

  3. Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2008-10-09

    Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for δ13C and δ15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, δ13C, and δ15N.

  4. Application of direct solid sample analysis for the determination of chlorine in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos de Gois, Jefferson; Pereira, Éderson R. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); INCT de Energia e Ambiente do CNPq (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G., E-mail: daniel.borges@ufsc.br [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); INCT de Energia e Ambiente do CNPq (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    This work describes a methodology developed to carry out Cl determination in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis. The solid samples were directly weighed into graphite ‘cups’ and inserted into the graphite furnace. The RF power and the carrier gas flow rate were optimized at 1300 W and 0.7 L min{sup −1}, respectively. Calibration could be carried out using aqueous standard solutions with pre-dried modifiers (Pd + Nd or Pd + Ca) or using solid certified reference materials with the same pre-dried modifiers or without the use of modifiers. The limit of quantification was determined as 5 μg g{sup −1} under optimized conditions and the Cl concentration was determined in five certified reference materials with certified concentrations for Cl, in addition to three certified reference materials, for which certified values for Cl were unavailable; in the latter case, the results were compared with those obtained using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry. Good agreement at a 95% statistical confidence level was achieved between determined and certified or reference values. - Highlights: • Direct determination of chlorine in solid biological materials is described for the first time using ICP-MS. • Calibration against aqueous standards is feasible. • The method is accurate and sensitive, regardless of the composition of the solid sample.

  5. Application of direct solid sample analysis for the determination of chlorine in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes a methodology developed to carry out Cl determination in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis. The solid samples were directly weighed into graphite ‘cups’ and inserted into the graphite furnace. The RF power and the carrier gas flow rate were optimized at 1300 W and 0.7 L min−1, respectively. Calibration could be carried out using aqueous standard solutions with pre-dried modifiers (Pd + Nd or Pd + Ca) or using solid certified reference materials with the same pre-dried modifiers or without the use of modifiers. The limit of quantification was determined as 5 μg g−1 under optimized conditions and the Cl concentration was determined in five certified reference materials with certified concentrations for Cl, in addition to three certified reference materials, for which certified values for Cl were unavailable; in the latter case, the results were compared with those obtained using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry. Good agreement at a 95% statistical confidence level was achieved between determined and certified or reference values. - Highlights: • Direct determination of chlorine in solid biological materials is described for the first time using ICP-MS. • Calibration against aqueous standards is feasible. • The method is accurate and sensitive, regardless of the composition of the solid sample

  6. A Simple Spectrophotometric Method for the Trace Determination of Zinc in Some Real, Environmental, Biological, Pharmaceutical, Milk and Soil Samples Using 5,7- Dibromo-8-hydroxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very simple, ultra-sensitive and highly selective non-extractive spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amount of zinc using 5,7-dibromo-8-hydroxyquinoline (DBHQ) has been developed. DBHQ reacts in a slightly acidic solution (0.000001-0.000007 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) with zinc to give a pale-yellow chelate, which has an absorption maximum at 391 nm. The reaction is instantaneous and absorbance remains stable for over 24 hrs. The average molar absorption co-efficient and Sandell's sensitivity were found to be 1.62 x 10/sup 5/ L mol/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/ and 10 ng cm/sup -2/ of Zn, respectively. Linear calibration graphs were obtained for 0.02-4 mg L/sup -1/ of Zn having detection limit of 5 mu g L/sup -1/ and RSD 0 - 2%. The stoichiometric composition of the chelate is 1:2 (Zn : DBHQ). A large excess of over 50 cations, anions and some common complexing agents (such as chloride, azide, tartrate, EDTA, oxalate, SCN-etc) do not interfere in the determination. The method was successfully used in the determination of zinc in several Standard Reference Materials (alloys and steels) as well as in some environmental waters (potable and polluted), biological samples (human blood and urine), soil samples, milk samples, pharmaceutical samples and complex synthetic mixtures.The results of the proposed method for biological samples were comparable with AAS and were found to be in excellent agreement. The method has high precision and accuracy (s = +- 0.01 for 0.5 mg L/sup -1/). (author)

  7. Temperature-controlled micro-TLC: a versatile green chemistry and fast analytical tool for separation and preliminary screening of steroids fraction from biological and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Slączka, Magdalena M; Zarzycka, Magdalena B; Bartoszuk, Małgorzata A; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta; Baran, Michał J

    2011-11-01

    This paper is a continuation of our previous research focusing on development of micro-TLC methodology under temperature-controlled conditions. The main goal of present paper is to demonstrate separation and detection capability of micro-TLC technique involving simple analytical protocols without multi-steps sample pre-purification. One of the advantages of planar chromatography over its column counterpart is that each TLC run can be performed using non-previously used stationary phase. Therefore, it is possible to fractionate or separate complex samples characterized by heavy biological matrix loading. In present studies components of interest, mainly steroids, were isolated from biological samples like fish bile using single pre-treatment steps involving direct organic liquid extraction and/or deproteinization by freeze-drying method. Low-molecular mass compounds with polarity ranging from estetrol to progesterone derived from the environmental samples (lake water, untreated and treated sewage waters) were concentrated using optimized solid-phase extraction (SPE). Specific bands patterns for samples derived from surface water of the Middle Pomerania in northern part of Poland can be easily observed on obtained micro-TLC chromatograms. This approach can be useful as simple and non-expensive complementary method for fast control and screening of treated sewage water discharged by the municipal wastewater treatment plants. Moreover, our experimental results show the potential of micro-TLC as an efficient tool for retention measurements of a wide range of steroids under reversed-phase (RP) chromatographic conditions. These data can be used for further optimalization of SPE or HPLC systems working under RP conditions. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that micro-TLC based analytical approach can be applied as an effective method for the internal standard (IS) substance search. Generally, described methodology can be applied for fast fractionation or screening of the

  8. Report of the Planning Group on Commercial Catches, Discards and Biological Sampling (PGCCDBS), 17-21 February 2014. Horta (Azores), Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    ICES

    2014-01-01

    The Planning Group on Commercial Catches, Discards and Biological Sampling [PGCCDBS] (Co-Chairs: Mike Armstrong, UK, and Gráinne Ní Chonchúir, Ireland) met in Horta, the Azores, 17th February – 21st February 2014. The PGCCDBS was established in 2002 in response to the EC-ICES Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) requesting ICES to provide support for the EU Data Collection Framework (DCF). It implements the ICES Quality Assurance Framework to ensure that data sets and parameters supporting asses...

  9. Determination of androgens and progestogens in environmental and biological samples using fabric phase sorptive extraction coupled to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes-Alonso, Rayco; Ciofi, Lorenzo; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan; Bubba, Massimo Del; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-03-11

    Androgens and progestogens are two important groups of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) which are implicated to produce severe detrimental impact over aquatic biota, even at very low concentrations of ngL(-1). For this reason, one of the major challenges to analytical chemists is the development of sensitive and selective extraction processes which allow the rapid and green determination of these emerging pollutants at low concentrations in environmental samples. Fabric phase sorptive extraction is a new, highly sensitive, efficient and solvent minimized technique which combine the advantages of sol-gel derived microextraction sorbents and the rich surface chemistry of cellulose fabric substrate. This process has several advantages such as minimum usage of organic solvents, short extraction times, small sample volumes and high analyte preconcentration factors. In this study, an extraction method based on sorptive fabric phase coupled to ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection (FPSE-UHPLC-MS/MS) has been developed for the determination of four progestogens and six androgens in environmental and biological samples. All the parameters involved in the extraction, such as sample volume, extraction and desorption times, desorption solvent volume and sample pH values have been optimized. The developed method provides satisfactory limits of detection (between 1.7 and 264ngL(-1)), good recoveries and low relative standard deviations (below 10% in tap and osmosis water and below 20% in wastewater and urine). Subsequently, the method was used to analyse tap water, wastewater treated with different processing technologies and urine samples. The concentrations of the detected hormones ranged from 28.3 to 227.3 ngL(-1) in water samples and from 1.1 to 3.7μgL(-1) in urine samples.

  10. A rapid spectrophotometric method for the determination of mercury in environmental, biological, soil and plant samples using diphenylthiocarbazone

    OpenAIRE

    AHMED, M. Jamaluddin; Alam, Md Shah

    2003-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and highly selective direct spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace levels of mercury(II) in various samples is described. Diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone) reacts in slightly acidic 50% aqueous 1,4-dioxane media (0.18–1.80 M sulphuric acid) with mercury(II) to give an orange chelate which has an absorption maximum at 488 nm. The average molar absorption co-efficient and Sandell's sensitivity were found to be 2.5×104l mol−1 cm−1 and 0.015 μg of Hg(II) cm−2...

  11. 50 CFR 23.50 - What are the requirements for a sample collection covered by an ATA carnet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... sample collection have not been changed. (8) For import into and export or re-export from the United... the specimens remain under customs control. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section, sample... plants in part 24 of this subchapter and 7 CFR parts 319, 352, and 355. (d) U.S. application...

  12. Three-Dimensional X-ray Observation of Atmospheric Biological Samples by Linear-Array Scanning-Electron Generation X-ray Microscope System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si3N4 thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields. PMID:21731770

  13. Three-dimensional X-ray observation of atmospheric biological samples by linear-array scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si₃N₄ thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields.

  14. Three-dimensional X-ray observation of atmospheric biological samples by linear-array scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Ogura

    Full Text Available Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM, which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si₃N₄ thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields.

  15. A comparative study of phosphopeptide-selective techniques for a sub-proteome of a complex biological sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källsten, Malin; Bergquist, Jonas; Zhao, Hongxing; Konzer, Anne; Lind, Sara Bergström

    2016-03-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is important for controlling cellular signaling and cell cycle regulatory events. The process is reversible and phosphoproteins normally constitute a minor part of the global proteome in a cell. Thus, sample preparation techniques tailored for phosphoproteome studies are continuously invented and evaluated. This paper aims at evaluating the performances of the most popular techniques for phospho-enrichments in sub-proteome analysis, such as viral proteomes expressed in human cells during infection. A two-species sample of Adenovirus type 2 infected human cells was used, and in-solution digestion, strong cation exchange (SCX), and electrostatic repulsion hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) fractionation, and subsequent enrichment by TiO2, were compared with SDS-PAGE fractionation and in-gel digestion. Evaluation was focused on phosphopeptide detection in the sub-proteome. The results showed that the SCX+TiO2 or ERLIC+TiO2 combinations had the highest enrichment efficiencies, but SDS-PAGE fractionation and in-gel digestion resulted in the highest number of identified proteins and phosphopeptides. Furthermore, the study demonstrates the usefulness of applying as many orthogonal techniques as possible in deep phosphoproteome analysis, since the overlap between approaches was low. PMID:26886742

  16. Dithizone chloroform single drop microextraction system combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier for the determination of Cd in water and biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhefeng; Zhou, Wei

    2006-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method using dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace Cd prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir as permanent modifier. Parameters, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, solvent type, pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, organic drop volume, stirring rate and sample volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (3 σ) of 0.7 ng/l and enrichment factor of 65 were achieved. The relative standard deviation was 7.4% ( c = 0.2 μg/l, n = 5). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in water samples and biological reference materials with satisfactory results.

  17. Dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction system combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier for the determination of Cd in water and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Zhefeng [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China)]. E-mail: zhefengfan@163.com; Zhou Wei [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China)

    2006-07-15

    A simple and sensitive method using dithizone-chloroform single drop microextraction has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace Cd prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir as permanent modifier. Parameters, such as pyrolysis and atomization temperature, solvent type, pH, dithizone concentration, extraction time, organic drop volume, stirring rate and sample volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (3{sigma}) of 0.7 ng/l and enrichment factor of 65 were achieved. The relative standard deviation was 7.4% (c = 0.2 {mu}g/l, n = 5). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace Cd in water samples and biological reference materials with satisfactory results.

  18. Pre-Mission Input Requirements to Enable Successful Sample Collection by a Remote Field/EVA Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. A.; Young, K. E.; Lim, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to evaluate the sample collection process with respect to sample characterization and decision making. In some cases, it may be sufficient to know whether a given outcrop or hand sample is the same as or different from previous sampling localities or samples. In other cases, it may be important to have more in-depth characterization of the sample, such as basic composition, mineralogy, and petrology, in order to effectively identify the best sample. Contextual field observations, in situ/handheld analysis, and backroom evaluation may all play a role in understanding field lithologies and their importance for return. For example, whether a rock is a breccia or a clast-laden impact melt may be difficult based on a single sample, but becomes clear as exploration of a field site puts it into context. The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team is a new activity focused on a science and exploration field based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and Phobos and Deimos. We used the FINESSE field excursion to the West Clearwater Lake Impact structure (WCIS) as an opportunity to test factors related to sampling decisions. In contract to other technology-driven NASA analog studies, The FINESSE WCIS activity is science-focused, and moreover, is sampling-focused, with the explicit intent to return the best samples for geochronology studies in the laboratory. This specific objective effectively reduces the number of variables in the goals of the field test and enables a more controlled investigation of the role of the crewmember in selecting samples. We formulated one hypothesis to test: that providing details regarding the analytical fate of the samples (e.g. geochronology, XRF/XRD, etc.) to the crew prior to their traverse will result in samples that are more likely to meet specific analytical

  19. Uncertainty in biological monitoring: a framework for data collection and analysis to account for multiple sources of sampling bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Gutierrez, Viviana; Hooten, Melvin B.; Campbell Grant, Evan H.

    2016-01-01

    Biological monitoring programmes are increasingly relying upon large volumes of citizen-science data to improve the scope and spatial coverage of information, challenging the scientific community to develop design and model-based approaches to improve inference.Recent statistical models in ecology have been developed to accommodate false-negative errors, although current work points to false-positive errors as equally important sources of bias. This is of particular concern for the success of any monitoring programme given that rates as small as 3% could lead to the overestimation of the occurrence of rare events by as much as 50%, and even small false-positive rates can severely bias estimates of occurrence dynamics.We present an integrated, computationally efficient Bayesian hierarchical model to correct for false-positive and false-negative errors in detection/non-detection data. Our model combines independent, auxiliary data sources with field observations to improve the estimation of false-positive rates, when a subset of field observations cannot be validated a posteriori or assumed as perfect. We evaluated the performance of the model across a range of occurrence rates, false-positive and false-negative errors, and quantity of auxiliary data.The model performed well under all simulated scenarios, and we were able to identify critical auxiliary data characteristics which resulted in improved inference. We applied our false-positive model to a large-scale, citizen-science monitoring programme for anurans in the north-eastern United States, using auxiliary data from an experiment designed to estimate false-positive error rates. Not correcting for false-positive rates resulted in biased estimates of occupancy in 4 of the 10 anuran species we analysed, leading to an overestimation of the average number of occupied survey routes by as much as 70%.The framework we present for data collection and analysis is able to efficiently provide reliable inference for

  20. 40 CFR 86.210-08 - Exhaust gas sampling system; Diesel-cycle vehicles not requiring particulate emissions measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas sampling system; Diesel... of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF... the outside surface of the CVS duct or dilution tunnel....

  1. Mercapto-ordered carbohydrate-derived porous carbon electrode as a novel electrochemical sensor for simple and sensitive ultra-trace detection of omeprazole in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalate Bojdi, Majid [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Chemistry, Kharazmi (Tarbiat Moallem) University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behbahani, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mashhadizadeh, Mohammad Hosein [Faculty of Chemistry, Kharazmi (Tarbiat Moallem) University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Akbar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed, E-mail: ss-hosseiny@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farahani, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    We are introducing mercapto-mesoporous carbon modified carbon paste electrode (mercapto-MP-C-CPE) as a new sensor for trace determination of omeprazole (OM) in biological samples. The synthesized modifier was characterized by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis (CHN) and N{sub 2} adsorption surface area measurement (BET). The electrochemical response characteristic of the modified-CPE toward OM was investigated by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry (CV and DPV). The proposed sensor displayed a good electrooxidation response to the OM, its linear range is 0.25 nM to 25 μM with a detection limit of 0.04 nM under the optimized conditions. The prepared modified electrode shows several advantages such as high sensitivity, long-time stability, wide linear range, ease of preparation and regeneration of the electrode surface by simple polishing and excellent reproducibility. - Highlights: • A modified nanoporous carbon as a novel sensor • High stability and good repeatability and reproducibility by the prepared sensor • Trace determination of omeprazole • Biological and pharmaceutical samples.

  2. Reexamining Sample Size Requirements for Multivariate, Abundance-Based Community Research: When Resources are Limited, the Research Does Not Have to Be.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank L Forcino

    Full Text Available Community ecologists commonly perform multivariate techniques (e.g., ordination, cluster analysis to assess patterns and gradients of taxonomic variation. A critical requirement for a meaningful statistical analysis is accurate information on the taxa found within an ecological sample. However, oversampling (too many individuals counted per sample also comes at a cost, particularly for ecological systems in which identification and quantification is substantially more resource consuming than the field expedition itself. In such systems, an increasingly larger sample size will eventually result in diminishing returns in improving any pattern or gradient revealed by the data, but will also lead to continually increasing costs. Here, we examine 396 datasets: 44 previously published and 352 created datasets. Using meta-analytic and simulation-based approaches, the research within the present paper seeks (1 to determine minimal sample sizes required to produce robust multivariate statistical results when conducting abundance-based, community ecology research. Furthermore, we seek (2 to determine the dataset parameters (i.e., evenness, number of taxa, number of samples that require larger sample sizes, regardless of resource availability. We found that in the 44 previously published and the 220 created datasets with randomly chosen abundances, a conservative estimate of a sample size of 58 produced the same multivariate results as all larger sample sizes. However, this minimal number varies as a function of evenness, where increased evenness resulted in increased minimal sample sizes. Sample sizes as small as 58 individuals are sufficient for a broad range of multivariate abundance-based research. In cases when resource availability is the limiting factor for conducting a project (e.g., small university, time to conduct the research project, statistically viable results can still be obtained with less of an investment.

  3. Determination of U, Th and Nb by ICP-MS in biological samples from a group non-occupationally exposed persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to have a good intake assessment for workers, by in vitro bioassay, appropriate methods to determine trace concentrations in urine and feces samples are required. Since the concentration of the radionuclides in the excretion samples of the workers shall be compared to the ones in the excretion samples of the members of the public. The adoption of this procedure is need to evaluate the contribution of the intake through diet ingestion or inhalation of particles in high background radiation areas, which can result in an increasing of the concentration of radionuclides in urine and feces samples due to environmental exposure independent of the occupational exposure. In Brazil, the radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series can be found associated to the ores. In order to carry out an evaluation of the internal contamination in workers from mine industry, specially niobium mine, the optimization of the methodology of the urine and feces sample preparation for determination of U, Th e Nb content using ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometer) was need. For the feces sample preparation, the sample ash (400 deg C) was the first step, followed by the addition of the nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric suprapur acids in PTFE recipient covered. The residue was dissolved with 2% nitric acid. For the urine samples, 1-ml aliquot was diluted in 2% nitric acid. A total of 23 feces samples and 25 urine samples from a group of inhabitants of Rio de Janeiro city, including children and adults, were analyzed. The results will be used as reference values in studies of evaluation of intake due to occupational exposure in Brazil. (author)

  4. Sequential cloud point extraction of trace elements from biological samples and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gine, Maria Fernanda; Patreze, Aparecida F.; Silva, Edson L. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA-USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mfgine@cena.usp.br; Sarkis, Jorge E.S.; Kakazu, Mauricio H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    A two-step sequential cloud point extraction (CPE) of trace elements from small sample volumes of human serum, animal blood, and food diet is proposed to gain analytical information in the analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The first CPE was attained by adding O,O-diethyldithiophosphate, the non ionic surfactant Triton{sup R} X-114 followed by heating at 40 deg C, centrifugation and cooling at 0 deg C. The resulting surfactant-rich phase was separated to determine Cd, Pb and Cu by isotope dilution. Isotope ratio measurements presented RSD < 0.7%. The residual surfactant-poor phase solution had the pH adjusted in the range 4 to 5 before the chelating reagent, 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol plus surfactant Triton{sup R} X-114 were added followed by the sequence to attain the CPE. Co and Ni were quantified in the second extracted surfactant-rich phases by standard additions method with RSD < 2%. Recoveries from 85 to 96% were obtained for all elements. Analyzing reference materials with certified and recommended values assessed accuracy. (author)

  5. Determination of Iodate in Food, Environmental, and Biological Samples after Solid-Phase Extraction with Ni-Al-Zr Ternary Layered Double Hydroxide as a Nanosorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Abdolmohammad-Zadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured nickel-aluminum-zirconium ternary layered double hydroxide was successfully applied as a solid-phase extraction sorbent for the separation and pre-concentration of trace levels of iodate in food, environmental and biological samples. An indirect method was used for monitoring of the extracted iodate ions. The method is based on the reaction of the iodate with iodide in acidic solution to produce iodine, which can be spectrophotometrically monitored at 352 nm. The absorbance is directly proportional to the concentration of iodate in the sample. The effect of several parameters such as pH, sample flow rate, amount of nanosorbent, elution conditions, sample volume, and coexisting ions on the recovery was investigated. In the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3s and enrichment factor were 0.12 μg mL−1 and 20, respectively. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system was linear in the range of 0.2–2.8 μg mL−1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.998. In order to validate the presented method, a certified reference material, NIST SRM 1549, was also analyzed.

  6. 4D (x-y-z-t) imaging of thick biological samples by means of Two-Photon inverted Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (2PE-iSPIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagnino, Zeno; Sancataldo, Giuseppe; D’Amora, Marta; Follert, Philipp; de Pietri Tonelli, Davide; Diaspro, Alberto; Cella Zanacchi, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques, such as selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM), has become a well established method for developmental biology. However, conventional SPIM architectures hardly permit imaging of certain tissues since the common sample mounting procedure, based on gel embedding, could interfere with the sample morphology. In this work we propose an inverted selective plane microscopy system (iSPIM), based on non-linear excitation, suitable for 3D tissue imaging. First, the iSPIM architecture provides flexibility on the sample mounting, getting rid of the gel-based mounting typical of conventional SPIM, permitting 3D imaging of hippocampal slices from mouse brain. Moreover, all the advantages brought by two photon excitation (2PE) in terms of reduction of scattering effects and contrast improvement are exploited, demonstrating an improved image quality and contrast compared to single photon excitation. The system proposed represents an optimal platform for tissue imaging and it smooths the way to the applicability of light sheet microscopy to a wider range of samples including those that have to be mounted on non-transparent surfaces.

  7. A HPLC Method for the Quantitative Determination of N-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenylcarbamothioyl)-3,5-imethylbenzamide in Biological Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidan, Igor; Grunwald, Jacob; Thekkedath, Ritesh; Degterev, Alexei; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive and simple HPLC method was developed for the determination of a novel compound, a potential anti-cancer drug, N-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenylcarbamothioyl)-3,5-dimethylbenzamide (DM-PIT-1), a member of the new structural class of non-phosphoinositide small molecule antagonist of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate–pleckstrin-homology domain interactions, in mouse plasma and tumor tissue homogenates. The chromatographic separation of DM-PIT-1 was achieved on C18 column using isocratic elution with acetonitrile-water (70:30) containing 0.1% formic acid (v/v). DM-PIT-1 was detected by UV absorbance at 320 nm and confirmed by LC-MS. The extraction of the DM-PIT-1 from the plasma and tumor tissue with methylene chloride resulted in its high recovery (70–80%). HPLC calibration curves for DM-PIT-1 based on the extracts from the mouse plasma and tumor tissue samples were linear over a broad concentration range of 0.25–20 μg/ml/g, with intra/inter-day accuracy of 95% and the precision of variation below 10%. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.1 ng and 0.2 ng respectively. The described method was successfully applied to study the pharmacokinetics of the DM-PIT-1 following the parenteral injections of DM-PIT-1 entrapped in 1,2-Disteratoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene-glycol)-2000] (PEG-PE) micelles. PMID:21514904

  8. Validation of limited sampling models (LSM) for estimating AUC in therapeutic drug monitoring - is a separate validation group required?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proost, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Limited sampling models (LSM) for estimating AUC in therapeutic drug monitoring are usually validated in a separate group of patients, according to published guidelines. The aim of this study is to evaluate the validation of LSM by comparing independent validation with cross-validation us

  9. 40 CFR 80.583 - What alternative sampling and testing requirements apply to importers who transport motor vehicle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... diesel fuel, or ECA marine fuel by truck or rail car? Importers who import diesel fuel subject to the 15... rail car for import to the U.S., the importer must obtain a copy of the terminal test result that... diesel fuel samples and perform audits. These inspections or audits may be either announced...

  10. Two to five repeated measurements per patient reduced the required sample size considerably in a randomized clinical trial for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smedslund Geir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient reported outcomes are accepted as important outcome measures in rheumatology. The fluctuating symptoms in patients with rheumatic diseases have serious implications for sample size in clinical trials. We estimated the effects of measuring the outcome 1-5 times on the sample size required in a two-armed trial. Findings In a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effects of a mindfulness-based group intervention for patients with inflammatory arthritis (n=71, the outcome variables Numerical Rating Scales (NRS (pain, fatigue, disease activity, self-care ability, and emotional wellbeing and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20 were measured five times before and after the intervention. For each variable we calculated the necessary sample sizes for obtaining 80% power (α=.05 for one up to five measurements. Two, three, and four measures reduced the required sample sizes by 15%, 21%, and 24%, respectively. With three (and five measures, the required sample size per group was reduced from 56 to 39 (32 for the GHQ-20, from 71 to 60 (55 for pain, 96 to 71 (73 for fatigue, 57 to 51 (48 for disease activity, 59 to 44 (45 for self-care, and 47 to 37 (33 for emotional wellbeing. Conclusions Measuring the outcomes five times rather than once reduced the necessary sample size by an average of 27%. When planning a study, researchers should carefully compare the advantages and disadvantages of increasing sample size versus employing three to five repeated measurements in order to obtain the required statistical power.

  11. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  12. Rapid ionic liquid-based ultrasound assisted dual magnetic microextraction to preconcentrate and separate cadmium-4-(2-thiazolylazo)-resorcinol complex from environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sumaira; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Soylak, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    A rapid and innovative microextraction technique named as, ionic liquid-based ultrasound-assisted dual magnetic microextraction (IL-UA-DMME) was developed for the preconcentration and extraction of trace cadmium from environmental and biological samples, prior to analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The proposed method has many obvious advantages, including evading the use of organic solvents and achieved high extraction yields by the combination of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and magnetic mediated-solid phase extraction (MM-SPE). In this approach ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4mim][PF6] play an important role to extract the cadmium-4-(2-thiazolylazo)-resorcinol (Cd-TAR) complex from acid digested sample solutions and ultrasonic irradiation was applied to assist emulsification. After then, dispersed small amount of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in sample solutions to salvaged the IL and complete phase separation was attained. Some analytical parameters that influencing the efficiency of proposed (IL-UA-DMME) method, such as pH, volume of IL, ligand concentration, ultra-sonication time, amount of Fe3O4 MNPs, sample volume and matrix effect were optimized. Limit of detection (LOD) and enrichment factor (EF) of the method under optimal experimental conditions were found to be 0.40μgL(-1) and 100, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of 50μgL(-1) Cd was 4.29%. The validity and accuracy of proposed method, was assessed to analyzed certified reference materials of fortified lake water TMDA-54.4, SPS-WW2 waste water, spinach leaves 1570a and also checked by standard addition method. The obtained values showed good agreement with the certified values and sufficiently high recovery were found in the range of 98.1-101% for Cd. The proposed method was facile, rapid and successfully applied for the determination of Cd in environmental and different biological samples. PMID

  13. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Using TaqMan Probes for the Identification of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs in Biological and Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cura, Carolina I.; Duffy, Tomas; Lucero, Raúl H.; Bisio, Margarita; Péneau, Julie; Jimenez-Coello, Matilde; Calabuig, Eva; Gimenez, María J.; Valencia Ayala, Edward; Kjos, Sonia A.; Santalla, José; Mahaney, Susan M.; Cayo, Nelly M.; Nagel, Claudia; Barcán, Laura; Málaga Machaca, Edith S.; Acosta Viana, Karla Y.; Brutus, Laurent; Ocampo, Susana B.; Aznar, Christine; Cuba Cuba, Cesar A.; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Ramsey, Janine M.; Ribeiro, Isabela; VandeBerg, John L.; Yadon, Zaida E.; Osuna, Antonio; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi has been classified into six Discrete Typing Units (DTUs), designated as TcI–TcVI. In order to effectively use this standardized nomenclature, a reproducible genotyping strategy is imperative. Several typing schemes have been developed with variable levels of complexity, selectivity and analytical sensitivity. Most of them can be only applied to cultured stocks. In this context, we aimed to develop a multiplex Real-Time PCR method to identify the six T. cruzi DTUs using TaqMan probes (MTq-PCR). Methods/Principal Findings The MTq-PCR has been evaluated in 39 cultured stocks and 307 biological samples from vectors, reservoirs and patients from different geographical regions and transmission cycles in comparison with a multi-locus conventional PCR algorithm. The MTq-PCR was inclusive for laboratory stocks and natural isolates and sensitive for direct typing of different biological samples from vectors, reservoirs and patients with acute, congenital infection or Chagas reactivation. The first round SL-IR MTq-PCR detected 1 fg DNA/reaction tube of TcI, TcII and TcIII and 1 pg DNA/reaction tube of TcIV, TcV and TcVI reference strains. The MTq-PCR was able to characterize DTUs in 83% of triatomine and 96% of reservoir samples that had been typed by conventional PCR methods. Regarding clinical samples, 100% of those derived from acute infected patients, 62.5% from congenitally infected children and 50% from patients with clinical reactivation could be genotyped. Sensitivity for direct typing of blood samples from chronic Chagas disease patients (32.8% from asymptomatic and 22.2% from symptomatic patients) and mixed infections was lower than that of the conventional PCR algorithm. Conclusions/Significance Typing is resolved after a single or a second round of Real-Time PCR, depending on the DTU. This format reduces carryover contamination and is amenable to quantification, automation and kit production. PMID:25993316

  14. Flammable gas tank safety program: Data requirements for core sample analysis developed through the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDuffie, N.G.; LeClair, M.D.

    1995-04-28

    This document represents the application of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process to the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Issue at the Hanford Site. The product of this effort is a list of data required from tank core sample analysis to support resolution of this issue.

  15. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace cadmium in alloys and biological samples after solid-liquid extraction and preconcentration with use of nitroso-S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is quantitatively retained by 2-nitroso-1-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid (nitroso-S) and tetradecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (TDBA) on microcrystalline naphthalene in the pH range 5.7-10.5 from a large volumes of aqueous solutions of various samples. After filtration, the solid mass consisting of cadmium complex and naphthalene is dissolved with 5 mL of dimethylformamide and the metal was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometric. Cadmium complex can alternatively be quantitatively adsorbed on tetradecyldimethylbenzylammonium-naphthalene adsorbent packed in a column and determined similarly. About 25 ng of cadmium can be concentrated in a column from 500 mL of aqueous sample, where its concentration is as low as 0.05 ng/mL. Eight replicate determinations of 0.1 μg/mL of cadmium in final DMF solution gave a mean absorbance of 0.060 with a relative standard deviation of 1.8 %. The sensitivity for 1 % absorption was 7.3 ng/mL. The interference of a large number of anions and cations has been studied and the optimized conditions developed were utilized for the trace determination of cadmium in various alloys and biological samples. (author)

  16. Monitoring of antifungal drugs in biological samples using ultrasonic-assisted supramolecular dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of a floating organic droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoddin, Maryam; Abdi, Khosrou

    2016-08-01

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of the three antifungal drugs using ultrasonic-assisted supramolecular dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of a floating organic droplet (UASMDLLME-SFO) was proposed. The supramolecular solvents produced from reversed micelles of 1-dodecanol (extraction solvent) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were injected into the aqueous sample solution. Reverse micelle coacervates were produced in situ through self-assembly processes. The antifungal drugs were extracted from the aqueous sample into a supramolecular solvent. Sonication accelerated the mass transfer of the target analytes into the supramolecular solvent phase and enhanced the dispersion process. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as type and volume of the extraction solvent, pH, volume of the disperser solvent and ultrasound extraction time were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detections for ketoconazole, clotrimazole and miconazole ranged from 0.08 to 1.3μgL(-1) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5)<6% were obtained. The method was successfully applied for preconcentration of the three drugs in biological and water samples. PMID:27262083

  17. Reprint of: Application of micro-thin-layer chromatography as a simple fractionation tool for fast screening of raw extracts derived from complex biological, pharmaceutical and environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarzycki, Pawel K., E-mail: pawel_k_z@hotmail.com [Section of Toxicology and Bioanalytics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland); Slaczka, Magdalena M.; Zarzycka, Magdalena B.; Wlodarczyk, Elzbieta; Baran, Michal J. [Section of Toxicology and Bioanalytics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland)

    2012-02-24

    The main goal of present paper is to demonstrate the separation and detection capability of micro-TLC technique involving simple one step liquid extraction protocols of complex materials without multi-steps sample pre-purification. In the present studies target components (cyanobacteria pigments, lipids and fullerenes) were isolated from heavy loading complex matrices including spirulina dried cells, birds' feathers and fatty oils as well as soot samples derived from biomass fuel and fossils-fired home heating systems. In each case isocratic separation protocol involving less that 1 mL of one component or binary mixture mobile phases can be completed within time of 5-8 min. Sensitive detection of components of interest was performed via fluorescence or staining techniques using iodine or phosphomolybdic acid. Described methodology can be applied for fast fractionation or screening of whole range of target substances as well as chemo-taxonomic studies and fingerprinting of complex mixtures, which are present in raw biological or environmental samples.

  18. Application of micro-thin-layer chromatography as a simple fractionation tool for fast screening of raw extracts derived from complex biological, pharmaceutical and environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarzycki, Pawel K., E-mail: pawel_k_z@hotmail.com [Section of Toxicology and Bioanalytics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland); Slaczka, Magdalena M.; Zarzycka, Magdalena B.; Wlodarczyk, Elzbieta; Baran, Michal J. [Section of Toxicology and Bioanalytics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland)

    2011-03-04

    The main goal of present paper is to demonstrate the separation and detection capability of micro-TLC technique involving simple one step liquid extraction protocols of complex materials without multi-steps sample pre-purification. In the present studies target components (cyanobacteria pigments, lipids and fullerenes) were isolated from heavy loading complex matrices including spirulina dried cells, birds' feathers and fatty oils as well as soot samples derived from biomass fuel and fossils-fired home heating systems. In each case isocratic separation protocol involving less that 1 mL of one component or binary mixture mobile phases can be completed within time of 5-8 min. Sensitive detection of components of interest was performed via fluorescence or staining techniques using iodine or phosphomolybdic acid. Described methodology can be applied for fast fractionation or screening of whole range of target substances as well as chemo-taxonomic studies and fingerprinting of complex mixtures, which are present in raw biological or environmental samples.

  19. Development of garlic bioactive compounds analytical methodology based on liquid phase microextraction using response surface design. Implications for dual analysis: Cooked and biological fluids samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Daniela Andrea; Locatelli, Daniela Ana; Torres-Palazzolo, Carolina Andrea; Altamirano, Jorgelina Cecilia; Camargo, Alejandra Beatriz

    2017-01-15

    Organosulphur compounds (OSCs) present in garlic (Allium sativum L.) are responsible of several biological properties. Functional foods researches indicate the importance of quantifying these compounds in food matrices and biological fluids. For this purpose, this paper introduces a novel methodology based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector (HPLC-UV) for the extraction and determination of organosulphur compounds in different matrices. The target analytes were allicin, (E)- and (Z)-ajoene, 2-vinyl-4H-1,2-dithiin (2-VD), diallyl sulphide (DAS) and diallyl disulphide (DADS). The microextraction technique was optimized using an experimental design, and the analytical performance was evaluated under optimum conditions. The desirability function presented an optimal value for 600μL of chloroform as extraction solvent using acetonitrile as dispersant. The method proved to be reliable, precise and accurate. It was successfully applied to determine OSCs in cooked garlic samples as well as blood plasma and digestive fluids. PMID:27542503

  20. Mixed hemimicelles solid-phase extraction of cephalosporins in biological samples with ionic liquid-coated magnetic graphene oxide nanoparticles coupled with high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianrong; Zhao, Hongyan; Xiao, Deli; Chuong, Pham-Huy; He, Jia; He, Hua

    2016-07-01

    A novel mixed hemimicelles solid phase extraction based on magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4/GO) and ionic liquid (IL) was developed for the simultaneous extraction and determination of trace cephalosporins in spiked human urine. The high surface area and excellent adsorption capacity of the graphene oxide after modification with1-hexadecyl-3-methylmidazoliumbromide(C16mimBr) were utilized adequately in the solid phase extraction(SPE) process. A comprehensive study of the parameters affecting the extraction recovery, such as the zeta-potential of magnetic graphene oxide, amounts of magnetic graphene oxide and surfactant, pH of solution, ionic strength, extraction time, and desorption condition were optimized. A comparative study on the use of different surfacant-coated Fe3O4/GO NPs as sorbents was presented. Good linearity (R(2)>0.9987) for all calibration curves was obtained. The LODs were ranged between 0.6 and 1.9ng mL(-1) for the cephalosporins and the LOQs were 1.5 to 5.5, respectively. Satisfactory recoveries(84.3% to 101.7%)and low relative standard deviations from 1.7% to 6.3% in biological matrices were achieved. The mixed hemimicelles magnetic SPE (MSPE) method based on ILs and Fe3O4/GO NPs magnetic separation has ever been successfully used for pretreatment of complex biological samples. PMID:27266334

  1. Development of garlic bioactive compounds analytical methodology based on liquid phase microextraction using response surface design. Implications for dual analysis: Cooked and biological fluids samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Daniela Andrea; Locatelli, Daniela Ana; Torres-Palazzolo, Carolina Andrea; Altamirano, Jorgelina Cecilia; Camargo, Alejandra Beatriz

    2017-01-15

    Organosulphur compounds (OSCs) present in garlic (Allium sativum L.) are responsible of several biological properties. Functional foods researches indicate the importance of quantifying these compounds in food matrices and biological fluids. For this purpose, this paper introduces a novel methodology based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector (HPLC-UV) for the extraction and determination of organosulphur compounds in different matrices. The target analytes were allicin, (E)- and (Z)-ajoene, 2-vinyl-4H-1,2-dithiin (2-VD), diallyl sulphide (DAS) and diallyl disulphide (DADS). The microextraction technique was optimized using an experimental design, and the analytical performance was evaluated under optimum conditions. The desirability function presented an optimal value for 600μL of chloroform as extraction solvent using acetonitrile as dispersant. The method proved to be reliable, precise and accurate. It was successfully applied to determine OSCs in cooked garlic samples as well as blood plasma and digestive fluids.

  2. LESM: a laser-driven sub-MeV electron source delivering ultra-high dose rate on thin biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labate, L.; Andreassi, M. G.; Baffigi, F.; Bizzarri, R.; Borghini, A.; Bussolino, G. C.; Fulgentini, L.; Ghetti, F.; Giulietti, A.; Köster, P.; Lamia, D.; Levato, T.; Oishi, Y.; Pulignani, S.; Russo, G.; Sgarbossa, A.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a laser-driven source of electron bunches with average energy 260~\\text{keV} and picosecond duration, which has been setup for radiobiological tests covering the previously untested sub-MeV energy range. Each bunch combines high charge with short duration and sub-millimeter range into a record instantaneous dose rate, as high as {{10}9}~\\text{Gy}~{{\\text{s}}-1} . The source can be operated at 10~\\text{Hz} and its average dose rate is 35~\\text{mGy}~{{\\text{s}}-1} . Both the high instantaneous dose rate and high level of relative biological effectiveness, attached to sub-MeV electrons, make this source very attractive for studies of ultrafast radiobiology on thin cell samples. The source reliability, in terms of shot-to-shot stability of features such as mean energy, bunch charge and transverse beam profile, is discussed, along with a dosimetric characterization. Finally, a few preliminary biological tests performed with this source are presented.

  3. Enhanced flow injection analysis for measurements of S-nitrosothiols species in biological samples using highly selective amperometric nitric oxide sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Cui Huang; Hui Bo Shao

    2012-01-01

    A highly selective nitric oxide (NO) sensor is fabricated and applied to devise an enhanced flow injection analysis (FIA) system for S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) measurement in biological samples.The NO sensor is prepared using a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) gas-permeable membrane loaded with Teflon AF(R) solution,a copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene and 2,2-bis(trifluoroethylene)-4,5-difluoro-1,3-dioxole,to improve selectivity.This method is much simpler and possesses good performance over a wide range of RSNOs concentrations.Standard deviation for three parallel measurements of blood plasma is 4.0%.The use of the gas sensing configuration as the detector enhances selectivity of the FIA measurement vs.using less selective electrochemical detectors that do not use PTFE/Teflon type outer membranes.

  4. Determination of mercury levels in biological samples using the incomplete cubane-type sulfur-bridged nitrilotriacetato molybdenum complex by a spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikoh, H; Yamate, M; Takahashi, M; Shibahara, T

    1997-01-01

    Spectrophotometric determination of mercury levels in biological samples was investigated using incomplete cubane-type sulfur-bridged molybdenum complex, K2[Mo3S4(Hnta)3] 9H2O, ("NTA" complex; H3nta = nitrilotri acetic acid). The urine or organs of mice, which were either exposed to metallic mercury vapor or injected intraperitoneally with mercuric ion, were decomposed from four to twelve hours with a mixed solution of potassium permanganate and sulfuric acid. After the pretreatment, mercury in the urine and organs of mice was captured by the "NTA" complex. Absorbance of the resultant solution in the urine or organs of mice was also measured by a spectrophotometer under conditions similar to that of the exhalation. PMID:9353959

  5. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez, Laura; Molina, Jorge; Florea, Daniela I.; Planells, Elena M. [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology and Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Cartuja, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Cabeza, M. Carmen [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Quintero, Bartolomé, E-mail: bqosso@ugr.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis.

  6. Recent applications on isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS on biological samples and single particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J. Sabine; Sela, Hagit; Dobrowolska, Justina; Zoriy, Miroslav; Becker, J. Susanne

    2008-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) have proved themselves to be powerful and sensitive inorganic mass spectrometric techniques for analysing stable and radioactive isotopes in different application fields because of their high sensitivity, low detection limits, good accuracy and precision. New applications of ICP-MS focus on tracer experiments and the development of isotope dilution techniques together with nanoflow injections for the analysis of small volumes of biological samples. Today, LA-ICP-MS is the method of choice for direct determination of metals, e.g., on protein bands in gels after the gel electrophoresis of protein mixtures. Tracer experiments using highly enriched 65Cu were utilized in order to study the formation of metal-binding bovine serum proteins. A challenging task for LA-ICP-MS is its application as an imaging mass spectrometric technique for the production of isotope images (e.gE, from thin sections of brain tissues stained with neodymium). In this paper, we demonstrate the application of imaging mass spectrometry on single particles (zircon and uranium oxide). Single Precambrian zircon crystals from the Baltic Shield were investigated with respect to isotope ratios using LA-ICP-MS for age dating. The U-Pb age was determined from the isochrone with (1.48 ± 0.14) × 109 a. Using isotope ratio measurements on 10 nuclear uranium oxide single particles the 235U/238U isotope ratio was determined to be 0.032 ± 0.004. This paper describes recent developments and applications of isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS on biological samples and single particles.

  7. A Simple Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Copper in Some Real, Environmental, Biological, Food and Soil Samples Using Salicylaldehyde Benzoyl Hydrazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamaluddin Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A very simple, ultra-sensitive, highly selective and non-extractive spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amounts copper(II has been developed. Salicylaldehy debenzoyl hydrazone (SAL-BH has been proposed as a new analytical reagent for the direct non-extractive spectrophotometric determination of copper(II. SAL-BH reacts with copper in a slightly acidic (0.0001-0.005 M H2SO4 in 40% 1,4-dioxane media with copper(II to give a highly absorbent greenish yellow chelate with a molar ratio 1:1(CuII: SAL-BH The reaction is instantaneous and the maximum absorption was obtained at 404 nm and remains stable for 72 h. The average molar absorptivity and Sandell’s sensitivity were found to be 1.4×105 L mol-1 cm-1 and 5.0 ng cm-2 of copper(II, respectively. Linear calibration graphs were obtained for 0.01 – 18 mg L-1 of CuII. The detection limit and quantification limit of the reaction system were found to be 1 ng mL-1 and 10 µg L-1, respectively. A large excess of over 50 cations, anions and complexing agents (e.g., tartrate, oxalate, citrate, phosphate, thiocyanate etc. do not interfere in the determination. The method is highly selective for copper and was successfully used for the determination of copper in several standard reference materials (steels and alloys as well as in some environmental waters (portable and polluted, biological (human blood and urine, food and soil samples and solutions containing both copper(I and copper(II as well as some complex synthetic mixtures. The results of the proposed method for biological and food samples were comparable with AAS and were found to be in good agreement. The method has high precision and accuracy (s = ± 0.01 for 0.5 mg L-1.

  8. Flow Injection Analysis Coupled with Carbon Electrodes as the Tool for Analysis of Naphthoquinones with Respect to Their Content and Functions in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Naphthoquinones are one of the groups of secondary metabolites widespread innature, where they mostly appear as chromatic pigments. They embody broad-range ofbiological actions from phytotoxic to fungicidal. An anticancer effect of naphthoquinonesstimulates an interest in determination and characterization of single derivatives of 1,2- and1,4-quinones in biological samples. The main aim of this work was to suggest a techniquesuitable to determine lawsone, juglone and/or plumbagin in biological samples and to studyof their influence on BY-2 tobacco cells. The BY-2 tobacco cells were cultivated in thepresence of the naphthoquinones of interest (500 μg.l-1 for 24 h and then the morphologicalchanges were observed. We found out that naphthoquinones triggered the programmed celldeath at BY-2 cells, which can be confirmed by the apoptotic bodies in nucleus. After thatwe suggested and optimized different electrochemical techniques such differential pulsevoltammetry (DPV coupled with hanging mercury drop (HMDE and carbon pasteelectrode, micro flow device coupled with carbon screen printed electrodes and flowinjection analysis coupled with Coulochem III detector to determine them. The detectionlimits of naphthoquinones of interest were expressed as 3S/N and varied from units tohundreds of ng per millilitres according to methods used. Moreover, we utilized DPVcoupled with HMDE and micro flow device to determine content of juglone in leavesPersian walnut (Juglans regia. We determined that the leaves contained juglone tenths of gper 100 g of fresh weight. The results obtained show the convincing possibilities of using ofthese methods in analysis of plant secondary metabolites.

  9. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis

  10. Acrylamide-functionalized graphene micro-solid-phase extraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for the online analysis of trace monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoting; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke; Zhang, Zhuomin

    2015-05-01

    Monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples are essential biomarkers for the diagnosis of neurological disorders. In this work, acrylamide-functionalized graphene adsorbent was successfully synthesized by a chemical functionalization method and was packed in a homemade polyether ether ketone micro column as a micro-solid-phase extraction unit. This micro-solid-phase extraction unit was directly coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography to form an online system for the separation and analysis of three monoamine acidic metabolites including homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in human urine and plasma. The online system showed high stability, permeability, and adsorption capacity toward target metabolites. The saturated extraction amount of this online system was 213.1, 107.0, and 153.4 ng for homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, respectively. Excellent detection limits were achieved in the range of 0.08-0.25 μg/L with good linearity and reproducibility. It was interesting that three targets in urine and plasma could be actually quantified to be 0.94-3.93 μg/L in plasma and 7.15-19.38 μg/L in urine. Good recoveries were achieved as 84.8-101.4% for urine and 77.8-95.1% for plasma with the intra- and interday relative standard deviations less than 9.3 and 10.3%, respectively. This method shows great potential for online analysis of trace monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples.

  11. Facile stripping voltammetric determination of haloperidol using a high performance magnetite/carbon nanotube paste electrode in pharmaceutical and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Hasan, E-mail: h.bagheri@srbiau.ac.ir [Chemical Injuries Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afkhami, Abbas [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahi, Yunes [Chemical Injuries Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshsafar, Hosein; Shirzadmehr, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared to construct a novel sensor for the determination of haloperidol (Hp) by voltammetric methods. The morphology and properties of electrode surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This modified sensor was used as a selective electrochemical sensor for the determination of trace amounts of Hp. The peak currents of differential pulse and square wave voltammograms of Hp increased linearly with its concentration in the ranges of 1.2 × 10{sup −3}–0.52 and 6.5 × 10{sup −4}–0.52 μmol L{sup −1}, respectively. The detection limits for Hp were 7.02 × 10{sup −4} and 1.33 × 10{sup −4} μmol L{sup −1} for differential pulse and square wave voltammetric methods, respectively. The results show that the combination of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles causes a dramatic enhancement in the sensitivity of Hp quantification. This sensor was successfully applied to determine Hp in pharmaceutical samples and biological fluids. The fabricated electrode showed excellent reproducibility, repeatability and stability. - Highlights: • A sensitive paste using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/multi-walled carbon nanotubes was fabricated. • Haloperidol determination is based on its adsorption on the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWCNTs. • Different electrochemical methods and impedance spectroscopy were used for this study. • Haloperidol was determined in pharmaceutical and biological samples. • In comparison to other conventional methods, this method is simple, rapid, selective and cost-effective.

  12. Non-destructive automated sampling of mycotoxins in bulk food and feed - A new tool for required harmonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjer, M; Stroka, J; Patel, S; Buechler, S; Pittet, A; Barel, S

    2001-06-01

    Mycotoxins contamination is highly non-uniformly distributed as is well recog-nized by the EC, by not only setting legal limits in a series of commodities, but also schedule a sampling plan that takes this heterogeneity into account. In practice however, it turns out that it is very difficult to carry out this sampling plan in a harmonised way. Applying the sampling plan to a container filled with pallets of bags (i.e. with nuts or coffee beans) varies from very laborious to almost impossible. The presented non-destructive automated method to sample bulk food could help to overcome these practical problems and to enforcing of EC directives. It is derived from a tested and approved technology for detection of illicit substances in security applications. It has capability to collect and iden-tify ultra trace contaminants, i.e. from a fingerprint of chemical substance in a bulk of goods, a cargo pallet load (~ 1000 kg) with boxes and commodities.The technology, patented for explosives detection, uses physical and chemistry processes for excitation and remote rapid enhanced release of contaminant residues, vapours and particulate, of the inner/outer surfaces of inspected bulk and collect them on selective probes. The process is automated, takes only 10 minutes, is non-destructive and the bulk itself remains unharmed. The system design is based on applicable international regulations for shipped cargo hand-ling and transportation by road, sea and air. After this process the pallet can be loaded on a truck, ship or plane. Analysis can be carried out before the cargo leaves the place of shipping. The potent application of this technology for myco-toxins detection, has been demonstrated by preliminary feasibility experiments. Aflatoxins were detected in pistachios and ochratoxin A in green coffee beans bulk. Both commodities were naturally contaminated, priory found and confirm-ed by common methods as used at routine inspections. Once the contaminants are extracted from a

  13. Sample Size and Repeated Measures Required in Studies of Foods in the Homes of African-American Families123

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, June; Bryant, Maria; Wang, Chin-Hua; Cai, Jianwen; Bentley, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the home food environment is of interest to researchers because it affects food intake and is a feasible target for nutrition interventions. The objective of this study was to provide estimates to aid the calculation of sample size and number of repeated measures needed in studies of nutrients and foods in the home. We inventoried all foods in the homes of 80 African-American first-time mothers and determined 6 nutrient-related attributes. Sixty-three households were measured 3...

  14. Modified Ionic Liquid Cold-Induced Aggregation Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Spectrofluorimetry for Trace Determination of Ofloxacin in Pharmaceutical and Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Norouzi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Ofloxacin is a quinolone synthetic antibiotic, which acts against resistant mutants of bacteria by inhibiting DNA gyrase. This antibacterial agent is widely used in the treatment of respiratory tract, urinary tract and tissue-based infections, which are caused by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this work, an efficient modified ionic liquid cold-induced aggregation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (M-IL-CIA-DLLME was combined with spectrofluorimetry for trace determination of ofloxacin in real samples.Methods: In this microextraction method, hydrophobic 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Hmim] [PF6] ionic liquid (IL as a microextraction solvent was dispersed into a heated sample solution containing sodium hexafluorophosphate (NaPF6 (as a common ion and the analyte of interest. Afterwards, the resultant solution was cooled in an ice-water bath and a cloudy condition was formed due to a considerable decrease of IL solubility. After centrifuging, the enriched phase was introduced to the spectrofluorimeter for the determination of ofloxacin.Results and major conclusion: In this technique, the performance of the microextraction method was not influenced by variations in the ionic strength of the sample solution (up to 30% w/v. Furthermore, [Hmim][PF6] IL was chosen as a green microextraction phase and an alternative to traditional toxic organic solvents. Different parameters affecting the analytical performance were studied and optimized. At optimum conditions, a relatively broad linear dynamic range of 0.15-125 μg l-1 and a limit of detection (LOD of 0.029 μg l-1 were obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D. obtained for the determination of five replicates of the 10 ml solution containing 50 μg l-1 ofloxacin was 2.7%. Finally, the combined methodology was successfully applied to ofloxacin determination in actual pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples.

  15. High Sensitivity Method to Estimate Distribution of Hyaluronan Molecular Sizes in Small Biological Samples Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Do

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan is a negatively charged polydisperse polysaccharide where both its size and tissue concentration play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The various functions of hyaluronan depend on its molecular size. Up to now, it has been difficult to study the role of hyaluronan in diseases with pathological changes in the extracellular matrix where availability is low or tissue samples are small. Difficulty to obtain large enough biopsies from human diseased tissue or tissue from animal models has also restricted the study of hyaluronan. In this paper, we demonstrate that gas-phase electrophoretic molecular mobility analyzer (GEMMA can be used to estimate the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes in biological samples with a limited amount of hyaluronan. The low detection level of the GEMMA method allows for estimation of hyaluronan molecular sizes from different parts of small organs. Hence, the GEMMA method opens opportunity to attain a profile over the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes and estimate changes caused by disease or experimental conditions that has not been possible to obtain before.

  16. Determination of trace aluminum in biological and water samples by cloud point extraction preconcentration and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang Hongbo [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Liang Pei [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)], E-mail: liangpei@mail.ccnu.edu.cn; Du Dan [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2008-06-15

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method for the preconcentration of trace aluminum prior to its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) has been developed. The CPE method is based on the complex of Al(III) with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP), and then entrapped in non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114. PMBP was used not only as chelating reagent in CPE preconcentration, but also as chemical modifier in GFAAS determination. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, such as pH of sample solution, concentration of PMBP and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and time, were investigated in detail. An enrichment factor of 37 was obtained for the preconcentration of Al(III) with 10 mL solution. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of this method for Al(III) is 0.09 ng mL{sup -1}, and the relative standard deviation is 4.7% at 10 ng mL{sup -1} Al(III) level (n = 7). The proposed method has been applied for determination of trace amount of aluminum in biological and water samples with satisfactory results.

  17. Determination of ultra trace amounts of bismuth in biological and water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemirani, Farzaneh; Baghdadi, Majid; Ramezani, Majid; Jamali, Mohammad Reza

    2005-04-04

    A new approach for a cloud point extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method was used for determining bismuth. The aqueous analyte was acidified with sulfuric acid (pH 3.0-3.5). Triton X-114 was added as a surfactant and dithizone was used as a complexing agent. After phase separation at 50 deg. C based on the cloud point separation of the mixture, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted using tetrahydrofuran (THF). Twenty microliters of the enriched solution and 10 {mu}l of 0.1% (w/v) Pd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} as chemical modifier were dispersed into the graphite tube and the analyte determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After optimizing extraction conditions and instrumental parameters, a preconcentration factor of 196 was obtained for a sample of only 10 ml. The detection limit was 0.02 ng ml{sup -1} and the analytical curve was linear for the concentration range of 0.04-0.60 ng ml{sup -1}. Relative standard deviations were <5%. The method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of bismuth in tap water and biological samples (urine and hair)

  18. A new cloud point extraction procedure for determination of inorganic antimony species in beverages and biological samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Nail; Gürkan, Ramazan

    2015-05-15

    A new cloud-point extraction (CPE) for the determination of antimony species in biological and beverages samples has been established with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the fact that formation of the competitive ion-pairing complex of Sb(III) and Sb(V) with Victoria Pure Blue BO (VPB(+)) at pH 10. The antimony species were individually detected by FAAS. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration range for Sb(V) is 1-250 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.25 μg L(-1) and sensitive enhancement factor of 76.3 while the calibration range for Sb(III) is 10-400 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 5.15 μg L(-1) and sensitive enhancement factor of 48.3. The precision as a relative standard deviation is in range of 0.24-2.35%. The method was successfully applied to the speciative determination of antimony species in the samples. The validation was verified by analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs).

  19. Sensitive determination method for mercury ion, methyl-, ethyl-, and phenyl-mercury in water and biological samples using high-performance liquid chromatography with chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodamatani, Hitoshi; Matsuyama, Akito; Saito, Keiitsu; Kono, Yuriko; Kanzaki, Ryo; Tomiyasu, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive determination method for mercury speciation analysis was developed. Four mercury species, mercury ion, methylmercury, ethylmercury, and phenylmercury, were complexed with emetine-dithiocarbamate (emetine-CS(2)), and then injected onto a HPLC instrument coupled with a tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(III) chemiluminescence detection system. The emetine-CS(2) complexing agent was effectively used to measure the concentration in addition to serving as a separation and detection reagent. The calibration curves for these mercury complexes were linear in the range of 0.050 - 10 μg L(-1) (as Hg). The limit of detection for (emetine-CS(2))(2)Hg, emetine-CS(2)-methylmercury, emetine-CS(2)-ethylmercury, and emetine-CS(2)-phenylmercury were 30, 17, 21, and 22 ng L(-1), respectively. The sensitivity of this method enables the determination of mercury species in water samples at sub-ppb levels. Furthermore, the method was applied to biological samples in combination with acid leaching and liquid-liquid extraction using emetine-CS(2) as an extraction reagent. The determination results were in good agreement with the values of the certified reference materials.

  20. Automated dynamic hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction combined with capillary electrophoresis for speciation of mercury in biological and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pingjing; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-10-01

    A simple home-made automatic dynamic hollow fiber based liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (AD-HF-LLLME) device was designed and constructed for the simultaneous extraction of organomercury and inorganic mercury species with the assistant of a programmable flow injection analyzer. With 18-crown-6 as the complexing reagent, mercury species including methyl-, ethyl-, phenyl- and inorganic mercury were extracted into the organic phase (chlorobenzene), and then back-extracted into the acceptor phase of 0.1% (m/v) 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (MPS) aqueous solution. Compared with automatic static (AS)-HF-LLLME system, the extraction equilibrium of target mercury species was obtained in shorter time with higher extraction efficiency in AD-HF-LLLME system. Based on it, a new method of AD-HF-LLLME coupled with large volume sample stacking (LVSS)-capillary electrophoresis (CE)/UV detection was developed for the simultaneous analysis of methyl-, phenyl- and inorganic mercury species in biological samples and environmental water. Under the optimized conditions, AD-HF-LLLME provided high enrichment factors (EFs) of 149-253-fold within relatively short extraction equilibrium time (25min) and good precision with RSD between 3.8 and 8.1%. By combining AD-HF-LLLME with LVSS-CE/UV, EFs were magnified up to 2195-fold and the limits of detection (at S/N=3) for target mercury species were improved to be sub ppb level.

  1. Assessment of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in police in Florence, Italy, through personal air sampling and biological monitoring of the urinary metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, A; Gottardi, M; Boddi, V; Bavazzano, P; Lanciotti, E

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in workers exposed to exhaust gas from cars, and they assessed the efficiency of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene as an indicator of exposure to pyrene and PAHs. The authors selected 2 groups of police who worked in 2 areas in the city of Florence: 1 group was highly exposed to high-density traffic emissions during the winter and summer of 1997, and the 2nd group experienced low exposure to traffic emissions during the same period. Ambient monitoring was achieved with personal sampling of airborne PAHs during each workshift. Eight hydrocarbons were used as indicators of pollution caused by PAHs (e.g., pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene). Biological monitoring was performed through dosing of 1-hydroxypyrene (pyrene metabolite) in urine samples taken at the end of each workshift. The ambient monitoring revealed that PAH concentrations were influenced by both season of sampling and varying intensities of traffic in the different areas. The median concentration of benzo[a]pyrene in winter was twice as high in the high-density traffic area as in the low-density traffic area (i.e., 4.1 ng/m3 versus 1.8 ng/m3). In summer, the high-density traffic area experienced benzo[a]pyrene concentrations that were 6 times higher than in the low-density traffic area (i.e., 1.2 ng/m3 versus 0.2 ng/m3). Benzo[a]pyrene was also correlated highly (r(s) = .92, p traffic area and 120.5 ng/gm creatinine in the low-density traffic area). An analysis of the general data revealed that 1-hydroxypyrene was, to some degree, related to pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, and airborne total PAHs, whereas analysis of separate data for the area and the season revealed an emergence of a closer correlation during the winter in the high-traffic area. Therefore, 1 -hydroxypyrene can be considered a good biological indicator of exposure to airborne PAHs in the urban environment, especially in winter

  2. Dithizone modified magnetic nanoparticles for fast and selective solid phase extraction of trace elements in environmental and biological samples prior to their determination by ICP-OES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guihong; He, Man; Peng, Hanyong; Hu, Bin

    2012-01-15

    A fast and simple method for analysis of trace amounts of Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) in environmental and biological samples was developed by combining magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) detection. Dithizone modified silica-coated magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (H(2)Dz-SCMNPs) were prepared and used for MSPE of trace amounts of Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The prepared magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The factors affecting the extraction of the target metal ions such as pH, sample volume, eluent, and interfering ions had been investigated and the adsorption mechanism of the target metals on the self-prepared H(2)Dz-SCMNPs was investigated by FT-IR and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of the developed method for Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) were 35, 11, 62, and 8ngL(-1), respectively, with the enrichment factor of 100. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, c=10μgL(-1), n=7) were in the range of 1.7-3.1% and the linear range was 0.1-100μgL(-1). The proposed method had been validated by two certified reference materials (GSBZ50009-88 environmental water and GBW07601 human hair), and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The method was also applied for the determination of trace metals in real water and human hair samples with recoveries in the range of 85-110% for the spiked samples. The developed MSPE-ICP-OES method has the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, selectivity, high extraction efficiency and is suitable for the analysis of samples with large volume and complex matrix. PMID:22265534

  3. A rapid ultrasound-assisted thiourea extraction method for the determination of inorganic and methyl mercury in biological and environmental samples by CVAAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, M V Balarama; Ranjit, Manjusha; Karunasagar, D; Arunachalam, J

    2005-07-15

    A rapid ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure for the determination of total mercury, inorganic and methyl mercury (MM) in various environmental matrices (animal tissues, samples of plant origin and coal fly ash) has been developed. The mercury contents were estimated by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Inorganic mercury (IM) was determined using SnCl(2) as reducing agent whereas total mercury was determined after oxidation of methyl mercury through UV irradiation. Operational parameters such as extractant composition (HNO(3) and thiourea), sonication time and sonication amplitude found to be different for different matrices and were optimized using IAEA-350 (Fish homogenate), IM and MM loaded moss and NIST-1633b (Coal fly ash) to get quantitative extraction of total mercury. The method was further validated through the analysis of additional certified reference materials (RM): NRCC-DORM2 (Dogfish muscle), NRCC-DOLT1 (Dogfish liver) and IAEA-336 (Lichen). Quantitative recovery of total Hg was achieved using mixtures of 5% HNO(3) and 0.02% thiourea, 10% HNO(3) and 0.02% thiourea, 20% HNO(3) and 0.2% thiourea for fish tissues, plant matrices and coal fly ash samples, respectively. The results obtained were in close agreement with certified values with an overall precision in the range of 5-15%. The proposed ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure significantly reduces the time required for sample treatment for the extraction of Hg species. The extracted mercury species are very stable even after 24h of sonication. Closed microwave digestion was also used for comparison purposes. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Hg in field samples of lichens, mosses, coal fly ash and coal samples.

  4. Development of sample extraction and clean-up strategies for target and non-target analysis of environmental contaminants in biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baduel, Christine; Mueller, Jochen F; Tsai, Henghang; Gomez Ramos, Maria Jose

    2015-12-24

    Recently, there has been an increasing trend towards multi-targeted analysis and non-target screening methods as a means to increase the number of monitored analytes. Previous studies have developed biomonitoring methods which specifically focus on only a small number of analytes with similar physico-chemical properties. In this paper, we present a simple and rapid multi-residue method for simultaneous extraction of polar and non-polar organic chemicals from biological matrices, containing up to 5% lipid content. Our method combines targeted multi-residue analysis using gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) and a multi-targeted analysis complemented with non-target screening using liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS/MS). The optimization of the chemical extraction procedure and the effectiveness of different clean-up methods were evaluated for two biological matrices: fish muscle (lipid content ∼2%) and breast milk (∼4%). To extract a wide range of chemicals, the partition/extraction procedure used for the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) approach was tested as the initial step for the extraction of 77 target compounds covering a broad compound domain. All the target analytes have different physico-chemical properties (log Kow ranges from -0.3 to 10) and cover a broad activity spectrum; from polar pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) to highly lipophilic chemicals such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochloride pesticides (OCPs). A number of options were explored for the clean-up of lipids, proteins and other impurities present in the matrix. Zirconium dioxide-based sorbents as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) and protein-lipid removal filter cartridges (Captiva ND Lipids) provided the best results for GC-MS and LC-MS analysis

  5. Development of sample extraction and clean-up strategies for target and non-target analysis of environmental contaminants in biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baduel, Christine; Mueller, Jochen F; Tsai, Henghang; Gomez Ramos, Maria Jose

    2015-12-24

    Recently, there has been an increasing trend towards multi-targeted analysis and non-target screening methods as a means to increase the number of monitored analytes. Previous studies have developed biomonitoring methods which specifically focus on only a small number of analytes with similar physico-chemical properties. In this paper, we present a simple and rapid multi-residue method for simultaneous extraction of polar and non-polar organic chemicals from biological matrices, containing up to 5% lipid content. Our method combines targeted multi-residue analysis using gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) and a multi-targeted analysis complemented with non-target screening using liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS/MS). The optimization of the chemical extraction procedure and the effectiveness of different clean-up methods were evaluated for two biological matrices: fish muscle (lipid content ∼2%) and breast milk (∼4%). To extract a wide range of chemicals, the partition/extraction procedure used for the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) approach was tested as the initial step for the extraction of 77 target compounds covering a broad compound domain. All the target analytes have different physico-chemical properties (log Kow ranges from -0.3 to 10) and cover a broad activity spectrum; from polar pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) to highly lipophilic chemicals such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochloride pesticides (OCPs). A number of options were explored for the clean-up of lipids, proteins and other impurities present in the matrix. Zirconium dioxide-based sorbents as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) and protein-lipid removal filter cartridges (Captiva ND Lipids) provided the best results for GC-MS and LC-MS analysis

  6. A simple spectrophotometric method for the determination of copper in some real, environmental, biological, food and soil samples using salicylaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very simple, ultra-sensitive, highly selective and non-extractive spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amounts copper (II) has been developed. Salicylaldehyde debenzoyl hydrazone (SAL-BH) has been proposed as a new analytical reagent for the direct non-extractive spectrophotometric determination of copper (II). SAL-BH reacts with copper in a slightly acidic (0.0001-0.005 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) in 40% 1,4-dioxane media with copper(lI) to give a highly absorbent greenish yellow chelate with a molar ratio 1:1(CuII: SAL-BH) The reaction is instantaneous and the maximum absorption was obtained at 404 nffi and remains stable for 72 h. The average molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity were found to be 1.4x105 L mol-I cm/sup -1/ and 5.0 ng cm-2 of copper (II), respectively. Linear calibration graphs were obtained for 0.01 -18 mg L-1 of C/sup 11/. The detection limit and quantification limit of the reaction system were found to be 1 ng mL/sup -1/ and 10 micro.g L/sup -1/, respectively. A large excess of over 50 cations, anions and complexing agents (e.g., tartrate, oxalate, citrate, phosphate, thiocyanate etc.) do not interfere in the determination. The method is highly selective for copper and was successfully used for the determination of copper in several standard reference materials (steels and alloys) as well as in some environmental waters (portable and polluted), biological (human blood and urine), food and soil samples and solutions containing both copper (I) and copper( II) as well as some complex synthetic mixtures. The results of the proposed method for biological and food samples were comparable with AAS and were found to be in good agreement. The method has high precision and accuracy (s = t 0.01 for 0.5 mgL/sup -1/). (author)

  7. Achieving Accuracy Requirements for Forest Biomass Mapping: A Data Fusion Method for Estimating Forest Biomass and LiDAR Sampling Error with Spaceborne Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, P. M.; Cook, B. D.; Sun, G.; Simard, M.; Zhang, Z.; Nelson, R. F.; Ranson, K. J.; Lutchke, S.; Blair, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    The synergistic use of active and passive remote sensing (i.e., data fusion) demonstrates the ability of spaceborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and multispectral imagery for achieving the accuracy requirements of a global forest biomass mapping mission. This data fusion approach also provides a means to extend 3D information from discrete spaceborne LiDAR measurements of forest structure across scales much larger than that of the LiDAR footprint. For estimating biomass, these measurements mix a number of errors including those associated with LiDAR footprint sampling over regional - global extents. A general framework for mapping above ground live forest biomass (AGB) with a data fusion approach is presented and verified using data from NASA field campaigns near Howland, ME, USA, to assess AGB and LiDAR sampling errors across a regionally representative landscape. We combined SAR and Landsat-derived optical (passive optical) image data to identify forest patches, and used image and simulated spaceborne LiDAR data to compute AGB and estimate LiDAR sampling error for forest patches and 100m, 250m, 500m, and 1km grid cells. Forest patches were delineated with Landsat-derived data and airborne SAR imagery, and simulated spaceborne LiDAR (SSL) data were derived from orbit and cloud cover simulations and airborne data from NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (L VIS). At both the patch and grid scales, we evaluated differences in AGB estimation and sampling error from the combined use of LiDAR with both SAR and passive optical and with either SAR or passive optical alone. This data fusion approach demonstrates that incorporating forest patches into the AGB mapping framework can provide sub-grid forest information for coarser grid-level AGB reporting, and that combining simulated spaceborne LiDAR with SAR and passive optical data are most useful for estimating AGB when measurements from LiDAR are limited because they minimized

  8. A novel graphene-based label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor for selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species in biological samples and living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yaotang; Garg, Bhaskar; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2016-02-01

    A novel label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti4+-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti4+) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions between phosphate groups and Ti4+. The as-prepared rGO@PDA-Ti4+-FMNs (nanosensor), fluoresce only weakly due to the ineffective Förster resonance energy transfer between the FMNs and rGO@PDA-Ti4+. The experimental findings revealed that the microwave-assisted interaction of the nanosensor with α-, β-casein, ovalbumin, human serum, non-fat milk, egg white, and living cells (all containing Ps) releases FMNs (due to the high formation constant between phosphate groups and Ti4+), leading to an excellent fluorescence `turn-on' response. The fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal microscopy, and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometry were used to detect Ps both qualitatively and quantitatively. Under the optimized conditions, the nanosensor showed a detection limit of ca. 118.5, 28.9, and 54.8 nM for the tryptic digests of α-, β-casein and ovalbumin, respectively. Furthermore, the standard addition method was used as a bench-mark proof for phosphopeptide quantification in egg white samples. We postulate that the present quantitative assay for Ps holds tremendous potential and may pave the way to disease diagnostics in the near future.A novel label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti4+-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti4+) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions

  9. Development and evaluation of a technique for the determination of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra by liquid scintillation in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Paulo Cesar P.; Sousa, Wanderson O.; Dantas, Bernardo M.; Juliao, Ligia M.Q.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: pcesar@ird.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    Radium isotopes are dispersed in the environment according to their physicochemical characteristics. Considering their long half-lives and radiological effects, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra are very important issues to radiological protection. In Brazil, radium isotopes represent an exposure problem both in the nuclear fuel cycle installations and in high natural radiation background areas. The experimental part of this work includes the development of a technique for the determination of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra by liquid scintillation in biological samples. Radium was concentrated and then separated from the others constituents of the sample by coprecipitation/ precipitation with Ba(Ra)SO{sub 4}. The precipitate was filtered and weighted to calculate the chemical yield. The filter containing the precipitate of Ba(Ra)SO{sub 4} was transferred to a scintillation vial. Two methods were used to prepare the sources. The first one consisted gel suspension and the second one, phases method. The solutions obtained were counted in a low background scintillation spectrometry system (Quantulus) suitable for the detection and identification of both alpha and beta particles for the determination of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra. The activity values of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra calculated by the two methods are in good agreement with the reference value indicating that both methods are suitable for the determination of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra. The values of minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the gel suspension method were 2.5 mBq.L{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra and 53 mBq.L{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra and for the method of phases were 2.6 mBq.L{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra and 66 mBq.L{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra. (author)

  10. Development and evaluation of a technique for the determination of 226Ra and 228Ra by liquid scintillation in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium isotopes are dispersed in the environment according to their physicochemical characteristics. Considering their long half-lives and radiological effects, 226Ra and 228Ra are very important issues to radiological protection. In Brazil, radium isotopes represent an exposure problem both in the nuclear fuel cycle installations and in high natural radiation background areas. The experimental part of this work includes the development of a technique for the determination of 226Ra and 228Ra by liquid scintillation in biological samples. Radium was concentrated and then separated from the others constituents of the sample by coprecipitation/ precipitation with Ba(Ra)SO4. The precipitate was filtered and weighted to calculate the chemical yield. The filter containing the precipitate of Ba(Ra)SO4 was transferred to a scintillation vial. Two methods were used to prepare the sources. The first one consisted gel suspension and the second one, phases method. The solutions obtained were counted in a low background scintillation spectrometry system (Quantulus) suitable for the detection and identification of both alpha and beta particles for the determination of 226Ra and 228Ra. The activity values of 226Ra and 228Ra calculated by the two methods are in good agreement with the reference value indicating that both methods are suitable for the determination of 226Ra and 228Ra. The values of minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the gel suspension method were 2.5 mBq.L-1 for 226Ra and 53 mBq.L-1 for 228Ra and for the method of phases were 2.6 mBq.L-1 for 226Ra and 66 mBq.L-1 for 228Ra. (author)

  11. Electrochemical preparation of a molecularly imprinted polypyrrole modified pencil graphite electrode for the determination of phenothiazine in model and real biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadali, Azizollah; Rouki, Zohreh; Nezhadali, Mohammad

    2015-11-01

    A sensitive electrochemical sensor for determination of phenothiazine (PTZ) was introduced based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film. A computational study was performed to evaluate the template-monomer geometry and interaction energy in the prepolymerization mixture. The electrode was prepared during electropolymerization of pyrrole (Py) on a pencil graphite electrode (PGE) by cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. The quantitative measurements were performed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solutions using 60% (v/v) acetonitrile-water (ACN/H2O) binary solvent. The effect of important parameters like pH, monomer concentration, number of cycles, etc on the efficiency of MIP electrode was optimized and the calibration curve was plotted at optimal conditions. Two dynamic linear ranges of 1-300 µmol L(-1) and 0.5-10 mmol L(-1) were observed. The detection limit (based on S/N=3) of PTZ was obtained 3×10(-7) mol L(-1). The MIP/PGE has been successfully applied as a selective sensor for fast and accurate determination of PTZ in some model and real biological samples.

  12. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

  13. The BD Onclarity HPV assay on SurePath collected samples meets the International Guidelines for Human Papillomavirus Test Requirements for Cervical Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejegod, Ditte; Bottari, Fabio; Pedersen, Helle;

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a validation of the BD Onclarity HPV (Onclarity) assay using the international guidelines for HPV test requirements for cervical cancer screening of women 30 years and above using Danish SurePath screening samples. The clinical specificity (0.90, 95% CI: 0.88-0.91) and sensit......This study describes a validation of the BD Onclarity HPV (Onclarity) assay using the international guidelines for HPV test requirements for cervical cancer screening of women 30 years and above using Danish SurePath screening samples. The clinical specificity (0.90, 95% CI: 0.......93). The inter laboratory agreement was 97% with lower confidence bound of 95% (kappa value: 0.92). The BD Onclarity HPV assay fulfills all the international guidelines for a new HPV test to be used in primarily screening. This is the first clinical validation of a new HPV assay using SurePath screening samples...... and thus the Onclarity HPV assay is the first HPV assay to hold an international validation for both SurePath and ThinPrep....

  14. A Simple and Selective Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Trace Gold in Real, Environmental, Biological, Geological and Soil Samples Using Bis (Salicylaldehyde Orthophenylenediamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Soomro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple high sensitive, selective, and rapid spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace gold based on the rapid reaction of gold(III with bis(salicylaldehydeorthophenylenediamine (BSOPD in aqueous and micellar media has been developed. BSOPD reacts with gold(III in slightly acidic solution to form a 1:1 brownish-yellow complex, which has an maximum absorption peak at 490 nm in both aqueous and micellar media. The most remarkable point of this method is that the molar absorptivities of the gold-BSOPD complex form in the presence of the nonionic TritonX-100 surfactant are almost a 10 times higher than the value observed in the aqueous solution, resulting in an increase in the sensitivity and selectivity of the method. The apparent molar absorptivities were found to be 2.3 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1 and 2.5 × 105 L mol−1 cm−1 in aqueous and micellar media, respectively. The reaction is instantaneous and the maximum absorbance was obtained after 10 min at 490 nm and remains constant for over 24 h at room temperature. The linear calibration graphs were obtained for 0.1 –30 mg L−1 and 0.01 –30 mg L−1 of gold(III in aqueous and surfactant media, respectively. The interference from over 50 cations, anions and complexing agents has been studied at 1 mg L−1 of Au(III; most metal ions can be tolerated in considerable amounts in aqueous micellar solutions. The Sandell’s sensitivity, the limit of detection and relative standard deviation (n = 9 were found to be 5 ng cm−2, 1 ng mL−1 and 2%, respectively in aqueous micellar solutions. Its sensitivity and selectivity are remarkably higher than that of other reagents in the literature. The proposed method was successfully used in the determination of gold in several standard reference materials (alloys and steels, environmental water samples (potable and polluted, and biological samples (blood and urine, geological, soil and complex synthetic mixtures. The results obtained agree

  15. Telomere length is a biomarker of cumulative oxidative stress, biologic age, and an independent predictor of survival and therapeutic treatment requirement associated with smoking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Savel'yeva, Ekaterina L; Moskvina, Svetlana N; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-11-01

    Globally, tobacco use is associated with 5 million deaths per annum and is regarded as one of the leading causes of premature death. Major chronic disorders associated with smoking include cardiovascular diseases, several types of cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (lung problems). Cigarette smoking (CS) generates a cumulative oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Mainstream and side stream gas-phase smoke each have about the same concentration of reactive free radical species, about 1 × 10(16) radicals per cigarette (or 5 × 10(14) per puff). This effect is critical in understanding the biologic effects of smoke. Several lines of evidence suggest that cigarette smoke constituents can directly activate vascular reactive oxygen species production. In this work we present multiple evidence that CS provide the important risk factors in many age-related diseases, and is associated with increased cumulative and systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. The cited processes are marked by increased white blood cell (leucocytes, WBCs) turnover. The data suggest an alteration of the circulating WBCs by CS, resulting in increased adherence to endothelial cells. Telomeres are complex DNA-protein structures located at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length shortens with biologic age in all replicating somatic cells. It has been shown that tobacco smoking enhances telomere shortening in circulating human WBCs. Telomere attrition (expressed in WBCs) can serve as a biomarker of the cumulative oxidative stress and inflammation induced by smoking and, consequently, show the pace of biologic aging. We originally propose that patented specific oral formulations of nonhydrolized carnosine and carcinine provide a powerful tool for targeted therapeutic inhibition of cumulative oxidative stress and inflammation and protection of telomere attrition associated with smoking. The longitudinal studies of the clinical

  16. Telomere length is a biomarker of cumulative oxidative stress, biologic age, and an independent predictor of survival and therapeutic treatment requirement associated with smoking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Savel'yeva, Ekaterina L; Moskvina, Svetlana N; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-11-01

    Globally, tobacco use is associated with 5 million deaths per annum and is regarded as one of the leading causes of premature death. Major chronic disorders associated with smoking include cardiovascular diseases, several types of cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (lung problems). Cigarette smoking (CS) generates a cumulative oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Mainstream and side stream gas-phase smoke each have about the same concentration of reactive free radical species, about 1 × 10(16) radicals per cigarette (or 5 × 10(14) per puff). This effect is critical in understanding the biologic effects of smoke. Several lines of evidence suggest that cigarette smoke constituents can directly activate vascular reactive oxygen species production. In this work we present multiple evidence that CS provide the important risk factors in many age-related diseases, and is associated with increased cumulative and systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. The cited processes are marked by increased white blood cell (leucocytes, WBCs) turnover. The data suggest an alteration of the circulating WBCs by CS, resulting in increased adherence to endothelial cells. Telomeres are complex DNA-protein structures located at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length shortens with biologic age in all replicating somatic cells. It has been shown that tobacco smoking enhances telomere shortening in circulating human WBCs. Telomere attrition (expressed in WBCs) can serve as a biomarker of the cumulative oxidative stress and inflammation induced by smoking and, consequently, show the pace of biologic aging. We originally propose that patented specific oral formulations of nonhydrolized carnosine and carcinine provide a powerful tool for targeted therapeutic inhibition of cumulative oxidative stress and inflammation and protection of telomere attrition associated with smoking. The longitudinal studies of the clinical

  17. Application of the k{sub 0}-INAA method for analysis of biological samples at the pneumatic station of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puerta, Daniel C.; Figueiredo, Ana Maria G.; Semmler, Renato, E-mail: dcpuerta@hotmail.com, E-mail: anamaria@ipen.br, E-mail: rsemmler@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jacimovic, Radojko, E-mail: radojko.jacimovic@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Ljubljana, LJU (Slovenia). Department of Environmental Sciences

    2013-07-01

    As part of the process of implementation of the k{sub 0}-INAA standardization method at the Neutron Activation Laboratory (LAN-IPEN), Sao Paulo, Brazil, this study presents the results obtained for the analysis of short and medium-lived nuclides in biological samples by k{sub 0}-INAA using the program k{sub 0}-IAEA, provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The elements Al, Ba, Br, Na, K, Mn, Mg, Sr and V were determined with respect to gold ({sup 197}Au) using the pneumatic station facility of the IEA-R1 4.5 MW swimming pool nuclear research reactor, Sao Paulo. Characterization of the pneumatic station was carried out by using the 'bare triple-monitor' method with {sup 197}Au-{sup 96}Zr-{sup 94}Zr. The Certified Reference Material IRMM-530R Al-0.1%Au alloy and high purity zirconium comparators were used. The efficiency curves of the gamma-ray spectrometer used were determined by measuring calibrated radioactive sources at the usually utilized counting geometries. The method was validated by analyzing the reference materials NIST SRM 1547 Peach Leaves, INCT-MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The concentration results obtained agreed with certified, reference and recommended values, showing relative errors (bias, %) less than 30% for most elements. The Coefficients of Variation were below 20%, showing a good reproducibility of the results. The E{sub n}-number showed that all results, except Na in NIST SRM 1547 and NIST SRM 1573a and Al in INCT-MPH-2, were within 95% confidence interval. (author)

  18. Use of egg yolk antibody (IgY) as an immunoanalytical tool in the detection of Indian cobra (Naja naja naja) venom in biological samples of forensic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunda, G; Sashidhar, R B; Sarin, R K

    2006-08-01

    An immunoglobulin Y (IgY) based indirect double antibody sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection of Indian cobra (Naja naja naja) venom in the biological samples of forensic origin. Polyclonal antibodies were raised and purified from chick egg yolk and rabbit serum. The cobra venom was sandwiched between immobilized affinity purified IgY and the rabbit IgG. The detection concentration of cobra venom was in the range of 0.1 to 300ng. The calibration plot was based on linear regression analysis (y=0.2581x+0.4375, r(2)=0.9886). The limit of detection of the assay was found to be 0.1ng. The coefficient of variation (CV) of different concentrations of working range in inter (n=6) and intra-assay (n=6) was observed to be less than 10%. The recovery of venom was found to be in the range of 80-99%, when different concentrations (0.002, 0.1, 0.2, 1, and 2microg) of cobra venom were spiked to pooled normal human serum (ml(-1)). No cross reactivity was observed with krait and viper venom in the immunoassay system in the concentration range of 0.1-1000ng. The method was initially, validated by analyzing specimens (autopsy) of experimental rats injected with cobra venom (1.2mgkg(-1) body mass). Further, human specimens (autopsy and biopsy) of snake bite victims of forensic origin were also analyzed. The methodology developed may find diagnostic application in forensic laboratories. PMID:16846624

  19. Radiometry in medicine and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Kie-Bong; Choi, Eui Y.

    2012-10-01

    Diagnostics in medicine plays a critical role in helping medical professionals deliver proper diagnostic decisions. Most samples in this trade are of the human origin and a great portion of methodologies practiced in biology labs is shared in clinical diagnostic laboratories as well. Most clinical tests are quantitative in nature and recent increase in interests in preventive medicine requires the determination of minimal concentration of target analyte: they exist in small quantities at the early stage of various diseases. Radiometry or the use of optical radiation is the most trusted and reliable means of converting biologic concentrations into quantitative physical quantities. Since optical energy is readily available in varying energies (or wavelengths), the appropriate combination of light and the sample absorption properties provides reliable information about the sample concentration through Beer-Lambert law to a decent precision. In this article, the commonly practiced techniques in clinical and biology labs are reviewed from the standpoint of radiometry.

  20. Protocols for the measurement of the F2-isoprostane, 15(S)-8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, in biological samples by GC-MS or GC-MS/MS coupled with immunoaffinity column chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Suchy, Maria-Theresia

    2016-04-15

    Arachidonic acid, the origin of the eicosanoids family, occurs in biological samples as free acid and as ester in lipids. Free arachidonic acid is oxidized to numerous metabolites by means of enzymes including cyclooxygenase (COX). Arachidonic acid esterified to lipids is attacked by reactive oxygen species (ROS) to generate numerous oxidized arachidonic acid derivatives. Generally, it is assumed that ROS-derived arachidonic acid derivatives are distinct from those generated by enzymes such as COX. Therefore, ROS-generated eicosanoids are considered specific biomarkers of oxidative stress. However, there are serious doubts concerning a strict distinction between the enzyme-derived eicosanoids and the ROS-derived iso-eicosanoids. Prominent examples are prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) and 15(S)-8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (15(S)-8-iso-PGF2α) which have been originally considered to exclusively derive from COX and ROS, respectively. There is convincing evidence that both COX and ROS can oxidize arachidonic acid to PGF2α and 15(S)-8-iso-PGF2α. Thus, many results previously reported for 15(S)-8-iso-PGF2α as exclusive ROS-dependent reaction product, and consequently as a specific biomarker of oxidative stress, require a careful re-examination which should also consider the analytical methods used to measure 15(S)-8-iso-PGF2α. This prominent but certainly not the only example underlines more than ever the importance of the analytical chemistry in basic and clinical research areas of oxidative stress. In the present work, we report analytical protocols for the reliable quantitative determination of 15(S)-8-iso-PGF2α in human biological samples including plasma and urine by mass spectrometry coupled to gas chromatography (GC-MS, GC-MS/MS) after specific isolation of endogenous 15(S)-8-iso-PGF2α and the externally added internal standard [3,3',4,4'-(2)H4]-15(S)-8-iso-PGF2α by immunoaffinity column chromatography (IAC). 15(S)-8-iso-PGF2α esterified to plasma lipids is

  1. Requirements for Foreign and Domestic Establishment Registration and Listing for Human Drugs, Including Drugs That Are Regulated Under a Biologics License Application, and Animal Drugs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing drug establishment registration and drug listing. These amendments reorganize, modify, and clarify current regulations concerning who must register establishments and list human drugs, human drugs that are also biological products, and animal drugs. The final rule requires electronic submission, unless waived in certain circumstances, of registration and listing information. This rulemaking pertains to finished drug products and to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) alone or together with one or more other ingredients. The final rule describes how and when owners or operators of establishments at which drugs are manufactured or processed must register their establishments with FDA and list the drugs they manufacture or process. In addition, the rule makes certain changes to the National Drug Code (NDC) system. We are taking this action to improve management of drug establishment registration and drug listing requirements and make these processes more efficient and effective for industry and for us. This action also supports implementation of the electronic prescribing provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) and the availability of current drug labeling information through DailyMed, a computerized repository of drug information maintained by the National Library of Medicine. PMID:27580511

  2. Determination of Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+ in biological and food samples by FAAS after preconcentration with hydroxyapatite nanorods originated from eggshell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite nanorods (HAPNRs) were prepared from recycled eggshell by using precipitation method. The structure of the HAPNRs was physicochemically and morphologically characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting HAPNRs were used for solid phase extractive preconcentration of Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+ prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Experimental variables that influence the quantitative extraction of metal ions were optimized by both batch and column methods. The analytes were quantitatively sorbed on the matrix between pHs 6 and 9. The maximum sorption capacity of the HAPNRs has been found to be 2.43, 2.37 and 2.53 mmol g−1 for Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+, respectively, with the preconcentration factor of 250. The 3σ detection limit and 10σ quantification limit for Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+ were found to be 0.72, 0.55 and 5.12 μg L−1 and 2.40, 1.83 and 17.06 μg L−1, respectively. The calibration curves were linear up to 250 μg L−1 for Cu2+, 300 μg L−1 for Zn2+ and 400 μg L−1 for Pb2+. Accuracy of the proposed method was verified using certified reference materials (NCS ZC85006 Tomato, Seronorm Trace Elements Whole Blood L-1, Seronorm Trace Elements Whole Blood L-3 and Seronorm Trace Elements Urine). The present method was successfully applied to the analysis of these metal ions in sea water, biological and food samples. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite nanorods were prepared from egg shell. • The prepared nanoparticles showed fast adsorption with high adsorption capacities of the metal ions. • The nanostructures were used for solid phase extraction of copper, zinc and lead ions prior to determination by FAAS. • Accuracy of the method was validated by analyses of certified reference materials

  3. Sampling Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  4. The BD Onclarity HPV Assay on Samples Collected in SurePath Medium Meets the International Guidelines for Human Papillomavirus Test Requirements for Cervical Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottari, Fabio; Pedersen, Helle; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Bonde, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a validation of the BD Onclarity HPV (Onclarity) assay using the international guidelines for HPV test requirements for cervical cancer screening of women 30 years old and older using Danish SurePath screening samples. The clinical specificity (0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.88 to 0.91) and sensitivity (0.97, 95% CI = 0.87 to 1.0) of the Onclarity assay were shown to be not inferior to the reference assay (specificity, 0.90 [95% CI = 0.88 to 0.92]; sensitivity, 0.98 [95% CI = 0.91 to 1.0]). The intralaboratory reproducibility of Onclarity was 97%, with a lower confidence bound of 96% (kappa value, 0.93). The interlaboratory agreement was 97%, with a lower confidence bound of 95% (kappa value, 0.92). The BD Onclarity HPV assay fulfills all the international guidelines for a new HPV test to be used in primarily screening. This is the first clinical validation of a new HPV assay using SurePath screening samples, and thus the Onclarity HPV assay is the first HPV assay to hold an international validation for both SurePath and ThinPrep. PMID:27307461

  5. Dispositivo de posicionamiento de muestras biológicas para su irradiación en un canal radial de un reactor nuclear // Biological samples positioning device for irradiations on a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Rodríguez - Gual

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ResumenPor la demanda de un dispositivo experimental para el posicionamiento de las muestras biológicaspara su irradiación en un canal radial de un reactor nuclear de investigaciones en funcionamiento, seconstruyó y se puso en marcha un dispositivo para la colocación y retirada de las muestras en laposición de irradiación de dicho canal. Se efectuaron las valoraciones económicas comparando conotro tipo de dispositivo con las mismas funciones. Este trabajo formó parte de un proyectointernacional entre Cuba y Brasil que abarcó el estudio de los daños inducidos por diferentes tipos deradiación ionizante en moléculas de ADN. La solución propuesta es comprobada experimentalmente,lo que demuestra la validez práctica del dispositivo. Como resultado del trabajo, el dispositivoexperimental para la irradiación de las muestras biológicas se encuentra instalado y funcionando yapor 5 años en el canal radial # 3(BH#3 Palabras claves: reactor nuclear de investigaciones, dispositivo para posicionamiento de muestras,___________________________________________________________________________AbstractFor the demand of an experimental device for biological samples positioning system for irradiationson a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor in operation was constructed and started up adevice for the place and remove of the biological samples from the irradiation channels withoutinterrupting the operation of the reactor. The economical valuations are effected comparing withanother type of device with the same functions. This work formed part of an international projectbetween Cuba and Brazil that undertook the study of the induced damages by various types ofionizing radiation in DNA molecules. Was experimentally tested the proposed solution, whichdemonstrates the practical validity of the device. As a result of the work, the experimental device forbiological samples irradiations are installed and operating in the radial beam hole #3(BH#3

  6. Analysis of Arsenicals and Their Sulfur Analogs in Biological Samples Using HPLC with Collision Cell ICP-MS and ESI-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent arsenic speciation studies have indicated that the sulfur analogs of the more common arsenic oxides are present in environmental and biological systems. This discovery was previously impeded due to the strong affinity of these arsenic-sulfides for the stationary phases typ...

  7. 福岛核事故期间浙江地区生物样品放射性水平监测%Radioactivity Monitoring in Biological Samples during the Events of Nuclear Leakage in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向元益; 羊佳; 胡飞; 胡晓燕; 刘刚

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces emergency monitoring of biological samples during the events of nuclear leakage in Japan. 17 biological samples were collected, and the concentrations of 7 nuclides were analyzed. The Monitoring results show that small amounts of artificial radionuclides, 131I and 137 Cs, were detected in the green vegetables and spinach on April 7.%浙江省辐射环境监测站在日本核泄漏事故期间,进行了浙江地区生物样品中放射性核素活度浓度的应急监测工作。事故期间共采集分析生物样品17个,监测结果表明,4月7日采集的青菜和菠菜样品中检测出微量的131I和137Cs。

  8. Biological investigations of Indian phaeophyceae: 17. Seasonal variation of antibacterial activity of total sterols obtained from frozen samples of Sargassum johnstonii Setchell et Gardner

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.P.S.

    From lipid fraction of frozen samples of Sargassum johnstonii unsaponifiable part was extracted with diethyl ether to isolate total sterols. The extracted sterols were obtained for a period of nine months and tested against test bacteria...

  9. Assessment of the supramolecular structures presents into biological samples by SAXS technique;Avaliacao das estrutras supramoleculares presentes em amostras biologicas atraves da tecnica de SAXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, A.L.C.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M., E-mail: andre_conceicao@yahoo.com.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2009-07-01

    In this work was made an assessment of the supramolecular structures presents into human breast tissue normal and pathological samples, as well as into two types of animals samples (tendon chicken and pork fat) using the small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique. The scattering profiles of the samples were determined at the momentum transfer range O.150nm{sup -1}<=5:q(=4pi.sin({theta}/2)/{lambda})<=8.500nm{sup -1}. In this range, it was possible identify structures corresponding to collagen fibrils (glandular tissue) and to triacylglycerides (adipose tissue) from the correlation between the information extracted from the human breast tissues scattering profiles and those extracted from animals samples. (author)

  10. Monitoring of total metal concentration in sludge samples: Case study for the mechanical–biological wastewater treatment plant in Velika Gorica, Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, monitoring of total metal concentration in sludge samples from wastewater treatment process is elaborated. The presented results summarize the analyses of sludge samples in a period from 2008 to 2012. Possible sources of pollutions are given. Primarily, waste solid samples were collected from different pretreatment steps: (A) coarse grid, (B) fine grid and (C) aerated sand grease grid. Samples of A and B followed a repeatable pattern in 2008 and 2010. According to the results from 2008, samples of C contained measurable concentration of the following metals (mg/kg dry matter): Zn (21), Ni (1.05) and Ba (14.9). Several types of sludge samples were analyzed: fresh raw sludge (PS; 6–12 hour old), the sludge from the digester for anaerobic sludge treatment (DS; 48–72 hour old), samples from lagoons where the sludge is temporarily deposited (DOS and DOSold; 30–120 days) and sludge samples from agricultural areas (AA; aged over 180 days). Additionally, samples of dehydrated sludge (DEHS and DEHSold; 90–180 days) were collected upon construction of equipment for sludge dehydration in 2011. An analysis of total metal concentrations for Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb, Ni, Hg, Cd, Ba, As, Se, Sb, Co, Mo, Fe and Mn was performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The most recent results (year 2011) indicated a high concentration of heavy metals in PS samples, exceeding the MCLs (mg/kg dry matter): Cu (2122), Zn (5945), Hg (13.67) and Cd (6.29). In 2012 (until July), only a concentration of Cu exceeded MCL (928.75 and 1230.5 in DS and DEHS, respectively). A composition of sludge was variable through time, offering the limited possibility for future prediction. The sludge is being considered as a hazardous waste and a subject of discussion regarding disposal. - Highlights: ► Summarized 5-year monitoring data for heavy metals in sludge ► Partially determined sources of pollution by

  11. Quest to identify geochemical risk factors associated with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) in an endemic region of Sri Lanka-a multimedia laboratory analysis of biological, food, and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Keith E; Redmon, Jennifer Hoponick; Elledge, Myles F; Wanigasuriya, Kamani P; Smith, Kristin; Munoz, Breda; Waduge, Vajira A; Periris-John, Roshini J; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Harrington, James M; Womack, Donna S; Wickremasinghe, Rajitha

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of a new form of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) in Sri Lanka's North Central Province (NCP) has be