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Sample records for biological radiation dosimeter

  1. Response of biological uv dosimeters to the simulated extraterrestrial uv radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérces, A.; Rontó, G.; Kerékgyártó, T.; Kovács, G.; Lammer, H.

    In the Laboratory polycrystalline uracil thin layer and bacteriophage T7 detectors have been developed for UV dosimetry on the EarthSs surface. Exponential response of the uracil polycrystal has been detected both by absorption spectroscopy and measurements of the refractive index under the influence of terrestrial solar radiation or using UV-C sources. In UV biological dosimetry the UV dose scale is additive starting at a value of zero according to the definition of CIE (Technical Report TC-6-18). The biological dose can be defined by a measured end-effect. In our dosimeters (phage T7 and uracil dosimeter) exposed to natural (terrestrial) UV radiation the proportion of pyrimidin photoproducts among the total photoproducts is smaller than 0.1 and the linear correlation between the biological and physical dose is higher than 0.9. According to the experimental data this linear relationship is often not valid. We observed that UV radiation did not only induce dimerisation but shorter wavelengths caused monomerisation of pyrimidin dimers. Performing the irradiation in oxygen free environment and using a Deuterium lamp as UV source, we could increase monomerisation against dimerisation thus the DNA-based dosimetrySs additivity rule is not fulfilled in these conditions. In this study we will demonstrate those non-linear experiments which constitute the basis of our biological experiments on the International Space Station.

  2. Miniature Active Space Radiation Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro will extend our Phase I R&D to develop a family of miniature, active space radiation dosimeters/particle counters, with a focus on biological/manned...

  3. Status of human chromosome aberrations as a biological radiation dosimeter in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    It seems that the determination of peripheral lymphocyte chriomosome aberration levels is now firmly established as a means of biological dosimetry of great value in many phases of the nuclear industry. In the case of large external exposure it can provide valuable quantitative estimates, as well as information on dose distribution and radiation quality. In the case of routine occupational exposures the technique is more qualitative, but is of value particularly in resolving uncertainties as to whether suspected overexposures did in fact occur. Where workers accumulate burdens of internal emitters, aberration analysis provides a valuable, though at present quite qualitative indicator. In spite of the expense of cytogenetic analyses, they are of sufficient value to justify much more widespread application, particularly in high risk situations.

  4. Response of bacteriophage T7 biological dosimeter to dehydration and extraterrestrial solar UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, M.; Fekete, A.; Módos, K.; Kovács, G.; Rontó, Gy.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    2007-02-01

    The experiment "Phage and uracil response" (PUR) will be accommodated in the EXPOSE facility of the ISS. Bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA will be exposed to different subsets of extreme environmental parameters in space, in order to study the Responses of Organisms to the Space Environment (ROSE). Launch into orbit is preceded by EXPOSE Experiment Verification Tests (EVT) to optimize the methods and the evaluation. Bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA thin layers were exposed to vacuum ( 10-6Pa), to monochromatic (254 nm) and polychromatic (200-400 nm) UV radiation in air as well as in simulated space vacuum. Using neutral density (ND) filters dose-effect curves were performed in order to define the maximum doses tolerated. The effect of temperature fluctuation in vacuum was also studied. The structural/chemical effects on bacteriophage T7/isolated T7 DNA were analyzed by spectroscopic and microscopical methods. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum and in the electrophoretic pattern of phage/DNA have been detected indicating the damage of isolated and intraphage DNA. DNA damage was also determined by quantitative PCR (QPCR) using 555 and 3826 bp fragments of T7 DNA. We obtained substantial evidence that DNA lesions (e.g. strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, cyclobutane pirimidine dimers (CPDs) etc.) accumulate throughout exposure. Preliminary results suggest a synergistic action of space vacuum and UV radiation with DNA being the critical target.

  5. T-cell Receptor Assay and Reticulocyte-Micronuclei Assay as Biological Dosimeters for Ionizing Radiation in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Vershenya, Stanislav; Biko, Johannes; Lorenz, Reinhard; Reiners, Christoph; Stopper, Helga; Grawe, Jan; Hempel, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    In radiation accidents, biological methods are used for dosimetry if the radiation dose could not be measured by physical means. The knowledge of individual dose is a prerequisite for planning medical treatment and for health risk evaluations. In this paper we represent the summary of biodosimetrical methods used in our laboratory in the patients treated with radioiodine for thyroid cancer. The dose-response relationship was measured by the flow cytometry-based micronucleus assay in transferr...

  6. Tissue-Equivalent Radiation Dosimeter-On-A-Chip Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Available digital dosimeters are bulky and unable to provide real-time monitoring of dose for space radiation. The complexity of space-flight design requires...

  7. Tissue-Equivalent Radiation Dosimeter-On-A-Chip Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many commercially available digital dosimeters are bulky and are unable to properly measure dose for space radiation. The complexity of space flight design requires...

  8. Early development and characterization of a DNA-based radiation dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avarmaa, Kirsten A.

    It is the priority of first responders to minimize damage to persons and infrastructure in the case of a nuclear emergency due to an accident or deliberate terrorist attack -- if this emergency includes a radioactive hazard, first responders require a simple-to-use, accurate and complete dosimeter for radiation protection purposes in order to minimize the health risk to these individuals and the general population at large. This work consists of the early evaluation of the design and performance of a biologically relevant dosimeter which uses DNA material that can respond to the radiation of any particle type. The construct consists of fluorescently tagged strands of DNA. The signalling components of this dosimeter are also investigated for their sensitivity to radiation damage and light exposure. The dual-labelled dosimeter that is evaluated in this work gave a measurable response to gamma radiation at dose levels of 10 Gy for the given detector design and experimental setup. Further testing outside of this work confirmed this finding and indicated a working range of 100 mGy to 10 Gy using a custom-built fluorimeter as part of a larger CRTI initiative. Characterization of the chromatic components of the dosimeter showed that photobleaching is not expected to have an effect on dosimeter performance, but that radiation can damage the non-DNA signalling components at higher dose levels, although this damage is minimal at lower doses over the expected operating ranges. This work therefore describes the early steps in the quantification of the behaviour of the DNA dosimeter as a potential biologically-based device to measure radiation dose.

  9. Study of a non-diffusing radiochromic gel dosimeter for 3D radiation dose imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Craig Michael

    2000-12-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of a new radiation gel dosimeter, based on nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBTZ) suspended in a gelatin mold. Unlike all Fricke based gel dosimeters this dosimeter does not suffer from diffusive loss of image stability. Images are obtained by an optical tomography method. Nitro blue tetrazolium is a common biological indicator that when irradiated in an aqueous medium undergoes reduction to a highly colored formazan, which has an absorbance maximum at 525nm. Tetrazolium is water soluble while the formazan product is insoluble. The formazan product sticks to the gelatin matrix and the dose image is maintained for three months. Methods to maximize the sensitivity of the system were evaluated. It was found that a chemical detergent, Triton X-100, in combination with sodium formate, increased the dosimeter sensitivity significantly. An initial G-value of formazan production for a dosimeter composed of 1mM NBTZ, gelatin, and water was on the order of 0.2. The addition of Triton and formate produced a G-value in excess of 5.0. The effects of NBTZ, triton, formate, and gel concentration were all investigated. All the gels provided linear dose vs. absorbance plots for doses from 0 to >100 Gy. It was determined that gel concentration had minimal if any effect on sensitivity. Sensitivity increased slightly with increasing NBTZ concentration. Triton and formate individually and together provided moderate to large increases in dosimeter sensitivity. The dosimeter described in this work can provide stable 3D radiation dose images for all modalities of radiation therapy equipment. Methods to increase sensitivity are developed and discussed.

  10. Phosphate Glass Gamma-Radiation Dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-11-30

    JH Section 3F» 3he PluftXmafoSEP 3 illM^An «ft*i tiöu« Plate 1 Shows the appearance of the !?P-60(XN-»3)/H) dosimeter, or radiac detector...200 r and MB! RESTRICTED FyT^&jw^* ^XJ^ WWW^^S^*^?^^?^’ ’:myv) f’Ol.ArO!»’« rOf.f’. JhV fiOll HI.V-fc "• KCH ÜfPARTMFMT RESTRICTED -56- The

  11. An ESR study on biological dosimeters: Human hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colak, Seyda, E-mail: seyda@hacettepe.edu.t [Hacettepe University, Physics Engineering Department, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Ozbey, Turan [Hacettepe University, Physics Engineering Department, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    In the present work, characteristic features of the radicals found in untreated, gamma and UV-irradiated and mechanical damaged human hair samples were investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Heights of the resonance peaks measured with respect to the spectrum base line were used to monitor microwave power, dose-response, storage time and temperature dependent kinetic features of the radical species contributing to the formation of recorded experimental ESR spectra. Peak heights and g-values (2.0037-2.0052) determined from recorded spectra of hair were color dependent with {Delta}Hpp-0.47 mT. The act of cutting hair samples gene rates sulfur centered radicals which are found in the a-keratin structure of hair. The variations of the peak heights with temperature were related with the water content found in the hair samples. In the 6-1100 Gy dose range, a linear + quadratic dose-response curve was recorded for hair and the mean radiation yield (G{sub mean}) was calculated to be 0.4. The gamma radiation induced radicals were stable for a several hours at room temperature storage conditions. Based on these findings it was concluded that human hair samples could be used as biological/personnel dosimeters and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring its dosimetric behaviours.

  12. Investigation of the effect of ionizing radiation on gene expression variation by the 'DNA chips': feasibility of a biological dosimeter; Etude de l'effet des radiations ionisantes sur la variation d'expression genique par la methode des 'puces a ADN': faisabilite d'un dosimetre biologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruel, G.

    2005-05-25

    After having described the different biological effects of ionizing radiation and the different approaches to biological dosimetry, and introduced 'DNA chips' or DNA micro-arrays, the author reports the characterization of gene expression variations in the response of cells to a gamma irradiation. Both main aspects of the use DNA chips are investigated: fundamental research and diagnosis. This research thesis thus proposes an analysis of the effect of ionizing radiation using DNA chips, notably by comparing gene expression modifications measured in mouse irradiated lung, heart and kidney. It reports a feasibility study of bio-dosimeter based on expression profiles

  13. Improvements in opti-chromic dosimeters for radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humpherys, K. C.; Kantz, A. D.

    "Opti-Chromic" dosimeters consisting of radiachromic dye in flourinated polymer tubing have been introduced as a dosimetry system in the range from 10 1 to 5 × 10 4 Gy. Batches of "Opti-Chromic" dosimeters have been produced to evaluate performance under large scale industrial conditions. A systematic study was undertaken to determine the effect of various dosimeter parameters on radiation sensitivity, shelf life, and response characteristics at the higher absorbed doses. These parameters were (A) Type of flourinated polymer tubing; (B) Organic solvent used to activate the radiachromic dye; (C) Concentration of radiachromic dye; (D) Additives to provide proper viscosity, color stability, and high-dose response. Prototype batches were produced and experimental dosimeters exposed to a range of absorbed doses and the response measured as a function of shelf life and dose. The results of the study are presented, and an improved formulation recommended for application to Food Processing. Other formulations may be of value in specific requirements of sensitivity or temperature.

  14. Visible absorption spectra of radiation exposed SIRAD dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, Martin J [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Cheung Tsang [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Yu, Peter K N [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-12-07

    SIRAD badge dosimeters are a new type of personal dosimeter designed to measure radiation exposure up to 200 R and give a visual qualitative measurement of exposure. This is performed using the active dosimeter window, which contains a radiochromic material amalgamated in the badge assembly. When irradiated, the badges active window turns blue, which can be matched against the given colour chart for a qualitative assessment of the exposure received. Measurements have been performed to analyse the absorption spectra of the active window, and results show that the window automatically turns a blue colour upon irradiation and produces two peaks in the absorption spectra located at 617 nm and 567 nm. When analysed with a common computer desktop scanner, the optical density response of the film to radiation exposure is non-linear but reproducible. The net OD of the film was 0.21 at 50 R exposure and 0.31 at 200 R exposure when irradiated with a 6 MV x-ray energy beam. When compared to the calibration colour strips at 6 MV x-ray energy the film's OD response matches relatively well within 3.5%. An approximate 8% reduction in measured OD to exposure was seen for 250 kVp x-rays compared to 6 MV x-rays. The film provides an adequate measurement and visually qualitative assessment of radiation exposure for levels in the range of 0 to 200 R. (note)

  15. Development and evaluation of polycrystalline cadmium telluride dosimeters for accurate quality assurance in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, K.; Han, M.; Kim, K.; Heo, Y.; Moon, C.; Park, S.; Nam, S.

    2016-02-01

    For quality assurance in radiation therapy, several types of dosimeters are used such as ionization chambers, radiographic films, thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD), and semiconductor dosimeters. Among them, semiconductor dosimeters are particularly useful for in vivo dosimeters or high dose gradient area such as the penumbra region because they are more sensitive and smaller in size compared to typical dosimeters. In this study, we developed and evaluated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) dosimeters, one of the most promising semiconductor dosimeters due to their high quantum efficiency and charge collection efficiency. Such CdTe dosimeters include single crystal form and polycrystalline form depending upon the fabrication process. Both types of CdTe dosimeters are commercially available, but only the polycrystalline form is suitable for radiation dosimeters, since it is less affected by volumetric effect and energy dependence. To develop and evaluate polycrystalline CdTe dosimeters, polycrystalline CdTe films were prepared by thermal evaporation. After that, CdTeO3 layer, thin oxide layer, was deposited on top of the CdTe film by RF sputtering to improve charge carrier transport properties and to reduce leakage current. Also, the CdTeO3 layer which acts as a passivation layer help the dosimeter to reduce their sensitivity changes with repeated use due to radiation damage. Finally, the top and bottom electrodes, In/Ti and Pt, were used to have Schottky contact. Subsequently, the electrical properties under high energy photon beams from linear accelerator (LINAC), such as response coincidence, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, reproducibility, and percentage depth dose, were measured to evaluate polycrystalline CdTe dosimeters. In addition, we compared the experimental data of the dosimeter fabricated in this study with those of the silicon diode dosimeter and Thimble ionization chamber which widely used in routine dosimetry system and dose measurements for radiation

  16. FlexyDos3D: a deformable anthropomorphic 3D radiation dosimeter: radiation properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Deene, Yves; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard; Hill, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional radiation dosimetry has received growing interest with the implementation of highly conformal radiotherapy treatments. The radiotherapy community faces new challenges with the commissioning of image guided and image gated radiotherapy treatments (IGRT) and deformable image...... and oxygen concentration has also been investigated. The radiophysical properties of this new dosimeter are discussed including stability, spatial integrity, temperature dependence of the dosimeter during radiation, readout and storage, dose rate dependence and tissue equivalence....

  17. Response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeter to beta radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Munish; Gupta, Anil; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimate of the response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters (DRDs) to various beta sources was performed. It has been established that the ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters do not respond to beta particles having energy (Emax)1 MeV, the DRDs exhibit measureable response and the values are ~8%, ~14% and ~27% per mSv for natural uranium, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh beta sources respectively. As the energy of the beta particles increases, the response also increases. The response of DRDs to beta particles having energy>1 MeV arises due to the fact that the thickness of the chamber walls is less than the maximum range of beta particles. This may also be one of the reasons for disparity between doses measured with passive/legal dosimeters (TLDs) and DRDs in those situations in which radiation workers are exposed to mixed field of gamma photons and beta particles especially at uranium processing plants, nuclear (power and research) reactors, waste management facilities and fuel reprocessing plants etc. The paper provides the reason (technical) for disparity between the doses recorded by TLDs and DRDs in mixed field of photons and beta particles.

  18. Development of semiconductor radiation sensors for portable alarm-dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. K.; Moon, B. S.; Chung, C. E.; Hong, S. B.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Han, S. H.; Lee, W. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-01-01

    We studied Semiconductor Radiation Sensors for Portable Alarm-Dosimeter. We calculated response functions for gamma energy 0.021, 0.122, 0.662, 0.835, 1.2 MeV using EGS4 codes. When we measured at various distance from source to detector, the detection efficiency of Si semiconductor detector was better than that of GM tube. The linear absorption coefficients of steel and aluminum plate were measured. These experimental results of the response of detector for intensity of radiation field coincide to the theoretical expectation. The count value of Si detector was changed with changing thickness of steel as changing threshold voltage of discriminator, and the linear absorption coefficient increased with increasing threshold voltage. Radiation detection efficiency shows difference at each threshold voltage condition. This results coincided to the theoretical simulation. 33 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  19. Standard Guide for Performance Characterization of Dosimeters and Dosimetry Systems for Use in Radiation Processing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides guidance on determining the performance characteristics of dosimeters and dosimetry systems used in radiation processing. 1.2 This guide describes the influence quantities that might affect the performance of dosimeters and dosimetry systems and that should be considered during dosimeter/dosimetry system characterization. 1.3 Users of this guide are directed to existing standards and literature for procedures to determine the effects from individual influence quantities and from combinations of more than one influence quantity. 1.4 Guidance is provided regarding the roles of the manufacturers, suppliers, and users in the characterization of dosimeters and dosimetry systems. 1.5 This guide does not address how the dosimeter/dosimetry system characterization information is to be used in radiation processing applications or in the calibration of dosimetry systems. Note 1—For guidance on the use of dosimeter/dosimetry system characterization information for the selection and use o...

  20. CCD imaging for optical tomography of gel radiation dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolodzko, J G; Marsden, C; Appleby, A

    1999-11-01

    Several investigations have been carried out by a number of researchers over the past few years to evaluate the utility of imaging gel dosimeters for the three-dimensional measurement of radiation fields. These have been proposed to be of particular value in mapping radiation dose distributions associated with emerging and complex approaches to cancer treatment such as conformal (CRT), intensity modulated (IMRT), "gamma knife," and pencil beam radiotherapies. Imaging of the gels has been successfully accomplished with clinical MRI units and via laser-based optical scanning. However, neither of these methods is generally accessible to all potential users, limiting the broader study and implementation of this valuable tool. We report here the design, methodology, and results of a preliminary study carried out to evaluate the utility of a new, inexpensive, and simplified approach to tomographic imaging of gel radiation dosimeters. For the purpose of this initial investigation, an array of liquid scintillation vials was prepared, containing a ferrous sulphate xylenol orange (FSX) gelatin formulation. The FSX formulation undergoes a change in optical absorption characteristics following irradiation, and the resulting color change can be observed visually. The vials were irradiated individually to different doses. Three-dimensional imaging was accomplished by tomographic reconstruction from two-dimensional optical images acquired using a diffuse, fluorescent light source, a digital charge-coupled device camera, single-photon-emission-computed tomography software, and other simple components designed by the authors. The resulting transverse images were evaluated through a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis to obtain the average change in image density in each vial as a function of radiation dose. These measured ROI values were subjected to a linear regression analysis to fit them to a straight line, and to determine the goodness of fit. Results from multiple imaging trials

  1. Radiation-induced defects in magnesium lactate as ESR dosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Hassan, G M; Takaki, S

    1999-01-01

    Magnesium lactate (Mg-lactate: (CH sub 3 CH(OH)COO) sub 2 Mg), magnesium lactate doped with lithium lactate (Mg(Li)-lactate) and nominal pure lithium lactate (CH sub 3 CH(OH)COOLi) doped with Mg-lactate (Li(Mg)-lactate) were irradiated by gamma-rays to study radicals for materials of radiation dosimeter with electron spin resonance (ESR). Quartet spectra were ascribed to lactate radicals in Mg-lactate and Li(Mg)-lactate with the spectroscopic splitting factors (g-factor) of 2.0032+-0.004 and 2.0029+-0.004 and the intensity ratio of 1:3:3:1 due to the hyperfine coupling constants of (A/g beta) of 1.92+-0.06 and 1.82+-0.06 mT, respectively. The response to gamma-ray dose and the thermal stability as well as the effect of UV-illumination have been studied to establish this material as an ESR dosimeter. The number of free radicals per 100 eV (G-value) was obtained to be 1.15+-0.32, 1.35+-0.35, 0.46+-0.14 and 0.78+-0.24 for Mg-lactate, Mg(Li)-lactate, Li-lactate and Lie(Mg)-lactate, respectively. Thermoluminescenc...

  2. Radiation-induced color bleaching of methyl red in polyvinyl butyral film dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Zahrany, Awad A., E-mail: azahrany@kacst.edu.sa [Atomic Energy Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, (KACST), P.O. BOX 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Rabaeh, Khalid A. [Atomic Energy Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, (KACST), P.O. BOX 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Radiography Department, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan); Basfar, Ahmed A. [Atomic Energy Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, (KACST), P.O. BOX 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-11-15

    Radio-chromic film based on polyvinyl butyral (PVB) containing different concentrations of methyl red (MR) dye for 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mM has been introduced as high dose dosimeter. The dosimeters were irradiated with gamma ray from {sup 60}Co source at doses from 5 to 150 kGy. UV/vis spectrophotometry was used to investigate the optical density of unirradiated and irradiated films in terms of absorbance at 497 nm. The dose sensitivity of MR-PVB film dosimeter increases strongly with increase of absorbed dose as well as increase of concentrations of MR dye. The effects of irradiation temperature, relative humidity, dose rate and the stability of the response of the films after irradiation were investigated and found that these films could be used as routine dosimeter in industrial radiation processing. The useful dose range of developed MR-PVB film dosimeters is in the range of 5-100 kGy. - Highlights: > This manuscript relates to radio-chromic dosimeter for used in high dose radiation processing. > Methyl red MR contains azo group which breaking due to gamma radiation, resulting in color bleaching. > Radio-chromic film PVB containing different concentrations of MR dye has been introduced. > The color bleaching of MR-PVB film dosimeter increases gradually with increasing absorbed dose. > Response of MR-PVB films was slightly affected by irradiation temperature and relative humidity.

  3. A Medipix-Based Small Personal Space Radiation Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort will take the first step in improving the existing Medipix dosimeter technology in terms of advancing the technique now used to couple the actual...

  4. Novel composition of polymer gel dosimeters based on N-(Hydroxymethyl)acrylamide for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basfar, Ahmed A.; Moftah, Belal; Rabaeh, Khalid A.; Almousa, Akram A.

    2015-07-01

    A new composition of polymer gel dosimeters is developed based on radiation induced polymerization of N-(Hydroxymethyl)acrylamide (NHMA) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The dosimeters were irradiated by 10 MV photon beam of a medical linear accelerator at a constant dose rate of 600 cGy/min with doses up to 20 Gy. The polymerization occurs and increases with increasing absorbed dose. The dose response of polymer gel dosimeters was studied using nuclear magnetic imaging (NMR) for relaxation rate (R2) of water proton. Dose rate, energy of radiation and the stability of the polymerization after irradiation were investigated. No appreciable effects of these parameters on the performance of the novel gel dosimeters were observed.

  5. Dosimeters for small radiation fields; Dosimetrie fuer kleine Strahlungsfelder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illemann, Jens [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    For radiation-therapeutic accelerators for the first time a patented concept exists, by which reference-dose measurements become possible in spite of smallest chamber dimension in few seconds measuring time per point. Because of the additionally obtained microdosimetric information in the future statements can be made on the relative biological effectiveness for the treatment of patients.

  6. New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of less toxic monomers with radiation-crosslinked gel matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroki, A.; Yamashita, S.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, N.; Taguchi, M.

    2013-06-01

    New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of less toxic methacrylate-type monomers such as 2-hydroxymethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and polyethylene glycol 400 dimethacrylate (9G) with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) gel were prepared. The HPC gels were obtained by using a radiation-induced crosslinking technique to be applied in a matrix instead of a gelatin, which is conventionally used in earlier dosimeters, for the polymer gel dosimeters. The prepared polymer gel dosimeters showed cloudiness by exposing to 60Co γ-ray, in which the cloudiness increased with the dose up to 10 Gy. At the same dose, the increase in the cloudiness appeared with increasing concentration of 9G. As a result of the absorbance measurement, it was found that the dose response depended on the composition ratio between HEMA and 9G.

  7. Development of a wavelength-separated type scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) dosimeter to compensate for the Cerenkov radiation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Nagase, Naomi; Matsuura, Taeko; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sutherland, Kenneth Lee; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    The scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) dosimeter consists of a miniature scintillator mounted on the tip of an optical fiber. The scintillator of the current SOF dosimeter is a 1-mm diameter hemisphere. For a scintillation dosimeter coupled with an optical fiber, measurement accuracy is influenced by signals due to Cerenkov radiation in the optical fiber. We have implemented a spectral filtering technique for compensating for the Cerenkov radiation effect specifically for our plastic scintillator-based dosimeter, using a wavelength-separated counting method. A dichroic mirror was used for separating input light signals. Individual signal counting was performed for high- and low-wavelength light signals. To confirm the accuracy, measurements with various amounts of Cerenkov radiation were performed by changing the incident direction while keeping the Ir-192 source-to-dosimeter distance constant, resulting in a fluctuation of Optical fiber bending was also addressed; no bending effect was observed for our wavelength-separated SOF dosimeter.

  8. SU-E-T-368: Effect of a Strong Magnetic Field On Select Radiation Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, M; Wen, Z; Tailor, R; Sawakuchi, G; Flint, D; Beddar, S; Ibbott, G [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of a strong magnetic field on TLD-100, OSLD (Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}:C), and PRESAGE dosimetry devices. This study will help to determine which types of dosimeters can be used for quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry measurements in a magnetic resonance imaginglinear accelerator (MRI-linac) system. Methods: The dosimeters were separated into two categories which were either exposed or not exposed to a strong magnetic field. In each category a set of dosimeters was irradiated with 0, 2, or 6 Gy. To expose the dosimeters to a magnetic field the samples in that category were place in a Bruker small animal magnetic resonance scanner at a field strength slightly greater than 2.5 T for at least 1 hour preirradiation and at least 1 hour post-irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian TrueBeam linac with 10×10 cm{sup 2} field at a 600 MU/min dose rate. The samples that received no radiation dose were used as control detectors. Results: The readouts of the dosimeters which were not exposed to a strong magnetic field were compared with the measurements of the dosimetry devices which were exposed to a magnetic field. No significant differences (less than 2% difference) in the performance of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE dosimeters due to exposure to a strong magnetic field were observed. Conclusion: Exposure to a strong magnetic field before and after irradiation does not appear to change the dosimetric properties of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE which indicates that these dosimeters have potential for use in quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry in a MRI-linac. We plan to further test the effect of magnetic fields on these devices by irradiating them in the presence of a magnetic fields similar to those produced by a MRI-linac system. Elekta-MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Agreement.

  9. Physico-chemical studies for strontium sulfate radiation dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.H. Rushdi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anhydrous strontium sulfate (SrSO4 has shown a promise candidate as a dosimeter for low dose applications producing unique EPR signals with γ-rays which it has a linear response relationship (r2 = 0.999 in the range of 1–100 Gy. The present study extended to evaluate the properties of strontium sulfate dosimeter in intermediate dose range of technology applications. It was observed that the intensity of the EPR signal at g = 2.01081 increases with a 3rd polynomial function in the range of 0.10–15 kGy. In addition, the radical (SO4− provides a stable signal with a good reproducibility (0.107%. Other physics characteristic including the collision of mass stopping power dependence of the system and the effect of atomic number in different energy regions were investigated. The uncertainty budget for high doses has obtained from the measurement with value of 3.57% at 2σ confidence level.

  10. Temperature response of a number of plastic dosimeters for radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabpour, M.; Kazemi, A. A.; Mousavi, H.; Solati, K.

    1993-10-01

    Various plastic dosemeters are employed for dosimetry control of radiation processing within gamma and electron irradiation facilities. The temperature response of a dosimeter is important when the dose to such a dosimeter is accumulated under varying irradiation temperatures. Such measurements would be significant for proper assessment of the dose for better process control, as well as, performance evaluation of dosimetry systems. In this work we have developed a high current peltier junction temperature controller system for our Gammacell-220. This system has been designed to regulate the operating temperature of the irradiation chamber in the range of 0 to 80 C this system has been applied to measure the temperature response of the red perspex, a local clear PMMA, Gammex, Gammachrome, and Gafchromic dosimeters. The curves of relative performance or variation of the induced optical densities of the above dosemeters versus the irradiation temperature at fixed dose values are obtained.

  11. Radiation-induced color bleaching of methyl red in polyvinyl butyral film dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Zahrany, Awad A.; Rabaeh, Khalid A.; Basfar, Ahmed A.

    2011-11-01

    Radio-chromic film based on polyvinyl butyral (PVB) containing different concentrations of methyl red (MR) dye for 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mM has been introduced as high dose dosimeter. The dosimeters were irradiated with gamma ray from 60Co source at doses from 5 to 150 kGy. UV/vis spectrophotometry was used to investigate the optical density of unirradiated and irradiated films in terms of absorbance at 497 nm. The dose sensitivity of MR-PVB film dosimeter increases strongly with increase of absorbed dose as well as increase of concentrations of MR dye. The effects of irradiation temperature, relative humidity, dose rate and the stability of the response of the films after irradiation were investigated and found that these films could be used as routine dosimeter in industrial radiation processing. The useful dose range of developed MR-PVB film dosimeters is in the range of 5-100 kGy.

  12. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M [Al Azhar University, Cairo Egypt (Egypt); Desouky, O [National center for radiation research and technology-Egyptian atomic energy, Cairo (Egypt); Eldib, A [Al Azhar University, Cairo Egypt (Egypt); Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  13. Assessment of radiation exposure of nuclear medicine staff using personal TLD dosimeters and charcoal detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, F.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Pardo, R.; Deban, L. [Valladolid Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, P.; Singi, G.M.; Martin, E. [Hospital Clinico Univ., Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Although the main concern regarding exposure to ionizing radiation for nuclear medicine workers is external radiation, inhalation of radionuclides can significantly contribute to the imparted doses. We propose a new approach to assess exposure to inhalation of {sup 131}I based on passive monitoring using activated charcoal detectors. We compared the inhalation doses to the staff of a nuclear medicine department, based on the measurements derived from charcoal detectors placed at various locations, and the external doses monitored using personal TLD dosimeters. (authors)

  14. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Jr.; Charles L.; Buckner, Mark A.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Bryan, William L.

    2011-04-26

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  15. DLR-Biofilm - a biological weighting UV-dosimeter in medical application; Der DLR-Biofilm - ein biologisch wichtendes UV-Dosimeter in der medizinischen Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, K.; Rettberg, P.; Horneck, G.J [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin; Schneider, L.; Wlaschek, M.; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Venerologie, Koeln (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    A prototype of an optoelectronic-biological UV dosimeter was developed as a combination of DLR-Biofilm and the optoelectronic UV sensor X20001. The device was used to quantify the individual exposure during UV therapy. The obtained biologically weighted doses were compared to the UV dose given by the manufacturer of the UV therapy lamp. The endogenous parameter 8-Isoprostan obtained directly from the skin of probands showed good correlation with the measured biologically weighted dose. (orig.)

  16. Calibration of routine dosimeters in radiation processing: Validation procedure for in-plant calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šećerov Bojana Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential prerequisite of radiation dosimetry is to provide quality assurance and documentation that the irradiation procedure has been carried out according to the specification requirement of correct calibration of the chosen dosimetry system. At the Radiation Plant of the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences we compared two recommended protocols of irradiation procedures in the calibration of dosimetry systems in radiation processing: (1 by irradiation of routine dosimeters (ethanol-chlorobenzene - ECB at the calibration laboratory and (2, by in-plant calibration with alanine transfer - dosimeters. The critical point for in-plant calibration is irradiation geometry, so we carefully positioned the phantom carrying both dosimeters in order to minimize dose gradients across the sample. The analysis of results obtained showed that the difference among determined absorbed doses for the construction of calibration curves between these two methods, (alanine vs. ECB, is less than 1%. The difference in combined standard uncertainty for each calibration procedure is 0.1%. These results demonstrate that our in-plant calibration is as good as calibration by irradiation at the calibration laboratory and validates our placement of the irradiation phantom during irradiation.

  17. Enhancement in dose sensitivity of polymer gel dosimeters composed of radiation-crosslinked gel matrix and less toxic monomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroki, A.; Yamashita, S.; Taguchi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters based on radiation-crosslinked hydroxypropyl cellulose gel were prepared, which comprised 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and polyethylene glycol #400 dimethacrylate (9G) as less toxic monomers and tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) as an antioxidant. The dosimeters exposed to 60Co γ-rays became cloudy at only 1 Gy. The irradiated dosimeters were optically analyzed by using a UV- vis spectrophotometer to evaluate dose response. Absorbance of the dosimeters linearly increased in the dose range from 0 to 10 Gy, in which dose sensitivity increased with increasing 9G concentration. The dose sensitivity of the dosimeters with 2 wt% HEMA and 3 wt% 9G was also enhanced by increment in THPC.

  18. Real time radiation dosimeters based on vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaro, Maria; Sarno, Maria; Ciambelli, Paolo; Altavilla, Claudia; Proto, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of the absorbed dose and quality assurance programs play an important role in radiotherapy. Ionization chambers (CIs) are considered the most important dosimeters for their high accuracy, practicality and reliability, allowing absolute dose measurements. However, they have a relative large physical size, which limits their spatial resolution, and require a high bias voltage to achieve an acceptable collection of charges, excluding their use for in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we propose new real time radiation detectors with electrodes based on graphene or vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). We have investigated their charge collection efficiency and compared their performance with electrodes made of a conventional material. Moreover, in order to highlight the effect of nanocarbons, reference radiation detectors were also tested. The proposed dosimeters display an excellent linear response to dose and collect more charge than reference ones at a standard bias voltage, permitting the construction of miniaturized CIs. Moreover, an MWCNT based CI gives the best charge collection efficiency and it enables working also to lower bias voltages and zero volts, allowing in vivo applications. Graphene based CIs show better performance with respect to reference dosimeters at a standard bias voltage. However, at decreasing bias voltage the charge collection efficiency becomes worse if compared to a reference detector, likely due to graphene’s semiconducting behavior.

  19. Stored-fluorography mode reduces radiation dose during cardiac catheterization measured with OSLD dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tang, Kuo-Ting; Liu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2015-12-01

    Coronary angiogram is an imperative tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases, in which cine-angiography is a commonly used method. Although the angiography proceeds under radiation, the potential risk of radiation exposure for both the patients and the operators was seldom noticed. In this study, the absorbed radiation dose in stored-fluorography mode was compared with that in cine-angiography mode by using optically simulated luminescent dosimeters to realize their effects on radiation dose. Patients received coronary angiogram via radial artery approach were randomized into the stored-fluorography group (N=30) or the cine-angiography group (N=30). The excluded criteria were: 1. women at pregnancy or on breast feeding, 2. chronic kidney diseases with glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min. During the coronary angiogram, absorbed dose of the patients and the operator radiation exposure was measured with optically simulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD). The absorbed dose of the patients in the stored-fluorography group (3.13±0.25 mGy) was apparently lower than that in the cine-angiography group (65.57±5.37 mGy; Pcine-angiography (0.6519μGy). Compared with traditional cine-angiography mode, the stored-fluorography mode can apparently reduce radiation exposure of the patients and the operator in coronary angiogram.

  20. Miniaturized, low power FGMOSFET radiation sensor and wireless dosimeter system

    KAUST Repository

    Arsalan, Muhammad

    2013-08-27

    A miniaturized floating gate (FG) MOSFET radiation sensor system is disclosed, The sensor preferably comprises a matched pair of sensor and reference FGMOSFETs wherein the sensor FGMOSFET has a larger area floating gate with an extension over a field oxide layer, for accumulation of charge and increased sensitivity. Elimination of a conventional control gate and injector gate reduces capacitance, and increases sensitivity, and allows for fabrication using standard low cost CMOS technology. A sensor system may be provided with integrated signal processing electronics, for monitoring a change in differential channel current I.sub.D, indicative of radiation dose, and an integrated negative bias generator for automatic pre-charging from a low voltage power source. Optionally, the system may be coupled to a wireless transmitter. A compact wireless sensor System on Package solution is presented, suitable for dosimetry for radiotherapy or other biomedical applications.

  1. Real-time fibre optic radiation dosimeters for nuclear environment monitoring around thermonuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A. Fernandez; Brichard, B. [SCK .CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); O' Keeffe, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Lewis, E. [Electronic and Computer Engineering Department, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Vaille, J.-R.; Dusseau, L. [CEM2-Universite Montpellier II, cc083 place E. Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); Jackson, D.A. [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Kent CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); Ravotti, F.; Glaser, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, TS-LEA-RAD/PH-DT2-SD, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); El-Rabii, H. [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique, ENSMA/CNRS, 1 av. Clement Ader, 86961 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France)], E-mail: afernand@sckcen.be

    2008-01-15

    The ability of fibre optic sensors to operate in hazardous nuclear environments and their intrinsic immunity to electro-magnetic interference make fibre optic sensing a very promising technology for the future ITER thermonuclear fusion reactor. In this paper, we evaluate fibre optic sensing technology for monitoring radiation dose in the vicinity of ITER during its operation and during the maintenance periods. First, the performance of an OSL dosimeter interrogated remotely using radiation tolerant optical fibres is evaluated both for real-time and integrating measurements for doses exceeding 100 Gy. We demonstrate its satisfactory operation in a mixed gamma neutron field. Second, we discuss the successful calibration of a new scintillating fibre optic radiation probe based on CsI(TI) crystals for operation in the dose-rate range 0.3-3000 mGy/h. The CsI(TI) crystal scintillator is mounted at the end of a 10-m long multimode fibre transceiver link to allow for remote deployment. The probes can detect and measure gamma dose rates ranging from 1 to 1000 mGy/h. Finally, we investigate the possible use of commercially available PMMA plastic optical fibres as on-line dosimeters up to 34 kGy. The dose measurement is derived from the radiation-induced attenuation in the optical fibre itself. A novel interrogation scheme based on a ratiometric technique is proposed for real-time dosimetry.

  2. Thin plastic radiochromic dye films as ionizing radiation dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenfil-Burgos, A. E.; Uribe, R. M.; de la Piedad, A.; McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, A.

    Radiochromic dye films were fabricated by casting polyvinyl butyral (PVB) in weakly acidic solution with the leucocyanide of pararosaniline. Calibrated films of 10-25 μm thickness were useful over a response range of about 10 3-10 5 Gy, by applying spectrophotometric analysis at the wavelength of the maximum of the radiation-induced absorption band (550 nm). The effects of temperature, pressure, and humidity during curing of the films pointed to the need for carefully controlling these parameters. For casting films at the high altitude of Mexico City (≈ 2500 meters), the optimum conditions are 45-75% r.h. and 20-25° C for a drying period of 72 to 92 hours, when the solvent is a mixture of ethanol and 2-methoxyethanol. The response of films fabricated in this way were compared with those of commercially available PVB and Nylon films. The effects of temperature, humidity, and period of storage on the response of these films were studied in the range from -5 to 60° C and from 11.8 to 96.6% r.h. for up to four months between irradiation and spectral analysis, and within nominal experimental uncertainty (≈ 10%), we found that all the radiochromic films studied can be stored for extended periods under steady-state conditions in the temperature range from -5 to 30° C and from 11.8-75.6% r.h. without correction factors for instability, but under extreme conditions of moisture at elevated temperatures the radiochromic image showed a fading effect on storage.

  3. MCz diode response as a high-dose gamma radiation dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Goncalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Depto. de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo-PUC/SP, Rua Marques de Paranagua no 111-01303 050 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Khoury, H.J. [Nuclear Energy Department, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-UFPE, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire no 1000-50740 540 Recife/PE (Brazil); Napolitano, C.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Haerkoenen, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics-HIP, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Bueno, C.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Depto. de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo-PUC/SP, Rua Marques de Paranagua no 111-01303 050 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil)], E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br

    2008-02-15

    This work presents the preliminary results obtained with a high-resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon diode processed at the Helsinki Institute of Physics as a high-dose gamma dosimeter in radiation processing. The irradiation was performed using a {sup 60}Co source (Gammacell 220, MDS Nordion) within total doses from 100 Gy up to 3 kGy at a dose rate of 3 kGy/h. In this interval, the dosimetric response of the diode is linear with a correlation coefficient (r{sup 2}) higher than 0.993. However, without any irradiation procedure, the device showed a small sensitivity dependence on the accumulated dose. For total dose of 3 kGy, the observed decrease was about 2%. To clarify the origin of this possible radiation damage effect, some studies are under way.

  4. A novel dosimeter for measuring the amount of radiation exposure of surgeons during percutaneous nephrolithotomy: Instadose™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuruk, Emrah; Gureser, Gokhan; Tuken, Murat; Ertas, Kasim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of Instadose™, a novel dosimeter designed for radiation workers to provide a measurement of the radiation dose at any time from any computer; to determine the amount of radiation exposure during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL); and to evaluate the factors that affect the amount of radiation exposed. Material and methods Two experienced surgeons wore Instadose™ on the outer part of their lead aprons during the PNL procedures performed between December 2013 and July 2014. Patient demographics and stone characteristics were noted. Factors affecting radiation dose were determined. Fluoroscopic screening time was compared with the amount of radiation in order to validate the measurements of Instadose™. Results Overall, 51 patients with a mean age of 43.41 ±18.58 (range 1–75) years were enrolled. Male to female ratio was 35/16. The amount of radiation was greater than 0.01mSv in only 19 (37.25%) cases. Stone location complexity (p = 0.380), dilation type (p = 0.584), stone size (p = 0.565), dilation size (p = 0.891) and access number (p = 0.268) were not associated with increased radiation exposure. Instadose™ measurements were correlated with fluoroscopic screening time (r = 0.519, p = 0.001). Conclusions Instadose™ is a useful tool for the measurement of radiation exposure during PNL. The advantage of measuring the amount of radiation exposure after each PNL operation is that it may aid urologists in taking appropriate precautions to minimize the risk of radiation related complications. PMID:27551558

  5. Application of a wrist dosimeter prototype for radiation monitoring ({sup 153}Sm) during a therapeutic procedure simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecatti, S G P [Fundacentro, Ministerio do Trabalho e Emprego, Rua Capote Valente, 710, 05409-002, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Guimaraes, M I C C [Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Travessa da Rua Dr. Ovidio Pires de Campos s/n, 05403-010, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Caldas, L V E [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: scecatti@fundacentro.gov.br, E-mail: ines@hcnet.usp.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br

    2009-12-01

    Gamma and beta radiation emitting radiopharmaceuticals are handled in nuclear medicine services, and in many cases there is only individual monitoring of gamma radiation. In this paper, the results obtained using a wrist dosimeter prototype (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy+Teflon pellets) show that the doses for workers occupationally exposed to beta radiation from {sup 153}Sm are not negligible. It is important that this dose is evaluated, and it has to be taken into consideration in the individual monitoring system.

  6. Taurine-EVA copolymer-paraffin rods dosimeters for EPR high-dose radiation dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maghraby Ahmed M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Taurine/EPR rods (3 × 10 mm have been prepared by a simple technique in the laboratory where taurine powder was mixed with a molten mixture of paraffin wax and an ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA copolymer. The binding mixture EVA/Paraffin does not present interference or noise in the EPR signal before or after irradiation. The rods show good mechanical properties for safe and multi-use handling. An EPR investigation of radiation induced radicals in taurine rods revealed that there are two types of radicals produced after exposure to gamma radiation (60Co. EPR spectra were recorded and analyzed - also the microwave power saturation and modulation amplitude were studied and optimized. Response of taurine to different radiation doses (1.5-100 kGy was studied and found to follow a linear relationship up to 100 kGy. Radiation induced radicals in taurine persists and showed a noticeable stability over 94 days following irradiation. Uncertainities associated with the evaluation of radiation doses using taurine dosimeters were discussed and tabulated. It was found that taurine possesses good dosimetric properties using EPR spectroscopy in high doses in addition to its simple spectrum.

  7. Personal Active Dosimeter for Space: the Light Observer for Radiation Environment (LORE) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio

    Long permanence in space outside the protections of the Earth magnetic shield and atmosphere (during long journeys, and on the Moon or/and Mars) requires a careful monitoring of absorbed doses by each astronaut. This is of paramount importance for transient and cumulative effects mostly due to Solar Particle Events. Alarming features and the possibility of monitoring absorbed dose also discriminating the kind of incoming radiation will be needed. Stemming from our large experience in detector building, in modelling, in designing of the supporting electronic, from our payloads flown on satellites, MIR Station and ISS (Nina, Mita, SilEye, SilEye2, Alteino, Pamela, ALTEA) we are developping a personal active dosimeter with alarming and wireless features. The goal is a small object able to measure charged and neutral ionizing radiation (the possibility to insert a miniaturized gamma detector will be investigated) The device will feature portability (cigarette-box dimensions, rechargeable batteries), sensitivity to ions (H to above Fe), to hard X-rays, and possibly to gamma with the ability to detect and count neutrons. Flash memories should contain pre loaded tables and the real Time code to perform the real time operations and risk thresholds so to activate an alarm if/when needed. Whenever in range, the device will connect wirelessly to the main computer and send there the raw and pre-analyzed data for a complete monitoring and possible more sophisticated analyses. The two major novelties and challenges in this project are the miniaturization of the device, including the firmware, and the definition of the transfer function and of its uncertainties, linking measured data with real flux data. This will require the proper balancing among size, radiation discrimination ability and uncertainty minimization.

  8. Rapid release of tissue enzymes into blood after blast exposure: potential use as biological dosimeters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peethambaran Arun

    Full Text Available Explosive blast results in multiple organ injury and polytrauma, the intensity of which varies with the nature of the exposure, orientation, environment and individual resilience. Blast overpressure alone may not precisely indicate the level of body or brain injury after blast exposure. Assessment of the extent of body injury after blast exposure is important, since polytrauma and systemic factors significantly contribute to blast-induced traumatic brain injury. We evaluated the activity of plasma enzymes including aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine kinase (CK at different time points after blast exposure using a mouse model of single and repeated blast exposures to assess the severity of injury. Our data show that activities of all the enzymes in the plasma were significantly increased as early as 1 h after blast exposure. The elevated enzyme activity remained up to 6 h in an overpressure dose-dependent manner and returned close to normal levels at 24 h. Head-only blast exposure with body protection showed no increase in the enzyme activities suggesting that brain injury alone does not contribute to the systemic increase. In contrast to plasma increase, AST, ALT and LDH activity in the liver and CK in the skeletal muscle showed drastic decrease at 6 h after blast exposures. Histopathology showed mild necrosis at 6 h and severe necrosis at 24 h after blast exposures in liver and no changes in the skeletal muscle suggesting that the enzyme release from the tissue to plasma is probably triggered by transient cell membrane disruption from shockwave and not due to necrosis. Overpressure dependent transient release of tissue enzymes and elevation in the plasma after blast exposure suggest that elevated enzyme activities in the blood can be potentially used as a biological dosimeter to assess the severity of blast injury.

  9. The Problem of using Quartz as a radiation dosimeter: fundamentals of dose dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G. E.; Finch, A. A.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Hole, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Quartz is widely used as a radiation dosimeter in Quaternary geomorphological and archaeological dating applications through Optically Stimulated Luminescence (over 1,200 journal publications since 2000). However, obtaining an accurate equivalent radiation dose (DE) can be challenging, especially where the luminescence intensity of the quartz is dim. The causes of variation in luminescence intensity between quartz grains of different provenances, transport and thermal histories is unknown, however it has been suggested that it relates to either the dosimetric history of the grain, or mechanical processes which occur in transit. Investigation of the fundamental properties of the luminescence of quartz, enables investigation of dose dependent changes in luminescence intensity. A series of dose dependence experiments were conducted using spectroscopic ionoluminescence, which comprises the excitation of quartz with protons accelerated at 0.95 MeV. The energy delivered to the sample throughout ion implantation is similar to that received during gamma irradiation, and thus approximates sample radiation dosing. A natural macro-crystal of α-quartz was investigated parallel and perpendicular to c, to observe any orientation dependent effects, as well as a calibration quartz from the Risø National Laboratory, Denmark, and a Scottish geomorphological sample, prepared using standard laboratory procedures. The calibration quartz sample has excellent luminescence intensity and is suited to analysis using the single-aliquot regenerative dose (SAR) standard OSL protocol, the Scottish sample alternatively has very dim luminescence and exhibits variable behaviour when analysed with SAR. Despite the differences between the luminescence behaviour of the samples, all three responded to the dose dependence experiments in a similar manner. The UV/blue emission was observed to deplete with increasing dose, whereas the red emission, not normally analysed within OSL, exhibited increased

  10. A Dosimetric Evaluation of Organs at Risk in Prostate Radiation Therapy using a MAGIC Gel Dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Sadoughi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple fields and presence of heterogeneities create complex dose distributions that need three dimensional dosimetry. In this work, we investigated MR-based MAGIC gel dosimetry as a three-dimensional dosimetry technique to measure the delivered dose to bladder and rectum in prostate radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: A heterogeneous slab phantom including bones was made. Paired cubes in the phantom representing bladder and prostate and a cylindrical container representing rectum were filled with MAGIC gel and placed in the anthropomorphic pelvic phantom. The phantom was irradiated with four beams as planned using a treatment planning system (TPS. Magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate images were acquired and turned into dose distribution maps using a calibration curve. This calibration curve was obtained by linear fitting to R2 values of 4 test tubes against their given known doses. Image processing and data analysis were performed in MATLAB7 software. The gel dosimeter was validated using an ionization chamber. Dose maps and dose volume histograms (DVHs were compared with dose distributions and DVHs of the TPS. Results: Mean “distance-to-agreement” and mean “dose difference” were 2.98 mm and 6.2%, respectively, in the comparison of profiles obtained from ionization chamber and gel dosimetry. Mean relative difference of DVHs between gel dosimetry and TPS data were 3.04%, 10.4% and 11.7%, for prostate, bladder and rectum, respectively. Discussion and Conclusions: Gel dosimetry is a good method for three dimensional dosimetry although it has a low precision in high dose gradient regions. This method can be used for evaluation of complicated dose distribution accuracy in 3D conformal radiotherapy, especially in presence of heterogeneities.

  11. Biological implications of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, V.P.

    1977-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: effects of diagnostic and therapeutic radiation on dividing cells, DNA, and blood cells; radiation sickness in relation to dose; early and late effects of radiation; effects of low dose irradiation; dose-effect curves; radioinduction of tumors in animals; and incidence of cancer in children following in utero exposure to diagnostic x rays. (HLW)

  12. 自显色个人剂量计研究%Investigation of Self-indicating Radiation Personal Dosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏文; 叶宏生; 林敏; 徐利军; 陈克胜; 陈义珍

    2014-01-01

    A self-indicating radiation personal dosimeter was investigated using radiation sensitive material diacetylene monomer PCDA ,which was a component of the polymeri-zation system .The substrate material ,solvent ,sensitive material ,solution tempera-ture ,thickness of film and the preparation method were studied .The dosimeter colour changes from w hite to blue w hen exposed 0.1-2.5 Gy ,and the linearly dependent coeffi-cient of the exposure response is 0.999 8 ,the stability of absorbency in two weeks after exposure is testified well . It can be used as self-indicating radiation alert personal dosimeter .%采用聚合变色体系,以类丁二炔单体PCDA为变色染料,制备了一种用于辐照剂量预警的自显色个人剂量计。对基体材料、稀释剂种类、变色染料、溶解温度、成膜厚度以及膜制备工艺进行了研究,建立了自显色个人剂量计制备方法。剂量计接受0.1~2.5 Gy辐照后,颜色从白色变为蓝色,在681.5 nm处测得剂量响应曲线线性相关系数为0.9998,照后两周内稳定性良好,可作为预警式个人剂量计使用。

  13. Measurement of personal dose equivalent of X and gamma radiation by ring dosimeter: Results of intercomparison measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Adamowicz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to present the results of the interlaboratory comparisons for ring dosimeters and to confirm that the applied method is suitable for measuring the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. In addition, calibration procedures used in dosimetric measurements in persons occupationally exposed to ionizing photon radiation X and γ were presented. Materials and Methods: Ring dosimeters made of flexible plastics with the diameter of approximately 20 mm, equipped with two thermoluminescence (TL detectors type MTS-N, were the subject of interlaboratory comparisons. Irradiated detectors were red out using a new manual TLD's reader (FIMEL, France. All TLD exposures were done for validation of TLD readers and were performed using the reference X-ray and γ beams with the ISO rod phantom. The methodology of performed exposures corresponded with the methods applied by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS, the European organizer of interlaboratory comparisons. Results: The energy, dose and angular characteristics of the ring dosimeter allowed to elaborate the formula for estimating and verifying the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. The test was performed to check and confirm the correctness of the estimated characteristics. The test results were satisfactory, and thus the readiness to implement TLD reader in the used method and to participate in interlaboratory comparisons was confirmed. Conclusions: According to the requirements of the Polish Centre for Accreditation, the laboratory was participating in the interlaboratory comparison organized by EURADOS in terms of the personal dose equivalent HP(0.07. The result of the comparison was satisfactory, therefore the correctness of the testing procedure was confirmed. Med Pr 2013;64(5:631–637

  14. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  15. Characteristics of radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Masashi; Shiraishi, Akemi; Murakami, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, a film badge is recently replaced by a new type radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimeter for external personal monitoring. Some fundamental characteristics of this dosimeter, such as dose dependence linearity, energy dependence, angular dependence, dose evaluation accuracy at mixed irradiation conditions, fading, etc., were examined at the Facility of Radiation Standard (FRS), JAERI. The results have proved that the RPL glass dosimeter has sufficient characteristics for practical use as a personal dosimeter for all of the items examined. (author)

  16. A deployable in vivo EPR tooth dosimeter for triage after a radiation event involving large populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin B., E-mail: Benjamin.B.Williams@dartmouth.edu [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medicine, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Dong, Ruhong [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Flood, Ann Barry [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Grinberg, Oleg [Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Kmiec, Maciej; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Matthews, Thomas P.; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Raynolds, Tim [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Salikhov, Ildar K. [Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Dartmouth Physically Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03768 (United States); Clin-EPR, LLC, Lyme, NH (United States)

    2011-09-15

    In order to meet the potential need for emergency large-scale retrospective radiation biodosimetry following an accident or attack, we have developed instrumentation and methodology for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify concentrations of radiation-induced radicals within intact teeth. This technique has several very desirable characteristics for triage, including independence from confounding biologic factors, a non-invasive measurement procedure, the capability to make measurements at any time after the event, suitability for use by non-expert operators at the site of an event, and the ability to provide immediate estimates of individual doses. Throughout development there has been a particular focus on the need for a deployable system, including instrumental requirements for transport and field use, the need for high throughput, and use by minimally trained operators. Numerous measurements have been performed using this system in clinical and other non-laboratory settings, including in vivo measurements with unexposed populations as well as patients undergoing radiation therapies. The collection and analyses of sets of three serially-acquired spectra with independent placements of the resonator, in a data collection process lasting approximately 5 min, provides dose estimates with standard errors of prediction of approximately 1 Gy. As an example, measurements were performed on incisor teeth of subjects who had either received no irradiation or 2 Gy total body irradiation for prior bone marrow transplantation; this exercise provided a direct and challenging test of our capability to identify subjects who would be in need of acute medical care. -- Highlights: > Advances in radiation biodosimetry are needed for large-scale emergency response. > Radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel can be measured using in vivo EPR. > A novel transportable spectrometer was applied in the laboratory and at remote sites. > The current instrument

  17. Ionizing radiation M.O.S. dosimeters: sensibility and stability; Dosimetres M.O.S. de rayonnements ionisants: sensibilite et stabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessinn, F.

    1993-12-01

    This thesis is a contribution to the study of the ionizing radiation responsivity of P.O.M.S. dosimeters. Unlike the development of processing hardening techniques, our works goal were to increase, on the one hand, the M.O.S. dosimeters sensitivity in order to detect small radiation doses and on the other hand, the stability with time and temperature of the devices, to minimize the absorbed-dose estimation errors. With this aim in mind, an analysis of all processing parameters has been carried out: the M.O.S. dosimeter sensitivity is primarily controlled by the gate oxide thickness and the irradiation electric field. Thus, P.M.O.S. transistors with 1 and 2 {mu}m thick silica layers have been fabricated for our experiments. The radiation response of our devices in the high-field mode satisfactorily fits a D{sub ox}{sup 2} power law. The maximum sensitivity achieved (9,2 V/Gy for 2{mu}m devices) is close to the ideal value obtained when considering only an unitary carrier-trapping level, and allows to measure about 10{sup -2} Gy radiation doses. Read-time stability has been evaluated under bias-temperature stress conditions: experiments underscore slow fading, corresponding to 10{sup -3} Gy/h. The temperature response has also been studied: the analytical model we have developed predicts M.O.S. transistors threshold voltage variations over the military specifications range [-50 deg. C, + 150 deg. C]. Finally, we have investigated the possibilities of irradiated dosimeters thermal annealing for reusing. It appears clearly that radiation-induced damage annealing is strongly gate bias dependent. Furthermore, dosimeters radiation sensitivity seems not to be affected by successive annealings. (author). 146 refs., 58 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. SU-E-T-585: Optically-Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters for Monitoring Pacemaker Dose in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apicello, L [Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY (United States); Riegel, A; Jamshidi, A [North Shore LIJ Health System, Lake Success, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A sufficient amount of ionizing radiation can cause failure to components of pacemakers. Studies have shown that permanent damage can occur after a dose of 10 Gy and minor damage to functionality occurs at doses as low as 2 Gy. Optically stimulated thermoluminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) can be used as in vivo dosimeters to predict dose to be deposited throughout the treatment. The purpose of this work is to determine the effectiveness of using OSLDs for in vivo dosimetry of pacemaker dose. Methods: As part of a clinical in vivo dosimetry experience, OSLDs were placed at the site of the pacemaker by the therapist for one fraction of the radiation treatment. OSLD measurements were extrapolated to the total dose to be received by the pacemaker during treatment. A total of 79 measurements were collected from November 2011 to December 2013 on six linacs. Sixty-six (66) patients treated in various anatomical sites had the dose of their pacemakers monitored. Results: Of the 79 measurements recorded, 76 measurements (96 %) were below 2 Gy. The mean and standard deviation were 50.12 ± 76.41 cGy. Of the 3 measurements that exceeded 2 Gy, 2 measurements matched the dose predicted in the treatment plan and 1 was repeated after an unexpectedly high Result. The repeated measurement yielded a total dose less than 2 Gy. Conclusion: This analysis suggests OSLDs may be used for in vivo monitoring of pacemaker dose. Further research should be performed to assess the effect of increased backscatter from the pacemaker device.

  19. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhol, J.M.; Chavanne, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Weckert, E. [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg (Germany)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  20. Biological Research for Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Sik; Moon, Myung Sook; Byun, Hee Sun; Phyo, Ki Heon; Kim, Sung Keun

    2005-04-15

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about ornithine decarboxylase and its controlling proteins, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, S-adenosymethionine decarboxylase, and glutamate decarboxylase 67KD effect on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(toxic agents). In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (or H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced apoptotic cell death, we utilized sensesed (or antisensed) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(or paraquat). We also investigated whether genisteine(or thiamine) may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation (may enhance the preventing effect radiation or paraquat-induced damage) because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects. Based on the above result, we suggest that the express regulation of theses genes have potentially importance for sensitizing the efficiency of radiation therapy of cancer or for protecting the radiation-induced damage of normal cells.

  1. Angular dependence of dose sensitivity of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters in different radiation geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jursinic, Paul A., E-mail: pjursinic@wmcc.org [West Michigan Cancer Center, 200 North Park Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: A type of in vivo dosimeter, an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, OSLD, may have dose sensitivity that depends on the angle of incidence of radiation. This work measures how angular dependence of a nanoDot changes with the geometry of the phantom in which irradiation occurs and with the intrinsic structure of the nanoDot. Methods: The OSLDs used in this work were nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose to the OSLDs was delivered by 6 MV x-rays. NanoDots with various intrinsic sensitivities were irradiated in numerous phantoms that had geometric shapes of cylinders, rectangles, and a cube. Results: No angular dependence was seen in cylindrical phantoms, cubic phantoms, or rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width ratio of 0.3 or 1.5. An angular dependence of 1% was observed in rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width of 0.433–0.633. A group of nanoDots had sensitive layers with mass density of 2.42–2.58 g/cm{sup 3} and relative sensitivity of 0.92–1.09 and no difference in their angular dependence. Within experimental uncertainty, nanoDot measurements agree with a parallel-plate ion chamber at a depth of maximum dose. Conclusions: When irradiated in cylindrical, rectangular, and cubic phantoms, nanoDots show a maximum angular dependence of 1% or less at an incidence angle of 90°. For a sample of 78 new nanoDots, the range of their relative intrinsic sensitivity is 0.92–1.09. For a sample of ten nanoDots, on average, the mass in the sensitive layer is 73.1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 26.9% polyester. The mass density of the sensitive layer of a nanoDot disc is between 2.42 and 2.58 g/cm{sup 3}. The angular dependence is not related to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C loading of the nanoDot disc. The nanoDot at the depth of maximum dose has no more angular dependence than a parallel-plate ion chamber.

  2. Feasibility of smartphone diaries and personal dosimeters to quantitatively study exposure to ultraviolet radiation in a small national sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, Brian; Søndergaard, Jens; Nielsen, Jesper B

    2015-01-01

    studies and of smartphones as a data collection tool. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Participants were sent a dosimeter which they wore for 7 days, received a short diary questionnaire by text message each day and subsequently a longer questionnaire. Correlation between responses from questionnaire, smartphone...... diaries and dosimeters were examined. RESULTS: This study shows a 99.5% return rate (n = 205) of the dosimeters by ordinary mail and high response-rates for a smartphone questionnaire dairy. Correlation coefficients for outdoor-time reported through smartphones and dosimeters as average by week 0.62 (0...... that dosimeter studies are feasible in national settings and that smartphones are a useful tool for monitoring and collecting UV behavior data. CONCLUSION: We found diary data reported on a daily basis through smartphones more strongly associated with actual outdoor time than questionnaire data. Our results...

  3. Biology relevant to space radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-30

    There are only very limited data on the health effects to humans from the two major components of the radiations in space, namely protons and heavy ions. As a result, predictions of the accompanying effects must be based either on (1) data generated through studies of experimental systems exposed on earth at rates and fluences higher than those in space, or (2) extrapolations from studies of gamma and x rays. Better information is needed about the doses, dose rates, and the energy and LET spectra of the radiations at the organ level that are anticipated to be encountered during extended space missions. In particular, there is a need for better estimates of the relationship between radiation quality and biological effects. In the case of deterministic effects, it is the threshold that is important. The possibility of the occurrence of a large solar particle event (SPE) requires that such effects be considered during extended space missions. Analyses suggest, however, that it is feasible to provide sufficient shielding so as to reduce such effects to acceptable levels, particularly if the dose rates can be limited. If these analyses prove correct, the primary biological risks will be the stochastic effects (latent cancer induction). The contribution of one large SPE to the risk of stochastic effects while undesirable will not be large in comparison to the potential total dose on a mission of long duration.

  4. Application of Lead Sulphide Nanoparticles for Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Dehtjars, J; Kovaļovs, P; Reisfeld, R.; Rešetņikova, A; Romanova, M.; Saraidarov, T; Surkova, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to design a dosimeter that provides measurements of doses of ionizing radiation absorbed in nano-sized objects. Such dosimeters can be useful for radiobiology in order to study effects of radiation on nanosized biological structures such as DNA molecule. We offer to use radiation-sensitive semiconductor nanoparticles as nanosized active elements of the dosimeter. Nanoparticles have to be embedded into a dielectric matrix that provides physical and chemical stabil...

  5. The Bland-Altman analysis: Does it have a role in assessing radiation dosimeter performance relative to an established standard?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.F., E-mail: robin.hill@email.cs.nsw.gov.a [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown NSW 2050 (Australia); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton BN1 9RR (United Kingdom); Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Baldock, C. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Bland-Altman analysis is used to compare two different methods of measurement and to determine whether a new method of measurement may replace an existing accepted 'gold standard' method. In this work, Bland-Altman analysis has been applied to radiation dosimetry to compare the PTW Markus and Roos parallel plate ionisation chambers and a PTW PinPoint chamber against a Farmer type ionisation chamber which is accepted as the gold standard for radiation dosimetry in the clinic. Depth doses for low energy x-rays beams with energies of 50, 75 and 100 kVp were measured using each of the ionisation chambers. Depth doses were also calculated by interpolation of the data in the British Journal of Radiology (BJR) Report 25. From the Bland-Altman analysis, the mean dose difference between the two parallel plate chambers and the Farmer chambers was 1% over the range of depths measured. The PinPoint chamber gave significant dose differences compared to the Farmer chamber. There were also differences of up to 12% between the BJR Report 25 depth doses and the measured data. For the Bland-Altman plots, the lines representing the limits of agreement were selected to be a particular percentage agreement e.g. 1 or 2%, instead of being based on the standard deviation ({sigma}) of the differences. The Bland-Altman statistical analysis is a powerful tool for making comparisons of ionisation chambers with an ionisation chamber that has been accepted as a 'gold standard'. Therefore we conclude that Bland-Altman analysis does have a role in assessing radiation dosimeter performance relative to an established standard.

  6. Development of radiation biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil; Son, Young Sook; Kim, Soo Kwan; Jang, Won Suk; Le, Sun Joo; Jee, Young Heun; Jung, Woo Jung

    1999-04-01

    Up until now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline (triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the premature chromosome condensation assay and apoptotic fragment assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiation dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with conventional chromosome aberration assay and micronuclei assay.

  7. Radiation-induced change of optical property of hydroxypropyl cellulose hydrogel containing methacrylate compounds: As a basis for development of a new type of radiation dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Hiroki, Akihiro; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogels with matrix of a cellulose derivative, hydrogel of hydroxpropyl cellulose (HPC), containing two of methacrylate compounds (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (9G)) were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays. The gels become white with irradiation, and thus, could be candidates of a new type of radiation dosimeter utilized in radiation therapy because the gels become white with irradiation and can be confirmed directly by human eyes even at low doses of 1-2 Gy. Radiation-induced change of optical properties, haze value and UV-vis absorption spectrum, of the irradiated gels was measured. Dose response of the white turbidity appearance was different for different compositions of the methacrylate compounds as well as for different dose rates. The degree of the radiation-induced white turbidity was quantified by measuring haze value, showing linear dose response in low dose region (<2 Gy). We also analyzed the gels with a UV-vis spectrometer and HEMA- and 9G-rich gels gave different spectral shapes, indicating that there are at least two mechanisms leading to the white turbidity. In addition, dose rate dependence was smaller for 9G-rich gels than HEMA-rich gels in the range of 0.015-1.5 Gy/min.

  8. Biological research for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Shim, Hae Won; Oh, Tae Jeong; Park, Seon Young; Lee, Kang Suk

    2000-04-01

    The work scope of Biological research for the radiation protection had contained the search of biological microanalytic methods for assessing the health effect by {gamma}-radiation and toxic agents, the standardization of human T-lymphocyte cell culture and polymerase chain reaction, T-cell clonal assay, and the quantification of mutation frequency in the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus by single exposure or combined exposure. Especially, the polymerase chain reaction methods using reverse transcriptase has been developed to analyze the mutant gene induced by {gamma}-radiation and chemical (pentachlorophenol) agent exposure, and to investigate the point mutations in the HPRT gene locus of T-lymphocytes. The HPRT T-cell clonal assay revealed that it could not differentiate {gamma}-irradiation from pentachlorophenol, because the frequency of somatic mutations induced by both damaging agents increased in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of DNA sequence alterations of HPRT mutant clones clearly showed that both damaging agents induced different mutational spectra in the HPRT locus of T-cells. The large deletions, which account for 75 percent of the analyzed mutants, are characteristic mutations induced by {gamma}-irradiation. By contrast, point mutations such as base substitutions and insertion, come up to 97 percent in the case of pentachlorophenol-treated cells. The point mutation frequencies at 190 base pair and 444 base pair positions are 3-6 folds as high as in those at other mutation positions. It may be that these mutation sites are hot spots induced by pentachlorophenol. These results suggest that the HPRT mutation spectrum can be used as a potential bio marker for assessing a specific environmental risk. (author)

  9. CR-39 and Lexan calibrated as low-LET radiation dosimeter, for three Mexican irradiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavera, L. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No 152, Mexico DF 07730 (Mexico)]. E-mail: mltavera@imp.mx; Balcazar, M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Matamoros, H. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No 152, Mexico DF 07730 (Mexico); Carrasco, H. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico)

    2005-11-15

    An experimental calibration of two common nuclear track detectors, CR-39 and Lexan, for gamma and electrons radiation, was performed using various irradiation facilities. The dose response was obtained as a function of two parameters, the bulk etch rate and the UV absorbance for a wide dose range from 10 to 1000 kGy. The bulk etch rate sensitivity, for gamma and electrons, in CR-39 detector is higher than for Lexan detector. Lexan has a well-defined UV absorbance spectrum, but presents saturation for doses higher than 500 kGy, the same saturation characteristic is observed for the corresponding bulk etch rate response. For electron and gamma radiation, CR-39 shows a good response for doses from 10 kGy up to 1000 kGy, where data fit well an exponential curve for electrons and a lineal curve for gamma radiation.

  10. Dosimeter Design Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    space environment. The dosimeters employ a silicon detector which responds to energy deposits in the range of 100 kilo-electron volt to 15 Mega ...specified to a hardness level of 1 Mega -radian/Silicon total dose and are latch-up free. COSMIAC can provide additional radiation testing to higher total...EEPROM_RST_CTRL - leave unchanged // +-------------- MEM_MAP set high (lower 64KB bank selected

  11. Compliance with the proper use of an individual radiation dosimeter among children and the effects of improper use on the measured dose: a retrospective study 18–20 months following Japan's 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Hayano, Ryugo; Yoneoka, Daisuke; Ozaki, Akihiko; Shimada, Yuki; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify profiles of children who did not properly use individual radiation dosimeters following Japan's 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident, and to assess how much error is generated by improper dosimeter use. Participants The participants in this study comprised 1637 school children who participated in the external radiation exposure screening programme administrated by Minamisoma City (located 20–30 km from the Fukushima nuclear plant) between 18 and 20 months after the Fukushima incident. Methods We assessed the factors associated with improper use (non-use) of the dosimeters at specific time periods during the day (school commuting hours, at school, at home, outdoors and at bedtime) using logistic regression analyses. Ratios of the measured dose to regression estimates of the ‘expected’ dose (referred to as an error due to non-use) were also examined. Results Only 119 children (7.3%) used the dosimeters properly in all time periods. This low rate was attributed primarily to non-use when children were in the home and outdoors, rather than at school. School level, air dose rate at home, gender, membership in outdoor sports clubs and time spent outdoors on weekends, were significantly associated with improper use, after adjustment for covariates. Data from children who did not wear the dosimeters to school and outdoors had statistically significant (but clinically insignificant) errors (ratio: 1.13, p<0.01; and 0.97, p<0.05, respectively), whereas improper use of the dosimeters at school, at home and at bedtime did not generate significant errors. Conclusions Well-targeted rigorous instructions on the use of the dosimeter are required, with particular focus on time periods other than school hours. However, given the small dose error due to the improper use of the dosimeters, even if the dosimeters are improperly used, solid evaluation of the radiation exposure may be possible with some accuracy. PMID:26719319

  12. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes.

  13. Taurine-EVA copolymer-paraffin rods dosimeters for EPR high-dose radiation dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Maghraby Ahmed M.; Mansour A; Abdel-Fattah A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Taurine/EPR rods (3 × 10 mm) have been prepared by a simple technique in the laboratory where taurine powder was mixed with a molten mixture of paraffin wax and an ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer. The binding mixture EVA/Paraffin does not present interference or noise in the EPR signal before or after irradiation. The rods show good mechanical properties for safe and multi-use handling. An EPR investigation of radiation induced radicals in taurine rods revealed that there are two types...

  14. Formates and dithionates: sensitive EPR-dosimeter materials for radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, E. [Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linkoeping, S-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden)]. E-mail: eva.lund@imv.liu.se; Gustafsson, H. [Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linkoeping, S-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Danilczuk, M. [Chemical Physics Laboratory, IFM, University of Linkoeping, S-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Sastry, M.D. [Chemical Physics Laboratory, IFM, University of Linkoeping, S-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Lund, A. [Chemical Physics Laboratory, IFM, University of Linkoeping, S-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Vestad, T.A. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Malinen, E. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hole, E.O. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Sagstuen, E. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2005-02-01

    Polycrystalline formates and dithionates are promising materials for EPR dosimetry, as large yields of radiation induced stable radicals are formed with a linear dose response. Rapid spin relaxation rates were detected in many of the substances, indicating that a high microwave power can be applied during EPR acquisition in order to improve sensitivity. Different techniques used to further improve the sensitivity, such as the replacement of {sup 7}Li with {sup 6}Li or exchange of protons with deuterons in the corresponding crystalline matrices and metal ion doping are discussed. It is concluded that formates and dithionates may be up to 10 times as sensitive as L-{alpha}-alanine.

  15. Temperature and relative humidity dependence of radiochromic film dosimeter response to gamma electron radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Puhl, J.M.; Miller, A.

    1995-01-01

    on some earlier studies, their response functions have been reported to be dependent on the temperature and relative humidity during irradiation. The present study investigates differences in response over practical ranges of temperature, relative humidity, dose, and for different recent batches of films...... of both types. It is observed that for each new batch of film to be used for radiation processing, the effects of such parameters on response to both gamma rays and electrons should be investigated. It is also suggested that the films should be packaged under controlled atmospheric conditions (relative...

  16. Study on the angular dependence of personal exposure dosimeter - Focus on thermoluminescent dosimeter and photoluminescent dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae [Department of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health College University (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Dae Cheol [Department of Radiologic Science, Shin Heung College University (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Woon-Kwan, E-mail: wkchung@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Eun-Hoe [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Soonchunhyang University (Korea, Republic of); Dieter, Kevin [Department of Physical Therapy, Gwangju Health College University (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Chong-Hwan [Department of White Memorial Medical Center (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Radiation management departments place more emphasis on the accuracy of measurements than on the increase in the average dose and personal exposure dose from the use of radiation equipment and radioactive isotopes. Although current measurements are taken using devices, such as film badge dosimeters, pocket dosimeters and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), this study compared the angular dependence between the widely used TLDs and photoluminescent dosimeter (PLDs) in order to present primary data and evaluate the utility of PLD as a new dosimeter device. For X-ray fluoroscopy, a whole body phantom was placed on a table with a setting for the G-I technical factors fixed at a range of approximately 40 cm with a range of {+-}90{sup o} at an interval scale of 15{sup o} from the center location of an average radiological worker for PLDs (GD-450) and TLDs (Carot). This process was repeated 10 times, and at each time, the cumulative dosage was interpreted from 130 dosimeters using TLDs (UD-710R, Panasonic) and PLDs (FGD-650). The TLD and PLD showed a 52% and 23% decrease in the depth dosage from 0{sup o} to -90{sup o}, respectively. Therefore, PLDs have a lower angular dependence than TLDs.

  17. Dose verification of a clinical intensity-modulated radiation therapy eye case by the magnetic resonance imaging of N-isopropylacrylamide gel dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Li; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Chiang, Chih-Ming; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, Ling-Ling

    2014-11-01

    In this study, N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel, together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was used to measure the relative three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) eye case. The gels were enclosed in cylindrical acrylic vessels with 10 cm outer diameter and 10 cm length. The gels were subsequently irradiated by delivering 5 Gy of a prescribed dose with a 6 MV linear accelerator using five fields. The 3D maps of the proton relaxation rate R2 were obtained using a 1.5 T MRI system correlated with the dose. The treatment planning system (TPS) data and NIPAM gel dosimeter data were compared with the experimental results in the form of relative dose distributions, including isodose curves, dose profiles, and gamma index maps. Results indicated that the linear relationship of the R2-dose for NIPAM gel dosimeters reached 0.999 within the dose range of 0 Gy to 12 Gy. Comparison of planar dose distributions among the gel dosimeters and TPS showed that the isodose lines corresponded to selected planes in the axial plane. For the 50% to 110% dose analysis, the maximum dose differences varied from 4.04% to 13.53%. Gamma evaluation of the planar dose profile resulted in pass rates of 96.84%, 83.16%, and 53.42% when the acceptance criteria of 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm, respectively, were used in the axial plane. Overall, the results showed that NIPAM polymer gel dosimeters can serve as a high-resolution, accurate, 3D tool for IMRT dose distribution verification.

  18. Production and testing of a synthetic diamond film radiation dosimeter for radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Fidanzio, A; Venanzi, C; Pinzari, F; Piermattei, A

    2002-01-01

    A detector, constituted by a polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited diamond film, has been made for on-line radiotherapy beam analysis in terms of dose distributions in water equivalent material. Preliminary results are reported which evidence that the leakage current can be a limiting parameter for an efficient collection of the charge carriers produced by the ionizing radiation. A signal to noise ratio near to 100 has been obtained. A priming effect similar to that found in natural diamond devices has also been evidenced, and a stable detector response was obtained after an accumulated dose of 5 Gy. The linearity has been achieved between the detector reading and the dose. The detector sensitivity resulted was equal to 77 nC/Gy per mm sup 3 of detector sensitive volume. A power law with exponent DELTA less than one has been found between detector reading and dose rate. However, when the dose rate dependence was corrected, the percentage depth doses, along an X-ray beam central axis, was in agreement with ...

  19. The importance of microdosimetry for radiation biology and radiation protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1967-01-01

    In this contribution several features will be discussed of relations between biological effects produced by ionizing radiations and the spatial distributions of energy deposition of these radiations. Effects produced by high-LET radiations are generally found to be less dependent on dose-rate, dose-

  20. Operator Radiation and the Efficacy of Ceiling-Suspended Lead Screen Shielding during Coronary Angiography: An Anthropomorphic Phantom Study Using Real-Time Dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qianjun; Chen, Ziman; Jiang, Xianxian; Zhao, Zhenjun; Huang, Meiping; Li, Jiahua; Zhuang, Jian; Liu, Xiaoqing; Hu, Tianyu; Liang, Wensheng

    2017-02-01

    Operator radiation and the radiation protection efficacy of a ceiling-suspended lead screen were assessed during coronary angiography (CA) in a catheterization laboratory. An anthropomorphic phantom was placed under the X-ray beam to simulate patient attenuation in eight CA projections. Using real-time dosimeters, radiation dose rates were measured on models mimicking a primary operator (PO) and an assistant. Subsequently, a ceiling-suspended lead screen was placed in three commonly used positions to compare the radiation protection efficacy. The radiation exposure to the PO was 2.3 to 227.9 (mean: 67.2 ± 49.0) μSv/min, with the left anterior oblique (LAO) 45°/cranial 25° and cranial 25° projections causing the highest and the lowest dose rates, respectively. The assistant experienced significantly less radiation overall (mean: 20.1 ± 19.6 μSv/min, P shielding, the ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced the radiation to the PO by 76.8%, 81.9% and 93.5% when placed close to the patient phantom, at the left side and close to the PO, respectively, and reduced the radiation to the assistant by 70.3%, 76.7% and 90.0%, respectively. When placed close to the PO, a ceiling-suspended lead screen provides substantial radiation protection during CA.

  1. Development of colored alumilite dosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Obara, K; Yagi, T; Yokoo, N

    2003-01-01

    In the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor, which are installed in the vacuum vessel of the ITER, are maintained by remote handling equipment (RH equipment). The RH equipment for maintenance is operated under sever environmental conditions, such as high temperature (50 approx 100 degC), high gamma-ray radiation (approx 1 kGy/h) in an atmosphere of inert gas or vacuum; therefore many components of the RH equipment must have a suitable radiation resistance efficiency for long time operation (10 approx 100 MGy). Typical components of the RH equipment have been extensively tested under an intensive gamma-ray radiation. Monitoring of the radiation dose of the components of the RH equipment is essential to control the operation period of the RH equipment considering radiation resistance. However, the maximum measurable radiation dose of the conventional dosimeters, such as ionization chamber, liquid, glass and plastic dosimeters are limited to b...

  2. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  3. Radiation biology of medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kelsey, Charles A; Sandoval, Daniel J; Chambers, Gregory D; Adolphi, Natalie L; Paffett, Kimberly S

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a thorough yet concise introduction to quantitative radiobiology and radiation physics, particularly the practical and medical application. Beginning with a discussion of the basic science of radiobiology, the book explains the fast processes that initiate damage in irradiated tissue and the kinetic patterns in which such damage is expressed at the cellular level. The final section is presented in a highly practical handbook style and offers application-based discussions in radiation oncology, fractionated radiotherapy, and protracted radiation among others. The text is also supplemented by a Web site.

  4. The shelf life of dyed polymethylmethacrylate dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, R.; Watts, M. F.; Plested, M. E.

    2002-03-01

    The long-term stability of the radiation response of Harwell Red 4034 and Amber 3042 Perspex Dosimeters has been monitored for more than 15 years, and the resulting data used in the justification of their shelf-life specifications.

  5. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Theodorakis, C.W.; Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    1996-12-31

    Natural populations have always been exposed to background levels of ionizing radiation; however, with the event of the nuclear age, studies about the effects of higher-than-background levels of ionizing radiation on individuals or populations of organisms became important. Originally, concern was focused on survival after large, acute radiation doses, and numerous studies document the somatic and genetic effects of acute ionizing radiation. However, there is a growing realization that chronic long-term exposure to higher-than-background levels of environmental radiation is more likely than is large acute exposure. Less than 10% of the literature on ionizing radiation effects deals with chronic long-term effects, and very few studies involve natural populations. In 1977, mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis, were experimentally introduced into a 0,45 ha, decommissioned, radioactive waste pond where the measured dose at the sediment-water interface was 1,150 rad/year. One year later, the fecundity of the population had not changed significantly. Eighteen years later, studies of the fish showed an inverse correlation between DNA strand breakage and fecundity in the contaminated pond. More recent studies have provided evidence that genetic diversity of the fish has increased in the contaminated site. These fish also have a greater prevalence of certain DNA banding patterns. Individuals displaying these banding patterns have a higher fecundity and lower degree of DNA strand breakage than individuals with less common banding patterns. Gambusia affinis has apparently adapted to the high background radiation, successfully surviving for approximately 50 generations. 31 refs, 5 figs.

  6. Studies about space radiation promote new fields in radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken

    2002-12-01

    Astronauts are constantly exposed to space radiation of various types of energy with a low dose-rate during long-term stays in space. Therefore, it is important to determine correctly the biological effects of space radiation on human health. Studies about biological the effects at a low dose and a low dose-rate include various aspects of microbeams, bystander effects, radioadaptive responses and hormesis which are important fields in radiation biology. In addition, space radiations contain high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. In particular, neutrons may cause reverse effectiveness at a low dose-rate in comparison to ionizing radiation. We are also interested in p53-centered signal transduction pathways involved in the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis induced by space radiations. We must also study whether the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation is affected by microgravity which is another typical component in space. To confirm this, we must prepare centrifuge systems in an International Space Station (ISS). In addition, we must prepare many types of equipment for space experiments in an ISS, because we cannot use conventional equipment from our laboratories. Furthermore, the research for space radiation might give us valuable information about the birth and evolution of life on the Earth. We can also realize the importance of preventing the ozone layer from depletion by the use of exposure equipment to sunlight in an ISS. For these reasons, we desire to educate space researchers of the next generation based on the consideration of the preservation of the Earth from research about space radiation.

  7. Development of an absolute neutron dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, C; Birstein, L; Loyola, H [Section de Desarrollos Innovativos, Comision Chilena de EnergIa Nuclear (CCHEN), Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: lbirstei@cchen.cl

    2008-11-01

    An Absolute Neutron Dosimeter was developed to be used as a calibration standard for the Radiation Metrology Laboratory at CCHEN. The main component of the Dosimeter consists of a Proportional Counter of cylindrical shape, with Polyethylene walls and Ethylene gas in its interior. It includes a cage shaped arrangement of graphite bars that operates like the Proportional Counter cathode and a tungsten wire of 25 {mu}m in diameter {mu}m as the anode. Results of a Montecarlo modeling for the Dosimeter operation and results of tests and measurements performed with a radioactive source are presented.

  8. Protection against radiation (biological, pharmacological, chemical, physical)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksonov, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological protection for astronauts from penetrating radiation on long-term space flights is discussed. The status of pharmacochemical protection, development of protective substances, medical use of protective substances, protection for spacecraft ecologic systems, adaptogens and physical conditioning, bone marrow transplants and local protection are discussed. Combined use of local protection and pharmacochemical substances is also briefly considered.

  9. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Jonathan [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Small, William [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine, Cardianl Bernardin Cancer Center; Woloschak, Gayle E. (ed.) [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  10. A method for the quantitative analysis of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatment plan verification with radiographic film and polymer gel dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Matthew Roy

    The clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy has necessitated the development of sophisticated quality assurance techniques to ensure that the radiation dose distribution calculated by the computerized radiotherapy treatment planning system is reproduced with an acceptable degree of fidelity during treatment delivery. The index of agreement is introduced as a quantitative quality assurance tool capable of comparing the planned dose distribution with the dose distribution measured with a radiation dosimeter. The index of agreement method begins with solving a constrained optimization problem for each pixel (or voxel) of the planned dose distribution. Each pixel (or voxel) of the planned distribution is then assigned a score based upon the solution of the constrained optimization problem. The index of agreement is then calculated by dividing the number of pixels (or voxels) that are clinically relevant and for which the score function is equal to zero by the total number of clinically relevant pixels (or voxels). Data acquired with radiographic film and polymer gel indicate that the index of agreement is a stable quality assurance parameter.

  11. Development of colored alumilite dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Kenjiro; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Yagi, Toshiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yokoo, Noriko [Radiation Application Development Association, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    In the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor, which are installed in the vacuum vessel of the ITER, are maintained by remote handling equipment (RH equipment). The RH equipment for maintenance is operated under sever environmental conditions, such as high temperature (50{approx}100 degC), high gamma-ray radiation ({approx}1 kGy/h) in an atmosphere of inert gas or vacuum; therefore many components of the RH equipment must have a suitable radiation resistance efficiency for long time operation (10{approx}100 MGy). Typical components of the RH equipment have been extensively tested under an intensive gamma-ray radiation. Monitoring of the radiation dose of the components of the RH equipment is essential to control the operation period of the RH equipment considering radiation resistance. However, the maximum measurable radiation dose of the conventional dosimeters, such as ionization chamber, liquid, glass and plastic dosimeters are limited to be approximately 1MGy which is too low to monitor the RH equipment for the ITER. In addition, these conventional dosimeters do not involve sufficient radiation resistance against the high gamma-ray radiation as well as are not easy handling and low cost. Based on the above backgrounds, a new dosimeter with bleaching of an azo group dye to be applied to a radiation monitor has been developed for high gamma-ray radiation use. The colored alumilite dosimeter is composed of the azo group dye (-N=N-) in an anodic oxidation layer of aluminum alloy (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). It can monitor the radiation dose by measuring the change of the bleaching of azo dye in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer due to gamma-ray irradiation. The degree of bleaching is measured as the change of hue (color) and brightness based on the Munsell's colors with a three dimensional universe using spectrophotometer. In the tests, the dependencies such as colors, anodized layer thickness, type of azo

  12. Biological Bases of Space Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP4, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Hematopoiesis Dynamics in Irradiated Mammals, Mathematical Modeling; Estimating Health Risks in Space from Galactic Cosmic Rays; Failure of Heavy Ions to Affect Physiological Integrity of the Corneal Endothelial Monolayer; Application of an Unbiased Two-Gel CDNA Library Screening Method to Expression Monitoring of Genes in Irradiated Versus Control Cells; Detection of Radiation-Induced DNA Strand Breaks in Mammalian Cells By Enzymatic Post-Labeling; Evaluation of Bleomycin-Induced Chromosome Aberrations Under Microgravity Conditions in Human Lymphocytes, Using "Fish" Techniques; Technical Description of the Space Exposure Biology Assembly Seba on ISS; and Cytogenetic Research in Biological Dosimetry.

  13. Biological Sensors for Solar Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André P. Schuch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is widely known as a genotoxic environmental agent that affects Earth ecosystems and the human population. As a primary consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion observed over the last decades, the increasing UV incidence levels have heightened the concern regarding deleterious consequences affecting both the biosphere and humans, thereby leading to an increase in scientific efforts to understand the role of sunlight in the induction of DNA damage, mutagenesis, and cell death. In fact, the various UV-wavelengths evoke characteristic biological impacts that greatly depend on light absorption of biomolecules, especially DNA, in living organisms, thereby justifying the increasing importance of developing biological sensors for monitoring the harmful impact of solar UV radiation under various environmental conditions. In this review, several types of biosensors proposed for laboratory and field application, that measure the biological effects of the UV component of sunlight, are described. Basically, the applicability of sensors based on DNA, bacteria or even mammalian cells are presented and compared. Data are also presented showing that on using DNA-based sensors, the various types of damage produced differ when this molecule is exposed in either an aqueous buffer or a dry solution. Apart from the data thus generated, the development of novel biosensors could help in evaluating the biological effects of sunlight on the environment. They also emerge as alternative tools for using live animals in the search for protective sunscreen products.

  14. Biological research for the radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Chan Kug; Shim, Hae Won; Jung, Il Lae; Byun, Hee Sun; Moon, Myung Sook; Cho, Hye Jeong; Kim, Jin Sik

    2003-04-01

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about polyamine effect on cell death triggered ionizing radiation, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and toxic agents. In this paper, to elucidate the role of polyamines as mediator in lysosomal damage and stress(H{sub 2}O{sub 2})- induced apoptosis, we utilized {alpha}-DiFluoroMethylOrnithine (DFMO), which inhibited ornithine decarboxylase and depleted intracellular putrescine, and investigated the effects of polyamine on the apoptosis caused by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, ionizing radiation and paraquat. We also showed that MGBG, inhibitor of polyamine biosynthesis, treatment affected intracellular redox steady states, intracellular ROS levels and protein oxidation. Thereafter we also investigated whether MGBG may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing effects. In addition, ceruloplasmin and thioredoxin, possible antioxidant proteins, were shown to have protective effect on radiation- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(or chemicals)-induced macromolecular damage or cell death.

  15. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.R.; Macconochie, I.O.; Poole, B.D.

    1983-02-08

    The present invention discloses a miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (e-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two e-cells and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one e-cell and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame in a further embodiment, the electro-optic elements a packaged in a wristwatch case with attaching means being a watchband. The filters in all embodiments allow only selected wavelengths of radiation to be detected by the photovoltaic detectors and then integrated by the e-cells.

  16. Evaluation of DNA dosimetry to assess ozone-mediated variability of biologically harmful radiation in Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, AL; Peat, HJ; Buma, AGJ

    2002-01-01

    In this study we investigated the use of a DNA dosimeter to accurately measure changes in ultraviolet B radiation (UVBR; 280-315 nm) under Antarctic ozone hole conditions. Naked DNA solution in quartz tubes was exposed to ambient solar radiation at Rothera Research Station, Antarctica, between Octob

  17. Biological dosimetry: the potential use of radiation-induced apoptosis in human T-lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menz, R.; Andres, R.; Larsson, B.; Ozsahin, M.; Crompton, N.E.A. [Department of Life Sciences, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Trott, K. [St. Bartholemew`s and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    An assay for biological dosimetry based on the induction of apoptosis in human T-lymphocytes is described. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometric identification of cells displaying apoptosis-associated DNA condensation. CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes were analysed. They were recognized on the basis of their cell-surface antigens. Four parameters were measured for both cell types: cell size, granularity, antigen immunofluorescence and DNA content. Apoptosis was quantified as the fraction of CD4-, or CD8-positive cells with a characteristic reduction of cell size and DNA content. At doses below 1 Gy, levels of radiation-induced apoptosis increased for up to 5 days after irradiation. Optimal dose discrimination was observed 4 days after irradiation, at which time the dose-response curves were linear, with a slope of 8% {+-} 0.5% per 0.1 Gy. In controlled, dose-response experiments the lowest dose level at which the radiation-induced apoptosis frequency was still significantly above control was 0.05 Gy. After 5 days post-irradiation incubation, intra- and interdonor variations were measured and found to be similar; thus, apoptotic levels depend more on the dose than on the donor. The results demonstrate the potential of this assay as a biological dosimeter. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 19 refs.

  18. Taurine as a biological dosimeter. Its determination in physiological samples by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubner, D.; Fernandez, M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1992-07-01

    Taurina, which is the metabolic end-product of cysteine shows a dose dependent change in urinary excretion after radiation exposure. The results of whole body gamma irradiated rats with doses of CO-60 ranging from 100 cGy to 800 cGy are expressed as percent increase of taurine in urine in the first 48 hours postirradiation and confirm the existence of a linear relationship. (author)

  19. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  20. Decontamination of biological ferment by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabundjian, Ingrid T.; Salum, Debora C.; Silva, Priscila V.; Furgeri, Camilo; Duarte, Renato; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: villavic@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Biological ferment is a product obtained from pure yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) culture by a suitable technological process and employed to increase the size and porosity of the baker's products. Foods containing high microorganisms count indicate that Good Manufacturing Practices were not applied. The aim of this study was to observe the viability of Dry Biological Ferment after the radiation process using different doses of {sup 60}Co gamma rays and different storage times. Dry baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae samples were purchased from a local supermarket in Sao Paulo (Brazil) and irradiated at IPEN in a Gammacell source at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 kGy doses (dose-rate of 3.51 kGy/h) at room temperature (25 deg C). The fluorescent method was performed to observe the viability of yeast cells. The viability decrease with the increase of the radiation dose, as shown: the amount of the viable cell found in the non-irradiated samples (control) at 0 day was 87.2%; 30 days 67.7%; 60 days 77.4% and 90 days 60.1%. With 1.0 kGy at 0 day was 61.4%; 30 days 22.7%; 60 days 56.9% and 90 days 24.2%. With 3.0 kGy at 0 day was 57.00%; at the next periods the most of the cells become not viable. (author)

  1. KCl:Eu2+ as a solar UV-C radiation dosimeter.Optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.Aguirre de Cáarcer; H.L.D'Antoni; M.Barboza-Flores; V.Correcher; F.Jaque

    2009-01-01

    The KCl:Eu2+ system response to UV-C was investigated by analyzing the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thertoo-luminescence (TL) signal produced by ultraviolet light exposure at room temperature.It was found that after UV-C irradiation,OSL was produced on a wide band of visible wavelengths with decay time that varied by several orders of magnitude depending on the Eu2+ aggregation state.In spite of the low intensity of solar UV-C reaching the Earth's surface in Madrid (40° N,700 m a.s.l.),it was possible to measure the UV-C radiation dose at 6:48 solar time by using the TL response of the KCl:Eu2+ system and differentiate it from the ambient beta radiation dose.

  2. Theoretical and experimental radiation effectiveness of the free radical dosimeter alanine to irradiation with heavy charged particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Olsen, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Dose-response characteristics have been measured for the crystalline amino acid L-.alpha.-alanine irradiated with ion beams of 6 and 16 MeV protons, 20 MeV .alpha. particles, 21 MeV7Li ions, 64 MeV16O ions, and 80 MeV32S ions. The experimental radiation effectiveness (RE) with reference to low-LE...

  3. Hanford beta-gamma personnel dosimeter prototypes and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, J.J.; Holbrook, K.L.; Soldat, K.L.

    1983-04-01

    Upgraded and modified Hanford dosimeter prototypes were evaluated for possible use at Hanford as a primary beta-gamma dosimeter. All prototypes were compatible with the current dosimeter card and holder design, as well as processing with the automated Hanford readers. Shallow- and deep-dose response was determined for selected prototypes using several beta sources, K-fluorescent x rays and filtered x-ray techniques. All prototypes included a neutron sensitive chip. A progressive evaluation of the performance of each of the upgrades to the current dosimeter is described. In general, the performance of the current dosimeter can be upgraded using individual chip sensitivity factors to improve precision and an improved algorithm to minimize bias. The performance of this dosimeter would be adequate to pass all categories of the ANSI N13.11 performance criteria for dosimeter procesors, provided calibration techniques compatible with irradiations adopted in the standard were conducted. The existing neutron capability of the dosimeter could be retained. Better dosimeter performance to beta-gamma radiation can be achieved by modifying the Hanford dosimeter so that four of the five chip positions are devoted to calculating these doses instead of the currently used two chip positions. A neutron sensitive chip was used in the 5th chip position, but all modified dosimeter prototypes would be incapable of discriminating between thermal and epithermal neutrons. An improved low energy beta response can be achieved for the current dosimeter and all prototypes considered by eliminating the security credential. Further improvement can be obtained by incorporating the 15-mil thick TLD-700 chips.

  4. Spectroscopic Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of Phase I test data demonstrates that the Photogenics Spectroscopic Dosimeter will detect neutron energies from 0.8 up to 600 MeV. The detector...

  5. Kevlar® as a Potential Accident Radiation Dosimeter for First Responders, Law Enforcement and Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyukha, Alexander; Trompier, François; Benevides, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    Today the armed forces and law enforcement personnel wear body armor, helmets, and flak jackets composed substantially of Kevlar® fiber to prevent bodily injury or death resulting from physical, ballistic, stab, and slash attacks. Therefore, there is a high probability that during a radiation accident or its aftermath, the Kevlar®-composed body armor will be irradiated. Preliminary study with samples of Kevlar® foundation fabric obtained from body armor used by the U.S. Marine Corps has shown that all samples evaluated demonstrated an EPR signal, and this signal increased with radiation dose. Based on these results, the authors predict that, with individual calibration, exposure at dose above 1 Gy can be reliably detected in Kevlar® samples obtained from body armor. As a result of these measurements, a post-event reconstruction of exposure dose can be obtained by taking various samples throughout the armor body and helmet worn by the same irradiated individual. The doses can be used to create a whole-body dose map that would be of vital importance in a case of a partial body or heterogeneous exposure.

  6. Fricke Xylenol Gel characterization at megavoltage radiation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Lama, Lucas Sacchini; Petchevist, Paulo César Dias; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2017-03-01

    Accurate determination of absorbed dose is of great importance in every medical application of ionizing radiation, mainly when involving biological tissues. Among different types of dosimeters, the ferrous sulfate chemical solution, known as Fricke solution, can be detached, due to its accuracy, reproducibility and linearity, been used in radiation dosimetry for over 50 years. Besides these characteristics, the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG), became one of the most known dosimeters for absorbed dose spatial distribution because of its high spatial resolution. In this work, we evaluated the FXG dosimeter taking into account different preparation recipes, in order to characterize its response in terms of absorbed dose range, linearity, sensitivity and fading.

  7. X-rays sensing properties of MEH-PPV, Alq₃ and additive components: a new organic dosimeter as a candidate for minimizing the risk of accidents of patients undergoing radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimitberger, T; Ferreira, G R; Akcelrud, L C; Saraiva, M F; Bianchi, R F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report our experimental design in searching a smart and easy-to-read dosimeter used to detect 6 MV X-rays for improving patient safety in radiation oncology. The device was based on an organic emissive solutions of poly(2-methoxy-5(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV), aluminum-tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq₃) and additive components which were characterized by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence and CIE color coordinate diagram. The optical properties of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions have been examined as function of radiation dose over the range of 0-100 Gy. It has shown that MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions are specifically sensitive to X-rays, since the effect of radiation on this organic system is strongly correlated with the efficient spectral overlap between Alq₃ emission and the absorption of degraded MEH-PPV, which alters the color and photoemission of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ mixtures from red to yellow, and then to green. The rate of this change is more sensitive when MEH-PPV/Alq₃ is irradiated in the presence of benzoyl peroxide than when in the presence of hindered phenolic stabilizers, respectively, an accelerator and an inhibitor to activate or inhibit free radical formation. This gives rise to optimize the response curve of the dosimeter. It is clear from the experimental results that organic emissive semiconductors have potential to be used as dedicated and low-cost dosimeters to provide an independent check of beam output of a linear accelerator and therefore to give patients the opportunity to have information on the dose prescription or equipment-related problems a few minutes before being exposed to radiation.

  8. Miniature Space Dosimeter Based on Semiconductor Oxides Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro and Clemson University have teamed for a miniature, ultra low power, space radiation dosimeter. We project this unit, "MicroRad", to be 50X...

  9. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  10. Development of a new laser-line and CCD based optical-CT scanner for the readout of 3D radiation dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, A E; Maris, T G; Zacharakis, G; Ripoll, J; Varveris, C; Damilakis, J, E-mail: apapadak@edu.med.uoc.g

    2010-11-01

    We present initial results on the comparison of the dose readout from a three dimensional polymer gel dosimeter using two different optical-CT systems; i) a common wide field and a wide area detector optical-CT system and ii) a new 'laser-line' and wide area detector based optical-CT system. The findings presented herein highlight the advantage of the laser based over the wide field optical-CT concept for the readout of scattering 3D dosimeters. Moreover, the new 'laser-line' based optical-CT system overcomes the disadvantage of the long acquisition times required by the existing laser-based instruments.

  11. Optical Fibre Dosimeter for SASE FEL Undulators

    CERN Document Server

    Körfer, M

    2003-01-01

    Single pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) are developed for high brightness and short wavelength applications. They use permanent magnet undulators which are radiation sensitive devices. During accelerator commissioning beam losses can appear anywhere along the undulator line. To avoid damage of the permanent magnets due to radiation, an optical fibre dosimeter system can be used. The increase of absorption caused by ionizing radiation is measured in radiation sensitive optical fibers. The dose system enables relatively fast particle loss tuning during accelerator operation and allows the monitoring of the accumulated dose. Dose measurements in narrow gaps which are inaccessible for any other (online) dosimeter type become possible. The electromagnetic insensitivity of optical fibre sensor is an advantage of applications in strong magnetic undulator fields. At each location the light absorption is measured by using an optical power-meter. The dynamic range is ...

  12. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  13. Radiation effects analysis in a group of interventional radiologists using biological and physical dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, M., E-mail: WEMLmirapas@iqn.upv.e [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Ferrer, S. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Tortosa, R. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rodriguez, P. [Biological Dosimetry Service, Unit of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Vegetable Biology and Ecology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain); Barrios, L.L. [Department of Physiology and Cellular Biology, Unit of Cellular Biology (UAB) (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Hospital Universitario La Fe Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Interventional radiologists and staff members are frequently exposed to protracted and fractionated low doses of ionizing radiation, which extend during all their professional activities. These exposures can derive, due to the effects of direct and scattered radiation, in deterministic effects (radiodermitis, aged skin, cataracts, telangiectasia in nasal region, vasocellular epitelioms, hands depilation) and/or stochastic ones (cancer incidence). A methodology has been proposed for estimating the radiation risk or detriment from a group of six exposed interventional radiologists of the Hospital Universitario La Fe (Valencia, Spain), which had developed general exposition symptoms attributable to deterministic effects of ionizing radiation. Equivalent doses have been periodically registered using TLD's and wrist dosimeters, H{sub p}(10) and H{sub p}(0.07), respectively, and estimated through the observation of translocations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood (biological methods), by extrapolating the yield of translocations to their respective dose-effect curves. The software RADRISK has been applied for estimating radiation risks in these occupational radiation exposures. This software is based on transport models from epidemiological studies of population exposed to external sources of ionizing radiation, such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors [UNSCEAR, Sources and effects of ionizing radiation: 2006 report to the general assembly, with scientific annexes. New York: United Nations; 2006]. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for skin cancer has been, using wrist physical doses, of [1.03x10{sup -3}, 5.06x10{sup -2}], concluding that there is not an increased risk of skin cancer incidence. The minimum and maximum average excess ratio for leukemia has been, using TLD physical doses, of [7.84x10{sup -2}, 3.36x10{sup -1}], and using biological doses, of [1.40x10{sup -1}, 1.51], which is considerably higher than incidence rates, showing an

  14. Biological monitoring of radiation using indicator plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyoo; Chun, Ki Jung; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, In Kyoo; Song, Heui Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Some clones of Tradescantia had dose response relationship involving somatic mutations such as appearance of pink, colorless or giant cell, and/or loss of reproductive integrity of stamen hair cells when exposed to radiation. Since Tradescantia could respond to radiation level as low as human being could be exposed to, it could play an important role as scientific tool of botanical tester for radiation. Especially TSH system can be easily applied to in situ monitoring of radiation by virtue of its excellent radiation indicator ship and simpleness in detection of mutations by radiation. 10 figs, 6 tabs, 19 refs. (Author).

  15. Dielectric material for dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, P.R.; Podgorsak, E.; Fullerton, G.D.; Fuller, G.E.

    1976-01-27

    A RITAD dosimeter is described having a dielectric material such as sapphire wherein the efficiency as measured by mean drift distance and trapping efficiency is increased by making use of a dielectric material in which the total active impurity does not exceed 50 ppm and in which any one active impurity does not exceed 10 ppm.

  16. Standardisation and Validation of Cytogenetic Markers to Quantify Radiation Absorbed Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalam Perumal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The amounts of radiation exposure received by radiation workers are monitored generally by physical dosimeters like thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD and film badge. However, in practice the over-exposure recorded by physical dosimeters need to be confirmed with biological dosimeters. In addition to confirming the dose recorded by physical dosimeters, biological dosimeters play an important role in estimating the doses received during accidental exposures. Exposure to high levels of radiation induces certain  biochemical, biophysical, and immunological changes (biomarkers in a cell. Measurement of these changes are generally precise but cannot be effectively used to assess the dose, as the level of these changes return to normalcy within hours to months after exposure. Thus, among various biological indicators, cytogenetic indicators are considered practical and reliable for dose estimation. The paper highlights the importance and establishment of biodosimetry facility using genetic markers such as the sensitive dicentric chromosomes, rapid micronucleus assay and stable translocations measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation and GTG banding for retrospective dose estimation. Finally, the development of gH2AX assay, as a potential marker of triage dosimeter, is discussed.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(2, pp.125-132, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.832

  17. Modified ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (MFBX) and thermoluminescent dosimeters--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindha, S; Rose, J V R; Sathyan, S; Singh I, Rabi Raja; Ravindran, B Paul

    2002-06-07

    Radiation dosimetry deals with the determination of absorbed dose to the medium exposed to ionizing radiation. Chemical dosimetry depends on oxidation or reduction of chemicals by ionizing radiation. A ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (FBX) dosimeter based on this principle is being used as a clinical dosimeter at present. Certain modifications were carried out in the preparation and storage of the FBX dosimeter to increase its shelf life. The resulting dosimeter was called a modified FBX (MFBX) dosimeter and has been used in our department for the past few years. An extensive study of the dose, dose rate and energy response of the dosimeter was carried out and compared with a thermoluminescent (LiF7) dosimeter. The results obtained were found to be comparable to the thermoluminescent (LiF7) dosimeter. Hence it was concluded that the MFBX dosimeter could be used for phantom dosimetry, data collection and in vivo measurements. Easier preparation and availability of the reagents are added advantages of using MFBX as a clinical dosimeter in small radiotherapy departments.

  18. Recall of Personal Dosimeters Not Presently in Use

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The Dosimetry Service requests all persons who do not require access to radiation areas in the foreseeable future to return their personal dosimeter to the Dosimetry Service. This concerns, for example, experimental physicists whose beam time is over until 2009, or persons whose work profile has changed and therefore no longer need regular access to radiation areas. When regular access to radiation areas is needed again at a later date, a new dosimeter can be attributed if the prerequisites (medical fitness certificate, RP course) are met. This recall will allow personal dosimeters to be attributed to personnel who will soon be working in newly created radiation areas at the LHC. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. Thomas Otto on behalf of the Dosimetry Service Radiation Protection Group

  19. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics.

  20. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  1. Early mechanisms in radiation-induced biological damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    An introduction to the mechanisms of radiation action in biological systems is presented. Several questions about the nature of the radiation damage process are discussed, including recognition of the oxygen effects, dose-response relationships, and the importance of the hydroxyl radical. (ACR)

  2. Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Yong [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belinsky, Steven [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Our main research objective was to determine the biological bases for low-dose, radiation-induced adaptive responses in the lung and use the knowledge gained to produce an improved risk model for radiation-induced lung cancer that accounts for activated natural protection, genetic influences, and the role of epigenetic regulation (epiregulation). Currently, low-dose radiation risk assessment is based on the linear-no-threshold hypothesis which now is known to be unsupported by a large volume of data.

  3. Interconversion of biologically important carboxylic acids by radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1978-01-01

    The interconversion of a group of biologically important polycarboxylic acids (acetic, fumaric, malic, malonic, succinic, citric, isocitric, tricarballylic) under gamma-ray or ultraviolet radiation was investigated. The formation of high molecular weight compounds was observed in all cases. Succinic acid was formed in almost all radiolysis experiments. Citric, malonic, and succinic acids appeared to be relatively insensitive to radiation. Interconversion of the polycarboxylic acids studied may have occurred under the effect of radiation in the prebiotic earth.

  4. Type testing of the SDM2000 personal dosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    LiuZhengShan; Deng Chang Ming; Guo Zhan Jie; Zhang Zhi Yong

    2001-01-01

    The results of the performance of a new type of personal dosimeter, the SDM2000 Personal Dosimeter made by China Institute for Radiation Protection is presented. Tests were performed on radiological performance including radiation energy, incidence angular, beta radiation, neutron radiation, accuracy of alarm levels, relative intrinsic error, overload, response time, linearity, retention of reading. There are also tests on the effects of a variety of environmental factors, such as temperature, humidity, external magnetic fields, electrostatic discharge, external electromagnetic fields. Other characteristics tested were dropping test, vibration test and battery life. The test results were compared with the relevant requirements of three standards: CIRP standard: Q/DSC1-92, National standard: GB/T 13161-91, IEC standard: IEC1283. In general, the performance of the SDM2000 personal dosimeter was found to be quite acceptable; it meets most of the relevant requirements of the three standards

  5. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  6. New Neutron Dosimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN has been operating an Individual Dosimetry Service for neutrons for about 35 years. The service was based on nuclear emulsions in the form of film packages which were developed and scanned in the Service. In 1999, the supplier of theses packages informed CERN that they will discontinue production of this material. TIS-RP decided to look for an external service provider for individual neutron dosimetry. After an extensive market survey and an invitation for tender, a supplier that met the stringent technical requirements set up by CERN's host states for personal dosimeters was identified. The new dosimeter is based on a track-etching technique. Neutrons have the capability of damaging plastic material. The microscopic damage centres are revealed by etching them in a strong acid. The resulting etch pits can be automatically counted and their density is proportional to dose equivalent from neutrons. On the technical side, the new dosimeter provides an improved independence of its response from energy and th...

  7. Adaptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudritsky, Yu.K.; Georgievsky, A.B.; Karpov, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    The adoptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiations is based on the recognition of the invariability of general biological laws for radiobiology and on the comprehension of life evolution regularities and axiomatic principles of environment and biota unity. The ionizing radiation factor is essential for life which could not exist beyond the radiation field. The possibility of future development of the adaptation hypothesis serves as a basis for it`s transformation into the theoretical foundation of radiobiology. This report discusses the aspects of the adaptation theory.

  8. Biological monitoring of radiation using indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Chun, Ki Jung; Lim, Yong Tak

    1998-06-01

    KAERI and INP(Poland) have been carried out parallel study and joint experiments on the major topics according to MOU about their cooperative project. The experimental materials were T-4430 clones. Main results of the cooperative project were made on {sup r}esponse of TSH mutation to low LET radiation, response of TSH mutation to neutrons, response of TSH to mixed irradiation with different radiations and synergism between radiation and environmental factors such as photo period and diurnal temperature difference. Both institutes have established wide variety of research techniques applicable to tradescantia study through the cooperation. These result of research can make the role of fundamental basis for the better relationship between Korea and Poland. (author). 46 refs., 11 tabs., 31 figs.

  9. Request for Travel Funds for Systems Radiation Biology Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen [NYU School of Medicine

    2014-03-22

    The 3rd International Systems Radiation Biology Workshop brought together the major European, US and Japanese research programs on radiation risk as well as selected experts representing systems biological approaches to discuss how the new methodologies could be best exploited for low dose research. A significant part of the workshop was devoted to discussions organised as breakout group sessions. To facilitate discussions number of participants was limited to 60 persons. To achieve the goals of this symposium in this international conference, support from DOE is vital. Hence, this proposal requested support in the amount of $15,000 to cover the travel expenses of international experts and radiation biology scientists from the United States. This supporting mechanism was clearly identified to the selected US participants as a conference support award from the DOE (See attached PDF). The workshop was an outstanding opportunity to strengthen interactions between leading experts in the emerging areas of radiation sciences, and will also provide opportunities for younger scientists to meet with experts and discuss their results. This workshop was designed to endorse active engagement in international collaboration. A major objective of this conference was to effectively communicate research results, in order to ensure that current thinking reflects sound science of radiation biology. Further, this international event addressed the use and success of scientific initiatives in radiation biology for policymakers, standard-setters, and the general public.

  10. New measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    The dual goals of optimizing clinical efficacy of hadrontherapy and determining radiation risk estimates for space research have intersected to a common focus for investigation of the biological effects of charged particles. This paper briefly highlights recent international progress at accelerator facilities engaged in both biological and clinical studies of the effects of particle beams, primarily protons, carbon and iron ions. Basic mechanisms of molecular, cellular and tissue responses continue under investigation for radiations with a range of ionization densities. Late normal tissue effects, including the risk of cancer in particular, are of importance for both research fields. International cooperation has enhanced the rate of progress as evidenced by recent publications. Specific areas of biomedical research related to the biological radiotoxicity of critical organs (especially the central nervous system), individual radiosensitivities to radiation carcinogenesis, and the analysis of effects in mixed radiation fields still require more research. Recommendations for addressing these issues are made.

  11. Effects of temperature and humidity during irradiation on the response of a film dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hasan M.; Wahid, Mian S.

    1995-09-01

    A commercially available leuco dye containing polyvinyl butyral based film (FWT-63-02) has been investigated ctrophotometrically for its dosimetric characteristic and for its use as routine dosimeter in radiation processing for the absorbed dose range 0.1 to 10 kGy. The present study was carried out to evaluate the performance of dosimeter under different environmental conditions (i.e. effects of temperature and relative humidity during irradiation). The response was measured at peak wavelength of 600 nm as well as at a number of other wavelengths (550, 625, 640 and 650 nm). The dosimeter was found to show quite stable response up to a radiation chamber temperature of 40°C. The dosimeter also showed stable behavior at low or moderate relative humidity conditions (<76%) in the radiation chamber. The characteristics of the dosimeter are suitable for its possible application in radiation processing, food irradiation and sterilization applications.

  12. Oxygen effects in radiation biology and radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, E.L.; Held, K.D.

    1979-01-01

    The question of the influence of O/sub 2/ on the radiation sensitivity of organisms, cells and biomolecules is reviewed. Evidence is presented to show that there are two mechanisms that govern the manner in which O/sub 2/ acts in cells. It is also suggested that these may in addition be other mechanisms but no evidence is presented to support this. (ACR)

  13. TH-A-BRD-01: Radiation Biology for Radiation Therapy Physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, C [Wayne State University, Grosse Pointe, MI (United States); Borras, C [Radiological Physics and Health Services, Washington, DC (United States); Carlson, D [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Mechanisms by which radiation kills cells and ways cell damage can be repaired will be reviewed. The radiobiological parameters of dose, fractionation, delivery time, dose rate, and LET will be discussed. The linear-quadratic model for cell survival for high and low dose rate treatments and the effect of repopulation will be presented and discussed. The rationale for various radiotherapy techniques such as conventional fractionation, hyperfractionation, hypofractionation, and low and high dose rate brachytherapy, including permanent implants, will be presented. The radiobiological principles underlying radiation protection guidelines and the different radiation dosimetry terms used in radiation biology and in radiation protection will be reviewed. Human data on radiation induced cancer, including increases in the risk of second cancers following radiation therapy, as well as data on radiation induced tissue reactions, such as cardiovascular effects, for follow up times up to 20–40 years, published by ICRP, NCRP and BEIR Committees, will be examined. The latest risk estimates per unit dose will be presented. Their adoption in recent radiation protection standards and guidelines and their impact on patient and workers safety in radiotherapy will be discussed. Biologically-guided radiotherapy (BGRT) provides a systematic method to derive prescription doses that integrate patient-specific information about tumor and normal tissue biology. Treatment individualization based on patient-specific biology requires the identification of biological objective functions to facilitate the design and comparison of competing treatment modalities. Biological objectives provide a more direct approach to plan optimization instead of relying solely on dose-based surrogates and can incorporate factors that alter radiation response, such as DNA repair, tumor hypoxia, and relative biological effectiveness. We review concepts motivating biological objectives and provide examples of how

  14. The Biological Effects of Nonionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-29

    surrounding C-12-81 normal tissues. According to N.W. Bleehan, this was the method used by Hippocrates , with the aid of a hot iron. Hippocrates , by the way, is...temporal pattern of desired increases of tempera - ture in the body; (2) the biological consequences of doing this must be established and evaluated

  15. Prototype Biology-Based Radiation Risk Module Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Patel, Zarana; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of space radiation and risk mitigation are strategic knowledge gaps for the Evolvable Mars Campaign. The current epidemiology-based NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model contains large uncertainties (HAT #6.5a) due to lack of information on the radiobiology of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and lack of human data. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. Our proposed study will compare DNA damage, histological, and cell kinetic parameters after irradiation in normal 2D human cells versus 3D tissue models, and it will use a multi-scale computational model (CHASTE) to investigate various biological processes that may contribute to carcinogenesis, including radiation-induced cellular signaling pathways. This cross-disciplinary work, with biological validation of an evolvable mathematical computational model, will help reduce uncertainties within NSCR and aid risk mitigation for radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  16. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  17. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhao; Yan-Hui Hao; Rui-Yun Peng

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  18. Study of complex molecules of biological interest with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, K.C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Molecular Model Discovery Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Melbourne, Victoria, 3122 (Australia); Bolognesi, P., E-mail: paola.bolognesi@cnr.it [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy); Feyer, V. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Research Center Jülich, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Plekan, O. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Avaldi, L. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Synchrotron radiation and synchrotron based spectroscopic techniques have found important applications in the study of isolated molecular species of biological interest. In this paper, some examples of spectroscopic and dynamic studies of amino acids and small peptides, nucleobases and pharmaceuticals are reviewed. Opportunities offered by the advent of new radiation sources combined with novel methods for the production of beams of these molecules are also discussed.

  19. Measurement of the dose by dispersed radiation in a lineal accelerator using thermoluminescent dosimeters of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy; Medicion de la dosis por radiacion dispersa en un acelerador lineal usando dosimetros termoluminiscentes de CaSO{sub 4}:Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez C, N.; Torijano, E.; Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Herrera, A. [ISSSTE, Hospital Nacional 20 de Noviembre, Eje 7 Sur Felix Cuevas Esq. Av. Coyoacan, Col. del Valle, 03229 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thermoluminescence (Tl) is based on the principle of the luminescent in a material when is heated below their incandescence temperature. Is a technique very used in dosimetry that is based on the property that have most of the crystalline materials regarding the storage of the energy that they absorb when are exposed to the ionizing radiations. When this material has been irradiated previously, the radioactive energy that contains is liberated in form of light. In general, the principles that govern the thermoluminescence are in essence the same of those responsible for all the luminescent processes and, this way, the thermoluminescence is one of the processes that are part of the luminescence phenomenon. For this work, the dispersed radiation was measured in the therapy area of the lineal accelerator of medical use type Elekta, using thermoluminescent dosimeters of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy + Ptfe developed and elaborated in the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa. With the dosimeters already characterized and calibrated, we proceeded to measure the dispersed radiation being a patient in treatment. The results showed values for the dispersed radiation the order of a third of the dose received by the patient on the treatment table at 30 cm of the direct beam and the order of a hundredth in the control area (4 m of the direct beam, approximately). The conclusion is that the thermoluminescent dosimeters of CaSO{sub 4}: Dy + Ptfe are appropriate to measure dispersed radiation dose in radiotherapy. (author)

  20. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  1. DEGRO 2009. Radiation oncology - medical physics - radiation biology. Abstracts; DEGRO 2009. Radioonkologie - Medizinische Physik - Strahlenbiologie. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    The special volume of the journal covers the abstracts of the DEGRO 2009 meeting on radiation oncology, medical physics, and radiation biology, covering the following topics: seldom diseases, gastrointestinal tumors, radiation reactions and radiation protection, medical care and science, central nervous system, medical physics, the non-parvicellular lung carcinomas, ear-nose-and throat, target-oriented radiotherapy plus ''X'', radio-oncology - young academics, lymphomas, mammary glands, modern radiotherapy, life quality and palliative radiotherapy, radiotherapy of the prostate carcinoma, imaging for planning and therapy, the digital documentation in clinics and practical experiences, NMR imaging and tomography, hadrons - actual status in Germany, urinal tract oncology, radiotoxicity.

  2. Dosimetry service participation of CIEMAT in intercomparisons 2008-2010 for personal dosimeters EURADOS; Participacion del servicio de dosimetria del CIEMAT en las intercomparaciones EURADOS 2008-2010 para dosimetros personales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Jimenez, R.; Romero Gutierrez, A. M.; Lopez Moyano, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    Individual monitoring of workers exposed to ionizing radiation requires the use of personal dosimeters. EURADOS (European Radiation Dosimetry Group) recently organized three intercomparison exercises External Personal Dosimetry Services (EPDS): two for body dosimeters in 2008 and 2010 and one for extremity dosimeters in the year 2009.El paper shows and analyzes the results obtained by CIEMAT SDPE participation in all exercises.

  3. Peculiarities of biological action of hadrons of space radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoev, I G; Yurov, S S

    1975-01-01

    Biological investigations in space enable one to make a significant contribution on high-energy hadrons to biological effects under the influence of factors of space flights. Physical and molecular principles of the action of high-energy hadrons are analysed. Genetic and somatic hadron effects produced by the secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons have been studied experimentally. The high biological effectiveness of hadrons, great variability in biological effects, and specifically of their action, are associated with strong interactions of high-energy hadrons. These are the probability of nuclear interaction with any atom nucleus, generation of a great number of secondary particles (among them, probably, highly effective multicharged and heavy nuclei, antiprotons, pi(-)-mesons), and the spatial distribution of secondary particles as a narrow cone with extremely high density of particles in its first part. The secondary radiation generated by high- and superhigh-energy hadrons upon their interaction with the spaceship is likely to be the greatest hazard of radiation to the crew during space flights.

  4. Review of the dose-to-water energy dependence of alanine and lithium formate EPR dosimeters and LiF TL-dosimeters - Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldeland, Einar, E-mail: einar.waldeland@oslo-universitetssykehus.no [Department of Medical Physics, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4953 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo (Norway); Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Malinen, Eirik [Department of Medical Physics, Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4953 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo (Norway); Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-09-15

    The dose-to-water energy dependence may be defined as the dosimeter reading per absorbed dose to water for a given radiation beam relative to that for {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays. The purpose of this work was to review the literature on the dose-to-water energy dependence of lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Ti TL-dosimeters for clinical beam qualities and to compare the findings with Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations of the energy dependence of lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Ti TL-dosimeters were performed using the EGSnrc code. The following common clinical radiation qualities were applied: 4-24 MV photons, 4-20 MeV electrons, 50-200 kV{sub p} X-rays, {sup 192}Ir {gamma} rays, and {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays as the reference. All dosimeter materials showed measured and Monte Carlo simulated energy responses around unity for MV photons, electrons and {sup 192}Ir {gamma} rays, except LiF TL-dosimeters which showed an average underresponse of approximately 3% for electrons. For medium energy X-rays (50-200 kV{sub p}), LiF displayed an increasing overresponse with decreasing energy to a maximum of about 40% for 50 kV{sub p} X-rays. The two EPR dosimeter materials showed decreasing energy response with decreasing X-ray energy, but lithium formate was less dependent on energy than alanine. Comparisons between Monte Carlo simulations and measurements revealed some deviations for medium energy X-rays, which may be due to LET-effects caused by low energy electrons. In conclusion, lithium formate is the dosimeter material with the lowest energy dependence over a wide range of clinically relevant radiation qualities, which clearly is advantageous for accurate dosimetry.

  5. GUI to Facilitate Research on Biological Damage from Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Frances A.; Ponomarev, Artem Lvovich

    2010-01-01

    A graphical-user-interface (GUI) computer program has been developed to facilitate research on the damage caused by highly energetic particles and photons impinging on living organisms. The program brings together, into one computational workspace, computer codes that have been developed over the years, plus codes that will be developed during the foreseeable future, to address diverse aspects of radiation damage. These include codes that implement radiation-track models, codes for biophysical models of breakage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) by radiation, pattern-recognition programs for extracting quantitative information from biological assays, and image-processing programs that aid visualization of DNA breaks. The radiation-track models are based on transport models of interactions of radiation with matter and solution of the Boltzmann transport equation by use of both theoretical and numerical models. The biophysical models of breakage of DNA by radiation include biopolymer coarse-grained and atomistic models of DNA, stochastic- process models of deposition of energy, and Markov-based probabilistic models of placement of double-strand breaks in DNA. The program is designed for use in the NT, 95, 98, 2000, ME, and XP variants of the Windows operating system.

  6. New Scientific Pearl about Biologic Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Alamdaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of X-ray by Rontgen in 1895, it became evident that radiation can cause some somatic damage to tissues. The hazards of X-ray exposure were clearly known when many large hospitals had radiology departments. The greatest increased in knowledge about X-ray risks had accrued from the dropping of the two atomic bombs in Japan in 1945 and some other atomic accident. For example, among the Japanese bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there have been about 400 extra cancer deaths. These were the origin of radiology personnel and people fear from radiation exposure and resistant in against simple X-ray exam (radiophobia. However, new scientific data on the effects radiation on survivors, especially about biologic effect of ionizing rays, background radiation exposure, amount of endogenous radiation, hormosis phenomenon and comparison radiation risk with other risk over lifetime are still being continuously revised and risk estimates updated. Fundamentally, this risk is much"nlower than whatever already estimated and it is insignificant in diagnostic domain. Better perception of physician from these instances help to prevent of false radiophobia and to make proper use of diagnostic and therapeutic advantages of ionizing beam.

  7. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  8. Measurement of effective dose in clinic radiation diagnosis with TL dosimeters developed in Mexico; Medicion de dosis efectiva en radiodiagnostico clinico con dosimetros TL desarrollados en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Martinez, Pedro R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Azorin Nieto, Juan [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez Urquidi, Blanca [Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa (Mexico); Maldonado Sanchez, Guadalupe [Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Toluca (Mexico). Hospital de Gineco Obstetricia

    2001-07-01

    At the moment the radiation diagnosis is one of the main causes of exposition to the ionizing radiations, and in many of the cases the limits to the limits of dose established by the Commission the International of Radiological safety are not applied. In this work the results obtained in the measurement of the effective dose with dosemeters Tl of LiF:Mg,Cu, P+PTFE developed in the National Institute of Nuclear Investigations (ININ), in patients to studies of clinical radiation diagnosis of urography and hysterosalpingography. The effective dose was considered in gonads, breasts and thyroid. Whereas in the radiologist physician the dose was measured in crystalline, thyroid and hands, in this work ware made whole body measurements in addition. The results showed that the dose received by patients is equivalent with the results reported in Literature; in the case of the radiologist physician, the dose considered in the made studies is below the limits recommended for POE.

  9. Experiences with electronic personal dosimeters at Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant-Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurochova, Bozena; Zelenka, Zdenik [Personal Dosimetry Department NPP Dukovany (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant operates four WWER-440 type reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1985, Unit 2 and Unit 3 since 1986, Unit 4 was connected to the grid in 1987. At Dukovany NPP occupational dosimetry is performed by approved Personal Dosimetry Service. The basic facilities for measuring external exposure are film badge (legal dosimeter), electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) and radio-photoluminescent dosimeter (RPL) as operational dosimeter, TLD for measuring doses to the extremities and TLD albedo dosimeter as neutron dosimeter. The presentation is based on the experiences with electronic personal dosimeters gathered at Dukovany NPP for the last three years. Electronic Personal Dosimetry System (EPDS) was developing by Czech company VF, a.s. and from 2002 year is also used at Temelin NPP (Czech Republic), SE VYZ Bohunice (Slovakia) and SE Mochovce NPP (Slovakia) as well. EPDS is designed for Merlin Gerin, Siemens and RADOS electronic dosimeters. Application SW for data analysis is used for daily monitoring of personal doses and for evaluation of collective doses during outages. System gives information about collective doses on devices and collective doses for select work tasks during outages. In addition EPDS allows the calculation of dose indexes I{sub D}. (I{sub D} is the ratio of the relevant collective dose and the number of equivalent working hours). This information is applicable for planning doses on special working activities for next outages and allows a detection radiation sources also.

  10. To the attention of all dosimeter users

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Many regular users of CERN personal dosimeters do not respect the safety regulations, which include a compulsory monthly read-out of the dosimeter. Therefore we would like to remind everybody that if the dosimeter is not read for a period of 3 months or more, we will ask for a return or replacement of the dosimeter, which has a value of CHF 350.-. We would like to emphasise that the dosimeter must be read even if you have not entered controlled areas. Staff members or CERN users who enter controlled areas only occasionally may exchange their regular dosimeter for a short term visitor dosimeter (VCT). This dosimeter has a limited validity period but without for a compulsory periodic read-out. For further information please contact dosimetry.service@cern.ch Thank you for your cooperation. Dosimetry Service Bldg. 24 E 011 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  11. To the attention of all dosimeter users

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2006-01-01

    Many regular users of CERN personal dosimeters do not respect the safety regulations, which include the compulsory monthly read-out of the dosimeter. We would therefore like to remind everybody that if the dosimeter is not read for a period of 3 months or more, we will ask for a return or replacement of the dosimeter, which has a value of CHF 350,-. We would like to emphasise that the dosimeter must be read even if you have not entered controlled areas. Staff members or CERN users who enter controlled areas only occasionally may exchange their regular dosimeter for a short-term visitor dosimeter (VCT). This dosimeter has a limited validity period but does not require a periodic read-out. For further information please contact dosimetry.service@cern.ch Thank you for your cooperation. Dosimetry Service - Bldg. 24 E 011 - http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  12. Reproducibility Experiment of OSL and TL Dosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Reproducibility is an important property of personal dosimeter. It not only can indicate the stability of dosimeter, appraise the precision and accuracy of measured value, but also can evaluate the

  13. To the attention of all dosimeter users

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Many regular users of CERN personal dosimeters do not respect the safety regulations, which include the compulsory monthly read-out of the dosimeter. Therefore we would like to remind everybody that if the dosimeter is not read for a period of 3 months or more, we will ask for a return or replacement of the dosimeter, which has a value of CHF 350.-. We would like to emphasise that the dosimeter must be read even if you have not entered controlled areas. Staff members or CERN users who enter controlled areas only occasionally may exchange their regular dosimeter for a short term visitor dosimeter (VCT). This dosimeter has a limited validity period but without for a compulsory periodic read-out. For further information please contact dosimetry.service@cern.ch Thank you for your cooperation. Dosimetry Service Bld 24 E 011 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  14. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  15. Biological effects of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, E.J. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    In May 1990 a group of scientists representing several federal agencies, the International Society of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, the private sector, and academia met to develop a strategy to encourage the study of the biological effects of low level exposures (BELLE) to chemical agents and radioactivity. A workshop was held in 1991 with seven invited speakers focusing on the toxicological implications of biological adaptations. The selection of topics and speakers was designed to consider critically the concept of hormesis, not only in a broad, conceptual manner, but also at the molecular and biochemical levels. These presentations offered a complementary perspective on the diverse range of molecular mechanisms that can become activated at low levels of toxicant exposure. In addition to chemical toxicology research, an overview of current research on Effects of low-dose radiation on the immune response' was presented as well as Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis'. The final presentation was devoted to biostatistical considerations when designing studies that address issues associated with the biological responses to low doses of chemicals and radiation, as well as issues in interpretation of the findings from such studies.

  16. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pardo, M. E.; Ley-Chávez, E.; Reyes-Frías, M. L.; Rodríguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vázquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is "Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation". At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  17. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom); Smith, Jim T. [School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Ford, Alex T., E-mail: alex.ford@port.ac.uk [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  18. Validation of an Innovative Satellite-Based UV Dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Marco; Masini, Andrea; Simeone, Emilio; Khazova, Marina

    2016-08-01

    We present an innovative satellite-based UV (ultraviolet) radiation dosimeter with a mobile app interface that has been validated by exploiting both ground-based measurements and an in-vivo assessment of the erythemal effects on some volunteers having a controlled exposure to solar radiation.Both validations showed that the satellite-based UV dosimeter has a good accuracy and reliability needed for health-related applications.The app with this satellite-based UV dosimeter also includes other related functionalities such as the provision of safe sun exposure time updated in real-time and end exposure visual/sound alert. This app will be launched on the global market by siHealth Ltd in May 2016 under the name of "HappySun" and available both for Android and for iOS devices (more info on http://www.happysun.co.uk).Extensive R&D activities are on-going for further improvement of the satellite-based UV dosimeter's accuracy.

  19. Towards Space Exploration of Moon, Mars Neos: Radiation Biological Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther

    2016-07-01

    Radiation has emerged as the most critical issue to be resolved for long-term missions both orbital and interplanetary. Astronauts are constantly exposed to galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) of various energies with a low dose rate. Primarily late tissue sequels like genetic alterations, cancer and non-cancer effects, i.e. cataracts and degenerative diseases of e.g. the central nervous system or the cardiovascular system, are the potential risks. Cataracts were observed to occur earlier and more often in astronauts exposed to higher proportions of galactic ions (Cucinotta et al., 2001). Predictions of cancer risk and acceptable radiation exposure in space are subject to many uncertainties including the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation especially heavy ions, dose-rate effects and possible interaction with microgravity and other spaceflight environmental factors. The initial cellular response to radiation exposure paves the way to late sequelae and starts with damage to the DNA which complexity depends on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the radiation. Repair of such complex DNA damage is more challenging and requires more time than the repair of simple DNA double strand breaks (DSB) which can be visualized by immunofluorescence staining of the phosphorylated histone 2AX (γH2AX) and might explain the observed prolonged cell cycle arrests induced by high-LET in comparison to low-LET irradiation. Unrepaired or mis-repaired DNA DSB are proposed to be responsible for cell death, mutations, chromosomal aberrations and oncogenic cell transformation. Cell killing and mutation induction are most efficient in an LET range of 90-200 keV/µm. Also the activation of transcription factors such as Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) and gene expression shaping the cellular radiation response depend on the LET with a peak RBE between 90 and 300 keV/µm. Such LET-RBE relationships were observed for cataract and cancer induction by heavy ions in laboratory animals

  20. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  1. Biological efficiency of interaction between various radiation and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Yu, Dong Han; Lee, Byoung Hun [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Petin, Vladislav G. [Medical Radiology Science Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Geras' kin, Stanislav A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Ecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Cebulska-Wasilewska, Antonina; Panek, Agnieszka; Wiechec, Anna [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    2004-06-01

    This research project has been carried out jointly with INP (Poland) to develop technologies to assess the biological efficiency of interaction between radiation and chemicals. Through the cooperative project, KAERI and INP have established wide variety of bioassay techniques applicable to radiation bioscience, human monitoring, molecular epidemiology and environmental science. The joint experiment, in special, made it possible to utilize the merits of both institutes and to upgrade and verify KAERI's current technology level. All results of the cooperative research will be jointly published in high standard scientific journals listed in the Science Citation Index (SCI), which can make the role of fundamental basis for improving relationship between Korea and Poland. Research skills such as Trad-MCN assay, SCGE assay, immunohistochemical assay and molecular assay developed through joint research will be further elaborated and will be continuously used for the collaboration between two institutes.

  2. Bragg Curve, Biological Bragg Curve and Biological Issues in Space Radiation Protection with Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honglu, Wu; Cucinotta, F.A.; Durante, M.; Lin, Z.; Rusek, A.

    2006-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X-rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged particle exposure. Since the dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply as the particle approaches the end of its range, a position known as the Bragg peak, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle traversal since biological effects are influenced by the track structure of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the biological Bragg curve is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle, and may vary for different biological endpoints. To achieve a Bragg curve distribution, we exposed cells to energetic heavy ions with the beam geometry parallel to a monolayer of fibroblasts. Qualitative analyses of gamma-H2AX fluorescence, a known marker of DSBs, indicated increased clustering of DNA damage before the Bragg peak, enhanced homogenous distribution at the peak, and provided visual evidence of high linear energy transfer (LET) particle traversal of cells beyond the Bragg peak. A quantitative biological response curve generated for micronuclei (MN) induction across the Bragg curve did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak. However, the ratio of mono-to bi-nucleated cells, which indicates inhibition in cell progression, increased at the Bragg peak location. These results, along with other biological concerns, show that space radiation protection with shielding can be a complicated issue.

  3. Procedure for the delivering of personal short-term visitor dosimeters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Update of the administrative procedure for delivering a personal short-term visitor dosimeter to associated members of CERN’s personnel.   Associated members of the CERN personnel may request a short term visitor dosimeter if working only in Supervised Radiation Areas and for a period of less than two months in a calendar year. Such a dosimeter is delivered without the need to provide the usual regular documents: radiation passport, certificate from the home institute or medical certificate. Periodic verification will ensure that holders of these personal dosimeters do not exceed the maximum allowed personal dose for this type of dosimeter, which is the same as the limit for members of the public at 1 mSv per year. From now on, the two-month period can be spread over a calendar year, offering greater flexibility to users coming to CERN for multiple short periods. Please return unused dosimeters Persons leaving CERN for a period of more than one month should return their dosimeter to the D...

  4. Alternative statistical methods for cytogenetic radiation biological dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Fornalski, Krzysztof Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents alternative statistical methods for biological dosimetry, such as the Bayesian and Monte Carlo method. The classical Gaussian and robust Bayesian fit algorithms for the linear, linear-quadratic as well as saturated and critical calibration curves are described. The Bayesian model selection algorithm for those curves is also presented. In addition, five methods of dose estimation for a mixed neutron and gamma irradiation field were described: two classical methods, two Bayesian methods and one Monte Carlo method. Bayesian methods were also enhanced and generalized for situations with many types of mixed radiation. All algorithms were presented in easy-to-use form, which can be applied to any computational programming language. The presented algorithm is universal, although it was originally dedicated to cytogenetic biological dosimetry of victims of a nuclear reactor accident.

  5. Cerenkov Radiation: A Multi-functional Approach for Biological Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei eMa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov radiation (CR has been used in various biological research fields, which has aroused lots of attention in recent years. Combining optical imaging instruments and most of nuclear medicine imaging or radiotherapy probes, the CR was developed as a new imaging modality for biology studies, called Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI. On the other hand, it was novelly used as an internal excitation source to activate some fluorophores for energy transfer imaging. However, it also has some shortages such as relatively weak luminescence intensity and low penetration in tissue. Thus some scientific groups demonstrated to optimize the CLI and demonstrated it to three-dimension tomography. In this article, we elaborate on its principle, history, and applications and discuss a number of directions for technical improvements. Then concluded some advantages and shortages of CR and discuss some prospects of it.

  6. Measurement of absorbed radiation doses during whole body irradiation for bone marrow transplants using thermoluminescent dosimeters; Verificacao das doses de radiacao absorvidas durante a tecnica de irradiacao de corpo inteiro nos transplantes de medula ossea, por meio de dosimetros termoluminescentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Cristina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Oliveira, Jose Salvador R. de [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Setor de Radioterapia]. E-mail: adelmogiordani@ig.com.br

    2004-10-01

    The objective was to evaluate the precision of the absorbed radiation doses in bone marrow transplant therapy during whole body irradiation. Two-hundred CaSO{sub 4}:Dy + teflon tablets were calibrated in air and in 'phantom'. These tablets were randomly selected and divided in groups of five in the patients' body. The dosimetric readings were obtained using a Harshaw 4000A reader. Nine patients had their entire bodies irradiated in parallel and opposite laterals in a cobalt-60 Alcion II model, with a dose rate of 0.80 Gy/min at 80.5 cm, {l_brace}(10 ? 10) cm{sup 2} field. The dosimetry of this unit was performed using a Victoreen 500 dosimeter. For the determination of the mean dose at each point evaluated, the individual values of the tablets calibrated in air or 'phantom' were used, resulting in a build up of 2 mm to superficialize the dose at a distance of 300 cm. In 70% of the patients a variation of less than 5% in the dose was obtained. In 30% of the patients this variation was less than 10%, when values obtained were compared to the values calculated at each point. A mean absorption of 14% was seen in the head, and an increase of 2% of the administered dose was seen in the lungs. In patients with latero-lateral distance greater than 35 cm the variation between the calculated doses and the measured doses reached 30% of the desired dose, without the use of compensation filters. The measured values of the absorbed doses at the various anatomic points compared to the desired doses (theoretic) presented a tolerance of {+-} 10%, considering the existent anatomical differences and when using the individual calibration factors of the tablets. (author)

  7. Design and fabrication of an optical dosimeter for UV and gamma irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez-Nino, J; Castano, V M

    1999-01-01

    A simple UV and gamma radiation optical dosimeter is presented. The organic dye degradation with radiation absorption is used to measure the radiation dose. The design, the electronic circuit, the calibration and the operation procedure are also described in detail. Finally, the results of actual applications are shown with beta-carotene in an acetone/ethanol solution utilised as an optical probe.

  8. Physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet radiation sterilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrentera, L.; Rodriguez, R.R. (Unidad Merida (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV)); Uribe, R.M. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States)); Carrillo, R.E. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medical Physics)

    1994-03-01

    The physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet (UV) sterilizer is described. The physical characterization was performed using radiochromic dye films by evaluating the uniformity of the radiant exposure along each lamp, the effect of the radiation from one lamp on the array of adjacent lamps, and by measuring the UV radiation absorption of seawater with respect to distilled water. The biological characterization was performed by measuring the amount of reduction of bacteria in stored seawater after different filtration and UV treatments. Among the filtration methods tested, differential filtration (5, 3 and 0.45 [mu]m filters connected in series) caused the highest bacterial reduction factor of 60%. UV radiant exposures of 212, 424, 636 and 848 J m[sup -2] yielded bacteria reduction factors of 99.86, 99.969, 99.997 and 100%, respectively, for populations of Vibrio and Pseudomonas bacteria present in stored seawater. It is concluded that the system is useful for water disinfection when 1, 2 or 3 lamps are on; when 4 lamps are used the treated water becomes sterile. (author).

  9. Physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet radiation sterilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrentera, Laura; Uribe, Roberto M.; Rodríguez, Romana R.; Carrillo, Ricardo E.

    1994-03-01

    The physical and biological characterization of a seawater ultraviolet (UV) sterilizer is described. The physical characterization was performed using radiochromic dye films by evaluating the uniformity of the radiant exposure along each lamp, the effect of the radiation from one lamp on the array of adjacent lamps, and by measuring the UV radiation absorption of seawater with respect to distilled water. The biological characterization was performed by measuring the amount of reduction of bacteria in stored seawater after different filtration and UV treatments. Among the filtration methods tested, differential filtration (5, 3 and 0.45 μm filters connected in series) caused the highest bacterial reduction factor of 60%. UV radiant exposures of 212, 424, 636 and 848 J m -2 yielded bacteria reduction factors of 99.86, 99.969, 99.997 and 100%, respectively, for populations of Vibrio and Pseudomonas bacteria present in stored seawater. It is concluded that the system is useful for water disinfection when 1, 2 or 3 lamps are on; when 4 lamps are used the treated water becomes sterile.

  10. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  11. Dye strip dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisomboon, S.; Siri-Upathum, C.

    1987-10-01

    This paper describes a new method for measuring radiation dose by using natural pigments. The pigments were extracted from Hibiscus rosa sinensis L. and Canna indica L. and were irradiated with gamma ray. Doses of 30 rad and above are indicated by color changes.

  12. An assessment of radiotherapy dosimeters based on CVD grown diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Ramkumar, S; Conway, J; Whitehead, A J; Sussman, R S; Hill, G; Walker, S

    2001-01-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a dosimeter for radiotherapy. Its radiation hardness, the near tissue equivalence and chemical inertness are some of the characteristics of diamond, which make it well suited for its application as a dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology have resulted in the improvement in the quality of material and increased its suitability for radiotherapy applications. We report in this paper, the response of prototype dosimeters based on two different types (CVD1 and CVD2) of CVD diamond to X-rays. The diamond devices were assessed for sensitivity, dependence of response on dose and dose rate, and compared with a Scanditronix silicon photon diode and a PTW natural diamond dosimeter. The diamond devices of CVD1 type showed an initial increase in response with dose, which saturates after approx 6 Gy. The diamond devices of CVD2 type had a response at low fields (1162.8 V/cm), the CVD2-type devices show...

  13. Low-level radiation: biological interactions, risks, and benefits. A bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-09-01

    The bibliography contains 3294 references that were selected from the Department of Energy's data base (EDB). The subjects covered are lower-level radiation effects on man, environmental radiation, and other biological interactions of radiation that appear to be applicable to the low-level radiation problem.

  14. Feasibility study of a lead monoxide-based dosimeter for quality assurance in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. T.; Han, M. J.; Heo, Y. J.; Park, J. E.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. N.; Oh, K. M.; Cho, H. L.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Nam, S. H.; Park, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    Lately, cancer has been treated using high-energy radiation, and this requires highly reliable treatment plans. Therefore, a dosimeter with excellent performance, which is capable of precise dose measurement, is critical. In current clinical practices, an ionization chamber and diode utilizing the ionization reaction mechanism are widely used. Several studies have been carried out to determine optimal materials for the detector in a dosimeter to enable diagnostic imaging. Recently, studies with lead monoxide, which was shown to have low drift current and high resolving power at a high bias, were reported with the dosimeter exhibiting a fast response time against incident photons. This research aims to investigate the feasibility of a lead monoxide-based dosimeter for QA (quality assurance) in radiotherapy. In this paper, we report that the manufactured dosimeter shows similar linearity to a silicon diode and demonstrates similar characteristics in terms of PDD (percent depth dose) results for the thimble ionization chamber. Based on these results, it is demonstrated that the lead monoxide-based dosimeter complies with radiotherapy QA requirements, namely rapid response time, dose linearity, dose rate independence. Thus, we expect the lead monoxide-based dosimeter to be used commercially in the future.

  15. SU-D-213-07: Initial Characterization of a Gel Patch Dosimeter for in Vivo Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matrosic, C; Culberson, W; Rosen, B; Madsen, E; Frank, G; Bednarz, B [Univ of Wisc Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In vivo dosimetry, despite being the most direct method for monitoring the dose delivered during radiation therapy and being recommended by several national and international organizations (AAPM, ICRU, NACP), is underutilized in the clinic due to issues associated with dose sensitivity, feasibility, and cost. Given the increasing complexity of radiation therapy modern treatments, there is a compelling need for a robust, affordable in vivo dosimetry option. In this work we present the initial characterization of a novel gel patch in vivo dosimeter. Methods: DEFGEL (6%T) was used to make 1-cm thick small cylindrical patch dosimeters. The optical density of each dosimeter was read before and after irradiation by an in-house laser densitometer. The dosimeters were irradiated using a Varian Clinac EX linac. Three separate batches of gel patches were used to create dose response curves and evaluate repeatability. The development time of the dosimeter was also evaluated. Results: The dose response of the dosimeter was found to be linear from a range of approximately 1-Gy to 20-Gy, which is a larger window of linearity compared to other in vivo dosimeters. At doses below 1-Gy, the cumulative uncertainties were on the order of the measured data. When compared, the three batches demonstrated repeatability from 1-Gy to approximately 13-Gy, with some variation at higher doses. For doses of >8-Gy, the dosimeter reached full optical density after 4-hours, whereas low doses developed within an hour. Conclusion: Initial results indicate that the gel patch dosimeter is a reliable and simple way to measure a large range of doses, including high doses such as those delivered during hypofractionated treatments (e.g. SBRT or MR-guided radiotherapy). The simple fabrication method for the dosimeter and the use of a laser densitometer would allow for the dosimeter to used and read in-house, cheaply and easily.

  16. Low Level Laser Therapy: laser radiation absorption in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Paola; Orlando, Stefano; Dell'Ariccia, Marco; Brandimarte, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experimental study in which we have measured the transmitted laser radiation through dead biological tissues of various animals (chicken, adult and young bovine, pig) in order to evaluate the maximum thickness through which the power density could still produce a reparative cellular effect. In our experiments we have utilized a pulsed laser IRL1 ISO model (based on an infrared diode GaAs, λ=904 nm) produced by BIOMEDICA s.r.l. commonly used in Low Level Laser Therapy. Some of the laser characteristics have been accurately studied and reported in this paper. The transmission results suggest that even with tissue thicknesses of several centimeters the power density is still sufficient to produce a cell reparative effect.

  17. Responses to low doses of ionizing radiation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Pollycove, Myron; Sondhaus, Charles A

    2004-07-01

    Biological tissues operate through cells that act together within signaling networks. These assure coordinated cell function in the face of constant exposure to an array of potentially toxic agents, externally from the environment and endogenously from metabolism. Living tissues are indeed complex adaptive systems.To examine tissue effects specific for low-dose radiation, (1) absorbed dose in tissue is replaced by the sum of the energies deposited by each track event, or hit, in a cell-equivalent tissue micromass (1 ng) in all micromasses exposed, that is, by the mean energy delivered by all microdose hits in the exposed micromasses, with cell dose expressing the total energy per micromass from multiple microdoses; and (2) tissue effects are related to cell damage and protective cellular responses per average microdose hit from a given radiation quality for all such hits in the exposed micromasses.The probability of immediate DNA damage per low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) average micro-dose hit is extremely small, increasing over a certain dose range in proportion to the number of hits. Delayed temporary adaptive protection (AP) involves (a) induced detoxification of reactive oxygen species, (b) enhanced rate of DNA repair, (c) induced removal of damaged cells by apoptosis followed by normal cell replacement and by cell differentiation, and (d) stimulated immune response, all with corresponding changes in gene expression. These AP categories may last from less than a day to weeks and be tested by cell responses against renewed irradiation. They operate physiologically against nonradiogenic, largely endogenous DNA damage, which occurs abundantly and continually. Background radiation damage caused by rare microdose hits per micromass is many orders of magnitude less frequent. Except for apoptosis, AP increasingly fails above about 200 mGy of low-LET radiation, corresponding to about 200 microdose hits per exposed micromass. This ratio appears to exceed approximately

  18. Synchrotron radiation and structure biology. From the instrumentation view point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakabe, N. [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Applied Biochemistry

    1996-12-31

    Structure Biology is based on a three dimensional macromolecule structures, the most of which are studied by x-ray crystal structure analysis. Synchrotron radiation X-rays are quite strong, tunable, very parallel and pico-second order bunch and are very suitable for diffraction data collection of macromolecular crystals. To collect accurate data at high resolution from large unit cell protein crystals using SR, we made screenless large Weissenberg cameras with imaging plates at the PF. 146 research projects using this data collection system were running in 1995. They include 51 projects from 11 overseas countries. Recently we have developed user-friendly type Weissenberg camera for the structure biology project of TARA (Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance), and installed it at BL6B of the PF. Cylindrical cassette radius of this new camera is 575.7mm and two large format (400x800mm) imaging plates (IP) can be fixed into the cassette by suction from back side. However, the system is not automatic and manual tasks to be performed are heavy. Therefore an automation of the system is very urgent to maintain accuracy and resolution. We are now developing a high accuracy, high resolution and high speed automated data collection system. This fully automated system consists of a camera, an IP reader equipped with 8 reading heads, an IP eraser, and a cassette transportation mechanism. In the new system, one imaging plate is fixed inside of a movable cylindrical cassette. The cassette presenting 16 rectangular holes, direct beam injection of i.e. 1.0A X-rays would produce 8 images of data at 2.6A resolutions. As 2 cassettes can be used simultaneously on the cassette transportation system, one cassette is being read while the other one is being exposed, therefore completely removing the reading bottleneck problem. This system therefore permits to use the radiation with the maximum of efficiency, and reduce the manpower necessary for data recording. (author)

  19. Optical properties of a long dynamic range chemical UV dosimeter based on solvent cast polyvinyl chloride (PVC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Abdurazaq; Parisi, Alfio V

    2013-11-01

    The dosimetric properties of the recently introduced UV dosimeter based on 16 μm PVC film have been fully characterised. Drying the thin film in air at 50 °C for at least 28 days was found to be necessary to minimise the temperature effects on the dosimeter response. This research has found that the dosimeter response, previously reported to be mainly to UVB, has no significant dependence on either exposure temperature or dose rate. The dosimeter has negligible dark reaction and responds to the UV radiation with high reproducibility. The dosimeter angular response was found to have a similar pattern as the cosine function but deviates considerably at angles larger than 70°. Dose response curves exhibit monotonically increasing shape and the dosimeter can measure more than 900 SED. This is about 3 weeks of continuous exposure during summer at subtropical sites. Exposures measured by the PVC dosimeter for some anatomical sites exposed to solar radiation for twelve consecutive days were comparable with those concurrently measured by a series of PPO dosimeters and were in line with earlier results reported in similar studies.

  20. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil [and others

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay.

  1. Skin contamination dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamby, David M.; Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Cazalas, Edward

    2011-06-21

    A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

  2. Current status and recommendations for the future of research, teaching, and testing in the biological sciences of radiation oncology: report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Paul E; Anscher, Mitchell S; Barker, Christopher A; Bassetti, Michael; Bristow, Robert G; Cha, Yong I; Dicker, Adam P; Formenti, Silvia C; Graves, Edward E; Hahn, Stephen M; Hei, Tom K; Kimmelman, Alec C; Kirsch, David G; Kozak, Kevin R; Lawrence, Theodore S; Marples, Brian; McBride, William H; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Park, Catherine C; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Zietman, Anthony L; Steinberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  3. An intercomparison of neutron dosimeters and detectors for in-containment dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auman, L.E.; Miller, W.H.; Graham, C.C.; Stretch, C.D.; Welty, T.J.; West, L. Jr. (Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia (United States))

    1992-02-01

    To improve the methodology for assessing neutron dose at Union Electric's Callaway Nuclear Power Plant, an intercomparison of neutron detectors and dosimeters was performed. Seven different neutron detectors and dosimeters were tested in four different neutron fields utilizing facilities at the Missouri University Research Reactor and at the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. In general, all results agree within a factor of 2 in predicting the neutron dose equivalent. It was concluded that measurements of dose in containment should utilize the Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), the Bonner-sphere system, and the proton recoil spectrometer to accurately assess the neutron dose. These data can then be used to provide correction factors for more traditionally used dosimeters in containment, such as thermoluminescent dosimeters and survey meters.

  4. UV dosimeter based on polyamide woven fabric and nitro blue tetrazolium chloride as an active compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozicki, Marek, E-mail: mkozicki@mitr.p.lodz.pl [Institute of Architecture of Textiles, Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); European Centre of Bio- and Nano-Technology (ECBNT), Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Sasiadek, Elzbieta [Institute of Architecture of Textiles, Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); European Centre of Bio- and Nano-Technology (ECBNT), Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    This paper reports on the preparation and features of a UV light dosimeter composed of nitro blue tetrazolium chloride (NBT) and polyamide woven fabric. This textile dosimeter is based on the conversion reaction of NBT into formazan, which was initially examined in aerated aqueous solutions through steady state UV irradiation. Irradiated solutions change their colour as a consequence of the formation of polydisperse NBT formazan particles. This was analysed in relation to the absorbed dose of UV light through UV-VIS spectrophotometry and dynamic laser light scattering measurements. When NBT substrate molecules are embedded in polyamide textile, UV irradiation leads to similar effects as in solution. However, the tinge intensity changes at much lower absorbed doses. The dependence of the tinge intensity on the absorbed dose was followed by measurements of the remission of light from the NBT-polyamide samples. Consequently, the calibration parameters were calculated such as the dose sensitivity, dose range, and quasi-linear dose range. An improvement of the NBT-polyamide samples by application of a colour levelling agent and improvement of their resistance to humidity is presented. Finally, the samples were used for estimation of absorbed UV energy distribution showing their capability as new dosimeters for in-plane high resolution radiation dose measurements. - Highlights: > Preparation of a textile dosimeter with nitro blue tetrazolium chloride is shown. > The dosimeter responds to UV light by a colour change. > 2D radiation dose measurements are possible. > PC scanners can be employed for measurements of the dosimeter.

  5. Dosimeter placement in the Rando phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, B.R.; Glaze, S.; North, L.B.; Bushong, S.C.

    1977-07-01

    Each section of the Alderson Rando phantom contains a tissue-equivalent plastic coating layer approximately 2 mm thick, applied to both faces. This compensates for material removed in the sawing process. Conventional use of thermoluminescent dosimeters positions them totally or partially within the coating layer. Analysis shows that, in the lung region, dosimeters placed in this layer received a dose averaging 39% lower than those placed at midsection. Where bony structures interfere, some dosimeters in the coating layer received an 18% higher dose than those at midsection. Therefore, positioning dosimeters at the center of a section is recommended.

  6. Characterization of a silicate glass as a high dose dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, K., E-mail: k.farah@cnstn.rnrt.t [Laboratoire de Radiotraitement. Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucleaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Mejri, A.; Hosni, F. [Laboratoire de Radiotraitement. Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucleaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Ben Ouada, H. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Interfaces, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, 5000 Monastir (Tunisia); Fuochi, P.G.; Lavalle, M. [ISOF-CNR, Via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Kovacs, A. [Institute of Isotopes, HAS, P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-02-21

    Commercial silicate glass has been investigated as a possible high dose dosimeter using an UV-vis spectrophotometer. Glass samples were irradiated by {sup 60}Co gamma rays and the results compared with those obtained with 3.4 and 8.4 MeV electron beams. The irradiated samples showed rapid fading at room temperature immediately after irradiation. In order to improve the stability of absorbance, glass samples were submitted to post-irradiation thermal treatments (150 deg. C for 20 min). The influences of the dose, type and energy of the ionizing radiation on the fading characteristics and on the response of the irradiated and thermally treated glasses were studied. Dependence of the glass response on the temperature during gamma irradiation in the range -3 to 80 deg. C is reported. The reproducibility to reuse glass dosimeter by thermal bleaching the radiation induced colour centres at 300 deg. C for 30 min was also investigated. Calibration curves in the range 0.1-17 kGy were obtained by using in-plant calibration techniques against transfer standard alanine dosimeters in the Tunisian semi-industrial gamma irradiation facility.

  7. Calcium carbonate as a possible dosimeter for high irradiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negron M, A.; Ramos B, S.; Camargo R, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Uribe, R. M. [Kent State University, College of Technology, Kent OH (United States); Gomez V, V. [UNAM, Instituto de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Kobayashi, K., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx [Yokohama National University (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses, for the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. The irradiation doses with the electron beam were from 0.015 to 9 MGy, and with Carbon beam from 1.5 kGy to 8 kGy. High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. The response of one of the radicals decreased with the dose. These measurements are reproducible; the preparation of the sample is simple and inexpensive; and the signal is stable for several months. The response curves show that the dosimeter tends to saturate at 10 MGy. Based on these properties, we propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation. (author)

  8. A new 2 methylalanine-PVC ESR dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Bruno T. [Departmento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Chen, Felipe [Departmento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Department of Radiological Health, Caja de Seguro Social, Panama City (Panama); Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural and Exact Sciences and Technology, University of Panama, Panama City (Panama); Baffa, Oswaldo [Departmento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2005-02-01

    The use of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as a binder to 2-methylalanine (2MA) dosimeters was investigated. It was recently shown by Olsson et al. (Radiat. Res. 157 (2002) 113), that 2MA is approximately 70% more sensitive than L-alanine which makes this substance a good candidate to replace alanine in ESR dosimetry. PVC is a low yield material for free radical production by ionizing radiation and a good binding material easily processed and widely available. PVC can be prepared at room temperature and mixed up to 50% in weight with 2MA to produce a pellet stable in mass and physical dimensions, in large quantities and with low background signal. Pure PVC pellet irradiated at 50 Gy gave weaker ESR signals compared to 2MA at the region of spectral interest. Spectrometer settings such as microwave power, and modulation amplitude were optimized for the measurements. This dosimeter production scheme allows the addition of Mn{sup 2+} ions for an internal reference signal, leading to a self-calibrated dosimeter (J. Radional. Nucl. Chem. 240 (1999) 215)

  9. Effect of D-(+-Glucose on the Stability of Polyvinyl Alcohol Fricke Hydrogel Three-Dimensional Dosimeter for Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejiao Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available D-(+-glucose (Glc was added to the original Fricke polyvinyl alcohol–glutaraldehyde–xylenol orange (FPGX hydrogel dosimeter system to make a more stable FPGX hydrogel three-dimensional dosimeter in this paper. Polyvinyl alcohol was used as a substrate, which was combined with Fricke solution. Various concentrations of Glc were tested with linear relevant fitting for optimal hydrogel production conditions. The effects of various formulations on the stability and sensitivity of dosimeters were evaluated. The results indicated that D-(+-Glc, as a free radical scavenger, had a great effect on stabilizing the dose response related to absorbency and reducing the auto-oxidization of ferrous ions. A careful doping with Glc could slow down the color change of the dosimeter before and after radiation without any effect on the sensitivity of the dosimeter.

  10. Effect of D-(+)-glucose on the stability of polyvinyl alcohol fricke hydrogel three dimensional dosimeter for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yue Jiao; Chen, Jie; Yang, Liming; Chen, Bin; Sheng, Zhenmei; Luo, Wen Yun [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Jian Xin; Lu, Xun; Sui, Guo Ping [Chemical and Ionizing Radiation Metrology Institute, Shanghai Institute of Measurement and Testing Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    D-(+)-glucose (Glc) was added to the original Fricke polyvinyl alcohol-glutaraldehyde-xylenol orange (FPGX) hydrogel dosimeter system to make a more stable FPGX hydrogel three-dimensional dosimeter in this paper. Polyvinyl alcohol was used as a substrate, which was combined with Fricke solution. Various concentrations of Glc were tested with linear relevant fitting for optimal hydrogel production conditions. The effects of various formulations on the stability and sensitivity of dosimeters were evaluated. The results indicated that D-(+)-Glc, as a free radical scavenger, had a great effect on stabilizing the dose response related to absorbency and reducing the auto-oxidization of ferrous ions. A careful doping with Glc could slow down the color change of the dosimeter before and after radiation without any effect on the sensitivity of the dosimeter.

  11. Molecular biology in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology perspective of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C.N. [Harvard Medical School (United States). Joint Center for Radiation Therapy

    1999-07-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are used to illustrate the application of molecular biology to clinical radiation oncology. Identified by linkage analysis and cloned, the structure of the genes and the numerous mutations are determined by molecular biology techniques that examine the structure of the DNA and the proteins made by the normal and mutant alleles. Mutations in the non-transcribed portion of the gene will not be found in protein structure assays and may be important in gene function. In addition to potential deleterious mutations, normal polymorphisms of the gene will also be detected, therefore not all differences in gene sequence may represent important mutations, a finding that complicates genetic screening and counseling. The localization of the protein in the nucleus, the expression in relation to cell cycle and the association with RAD51 led to the discovery that the two BRCA genes may be involved in transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. The defect in DNA repair can increase radiosensitivity which might improve local control using breast-conserving treatment in a tumor which is homozygous for the loss of the gene (i.e., BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes). This is supported by the early reports of a high rate of local control with breast-conserving therapy. Nonetheless, this radiosensitivity theoretically may also lead to increased susceptibility to carcinogenic effects in surviving cells, a finding that might not be observed for decades. The susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage appears also to make the cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Understanding the role of the normal BRCA genes in DNA repair might help define a novel mechanism for radiation sensitization by interfering with the normal gene function using a variety of molecular or biochemical therapies.

  12. A PC based thin film dosimeter system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.; Hargittai, P.; Kovacs, A.

    2000-01-01

    A dosimeter system based on the Riso B3 dosimeter film, an office scanner for use with PC and the associated software is presented. The scanned image is analyzed either with standard software (Paint Shop Pro 5 or Excel) functions or with the computer code "Scanalizer" that allows presentation...

  13. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow (˜25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 μm microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy/s, micron

  14. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pmetabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism stresses, but space radiation was a kind of direct effect leading to macromolecule (DNA and protein) damage and signal pathway disorders. This functional proteomic analysis work might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  15. Calibration of dosimeters at 80-120 keV electron irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.; Helt-Hansen, J.

    We describe calorimeters for dose measurement at low-energy electron accelerator energies (80–120 keV). Three calorimeters with different characteristics were designed and their dose response and measurement uncertainties were characterized. The heatedair between the electron beam exit window...... to calibrate thin-film dosimeters (Risø B3 and alanine films) by irradiation at the 80–120 keV electron accelerators. This calibration was compared to a 10MeV calibration, and we show that the radiation response of the dosimeter materials (the radiation chemical yield) is constant at these irradiation energies...

  16. An investigation into the sensitivity of various albedo neutron dosimeters aimed at correcting the readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, A. G.; Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.

    2012-03-01

    The results of an experimental determination of the sensitivity of three types of individual neutron albedo dosimeters in neutron reference fields on the basis of radionuclide sources and at the top concrete shielding of the U-70 accelerator are presented. The results show that the ratios between the responses of the albedo dosimeters designed earlier at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (the albedo dosimeter (AD) and the multicomponent dosimeter (MD)) and the currently used DVGN-01 dosimeter are constant within 25% in a wide range of neutron energy. This fact makes it possible to use the results of measuring the AD and MD responses obtained earlier in neutron fields of nuclear-physical installations at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) for the correction of DVGN-01 dosimeter measurement results to apply it to personal radiation monitoring (PRM) at these installations. The correction factors for DVGN-01 measurement results are found and recommended to be used in PRM for most JINR installations.

  17. Determining the applicability of the Landauer nanoDot as a general public dosimeter in a research imaging facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Michael A; Thoreson, Kelly F; Cerecero, Jennifer A

    2012-11-01

    The Research Imaging Institute (RII) building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) houses two cyclotron particle accelerators, positron emission tomography (PET) machines, and a fluoroscopic unit. As part of the radiation protection program (RPP) and meeting the standard for achieving ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable), it is essential to minimize the ionizing radiation exposure to the general public through the use of controlled areas and area dose monitoring. Currently, thirty-four whole body Luxel+ dosimeters, manufactured by Landauer, are being used in various locations within the RII to monitor dose to the general public. The intent of this research was to determine if the nanoDot, a single point dosimeter, can be used as a general public dosimeter in a diagnostic facility. This was tested by first verifying characteristics of the nanoDot dosimeter including dose linearity, dose rate dependence, angular dependence, and energy dependence. Then, the response of the nanoDot dosimeter to the Luxel+ dosimeter when placed in a continuous, low dose environment was investigated. Finally, the nanoDot was checked for appropriate response in an acute, high dose environment. Based on the results, the current recommendation is that the nanoDot should not replace the Luxel+ dosimeter without further work to determine the energy spectra in the RII building and without considering the limitation of the microStar reader, portable on-site OSL reader, at doses below 0.1 mGy (10 mrad).

  18. Application of translocation, γ-H2AX, and Sam68 as a biological indicators for the assessment of radiation exposure in nuclear power plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kwang Hee; Park, Hyung Sun; Nam, Seon Young [Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This study showed that confirmation of the initial dose estimated by dicentric analysis is provided by the subsequent FISH analysis for translocation frequency and provides further evidence for the valid use of FISH as a retrospective biological dosimeter. The IAEA manual on cytogenetic dosimetry recommends a halftime value of 3 y to correct for the decrease of dicentrics in case of delayed sampling based on the patient data of Buckton. Support for this comes from the cytogenetic follow up of an individual exposed to tritium, which also indicated a decline in dicentrics with a half-time of ∼3 y. Naturally, the RBE of tritium, as well as other kinds of ionizing radiation, depends on the dose, exposure conditions, and studied parameters. The information about the RBE of tritium that is most important from an applied standpoint is that associated with the range of low doses. In our study, the dose dependence of tritium RBE was not identified because of very low dose Tritium (< 1mSv). However, The strong smooth relationship between translocation yield and age is shown in Table 2. The translocation yields reported here are only slightly lower than already published. The implication is that the increase of yield with age could be due to environmental factors, to a natural aging process or both. In addition, we confirmed that γ-H2AX and Sam68 associated with DNA damage and apoptosis, can be new biological indicators for radiation exposure. Radiation workers are exposed to ionizing radiation from various sources. Ionizing radiation produces several types of DNA lesion, including DNA base alterations, DNA. DNA cross-links, and single- and double-strand breaks. As a protocol for biological dosimetry recommended by IAEA (2001), the analysis of solid stained dicentric chromosomes has been used since the mid 1960s. The intervening years have seen great improvements bringing the technique to a point where dicentric analysis has become a routine component of the radiological

  19. Investigation of radiological properties and water equivalency of PRESAGE dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Adamovics, John; Bosi, Stephen; Kim, Jung-Ha; Baldock, Clive [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2050 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Department of Chemistry and Biology, Rider University, Lawrenceville, New Jersey 08648 (United States); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales 2031 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: PRESAGE is a dosimeter made of polyurethane, which is suitable for 3D dosimetry in modern radiation treatment techniques. Since an ideal dosimeter is radiologically water equivalent, the authors investigated water equivalency and the radiological properties of three different PRESAGE formulations that differ primarily in their elemental compositions. Two of the formulations are new and have lower halogen content than the original formulation. Methods: The radiological water equivalence was assessed by comparing the densities, interaction probabilities, and radiation dosimetry properties of the three different PRESAGE formulations to the corresponding values for water. The relative depth doses were calculated using Monte Carlo methods for 50, 100, 200, and 350 kVp and 6 MV x-ray beams. Results: The mass densities of the three PRESAGE formulations varied from 5.3% higher than that of water to as much as 10% higher than that of water for the original formulation. The probability of photoelectric absorption in the three different PRESAGE formulations varied from 2.2 times greater than that of water for the new formulations to 3.5 times greater than that of water for the original formulation. The mass attenuation coefficient for the three formulations is 12%-50% higher than the value for water. These differences occur over an energy range (10-100 keV) in which the photoelectric effect is the dominant interaction. The collision mass stopping powers of the relatively lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations also exhibit marginally better water equivalency than the original higher halogen-containing PRESAGE formulation. Furthermore, the depth dose curves for the lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations are slightly closer to that of water for a 6 MV beam. In the kilovoltage energy range, the depth dose curves for the lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations are in better agreement with water than the original PRESAGE formulation. Conclusions: Based

  20. A new EPR dosimeter based on sulfanilic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghraby, A. [Radiation Dosimetry Department, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Ministry of Scientific Research, Haram, Giza, Tersa Street, P.O. Box 136 (Egypt)]. E-mail: maghrabism@yahoo.com; Tarek, E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Fayoum University, Fayoum (Egypt)

    2006-02-15

    A new radiation dosimeter based on sulfanilic acid was suggested and tested. Radiation-induced radical EPR spectrum was recorded and characterized. EPR spectrum of sulfanilic acid is characterized by its simple single signal, which is located at g-factor=2.0053+/-0.00017. Its microwave absorption curve and effect of modulation amplitude on signal intensity and line width were studied. The radiation-induced radical was found to be stable after about 24h following irradiation within +/-1.2%. Energy dependence curves of sulfanilic acid compared to soft tissue and alanine were plotted. Sulfanilic acid is characterized also by its isotropic behavior and its calibration curve in {sup 137}Cs gamma radiation is plotted compared to that of alanine. Its sensitivity is about 85% of alanine, while its detection limit is about 100+/-30mGy.

  1. Evaluation of the implementation and use of active personal dosimeters for neutrons in Brazil; Evaluacion de la implementacion y del uso de los dosimetros individuales activos para neutrones en el Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro B, C. P.; Wagner P, W.; De Souza P, K. C., E-mail: karla@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio Bandeirantes, 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    This work was conducted through of a field research based on a questionnaire sent to users of active personal dosimeters. A retrospective study of the last six years was also carried out of the services in the Neutron Metrology Laboratory (2008-2013) referent to the active personal dosimeters, taking into consideration the standards ISO-8529-3 and IEC-61526. The active personal dosimeters are defined as any instrument of individual monitoring with direct reading capacity, used by individuals exposed to ionizing radiation fields. Through research was verified that the active personal dosimeters work associated with other dosimeter types. Considering all dosimeters declared in the questionnaire, only two dosimeters (MGP brand Dmc 2000-GN model and the brand ATOMTEX model AT2503A) have conformity declaration with the international standard IEC-61526: 2005 reported by the manufacturers. (author)

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Fang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from five participants and each sample was subjected to 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2.5 Gy, and 5 Gy of cobalt 60 radiation, followed by array-based expression profiling. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the immune system and cancer development pathways appeared to be the major affected targets by radiation exposure. Therefore, 1 Gy radioactive exposure seemed to be a critical threshold dosage. In fact, after 1 Gy radiation exposure, expression levels of several genes including FADD, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF8, TNFRSF10A, TNFSF10, TNFSF8, CASP1, and CASP4 that are associated with carcinogenesis and metabolic disorders showed significant alterations. Our results suggest that exposure to low-dose radiation may elicit changes in metabolic and immune pathways, potentially increasing the risk of immune dysfunctions and metabolic disorders.

  3. Biological effects of ionizing radiations; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, J.C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire]|[Commission Internationale de protection radiologique (France)]|[Association Internationale de Radiopathologie (France)

    1999-01-01

    Since ten years the ionizing radiations are more and more often used in various domains as medical, industrial or research sector. In the same way, these radiation impacts on the environment and the living organisms, have been studied intensively. The effects mechanism knowledge improved considerably and allowed to better protect the workers and the public. (A.L.B.)

  4. Acute radiation disease and biological dosimetry in 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, A I

    1997-01-01

    Mankind is at risk for accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. The experience in evaluating and treating victims of radiation exposure is briefly reviewed based upon accidents occurring over the past 25 years. Individual cases of acute toxicities to the skin, gastrointestinal tract, liver and bone marrow are presented. Biodosimetry (utilizing chromosome analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow and electron spin resonance spectrometry of dental enamel) has been utilized in radiation accidents to assess individual dose. Variability in the dose of ionizing radiation received is typical among the population affected by the Chernobyl accident. Whereas the acute radiation syndrome resulting in a high mortality has been well-documented, little information is available regarding the effects of chronic, low-level exposure from the Chernobyl accident.

  5. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading...

  6. Calibration factors for the SNOOPY - NP-100 neutron dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscu, D.F. [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L8 (Canada)], E-mail: moscudf@mcmaster.ca; McNeill, F.E. [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L8 (Canada); Chase, J. [Radiation Protection Division, Ontario Power Generation, Whitby, Ontario, L1N 9E3 (Canada)

    2007-10-15

    Within CANDU nuclear power facilities, only a small fraction of workers are exposed to neutron radiation. For these individuals, roughly 4.5% of the total radiation equivalent dose is the result of exposure to neutrons. When this figure is considered across all workers receiving external exposure of any kind, only 0.25% of the total radiation equivalent dose is the result of exposure to neutrons. At many facilities, the NP-100 neutron dosimeter, manufactured by Canberra Industries Incorporated, is employed in both direct and indirect dosimetry methods. Also known as 'SNOOPY', these detectors undergo calibration, which results in a calibration factor relating the neutron count rate to the ambient dose equivalent rate, using a standard Am-Be neutron source. Using measurements presented in a technical note, readings from the dosimeter for six different neutron fields in six source-detector orientations were used, to determine a calibration factor for each of these sources. The calibration factor depends on the neutron energy spectrum and the radiation weighting factor to link neutron fluence to equivalent dose. Although the neutron energy spectra measured in the CANDU workplace are quite different than that of the Am-Be calibration source, the calibration factor remains constant - within acceptable limits - regardless of the neutron source used in the calibration; for the specified calibration orientation and current radiation weighting factors. However, changing the value of the radiation weighting factors would result in changes to the calibration factor. In the event of changes to the radiation weighting factors, it will be necessary to assess whether a change to the calibration process or resulting calibration factor is warranted.

  7. Film dosimeters based on methylene blue and methyl orange in polyvinyl alcohol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, W.H.; Miller, A.

    1994-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films containing methylene blue and methyl orange are useful as gamma and electron radiation dosimeters. Absorbed doses should not exceed 40 kGy for methylene blue and 500 kGy for methyl orange. Because PVA is water-soluble, the films may be made without toxic solvents. Th...

  8. A fibre optic dosimeter customised for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchowerska, N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: Natalka@email.cs.nsw.gov.au; Lambert, J.; Nakano, T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Law, S. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Optical Fibre Technology Centre, University of Sydney, 206 National Innovation Centre, Australian Technology Park, Eveleigh, NSW 1430 (Australia); Elsey, J. [Bandwidth Foundry Pty Ltd, Australian Technology Park, NSW, 1430 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2007-04-15

    In-vivo dosimetry for brachytherapy cancer treatment requires a small dosimeter with a real time readout capability that can be inserted into the patient to determine the dose to critical organs. Fibre optic scintillation dosimeters, consisting of a plastic scintillator coupled to an optical fibre, are a promising dosimeter for this application. We have implemented specific design features to optimise the performance of the dosimeter for specific in-vivo dosimetry during brachytherapy. Two sizes of the BrachyFOD{sup TM} scintillation dosimeter have been developed, with external diameters of approximately 2 and 1 mm. We have determined their important dosimetric characteristics (depth dose relation, angular dependence, energy dependence). We have shown that the background signal created by Cerenkov and fibre fluorescence does not significantly affect the performance in most clinical geometries. The dosimeter design enables readout at less than 0.5 s intervals. The clinical demands of real time in-vivo brachytherapy dosimetry can uniquely be satisfied by the BrachyFOD{sup TM}.

  9. Dosimetry in radiation processing in the U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalova, V. V.; Gurskii, M. N.; Pikaev, A. K.

    The paper is devoted to the methods of dosimetry used in radiation processing in the USSR. The information on film, solid state and liquid dosimeters is presented. The special attention is paid to the dosimeters that are lot produced. The examples of the application of dosimeters in different radiation technological processes are described. The aspects of standartization of dosimetric measurements are discussed.

  10. Biological fingerprint of high LET radiation. Brenner hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Yoshiaki; Awa, Akio; Nakamura, Nori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    Hypothesis by Brenner et al. (1994) that in chromosome aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes induced by radiation exposure, F value (dicentrics/rings) differs dependently on the LET and can be a biomarker of high LET radiation like neutron and {alpha}-ray was reviewed and evaluated as follows. Radiation and chromosome aberrations; in this section, unstable aberrations like dicentric and rings (r) and stable ones like translocation and pericentric inversions were described. F value. Brenner hypothesis. Bauchinger`s refutation. F value determined by FISH method; here, FISH is fluorescence in situ hybridization. F value in studies by author`s Radiation Effect Research Facility. Frequency of chromosome aberration in A-bomb survivors and ESR (ESR: electron spin resonance). The cause for fluctuation of F values. The Brenner hypothesis could not be supported by studies by author`s facility, suggesting that the rate of inter-chromosomal and intra-chromosomal exchange abnormalities can not be distinguishable by the radiation LET. This might be derived from the difference in detection technology of r rather than in LET. (K.H.)

  11. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed x- ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, M. C.; Silva, C. R. E.; Oliveira, P. M. C.; da Silva, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed x-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed x-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC x-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed x-rays.

  12. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed X-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Margarete C.; Silva, Teogenes; Silva, Claudete R.E., E-mail: margaretecristinag@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem

    2015-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed X-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed X-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC X-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed X-rays. (author)

  13. Preliminary study of diffusion effects in Fricke gel dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroga, A. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios de Matematica de Cordoba, Oficina 318 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Vedelago, J. [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Valente, M., E-mail: aiquiroga@famaf.unc.edu [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Diffusion of ferric ions in ferrous sulfate (Fricke) gels represents one of the main drawbacks of some radiation detectors, like Fricke gel dosimeters. In practice, this disadvantage can be overcome by prompt dosimeter analysis, constraining strongly the time between irradiation and analysis. Due to required integral accuracy levels, special dedicated protocols are implemented with the aim of minimizing signal blurring due to diffusion effects. This work presents dedicated analytic modelling and numerical calculations of diffusion coefficients in Fricke gel radiation sensitive material. Samples are optically analysed by means of visible light transmission measurements capturing images with a Ccd camera provided with a monochromatic 585 nm filter corresponding to the X O-infused Fricke solution absorbance peak. Dose distributions in Fricke gels are suitably delivered in order to assess specific initial conditions further studied by periodical sample image acquisitions. In a first analytic approach, experimental data are fit with linear models in order to achieve a value for the diffusion coefficient. The second approach to the problem consists on a group of computational algorithms based on inverse problem formulation, along with suitable 2D diffusion model capable of estimating diffusion coefficients by fitting the obtained algorithm numerical solutions with the corresponding experimental data. Comparisons are performed by introducing an appropriate functional in order to analyse both experimental and numerical values. Solutions to second order diffusion equation are calculated in the framework of a dedicated method that incorporates Finite Element Method. Moreover, optimised solutions can be attained by gradient type minimisation algorithms. Knowledge about diffusion coefficient for Fricke gel radiation detector might be helpful in accounting for effects regarding elapsed time between dosimeter irradiation and further analysis. Hence, corrections might be included

  14. FXG dosimeter response for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using different evaluation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavinato, Christianne C.; Campos, Leticia L., E-mail: ccavinato@ipen.b, E-mail: lcrodri@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza, Benedito H.; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Daros, Kellen A.C.; Medeiros, Regina B., E-mail: bhsouza@unifesp.b, E-mail: daros.kellen@unifesp.b, E-mail: rbitel-li.ddi@epm.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Giordani, Adelmo J. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2011-07-01

    This work aims to compare the dose-response of the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter developed at IPEN using 270 Bloom gelatin from porcine skin made in Brazil evaluated using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the dosimetric response evaluated using the optical absorption (OA) spectrophotometry technique, in order to verify the possibility of quality assurance (QA) and reproducibility of FXG dosimeter to be carried out routinely using the OA technique for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) application using a 6 MV photons linear accelerator. The response in function of the absorbed dose of FXG dosimeter developed at IPEN presents linear behavior in clinical interest dose range when irradiated with Co-60 gamma radiation and 6 MV photons and evaluated using the MRI and OA techniques. The results indicate that the optical technique can be used for QA of FXG dosemeter when used in the possible application in QA of 3DCRT. (author)

  15. Dependence of alanine gel dosimeter response as a function of photon clinical beams dose rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cleber Feijo, E-mail: cleber.feijo@famesp.com.br [Faculdade Metodo de Sao Paulo (FAMESP), SP (Brazil); Campos, Leticia Lucente, E-mail: Icrodri@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    Gel dosimetry is a new area developed by Gore, it is ery useful for application in radiotherapy because using NMR imaging as evaluation technique is possible to evaluate three dimensional absorbed dose distribution. The measure technique is based on difference of ferrous (Fe{sup 2+}) and ferric (Fe{sup 3+}) ) ions concentration that can be measured also by spectrophotometry technique. The Alanine gel dosimeter was developed at IPEN. The alanine is an amino acid and tissue equivalent material that presents significant improvement on previous alanine dosimetry systems. The addition of Alanine increases the production of ferric ions in the solution. This work aims to study the dose rate dependence of photon clinical beams radiation on the alanine gel dosimeter optical response, as well as the response repeatability and gel production reproducibility, since this property is very important for characterization and standardization of any dosimeter. (author)

  16. Single and multichannel scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapic beams with SiPM readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berra, A.; Ferri, A.; Novati, C.; Ostinelli, A.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of many neoplastic diseases requires the use of radiotherapy, which consists in the irradiation of the tumor, identified as the target volume, with ionizing radiations generated both by administered radiopharmaceuticals or by linear particle accelerators (LINACs). The radiotherapy beam delivered to the patient must be regularly checked to assure the best tumor control probability: this task is performed with dosimeters, i.e. devices able to provide a measurement of the dose deposited in their sensitive volume. This paper describes the development of two scintillator dosimeter prototypes for radiotherapic applications based on plastic scintillating fibers read out by high dynamic range Silicon PhotoMultipliers. The first dosimeter, consisting of a single-channel prototype with a pair of optical fibers, a scintillating and a white one, read out by two SiPMs, has been fully characterized and led to the development of a second multi-channel dosimeter based on an array of scintillating fibers: this device represents the first step towards the assembly of a "one-shot" device, capable to perform some of the daily quality controls in a few seconds. The dosimeters characterization was performed with a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator at the Radiotherapy Department of the St. Anna Hospital in Como (IT).

  17. A study on Fricke-PVA-xylenol orange hydrogel dosimeter for E-beam radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Fangqi; YANG Liming; CHEN Jie; LIN Han; FAN Jinchen; RONG Liang; LUO Wenyun; ZHA Yuanzi; WU Guohua

    2009-01-01

    A Fricke-PVA-xylenol orange (FPX) hydrogel dosimeter, in good transparency, was prepared by physical crosslinking for three-dimensional dose measurements. The process of mixing the chemical dosimeter with the PVA solution was carried out at room temperature, which reduced the influence of auto-oxidation rate. Gradation in color was obviously observed with different distance from the radiation source after 6 MeV electron beam irradiation for radiotherapy. The effects of irradiation dose and three components of the FPX gel dosimeter, i.e. ferrous ions, xylenol orange (XO) and sulphuric acid on sensitivity and stability of dose response were investigated by UV-vis spectropho-tometric measurement. The dose response of the FPX gel dosimeter was linear in the range 0~2.0 Gy. The orthogonal test was employed to find the optimal composition of the gel dosimeter with a sensitivity of about 0.095 cm-1·Gy-1. It was found that XO concentration greatly affected the sensitivity of dose response and lower concentrations of the fer-rous ion and XO gave higher sensitivity within the range 0~2.0 Gy.

  18. Application and experience of a two-dosimeter algorithm for better estimation of effective dose during maintenance periods at Korea nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2009-01-01

    The application of a two-dosimeter and its algorithm and a test of its use in an inhomogeneous high radiation field are described. The goal was to develop an improved method for estimating the effective dose during maintenance periods at Korean nuclear power plants (NPPs). The application and experience to KNPPs was evaluated using data for each algorithm from two-dosimeter results for an inhomogeneous high radiation field during maintenance periods at Korean NPPs.

  19. In situ ion-beam-induced luminescence analysis for evaluating a micrometer-scale radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Shunsuke; Kada, Wataru; Parajuli, Raj Kumar; Matsubara, Yoshinori; Sakai, Makoto; Miura, Kenta; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Yamada, Naoto; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Hanaizumi, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    Micrometer-scale responses of radio-photoluminescence (RPL) glass dosimeters to focused ionized particle radiation were evaluated by combining ion-beam-induced luminescence (IBIL) and proton beam writing (PBW) using a 3 MeV focused proton microbeam. RPL phosphate glass dosimeters doped with ionic Ag or Cu activators at concentrations of 0.2 and 0.1% were fabricated, and their scintillation intensities were evaluated by IBIL spectroscopy under a PBW micropatterning condition. Compared with the Ag-doped dosimeter, the Cu-doped dosimeter was more tolerant of the radiation, while the peak intensity of its luminescence was lower, under the precise dose control of the proton microprobe. Proton-irradiated areas were successfully recorded using these dosimeters and their RPL centers were visualized under 375 nm ultraviolet light. The reproduction of the irradiated region by post-RPL imaging suggests that precise estimation of irradiation dose using microdosimeters can be accomplished by optimizing RPL glass dosimeters for various proton microprobe applications in organic material analysis and in micrometer-scale material modifications.

  20. Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Richard L; Björn, Lars Olof; Bais, Alkiviadis; Ilyasad, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    Since publication of the 1998 UNEP Assessment, there has been continued rapid expansion of the literature on UV-B radiation. Many measurements have demonstrated the inverse relationship between column ozone amount and UV radiation, and in a few cases long-term increases due to ozone decreases have been identified. The quantity, quality and availability of ground-based UV measurements relevant to assessing the environmental impacts of ozone changes continue to improve. Recent studies have contributed to delineating regional and temporal differences due to aerosols, clouds, and ozone. Improvements in radiative transfer modelling capability now enable more accurate characterization of clouds, snow-cover, and topographical effects. A standardized scale for reporting UV to the public has gained wide acceptance. There has been increased use of satellite data to estimate geographic variability and trends in UV. Progress has been made in assessing the utility of satellite retrievals of UV radiation by comparison with measurements at the Earth's surface. Global climatologies of UV radiation are now available on the Internet. Anthropogenic aerosols play a more important role in attenuating UV irradiances than has been assumed previously, and this will have implications for the accuracy of UV retrievals from satellite data. Progress has been made inferring historical levels of UV radiation using measurements of ozone (from satellites or from ground-based networks) in conjunction with measurements of total solar radiation obtained from extensive meteorological networks. We cannot yet be sure whether global ozone has reached a minimum. Atmospheric chlorine concentrations are beginning to decrease. However, bromine concentrations are still increasing. While these halogen concentrations remain high, the ozone layer remains vulnerable to further depletion from events such as volcanic eruptions that inject material into the stratosphere. Interactions between global warming and

  1. SU-E-T-274: Does Atmospheric Oxygen Affect the PRESAGE Dosimeter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Blencowe, A [The University of South Australia, South Australia, SA (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To experimentally determine the influence of atmospheric oxygen on the efficiency of the PRESAGE dosimeter and its reporting system. Methods: Batches of the reporting system – a mixture of chloroform and leuchomalachite green dye – and PRESAGE were prepared in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. For anaerobic batches, samples were deoxygenated by bubbling nitrogen through the dosimeter precursors or reporting system for 10 min. The dosimeters and reporting systems were prepared in spectrophotometric cuvettes and glass vials, respectively, and were irradiated with 6 MV photons to various radiation doses using a clinical linear accelerator. Changes in optical density of the dosimeters and reporting system before and after irradiation were measured using a spectrophotometer. In addition, the concentrations of dissolved oxygen were measured using a dissolved oxygen meter. Results: The experiments revealed that oxygen has little influence on the characteristics of PRESAGE, with the radical initiator oxidizing the leucomalachite green even in the presence of oxygen. However, deoxygenation of the reporting system leads to an increase in sensitivity to radiation dose by ∼ 30% when compared to the non-deoxygenated system. A slight improvement in sensitivity (∼ 5%) was also achieved by deoxygenating the PRESAGE precursor prior to casting. Measurement of the dissolved oxygen revealed low levels (0.4 ppm) in the polyurethane precursor used to fabricate the dosimeters, as compared to water (8.6 ppm). In addition, deoxygenation had no effect on the retention of the post-response absorption value of the PRESAGE dosimeter. Conclusion: The results suggest that the presence of oxygen does not inhibit the radiochromic properties of the PRESAGE system. In addition, there were no observed changes in the dose linearity, absorption spectrum and post-response photofading characteristics of the PRESAGE under the conditions investigated.

  2. Vanguards of Paradigm Shift in Radiation Biology: Radiation-Induced Adaptive and Bystander Responses

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUMOTO, Hideki; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv) are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation, using a linear no-threshold model (LNT model). However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose/low dose-rate radiation than they do to high dose/high dose-rate radiation. In oth...

  3. Ozone depletion - Ultraviolet radiation and phytoplankton biology in Antarctic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. C.; Prezelin, B. B.; Baker, K. S.; Bidigare, R. R.; Boucher, N. P.; Coley, T.; Karentz, D.; Macintyre, S.; Matlick, H. A.; Menzies, D.

    1992-01-01

    The near-50-percent thinning of the stratospheric ozone layer over the Antarctic, with increased passage of mid-UV radiation to the surface of the Southern Ocean, has prompted concern over possible radiation damage to the near-surface phytoplankton communities that are the bases of Antarctic marine ecosystems. As the ozone layer thinned, a 6-week study of the marginal ice zone of the Bellingshousen Sea in the austral spring of 1990 noted sea-surface and depth-dependent ratios of mid-UV irradiance to total irradiance increased, and mid-UV inhibition of photosynthesis increased. A 6-12 percent reduction in primary production associated with ozone depletion was estimated to have occurred over the course of the present study.

  4. Study on biological response to space radiation and its countermeasure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Il; Lee, Ju Woon; Kim, Dong Ho; Kim, Jae Hun; Song, Beom Suk; Kim, Jae Kyung; Park, Jong Heum; Kim, Jin Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The purpose is to develop the core technologies for the advanced life supporting system based on radiation technology by 2015 and to be a member of G7 in the space technology research field. And it is the final aim that contribution for establishment of the self-supporting technology and national strength by 2020. To simulate the space environment of microgravity and expose to space radiation, denervation model was established in Gamma Phytotron. The changes in microflora population in animal model was shown. The effect of simulated microgravity and long-term exposure to irradiation was investigated. In the experiment of MARS 500, crews for expedition to Mars had been served by Korean space foods (Bulgogi, Bibimbap, Seaweed soup, Mulberry beverage, Kimchi, Sujeonggwa) for 120 days, then their immunity will be examined and compared with it on the ground.

  5. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume V, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    reviewed. On a molecular RADIATION (ABSTRACT). (Eng.i level, the electromagnetic field causes the motion Davydov. B. I. (No affiliation given): Antipov...Eng.) Visalberghi. E SUBJECTED TO MICROWAVE RADIA- (Instituto di Biologia Generale. Universita di Pisa. TION AS EMBRYOS (MEETING ABSTRACT). (Eng...the irradiation. A se- tions of electromagnetic energy on molecular ions cond MF exposure was efficient only after more than and their behavior at

  6. Responses to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation in Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E.; Pollycove, Myron; Sondhaus, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    Biological tissues operate through cells that act together within signaling networks. These assure coordinated cell function in the face of constant exposure to an array of potentially toxic agents, externally from the environment and endogenously from metabolism. Living tissues are indeed complex adaptive systems.

  7. Thermoluminescent Dosimeter Use for Environmental Surveillance at the Hanford Site, 1971–2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.; Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-03-01

    This report describes the use of thermo luminescent dosimeters for environmental surveillance of external radiation on and around the Hanford Site for the period of 1970 to 2005. It addresses changes in the technology and associated quality control and assurance used in this work and summarizes the results of the 35 year period of external radiation surveillance. The appendices to this report provide trend plots for each location that comprised the shoreline, onsite, perimeter, and offsite sample design.

  8. Ionizing radiation - one of the most important link of the energetic chain in biological cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goraczko, W. [Technical Univ. Poznan, Radio- and Photochemistry Dept., Poznan (Poland)

    1999-09-01

    High (large) and low (small) doses of ionizing radiation consistently induce opposite physiologic effects in biological systems. The effects of low doses cannot be inferred by interpolation between the result from groups exposed to high doses and controls irradiated only by Natural Background Radiation. Stimulation ('bio-positive') effects by low-level doses of ionizing radiation are called radiation hormesis. It is still controversial idea, however it was found that some biological objects (yeast, seeds, animals) after gamma irradiation by low-level doses (10-50 times more NBR) can increase their development. The result of present researches demonstrate that the excitation of living system by gamma quanta (high energy) initiates prolonged secondary emission that influences biota and activates many important processes in biological systems. According to the excitation theory of bio-molecules the author suggests that gamma irradiation in low-level doses excites such molecules as DNA and proteins, and this being followed by a long-termed secondary coherent radiation. The spectral analysis of this secondary emission confirmed the contribution of the UV component to the total emission. The data obtaining by using SPC method (single photon counting) make possible a partial understanding of the radiation hormesis phenomenon and suggest closer relationship to UV emission from biological systems during mitotic processes. The experiments with humic acid (high doses) and glycine (low doses) confirm the author hypothesis that gamma-irradiated organic compounds are capable to emit secondary radiation. This secondary radiation probably plays very significant role in the intercellular communication inside the living systems. In conclusion the author proposed de-excitation processes in bio-molecules as a common denominator of UV and ionizing radiation interacting with living cells. Finally he refers to the Cerenkov radiation which is created inside the biological cells

  9. TH-C-19A-05: Evaluation of a New Reusable 3D Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juang, T [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Adamovics, J [Rider University, Skillman, NJ (United States); Oldham, M [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: PRESAGE is a radiochromic plastic which has demonstrated strong potential for high resolution single-use 3D dosimetry. This study evaluates a new PRESAGE formulation (Presage-RU) in which the radiochromic response is reversible (the dosimeter optically clears after irradiation), enabling the potential for reusability. Methods: Presage-RU dose response and optical-clearing rates were evaluated in both small volume dosimeters (1×1×4.5cm) and a larger cylindrical dosimeter (8cm diameter, 4.5cm length). All dosimeters were allowed to fully optically clear in dark, room temperature conditions between irradiations. Dose response was determined by irradiating small volume samples from 0–8.0Gy and measuring change in optical density. The cylindrical dosimeter was irradiated with a simple 4-field box plan (parallel opposed pairs of 4cm×4cm AP-PA beams and 2cm×4cm lateral beams) to 20Gy. High resolution 3D dosimetry was achieved utilizing optical-CT readout. Readings were tracked up to 14 days to characterize optical clearing. Results: Initial irradiation yielded a response of 0.0119△OD/(Gy*cm) while two subsequent reirradiations yielded a lower but consistent response of 0.0087△OD/(Gy*cm). Strong linearity of dose response was observed for all irradiations. In the large cylindrical dosimeter, the integral dose within the high dose region exhibited an exponential decay in signal over time (halflife= 23.9 hours), with the dosimeter effectively cleared (0.04% of the initial signal) after 10 days. Subsequent irradiation resulted in 19.5% lower initial signal but demonstrated that the exponential clearing rate remained consistent. Results of additional subsequent irradiations will also be presented. Conclusion: This work introduces a new re-usable radiochromic dosimeter (Presage-RU) compatible with high resolution (sub-millimeter) 3D dosimetry. Sensitivity of the initial radiation was observed to be slightly higher than subsequent irradiations, but the

  10. Imaging Primary Lung Cancers in Mice to Study Radiation Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsch, David G.; Grimm, Jan; Guimaraes, Alexander R.; Gregory R Wojtkiewicz; Perez, Bradford A.; Santiago, Philip M.; Anthony, Nikolas K.; Forbes, Thomas; Doppke, Karen; Weissleder, Ralph; Jacks, Tyler

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To image a genetically engineered mouse model of non–small-cell lung cancer with micro–computed tomography (micro-CT) to measure tumor response to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials The Cre-loxP system was used to generate primary lung cancers in mice with mutation in K-ras alone or in combination with p53 mutation. Mice were serially imaged by micro-CT, and tumor volumes were determined. A comparison of tumor volume by micro-CT and tumor histology was performed. Tumor ...

  11. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radioisotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakaoka, Yasuo [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering Science, Department of Biophysical Engineering, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  12. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yang Yu,1 Hui Guan,1 Yuanli Dong,1 Ligang Xing,2 Xiaolin Li2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis.Methods: We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems.Results: Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy. The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity.Conclusion: Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. Keywords: lung cancer, esophagitis, radiation injuries, predictors

  13. Initial characterization of a gel patch dosimeter for in vivo dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosic, C.; Culberson, W.; Rosen, B.; Madsen, E.; Frank, G.; Bednarz, B.

    2016-05-01

    In vivo dosimetry is a greatly underutilized tool for patient safety in clinical external beam radiotherapy treatments, despite being recommended by several national and international organizations (AAPM, ICRU, IAEA, NACP). The reasons for this underutilization mostly relate to the feasibility and cost of in vivo dosimetry methods. Due to the increase in the number of beam angles and dose per fraction in modern treatments, there is a compelling need for a novel dosimeter that is robust and affordable while able to operate properly in these complex conditions. This work presents a gel patch dosimeter as a novel method of in vivo dosimetry. DEFGEL, a 6% T normoxic polyacrylamide gel, was injected into 1 cm thick acrylic molds to create 1 cm thick small cylindrical patch dosimeters. To evaluate the change in optical density due to radiation induced polymerization, dosimeters were scanned before and after irradiation using an in-house developed laser densitometer. The dose-responses of three separate batches of gel were evaluated and compared to check for linearity and repeatability. The response development time was evaluated to ensure that the patch dosimeter could be high throughput. Additionally, the potential of this system to be used as an in vivo dosimeter was tested with a clinically relevant end-to-end in vivo phantom test. All irradiations were performed with a Varian Clinac 21EX at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC). The dose-response of all three batches of gel was found to be linear within the range of 2-20 Gy. At doses below 0.5 Gy the statistical uncertainties were prohibitively large to make quantitative assessments of the results. The three batches demonstrated good repeatability in the range of 2 Gy to up to 10 Gy, with only slight variations in response at higher doses. For low doses the dosimeter fully developed within an hour while at higher doses they fully developed within four hours. During the in vivo

  14. Information on biological health effects of ionizing radiation and radionuclides: the rule of a web site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comte, A.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Flury-Herard, A. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, 92 (France); Ourly, F. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Hemidy, P.; Lallemand, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), Service de Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a source of information on biological and health effects of radionuclides and ionizing radiation in an easy to use format. Reported work is made up of two distinct parts: data sheets for selected radionuclides and a web file. Data sheets: Specific radiation data sheets provide an overview of the properties, the environmental behaviour, the different pathways of human exposure and the biological and health consequences of selected radionuclides. Radionuclides that have been selected are those commonly dealt with in nuclear industry (and in other areas such as medicine) and released to the environment or naturally occurring (plutonium, tritium, carbon 14). Data sheets corresponding to the different radionuclides are based on the main sources of scientific information in dosimetry, epidemiology, radiobiology and radiation protection. These data sheets are intended for radiation protection specialists and physicians. They include: main physical and chemical characteristics, main radiation protection data: dose coefficients (public, workers), dose limits sources, total released estimate (nuclear industry, atmospheric tests, main pathway of human exposure and biological behaviour, biological and health effects, medical supervision, treatment a list of the main references, appendix providing accurate information. Web file: http://www-dsv.cea.fr/doc/carmin{sub e}xt/fond.php This web file provides a source of information on biological and health effects of ionizing radiation and biological basic knowledge of radiation protection. Available for consultation via Internet, compiled information provides, in a same file, subjects as varied as biological mechanisms, ionizing radiations action, biological and health effects, risk assessment This file is mainly intended to assist in informing and training of non-specialist readership (students, teaching on radiation protection basic knowledge. This electronic document is divided in three

  15. NONLINEAR RESPONSES OF GAMMA —RAY DOSIMETERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗达玲; 杨健明; 等

    1994-01-01

    Either sublinear or supralinear responses of dosimeters to γ-ray can be described by a response function derived from statistical Poisson distribution.The characteristic parameters of the function determine linearity,sublinearity and supralinearlty in their responses.The experimental data of gamma dose-responses of alanine ESR dosimeters film dosimeters.LiF(Mg,Cu,P) and LiF(Mg,Ti) thermoluminescence dosimeters are used to test the response function.

  16. Response of TLD-100 LiF dosimeters for X-rays of low energies; Respuesta de dosimetros de TLD-100 de LiF para rayos X de bajas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonzi, E. V.; Mainardi, R. T. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Av. Haya de la Torre y Av. Medina Allende s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, X5016LEA Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-10-15

    In diverse practical applications as the existent in radiological clinics, industrial facilities and research laboratories, the solid state dosimeters are used for the measure of the different types of ionizing radiations. At the present time dosimeters are manufactured with different types of materials that present thermoluminescent properties, to the effects of determining the absorbed radiation dose. Under these conditions, the radiation dose is determined integrated in all the range of energies of the beam of X-rays, since it assumes that the response of these dosimeters is lineal with the energy of the photons or radiant particles. Because interest exists in advancing in the development of a determination method in the way of the X-rays spectrum emitted by a tube of those used in diagnostic or therapy, we have measured the response of TLD-100 LiF dosimeters for low energies, minor at 60 keV, for a several group of these dosimeters. (Author)

  17. Radiation degradation of biological residues (Aflatoxins) produced in food laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Aquino, Simone; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Trindade, Reginaldo A.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (brazil)]. E-mails: vladrogo@yahoo.com.br; villavic@ipen.br; Zorzete, Patricia; Correa, Benedito [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas]. E-mail: correabe@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Some molds have the capacity to produce substances that are toxic and generally cancer-causing agents, such as aflatoxins, that stand between the most important carcinogenic substances (class one of the agents which are certainly carcinogenous for human people according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer). Aspergillus spp. is present in world-wide distribution, with predominance in tropical and subtropical regions growing in any substratum. The aim of this work is establish a minimum dose of radiation that degrades aflatoxins produced by fungi Aspergillus spp. The Aspergillus spp. colonies will be cultivated in coconut agar medium and the samples will be conditioned in appropriate bags for irradiation treatment of contaminated material and processed in the Gammacell 220 with dose of 20 kGy. (author)

  18. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldatov, A. N., E-mail: general@tic.tsu.ru; Vasilieva, A. V., E-mail: anita-tomsk@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenin ave., 36, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 – 6.45 μm, with a generation pulse length of 50 – 150 ns, and pulse energy of ∼ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage.

  19. Biological effects of background radiation: mutagenicity of 40K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevertz, D.; Friedman, A.M.; Katz, J.J.; Kubitschek, H.E.

    1985-12-01

    The naturally occurring radioactive isotope 40K is the single largest contributor to the internal background radiation dose in living organisms. We examined cell growth and mutation rate or frequency in several strains of Escherichia coli in (i) media containing the natural content of 40K, (ii) media containing potassium from which essentially all of the 40K had been removed by isotope separation, and (iii) media highly enriched in 40K. Growth rates (doubling times) were identical in the present or absence of 40K. In more than 40 chemostat experiments, we were unable to detect any significant differences in mutation rate to bacteriophage T5 resistance or in mutation frequency to valine resistance or tryptophan prototrophy attributable to 40K. We conclude that, in the bacterial systems we have studied, 40K does not make a significant contribution to spontaneous mutation.

  20. Sensitivity and variability of Presage dosimeter formulations in sheet form with application to SBRT and SRS QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, Michael, E-mail: mdumas1127@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine and Karmanos Cancer Institute Detroit, Detroit, Michigan 48201 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Rakowski, Joseph T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine and Karmanos Cancer Institute Detroit, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure sensitivity and stability of the Presage dosimeter in sheet form for various chemical concentrations over a range of clinical photon energies and examine its use for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) QA. Methods: Presage polymer dosimeters were formulated to investigate and optimize their sensitivity and stability. The dosimeter is composed of clear polyurethane base, leucomalachite green (LMG) reporting dye, and bromoform radical initiator in 0.9–1.0 mm thick sheets. The chemicals are mixed together for 2 min, cast in an aluminum mold, and left to cure at 60 psi for a minimum of two days. Dosimeter response was characterized at energies Co-60, 6 MV, 10 MV flattening-filter free, 15 MV, 50 kVp (mean 19.2 keV), and Ir-192. The dosimeters were scanned by a Microtek Scanmaker i800 at 300 dpi, 2{sup 16} bit depth per color channel. Red component images were analyzed with ImageJ and RIT. SBRT QA was done with gamma analysis tolerances of 2% and 2 mm DTA. Results: The sensitivity of the Presage dosimeter increased with increasing concentration of bromoform. Addition of tin catalyst decreased curing time and had negligible effect on sensitivity. LMG concentration should be at least as high as the bromoform, with ideal concentration being 2% wt. Gamma Knife SRS QA measurements of relative output and profile widths were within 2% of manufacturer’s values validated at commissioning, except the 4 mm collimator relative output which was within 3%. The gamma pass rate of Presage with SBRT was 73.7%, compared to 93.1% for EBT2 Gafchromic film. Conclusions: The Presage dosimeter in sheet form was capable of detecting radiation over all tested photon energies and chemical concentrations. The best sensitivity and photostability of the dosimeter were achieved with 2.5% wt. LMG and 8.2% wt. bromoform. Scanner used should not emit any UV radiation as it will expose the dosimeter, as with the Epson 10000 XL scanner

  1. The importance of radiation chemistry to radiation and free radical biology (The 2008 Silvanus Thompson Memorial Lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardman, P

    2009-02-01

    Biological effects of radiation are manifest over timescales extending to years. However, many chemical events are complete in milliseconds; after this time, adding oxygen to irradiated hypoxic cells no longer enhances radiosensitivity. This does not mean that damage pathways cannot be modified; the potential gain from chemical modulation of early events is as large as any associated with later pathways, and the prognostic importance of variations in levels of small molecules active in fast free radical pathways is as important as any associated with genetic make-up. Reactive oxygen species are much invoked in the wider context, but are frequently undefined and seldom measured unambiguously. Radiation chemistry has much to offer to both radiation and free radical biology. An appreciation of the interlinked parameters of time, spatial distribution and yield is well developed, as are methods to generate specific radicals in known concentrations and to monitor their reactions directly. Intense clinical interest in the 1980s in hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, developed from radiation chemical studies, has waned, but the goal of eliminating hypoxic radioresistance remains attractive. Nitric oxide may be more important than oxygen in determining hypoxic radiosensitivity, and radiation chemistry provides the tools to understand the mechanisms and the limitations of in vitro models. Imaging hypoxia in tumours relies heavily on free radical chemistry and radiolysis methods to understand the mechanistic basis for diagnostic agents. Quantitation of the chemical reactivity of free radicals is a cornerstone of radiation chemistry via the language, concepts and mathematics of chemical kinetics, which are equally applicable to understanding the molecular pathways in radiobiology.

  2. Fiber optic dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2014-08-01

    A small dimension, real-time readout dosimeter is desirable for specific applications in medical physics as for example, dose measurement in prostate brachytherapy. This particular radiotherapy procedure consists in the permanent deposition of low energy, low-dose and low-dose rate small sized radioactive seeds. We developed a scintillating fiber optic based dosimeter suitable for in-vivo, real-time low dose and low dose rate measurements. Due to the low scintillation light produced in the scintillating fiber, a high sensitive and high gain light detector is required. The Silicon Photomultipliers are an interesting option that allowed us to obtain good results in our studies.

  3. Molecular structure effects on the post irradiation diffusion in polymer gel dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattea, F.; Romero, M.; Strumia, M. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Vegetal / CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Departamento de Quimica Organica, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Vedelago, J. [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Quiroga, A. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios de Matematica / CONICET, Oficina 318 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Valente, M., E-mail: fmattea@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisica E. Gaviola / CONICET, LIIFAMIRx, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Polymer gel dosimeters have specific advantages for recording 3D radiation dose distribution representing a key factor for most of the therapeutic and diagnostic radiation techniques. Radiation-induced polymerization and crosslinking reactions that take place in the dosimeter have been studied for different monomers like acrylamide and N,N-methylene-bis acrylamide (Bis) and most recently for less toxic monomers like N-isopropylacrylamide and Bis. In this work a novel system based on itaconic acid and Bis is proposed, the radical polymerization or gel formation of these monomers has been already studied for the formation of an hydrogel for non dosimetric applications and their reactivity are comparable with the already mentioned systems. Although the 3D structure is maintained after the dosimeter has been irradiated, it is not possible to eliminate the diffusion of the reacted and monomer species in regions of dose gradients within the gel after irradiation. As a consequence the dose information of the dosimeters loose quality over time. The mobility within the gelatin structure of the already mentioned species is related to their chemical structure, and nature. In this work the effect of changes in the chemical structure of the monomers over the dosimetric sensitivity and over the post-irradiation diffusion of species is studied. One of the acrylic acid groups of the itaconic acid molecule is modified to obtain molecules with similar reactivity but different molecular sizes. Dosimetric systems with these modified species, Bis, an antioxidant to avoid oxygen polymerization inhibition, water and gelatin are irradiated in an X-ray tomography at different doses, and the resulting dosimeters are characterized by Raman spectroscopy and optical absorbance to study their feasibility and capabilities as dosimetric systems, and by optical-CT to analyze the diffusion degree after being irradiated. (Author)

  4. Radiation degradation of alginate and some results of biological effect of degraded alginate on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, N.Q.; Hai, L.; Luan, L.Q.; Hanh, T.T. [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Radiation degradation yields (Gd) of alginate in aqueous solution with different concentration were determined by viscometry method. The relationship between Gd and the alginate concentration was found out as: Gd=33.5 x C{sup -0.68}, with C% (w/v) and dry alginate referred to C=100%. An empirical equation for preparing degraded alginate with the desired low viscometry average molecular weight (Mv) by radiation was proposed. Alginate extracted directly horn seaweed'Sagassum, degraded by radiation was used for field experiments and results of the biological effect on plants (tea, carrot, chrysanthemum) were presented. (author)

  5. SU-E-T-643: Pure Alanine Dosimeter for Verification Dosimetry in IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Karmi, Anan M.; Zraiqat, Fadi [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was evaluation of accuracy of pure alanine dosimeters measuring intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions in a thorax phantom. Methods: Alanine dosimeters were prepared in the form of 110 mg pure L-α-alanine powder filled into clear tissue-equivalent polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plastic tubes with the dimensions 25 mm length, 3 mm inner diameter, and 1 mm wall thickness. A dose-response calibration curve was established for the alanine by placing the dosimeters at 1.5 cm depth in a 30×30×30 cm{sup 3} solid water phantom and then irradiating on a linac with 6 MV photon beam at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size to doses ranging from 1 to 5 Gy. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the absorbed dose in alanine. An IMRT treatment plan was designed for a commercial heterogeneous CIRS thorax phantom and the dose values were calculated at three different points located in tissue, lung, and bone equivalent materials. A set of dose measurements was carried out to compare measured and calculated dose values by placing the alanine dosimeters at those selected locations inside the thorax phantom and delivering the IMRT to the phantom. Results: The alanine dose measurements and the IMRT plan dose calculations were found to be in agreement within ±2%. Specifically, the deviations were −0.5%, 1.3%, and −1.7% for tissue, lung, and bone; respectively. The slightly large deviations observed for lung and bone may be attributed to tissue inhomogeneity, steep dose gradients in these regions, and uncontrollable changes in spectrometer conditions. Conclusion: The results described herein confirmed that pure alanine dosimeter was suitable for in-phantom dosimetry of IMRT beams because of its high sensitivity and acceptable accuracy. This makes the dosimeter a promising option for quality control of the therapeutic beams, complementing the commonly used ionization chambers, TLDs, and films.

  6. K-band EPR dosimetry: small-field beam profile determination with miniature alanine dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Felipe [Departmento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Department of Radiological Health, Caja de Seguro Social, Panama City (Panama); Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural and Exact Sciences and Technology, University of Panama, Panama City (Panama); Graeff, Carlos F.O. [Departmento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo [Departmento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2005-02-01

    The use of small-size alanine dosimeters presents a challenge because the signal intensity is less than the spectrometer sensitivity. K-band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer seems to be a good compromise between size and sensitivity of the sample. Miniature alanine pellets were evaluated for small-field radiation dosimetry. Dosimeters of DL-alanine/PVC with dimensions of 1.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm length with 5 mg mass were developed. These dosimeters were irradiated with 10 MV X-rays in the dose range 0.05-60 Gy and the first harmonic (1 h) spectra were recorded. Microwave power, frequency and amplitude of modulation were optimized to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). For beam profile determination, a group of 25 dosimeters were placed in an acrylic device with dimensions of (7.5x2.5x1) cm{sup 3} and irradiated with a (3x3) cm{sup 2} 10 MV X-rays beam field size. The dose at the central region of the beam was 20 Gy at a depth of 2.2 cm (build up for acrylic). The acrylic device was oriented perpendicular to the beam axis and to the gantry rotation axis. For the purposes of comparison of the spatial resolution, the beam profile was also determined with a radiographic film and 2 mm aperture optical densitometer; in this case the dose was 1 cGy. The results showed a similar spatial resolution for both types of dosimeters. The dispersion in dose reading was larger for alanine in comparison with the film, but alanine dosimeters can be read faster and more directly than film over a wide dose range.

  7. Application of biological dosimetry in accidental radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosal, M.; Batora, I.; Kolesar, D.; Stojkovic, J. (Komenskeho Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta); Gaal, P.; Sklovsky, A. (Krajska Hygienicka Stanica, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)); Cizova, O. (Sexuologicka Ambulancia KUNZ, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-03-01

    The case is described of accidental irradiation of a male person with /sup 137/Cs of an activity of 24.71 GBq. The first estimate induced a reasonable suspicion that the absorbed dose could be very high and life-threatening. On the other hand the clinical picture, usual laboratory examinations, findings in the fluorescent blood count, the analysis of chromosomal count of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, the spermiogram, and the negative post-irradiation porphyrinuria suggested that the absorbed dose could be much lower than the original estimate. The results of dosimetry obtained after the reconstruction of the accident by measuring on a phantom revealed that the actual dose was very close to that presumed from the results of biological dosimetry during the first days of examination of the patient.

  8. Ionizing radiation and mitogenetic radiation: two links of the same energetic chain in a biological cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraczko, W

    2000-03-01

    Present research demonstrates that the excitation of living systems by high energy/low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) initiates prolonged secondary ultraviolet (UV) range emission that influences biota. When doses of this energy are too high, the process of energy or radiation absorption by the cells causes negative changes (i.e. negative mutations or death). When these doses are sufficiently low, vital processes inside the cells are stimulated and can create positive changes. This paper proposes a common denomination for mechanisms of UV and ionizing radiation when interacting with living cells, underlying both its mitogenetic effect and radiation hormesis. Data from radon exposure in chronically exposed nuclear workers, acutely exposed Hiroshima and Nagasaki victims and observers of atmospheric nuclear explosions, combined with animal results, present irrefutable evidence that low doses of IR are beneficial. As a conclusion the author postulates the possibility of new methods of therapy regarding the use of IR and mitogenetic radiation. This paper has been written to encourage debate regarding possible future benefits that may be derived from low level doses of IR exposure in the general population.

  9. Study of structural model of biological membranes by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalcanti, L P

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to study, from the structural point of view, the process of incorporation of various types of hydrophobic compounds into the lamellar phase of liposomes and multilayers of the zwitterionic phospholipid DPPC. X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques using synchrotron radiation, have been used to monitor changes of several bilayer systems. Thermotropic phase transitions as well as the order of the lamellar packing were studied in situ experiments. The behavior of the L beta' and L alpha phases was followed as a function of the water content in dispersions of DPPC multi lamellar vesicles with the addition of the alkaloid Ellipticine in several concentrations. The results showed a decrease in the temperature of the pre-transition as well as that of the main transition (P beta' ->L alpha). The decrease of the lamellar spacing as a function of temperature in the liquid crystalline phase leads to the description of the thermal compression coefficient in the L alpha phase. It wa...

  10. Non-Directional Radiation Spread Modeling and Non-Invasive Estimating the Radiation Scattering and Absorption Parameters in Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Makarov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dwells on a development of new non-invasive measurement methods of optical parameters of biological tissues, which are responsible for the scattering and absorption of monochromatic radiation. It is known from the theory of radiation transfer [1] that for strongly scattering media, to which many biological tissues pertain, such parameters are parameters of diffusion approximation, as well as a scattering coefficient and an anisotropy parameter.Based on statistical modeling the paper examines a spread of non-directional radiation from a Lambert light beam with the natural polarization that illuminates a surface of the biological tissue. Statistical modeling is based on the Monte Carlo method [2]. Thus, to have the correct energy coefficient values of Fresnel reflection and transmission in simulation of such radiation by Monte Carlo method the author uses his finding that is a function of the statistical representation for the incidence of model photons [3]. The paper describes in detail a principle of fixing the power transmitted by the non-directional radiation into biological tissue [3], and the equations of a power balance in this case.Further, the paper describes the diffusion approximation of a radiation transfer theory, often used in simulation of radiation propagation in strongly scattering media and shows its application in case of fixing the power transmitted into the tissue. Thus, to represent an uneven power distribution is used an approximating expression in conditions of fixing a total input power. The paper reveals behavior peculiarities of solution on the surface of the biological tissue inside and outside of the incident beam. It is shown that the solution in the region outside of the incident beam (especially far away from it, essentially, depends neither on the particular power distribution across the surface, being a part of the tissue, nor on the refractive index of the biological tissue. It is determined only by

  11. Solar ultraviolet radiation from cancer induction to cancer prevention: solar ultraviolet radiation and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuorkey, Muobarak J

    2015-09-01

    Although decades have elapsed, researchers still debate the benefits and hazards of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. On the one hand, humans derive most of their serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D3], which has potent anticancer activity, from solar UVB radiation. On the other hand, people are more aware of the risk of cancer incidence associated with harmful levels of solar UVR from daily sunlight exposure. Epidemiological data strongly implicate UV radiation exposure as a major cause of melanoma and other cancers, as UVR promotes mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. This review highlights the impact of the different mutagenic effects of solar UVR, along with the cellular and carcinogenic challenges with respect to sun exposure.

  12. Evaluation of performance of electronic dosimeters for individual monitoring: tests in laboratory; Avaliacao do desempenho de dosimetros eletronicos para monitoracao individual: testes em laboratorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, W.J.; Khoury, H.J.; Barros, V.S.M. de, E-mail: wjaramig@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear. Laboratorio de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes; Medeiros, R.B. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2015-07-01

    Electronic dosimeters based on direct ion storage technology are being widely used in many countries for individual monitoring in many applications of ionizing radiation. However, their use as routine dosimeter has been established in a few countries due to lack of accreditation or intercomparison programs. The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of two direct íon storage dosimeters model available in the international market: the Miriom-Instadose-1 and RADOS DIS-1 to be eventually accepted for individual monitoring in Brazil. (author)

  13. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with tabletop synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Dollar, F; Bloom, M S; Chvykov, V; Kalintchenko, G; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Najmudin, Z; Palmer, C A J; Schreiber, J; Schumaker, W; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1896, x-rays have had a profound impact on science, medicine and technology. Here we show that the x-rays from a novel tabletop source of bright coherent synchrotron radiation can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens, yielding superior image quality and avoiding the need for scarce or expensive conventional sources.

  14. In vitro cultured cells as probes for space radiation effects on biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meli, A.; Perrella, G.; Curcio, F.; Ambesi-Impiombato, F.S. [Dipartimento di Patologia e Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Universita di Udine, P.le S. Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    1999-12-06

    Near future scenarios of long-term and far-reaching manned space missions, require more extensive knowledge of all possible biological consequences of space radiation, particularly in humans, on both a long-term and a short-term basis. In vitro cultured cells have significantly contributed to the tremendous advancement of biomedical research. It is therefore to be expected that simple biological systems such as cultured cells, will contribute to space biomedical sciences. Space represents a novel environment, to which life has not been previously exposed. Both microgravity and space radiation are the two relevant components of such an environment, but biological adaptive mechanisms and efficient countermeasures can significantly minimize microgravity effects. On the other hand, it is felt that space radiation risks may be more relevant and that defensive strategies can only stem from our deeper knowledge of biological effects and of cellular repair mechanisms. Cultured cells may play a key role in such studies. Particularly, thyroid cells may be relevant because of the exquisite sensitivity of the thyroid gland to radiation. In addition, a clone of differentiated, normal thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5 cells) is available in culture, which is well characterized and particularly fit for space research.

  15. Simulation of the radiation effects on biological objects; Simulation der Strahlenwirkung auf biologische Objekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bug, Marion; Nettelbeck, Heidi [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Biologische Wirksamkeit Ionisierender Strahlung'

    2013-06-15

    The simulation of biological radiation effects by means of the electron transport in water and DNA and the cross sections for elastic scattering, electronic excitation, and ionization in electron collisions with tetrahydrofuran molecules is described, whereby the strand-breaking probabilities are determined. (HSI)

  16. Radiation oncology--linking technology and biology in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, C Norman

    2002-01-01

    Technical advances in radiation oncology including CT-simulation, 3D- conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery techniques, and brachytherapy have allowed greater treatment precision and dose escalation. The ability to intensify treatment requires the identification of the critical targets within the treatment field, recognizing the unique biology of tumor, stroma and normal tissue. Precision is technology based while accuracy is biologically based. Therefore, the intensity of IMRT will undoubtedly mean an increase in both irradiation dose and the use of biological agents, the latter considered in the broadest sense. Radiation oncology has the potential and the opportunity to provide major contributions to the linkage between molecular and functional imaging, molecular profiling and novel therapeutics for the emerging molecular targets for cancer treatment. This process of 'credentialing' of molecular targets will require multi disciplinary imaging teams, clinicians and basic scientists. Future advances will depend on the appropriate integration of biology into the training of residents, continuing post graduate education, participation in innovative clinical research and commitment to the support of basic research as an essential component of the practice of radiation oncology.

  17. The effect of green tea on radiation-induced late biological effect in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Se Ra; Lee, Hae June; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of Green tea on the late biological effect of mice irradiated with 3 Gy of gamma-radiation. There were various findings including hematopoietic and lymphoid tumor, lung cancer, ovarian cancer and cancer of other lesions. Further studies are needed to characterize better the protective nature of active compounds.

  18. Quenching effect in an optical fiber type small size dosimeter irradiated with 290 MeV·u{sup -1} carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Yuho; Watanabe, Kenichi; Uritani, Akira; Yamazaki, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Koba, Yusuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    We are developing a small size dosimeter for dose estimation in particle therapies. The developed dosimeter is an optical fiber based dosimeter mounting an radiation induced luminescence material, such as an OSL or a scintillator, at a tip. These materials generally suffer from the quenching effect under high LET particle irradiation. We fabricated two types of the small size dosimeters. They used an OSL material Eu:BaFBr and a BGO scintillator. Carbon ions were irradiated into the fabricated dosimeters at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The small size dosimeters were set behind the water equivalent acrylic phantom. Bragg peak was observed by changing the phantom thickness. An ion chamber was also placed near the small size dosimeters as a reference. Eu:BaFBr and BGO dosimeters showed a Bragg peak at the same thickness as the ion chamber. Under high LET particle irradiation, the response of the luminescence-based small size dosimeters deteriorated compared with that of the ion chamber due to the quenching effect. We confirmed the luminescence efficiency of Eu:BaFBr and BGO decrease with the LET. The reduction coefficient of luminescence efficiency was different between the BGO and the Eu:BaFBr. The LET can be determined from the luminescence ratio between Eu:BaFBr and BGO, and the dosimeter response can be corrected. We evaluated the LET dependence of the luminescence efficiency of the BGO and Eu:BaFBr as the quenching effect. We propose and discuss the correction of the quenching effect using the signal intensity ratio of the both materials. Although the correction precision is not sufficient, feasibility of the proposed correction method is proved through basic experiments.

  19. Radiochromic dye dosimeter solutions as reference measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mahnaz; McLaughlin, William L.

    Solutions of leucocyanides of triphenylmethane dyes in organic solvents are designed as stable reference dosimeters for large radiation doses, with useful characteristics, both for steady-state and pulsed radiation fields. These radiochromic solutions may be used in conventional glass ampoules to cover the absorbed dose range 10 2-10 4kGy, when analyzed spectrophotometrically at visible wavelengths at the maxima of radiation-induced absorption bands. The radiation chemical yields of dye formation ( G-values) and molar linear absorption coefficients (ɛ m) of the dyes in several formulations, with and without dissolved polymer and weak oxidizing agents, are established. The most stable formulation before and after irradiation consists of new fuchsin cyanide in a mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and triethyl phosphate containing small amounts of acetic acid, p-nitrobenzoic acid and polyvinyl butyral. The useful range of doses for this solution is 10 2-4 x 10 3 Gy when measured at 557 nm wavelength. The radiation chemical yield, G-value for dye production, is 3.35 x 10 15 molec J -1 (0.0055 μmol J -1) and the value of ɛ m at this wavelength is 1.32 x 10 5 M -1 cm -1.

  20. Advances in dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Guan, Hui; Dong, Yuanli; Xing, Ligang; Li, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the research progress about the dosimetry and biological predictors of radiation-induced esophagitis. Methods We performed a systematic literature review addressing radiation esophagitis in the treatment of lung cancer published between January 2009 and May 2015 in the PubMed full-text database index systems. Results Twenty-eight eligible documents were included in the final analysis. Many clinical factors were related to the risk of radiation esophagitis, such as elder patients, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the intense radiotherapy regimen (hyperfractionated radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy). The parameters including Dmax, Dmean, V20, V30, V50, and V55 may be valuable in predicting the occurrence of radiation esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are also associated with radiation-induced toxicity. Conclusion Dosimetry and biological factors of radiation-induced esophagitis provide clinical information to decrease its occurrence and grade during radiotherapy. More prospective studies are warranted to confirm their prediction efficacy. PMID:26869804

  1. [AOR characterization and zoning: a dosimeter for blue light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, R; Uva, J; Di Lecce, V; Quarto, A

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained thanks to an innovative experimental device for the assessment of artificial optical radiation (AOR) exposure in workplace. This . device was developed by 'Politecnico di Bari-DIASS'. The wearable personal dosimeter has three sensors: one is used for measuring head position/movement, therefore there is a color light sensor to determine the AOR and finally there is a video camera to localize sources. Our system is connected to a netbook via USB cable that allows one to obtain the real and extimated value of worker's exposure, also with "augmented reality". The aim of this paper is realizing work place safety zoning for the classifacation of not only specific dangerous areas through the analysis of overlapping information from the device.

  2. An automatic evaluation system for NTA film neutron dosimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, R

    1999-01-01

    At CERN, neutron personal monitoring for over 4000 collaborators is performed with Kodak NTA films, which have been shown to be the most suitable neutron dosimeter in the radiation environment around high-energy accelerators. To overcome the lengthy and strenuous manual scanning process with an optical microscope, an automatic analysis system has been developed. We report on the successful automatic scanning of NTA films irradiated with sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 Pu-Be source neutrons, which results in densely ionised recoil tracks, as well as on the extension of the method to higher energy neutrons causing sparse and fragmentary tracks. The application of the method in routine personal monitoring is discussed. $9 overcome the lengthy and strenuous manual scanning process with an optical microscope, an automatic analysis system has been developed. We report on the successful automatic scanning of NTA films irradiated with /sup 238/Pu-Be source $9 discussed. (10 refs).

  3. Applicability of the Sunna dosimeter for food irradiation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, A.; Baranyai, M.; Wojnárovits, L.; Miller, S.; Murphy, M.; McLaughlin, W. L.; Slezsák, I.; Kovács, A. I.

    2002-03-01

    The quick development concerning the commercial application of food irradiation in the USA recently resulted in growing marketing of irradiated red meat as well as irradiated fresh and dried fruits. These gamma and electron irradiation technologies require specific dosimetry systems for process control. The new version of the Sunna dosimeter has been characterized in gamma, electron and bremsstrahlung radiation fields by measuring the optically stimulated luminescence (osl) at 530 nm both below and above 1 kGy, i.e. for disinfestation and for meat irradiation purposes. No humidity and no significant dose rate effect on the green osl signal was observed. The temperature coefficient was determined from 0°C up to about 40°C and to stabilize the osl signal after irradiation a heat treatment method was introduced. Based on these investigations the Sunna 'gamma' film is a suitable candidate for dose control below and above 1 kGy for food irradiation technologies.

  4. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  5. The study on optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter based on the SrS:Eu, Sm and CaS:Eu, Sm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yan-Ping; Chen Zhao-Yang; Fan Yan-Wei; Ba Wei-Zhen; Gou Qi; Lu Wu; Tang Xin-Qiang; Du Yan-Zhao

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing use of nuclear energy, there is a need for a wider range of efficient dosimeters for radiation detection and assessment. There has been a tremendous growth in the development of radiation detectors and devices in the past few decades. In recent years, the development of new materials for radiation dosimetry has progressed significantly. Alkaline earth sulfides (AES) have been known for a long time as excellent and versatile phosphor materials.In the present investigation, a number of phosphor samples such as mono-, binary and ternary sulfides of alkaline earths (Ⅱa-Ⅵb) have been prepared and their TL properties have been studied with respect to exposure (x-ray) response and fading. In this paper, some results on SrS:Eu, Sm and CaS:Eu, Sm phosphors are presented. A type of novel OSL dosimeter is described. The dosimeter takes advantage of the characteristics of charge trapping materials SrS:Eu, Sm and CaS:Eu, Sm that exhibit optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The measuring range of the dosimeter is from 0.01 to 1000 Gy. The OSL dosimeters provide capability for remote monitoring radiation locations which are difficult to access and hazardous. This equipment is relatively simple, small in size and has low power consumption. The device is suitable for space radiation dose exploration. In addition, it also can be used in IC and other radiation occasions and has good prospects.

  6. Assessment of the biological effects of 'strange' radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryakhin, E.A.; Tryapitsina, G.A. [Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Urutskoyev, L.I. [RECOM Company, Kurchatov Russian Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Akleyev, A.V. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The results from studies of the effects produced by electrical explosions of foils made from super pure materials in water point to the emergence of new chemical elements. An additional finding was the discharge of 'strange' radiation accompanying the transformation of chemical elements. However, currently, the mechanism involved in the interaction between 'strange' radiation and a substance or a biological entity remains obscure. Therefore, the aim of the present research is to investigate the biological effects of the 'strange' radiation. Pilot studies were performed at the RECOM RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' in April-May of 2004. The animals used in the experiment were female mice of C57Bl/6 line aged 80 days with body weight 16-18 g. The animals were exposed to radiation discharged during explosions of Ti foils in water and aqueous solutions. The cages with animals were placed at 1 m from the epicenter of the explosion. Explosions were carried out on the 19. (3 explosions), 20. (4 explosions) and 22. (3 explosions) of April, 2004 (explosions No1373 - No1382, respectively). The animals were assigned to 4 experimental groups comprised of 17-20 mice per group. The animals received experimental exposure within 1, 2 and 3 days of the experiment. In total, the experimental groups were exposed to 3, 7 and 10 explosions, respectively. In order to identify the biological reactions, the following parameters were estimated: number of nucleated cells in the bone marrow, number of CFU in the spleen after additional gamma-irradiation (6 Gy), cell composition of the bone marrow, the rate of erythrocytes with the different level of maturation in the bone marrow, the rate of erythrocytes with the micronuclei in the bone marrow, the reaction of bone marrow cells to additional gamma-irradiation (2 Gy), number of leucocytes in the peripheral blood, and cell composition of the peripheral blood. The following conclusions were drawn from these

  7. Study of Fricke gel dosimeter response for different gel quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Campos, L. L.

    2010-11-01

    The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter has been studied for application in radiotherapy because it is capable of to measure the spatial distribution of radiation doses. The dosimetry is based on the oxidation of ferrous (Fe2+) to ferric (Fe3+) ions radiation induced, related to the radiation dose. The gel material usually employed is the 300 Bloom gelatin, which is imported and very expensive in Brazil. Aiming to analyze the viability of to use a locally produced and low cost gel material, in this work the spectrophotometric responses of FXG solutions prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin commercially available and 300 Bloom gelatin imported were compared. The absorption spectra of solutions prepared with 5% by weight 270 and 300 Bloom gelatins non-irradiated and irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range between 0.5 and 100 Gy were analysed, the dose-response curves were evaluated and the useful dose range was established. The obtained results indicate that the FXG solution prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin presents good performance, similar to that presented by the FXG solution prepared with 300 Bloom gelatin and its use can be recommended owing to the low cost and the availability in local market.

  8. Online measurement of the BEPC Ⅱ background using RadFET dosimeters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Hui; LI Jin; GONG Guang-Hua; LI Yu-Xiong; HOU Lei; SHAO Bei-Bei

    2009-01-01

    To monitor the integral dose deposited in the BESⅢ electromagnetic calorimeter whose perfor-mance degrades due to exposure to the BEPCⅡ background, a 400 nm IMPL RadFET dosimeter-based integral dose online monitor system is built. After calibration with the 60Co source and verification with TLD in the pulse radiation fields, an experiment was arranged to measure the BEPC Ⅱ background online. The results are presented.

  9. Neutron Fading Characteristics of Copper Doped Lithium Fluoride (LiF: MCP) Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-21

    characteristics for various applications of radiation monitoring including personal, environmental and clinical dosimetry. The characteristics of an "ideal...enables its widespread use in several areas including clinical , personal, and environmental dosimetry. Composition LiF: MCP dosimeters are composed...such as CaF2: Mn (Zeff 16.3) or CaSO . (Zeff 14.3), which is an important attribute for dosimetry. (Miljanic, et al., 2002). LiF: MCP powder has been

  10. A comparison of the dosimetric characteristics of a glass rod dosimeter and a thermoluminescent dosimeter for mailed dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ju-Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwe-Ya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Austin Caner Centers, Austin, TX (United States); Kim, Yon-Lae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong-Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Tae-Suk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: suhsanta@catholic.ac.kr

    2009-01-15

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (RPL-GRD) system has recently become commercially available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric characteristics (reproducibility, linearity, fading, energy dependence and angular dependence) of the RPL-GRD for a mailed dosimeter and to compare it with LiF-TLD powder. In this study, the model GD-301 GRD and TLD-700 were powder type used. All measurements with the exception of angular dependence were performed in a water phantom using a holder stand. The RPL-GRD has better reproducibility than the TLD for the Co-60 beam as well as for the clinical photon beam. The RPL-GRD signal was linear as a function of applied dose in the range of 0.5-3 Gy for the Co-60 gamma rays. The fading of the RPL-GRD after a received dose of 2 Gy was initially found to be within 1.7% for five months. The energy dependence of both dosimeters was found to be less than 1.6% for photon beams, but was less than 5.0% for electron beams, which was in agreement with published data. The angular dependence of the RPL-GRD was measured to be approximately 1.4% for angles ranging {+-}90 deg. from the beam axis using a spherical polystyrene phantom. The measurements comparing RPL-GRD and TLD dosimetric characteristics demonstrated that the RPL-GRD is suitable for mailed dosimetry in a quality assurance (QA) audit program.

  11. SU-E-T-171: Characterization of the New Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy Source Using PRESAGE Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Followill, D; Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Adamovics, J [John Adamovics, Skillman, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy source using PRESAGE™ dosimeters to obtain independent confirmation of TG-43U1 dosimetry values from previous studies and ascertain its reproducibility in HDR brachytherapy. Methods: PRESAGE™ dosimeters are solid, polyurethane-based dosimeters doped with radiochromic leucodyes that produce a linear optical-density response when exposed to radiation. Eight 1-kg dosimeters were scanned prior to irradiation on an optical-CT scanner to eliminate background signal and any optical imperfections from each dosimeter. To quantify potential imaging artifacts due to oversaturated responses in the immediate range of the source, half of the eight dosimeters were cast with a smaller channel diameter of 5.4 mm, and the other half were cast with a larger channel diameter of 15mm. During irradiation, the catheters were placed in the center of each channel. Catheters fit the 5.4mm diameters channels whereas polyurethane plugs were inserted into the larger channels to create a sturdy, immobile catheter which allowed uniform dose distributions. Two dosimeters of each 5.4mm and 15mm were irradiated at either 1517.3 cGy or 2017.5 cGy. Post-irradiation scans were performed within 48 hours of irradiation. A 3D reconstruction based on subtraction of these two images and the relative dose measurements were made using in-house software. Results: Comparing measured radial dose rates with previous results revealed smaller percent errors when PRESAGE™ irradiations were at lower maximum dose. The dosimeters showed small deviations in radial dose function, g{sub p} (r), from previous studies. Among the dosimeters irradiated at 1517.3 cGy, the g{sub p}(r) compared to previous studies fluctuated from 0.0043 to 0.3922. This suggests small fluctuations can drastically change radial dose calculations. Conclusion: The subtraction of pre-irradiation and post-irradiation scans of PRESAGE™ dosimeters using an optical-CT scanner

  12. A study on the real-time radiation dosimetry measurement system based on optically stimulated luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-Ping; CHEN Zhao-Yang; BA Wei-Zhen; FAN Yan-Wei; DU Yan-Zhao; PAN Shi-Lie; GUO Qi

    2008-01-01

    The optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) radiation dosimeter technically surveys a wide dynamic measurement range and a high sensitivity.Optical fiber dosimeters provide capability for remote monitoring of the radiation in the locations which are difficult-to-acoess and hazardous.In addition.optical fiber dosimeters are immune to electrical and radio-frequency interference.In this paper,a novel remote optical fiber radiation dosimeter is described.The optical fiber dosimeter takes advantage of the charge trapping materials CaS:Ce, Sm that exhibit OSL.The measuring range of the dosimeter is from 0.1 to 100 Gy.The equipment is relatively simple and small in size,and has low power consumption.This device is suitable for measuring the space radiation dose and also can be used in high radiation dose condition and other dangerous radiation occasions.

  13. [Biological, chemical, and radiation factors in the classification of medical waste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, N V; Korotkova, G I; Orlov, A Iu; Kadyrov, D E

    2011-01-01

    The current classification of medical waste does not consider the sanitary-and-chemical hazard of epidemiologically dangerous and extremely dangerous medical waste (classes B and C). According to the results of the studies performed, the authors propose the improved classification of medical waste, which makes it possible to take into account not only infectious, radiation, and toxicological, but also sanitary-and-chemical hazards (toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and biological activity) of medical waste.

  14. Status of research on biological effects and safety of electromagnetic radiation: telecommunications frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, S.B.

    1994-06-01

    The possible adverse effects on human health of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) and microwave electromagnetic fields and radiation are of public concern. As the ambient electromagnetic environment continues to intensify (e.g. cellular and portable phones, wireless communications, LANs, PCNs) the effects of exposure from cumulative sources and prolonged exposure to low levels needs to be addressed. This review considers RF and microwave radiation above 100 kHz. It is acknowledged that there are several possible areas of biological interaction which have health implications and about which current knowledge is limited. Advice is based on the assessment of risks to health resulting from these exposures as derived from studies on the effects of RF radiation on animals and volunteers and from epidemiological studies of exposed populations. 360 refs., 9 tabs., 1 fig.

  15. Whack-A-Mole Model: Towards unified description of biological effect caused by radiation-exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakamura, Issei; Bando, Masako

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel model to estimate biological effects caused by artificial radiation exposure, Whack-a-mole (WAM) model. It is important to take account of the recovery effects during the time course of the cellular reactions. The inclusion of the dose-rate dependence is essential in the risk estimation of low dose radiation, while nearly all the existing theoretical models relies on the total dose dependence only. By analyzing the experimental data of the relation between the radiation dose and the induced mutation frequency of 5 organisms, mouse, drosophila, chrysanthemum, maize and tradescantia, we found that all the data can be reproduced by WAM model. Most remarkably, a scaling function, which is derived from WAM model, consistently accounts for the observed mutation frequencies of 5 organisms. This is the first rationale to account for the dose rate dependence as well as to give a unified understanding of a general feature of organisms.

  16. Applications of Synchrotron Radiation Micro Beams in Cell Micro Biology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari

    2007-01-01

    This book demonstrates the applications of synchrotron radiation in certain aspects of cell microbiology, specifically non-destructive elemental analyses, chemical-state analyses and imaging (distribution) of the elements within a cell. The basics for understanding and applications of synchrotron radiation are also described to make the contents easier to be understood for a wide group of researchers in medical and biological sciences who might not be familiar with the physics of synchrotron radiation. The two main techniques that are discussed in this book are the x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and the x-ray fine structure analysis (XAFS). Application of these techniques in investigations of several important scientific fields, such as neurodegeneration and other diseases related to cell malfunctioning, are demonstrated in this book.

  17. Whack-A-Mole Model: Towards a Unified Description of Biological Effects Caused by Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Wada, Takahiro; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakamura, Issei; Bando, Masako

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel model to for estimating biological effects caused by artificial radiation exposure, i.e., the Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model. It is important to take into account the recovery effects during the time course of cellular reactions. The inclusion of dose-rate dependence is essential in the risk estimation of low-dose radiation, while nearly all the existing theoretical models rely on the total dose dependence only. By analyzing experimental data of the relationship between the radiation dose and the induced mutation frequency of five organisms, namely, mouse, Drosophila, chrysanthemum, maize, Tradescantia, we found that all the data can be reproduced by the WAM model. Most remarkably, a scaling function, which is derived from the WAM model, consistently accounts for the observed mutation frequencies of the five organisms. This is the first rationale to account for the dose rate dependence as well as to provide a unified understanding of a general feature of organisms.

  18. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Williams, J. R.; Dicello, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used.

  19. Dosimetry for small fields in stereotactic radiosurgery using gafchromic MD-V2-55 film, TLD-100 and alanine dosimeters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerda Massillon-J L

    Full Text Available This work investigated the suitability of passive dosimeters for reference dosimetry in small fields with acceptable accuracy. Absorbed dose to water rate was determined in nine small radiation fields with diameters between 4 and 35 mm in a Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK and a modified linear accelerator (linac for stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Measurements were made using Gafchromic film (MD-V2-55, alanine and thermoluminescent (TLD-100 dosimeters and compared with conventional dosimetry systems. Detectors were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water in (60Co gamma-ray and 6 MV x-ray reference (10×10 cm(2 fields using an ionization chamber calibrated at a standards laboratory. Absorbed dose to water rate computed with MD-V2-55 was higher than that obtained with the others dosimeters, possibly due to a smaller volume averaging effect. Ratio between the dose-rates determined with each dosimeter and those obtained with the film was evaluated for both treatment modalities. For the LGK, the ratio decreased as the dosimeter size increased and remained constant for collimator diameters larger than 8 mm. The same behaviour was observed for the linac and the ratio increased with field size, independent of the dosimeter used. These behaviours could be explained as an averaging volume effect due to dose gradient and lack of electronic equilibrium. Evaluation of the output factors for the LGK collimators indicated that, even when agreement was observed between Monte Carlo simulation and measurements with different dosimeters, this does not warrant that the absorbed dose to water rate in the field was properly known and thus, investigation of the reference dosimetry should be an important issue. These results indicated that alanine dosimeter provides a high degree of accuracy but cannot be used in fields smaller than 20 mm diameter. Gafchromic film can be considered as a suitable methodology for reference dosimetry. TLD dosimeters are not

  20. Radiation stability and modification of gelatin for biological and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haema, Kamonwon; Oyama, Tomoko Gowa; Kimura, Atsushi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2014-10-01

    Gelatin is used in various biological and medical fields, including drug delivery systems and tissue engineering. In the context of these applications, radiation sterilization of gelatin was evaluated in terms of radiation stability. The molecular weight of gelatin powder irradiated by electron beams (EB) was analyzed using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). We found that irradiation decomposed the gelatin and that the weight-averaged molar mass (Mw) decreased by approximately 7-10% with sterilization doses in the range of 5-25 kGy. Also, we found that the hydrolysis rate in body and cell culture environments (37 °C water) was affected by irradiation. Although gelatin powder underwent chain scission when irradiated, crosslinking was predominantly induced when the gelatin was irradiated in water solution. Radiation-crosslinked (RX) gelatin hydrogel was fabricated without using any crosslinkers. In this case, fabrication and radiation sterilization were performed simultaneously. Using gel fraction and GPC analysis of the eluted sol, it was determined that the RX-gelatin hydrogel was stable for 7 days in water at 37 °C. These results provide important data for evaluating the feasibility of biological and medical applications of gelatin and RX-gelatin hydrogel.

  1. Production dosimeter LiF: Mg, Ti and comparison its responses with dosimeter LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100 in Harshaw company against of gamma rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KH Mohammadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermoluminescence dosimeters are small tablets used with 3. 2*3. 2*0. 9mm^3 for measurement of received dose from radioactive various beams. The most common dosimeter is TLD-100 which is lithium-fluoride family and this dosimeter contain magnesium impurities. In this study, first lithium-flouride powder was mixed with titanium and controlled atmosphere samples were heated. After measuring of samples density and hardness, their glow curves were drawn and microscopic pictures of producted samples were provided. Of course, the reader should know that the best press pressure, the best range of temperature heating and the best range of samples heating were determined in 6-8 (ton/cm2, 775-800 ° C and 15-20 h, respectively [1]. Then, the response of producted TLD-100 under radiation of gamma sources, 60Co, was measured in 500 mSv rate and obtained values were compared with obtained values by Harshaw producted samples. Dosimetry characteristics of producted samples was evaluated according to ASTM E 668-00, IEC-ISO 1066 standards. The results of comparisions indicate good agreements between producted sample and Harshaw sample.

  2. Reactor Gamma Heat Measurements with Calorimeters and Thermoluminescence Dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Karsten; Majborn, Benny

    1973-01-01

    Intercomparison measurements of reactor γ-ray heating were carried out with calorimeters and thermoluminescence dosimeters. Within the measurement uncertainties the two methods yield coincident results. In the actual measurement range thermoluminescence dosimeters are less accurate than calorimet...... calorimeters, but possess advantages such as a small probe size and the possibility of making simultaneous measurements at many different positions. Hence, thermoluminescence dosimeters may constitute a valuable supplement to calorimeters for reactor γ-ray heating measurements....

  3. Comparison of the fiber optic dosimeter and semiconductor dosimeter for use in diagnostic radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, W. J.; Shin, S. H.; Sim, H. I.; Hong, S.; Kim, S. G.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Jeon, H. S.; Kwon, G. W.; Jang, K. W.; Cho, S.; Lee, B.

    2014-05-01

    A fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) was fabricated using a plstic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure entrance surface dose (ESD) in diagnostic radiology. Under changing tube current and irradition time of the digital radiography (DR) system, we measured the scintillating light and the ESD simultaneously. As experiemtnal results, the total counts of the FOD were changed in a manner similar to the ESDs of the semiconductor dosimeter (SCD). In conclusion, we demonstrated that the proposed FOD minimally affected the diagnostic information of DR image while the SCD caused serious image artifacts.

  4. Carbon Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Biological effects on Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Gong, Ning; Meng, Qingmei; Liu, Jiawei; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Large number of researches on rice after spaceflights indicated that rice was a favorable model organism to study biological effects induced by space radiation. The stimulative effect could often be found on rice seedlings after irradiation by low-dose energetic heavy-ion radiation. Spaceflight also could induce stimulative effect on kinds of seeds. To further understand the mechanism of low-dose radiation biological effects and the dose range, the germinated rice seeds which were irradiated by different doses of carbon heavy-ion (0, 0.02, 0.1, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy, LET=27.3keV/µm) were used as materials to study. By investigating the variation of rice phenotype under different doses, we found that 2Gy radiation dose was a dividing point of the phenotypic variation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the variation of mitochondria, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosome and nucleus in mesophyll cell of rice apical meristem at 24 hours after radiation with different doses. The cells were not apparently physiologically damaged when the dose of radiation was less than 2Gy. The number of chloroplast did not change significantly, but the number of mitochondria was significantly increased, and gathered around in the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum; the obvious lesion of chloroplast and mitochondria were found at the mesophyll cells when radiation dose was higher than 2Gy. The mitochondria were swelling and appearing blurred crest. The chloroplast and mitochondrial mutation rate increased significantly (p<0.01). These phenomena showed that cell biological changes may be the reasons of the stimulation and inhibition effects with the boundary of 2Gy. Since mitochondrial was an important organelle involved in the antioxidative systems, its dysfunction could result in the increase of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. We found that the growth stimulation induced by low-dose radiation mainly occurred at three-leaf stage along

  5. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation.

  6. Transient impedance changes in venous endothelial monolayers as a biological radiation dosimetry response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Fossum Young

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In March of 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent 14 m-high tsunami caused major damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan.  While cancer incidence in the radiation-exposed population is a logical concern, the complex effects of radiation on the heart and cardiovascular system are also of interest.  Immediate and early vascular radiation effects could be exploited as a dosimetry modality.  To test whether non-coronary vasculature exhibited transient perturbation in barrier function, video microscopy studies and Electric Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing technology were used to probe very subtle changes in primary human vascular endothelium.  Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers exhibit a transient, statistically significant decrease (P = 0.017 in monolayer resistance 3 h after irradiation with 5.0 Gy of g rays.  Radiation induced perturbations in HUVEC monolayer permeability are similar in magnitude and kinetics to those observed in coronary arterial endothelium.  Therefore, at least two types of vasculature respond to radiation on ECIS arrays with an early transient disruption in permeability.  The finding supports the use of early passage HUVECs for use in bioelectric dosimetry studies of vasculature and suggests that permeability of vessels could potentially serve as a biological dosimetry tool.

  7. Evaluation of radiation exposure in interventional radiology (IR) using active personal dosimeters (APD); Evaluierung der Strahlenexposition in der Interventionellen Radiologie (IR) mit Hilfe von Aktiv-Personen-Dosimetern (APD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugschwandtner, K. [KH Hietzing mit NZ Rosenhuegel, Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Krankenhausphysik; TU Wien (Austria). Atominstitut; Freund, R. [KH Hietzing mit NZ Rosenhuegel, Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Krankenhausphysik; Mertikian, G. [KH Hietzing mit NZ Rosenhuegel, Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Poljanc, K. [TU Wien (Austria). Atominstitut; Ibi, B. [KA Rudolfstiftung, Wien (Austria). Stabstelle Medizinphysik

    2015-07-01

    Increased awareness of high personal dose exposure of medical staff in interventional radiology (IR) demands an assessment of radiation protection procedures. Mandatory dose monitoring systems do not allow to relate dose to specific actions of the staff as they just accumulate a total dose per month. Doses of head and limbs are expected to be high as those body parts which are not protected by the lead apron. We decided to use a measuring system by Unfors, RaySafe i2 which is built for real- time- dosimetry of scattered radiation in pulsed X-ray fields. An increased dose of the body side closer to the X-ray source (left body side) was detected. This is due to the position and the posture of the radiologist during intervention. Separating the phases of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) from those of fluoroscopy allowed not only to list the separate accumulated doses, but showed as well a big difference in dose rate. The measurements revealed the need of an improvement of common radiation protection, especially while DSA.

  8. Improving the Success Rate of Delivering Annual Occupational Dosimetry Reports to Persons Issued Temporary External Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, Michael Wesley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Workers who are not routinely monitored for occupational radiation exposure at LANL may be issued temporary dosimeters in the field. Per 10CFR835 and DOE O 231.1A, the Laboratory's radiation protection program is responsible for reporting these results to the worker at the end of the year. To do so, the identity of the worker and their mailing address must be recorded by the delegated person at the time the dosimeter is issued. Historically, this data has not been consistently captured. A new online application was developed to record the issue of temporary dosimeters. The process flow of the application was structured such that: 1) the worker must be uniquely identified in the Lab's HR database, and 2) the mailing address of record is verified live time via a commercial web service, for the transaction to be completed. A COPQ savings (Type B1) of $96K/year is demonstrated for the new application.

  9. Personnel exposure control system with auto thermoluminescence dosimeter in Shimane Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Hideo; Ochi, Susumu (Chugoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Hiroshima (Japan))

    1982-03-01

    In the past, film badges and pocket dosimeters were put on the persons who entered a controlled area in a nuclear power station to measure the external radiation exposure. For these, read out error or mistake, delay in taking out the result, trouble for monitoring many persons, etc. were problems. To solve these problems, the auto thermoluminescence dosimeter (ATLD) system has been introduced in Shimane Nuclear Power Station in place of pocket dosimeters since the second half of fiscal 1978. The outline of the system and the composition and software of the TLD automatic readout system are described. For the control of access to controlled areas, workers are forced to pass the check point where watchmen check everyone's ID card, and subjected to the check-up with the TLD automatic readout device. The checking items in the case of entering the areas are: (1) confirmation of licensee, (2) confirmation of the term of validity for the medical examination on ionizing radiation, (3) checking for exposure dose compared to the controlled exposure level, (4) confirmation of time limit to stay in controlled areas, and (5) TLD element annealing condition. The checking items in the case of leaving the areas are: (1) checking for identifying the TLD element that the personnel has brought in, (2) exposure dose compared to the controlled exposure level, (3) time for which the personnel stayed in controlled areas.

  10. Influence of radar radiation on breeding biology of tits (Parus sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejt, L; Mazgajski, T; Kubacki, R; Kieliszek, J; Sobiczewska, E; Szmigielski, S

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to observe the influence of long-term exposure to radar radiation on breeding biology of tits (Parus sp.), living and building nests around a military radar station, emitting pulse-modulated microwave radiation of 1,200-3,000 MHz. Two series of 36 nest-boxes each were located on the radar station area. Measurements of exposure were performed separately for each nest-box. Average power density (P(av), W/m(2)) and dose of exposure (W/m(2) x h) were recorded for each nest-box during 45 days. Control nest-boxes (N = 42) were located in other part of the same forests, free from radar radiation. The assessment of effects of radar exposure on breeding biology of tits included number of inhabited nest-boxes, number of eggs, and nestlings in the nest (Why not chick mortality?). Experimental nest-boxes were either exposed to relatively high levels of radiation (2.0-5.0 W/m(2), mean 3.41 +/- 1.38 W/m(2)) or an intermediate level of radiation that ranged from 0.1-2.0 W/m(2) (mean 1.12 +/- 0.84 W/m(2)). For control nest-boxes the exposure ranged from 0.001-0.01 W/m(2) (mean 0.0062 +/- 0.0007 W/m(2)). Only blue or great tits occupied all nest-boxes, used in the experiment. The number of nesting blue tits was higher in nest-boxes located on the radar station area than in the control boxes. In contrast, control nest-boxes were inhabited mainly by great tits. On the radar station area, blue tits nested in high exposed nest-boxes (67,0%) and great tit occupied mainly these boxes, which were exposed to low-level radiation (62,5%), the difference being statistically significant (p tits occupying exposed and control nest boxes. Results of the present study show that radar radiation generally does not lead to decrease of number of nesting tits, but may cause shifts in tits species living around the radar station. (But is the microhabitat, apart from the radiation level, around each nest box more likely to attract one species of tit or another?).

  11. Biological radiation dose from secondary particles in a Milky Way gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Karam, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are a class of highly energetic explosions emitting radiation in a very short timescale of a few seconds and with a very narrow opening angle. Although, all GRBs observed so far are extragalactic in origin, there is a high probability of a GRB of galactic origin beaming towards the Earth in the past ~0.5 Gyr. We define the level of catastrophic damage to the biosphere as approximation 100 kJ m-2, based on Thomas et al. (2005a, b). Using results in Melott & Thomas (2011), we estimate the probability of the Earth receiving this fluence from a GRB of any type, as 87% during the last 500 Myr. Such an intense burst of gamma rays would ionize the atmosphere and deplete the ozone (O3) layer. With depleted O3, there will be an increased flux of Solar UVB on the Earth's surface with potentially harmful biological effects. In addition to the atmospheric damage, secondary particles produced by gamma ray-induced showers will reach the surface. Among all secondary particles, muons dominate the ground-level secondary particle flux (99% of the total number of particles) and are potentially of biological significance. Using the Monte Carlo simulation code CORSIKA, we modelled the air showers produced by gamma-ray primaries up to 100 GeV. We found that the number of muons produced by the electromagnetic component of hypothetical galactic GRBs significantly increases the total muon flux. However, since the muon production efficiency is extremely low for photon energies below 100 GeV, and because GRBs radiate strongly for only a very short time, we find that the biological radiation dose from secondary muons is negligible. The main mechanism of biological damage from GRBs is through Solar UVB irradiation from the loss of O3 in the upper atmosphere.

  12. Abstracts of the 28. annual meeting of the Austrian Radiation Oncology, Radiation Biology and Medical Radiation Physics Society (OeGRO 2011); Abstracts der 28. Jahrestagung der Oesterreichischen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, Radiobiologie und Medizinische Radiophysik (OeGRO 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2012-06-15

    The second part of the volume includes the abstracts of the 28th annual meeting of the Austrian Radiation Oncology, Radiation Biology and Medical Radiation Physics Society (OeGRO 2011), covering the following topics: extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy; brachytherapy, hyperthermia; radiotherapy side effects; psycho-oncology in radiotherapy; head-neck carcinomas; radiation source implants for carcinoma irradiation; MRI-supported adaptive radiotherapy; CT-guided radiotherapy; mammary carcinomas; prostate carcinomas; magnetic nanoparticles for future medical applications.

  13. Biological dosimetry -- cytogenetics findings at persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catović, Amra; Tanacković, Fikreta

    2006-05-01

    A large number of physical and chemical agents are capable to course chromosomal aberrations. Ionizing radiation is frequent and well known course of chromosomal aberrations. If deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is irradiated before synthesis chromosomal-type aberrations are caused. Chromatid-type aberrations are results of DNA damages occurred during or after synthesis. Some of these changes could exist at patients several years after exposition. Biological dosimetry-cytogenetics analysis of persons occupational exposed to ionizing radiation in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina have been carried out in "Center for Human Genetics" of Medical Faculty in Sarajevo. In this study we have evaluated cytogenetics findings of persons employed in a zone of radiation. Cytogenetics findings have been demonstrated in allowed limit in 154 (81.1%) examinees, and cytogenetics findings were out of normal values in 36 (18.9%) examinees. The majorities who have been employed in a zone of ionizing radiation were in age group 40-44 (25.3%) and age group 45-49 (24.7%). Radiological technicians (35.7%) were exposed the most to ionizing radiation, than clinical nurse specialists (14.7%), radiologists (11.1), physicians (7.4%) machines technicians (6.3%), pneumologists (4.7%), orthopedists (4.2%) and scrub nurses (4.2%). Biological dosimetry-cytogenetics analysis have been carried out at 108 (56.8%) male and 82 (43.2%) female examinees. The most frequent aberration have been presented with 26.8% in the form of acentric fragments, than chromatid fragments with 21.2%, dicentric chromosomes with 19.5%, gaps with 18.7%, minutes with 12.2% and inter-arm interchanges with 1.6%.

  14. Tissue interfaces dosimetry in small field radiotherapy with alanine/EPR mini dosimeters and Monte Carlo-Penelope simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega R, J. L.; Nicolucci, P.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, FFCLRP, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Bairro Monte Alegre, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Chen, F. [Universidade Federale do ABC, CCNH, Rua Santa Adelia 166, Bangu, 09210-170 Santo Andre, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Apaza V, D. G., E-mail: josevegaramirez@yahoo.es [Universidad Nacional de San Agustin de Arequipa, Departamento de Fisica, Arequipa (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The dosimetry system based on alanine mini dosimeters plus K-Band EPR spectrometer was tested in the tissue-interface dosimetry through the percentage depth-dose (Pdd) determination for 3 x 3 cm{sup 2} and 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} radiation fields sizes. The alanine mini dosimeters were produced by mechanical pressure from a mixture of 95% L-alanine and 5% polyvinyl alcohol (Pva) acting as binder. Nominal dimensions of these mini dosimeters were 1 mm diameter and 3 mm length as well as 3 - 4 mg mass. The EPR spectra of the mini dosimeters were registered using a K-Band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer. The mini dosimeters were placed in a nonhomogeneous phantom and irradiated with 20 Gy in a 6 MV PRIMUS Siemens linear accelerator, with a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm using the small fields previously mentioned. The cylindrical non-homogeneous phantom was comprised of several disk-shaped plates of different materials in the sequence acrylic-bone cork-bone-acrylic, with dimensions 15 cm diameter and 1 cm thick. The plates were placed in descending order, starting from top with four acrylic plates followed by two bone plates plus eight cork plates plus two bone plates and finally, four acrylic plates (4-2-8-2-4). Pdd curves from the treatment planning system and from Monte Carlo simulation with Penelope code were determined. Mini dosimeters Pdd results show good agreement with Penelope, better than 95% for the cork homogeneous region and 97.7% in the bone heterogeneous region. In the first interface region, between acrylic and bone, it can see a dose increment of 0.6% for mini dosimeters compared to Penelope. At the second interface, between bone and cork, there is 9.1% of dose increment for mini dosimeter relative to Penelope. For the third (cork-bone) and fourth (bone-acrylic) interfaces, the dose increment for mini dosimeters compared to Penelope was 4.1% both. (Author)

  15. Characterization of ferric ions diffusion in Fricke gel dosimeters by using inverse problem techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedelago, J.; Quiroga, A.; Valente, M.

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion of ferric ions in ferrous sulfate (Fricke) gels represents one of the main drawbacks of some radiation detectors, such as Fricke gel dosimeters. In practice, this disadvantage can be overcome by prompt dosimeter analysis, and constraining strongly the time between irradiation and analysis, implementing special dedicated protocols aimed at minimizing signal blurring due to diffusion effects. This work presents a novel analytic modeling and numerical calculation approach of diffusion coefficients in Fricke gel radiation sensitive materials. Samples are optically analyzed by means of visible light transmission measurements by capturing images with a charge-coupled device camera provided with a monochromatic filter corresponding to the XO-infused Fricke solution absorbance peak. Dose distributions in Fricke gels are suitably delivered by assessing specific initial conditions further studied by periodical sample image acquisitions. Diffusion coefficient calculations were performed using a set of computational algorithms based on inverse problem formulation. Although 1D approaches to the diffusion equation might provide estimations of the diffusion coefficient, it should be calculated in the 2D framework due to the intrinsic bi-dimensional characteristics of Fricke gel layers here considered as radiation dosimeters. Thus a suitable 2D diffusion model capable of determining diffusion coefficients was developed by fitting the obtained algorithm numerical solutions with the corresponding experimental data. Comparisons were performed by introducing an appropriate functional in order to analyze both experimental and numerical values. Solutions to the second-order diffusion equation are calculated in the framework of a dedicated method that incorporates finite element method. Moreover, optimized solutions can be attained by gradient-type minimization algorithms. Knowledge about diffusion coefficient for a Fricke gel radiation detector is helpful in accounting for

  16. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Irradiated with Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of the present experiment was to provide data on the dose-dependent production of chromosome aberrations such as dicentrics, centric rings, and excess acentrics. Radiation is one of the more dangerous clastogens in the environment. Ionizing radiation causes chromosome breakages and various cytogenetic aberrations in exposed cells. In an investigation into radiation emergencies, it is important to estimate the dose to exposed persons for several reasons. Physical dosimeters (e. g., film badges) may misrepresent the actual radiation dose and may not be available in a radiological accident or terrorism incident. Biological dosimetry is suitable for estimating the radiation dose during such accidents. The dicentric chromosome assay is very sensitive and a reliable bio-indicator in cases of accidental overexposure.

  17. Biological effects of ionizing radiations. Radiological accident from Goiania, GO, Brazil; Efeitos biologicos das radiacoes ionizantes. Acidente radiologico de Goiania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Emico, E-mail: emico.okuno@if.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF-USP), SP (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    This article presents the fundaments of radiation physics, the natural and artificial sources, biological effects, radiation protection. We also examine the sequence of events that resulted in Goiania accident with a source of caesium-137 from abandoned radiotherapy equipment and its terrible consequences. (author)

  18. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants. Petit dejeuner de presse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flury-Herard, A. [CEA, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 75 - Paris (France); Boiteux, S.; Dutrillaux, B. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 92 (France); Toledano, M. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  19. Positioning of personnel dosimeters - comments on replies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.W. (Academy of Health Sciences, U.S. Army, Fort Sam Houston, TX); Wiatrowski, W.A. (Audi L. Murphy Memorial Veterans Hospital, San Antonio, TX (USA)); Bushong, S.C. (Baylor Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Coll. of Medicine)

    1982-02-01

    Comments are made on a paper published in 1980 concerning the positioning of personnel dosimeters on individuals wearing protective aprons in diagnostic radiology. The main issue under discussion is whether an additional film badge should be worn on the collar to monitor head and neck exposure while wearing the lead apron over the whole body badge to avoid misinterpretations of reported 'whole body' exposure data. The recommendations on this issue are conflicting in NRCP Reports 57 and 59 and thus clarification is sought.

  20. A hypothesis on biological protection from space radiation through the use of new therapeutic gases as medical counter measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoenfeld Michael P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is biological damage that is associated with increased oxidative stress. It is therefore important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and as biological signaling molecules for management of the body's response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it can be concluded that this approach may have therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion (IR injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, cataracts, and aging. We envision applying these therapies through inhalation of gas mixtures or ingestion of water with dissolved gases.

  1. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G.; Edouard, M.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Requardt, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, JF.; Elleaume, H.; Bravin, A., E-mail: prezado@esrf.fr [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2009-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  2. Determination of radiation dose to patient by biological dosimetry in interventional radiological procedures; Estimacion de la dosis de radiacion a paciente mediante dosimetria biologica en exploraciones complejas de radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna Berna, A.; Alcaraz, M.; Armero, D.; Navarro, J. L.; Morant, J. J.; Canteras, M.

    2006-07-01

    Interventional radiology is substituting complex surgical procedures. The requirements of high quality images and long fluoroscopy exposure times gives rise to high levels of radiation doses to patients. This topic is increasingly becoming of high concern. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the micronucleus assay (MN) in lymphocytes for the determination of the dose delivered to 15 patients who underwent interventional radiological procedures. The determination of a dose to patients supposing uniform irradiation was done with a dose-effect calibration curve previously determined for 120 keV X-rays. due to the low level of MN rate compared with background we used a bayesian approach to obtain the net MN counting rate, resulting and average counting rate of 3,2{+-}2,5 MN/500 bi nucleated cell. The group of coronariography patients resulted in higher MN rate 5,1 MN/500 BC vs 2,6 for the rest of patients. Average equivalent uniform dose for the total group of patients was 6,5{+-}2,6 cGy, while for the coronariography group was 8,8 {+-} 4,6 cGy. In conclusion, interventional radiology procedures deliver significant doses to patients and the MN assay as biological dosimeter is a good too to evaluate this range to doses. (Author)

  3. Quality control for X-ray dosimetry with Fricke dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann de [Centro Regional de Cincias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: lsouza@cnen.gov.br; Austerlitz, C. [East Carolina University, NC (United States)]. E-mail: camposc@ecu.edu

    2007-07-01

    It is a well-established fact that the success of radiation therapy is dependent on the accurate dosimetry of the radiation beam used. This dosimetry must include equipment performance as well. A system for Fricke dosimetry was used for this purpose. The Fricke solution and a parallel ionization chamber (used for comparison) were irradiated with an X-ray beam from a Pantak X-ray equipment. The ionization chamber was positioned at a distance of 500 mm of the focal point, in the central axis of the X-ray field which is defined as 100x100 mm{sup 2} at the calibration distance. A plexiglas phantom appropriate to hold the polypropylene tube was used to irradiate the vials with the Fricke solution. The irradiated solutions were transferred directly from the polypropylene vials to 10 mm length cuvettes and the optical densities were measured in 304 nm using a Beckman Counter Model DU 640 spectrophotometer. Three institutions were visited to verify their procedures and two were in accordance with the lAEA recommended procedures for soft X-ray dosimetry. The results of the measurements performed in the institutions visited show that the Fricke dosimeter system developed can be used for quality control for soft X-ray equipment. (author)

  4. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Pape, Yann Le [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2016-01-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) values in the concrete biological shields of the US PWR fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to assure reliable risk assessment for NPPs extended operation.

  5. Evaluation of a Colorimetric Personal Dosimeter for Nitrogen Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Philip

    A personal colorimetric dosimeter for nitrogen dioxide was developed. Tests were performed to determine the response of these strips to various concentrations of NO2. The dosimeter strips were satisfactory for approximate determinations of total exposure (concentration + time) of nitrogen dioxide. The total exposure was calculated in terms of time…

  6. Investigating the accuracy of microstereotactic-body-radiotherapy utilizing anatomically accurate 3D printed rodent-morphic dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bache, Steven T.; Juang, Titania; Belley, Matthew D. [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Koontz, Bridget F.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Kirsch, David G.; Oldham, Mark, E-mail: mark.oldham@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Adamovics, John [Rider University, Lawrenceville, New Jersey 08648 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Sophisticated small animal irradiators, incorporating cone-beam-CT image-guidance, have recently been developed which enable exploration of the efficacy of advanced radiation treatments in the preclinical setting. Microstereotactic-body-radiation-therapy (microSBRT) is one technique of interest, utilizing field sizes in the range of 1–15 mm. Verification of the accuracy of microSBRT treatment delivery is challenging due to the lack of available methods to comprehensively measure dose distributions in representative phantoms with sufficiently high spatial resolution and in 3 dimensions (3D). This work introduces a potential solution in the form of anatomically accurate rodent-morphic 3D dosimeters compatible with ultrahigh resolution (0.3 mm{sup 3}) optical computed tomography (optical-CT) dose read-out. Methods: Rodent-morphic dosimeters were produced by 3D-printing molds of rodent anatomy directly from contours defined on x-ray CT data sets of rats and mice, and using these molds to create tissue-equivalent radiochromic 3D dosimeters from Presage. Anatomically accurate spines were incorporated into some dosimeters, by first 3D printing the spine mold, then forming a high-Z bone equivalent spine insert. This spine insert was then set inside the tissue equivalent body mold. The high-Z spinal insert enabled representative cone-beam CT IGRT targeting. On irradiation, a linear radiochromic change in optical-density occurs in the dosimeter, which is proportional to absorbed dose, and was read out using optical-CT in high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic voxels). Optical-CT data were converted to absolute dose in two ways: (i) using a calibration curve derived from other Presage dosimeters from the same batch, and (ii) by independent measurement of calibrated dose at a point using a novel detector comprised of a yttrium oxide based nanocrystalline scintillator, with a submillimeter active length. A microSBRT spinal treatment was delivered consisting of a 180

  7. Biological stress responses induced by alpha radiation exposure in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoeck, A.; Horemans, N.; Van Hees, M.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Knapen, D.; Blust, R. [University of Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    To enhance the robustness of radiation protection criteria for biota, additional information on the biological impact of radionuclides on non-human biota is needed. In particular the effects of alpha emitting isotopes have been poorly studied within a radioecological contextual though they exhibit a high linear energy transfer which can cause significant biological damage when taken up by organisms. Therefore, it is not only essential to measure alpha radiation toxicity, but also try to understand the underlying mechanisms of this stressor. The current study aimed to contribute to a better knowledge of the fundamental processes regulating alpha radiation stress response mechanisms in higher plants. {sup 241}Am was primarily selected as it is an almost pure alpha emitter and, as a daughter nuclide of {sup 241}Pu, it will become one of the dominant pollutants in plutonium affected areas. The aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor has proven its value in eco-toxicological research as representative of higher aquatic plants (OECD guideline nr. 221) and will be used to analyze alpha radiation stress in plant systems. An individual growth inhibition test was set up by means of single dose-response curve in order to identify the Effective Dose Rates (EDR-values) for frond size and biomass. As the mean path length is small for alpha particles, the accumulation of the radionuclide inside species represents almost exclusively the dosimetry. Therefore, quantification of {sup 241}Am uptake and {sup 241}Am distribution were evaluated separately for roots and fronds taking the activity concentrations of growth medium into account. Taken together with the respective dose conversion coefficients from the ERICA tool, this allowed to construct an accurate dosimetric model to determine internal and external dose rates. Different standard media were tested on growth rate and biomass to analyse the amount of {sup 241}Am taken up by the plants exposed from 2.5 to 100 kBq/L. From these

  8. [Experience of the development special medical technical laboratory for studies of effects caused by potent electromagnetic radiation in biologic objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, B N; Kalyada, T V; Petrov, S V

    2015-01-01

    This article covers topics of creating special medical technical laboratory for medial and biologic studies concerning influence of potent high-frequency elecromagnetic radiation on various biologic objects. The authors gave example of such laboratory, described its construction features, purpose and main characteristics of the included devices.

  9. In Silico Nanodosimetry: New Insights into Nontargeted Biological Responses to Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Kuncic

    2012-01-01

    nontargeted responses cannot be understood in the framework of DNA-centric radiobiological models; what is needed are new physically motivated models that address the damage-sensing signalling pathways triggered by the production of reactive free radicals. To this end, we have conducted a series of in silico experiments aimed at elucidating the underlying physical processes responsible for nontargeted biological responses to radiation. Our simulation studies implement new results on very low-energy electromagnetic interactions in liquid water (applicable down to nanoscales and we also consider a realistic simulation of extranuclear microbeam irradiation of a cell. Our results support the idea that organelles with important functional roles, such as mitochondria and lysosomes, as well as membranes, are viable targets for ionizations and excitations, and their chemical composition and density are critical to determining the free radical yield and ensuing biological responses.

  10. Multidisciplinary approach of early breast cancer: The biology applied to radiation oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azria David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Early breast cancer treatment is based on a multimodality approach with the application of clinical and histological prognostic factors to determine locoregional and systemic treatments. The entire scientific community is strongly involved in the management of this disease: radiologists for screening and early diagnosis, gynecologists, surgical oncologists and radiation oncologists for locoregional treatment, pathologists and biologists for personalized characterization, genetic counselors for BRCA mutation history and medical oncologists for systemic therapies. Recently, new biological tools have established various prognostic subsets of breast cancer and developed predictive markers for miscellaneous treatments. The aim of this article is to highlight the contribution of biological tools in the locoregional management of early breast cancer.

  11. The importance of using the dosimeter in medical professionals in the hemodynamic service; A importancia do uso do dosimetro nos profissionais medicos no servico de hemodinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Francisca A. de; Victor Filho, Edgard, E-mail: francissamello@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: edgardvf@hotmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas do Recife (HCR/UFPE), PE (Brazil); Silva, Carla V. da; Santos, Tayline T. dos, E-mail: carla_vieira85@hotmail.com, E-mail: taylinetyene@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Guerra, Decio C., E-mail: decio.cavalcanti@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Lagarto, SE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the medical exposure to ionizing radiation of X type in a interventional radiology service, of an university hospital, making a correlation with the importance of using dosimeters for monitoring the effective dose in individuals occupationally exposed (IOE). It was performed an analysis of radiation doses in two stages: the first there was not guidance on the need of using dosimeters; in the second time the professionals performed all procedures carrying the dosimeter. The result showed an average effective dose of professionals / year of 8.60 mSv at first moment, against a dose of 27.41 mSv in the second time after the routine of use the dosimeters, surpassing, in this second phase, the annual dose rate allowed by current radiation protection legislation, which calls for 20 mSv / year for professional. The comparison result in an increase of effective dose of professionals in nearly 300%. It is concluded that the implementation a continuing education project, including awareness of the importance in daily use dosimeter, shows up as a solution for optimizing the dose of these occupationally exposed individuals.

  12. Aerosol deposition in automatic dosimeter nebulization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieminen, M.M.; Lahdensuo, A.; Muittari, A.; Holli, H.; Karvonen, J.

    1987-01-01

    A new dosimeter nebulization method was studied in 10 asthmatics and 8 normal volunteers by delivering fixed doses of /sup 99m/Tc-traced radioaerosol in 0.2 s periods of tidal breathing. Two separate inspiratory phases were studied with the onset of nebulization, when in the earlier phase 15% and in the later phase 60% of tidal volume was inhaled. Further, bronchodilator administration was analogically assessed in the asthmatics. In healthy subjects, the total lung deposition was 17% greater in the earlier phase (P<0.005) than in the later one. In asthmatics, the difference was not significant. The losses of aerosol outside the lower respiratory tract were minimized, in the mouthwashing 0.3% and in the exhaled air 1.4%. The onset of nebulization (early or late) had no significant effect on bronchodilation with salbutamol in asthmatics. We conclude that the present dosimeter method is useful for efficient delivery of radioaerosols and drugs, and for standardization of bronchoprovocation.

  13. Constitutive expression of tdTomato protein as a cytotoxicity and proliferation marker for space radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishti, Arif A; Hellweg, Christine E; Berger, Thomas; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Feles, Sebastian; Kätzel, Thorben; Reitz, Günther

    2015-01-01

    The radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions requires knowledge on the biological effectiveness of different space radiation components, e.g. heavy ions, on the interaction of radiation and other space environmental factors such as microgravity, and on the physical and biological dose distribution in the human body. Space experiments and ground-based experiments at heavy ion accelerators require fast and reliable test systems with an easy readout for different endpoints. In order to determine the effect of different radiation qualities on cellular proliferation and the biological depth dose distribution after heavy ion exposure, a stable human cell line expressing a novel fluorescent protein was established and characterized. tdTomato, a red fluorescent protein of the new generation with fast maturation and high fluorescence intensity, was selected as reporter of cell proliferation. Human embryonic kidney (HEK/293) cells were stably transfected with a plasmid encoding tdTomato under the control of the constitutively active cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (ptdTomato-N1). The stably transfected cell line was named HEK-ptdTomato-N1 8. This cytotoxicity biosensor was tested by ionizing radiation (X-rays and accelerated heavy ions) exposure. As biological endpoints, the proliferation kinetics and the cell density reached 100 h after irradiation reflected by constitutive expression of the tdTomato were investigated. Both were reduced dose-dependently after radiation exposure. Finally, the cell line was used for biological weighting of heavy ions of different linear energy transfer (LET) as space-relevant radiation quality. The relative biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions in reducing cellular proliferation peaked at an LET of 91 keV/μm. The results of this study demonstrate that the HEK-ptdTomato-N1 reporter cell line can be used as a fast and reliable biosensor system for detection of cytotoxic damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  14. Monte Carlo modeling in CT-based geometries: dosimetry for biological modeling experiments with particle beam radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenderfer, Eric S; Dolney, Derek; Schaettler, Maximilian; Sanzari, Jenine K; McDonough, James; Cengel, Keith A

    2014-03-01

    The space radiation environment imposes increased dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation, particularly during a solar particle event (SPE). These events consist primarily of low energy protons that produce a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution. Due to this inherent dose heterogeneity, experiments designed to investigate the radiobiological effects of SPE radiation present difficulties in evaluating and interpreting dose to sensitive organs. To address this challenge, we used the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation framework to develop dosimetry software that uses computed tomography (CT) images and provides radiation transport simulations incorporating all relevant physical interaction processes. We found that this simulation accurately predicts measured data in phantoms and can be applied to model dose in radiobiological experiments with animal models exposed to charged particle (electron and proton) beams. This study clearly demonstrates the value of Monte Carlo radiation transport methods for two critically interrelated uses: (i) determining the overall dose distribution and dose levels to specific organ systems for animal experiments with SPE-like radiation, and (ii) interpreting the effect of random and systematic variations in experimental variables (e.g. animal movement during long exposures) on the dose distributions and consequent biological effects from SPE-like radiation exposure. The software developed and validated in this study represents a critically important new tool that allows integration of computational and biological modeling for evaluating the biological outcomes of exposures to inhomogeneous SPE-like radiation dose distributions, and has potential applications for other environmental and therapeutic exposure simulations.

  15. Histopathological And Biological Studies On The Role Of Soybean And Broad Bean AgainstRadiation Induce Damage In Rat Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa Fathy Waer, **Abdel El ­ Rahman Mohamed Attia

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the physiological and histological activities in the animal body are disturbed after exposure to ionizing radiation. These disturbances are either due to direct harmful effect of radiation on the biological systems or to the indirect effect of free radicals formed in the body after irradiation. There is growing evidence that the type of food plays an important role in the prevention of chronic diseases. The biological disturbance due to ionizing radiation makes search for ways of protecting living organisms essential for controlling the radiation hazards. Much of the world population relies on legumes, as a stable food. Legumes can affectively protect cells and tissues against damage. Our present study was conducted to investigate the hazardous effects of single dose !"#$%#&f the possible protective effect of feeding beans (broad beans and soybeans against radiation exposure. Histopathological, and biological changes of kidney function in irradiated, and bean fed animals were carried out. Animals were weighted and daily food intake was determined. The result obtained revealed that soybean is an extremely rich source of protein and fat as compared to faba bean. Radiations cause a reduction in food intake and weight gain. It causes great changes in the kidney glomeruli and collecting tubules. The recovery of the cells depend on the type of feeding so, feeding soybean gives a significant radiation protection and decreases the extent of changes induced by radiation

  16. Evaluation of LLNL's Nuclear Accident Dosimeters at the CALIBAN Reactor September 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, D P; Wysong, A R; Heinrichs, D P; Wong, C T; Merritt, M J; Topper, J D; Gressmann, F A; Madden, D J

    2011-06-21

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses neutron activation elements in a Panasonic TLD holder as a personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD). The LLNL PNAD has periodically been tested using a Cf-252 neutron source, however until 2009, it was more than 25 years since the PNAD has been tested against a source of neutrons that arise from a reactor generated neutron spectrum that simulates a criticality. In October 2009, LLNL participated in an intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimeters at the CEA Valduc Silene reactor (Hickman, et.al. 2010). In September 2010, LLNL participated in a second intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimeters at CEA Valduc. The reactor generated neutron irradiations for the 2010 exercise were performed at the Caliban reactor. The Caliban results are described in this report. The procedure for measuring the nuclear accident dosimeters in the event of an accident has a solid foundation based on many experimental results and comparisons. The entire process, from receiving the activated NADs to collecting and storing them after counting was executed successfully in a field based operation. Under normal conditions at LLNL, detectors are ready and available 24/7 to perform the necessary measurement of nuclear accident components. Likewise LLNL maintains processing laboratories that are separated from the areas where measurements occur, but contained within the same facility for easy movement from processing area to measurement area. In the event of a loss of LLNL permanent facilities, the Caliban and previous Silene exercises have demonstrated that LLNL can establish field operations that will very good nuclear accident dosimetry results. There are still several aspects of LLNL's nuclear accident dosimetry program that have not been tested or confirmed. For instance, LLNL's method for using of biological samples (blood and hair) has not been verified since the method was first developed in the 1980's. Because LLNL and

  17. External radiation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  18. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  19. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  20. Evaluation of a multi-guard ring (MGR) structure diode as diagnostic X-ray dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, F.; Khoury, H. J.; Nascimento, C. R.; Asfora, V. K.; Bueno, C. C.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we describe the results obtained for the evaluation of a multi-guard ring (MGR) structure diode as diagnostic X-ray dosimeter. This device was developed in the framework of R&D programs for the future CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with high radiation hardness to fulfill the requirements from this accelerator environment. In order to use the MGR diode as a dosimeter, it was connected in the photovoltaic mode to the input of an integrating electrometer and positioned at the center of an X-ray beam, beside a previously calibrated ionization chamber. The dependence of the diode response on the X-ray beam doses was evaluated for 35-90 kV X-ray generator bias supply, with doses in the range of 50 μGy-5 mGy. The good linearity of the dose-response curve obtained showed the MGR diode dosimeter to be a reliable alternative method for diagnostic X-ray dosimetry.

  1. Validation and in vivo assessment of an innovative satellite-based solar UV dosimeter for a mobile app dedicated to skin health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, M; Masini, A; Simeone, E; Khazova, M

    2016-09-31

    We present an innovative satellite-based solar UV (ultraviolet) radiation dosimeter with a mobile app interface that has been validated by exploiting both ground-based measurements and an in vivo assessment of the erythemal effects on some volunteers having controlled exposure to solar radiation. The app with this satellite-based UV dosimeter also includes other related functionalities such as the provision of safe sun exposure time updated in real-time and end exposure visual/sound alert. Both validations showed that the system has a good accuracy and reliability needed for health-related applications. This app will be launched on the market by siHealth Ltd in May 2016 under the name of "HappySun" and is available for both Android and iOS devices (more info on ). Extensive R&D activities are on-going for the further improvement of the satellite-based UV dosimeter's accuracy.

  2. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, K. [Okayama University Medical School, Okayama (Japan); Nomura, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kojima, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Excessive active oxygen produced in vivo by various causes is toxic. Accumulation of oxidation injuries due to excessive active causes cell and tissue injuries, inducing various pathologic conditions such as aging and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, there are chemical defense mechanisms in the body that eliminate active oxygen or repair damaged molecules, defending against resultant injury. It is interesting reports that appropriate oxidation stress activate the chemical biological defense mechanisms. In this study, to elucidate these phenomena and its mechanism by low dose radiation, we studied on the below subjects. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms by low dose radiation: (1) The effects radiation on lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in the organs, membrane fluidity and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined in rats and rabbits. Rats were irradiated with low dose X-ray over their entire bodies, and rabbits inhaled vaporized radon spring water, which primarily emitted {alpha}-ray. The following results were obtained. Unlike high dose X-ray, low dose X-ray and radon inhalation both reduced LPO levels and made the state of the SH-group on membrane-bound proteins closer to that of juvenile animals, although the sensitivity to radioactivity varied depending on the age of the animals and among different organs and tissues. The SOD activity was elevated, suggesting that low dose X-ray and radon both activate the host defensive function. Those changes were particularly marked in the organs related to immune functions of the animals which received low dose X-ray, while they were particularly marked in the brain after radon inhalation. It was also found that those changes continued for longer periods after low dose X-irradiation. (2) Since SOD is an enzyme that mediates the dismutation of O{sub 2}- to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the question as to whether the resultant H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is further detoxicated into H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} or not must

  3. Mechanism of Action for Anti-Radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-Dose Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. We partially analyzed the biochemical characteristics of the SRDs. The SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  4. Mechanism of action for anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high-dose gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after high-dose gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naïve animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which they mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  5. Dose response of thin-film dosimeters irradiated with 80-120 keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.; Sharpe, P.

    2005-01-01

    the dosimeters mean that calibration functions at the lower electron energies will be dependent on both irradiation energy and the required effective point of measurement of the dosimeter. These are general effects that apply to any dosimeters that have non-linear response functions and where dose gradients...... are present within the dosimeter. (C) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. SU-E-T-265: Presage Thin Sheet Dosimeter Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, M; Rakowski, J [Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the sensitivity and stability of the Presage dosimeter in sheet form for different concentrations of chemicals and for a diverse range of clinical photon energies. Methods: Presage polymer dosimeters are formulated to investigate and optimize their sensitivity and stability. The dosimeter is composed of clear polyurethane base, leucomalachite green reporting dye, and bromoform radical initiator in 1mm thick sheets. The chemicals are well mixed together, cast in an aluminum mold, and left to cure at 60 psi for a minimum of 2 days. Dosimeter response will be characterized at multiple energies including Co-60, 6 MV, 15 MV, 50 kVp, and 250 kVp. The dosimeters are read by an Epson 10000 XL scanner at 800 dpi, 2{sup 16} bit depth. Red component images are analyzed with ImageJ. Results: Analysis of optical density verse dose for Co-60 energies indicates that the bromoform containing Presage was able to quantify dose from 0 to 300 Gy, with saturation beyond 300 Gy. Initial results show two regions of linear response, 0–100 Gy and 150–300 Gy. The 150–300 Gy region has a sensitivity of 0.0024 net OD/Gy. Further results on other energies are still in progress. Conclusions: This work shows the potential for use of thin sheets of Presage dosimeter as a dosimeter capable of being analyzed with a flatbed scanner.

  7. Light scattering in optical CT scanning of Presage dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y; Adamovics, J; Cheeseborough, J C; Chao, K S; Wuu, C S, E-mail: yx2010@columbia.ed

    2010-11-01

    The intensity of the scattered light from the Presage dosimeters was measured using a Thorlabs PM100D optical power meter (Thorlabs Inc, Newton, NJ) with an optical sensor of 1 mm diameter sensitive area. Five Presage dosimeters were made as cylinders of 15.2 cm, 10 cm, 4 cm diameters and irradiated with 6 MV photons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Each dosimeter was put into the scanning tank of an OCTOPUS' optical CT scanner (MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) filled with a refractive index matching liquid. A laser diode was positioned at one side of the water tank to generate a stationary laser beam of 0.8 mm width. On the other side of the tank, an in-house manufactured positioning system was used to move the optical sensor in the direction perpendicular to the outgoing laser beam from the dosimeters at an increment of 1 mm. The amount of scattered photons was found to be more than 1% of the primary light signal within 2 mm from the laser beam but decreases sharply with increasing off-axis distance. The intensity of the scattered light increases with increasing light attenuations and/or absorptions in the dosimeters. The scattered light at the same off-axis distance was weaker for dosimeters of larger diameters and for larger detector-to-dosimeter distances. Methods for minimizing the effect of the light scattering in different types of optical CT scanners are discussed.

  8. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F

    2010-03-18

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health.

  9. Dosimetric comparison among different head and neck radiotherapy techniques using PRESAGE® dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Rehman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to investigate dose distribution of Three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for Head and Neck cancer using 3-dimensional PRESAGE® dosimeter. Method: Computer Tomography (CT scans of Radiological Physics Center (RPC Head and Neck anthropomorphic phantom with both RPC standard insert and PRESAGE® insert were acquired separated with Philipp’s CT scanner and both CT scans were exported via DICOM to the pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS. Each plan was delivered twice to the RPC phantom first containing the RPC standard insert having Thermoluminescent detectors (TLD and film dosimeters and then again containing the PRESAGE® insert having three dimensional dosimeter (PRESAGE® by using a Varian True beam linear accelerator. After irradiation, the standard insert including point dose measurement (TLD and planner GafChromic® EBT film measurement was read using RPC standard procedure. The 3D dose distribution from PRESAGE® was read out with the Duke Midsized optical scanner dedicated to RPC (DMOS-RPC. Dose volume histogram (DVH, mean and maximal doses for organ-at-risk (OARs were calculated and compared among each Head and Neck technique. The prescription dose was same for all Head and Neck radiotherapy techniques which was 6.60 Gy per friction. Beam profile comparison and gamma analysis were used to quantify agreement among film measurement, PRESAGE® measurement and calculated dose distribution. Quality assurances of all plans were performed by using ArcCHECK method. Results: VMAT delivered the lowest mean and maximal doses to organ at risk (spinal cord and parotid than IMRT and 3DCRT. Such dose distribution was verified by absolute dose distribution using TLD system. 2D gamma 5%/3 mm criteria of Pinnacle vs. EBT2 film 3DCRT (92.34%, IMRT (92.3% and VMAT (96.63% in axial plan respectively. It was

  10. Novel Biological Approaches for Testing the Contributions of Single DSBs and DSB Clusters to the Biological Effects of High LET Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenova, Veronika; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2016-01-01

    The adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are commonly attributed to the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). IR-induced DSBs are generated by clusters of ionizations, bear damaged terminal nucleotides, and frequently comprise base damages and single-strand breaks in the vicinity generating a unique DNA damage-clustering effect that increases DSB "complexity." The number of ionizations in clusters of different radiation modalities increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET), and is thought to determine the long-known LET-dependence of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Multiple ionizations may also lead to the formation of DSB clusters, comprising two or more DSBs that destabilize chromatin further and compromise overall processing. DSB complexity and DSB-cluster formation are increasingly considered in the development of mathematical models of radiation action, which are then "tested" by fitting available experimental data. Despite a plethora of such mathematical models the ultimate goal, i.e., the "a priori" prediction of the radiation effect, has not yet been achieved. The difficulty partly arises from unsurmountable difficulties in testing the fundamental assumptions of such mathematical models in defined biological model systems capable of providing conclusive answers. Recently, revolutionary advances in methods allowing the generation of enzymatic DSBs at random or in well-defined locations in the genome, generate unique testing opportunities for several key assumptions frequently fed into mathematical modeling - including the role of DSB clusters in the overall effect. Here, we review the problematic of DSB-cluster formation in radiation action and present novel biological technologies that promise to revolutionize the way we address the biological consequences of such lesions. We describe new ways of exploiting the I-SceI endonuclease to generate DSB-clusters at random locations in the genome and describe the

  11. Analysis and assessment of the detriment in interventional radiology using biological dosimetry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J.I. [Hospital Univ. la Fe de Valen cian, Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Valencia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F.; Rodriguez, P. [Universitat Autonom a de Barcelona, Servicio de Dosimetria Biologica, Unidad de Antropologia, Departamento de Biologia Animal, Vegetal y Ecologia., Barcelona (Spain); Barrios, L. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Dept. de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia. Unidad de Biologia Celular, Barcelona (Spain); Verdu, G.; Ramos, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Valencia, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Interventional radiologist and staff members usually are exposed to high levels of scattered radiation. As a result, the exposition to radiation procedures can produce detrimental effects that we would have to know. Effective dose is the quantity that better estimates the radiation risk. For this study we have realized an estimation of the radiological detriment to exposed workers of the Hospital la Fe de Valencia. For it, have been used physical doses registered in detectors T.L.D., and doses estimated by biological dosimetry in lymphocytes of peripheral blood. There has been estimated for every case the probability of effect of skin cancer and of non-solid cancers (leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma), being compared with the baseline probability of natural effect. Biological doses were obtained by extrapolating the yield of dicentrics and translocations to their respective dose -effect curves. The discrepancies observed between physically recorded doses and biological estimated doses indicate that workers did not always wear their dosimeters or the dosimeters were not always in the radiation field. Cytogenetic studies should be extended to more workers to assess the risk derived from their occupational exposure. (authors)

  12. A new radiochromic thin-film dosimeter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A.; Batsberg, W.; Karman, W.

    A film dosimeter based on pararosaniline cyanide dissolved in polyvinyl butyral (PVB) has been developed and its properties are described. The dosimeter is made in 3 versions: 1) a clear, thin film that requires a thickness measurement for evaluation, 2) a film with a relatively high absorbance for automatic thickness correction, 3) a UV-protected pressure-sensitive adhesive tape. The response of the dosimeter is independent on the dose rate, and it may be used for routine dose measurement of both gamma and electron irradiation. Its high spatial resolution makes it particularly useful for dose distribution measurements.

  13. Aqueous solution of basic fuchsin as food irradiation dosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan M. KHAN; Shagufta NAZ

    2007-01-01

    Dosimetric characterization of aqueous solution of basic fuchsin was studied spectrophotometrically for possible application in the low-dose food irradiation dosimetry. Absorption spectra of unirradiated and irradiated solutions were determined and the decrease in absorbance with the dose was noted down. Radiation-induced bleaching of the dye was measured at wavelengths of maximum absorption λmax (540nm) as well as 510nm and 460 nm. At all these wavelengths, the decrease in absorbance of the dosimeter was linear with respect to the absorbed dose from 50 Gy to 600 Gy. The stability of dosimetric solution during post-irradiation storage in the dark at room temperature showed that after initial bleaching during first ten to twenty days, the response was almost stable for about 34 days. The study on the effect of different light and temperature conditions also showed that the response gradually decreased during the storage period of 34 days, which shows that basic fuchsin dye is photosensitive as well as thermally sensitive.

  14. Personal noise dosimeters: accuracy and reliability in varied settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Cunningham, Sheri Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the accuracy, reliability, and characteristics of three brands of personal noise dosimeters (N = 7 units) in both pink noise (PN) environments and natural environments (NEs) through the acquisition of decibel readings, Leq readings and noise doses. Acquisition periods included repeated PN conditions, choir room rehearsals and participant (N = 3) Leq and noise dosages procured during a day in the life of a music student. Among primary results: (a) All dosimeters exhibited very strong positive correlations for PN measurements across all instruments; (b) all dosimeters were within the recommended American National Standard Institute (ANSI) SI.25-1991 standard of ±2 dB (A) of a reference measurement; and (c) all dosimeters were within the recommended ANSI SI.25-1991 standard of ±2 dB (A) when compared with each other. Results were discussed in terms of using personal noise dosimeters within hearing conservation and research contexts and recommendations for future research. Personal noise dosimeters were studied within the contexts of PN environments and NEs (choral classroom and the day in the life of collegiate music students). This quantitative study was a non-experimental correlation design. Three brands of personal noise dosimeters (Cirrus doseBadge, Quest Edge Eg5 and Etymotic ER200D) were tested in two environments, a PN setting and a natural setting. There were two conditions within each environment. In the PN environment condition one, each dosimeter was tested individually in comparison with two reference measuring devices (Ivie and Easera) while PN was generated by a Whites Instrument PN Tube. In condition two, the PN procedures were replicated for longer periods while all dosimeters measured the sound levels simultaneously. In the NE condition one, all dosimeters were placed side by side on a music stand and recorded sound levels of choir rehearsals over a 7-h rehearsal period. In NE, condition two noise levels were measured during

  15. Radiation distribution through ilmenite-limonite concrete and its application as a reactor biological shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarious, A.S.; El-Kolaly, M.A.; Kansouh, W.A.; Bashter, I.I.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the penetration of primary ..gamma.. rays, secondary ..gamma.. rays and slow neutrons through an ilmenite-limonite concrete shield (heat resistant concrete) and through both ordinary and ilmenite concrete shields has been carried out. A shielding assembly with dimensions of 120 x 120 x 120cm/sup 3/ for each concrete type has been used. Direct, cadmium filtered and B/sub 4/C-filtered reactor beams emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor were used. The ..gamma..-ray doses were measured using LiF-7 Teflon disc TLD dosimeters and the slow neutron doses were measured using LiF-6 Teflon disc TLD dosimeters. Ratios of the total ..gamma.. doses, secondary ..gamma.. doses and slow neutron doses for an ilmenite-limonite concrete shield, and for both ordinary and ilmenite concrete, have been obtained. The results show that ilmenite concrete is better than both ordinary and ilmenite-limonite concrete for ..gamma.. ray attenuation, especially at deep penetration. Also it was concluded that ilmenite concrete with a density p = 4.6 g/cm/sup 3/ is better than both ordinary and ilmenite-limonite concrete for slow neutron attenuation.

  16. Spectral response of solvent-cast polyvinyl chloride (PVC) thin film used as a long-term UV dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Abdurazaq; Parisi, Alfio V

    2013-08-01

    The spectral response of solvent-cast polyvinyl chloride (PVC) thin film suitable for use as a long-term UV dosimeter has been determined by measuring the UV induced change in the 1064 cm(-1) peak intensity of the PVC's infrared (IR) spectra as a function of the wavelength of the incident radiation. Measurements using cut-off filters, narrow band-pass filters and monochromatic radiation showed that the 16 μm PVC film responds mainly to the UVB band. The maximum response was at 290 nm and decreasing exponentially with wavelength up to about 340 nm independent of temperature and exposure dose. The most suitable concentration (W/V%) of PVC/Tetrahydrofuran solution was found to be 10% and the best thickness for the dosimeter was determined as 16 μm.

  17. Relative biological effectiveness of simulated solar particle event proton radiation to induce acute hematological change in the porcine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wan, Steven X.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Cengel, Keith A.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for simulated solar particle event (SPE) radiation on peripheral blood cells using Yucatan minipigs and electron-simulated SPE as the reference radiation. The results demonstrated a generally downward trend in the RBE values with increasing doses of simulated SPE radiation for leukocytes in the irradiated animals. The fitted RBE values for white blood cells (WBCs), lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils were above 1.0 in all three radiation dose groups at all time-points evaluated, and the lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals were > 1.0 in the majority of the dose groups at different time-points, which together suggest that proton-simulated SPE radiation is more effective than electron-simulated SPE radiation in reducing the number of peripheral WBCs, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils, especially at the low end of the 5–10 Gy dose range evaluated. Other than the RBE values, the responses of leukocytes to electron-simulated SPE radiation and proton-simulated SPE radiation exposure are highly similar with respect to the time-course, the most radiosensitive cell type (the lymphocytes), and the shape of the dose–response curves, which is generally log-linear. These findings provide additional evidence that electron-simulated SPE radiation is an appropriate reference radiation for determination of RBE values for the simulated SPE radiations, and the RBE estimations using electron-simulated SPE radiation as the reference radiation are not complicated by other characteristics of the leukocyte response to radiation exposure. PMID:24027300

  18. Relative biological effectiveness of simulated solar particle event proton radiation to induce acute hematological change in the porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Wan, Steven X; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Cengel, Keith A; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for simulated solar particle event (SPE) radiation on peripheral blood cells using Yucatan minipigs and electron-simulated SPE as the reference radiation. The results demonstrated a generally downward trend in the RBE values with increasing doses of simulated SPE radiation for leukocytes in the irradiated animals. The fitted RBE values for white blood cells (WBCs), lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils were above 1.0 in all three radiation dose groups at all time-points evaluated, and the lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals were > 1.0 in the majority of the dose groups at different time-points, which together suggest that proton-simulated SPE radiation is more effective than electron-simulated SPE radiation in reducing the number of peripheral WBCs, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and eosinophils, especially at the low end of the 5-10 Gy dose range evaluated. Other than the RBE values, the responses of leukocytes to electron-simulated SPE radiation and proton-simulated SPE radiation exposure are highly similar with respect to the time-course, the most radiosensitive cell type (the lymphocytes), and the shape of the dose-response curves, which is generally log-linear. These findings provide additional evidence that electron-simulated SPE radiation is an appropriate reference radiation for determination of RBE values for the simulated SPE radiations, and the RBE estimations using electron-simulated SPE radiation as the reference radiation are not complicated by other characteristics of the leukocyte response to radiation exposure.

  19. AUTOMATION OF THE ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING OF DATA FROM THERMOLUMINESCENCE DOSIMETER READERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Benavides-Benitez

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermolumlnescence dosimeter (TLD readers used In the Laboratory of External Dosimetry of the Center of Protection and Hygiene from the Radiations are old-fashioned. The data obtained by this equipment must be manually written down In arder to subsequently, process them and these data do not remain registered In any memory for future analysis. This paper describes the desing and creation of a system that conneds these TLD readers to a personal computer. The system Includes a data acquisition card with several analogue input channels, counters, timers as well as digital inputs/outputs and software, In arder to control the acquisition and processing of the data.

  20. Some Limitations in the Use of Plastic and Dyed Plastic Dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Bjergbakke, Erling; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    fractionated and uninterrupted absorbed doses in the megarad range with 60Co γ-rays and 10 MeV electron beams. It was found that with some systems, differences in radiation response due to dose-rate and temperature dependence can cause large systematic errors in dose interpretation. Poor reproducibility...... of response may result from batch-to-batch differences or intra-batch variations in thickness, distribution of sensitizers and background optical density. When using these routine dosimeters, careful calibration of the response and monitoring of factors contributing to poor reproducibility are essential....

  1. Antioxidant effect of green tea on polymer gel dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, E. J. J.; Sathiyaraj, P.; Deena, T.; Kumar, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Extract from Green Tea (GTE) acts as an antioxidant in acrylamide based polymer gel dosimeter. In this work, PAGAT gel was used for investigation of antioxidant effect of GTE.PAGAT was called PAGTEG (Polyacrylamide green tea extract gel dosimeter) after adding GTE. Free radicals in water cause pre polymerization of polymer gel before irradiation. Polyphenols from GTE are highly effective to absorb the free radicals in water. THPC is used as an antioxidant in polymer gel dosimeter but here we were replaced it by GTE and investigated its effect by spectrophotometer. GTE added PAGAT samples response was lower compared to THPC added sample. To increase the sensitivity of the PAGTEG, sugar was added. This study confirmed that THPC was a good antioxidant for polymer gel dosimeter. However, GTE also can be used as an antioxidant in polymer gel if use less quantity (GTE) and add sugar as sensitivity enhancer.

  2. News from radiation biology; Was gibt es Neues in der Strahlenbiologie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencsik-Theilen, Alena Anna; Mueller, Wolfgang-Ulrich [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie; Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Drexler, Guido A. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Arbeitsgebiet Strahlenbiologie; Gaipl, Udo S. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Strahlenklinik, Strahlen-Immunbiologie; Hornhardt, Sabine; Kulka, Ulrike; Romm, Horst [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg (Germany); Multhoff, Gabriele [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Rave-Fraenk, Margret [Universitatesmedizin Goettingen (Germany). Abt. Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2010-07-01

    Current research in radiobiology is characterized by diverse fields of application and working methods. Biotechnological and molecular biological procedures play a prominent role. The {gamma}-H2AX fluorescence microscopy, for example, makes possible the study of DNA double stand breaks in a dose range of about 1 mSv. In microbeam experiments radiation induced modifications can be observed within subcellular structures of less than 1 {mu}m. The analysis of DNA repair systems still is of significant importance. As an example, the various facets of homologous recombination are highlighted. A meanwhile very important field of application in the context of radiobiological research is radiotherapy. Studies of differing sensitivities of different cellular systems of normal and tumour tissues are in the center of interest. As to radiation-induced tumour development, recently in addition to genetic reflections so-called ''epigenetic'' factors are considered in radiobiological research. Primarily intercellular processes of regulation are addressed whose structure is not stored on the DNA, i.e. it is not genetically stored. (orig.)

  3. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remec, Igor; Rosseel, Thomas M.; Field, Kevin G.; Le Pape, Yann

    2016-02-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete, with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence values (E > 0.1 MeV) in the concrete biological shields of the US pressurized water reactor fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to ensure reliable risk assessment for extended operation of nuclear power plants. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC0500OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  4. Measurement of skeletal muscle radiation attenuation and basis of its biological variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey, J; Esfandiari, N; Baracos, V E; Buteau, F A; Frenette, J; Putman, C T; Mazurak, V C

    2014-03-01

    Skeletal muscle contains intramyocellular lipid droplets within the cytoplasm of myocytes as well as intermuscular adipocytes. These depots exhibit physiological and pathological variation which has been revealed with the advent of diagnostic imaging approaches: magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR spectroscopy and computed tomography (CT). CT uses computer-processed X-rays and is now being applied in muscle physiology research. The purpose of this review is to present CT methodologies and summarize factors that influence muscle radiation attenuation, a parameter which is inversely related to muscle fat content. Pre-defined radiation attenuation ranges are used to demarcate intermuscular adipose tissue [from -190 to -30 Hounsfield units (HU)] and muscle (-29 HU to +150 HU). Within the latter range, the mean muscle radiation attenuation [muscle (radio) density] is reported. Inconsistent criteria for the upper and lower HU cut-offs used to characterize muscle attenuation limit comparisons between investigations. This area of research would benefit from standardized criteria for reporting muscle attenuation. Available evidence suggests that muscle attenuation is plastic with physiological variation induced by the process of ageing, as well as by aerobic training, which probably reflects accumulation of lipids to fuel aerobic work. Pathological variation in muscle attenuation reflects excess fat deposition in the tissue and is observed in people with obesity, diabetes type II, myositis, osteoarthritis, spinal stenosis and cancer. A poor prognosis and different types of morbidity are predicted by the presence of reduced mean muscle attenuation values in patients with these conditions; however, the biological features of muscle with these characteristics require further investigation.

  5. Standard Procedure for Calibrating an Areal Calorimetry Based Dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    unlimited (P.A. Case No. TSRL-PA-2015-0136, 24 Sep 15). REFERENCES Beason, C. W. (2005). CLT As A Calorimeter. PowerPoint presentation dated 10 January...or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. This report was cleared for public release by the 88th ABW Public Affairs Office and is...is presented for calibrating an areal calorimetry-based dosimeter. A detailed example of calibrating an areal calorimetry-based dosimeter is

  6. Overview on conductometric solid-state gas dosimeters

    OpenAIRE

    I. Marr; Groß, A.; Moos, R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce the operation principles of conductometric solid-state dosimeter-type gas sensors, which have found increased attention in the past few years, and to give a literature overview on promising materials for this purpose. Contrary to common gas sensors, gas dosimeters are suitable for directly detecting the dose (also called amount or cumulated or integrated exposure of analyte gases) rather than the actual analyte concentration. Therefore...

  7. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaro, G.; Accardo, A.; Benseny-Cases, N.; Burghammer, M.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Cotte, M.; Dante, S.; De Angelis, F.; Di Cola, E.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Hauser, C.; Riekel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments.

  9. Biological radiation dose from secondary particles in a Milky Way gamma ray burst

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra; Karam, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GBRs) are a class of highly energetic explosions emitting radiation in a very short timescale of a few seconds and with a very narrow opening angle. Although, all GRBs observed so far are extragalactic in origin, there is a high probability of a GRB of galactic origin beaming towards the Earth in the past ~ 0.5 Gyr. Such an intense burst of gamma rays would ionize the atmosphere and deplete the ozone layer. With depleted ozone, there will be an increased flux of solar UVB on the Earth\\~Os surface with harmful biological effects. In addition to the atmospheric damage, secondary particles produced by gamma ray-induced showers will reach the surface. Amongst all secondary particles, muons dominate the ground-level secondary particle flux (99% of the total number of particles) and are potentially of biological significance. Using the Monte Carlo simulation code CORSIKA, we modeled the air showers produced by gamma ray primaries up to 100 GeV. We found that the number of muons produced by hypothe...

  10. Enhancing the biological degradability of sulfamethoxazole by ionizing radiation treatment in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sági, Gyuri; Kovács, Krisztina; Bezsenyi, Anikó; Csay, Tamás; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2016-07-01

    Changes of biodegradability and toxicity were followed up on aqueous solutions of sulfamethoxazole (SMX), during ionizing radiation treatment. The biodegradability of SMX (0.1 mmol dm-3) was specified by five-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5), using municipal activated sludge, and the results showed an improvement with applying only 0.4 kGy dose. BOD5 further increased with prolonged irradiation, indicating a conversion of SMX, a non-biodegradable compound, to biologically treatable substances. At 2.5 kGy dose, the BOD5/COD ratio increased from 0 to 0.16. The total organic carbon (TOC) content showed a decrease of only 15% at this point, thus high degree of mineralization is not necessary to make SMX digestible for the low concentrations of microorganisms used during BOD5 measurements. Increment in respiration inhibition of municipal activated sludge was observed with increasing the dose. The EC50 values showed a decrease of one order of magnitude when changing the dose from 0.4 kGy to 2.5 kGy. The increase of inhibition and formation of H2O2 showed a strong correlation.

  11. Physics fundamentals and biological effects of synchrotron radiation therapy; Fundamentos fisicos y efectos biologicos de la radioterapia con radiacion sincrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y.

    2010-07-01

    The main goal of radiation therapy is to deposit a curative dose in the tumor without exceeding the tolerances in the nearby healthy tissues. For some radioresistant tumors, like gliomas, requiring high doses for complete sterilization, the major obstacle for curative treatment with ionizing radiation remains the limited tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue. This limitation is particularly severe for brain tumors and, especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restricted. One possible solution is the development of new radiation therapy techniques exploiting radically different irradiation modes and modifying, in this way, the biological equivalent doses. This is the case of synchrotron radiation therapy (SR T). In this work the three new radiation therapy techniques under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESR F), in Grenoble (France) will be described, namely: synchrotron stereotactic radiation therapy (Ssr), microbeam radiation therapy (MR T) and mini beam radiation therapy. The promising results in the treatment of the high grade brain tumors obtained in preclinical studies have paved the way to the clinical trials. The first patients are expected in the fall of 2010. (Author).

  12. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  13. Cellular response to ionizing radiations: a study of the roles of physics and biology. [Neutrons (14 MeV); X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWyngaert, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the complementary roles of physics and biology in determining the response of cellular systems to ionizing radiations has been conducted. Upon exposure to radiation, a cell responds in a binary (yes/no) manner in terms of its proliferative ability (survival). The relationship between the survival probability and absorbed dose may then be examined in terms of relevant physical and biological parameters. The approach to these studies was to vary the physics and biology independently and observe separately their influences upon the measured effect. Unique to these studies was the use of heterogeneous tumor systems. These are solid tumors found to consist of genetically related but identifiably distinct populations of cells. The two heterogeneous systems studied, a murine system consisting of four subpopulations and a human tumor system with two subpopulations, were exposed to graded doses of 14 MeV neutrons or x-rays and their effectiveness in inducing cell lethality compared. A further examination of the radiation effect involved a study at the chemical level, measuring the ability of oxygen to potentiate the damage produced by photon irradiation. To summarize, the physics, biology and the environment have all been varied, and the systematics of the responses studied. The data were analyzed within the formalisms of the dual theory of radiation action, the repair-misrepair model, and the repair saturation model of cell killing. The change in survival curve shape and the increased effectiveness in cell killing for higher Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiations (neutrons vs. x-rays) are discussed in relation to explanations in terms of either physical or biochemical processes.

  14. Gamma radiation processing dosimetry with commercial silicon diodes; Dosimetria de processos de irradiacao gama com diodos comerciais de silicio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Danilo Cardenuto

    2009-07-01

    This work envisages the development of dosimeters based on Si diodes for gamma radiation dosimetry from 1 Gy up to 100 Gy. This dose range is frequently utilized in radiation processing of crystal modifications, polymers crosslinking and biological studies carried out in the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP. The dosimeter was constructed by a commercial SFH00206 (Siemens) Si diode, operating in a photovoltaic mode, whose electrical characteristics are suitable for this application. The current generated in the device by the Cobalt-60 gamma radiation from the Irradiators types I and II was registered with a digital electrometer and stored during the exposure time. In all measurements, the current signals of the diode registered as a function of the exposure time were very stable. Furthermore, the device photocurrent was linearly dependent on the dose rate within a range of 6.1x10{sup -2} Gy/min up to 1.9x10{sup 2} Gy/min. The calibration curves of the dosimeters, e.g., the average charge registered as a function of the absorbed dose were obtained by the integration of the current signals as a function of the exposure time. The results showed a linear response of the dosimeter with a correlation coefficient better than 0.998 for total absorbed dose up to 120 Gy. Finally, due to the small experimental errors 5 % it was also possible to measure the transit dose due to the movement of the Cobalto- 60 radioactive sources in irradiation facilities used in this work. (author)

  15. Long-term variability and impact on human health of biologically active UV radiation in Moscow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, Ekaterina; Chubarova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of erythemally weighted UV irradiance (Qer) have been performed at the Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University since 1999 with the UVB-1 YES pyranometers. These types of devices are broadband with a spectral sensitivity curve close to the action spectrum of erythema. Main uncertainties of UVB-1 YES measurements include the difference in spectral curves of the instrument and the action spectrum of erythema, as well as the deviation from the cosine law. These uncertainties were taken into account in the database of Qer measurements (Chubarova, 2008. Additional corrections of UVB-1 measurements at low ambient temperatures have been made. We analyze interannual, seasonal and diurnal Qer changes over the time period 1999-2012. In addition, the comparisons with the results of UV reconstruction model (Chubarova, 2008) are made. This model allows us to evaluate relative changes in Qer due to variations in total ozone, effective cloud amount transmission, aerosol and cloud optical thickness since 1968. It is important to note that the main reason for UV irradiance monitoring development is the strong influence of UV irradiance on the biosphere and especially on human health mainly on human skin (CIE, 1993, CIE, 2006) and eyes (Oriowo, M. et al., 2001). Based on the detailed studies we have shown the possibility of utilizing UVB-1 pyranometers for measuring the eye-damage UV radiation. Parallel measurements by the Bentham DTM-300 spectrometer and the UVB-1 YES pyranometer at the Innsbruck Medical University (Austria) have provided us the calibration factor in eye-damage units for this broadband instrument. Influence of main geophysical factors on different types of UV irradiance is estimated by means the RAF ideology (Booth, Madronich, 1994). We discuss the responses of different types of biologically active UV radiation to the impact of various atmospheric factors. The UV conditions (deficiency, optimum, excess for human) are analyzed according to

  16. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  17. The study of biological effects of electromagnetic mobile phone radiation on experimental animals by combining numerical modeling and experimental research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Krstić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study biological effects of electromagneticradiation, it is essential to know the real values of field componentsthat penetrated the tissue. The study of biological effects is usuallyperformed on experimental animals. The biological effects observedon experimental animals should be linked with penetrating field inthe tissue. The penetrating electromagnetic field is almost impossibleto measure; therefore, modeling process must be carried out and thefield components in models of experimental animals could becalculated. This paper presents an approach to modeling of fieldpenetration and gives contribution to understanding the real effects of the fields and the sensitivity of tissues to electromagnetic radiation generated by mobile phone.

  18. Prognostic cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhuis, Maartje G; Eijsink, Jasper J H; Roossink, Frank; de Graeff, Pauline; Pras, Elisabeth; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G Bea A; de Bock, Geertruida H; van der Zee, Ate G J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell b

  19. Preparation of CaF{sub 2}:Dy chips as thermoluminescent dosimeters for environmental measurements using a Harshaw 2080 TL picoprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matoso, Erika; Leite, Barbara Eliodora [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP/CEA), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Centro Experimental Aramar; Nunes, Maira Goes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the necessary steps to prepare the dosimeters for application in environmental measurements. The material used was calcium fluoride doped with dysprosium (CaF{sub 2}: Dy), commercially supplied by Harshaw as TLD-200. It were carried out four initial irradiations (Co-60 source gamma - 0.8 mGy from Dosimetric Material Laboratory LMD/GMP) in a new batch of TLD-200 dosimeters to achieve a stable response and four more irradiations to separate them, according to their response range. A batch of pre-selected 197 dosimeters from 263 was used to finally obtained two batches of 99 (9.2{+-}0.7nC) and 93 (10.5{+-}0.6nC) dosimeters. A calibration curve was prepared relating the thermoluminescent response of the phosphor and the radiation exposure (0 to 600{mu}Gy), obtained by irradiation with Co-60 source of 4P geometry and measurements using a Harshaw Picoprocessor 2080 TL equipment. Repeatability of the measurements was determined for 100{mu}Gy (CV= 5.09%) and 300{mu}Gy (CV=4.18%) and the minimum detectable dose was evaluated as 2{mu}Gy. The fading was determined by irradiating the dosimeters with 0.8 mGy and reading then after 1, 5, 7, 8, 15, 29, 50, 70 and 90 days. (author)

  20. PDT dose dosimeter for pleural photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michele M.; Darafsheh, Arash; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    PDT dose is the product of the photosensitizer concentration and the light fluence in the target tissue. For improved dosimetry during plural photodynamic therapy (PDT), a PDT dose dosimeter was developed to measure both the light fluence and the photosensitizer concentration simultaneously in the same treatment location. Light fluence and spectral data were rigorously compared to other methods of measurement (e.g. photodiode, multi-fiber spectroscopy contact probe) to assess the accuracy of the measurements as well as their uncertainty. Photosensitizer concentration was obtained by measuring the fluorescence of the sensitizer excited by the treatment light. Fluence rate based on the intensity of the laser spectrum was compared to the data obtained by direct measurement of fluence rate by a fiber-coupled photodiode. Phantom studies were done to obtain an optical property correction for the fluorescence signal. Measurements were performed in patients treated Photofrin for different locations in the pleural cavity. Multiple sites were measured to investigate the heterogeneity of the cavity and to provide cross-validation via relative dosimetry. This novel method will allow for accurate real-time determination of delivered PDT dose and improved PDT dosimetry.

  1. Retrospective assessment of radiation exposure using biological dosimetry: chromosome painting, electron paramagnetic resonance and the glycophorin a mutation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinerman, R A; Romanyukha, A A; Schauer, D A; Tucker, J D

    2006-07-01

    Biological monitoring of dose can contribute important, independent estimates of cumulative radiation exposure in epidemiological studies, especially in studies in which the physical dosimetry is lacking. Three biodosimeters that have been used in epidemiological studies to estimate past radiation exposure from external sources will be highlighted: chromosome painting or FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization), the glycophorin A somatic mutation assay (GPA), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with teeth. All three biodosimeters have been applied to A-bomb survivors, Chernobyl clean-up workers, and radiation workers. Each biodosimeter has unique advantages and limitations depending upon the level and type of radiation exposure. Chromosome painting has been the most widely applied biodosimeter in epidemiological studies of past radiation exposure, and results of these studies provide evidence that dose-related translocations persist for decades. EPR tooth dosimetry has been used to validate dose models of acute and chronic radiation exposure, although the present requirement of extracted teeth has been a disadvantage. GPA has been correlated with physically based radiation dose after high-dose, acute exposures but not after low-dose, chronic exposures. Interindividual variability appears to be a limitation for both chromosome painting and GPA. Both of these techniques can be used to estimate the level of past radiation exposure to a population, whereas EPR can provide individual dose estimates of past exposure. This paper will review each of these three biodosimeters and compare their application in selected epidemiological studies.

  2. Effects of low power microwave radiation on biological activity of Collagenase enzyme and growth rate of S. Cerevisiae yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaim, Hamad S.; Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, microwave radiation, a type/subset of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) has been widely used in industry, medicine, as well as food technology and mobile communication. Use of mobile phones is rapidly growing. Four years from now, 5.1 billion people will be mobile phone users around the globe - almost 1 billion more mobile users than the 4.3 billion people worldwide using them now. Consequently, exposure to weak radiofrequency/microwave radiation generated by these devices is markedly increasing. Accordingly, public concern about potential hazards on human health is mounting [1]. Thermal effects of radiofrequency/microwave radiation are very well-known and extensively studied. Of particular interest are non-thermal effects of microwave exposures on biological systems. Nonthermal effects are described as changes in cellular metabolism caused by both resonance absorption and induced EMR and are often accompanied by a specific biological response. Non-thermal biological effects are measurable changes in biological systems that may or may not be associated with adverse health effects. In this study we studied non-thermal effects of low power microwave exposures on kinetics of L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and growth rate of yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains type II. The selected model systems were continuously exposed to microwave radiation at the frequency of 968MHz and power of 10dBm using the designed and constructed (custom made) Transverse Electro-Magnetic (TEM) cell [2]. The findings reveal that microwave radiation at 968MHz and power of 10dBm inhibits L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity by 26% and increases significantly (15%) the proliferation rate of yeast cells.

  3. EPR and UV spectroscopic study of table sugar as a high-dose dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yordanov, N.D. E-mail: ndyepr@bas.bg; Gancheva, V.; Georgieva, E

    2002-10-01

    The possibilities for the estimation of the absorbed dose for high-energy radiation with a new self-calibrated dosimeter containing table sugar as a radiation-sensitive material and Mn{sup 2+}/MgO as an internal standard by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is reported. The dose response of this dosimeter is represented as the ratio between the EPR signal intensities of sugar and Mn{sup 2+} versus absorbed dose. Because the EPR spectra of both substances are simultaneously recorded, the influence of some related instrumental setting parameters were investigated. UV spectral studies on water solutions of irradiated solid sugar were also performed. In all solutions of irradiated sugar samples a band at 267 nm was recorded as linearly increasing intensity with the absorbed dose. The minimum detectable dose using the UV spectrum of water solutions of irradiated sugar is 100 Gy. Combination of EPR and UV spectral data is possible to use for independent internal or international calibration and control of dose estimations.

  4. WORKSHOP REPORT: MOLECULAR & CELLULAR BIOLOGY OF MODERATE DOSE (1-10 GY) RADIATION & POTENTIAL MECHANISMS OF RADIATION PROTECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARYNormal tissue response and injury after exposure to ionizing radiation are of great importance to patients with cancer, populations potentially subjected to military, accidental or intentional exposure including bioterrorism, and workers in the nuclear po...

  5. SU-E-T-476: Improving KCl:Eu2+ Dosimeter Sensitivity: The Role of Oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Z [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Mazur, T; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Driewer, J [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. The purpose of this work is to determine if increased signal could be realized in KCl:Eu2+ by incorporating oxygen in the material fabrication process. Methods: The prototype KCl:Eu2+ dosimeters have a physical makeup similar to thermoluminescent dosimeter chips. The photostimulation light source consists of either a He-Ne laser or a UV enhanced Xe arc lamp with wavelength selection provided by a motorized monochromator. X-ray diffraction is used to determine the phase composition of the dosimeters. Photoluminescence (PL) and photostimulated luminescence (PSL) emission spectra are obtained using a Nanolog Spectrofluoremeter. Results: Europium activator is completely incorporated into the KCl parent-matrix without the formation of a noticeable secondary phase. Regardless of synthesis atmosphere, air or pure nitrogen, PSL amplitude shows a maximum at 1.0 mol % Eu. Depending on europium concentration, dosimeters fabricated in air exhibit stronger PSL by a factor of 2 to 4 compared to those made in N2. There is no change in PSL stimulation spectrum while noticeable shifts in both PL and PSL emission spectra are observed for air versus nitrogen. Almost all charge-storage centers are spatially correlated, suggesting oxygen’s stabilization role in the PSL process. KCl:Eu2+ made in oxygen-rich air is capable of measuring a dose-to-water as low as 0.01 cGy from a 6MV photon beam with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 6. Conclusions: Synthesis in a reduction atmosphere, for example, nitrogen, was thought to be mandatory in order to retain europium activator’s divalent status to be PSL active. Fortunately, divalent europium can be well preserved in an oxygen-rich atmosphere. More importantly, oxygen can enhance PSL by a factor of 2 to 4. HL

  6. Biosensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Radiation-Induced Biologic Effects in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James R.; Balogh, Lajos; Majoros, Istvan; Keszler, Balazs; Myc, Andrzej; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta; Norris, Theodore; delaiglesia, Felix; Beeson, Nicholas W. (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    This work seeks to develop cellular biosensors based on dendritic polymers. Nanoscale polymer structures less than 20 nm in diameter will be used as the basis of the biosensors. The structures will be designed to target into specific cells of an astronaut and be able to monitor health issues such as exposure to radiation. Multiple components can be assembled on the polymers including target directors, analytical devices (such as molecular probes), and reporting agents. The reporting will be accomplished through fluorescence signal monitoring, with the use of multispectral analysis for signal interpretation. These nanosensors could facilitate the success and increase the safety of extended space flight. The design and assembly of these devices has been pioneered at the Center for Biologic Nanotechnology in the University of Michigan. This period, synthesis of the test-bed biosensors continued. Studies were performed on the candidate fluorescent dyes to determine which might be suitable for the biosensor under development. Development continued on producing an artificial capillary bed as a tool for the use in the production of the fluorescence signal monitor. Work was also done on the in vitro multispectral analysis system, which uses the robotic microscope.

  7. Biosensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Radiation-Induced Biologic Effects in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James R., Jr.; Balogh, Lajos; Majoros, Istvan; Keszler, Balazs; Myc, Andrzej; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta; Norris, Theodore; delaIglesia, Felix; Beeson, Nicholas W. (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    This proposal seeks to develop cellular biosensors based on dendritic polymers. Nanoscale polymer structures less than 20 nm in diameter will be used as the basis of the sensor/actuators. The structures will be designed to target into specific cells of an astronaut and be able to monitor health issues such as the exposure to radiation or infectious agents. Multiple components can be assembled on the polymers including target directors, analytical devices (such as molecular probes), magnetic particles and metals, and imaging agents. The design and assembly of these devices has been pioneered at the Center for Biologic Nanotechnology in the University of Michigan. These molecules would also be able to administer therapeutics in response to the needs of the astronaut, and act as actuators to remotely manipulate an astronaut as necessary to ensure their safety. The reporting will be accomplished either through fluorescence signal monitoring, with the use of multispectral analysis for signal interpretation, or through functional MRI. These nanosensors coupled to NEMS devices could facilitate the success and increase the safety of extended space flight.

  8. Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

  9. Biological stress responses to radio frequency electromagnetic radiation: are mobile phones really so (heat) shocking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotgreave, Ian A

    2005-03-01

    Cells phenotypically adapt to alterations in their intra- and extracellular environment via organised alterations to gene and protein expression. Many chemical and physical stimuli are known to drive such responses, including the induction of oxidative stress and heat shock. Increasing use of mobile telephones in our society, has brought focus on the potential for radio frequency (microwave) electromagnetic radiation to elicit biological stress responses, in association with potentially detrimental effects of this to human health. Here we review evidence suggesting altered gene and protein expression in response to such emissions, with particular focus on heat shock proteins. Non-thermal induction of heat shock proteins has been claimed by a number of investigations in in vitro cellular systems, and appears pleiotropic for many other regulatory events. However, many of these studies are flawed by inconsistencies in exposure models, cell types used and the independent reproducibility of the findings. Further, the paucity of evidence from in vivo experimentation is largely contradictory. Therefore, the validity of these effects in human health risk assessment remain unsubstantiated. Where possible, suggestions for further experimental clarification have been provided.

  10. Outcome of radiation biology in radiotherapy. Past and future directions; Applications cliniques des recherches en radiobiologie. Etat des lieux et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C. [Hopital Saint-Louis, Service d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Favaudon, V. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, Unite 350 Inserm, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Over the last ten years the impact of fundamental radiation biology into daily radiotherapy has been of concern chiefly to fractionation, prediction of radiation response, tumour oxygenation, intrinsic radiosensitivity including genetic approaches, and the determinants of the outcome of chemoradiotherapy combinations. Future goals will rely on sophisticated approaches, based on the progress of molecular and cellular biology and the characterization of new targets for radiation. Some of these novel advances will be discussed. (authors)

  11. Photon and neutron kerma coefficients for polymer gel dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khayatt, A.M., E-mail: Ahmed_el_khayatt@yahoo.com [Physics Department, College of Science, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU) (Saudi Arabia); Reactor Physics Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, 13759 Cairo (Egypt); Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Peñuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-08-21

    Neutron and gamma ray kerma coefficients were calculated for 17 3D dosimeters, for the neutron and gamma ray energy ranges extend from 2.53×10{sup −8} to 29 MeV and from 1.0×10{sup −3} to 20 MeV, respectively. The calculated kermas given here for discrete energies and the kerma coefficients are referred to as “point-wise data”. Curves of gamma ray kermas showed slight dips at about 60 keV for most 3D dosimeters. Also, a noticeable departure between thermal and epithermal neutrons kerma sets for water and polymers has been observed. Finally, the obtained results could be useful for dose estimation in the studied 3D dosimeters. - Highlights: • Neutron and gamma ray kerma coefficients were calculated in 17 3D dosimeters. • Curves of gamma-ray kermas showed slight dips at about 60 keV. • Disagreement between neutron kermas for water and polymers has been observed. • The obtained results could be useful for dose estimation in the studied dosimeters.

  12. PNNL Results from 2010 CALIBAN Criticality Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Robin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.

    2011-10-28

    This document reports the results of the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) and fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD) during a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the CEA Valduc Center on September 20-23, 2010. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) participated in a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique (CEA) Valduc Center near Dijon, France on September 20-23, 2010. The intercomparison exercise was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the lead Laboratory. PNNL was one of six invited DOE Laboratory participants. The other participating Laboratories were: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 National Security Complex at Oak Ridge, and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The goals of PNNL's participation in the intercomparison exercise were to test and validate the procedures and algorithm currently used for the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeters (PNADs) on the metallic reactor, CALIBAN, to test exposures to PNADs from the side and from behind a phantom, and to test PNADs that were taken from a historical batch of Hanford PNADs that had varying degrees of degradation of the bare indium foil. Similar testing of the PNADs was done on the Valduc SILENE test reactor in 2009 (Hill and Conrady, 2010). The CALIBAN results are reported here.

  13. Microbeam radiation therapy. Physical and biological aspects of a new cancer therapy and development of a treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzsch, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a novel treatment strategy against cancer. Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation is collimated to parallel, a few micrometre wide, planar beams and used to irradiate malignant tissues with high doses. The applied peak doses are considerably higher than in conventional radiotherapy, but valley doses between the beams remain underneath the established tissue tolerance. Previous research has shown that these beam geometries spare normal tissue, while being effective in tumour ablation. In this work physical and biological aspects of the therapy were investigated. A therapy planning system was developed for the first clinical treatments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France) and a dosimetry method based on radiochromic films was created to validate planned doses with measurements on a micrometre scale. Finally, experiments were carried out on a cellular level in order to correlate the physically planned doses with the biological damage caused in the tissue. The differences between Monte Carlo dose and dosimetry are less than 10% in the valley and 5% in the peak regions. Developed alternative faster dose calculation methods deviate from the computational intensive MC simulations by less than 15% and are able to determine the dose within a few minutes. The experiments in cell biology revealed an significant influence of intercellular signalling on the survival of cells close to radiation boundaries. These observations may not only be important for MRT but also for conventional radiotherapy.

  14. Backscatter radiation at tissue-titanium interfaces; Biological effects from diagnostic 65 kVp X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosengren, B. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden) Dept. of Oncology, University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Wulff, L. (Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Central Hospital, Boden (Sweden)); Carlsson, E. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)); Carlsson, J. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)); Strid, K.G. (Dept. of Handicap Research, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden)); Montelius, A. (Dept. of Hospital Physics, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    The induced secondary electrons from a metal surface by diagnostic X-rays are thought to contribute to cell damage near the tissue-metal boundaries of metal implants. Titanium implants are becoming increasingly more popular for tissue reconstructions and it is rather often desirable to take radiographs of the operated area. In this study we compared the biological effects of radiation on cultured mammalian test cells grown on titanium plates with the radiation effects on cells that were grown on plastic control plates. In order to study the acute radiation effects on cell growth it was necessary to work with rather high radiation doses (0.7-5 Gy). Photon energies, suitable for diagnostic radiography in odontology, 65 kV, were applied. We found that the cells grown on titanium plates were, in terms of the applied dose in the surrounding culture medium, more sensitive to the irradiations than the cells growing on plastic plates. The survival curve for the cells on titanium had a steeper slope, showed no shoulder in the low-dose region and looked like curves normally obtained for high LET radiation. It was not possible to resolve to what degree the titanium-dependent changes were due to an increased dose near the titanium surface or to a change in the radiobiological effectiveness. Although there was a significant decrease in cellular survival near the metal, postoperative intraoral radiography after titanium implantations need not be excluded. The maximal doses given in odontological X-ray examinations are less than 1 mGy and, if the results in this study are applied, the biological effects near the titanium implant will correspond to biological effects in soft tissue of doses less than 20 mGy which is lower than the doses that give acute effects. The risk of acute healing disturbances are significant only at much higher radiation doses. (orig.).

  15. Enhancement of the optical properties of a new radiochromic dosimeter based on aliphatic-aromatic biodegradable polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimitberger, Thiago, E-mail: tschimitberger@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The development of a dosimeter that is of low cost, easy to process without dependence on expensive complex instruments and environment friendly is a challenging in irradiation quality control. Recently, an aliphatic-aromatic biodegradable polymer has been proposed as radiochromic dosimeter. The dosimeter is based on biodegradable poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) copolymers (PBAT). In order to improve the photoluminescence (PL) properties of PBAT, increasing its range of applicability (50 kGy to 1000 kGy), this work investigates the influence of solution concentration in the dose response. Films with thickness of c.a. 80 μm were produce by wirebar coating, a simple deposition method for preparing large areas of organic films at low cost. The irradiation of samples was performed at room temperature using a Co-60 source at dose rate of 20 kGy/h. The films were exposed to doses ranging from 501 kGy to 1000 kGy. A 405 nm LED light source was used to excite the films. The USB2000 spectrometer made by Ocean Optics was used to collect the emission spectra of the luminescent films. The photoluminescent intensity captured by the spectrometer present linear radiation dose dependence. The maximum PL for the film sample made from a 0.05 g.mL{sup -1} solution is 1.5 (a.u.) while it is about 3.5 (a.u.) for a film sample made from a 0.2 mg.mL{sup -1} solution, when irradiated with 1000 kGy. These results indicate that PBAT films have great potential to be used as a high gamma dose radiochromic dosimeter over a wide dose range, expanding its applicability for different radiations process. (author)

  16. A Comprehensive Evaluation of NIPAM Polymer Gel Dosimeters on Three Orthogonal Planes and Temporal Stability Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Yuan Cheng

    Full Text Available Polymer gel dosimeters have been proven useful for dose evaluation in radiotherapy treatments. Previous studies have demonstrated that using a polymer gel dosimeter requires a 24 h reaction time to stabilize and further evaluate the measured dose distribution in two-dimensional dosimetry. In this study, the short-term stability within 24 h and feasibility of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM polymer gel dosimeters for use in three-dimensional dosimetry were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. NIPAM gels were used to measure the dose volume in a clinical case of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. For dose readouts, MR images of irradiated NIPAM gel phantoms were acquired at 2, 5, 12, and 24 h after dose delivery. The mean standard errors of dose conversion from using dose calibration curves (DRC were calculated. The measured dose volumes at the four time points were compared with those calculated using a treatment planning system (TPS. The mean standard errors of the dose conversion from using the DRCs were lower than 1 Gy. Mean pass rates of 2, 5, 12, and 24 h axial dose maps calculated using gamma evaluation with 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria were 83.5% ± 0.9%, 85.9% ± 0.6%, 98.7% ± 0.3%, and 98.5% ± 0.9%, respectively. Compared with the dose volume histogram of the TPS, the absolute mean relative volume differences of the 2, 5, 12, and 24 h measured dose volumes were lower than 1% for the irradiated region with an absorbed dose higher than 2.8 Gy. It was concluded that a 12 h reaction time was sufficient to acquire accurate dose volume using the NIPAM gels with MR readouts.

  17. High-dose dosimetry of beta rays using blue beryl dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Lucas S. do, E-mail: lsatiro@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Watanabe, Shigueo; Bittencour, Jose F., E-mail: Lacifid@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    High dose radiation is widely used in industrial applications as sterilization of medical products, improvement of materials properties, color enhancement of jewelry stones, etc. The radiation dosimetry of high doses is quite important for these applications. In this work we have investigated the usage of blue beryl crystal also known as aquamarine in high dose dosimetry of beta rays. Some works have shown that silicate minerals exhibit a good Thermoluminescent response when irradiated up to 2000 kGy of gamma rays. Here, we have produced small beryl pellets of approximately 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thickness to measure high doses of beta rays produced at an electron accelerator at IPEN. Twelve beryl dosimeters were made and six of them were irradiated from 10kGy up to 100 kGy. The technique used to create a calibration curve was the thermoluminescence using the glow peak at 310°C. (author)

  18. Initial experience with optical-CT scanning of RadBall Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldham, M; Clift, C; Thomas, A; Farfan, E; Foley, T; Jannik, T; Adamovics, J; Holmes, C; Stanley, S, E-mail: Mark.Oldham@Duke.ed

    2010-11-01

    The RadBall dosimeter is a novel device for providing 3-D information on the magnitude and distribution of contaminant sources of unknown radiation in a given hot cell, glovebox, or contaminated room. The device is presently under evaluation by the National Nuclear Lab (NNL, UK) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL, US), for application as a diagnostic device for such unknown contaminants in the nuclear industry. A critical component of the technique is imaging the dose distribution recorded in the RadBall using optical-CT scanning. Here we present our initial investigations using the Duke Mid-sized Optical-CT Scanner (DMOS) to image dose distributions deposited in RadBalls exposed to a variety of radiation treatments.

  19. 5. Conference cycle. The radiations and the Biological Sciences; 5. Ciclo de conferencias. Las radiaciones y las Ciencias Biologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar G, M.; Chavez B, A

    1991-06-15

    Nuclear technologies and their development have influenced many aspects of modern life. Besides used for electricity production nuclear technologies are applied in many other fields, especially in biological sciences. In genetics and molecular biology they enable research resulting in increased food production and better food preservation. Usage in material sciences lead to new varieties of plastics or improved characteristics. Nuclear applications are used in pe troleum industries and in forecasting geothermic power. Radiobiology and radiotherapy enable diagnosis and therapy of several diseases, e.g. cancer. Nuclear technologies also contribute to preserve the environment. They offer methods to analyse as well as decrease the environmental impacts. The 5. conference cyle entitled 'The Radiations and the Biological Sciences' aims to inform students of biological sciences about new nuclear technologies applied in their field of interest.

  20. Duality of solar UV-B radiation and relevant dosimetry: vitamin D synthesis versus skin erythema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenetskaya, Irina P.

    2003-06-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) gives rise to beneficial or adverse health effects depending on the dose. Excessive UV exposures are associated with acute and chronic health effect but in appropriate doses UV sunlight is advisable. Important biological function of UVR is initiation of endogenous synthesis of vitamin D in human skin. A useful method based on an in vitro model of vitamin D synthesis ('D-dosimeter') has been specially developed to measure the vitamin D synthetic capacity of sunlight in situ. For the first time laboratory and field tests have been performed to link commonly used erythemal units (MEDs) and previtamin D accumulation.

  1. Mutant frequency of radiotherapy technicians appears to be associated with recent dose of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, K.; Ferraris, J.; Bradley, W.E.; Swartz, J.; Seifert, A.M. (Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada))

    1989-10-01

    The frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants among peripheral T-lymphocytes of radiotherapy technicians primarily exposed to 60Co was measured by the T-cell cloning method. Mutant frequencies of these technicians in 1984 and 1986 were significantly higher than those of physiotherapy technicians who worked in a neighboring service, and correlated significantly with thermoluminescence dosimeter readings recorded during the 6 mo preceding mutant frequency determination. Correlations decreased when related to dose recorded over longer time intervals. HPRT mutant frequency determination in peripheral lymphocytes is a good measure of recently received biologically effective radiation dose in an occupationally exposed population.

  2. The development of remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-woo [KAERI - Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup-si (Korea, Republic of); Chonbuk National University, Jeonjoo-Si (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyu-hwan [KINS - Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon-Si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-il [Chonbuk National University, Jeonjoo-Si (Korea, Republic of); Im, Chae-wan [REMTECH, Seoul-Si (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Internet of things (IoT) technology has recently shown a large flow of IT trends in human life. In particular, our lives are now becoming integrated with a lot of items around the 'smart-phone' with IoT, including Bluetooth, Near Field Communication (NFC), Beacons, WiFi, and Global Positioning System (GPS). Our project focuses on the interconnection of radiation dosimetry and IoT technology. The radiation workers at a nuclear facility should hold personal dosimeters such as a Thermo-Luminescence Dosimeter (TLD), an Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter (OSL), pocket ionization chamber dosimeters, an Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD), or an alarm dosimeter on their body. Some of them have functions that generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers in a real working area. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions for communicating with other areas or the responsible personnel in real time. In particular, when conducting a particular task in a high dose area, or a number of repair works within a radiation field, radiation dose monitoring is important for the health of the workers and the work efficiency. Our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system (RWRD) that can be used to monitor the radiation dose in a nuclear facility for radiation workers and a radiation protection program In this project, a radiation dosimeter is the detection device for personal radiation dose, a smart phone is the mobile wireless communication tool, and, Beacon is the wireless starter for the detection, communication, and position of the worker using BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy). In this report, we report the design of the RWRD and a demonstration case in a real radiation field. (authors)

  3. Study of L-aspartic acid for its possible use as a dosimeter in the interval of 3.4-20 kGy at different irradiation temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-López, Adriana; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Uribe, Roberto M.; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    Certain commercial applications of radiation processing increase the efficiency of chemical reactions at low temperatures to decrease the free radicals in the bulk material and avoid the synergistic effects of heat. Such applications have motivated the search for a reliable, low-temperature dosimeter for use under the conditions of the irradiation process. For this purpose, polycrystalline samples of L-aspartic acid (2-aminobutanedioic acid) were irradiated with gamma rays at low temperatures and doses in the kiloGray range (3.4-64 kGy). The potential use of the aspartic acid system as a chemical dosimeter is based on the formation of stable free radicals when the amino acid is exposed to ionizing radiation. These radicals can be studied and quantified using electron spin resonance (ESR). The response curves at different temperatures show that the intensity of the ESR spectra (the five characteristic lines) depends on the dose received. The response of the dosimeter increases with increasing temperature, and this relationship is linear up to 20 kGy at 298 K. The decay characteristics show that the change in the ESR signal over time is low and reproducible. In addition, the L-aspartic acid dosimeter is easy to handle and has low cost.

  4. Nano-barium–strontium sulfate as a new thermoluminescence dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboelezz, E., E-mail: eslam_genius@hotmail.com [Department of Ionizing Radiation, National Institute for Standards, El-Giza (Egypt); Sharaf, M.A.; Hassan, G.M. [Department of Ionizing Radiation, National Institute for Standards, El-Giza (Egypt); El-Khodary, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    A sensitive thermoluminescence (Ba{sub 0.88}Sr{sub 0.12}SO{sub 4}){sub 99.8%}:Eu{sub 0.2%} (B88) nano-phosphor has been prepared using the chemical co-precipitation method. A comparative study of B88 nanophosphor with its corresponding prepared micro-crystalline form has been made. The dose response of nano-B88, to γ-ray in low and intermediate ranges, was studied in comparison with micro-phase and reference material (TL-700H). The supralinearity factors for nano/micro-B88 and TL-700H are calculated and compared between them along both low and intermediate dose ranges. The lower detection limit of dose calculation (D{sub LDL}) method is compared with the detection limit (D{sub DL}) and critical level (D{sub CL}) of dose calculation algorithm. According to B88 energy dependence study, it is energy dependent for all photon energies except from 0.8 to 4 MeV due to their high value of effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}=43.5). Nano-B88 is sensitive to light, so the nano-B88 should be stored in dark region away from any source of visible and UV-light. The fading and reusability studies of both nano/micro-B88 samples are also included. The combined and expanded uncertainties that accompanied the radiation dose measurements are calculated. - Highlights: • A comparative study of nano/micro-B88 form has been made. • The sensitivity of both phases for B88 in low range of dose is ≈50 times TL-700H. • The lower detection limit of dose calculation was found to be ≈135 μGy for nano-B88. • B88 is energy independent for photon energies ranging from 0.8 to 4 MeV. • Nano-B88 can be used as a good TL dosimeter in radiation dosimetry.

  5. Biological Effectiveness and Application of Heavy Ions in Radiation Therapy Described by a Physical and Biological Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kjeld J.; Hansen, Johnny W.

    A description is given of the physical basis for applying track structure theory in the determination of the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation of single- and multi-hit target systems. It will be shown that for applying the theory to biological systems the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation...... simultaneously in therapy....

  6. Mercuric iodide dosimeter response to high energy electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewinger, E.; Nissenbaum, J.; Schieber, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mercuric iodide solid state dosimeter response to high energy electron beams of up to 35 MeV is reported. High sensitivity of up to 1.5 V/cGy was observed with a 200 V external bias, as well as several mV/cGy, with no external bias for small volume (approx. 10 mm/sup 3/) detectors. The physical characteristics of the detector response are discussed, showing the feasibility of mercuric iodide as a reliable dosimeter for high energy electron beams.

  7. Measurement of a PAGAT gel dosimeter by ultrasound computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoei, S.; Trapp, J. V.; Langton, C. M.

    2013-06-01

    In this work we used a 3D quantitative CT ultrasound imaging system to characterise polymer gel dosimeters. The system comprised of two identical 5 MHz 128 element phased-array ultrasound transducers co-axially aligned and submerged in water as a coupling agent. Rotational and translational movement of the gel dosimeter sample between the transducers were performed using a robotic arm. Ultrasound signals were generated and received using an Olympus Omniscan unit. Dose sensitivity of attenuation and time of flight ultrasonic parameters were assessed using this system.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation experiments on box-type radon dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Khalid; Kamran, Muhammad; Illahi, Ahsan; Manzoor, Shahid

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies show that inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) may be carcinogenic especially to mine workers, people living in closed indoor energy conserved environments and underground dwellers. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to measure the 222Rn concentrations (Bq/m3) in indoors environments. For this purpose, box-type passive radon dosimeters employing ion track detector like CR-39 are widely used. Fraction of the number of radon alphas emitted in the volume of the box type dosimeter resulting in latent track formation on CR-39 is the latent track registration efficiency. Latent track registration efficiency is ultimately required to evaluate the radon concentration which consequently determines the effective dose and the radiological hazards. In this research, Monte Carlo simulation experiments were carried out to study the alpha latent track registration efficiency for box type radon dosimeter as a function of dosimeter's dimensions and range of alpha particles in air. Two different self developed Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed namely: (a) Surface ratio (SURA) method and (b) Ray hitting (RAHI) method. Monte Carlo simulation experiments revealed that there are two types of efficiencies i.e. intrinsic efficiency (ηint) and alpha hit efficiency (ηhit). The ηint depends upon only on the dimensions of the dosimeter and ηhit depends both upon dimensions of the dosimeter and range of the alpha particles. The total latent track registration efficiency is the product of both intrinsic and hit efficiencies. It has been concluded that if diagonal length of box type dosimeter is kept smaller than the range of alpha particle then hit efficiency is achieved as 100%. Nevertheless the intrinsic efficiency keeps playing its role. The Monte Carlo simulation experimental results have been found helpful to understand the intricate track registration mechanisms in the box type dosimeter. This paper explains that how radon concentration from the

  9. Automation of dosimeters calibration for radiotherapy in secondary dosimetric calibration laboratory of the CPHR; Automatizacion de la calibracion de dosimetros de radioterapia en el laboratorio secundario de calibracion dosimetrica del CPHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, Andy L. Romero; Lores, Stefan Gutierrez, E-mail: c19btm@frcuba.co.cu [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones (CPHR), La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an automated system for measurements in the calibration of reference radiation dosimeters. It was made a software application that performs the acquisition of the measured values of electric charge, calculated calibration coefficient and automates the calibration certificate issuance. These values are stored in a log file on a PC. The use of the application improves control over the calibration process, helps to humanize the work and reduces personnel exposure. The tool developed has been applied to the calibration of dosimeters radiation patterns in the LSCD of the Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Cuba.

  10. Evaluation of thermoluminescent dosimeters using water equivalent phantoms for application in clinical electrons beams dosimetry; Avaliacao de dosimetros termoluminescentes empregando objetos simuladores equivalentes a agua para aplicacao na dosimetria de feixes clinicos de eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravim, Amanda

    2010-07-01

    The dosimetry in Radiotherapy provides the calibration of the radiation beam as well as the quality control of the dose in the clinical routine. Its main objective is to determine with greater accuracy the dose absorbed by the tumor. This study aimed to evaluate the behavior of three thermoluminescent dosimeters for the clinical electron beam dosimetry. The performance of the calcium sulfate detector doped with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}: Dy) produced by IPEN was compared with two dosimeters commercially available by Harshaw. Both are named TLD-100, however they differ in their dimensions. The dosimeters were evaluated using water, solid water (RMI-457) and PMMA phantoms in different exposure fields for 4, 6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV electron beam energies. It was also performed measurements in photon beams of 6 and 15 MV (2 and 5 MeV) only for comparison. The dose-response curves were obtained for the {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in air and under conditions of electronic equilibrium, both for clinical beam of photons and electrons in maximum dose depths. The sensitivity, reproducibility, intrinsic efficiency and energy dependence response of dosimeters were studied. The CaSO{sub 4}: Dy showed the same behavior of TLD-100, demonstrating only an advantage in the sensitivity to the beams and radiation doses studied. Thus, the dosimeter produced by IPEN can be considered a new alternative for dosimetry in Radiotherapy departments. (author)

  11. Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

    1997-09-04

    Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

  12. Basic radiological characteristics of a non-scattering gel dosimeter for 3D dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kyung Hwan; Ji, Yunseo; Lee, Suk; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Chul Yong; Cao, Yuanjie; Cho, Samju

    2016-12-01

    We used a spectrophotometer to compare the dosimetric properties of two non-scattering (radiochromic) gel dosimeters: a non-scattering gel dosimeter developed in-house and a PRESAGE™ gel dosimeter. We evaluated the dosimetric characteristics, including spectral absorption, dose linearity, reproducibility, and dose rate dependency of the two gel dosimeters. The non-scattering gel and the PRESAGE™ gel dosimeters showed peak sensitivity at wavelengths of 600 nm and 630 nm, respectively. Over a range of doses the best dose linearities of the non-scattering and the PRESAGE™ gel dosimeters resulted in R2 values of 0.99 at wavelengths of 600 nm and 630 nm, respectively. The reproducibility and dose-rate dependence of each of the two gel dosimeters were within the range of ±3 %. Our results revealed that the peak sensitivities of the two radiochromic gel dosimeters were significantly different; the in-house non-scattering gel dosimeter demonstrated peak sensitivity at a wavelength of 600 nm while the PRESAGE™ gel dosimeter had peak sensitivity at a wavelength of 630 nm. We confirmed that for 3D gel dosimetry, the in-house non-scattering gel dosimeter had a more stable dose response compared with a commercial non-scattering gel dosimeter.

  13. Mathematical model of biological order state or syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: based on electromagnetic radiation within the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinxiang; Huang, Jinzhao

    2012-03-01

    In this study, based on the resonator model and exciplex model of electromagnetic radiation within the human body, mathematical model of biological order state, also referred to as syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine, was established and expressed as: "Sy = v/ 1n(6I + 1)". This model provides the theoretical foundation for experimental research addressing the order state of living system, especially the quantitative research syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine.

  14. A phenomenological relative biological effectiveness approach for proton therapy based on an improved description of the mixed radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairani, A.; Dokic, I.; Magro, G.; Tessonnier, T.; Bauer, J.; Böhlen, T. T.; Ciocca, M.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, P. R.; Jäkel, O.; Debus, J.; Haberer, T.; Abdollahi, A.; Parodi, K.

    2017-02-01

    Proton therapy treatment planning systems (TPSs) are based on the assumption of a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 without taking into account the found in vitro experimental variations of the RBE as a function of tissue type, linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. The phenomenological RBE models available in literature are based on the dose-averaged LET (LET D ) as an indicator of the physical properties of the proton radiation field. The LET D values are typically calculated taking into account primary and secondary protons, neglecting the biological effect of heavier secondaries. In this work, we have introduced a phenomenological RBE approach which considers the biological effect of primary protons, and of secondary protons, deuterons, tritons (Z  =  1) and He fragments (3He and 4He, Z  =  2). The calculation framework, coupled with a Monte Carlo (MC) code, has been successfully benchmarked against clonogenic in vitro data measured in this work for two cell lines and then applied to determine biological quantities for spread-out Bragg peaks and a prostate and a head case. The introduced RBE formalism, which depends on the mixed radiation field, the dose and the ratio of the linear–quadratic model parameters for the reference radiation {{≤ft(α /β \\right)}\\text{ph}} , predicts, when integrated in an MC code, higher RBE values in comparison to LET D -based parameterizations. This effect is particular enhanced in the entrance channel of the proton field and for low {{≤ft(α /β \\right)}\\text{ph}} tissues. For the prostate and the head case, we found higher RBE-weighted dose values up to about 5% in the entrance channel when including or neglecting the Z  =  2 secondaries in the RBE calculation. TPSs able to proper account for the mixed radiation field in proton therapy are thus recommended for an accurate determination of the RBE in the whole treatment field.

  15. Variation in the calibrated response of LiF, Al2O3, and silicon dosimeters when used for in-phantom measurements of source photons with energies between 30 KeV AND 300 KeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Sashi; Currier, Blake; Medich, David C

    2015-04-01

    The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used to quantify changes in the absorbed dose conversion factor for LiF, Al2O3, and silicon-based electronic dosimeters calibrated in-air using standard techniques and summarily used to measure absorbed dose to water when placed in a water phantom. A mono-energetic photon source was modeled at energies between 30 keV and 300 keV for a point-source placed at the center of a water phantom, a point-source placed at the surface of the phantom, and for a 10-cm radial field geometry. Dosimetric calculations were obtained for water, LiF, Al2O3, and silicon at depths of 0.2 cm and 10 cm from the source. These results were achieved using the MCNP5 *FMESH photon energy-fluence tally, which was coupled with the appropriate DE/DF card for each dosimetric material studied to convert energy-fluence into the absorbed dose. The dosimeter's absorbed dose conversion factor was calculated as a ratio of the absorbed dose to water to that of the dosimeter measured at a specified phantom depth. The dosimeter's calibration value also was obtained. Based on these results, the absorbed dose conversion factor for a LiF dosimeter was found to deviate from its calibration value by up to 9%, an Al2O3 dosimeter by 43%, and a silicon dosimeter by 61%. These data therefore can be used to obtain LiF, Al2O3, and silicon dosimeter correction factors for mono-energetic and poly-energetic sources at measurement depths up to 10 cm under the irradiation geometries investigated herein.

  16. Response of radiochromic film dosimeters to gamma rays in different atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Humphreys, J. C.; Wenxiu, Chen

    The high-dose gamma ray response (10 3 - 5×10 5 Gy) of radiochromic film dosimeters, with ten kinds of plastic matrices (polychlorostyrene containing 1 or 25% C ?, polybromostyrene containing 2 or 43% Br, nylon, polyvinyl chloride, cellulose triacetate, and an aromatic polymide) were investigated when irradiated under certain conditions in vacuum and in different atmospheres (air, oxygen, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide). In addition, the stability of the films was studied for storage periods up to one month after irradiation under these conditions. The responses and stabilities of the polyhalostyrene and nylon films were only slightly affected by the different atmospheres of irradiation, but there were marked differences of response for the other film types. The dyed cellulose triacetate films and polyvinylchloride films are generally more sensitive in N 2O and O 2-deprived atmospheres than in air or in O 2, but the opposite is true for the dyed polyvinyl butyral and aromatic nylon films. The dyed cellulose triacetate and dyed polychlorostryrene with 1% C ? are the most stable films for all conditions or irradiation. For accurate routine radiation processing dosimetry, it is important to know the conditions of irradiation so that appropriate dosimetry systems and procedures may be used and so that suitable correction factors can be applied. Emphasis must be given to differences in atmospheric conditions encountered by dosimeters in practical industrial situations, which may cause marked differences in ultimate response factors.

  17. Measurement of Entrance Surface Dose on an Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom Using a Miniature Fiber-Optic Dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Hong, Seunghan; Sim, Hyeok In; Kim, Seon Geun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Youn, Won Sik; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-01-01

    A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD) during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR) system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA) chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology. PMID:24694678

  18. Measurement of Entrance Surface Dose on an Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom Using a Miniature Fiber-Optic Dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jae Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology.

  19. Paradigm Shift in Radiation Biology/Radiation Oncology-Exploitation of the "H₂O₂ Effect" for Radiotherapy Using Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) Radiation such as X-rays and High-Energy Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-25

    Most radiation biologists/radiation oncologists have long accepted the concept that the biologic effects of radiation principally involve damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which is the critical target, as described in "Radiobiology for the Radiologist", by E.J. Hall and A.J. Giaccia [1]. Although the concepts of direct and indirect effects of radiation are fully applicable to low-LET (linear energy transfer) radioresistant tumor cells/normal tissues such as osteosarcoma cells and chondrocytes, it is believed that radiation-associated damage to DNA does not play a major role in the mechanism of cell death in low-LET radiosensitive tumors/normal tissues such as malignant lymphoma cells and lymphocytes. Hall and Giaccia describe lymphocytes as very radiosensitive, based largely on apoptosis subsequent to irradiation. As described in this review, apoptosis of lymphocytes and lymphoma cells is actually induced by the "hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) effect", which I propose in this review article for the first time. The mechanism of lymphocyte death via the H₂O₂ effect represents an ideal model to develop the enhancement method of radiosensitivity for radiation therapy of malignant neoplasms. In terms of imitating the high radiosensitivity of lymphocytes, osteosarcoma cells (representative of low-LET radioresistant cells) might be the ideal model for indicating the conversion of cells from radioresistant to radiosensitive utilizing the H₂O₂ effect. External beam radiation such as X-rays and high-energy electrons for use in modern radiotherapy are generally produced using a linear accelerator. We theorized that when tumors are irradiated in the presence of H₂O₂, the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes such as peroxidases and catalase are blocked and oxygen molecules are produced at the same time via the H₂O₂ effect, resulting in oxidative damage to low-LET radioresistant tumor cells, thereby rendering them highly sensitive to irradiation. In this

  20. Paradigm Shift in Radiation Biology/Radiation Oncology—Exploitation of the “H2O2 Effect” for Radiotherapy Using Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer Radiation such as X-rays and High-Energy Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most radiation biologists/radiation oncologists have long accepted the concept that the biologic effects of radiation principally involve damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, which is the critical target, as described in “Radiobiology for the Radiologist”, by E.J. Hall and A.J. Giaccia [1]. Although the concepts of direct and indirect effects of radiation are fully applicable to low-LET (linear energy transfer radioresistant tumor cells/normal tissues such as osteosarcoma cells and chondrocytes, it is believed that radiation-associated damage to DNA does not play a major role in the mechanism of cell death in low-LET radiosensitive tumors/normal tissues such as malignant lymphoma cells and lymphocytes. Hall and Giaccia describe lymphocytes as very radiosensitive, based largely on apoptosis subsequent to irradiation. As described in this review, apoptosis of lymphocytes and lymphoma cells is actually induced by the “hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 effect”, which I propose in this review article for the first time. The mechanism of lymphocyte death via the H2O2 effect represents an ideal model to develop the enhancement method of radiosensitivity for radiation therapy of malignant neoplasms. In terms of imitating the high radiosensitivity of lymphocytes, osteosarcoma cells (representative of low-LET radioresistant cells might be the ideal model for indicating the conversion of cells from radioresistant to radiosensitive utilizing the H2O2 effect. External beam radiation such as X-rays and high-energy electrons for use in modern radiotherapy are generally produced using a linear accelerator. We theorized that when tumors are irradiated in the presence of H2O2, the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes such as peroxidases and catalase are blocked and oxygen molecules are produced at the same time via the H2O2 effect, resulting in oxidative damage to low-LET radioresistant tumor cells, thereby rendering them highly sensitive to irradiation. In this

  1. Development of a new dosimeter of EPR based on lactose; Desarrollo de un nuevo dosimetro de RPE basado en lactosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz C, L.; Torijano C, E.; Azorin N, J.; Aguirre G, F. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Cruz Z, E., E-mail: eftc@xanum.uam.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    50 years have passed since was proposed using the amino acid alanine as dosimeter advantage the phenomenon of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR); this dosimetric method has reached a highly competitive level regarding others dosimetry classic methods, for example the thermoluminescence or the use of Fricke dosimeters, to measure high dose of radiation. In this type of materials, the free radicals induced by the radiation are stable and their concentration is proportional to the absorbed dose may be determined by the amplitude pick to pick of the first derived of the EPR absorption spectrum. The obtained results studying the EPR response of lactose tablets elaborated in the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa are presented. The tablets were irradiated with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co in the irradiator Gamma beam 651-Pt of the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico to a dose rate of 8 kGy-h{sup -1} and their EPR response in a EPR spectrometer e-scan Bruker. The obtained response in function of the dose was lineal in the interval of 1 at 10 kGy. The lactose sensibility was compared with the l-alanine, used as reference, and the result was consistently 0.25 of this. Due to the linearity shown in the interval of used dose and their low production cost, we conclude that the lactose is a promissory option for the dosimetry of high dose of radiation. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo simulation experiments on box-type radon dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Khalid, E-mail: kjamil@comsats.edu.pk; Kamran, Muhammad; Illahi, Ahsan; Manzoor, Shahid

    2014-11-11

    Epidemiological studies show that inhalation of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) may be carcinogenic especially to mine workers, people living in closed indoor energy conserved environments and underground dwellers. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to measure the {sup 222}Rn concentrations (Bq/m{sup 3}) in indoors environments. For this purpose, box-type passive radon dosimeters employing ion track detector like CR-39 are widely used. Fraction of the number of radon alphas emitted in the volume of the box type dosimeter resulting in latent track formation on CR-39 is the latent track registration efficiency. Latent track registration efficiency is ultimately required to evaluate the radon concentration which consequently determines the effective dose and the radiological hazards. In this research, Monte Carlo simulation experiments were carried out to study the alpha latent track registration efficiency for box type radon dosimeter as a function of dosimeter’s dimensions and range of alpha particles in air. Two different self developed Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed namely: (a) Surface ratio (SURA) method and (b) Ray hitting (RAHI) method. Monte Carlo simulation experiments revealed that there are two types of efficiencies i.e. intrinsic efficiency (η{sub int}) and alpha hit efficiency (η{sub hit}). The η{sub int} depends upon only on the dimensions of the dosimeter and η{sub hit} depends both upon dimensions of the dosimeter and range of the alpha particles. The total latent track registration efficiency is the product of both intrinsic and hit efficiencies. It has been concluded that if diagonal length of box type dosimeter is kept smaller than the range of alpha particle then hit efficiency is achieved as 100%. Nevertheless the intrinsic efficiency keeps playing its role. The Monte Carlo simulation experimental results have been found helpful to understand the intricate track registration mechanisms in the box type dosimeter. This paper

  3. WE-D-17A-02: Evaluation of a Two-Dimensional Optical Dosimeter On Measuring Lateral Profiles of Proton Pencil Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, W; Lee, T; Schultz, T; Arjomandy, B; Park, S [McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, MI (United States); Gao, M; Pankuch, M [ProCure Treatment Centers, Warrenville, IL (United States); Boyer, S; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Pillainayagam, M [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Schreuder, A [Provision Healthcare Partners, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a two-dimensional optical dosimeter on measuring lateral profiles for spots and scanned fields of proton pencil beams. Methods: A digital camera with a color image senor was utilized to image proton-induced scintillations on Gadolinium-oxysulfide phosphor reflected by a stainless-steel mirror. Intensities of three colors were summed for each pixel with proper spatial-resolution calibration. To benchmark this dosimeter, the field size and penumbra for 100mm square fields of singleenergy pencil-scan protons were measured and compared between this optical dosimeter and an ionization-chamber profiler. Sigma widths of proton spots in air were measured and compared between this dosimeter and a commercial optical dosimeter. Clinical proton beams with ranges between 80 mm and 300 mm at CDH proton center were used for this benchmark. Results: Pixel resolutions vary 1.5% between two perpendicular axes. For a pencil-scan field with 302 mm range, measured field sizes and penumbras between two detection systems agreed to 0.5 mm and 0.3 mm, respectively. Sigma widths agree to 0.3 mm between two optical dosimeters for a proton spot with 158 mm range; having widths of 5.76 mm and 5.92 mm for X and Y axes, respectively. Similar agreements were obtained for others beam ranges. This dosimeter was successfully utilizing on mapping the shapes and sizes of proton spots at the technical acceptance of McLaren proton therapy system. Snow-flake spots seen on images indicated the image sensor having pixels damaged by radiations. Minor variations in intensity between different colors were observed. Conclusions: The accuracy of our dosimeter was in good agreement with other established devices in measuring lateral profiles of pencil-scan fields and proton spots. A precise docking mechanism for camera was designed to keep aligned optical path while replacing damaged image senor. Causes for minor variations between emitted color lights will be investigated.

  4. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin, E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mothersill, Carmel E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some “bystander effects” that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} protons mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  5. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure in Portuguese airline pilots: study of a possible correlation with oxidative biological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo; Folgosa, Filipe; Soares, Paulo; Pereira, Alice S; Garcia, Raquel; Gestal-Otero, Juan Jesus; Tavares, Pedro; Gomes da Silva, Marco D R

    2013-05-01

    Several studies have sought to understand the health effects of occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. However, only few biologic markers or associations with disease outcomes have so far been identified. In the present study, 22 long- and 26 medium-haul male Portuguese airline pilots and 36 factory workers who did not fly regularly were investigated. The two groups were comparable in age and diet, were non-smokers, never treated with ionizing radiation and other factors. Cosmic radiation exposure in pilots was quantified based on direct monitoring of 51 flights within Europe, and from Europe to North and South America, and to Africa. Indirect dose estimates in pilots were performed based on the SIEVERT (Système informatisé d'évaluation par vol de l'exposition au rayonnement cosmique dans les transports aériens) software for 6,039 medium- and 1,366 long-haul flights. Medium-haul pilots had a higher cosmic radiation dose rate than long-haul pilots, that is, 3.3 ± 0.2 μSv/h and 2.7 ± 0.3 μSv/h, respectively. Biological tests for oxidative stress on blood and urine, as appropriate, at two time periods separated by 1 year, included measurements of antioxidant capacity, total protein, ferritin, hemoglobin, creatinine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Principal components analysis was used to discriminate between the exposed and unexposed groups based on all the biological tests. According to this analysis, creatinine and 8OHdG levels were different for the pilots and the unexposed group, but no distinctions could be made among the medium- and the long-haul pilots. While hemoglobin levels seem to be comparable between the studied groups, they were directly correlated with ferritin values, which were lower for the airline pilots.

  6. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  7. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shuji; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  8. VALIDATION OF HANFORD PERSONNEL AND EXTREMITY DOSIMETERS IN PLUTONIUM ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherpelz, Robert I.; Fix, John J.; Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2000-02-10

    A study was performed in the Plutonium Finishing Plant to assess the performance of Hanford personnel neutron dosimetry. The study was assessed whole body dosimetry and extremity dosimetry performance. For both parts of the study, the TEPC was used as the principle instrument for characterizing workplace neutron fields. In the whole body study, 12.7-cm-diameter TEPCs were used in ten different locations in the facility. TLD and TED personnel dosimeters were exposed on a water-filled phantom to enable a comparison of TEPC and dosimeter response. In the extremity study, 1.27-cm-diameter TEPCs were exposed inside the fingers of a gloveboxe glove. Extremity dosimeters were wrapped around the TEPCs. The glove was then exposed to six different cans of plutonium, simulating the exposure that a worker's fingers would receive in a glovebox. The comparison of TEPC-measured neutron dose equivalent to TLD-measured gamma dose equivalent provided neutron-to-gamma ratios that can be used to estimate the neutron dose equivalent received by a worker's finger based on the gamma readings of an extremity dosimeter. The study also utilized a Snoopy and detectors based on bubble technology for assessing neutron exposures, providing a comparison of the effectiveness of these instruments for workplace monitoring. The study concludes that the TLD component of the HCND performs adequately overall, with a positive bias of 30%, but exhibits excessive variability in individual results due to instabilities in the algorithm. The TED response was less variable but only 20% of the TEPC reference dose on average because of the low neutron energies involved. The neutron response of the HSD was more variable than the TLD component of the HCND and biased high by a factor of 8 overall due to its calibration to unmoderated 252Cf. The study recommends further work to correct instabilities in the HCND algorithm and to explore the potential shown by the bubble-based dosimeters.

  9. a Thermally Desorbable Miniature Passive Dosimeter for Organic Vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jesus Antonio

    A thermally desorbable miniature passive dosimeter (MPD) for organic vapors has been developed in conformity with theoretical and practical aspects of passive dosimeter design. The device was optimized for low sample loadings resulting from short-term and/or low concentration level exposure. This was accomplished by the use of thermal desorption rather than solvent elution, which provided the GC method with significantly higher sensitivity. Laboratory evaluation of this device for factors critical to the performance of passive dosimeters using benzene as the test vapor included: desorption efficiency (97.2%), capacity (1400 ppm-min), sensitivity (7ng/sample or 0.06 ppmv for 15 minutes sampling) accuracy and precision, concentration level, environmental conditions (i.e., air face velocity, relative humidity) and sample stability during short (15 minutes) and long periods of time (15 days). This device has demonstrated that its overall accuracy meets NIOSH and OSHA requirements for a sampling and analytical method for the exposure concentration range of 0.1 to 50 ppm (v/v) and 15 minutes exposures. It was demonstrated that the MPD operates in accordance with theoretically predicted performance and should be adequate for short-term and/or low concentration exposure monitoring of organic vapors in the workplace. In addition a dynamic vapor exposure evaluation system for passive dosimeters have been validated using benzene as the test vapor. The system is capable of generating well defined short-square wave concentration profiles suitable for the evaluation of passive dosimeters for ceiling exposure monitoring.

  10. Radiation dosimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  11. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  12. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  13. Verificação das doses de radiação absorvidas durante a técnica de irradiação de corpo inteiro nos transplantes de medula óssea, por meio de dosímetros termoluminescentes Measurement of absorbed radiation doses during whole body irradiation for bone marrow transplants using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelmo José Giordani

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a precisão das doses de radiação absorvidas na terapia de transplantes de medula óssea durante a técnica de irradiação de corpo inteiro. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se 200 pastilhas de sulfato de cálcio com disprósio compactado com teflon (CaSO4 + teflon, calibradas no ar e no "phantom", selecionadas aleatoriamente e dispostas em grupos de cinco no corpo dos pacientes. As leituras dosimétricas foram efetuadas pela leitora Harshaw 4000A. Nove pacientes foram irradiados no corpo inteiro em paralelos e em opostos laterais, utilizando-se unidade de cobalto-60, modelo Alcion II, com taxa de dose de 0,80 Gy/min a 80,5 cm, {campo (10 × 10 cm²}. A dosimetria dessa unidade foi realizada com dosímetro Victoreen 500. Para a determinação da dose média em cada ponto avaliado usaram-se os fatores individuais de calibração das pastilhas no ar e no "phantom", colocando-se um "build up" de 2 mm para superficializar a dose à distância de 300 cm. RESULTADOS: Em 70% dos pacientes obteve-se variação de dose menor que 5% e em 30% dos pacientes essa variação foi inferior a 10%, quando comparados os valores medidos com aqueles calculados em cada ponto. Na cabeça ocorre absorção, em média, de 14% da dose administrada, e nos pulmões, acréscimo de 2% na dose administrada. Nos pacientes com distância látero-lateral maior que 35 cm as variações entre as doses calculadas e medidas podem chegar a 30% da dose desejada, sem o uso de filtros compensadores. CONCLUSÃO: Os valores medidos das doses absorvidas nos diversos pontos anatômicos, comparados aos valores desejados (teóricos, apresentam tolerância de ±10%, considerando-se as diferenças anatômicas existentes, quando utilizados os fatores de calibração individuais das pastilhas.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the precision of the absorbed radiation doses in bone marrow transplant therapy during whole body irradiation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two-hundred CaSO4:Dy + teflon

  14. Dosimetry auditing procedure with alanine dosimeters for light ion beam therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ableitinger, Alexander; Vatnitsky, Stanislav; Herrmann, Rochus

    2013-01-01

    verification aimed at measuring a dose of 10 Gy homogeneously delivered to a virtual-target volume of 8 × 8 × 12 cm3. In order to interpret the readout of the irradiated alanine dosimeters additional Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the energy dependent detector response of the particle......Background and purpose In the next few years the number of facilities providing ion beam therapy with scanning beams will increase. An auditing process based on an end-to-end test (including CT imaging, planning and dose delivery) could help new ion therapy centres to validate their entire logistic...... chain of radiation delivery. An end-to-end procedure was designed and tested in both scanned proton and carbon ion beams, which may also serve as a dosimetric credentialing procedure for clinical trials in the future. The developed procedure is focused only on physical dose delivery and the validation...

  15. Sensitivity of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV photons at clinical doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrale, M; Longo, A; Spanò, M; Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Brai, M

    2011-12-01

    In this study we analyzed the ESR signal of alanine dosimeters with gadolinium exposed to 6 MV linear accelerator photons. We observed that the addition of gadolinium brings about an improvement in the sensitivity to photons because of its high atomic number. The experimental data indicated that the addition of gadolinium increases the sensitivity of the alanine to 6 MV photons. This enhancement was better observed at high gadolinium concentrations for which the tissue equivalence is heavily reduced. However, information about the irradiation setup and of the radiation beam features allows one to correct for this difference. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to obtain information on the expected effect of the addition of gadolinium on the dose absorbed by the alanine molecules inside the pellets. These results are compared with the experimental values, and the agreement is discussed.

  16. Solid state dosimeters used in medical physics 'A review'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin-Nieto, Juan [Physics Department, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Many solid-state detectors have been successfully used to perform the quality control and in vivo dosimetry in medical physics, both in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, as they have high sensitivity in a small volume; most of them do not require electrical connection and have dosimetric characteristics of interest such as: good accuracy and reproducibility, as well as a response independent of the energy of radiation, some of them. For this reason, the selection of an appropriate detector for use in medical physics must take into account the energy mass absorption coefficient relative to water for photon sources and the mass stopping power relative to water for beta emitters and electron beams in the energy range of interest in medical physics, as well as the effective atomic number of materials that constitute them. This paper presents a review of the dosimetric characteristics of the solid state dosimeters most suitable for use in medical physics.

  17. Dose verification in HDR brachytherapy and IMRT with Fricke gel-layer dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Bartesaghi, G.; Pirola, L. [Department of Physics, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Italy (Italy); Carrara, M.; Gambini, I.; Tomatis, S.; Fallai, C.; Zonca, G. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy (Italy); Stokucova, J. [Faculty Hospital Na Bulovce, Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2009-10-15

    At the Department of Physics of the Universita degli Studi di Milano in collaboration with the Medical Physics Unit and the Radiotherapy Unit of the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano the research of a dosimetric technique based on Fricke gel layers and optical analysis in under study. In fact, Fricke gel layer dosimeters (FGLD) have various advantages such as the tissue-equivalence for photons in the clinical energy interval, the possibility to obtain the spatial information about continuous dose distribution and not only a point dose distribution as it is for example in the case of ionization chambers, TLD or diodes and the possibility to obtain the information about 3D dose distributions. In this work, specific applications of FGLD to absolute dosimetry in radiotherapy have been studied, i.e. in-phantom measurements of complex intensity modulated radiation therapy fields (IMRT) and complex brachytherapy fields. (Author)

  18. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  19. Radiation dosimetry by ESR in bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, R. (Universidad de San Agustin de Arequipa (Peru)); Marticorena, B. (Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima)

    1983-05-01

    The absorption speed in bovine bone samples irradiated with a /sup 90/Sr ..beta..-source of 45 mCi is studied with ESR. The signal changes linearly with the absorbed quantity of radiation to a maximum dose of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ rads. This positive result allows to foresee the use of bone as a radiation dosimeter.

  20. CdWO{sub 4}-on-MEH-PPV:PS as a candidate for real-time dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.M. [Laboratory of Polymers and Electronic Properties of Materials, UFOP, 35400-000 (Brazil); Novais, S.M.V.; Silva, E.S.S. [Group of Advanced Ceramic Materials, UFS, 49100-000 (Brazil); Schimitberger, T. [Laboratory of Polymers and Electronic Properties of Materials, UFOP, 35400-000 (Brazil); Macedo, Z.S. [Group of Advanced Ceramic Materials, UFS, 49100-000 (Brazil); Bianchi, R.F., E-mail: bianchi@iceb.ufop.br [Laboratory of Polymers and Electronic Properties of Materials, UFOP, 35400-000 (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    We report on the investigations about the modification of optical properties induced by X-rays onto film detectors of cadmium tungstate (CdWO{sub 4}), poly[2-methoxy-5(2 Prime -ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and polystyrene (PS) This device takes advantage of reduction of spectral overlap between the radioluminescence (RL) of CdWO{sub 4} and the absorption of MEH-PPV as it is exposed to radiation, forming the basis of a new dosimeter that is capable of converting the orange-red radioluminescence of PS:MEH-PPV:CdWO{sub 4} into green. We propose an explanation of the optical processes occurring in MEH-PPV:CdWO{sub 4} in terms of the radiation hardness of CdWO{sub 4} combined to the RL-induced degradation of MEH-PPV. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin composite film dosimeters using a combination of a scintillator crystal and a light-emitting polymer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A X-ray dose detector based on MEH-PPV/CdWO{sub 4} materials which are rarely seen together. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new smart, disposable and easy-to-read organic-inorganic radiation detector.

  1. [Ecological and biological characteristics of Drosophila melanogaster features depending on the dose of electromagnetic radiation of various types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babkina, V V; Chernova, G V; Allenova, E A; Endebera, O P; Naumkina, E N

    2013-01-01

    Biological effects of exposure to red light (lambda = 660 +/- 10 nm) on the viability and morphophysiological characteristics of Drosophila melanogaster have been studied. The ability of this physical agent to modify these features is shown. The degree of expression and impact of biological effects depend on the dose, functional and genetic status of the organism. The study of the life expectancy of the exposed to EHF and white light D. melanogaster has revealed that expression of the features depends on the radiation doses, genotype, sex, the nature of the position of wings and lighting conditions. It has been found that the dark mode (24 h-night) is more favorable than the artificial lighting. Individuals with the left wing at the top are more sensitive to the external factors.

  2. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  3. An overview of recent charged-particle radiation biology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, M

    2001-01-01

    Radiobiology with charged particles is being carried out in Italy since several decades, starting with the experiments with protons in Milan. Later, also other groups entered the field, such as those in Naples, in Legnaro (LNL) and in Rome. In the last 10-15 years the activities in the field began to grow in a significant way. This happened in concomitance with the involvement of various researchers and Institutions in European and international projects devoted to radiation protection aspects, such as those aimed at elucidating and modelling radiation action mechanisms (EC/EU) and those aimed at radiation protection in space (NASA). A special role has been played since then by the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro of the INFN, where a radiobiology facility for low energy light ions was set up and operated in 1985. A formidable stimulus for charged-particle radiobiology was more recently given by the onset of plans for developing hadrontherapy Centres in Italy. The TERA Foundation first, and than the TOP Project at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, at the same time favoured the spreading in Italy of radiobiology research with charged particles and encouraged co-operation among various groups. The Italian radiobiology community, though relatively small, developed a number of valuable activities with charged particles, mostly at the cellular and molecular levels, that span from mechanisms of radiation action to radiation protection in space and to therapy with charged hadrons. In this article, due to space limitations, we have just been able to list the present activities and to briefly review some research that forms a common background for the various areas. This includes the work on Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated with light ions at LNL, that provided extensive data on the relationships between radiation quality, molecular damage and cellular effects, and the related work aimed at possible interpretation by mechanistic models. It appears that the multiplicity

  4. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    -arctic regions, manipulation experiments with various set-ups have been performed. Activation of plant defence mechanisms by production of UV-B absorbing compounds was significant in ambient UV-B in comparison to a filter treatment reducing the UV-B radiation. Despite the UV-B screening response, ambient UV...... (mycorrhiza) or in the biomass of microbes in the soil of the root zone. However, the composition of the soil microbial community was different in the soils under ambient and reduced UV radiation after three treatment years. These results provide new insight into the negative impact of current UV-B fluxes...

  5. Evaluation of NF-kappaB Pathway Inhibition for Space Radiation Biology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kristina; Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Schmitz, Claudia; Lau, Patrick; Testard, Isabelle; Reitz, Guenther

    Radiation is a potentially limiting factor for long term orbital and interplanetary missions. To improve risk estimation and to allow development of appropriate countermeasures, the study of the cellular radiation response is necessary. The anti-apoptotic factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) was identified as important modulating factor in the cellular response to heavy ions (Radiat. Res. 164: 527-530, 2005). This transcription factor could improve cellular survival after exposure to high radiation doses and influence the cancer risk of astronauts exposed to low doses of cosmic radiation. Therefore, the inhibition of selected NF-κB pathway compo-nents might help to identify possible pharmacological targets. It is supposed that the ATM kinase mediates the signal from damaged DNA in the nucleus to kinases in the cytoplasm. For liberation of NF-κB and its nuclear translocation, the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) has to be degraded in the proteasom. In this work, the efficacy and cytotoxicity of ATM, NF-κB and the proteasome inhibitors were analyzed using recombinant HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells. In the recommended concentration range, only the NF-κB inhibitor caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) displayed considerable cytotoxicity, while the others were not toxic. The inhibition of ATM by KU-55933 suppresses the X-ray and heavy ion (13 C, 35 MeV/u, LET 70 keV/m) induced activation of NF-κB dependent gene expression, indicating the central position of ATM in radiation induced NF-κB activation. CAPE and capsaicin partially inhibited NF-κB acti-vation by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor α. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 completely abolished the activation and was therefore used for short-term incubation experiments with X-rays. MG-132 suppressed the X-ray induced NF-κB activation in HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells entirely. The results lead to the conclusion that ATM and the proteasomal degradation of IκB are essential prerequisites for radiation induced NF

  6. SU-E-T-130: Dosimetric Evaluation of Tissue Equivalent Gel Dosimeter Using Saccharide in Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D; Jung, H; Ji, Y; Kim, K; Chang, U [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, S [Kyonggi University, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the dose responses of the MAGIC gel with various concentrations and type of saccharide are examined to clarify the roles of mono and disaccharide in the polymerization process. Then we focused on the tissue equivalence and dose sensitivity of MAGIC gel dosimeters. Methods: The gel is composed of HPLC, 8% gelatin, 2 × 10-3 M L-ascorbic acid, 1.8 × 10-2 M hydroquinone, 8 × 10-5 M copper(II)sulfate and 9% methacrylic acid, new polymer gels are synthesized by adding glucose(monosaccharide), sucrose(disaccharide) and urea in the concentration range of 5∼35%. For irradiation of the gel, cesium-137 gamma-ray irradiator was used, radiation dose was delivered from 5∼50 Gy. MRI images of the gel were acquired by using a 3.0 T MRI system. Results: When saccharide and urea were added, the O/C, O/N and C/N ratios agreed with those of soft tissue with 1.7%. The dose-response of glucose and sucrose gel have slope-to-intercept ratio of 0.044 and 0.283 respectively. The slope-to-ratio is one important determinant of gel sensitivity. R-square values of glucose and sucrose gel dosimeters were 0.984 and 0.994 respectively. Moreover when urea were added, the slope-to-intercept ratio is 0.044 and 0.073 respectively. R-square values of mono and disaccharide gel were 0.973 and 0.989 respectively. When a saccharide is added into the MAGIC gel dosimeter, dose sensitivity is increased. However when urea were added, dose sensitivity is slightly decreased. Conclusion: In this study, it was possible to obtain the following conclusions by looking at the dose response characteristics after adding mono-, di-saccharide and urea to a MAGIC gel dosimeter. Saccharide was a tendency of increasing dose sensitivity with disaccharide. Sa.ccharide is cost effective, safe, soft tissue equivalent, and can be used under various experimental conditions, making it a suitable dosimeter for some radiotherapy applications.

  7. DNA double-strand breaks as potential indicators for the biological effects of ionising radiation exposure from cardiac CT and conventional coronary angiography: a randomised, controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisel, Dominik; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Laule, Michael; Knebel, Fabian [Charite Medical School, Department of Cardiology, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    To prospectively compare induced DNA double-strand breaks by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). 56 patients with suspected coronary artery disease were randomised to undergo either CCA or cardiac CT. DNA double-strand breaks were assessed in fluorescence microscopy of blood lymphocytes as indicators of the biological effects of radiation exposure. Radiation doses were estimated using dose-length product (DLP) and dose-area product (DAP) with conversion factors for CT and CCA, respectively. On average there were 0.12 {+-} 0.06 induced double-strand breaks per lymphocyte for CT and 0.29 {+-} 0.18 for diagnostic CCA (P < 0.001). This relative biological effect of ionising radiation from CCA was 1.9 times higher (P < 0.001) than the effective dose estimated by conversion factors would have suggested. The correlation between the biological effects and the estimated radiation doses was excellent for CT (r = 0.951, P < 0.001) and moderate to good for CCA (r = 0.862, P < 0.001). One day after radiation, a complete repair of double-strand breaks to background levels was found in both groups. Conversion factors may underestimate the relative biological effects of ionising radiation from CCA. DNA double-strand break assessment may provide a strategy for individualised assessments of radiation. (orig.)

  8. The Response of Alanine Dosimeters in Thermal Neutron Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Bassler, Niels; Sharpe, P.

    Purpose: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a special kind of particle therapy, based on the neutron induced fission of the boron isotope 10B [1]. We have performed dosimetry experiments on the mixed neutron and gamma fields at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Mainz. Commonly, dosimetry...... in such fields is realized by foil activation and ion chambers [2]. Here we investigate alanine as an easier and more robust alternative dosimeter. Methods: We have performed four phantom experiments at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Mainz [3], in a predominantly thermal neutron field with a strong gamma...... neutron capture of hydrogen. The primary gamma dose deposited originate from the reactor core itself. Conclusion: Alanine dosimeters are suitable of measurements in mixed neutron fields and the alanine response in thermal neutron fields can be fully understood by the used interpretation model. In further...

  9. Dense Plasma Focus: physics and applications (radiation material science, single-shot disclosure of hidden illegal objects, radiation biology and medicine, etc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Chernyshova, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pimenov, V. N.; Demina, E. V.; Niemela, J.; Crespo, M.-L.; Cicuttin, A.; Tomaszewski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.; Giannini, G.; Longo, F.; Talab, A.; Ul'yanenko, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents some outcomes obtained during the year of 2013 of the activity in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency Co-ordinated research project "Investigations of Materials under High Repetition and Intense Fusion-Relevant Pulses". The main results are related to the effects created at the interaction of powerful pulses of different types of radiation (soft and hard X-rays, hot plasma and fast ion streams, neutrons, etc. generated in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) facilities) with various materials including those that are counted as perspective ones for their use in future thermonuclear reactors. Besides we discuss phenomena observed at the irradiation of biological test objects. We examine possible applications of nanosecond powerful pulses of neutrons to the aims of nuclear medicine and for disclosure of hidden illegal objects. Special attention is devoted to discussions of a possibility to create extremely large and enormously diminutive DPF devices and probabilities of their use in energetics, medicine and modern electronics.

  10. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    Depletion of the ozone layer and the consequent increase in solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) may impact living conditions for arctic plants significantly. In order to evaluate how the prevailing UV-B fluxes affect the heath ecosystem at Zackenberg (74°30'N, 20°30'W) and other high...

  11. Ground-level ozone following astrophysical ionizing radiation events: an additional biological hazard?

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to-date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling we have examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and find that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supe...

  12. Characterization and application of two kinds of ESR dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioni, Eric; Pabst, Jean-Yves; Kuntz, Florent

    2002-09-01

    Many previous papers described the use of low-concentration alanine pellets, powder or films for industrial high-dose application, but very few authors presented applications of such dosimeters to the low-dose range used for wastewater, flowers or radiotherapy treatment. The present paper describes the large-scale manufacturing process of high-concentration alanine pellets used for radiotherapy dose control in some French hospitals. The fading process due to sunlight exposure has been evaluated by means of direct UV light irradiation. The major disadvantage of alanine is its strong solubility in water (the pellets are completely dissolved when immersed for 10 min in pure water). The use of barium sulphate, not soluble in water, made it possible to carry out dosimetric measurements even when the dosimeter is completely immersed in water or stored after irradiation in high humidity levels. The paper presents manufacturing process of barium sulphate pellets, their dosimetric characteristics and one application of this dosimeter for the control of the absorbed doses during wastewater treatments.

  13. Obligatory Radiation Protection Course

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    Since February 2008, participation in the radiation protection course has been a prerequisite for obtaining a CERN personal dosimeter for all Staff Members and Users. All Staff and Users holding a personal dosimeter were informed by the Bulletin and by a personal e-mail sent in February 2008 that they were required to participate in the course before the annual exchange of their dosimeter. Many people had not done so by that time and the Dosimetry Service exceptionally classified them for 2 months as short-term visitors (VCT), a category of monitored personnel to whom the training requirement does not presently apply. As all personnel concerned have since had time to participate in an RP course, this "grace period" will no longer be granted as of 1 October 2008 and the RP course must be completed before the personal dosimeter is exchanged. For newcomers to CERN, and for those returning to CERN after an absence of more than 1 year, one registration as a VCT for two months ...

  14. Reference dosimeter system of the iaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kishor; Girzikowsky, Reinhard

    1995-09-01

    Quality assurance programmes must be in operation at radiation processing facilities to satisfy national and international Standards. Since dosimetry has a vital function in these QA programmes, it is imperative that the dosimetry systems in use at these facilities are well calibrated with a traceability to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory. As a service to the Member States, the International Atomic Energy Agency operates the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) to assist in this process. The transfer standard dosimetry system that is used for this service is based on ESR spectrometry. The paper describes the activities undertaken at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory to establish the QA programme for its reference dosimetry system. There are four key elements of such a programme: quality assurance manual; calibration that is traceable to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory; a clear and detailed statement of uncertainty in the dose measurement; and, periodic quality audit.

  15. Automatic scanning of NTA film neutron dosimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, R

    1999-01-01

    At the European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN, personal neutron monitoring for over 4000 collaborators is performed with Kodak NTA film, one of the few suitable dosemeters in the stray radiation environment of a high energy accelerator. After development, films are scanned with a projection microscope. To overcome this lengthy and strenuous procedure an automated analysis system for the dosemeters has been developed. General purpose image recognition software, tailored to the specific needs with a macro language, analyses the digitised microscope image. This paper reports on the successful automatic scanning of NTA films irradiated with neutrons from a /sup 238/Pu-Be source (E approximately=4 MeV), as well as on the extension of the method to neutrons of higher energies. The question of detection limits is discussed in the light of an application of the method in routine personal neutron monitoring. (9 refs).

  16. Highly cited German research contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics. Focus on collaboration and diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Medicine; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-10-15

    Background and purpose: Tight budgets and increasing competition for research funding pose challenges for highly specialized medical disciplines such as radiation oncology. Therefore, a systematic review was performed of successfully completed research that had a high impact on clinical practice. These data might be helpful when preparing new projects. Methods: Different measures of impact, visibility, and quality of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For this study, the article citation rate was chosen (minimum 15 citations per year on average). Highly cited German contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics (published between 1990 and 2010) were identified from the Scopus database. Results: Between 1990 and 2010, 106 articles published in 44 scientific journals met the citation requirement. The median average of yearly citations was 21 (maximum 167, minimum 15). All articles with {>=} 40 citations per year were published between 2003 and 2009, consistent with the assumption that the citation rate gradually increases for up to 2 years after publication. Most citations per year were recorded for meta-analyses and randomized phase III trials, which typically were performed by collaborative groups. Conclusion: A large variety of clinical radiotherapy, biology, and physics topics achieved high numbers of citations. However, areas such as quality of life and side effects, palliative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy for nonmalignant disorders were underrepresented. Efforts to increase their visibility might be warranted. (orig.)

  17. Transient absorption spectroscopy in biology using the Super-ACO storage ring FEL and the synchrotron radiation combination

    CERN Document Server

    Renault, E; De Ninno, G; Garzella, D; Hirsch, M; Nahon, L; Nutarelli, D

    2001-01-01

    The Super-ACO storage ring FEL, covering the UV range down to 300 nm with a high average power (300 mW at 350 nm) together with a high stability and long lifetime, is a unique tool for the performance of users applications. We present here the first pump-probe two color experiments on biological species using a storage ring FEL coupled to the synchrotron radiation. The intense UV pulse of the Super-ACO FEL is used to prepare a high initial concentration of chromophores in their first singlet electronic excited state. The nearby bending magnet synchrotron radiation provides, on the other hand a pulsed, white light continuum (UV-IR), naturally synchronized with the FEL pulses and used to probe the photochemical subsequent events and the associated transient species. We have demonstrated the feasibility with a dye molecule (POPOP) observing a two-color effect, signature of excited state absorption and a temporal signature with Acridine. Applications on various chromophores of biological interest are carried out,...

  18. Biological dosimetry by the triage dicentric chromosome assay: potential implications for treatment of acute radiation syndrome in radiological mass casualties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romm, Horst; Wilkins, Ruth C; Coleman, C Norman; Lillis-Hearne, Patricia K; Pellmar, Terry C; Livingston, Gordon K; Awa, Akio A; Jenkins, Mark S; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A; Oestreicher, Ursula; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2011-03-01

    Biological dosimetry is an essential tool for estimating radiation dose. The dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) is currently the tool of choice. Because the assay is labor-intensive and time-consuming, strategies are needed to increase throughput for use in radiation mass casualty incidents. One such strategy is to truncate metaphase spread analysis for triage dose estimates by scoring 50 or fewer metaphases, compared to a routine analysis of 500 to 1000 metaphases, and to increase throughput using a large group of scorers in a biodosimetry network. Previously, the National Institutes for Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) sponsored a double-blinded interlaboratory comparison among five established international cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratories to determine the variability in calibration curves and in dose measurements in unknown, irradiated samples. In the present study, we further analyzed the published data from this previous study to investigate how the number of metaphase spreads influences dose prediction accuracy and how this information could be of value in the triage and management of people at risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS). Although, as expected, accuracy decreased with lower numbers of metaphase spreads analyzed, predicted doses by the laboratories were in good agreement and were judged to be adequate to guide diagnosis and treatment of ARS. These results demonstrate that for rapid triage, a network of cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratories can accurately assess doses even with a lower number of scored metaphases.

  19. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation: Evaluation of the dose with cytogenetic methodologies by the construction of calibration curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, Demetre; Facco, E.; Sarchiapone, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    In case of a radiation accident, it is well known that in the absence of physical dosimetry biological dosimetry based on cytogenetic methods is a unique tool to estimate individual absorbed dose. Moreover, even when physical dosimetry indicates an overexposure, scoring chromosome aberrations (dicentrics and rings) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) at metaphase is presently the most widely used method to confirm dose assessment. The analysis of dicentrics and rings in PBLs after Giemsa staining of metaphase cells is considered the most valid assay for radiation injury. This work shows that applying the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using telomeric/centromeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in metaphase chromosomes for radiation dosimetry, could become a fast scoring, reliable and precise method for biological dosimetry after accidental radiation exposures. In both in vitro methods described above, lymphocyte stimulation is needed, and this limits the application in radiation emergency medicine where speed is considered to be a high priority. Using premature chromosome condensation (PCC), irradiated human PBLs (non-stimulated) were fused with mitotic CHO cells, and the yield of excess PCC fragments in Giemsa stained cells was scored. To score dicentrics and rings under PCC conditions, the necessary centromere and telomere detection of the chromosomes was obtained using FISH and specific PNA probes. Of course, a prerequisite for dose assessment in all cases is a dose-effect calibration curve. This work illustrates the various methods used; dose response calibration curves, with 95% confidence limits used to estimate dose uncertainties, have been constructed for conventional metaphase analysis and FISH. We also compare the dose-response curve constructed after scoring of dicentrics and rings using PCC combined with FISH and PNA probes. Also reported are dose response curves showing scored dicentrics and rings per cell, combining

  20. Biosentinel: Developing a Space Radiation Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Marina, Diana B.; Parra, Macarena P.; Boone, Travis D.; Tan, Ming; Ricco, Antonio J.; Straume, Tore N.; Lusby, Terry C.; Harkness, T.; Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Brent, R.; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation presents a major challenge to human exploration and long-term residence in space. The deep-space radiation spectrum includes highly energetic particles that generate double strand breaks (DSBs), deleterious DNA lesions that are usually repaired without errors via homologous recombination (HR), a conserved pathway in all eukaryotes. While progress identifying and characterizing biological radiation effects using Earth-based facilities has been significant, no terrestrial source duplicates the unique space radiation environment.We are developing a biosensor-based nanosatellite to fly aboard NASAs Space Launch System Exploration Mission 1, expected to launch in 2017 and reach a 1AU (astronomic unit) heliocentric orbit. Our biosensor (called BioSentinel) uses the yeast S. cerevisiae to measure DSBs in response to ambient space radiation. The BioSentinel strain contains engineered genetic defects that prevent growth until and unless a radiation-induced DSB near a reporter gene activates the yeasts HR repair mechanisms. Thus, culture growth and metabolic activity directly indicate a successful DSB-and-repair event. In parallel, HR-defective and wild type strains will provide survival data. Desiccated cells will be carried within independent culture microwells, built into 96-well microfluidic cards. Each microwell set will be activated by media addition at different time points over 18 months, and cell growth will be tracked continuously via optical density. One reserve set will be activated only in the occurrence of a solar particle event. Biological measurements will be compared to data provided by onboard physical dosimeters and to Earth-based experiments.BioSentinel will conduct the first study of biological response to space radiation outside Low Earth Orbit in over 40 years. BioSentinel will thus address strategic knowledge gaps related to the biological effects of space radiation and will provide an adaptable platform to perform human

  1. Fabrication and Optimization of a PAGATA Gel Dosimeter: Increasing the Melting Point of the PAGAT Gel Dosimeter with Agarose Additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiar Azadbakht

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter melts at 30 ˚C and even at room temperature during the summer, so it needs to be kept in a cool place such as a refrigerator. To increase the stability of the PAGAT gel, different amounts of agarose were added to the PAGAT gel composition and the PAGATA gel was manufactured. Material and Methods: The PAGATA gel vials were irradiated using a Co-60 machine. Then, the samples were evaluated using a 1.5 T Siemens MRI scanner. The ingredients of the PAGATA normoxic gel dosimeter were 4.5% N-N' methylen-bis-acrylamide, 4.5% acrylamide, 4.5% gelatine, 5 mM tetrakis (THPC, 0.01 mM hydroquinone (HQ, 0.5% agarose and 86% de-ionized water (HPLC. Results: Melting point and sensitivity of the PAGAT gel dosimeter with addition of 0.0, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% of agarose were measured, in which the melting points were increased to 30, 82, 86, 88, 89 and 90°C and their sensitivities found to be 0.113, 0.1059, 0.125, 0.122, 0.115 and 0.2  respectively. Discussion and Conclusions: Adding agarose increased the sensitivity and background R2 of the evaluated samples. The optimum amount of agarose was found to be 0.5% regarding these parameters and also the melting point of the gel dosimeter. A value of 0.5% agarose was found to be an optimum value considering the increase of sensitivity to 0.125 and melting point to 86°C but at the expense of increasing the background R2 to 4.530.

  2. Design and test of a scintillation dosimeter for dosimetry measurements of high energy radiotherapy beams; Conception et realisation d'un dosimetre a scintillation adapte a la dosimetrie de faisceaux de rayonnements ionisants en faisceaux de rayonnements ionisants en radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontbonne, J.M

    2002-12-01

    This work describes the design and evaluation of the performances of a scintillation dosimeter developed for the dosimetry of radiation beams used in radiotherapy. The dosimeter consists in a small plastic scintillator producing light which is guided by means of a plastic optical fiber towards photodetectors. In addition to scintillation, high energy ionizing radiations produce Cerenkov light both in the scintillator and the optical fiber. Based on a wavelength analysis, we have developed a deconvolution technique to measure the scintillation light in the presence of Cerenkov light. We stress the advantages that are anticipated from plastic scintillator, in particular concerning tissue or water equivalence (mass stopping power, mass attenuation or mass energy absorption coefficients). We show that detectors based on this material have better characteristics than conventional dosimeters such as ionisation chambers or silicon detectors. The deconvolution technique is exposed, as well as the calibration procedure using an ionisation chamber. We have studied the uncertainty of our dosimeter. The electronics noise, the fiber transmission, the deconvolution technique and the calibration errors give an overall combined experimental uncertainty of about 0,5%. The absolute response of the dosimeter is studied by means of depth dose measurements. We show that absolute uncertainty with photons or electrons beams with energies ranging from 4 MeV to 25 MeV is less than {+-} 1 %. Last, at variance with other devices, our scintillation dosimeter does not need dose correction with depth. (author)

  3. Personnel Photon Dosimeter on the Base of TLD natLiF

    CERN Document Server

    Kaskanov, G Ya

    2003-01-01

    A personnel photon dosimeter on the base of thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) ^{nat}LiF is described. Experimental responses of the dosimeters in the unit of individual equivalent dose H_p(10) for energy of photons 59.5, 120, 662, and 1250 keV are presented. It is shown that the dosimeter allows one to measure H_p(10) with admissible uncertainty in the energy range from 60 to 1250 keV.

  4. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume 7, Number 2-4, July thru December 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    6 C for exposure of an individual pulse at the threshold energy density. Experimental data on cochlear potentials, single-unit nerve fiber re- sponses...and brainstem evoked responses suggest that 0389 TREATMENT OF THERAPEUTICALLY RESISTANT NON- pulsed MW radiation produces cochlear microphonic re...The results vice versa. Retardation of bone growth (7/10 rabbits) indicated: (I) no edema and no malformation in embry- was observed in both

  5. Neutron-Activation Analysis of Biological Material with High Radiation Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K.

    1966-09-15

    A method has been developed for the chemical separation and subsequent gamma-spectrometric analysis of the alkali metals, the alkaline earths, the rare earths, chromium, hafnium, lanthanum, manganese, phosphorus, scandium and silver in neutron-activated biological material. The separation steps, being fully automatic, are based on a combination of ion-exchange and partition chromatography and require 40 min.

  6. X-ray holographic microscopy with zone plates applied to biological samples in the water window using 3rd harmonic radiation from the free-electron laser FLASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorniak, T; Heine, R; Mancuso, A P; Staier, F; Christophis, C; Pettitt, M E; Sakdinawat, A; Treusch, R; Guerassimova, N; Feldhaus, J; Gutt, C; Grübel, G; Eisebitt, S; Beyer, A; Gölzhäuser, A; Weckert, E; Grunze, M; Vartanyants, I A; Rosenhahn, A

    2011-06-06

    The imaging of hydrated biological samples - especially in the energy window of 284-540 eV, where water does not obscure the signal of soft organic matter and biologically relevant elements - is of tremendous interest for life sciences. Free-electron lasers can provide highly intense and coherent pulses, which allow single pulse imaging to overcome resolution limits set by radiation damage. One current challenge is to match both the desired energy and the intensity of the light source. We present the first images of dehydrated biological material acquired with 3rd harmonic radiation from FLASH by digital in-line zone plate holography as one step towards the vision of imaging hydrated biological material with photons in the water window. We also demonstrate the first application of ultrathin molecular sheets as suitable substrates for future free-electron laser experiments with biological samples in the form of a rat fibroblast cell and marine biofouling bacteria Cobetia marina.

  7. An Evaluation of Bipolar Junction Transistors as Dosimeter for Megavoltage Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos, Renan Garcia de; Vidal da Silva, Rogerio Matias; Silva, Malana Marcelina Almeida; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon, sn, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100-000 (Brazil); Pereira dos Santos, Luiz Antonio [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, CNEN/CRCN-NE, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1, Recife, PE, 50740-540 (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Dosimetry is an extremely important field in medical applications of radiation and nowadays, electron beam is a good option for superficial tumor radiotherapy. Normally, the applied dose to the patient both in diagnostic and therapy must be monitored to prevent injuries and ensure the success of the treatment, therefore, we should always look for improving of the dosimetric methods. Accordingly, the aim of this work is about the use of a bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for electron beam dosimetry. After previous studies, such an electronic device can work as a dosimeter when submitted to ionizing radiation of photon beam. Actually, a typical BJT consists of two PN semiconductor junctions resulting in the NPN structure device, for while, and each semiconductor is named as collector (C), base (B) and emitter (E), respectively. Although the transistor effect, which corresponds to the current amplification, be accurately described by the quantum physics, one can utilize a simple concept from the circuit theory: the base current IB (input signal) is amplified by a factor of β resulting in the collector current IC (output signal) at least one hundred times greater the IB. In fact, the BJT is commonly used as a current amplifier with gain β=I{sub C}/I{sub B}, therefore, it was noticed that this parameter is altered when the device is exposed to ionizing radiation. The current gain alteration can be explained by the trap creation and the positive charges build up, beside the degradation of the lattice structure. Then, variations of the gain of irradiated transistors may justify their use as a dosimeter. Actually, the methodology is based on the measurements of the I{sub C} variations whereas I{sub B} is maintained constant. BC846 BJT type was used for dose monitoring from passive-mode measurements: evaluation of its electrical characteristic before and after irradiation procedure. Thus, IC readings were plotted as a function of the applied dose in 6 MeV electron beam

  8. Effect of ionizing radiation on the physical biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; Bornstein, Sophia; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Schmidt, Mark; Tormoen, Garth W; Kernan, Casey; Thomas, Charles R; Wong, Melissa H; Phillips, Kevin G; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer worldwide. Although there are numerous treatment options for HNSCC, such as surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy, molecularly targeted systemic therapeutics, and radiotherapy, overall survival has not significantly improved in the last 50 years. This suggests a need for a better understanding of how these cancer cells respond to current treatments in order to improve treatment paradigms. Ionizing radiation (IR) promotes cancer cell death through the creation of cytotoxic DNA lesions, including single strand breaks, base damage, crosslinks, and double strand breaks (DSBs). As unrepaired DSBs are the most cytotoxic DNA lesion, defining the downstream cellular responses to DSBs are critical for understanding the mechanisms of tumor cell responses to IR. The effects of experimental IR on HNSCC cells beyond DNA damage in vitro are ill-defined. Here we combined label-free, quantitative phase and fluorescent microscopy to define the effects of IR on the dry mass and volume of the HNSCC cell line, UM-SCC-22A. We quantified nuclear and cytoplasmic subcellular density alterations resulting from 8 Gy X-ray IR and correlated these signatures with DNA and γ-H2AX expression patterns. This study utilizes a synergistic imaging approach to study both biophysical and biochemical alterations in cells following radiation damage and will aid in future understanding of cellular responses to radiation therapy.

  9. A study on the radiation and environment safety -Development of technology for biological dosimetry-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, In Kyoo; Kim, Jin Kyoo; Chun Kee Jung; Park, Hyo Kook; Kim, Sang Bok; Park Sun Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Adult rats were treated a single, whole body exposure to a dose of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 Gy. The animals were sacrificed 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 hours following exposure. The amount of serum acute phase proteins(haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein, alpha-1 antitrypsin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, transferrin) were measured by competitive ELISA. In the 0.1 Gy irradiated rats, serum haptoglobin, C-reactive protein and alpha-1 antitrypsin were 400% higher and serum transferrin was 50% lower as compared to controls, 96 hours after irradiation. Ceruloplasmin increased by 400%, 24 hours after irradiation, but 96 hours after irradiation, the concentration of this protein in rat returned to normal level. On the other hand, no changes were observed in the case of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. In the group of the 3.0 Gy irradiated rats, transferrin increased by 200%, 96 hours after irradiation. These biochemical responses to radiation did not show dose-dependent relation, but the sensitivity of the indicators was high enough to detect absorbed dose of 0.1 Gy. The above results can be applied to the measurements of acute phase reactants in human serum for the assessment of exposure doses in radiation workers and patients under radiation therapy. 39 figs, 72 refs. (Author).

  10. Clinical application of glass dosimeter for in vivo dose measurements of total body irradiation treatment technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Sang-Yeob; Lee, Doo-Hyun; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu-dong, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Rena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong, E-mail: cool_park@ncc.re.k [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu-dong, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The commercially available glass dosimeter (model GD-301) was investigated for its dosimetric characteristics, in order to evaluate its use for in vivo dosimetry. We specifically assessed overall precision of dosimetric dose data in patients who received treatment with the total body irradiation (TBI). Uniformity obtained in this study was within 1.2% (1 SD). The dose-response was linear in the range of 0.5-10 Gy with R of 0.999. Dose rate, SSD, field size, angular and energy dependence were found to be within 3.0%. In vivo skin dosimetry for TBI was performed for 3 patients. For all patients, the glass dosimeter was exposed and measured dose recorded for one fraction in addition to conventional used TLD and MOSFET. Overall uncertainty of the glass dosimeter for in vivo dose measurement was estimated at 2.4% (68.3% confidence level). The measured doses of the glass dosimeter were well within {+-}5.0% of the prescription dose at all sites expect mediastinum of one patient, for which it is within {+-}5.7%. Agreement of measured doses between glass dosimeter and TLD, MOSFET was within {+-}6.3% and {+-}6.6%, respectively. Results show that the glass dosimeter can be used as an accurate and reproducible dosimeter for TBI treatment skin dose measurements. The glass dosimeter is a practical alternative to TLD or MOSFET as an in vivo dosimeter.

  11. Solid-state dosimeters: A new approach for mammography measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brateman, Libby F., E-mail: bratel@radiology.ufl.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine Box 100374, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0374 (United States); Heintz, Philip H. [Department of Radiology, University of New Mexico, MSC10 5530, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To compare responses of modern commercially available solid-state dosimeters (SStDs) used in mammography medical physics surveys for two major vendors of current digital mammography units. To compare differences in dose estimates among SStD responses with ionization chamber (IC) measurements for several target/filter (TF) combinations and report their characteristics. To review scientific bases for measurements of quantities required for mammography for traditional measurement procedures and SStDs. Methods: SStDs designed for use with modern digital mammography units were acquired for evaluation from four manufacturers. Each instrument was evaluated under similar conditions with the available mammography beams provided by two modern full-field digital mammography units in clinical use: a GE Healthcare Senographe Essential (Essential) and a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 5000 (Dimensions), with TFs of Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh; and Rh/Rh and W/Rh, W/Ag, and W/Al, respectively. Measurements were compared among the instruments for the TFs over their respective clinical ranges of peak tube potentials for kVp and half-value layer (HVL) measurements. Comparisons for air kerma (AK) and their associated relative calculated average glandular doses (AGDs), i.e., using fixed mAs, were evaluated over the limited range of 28–30 kVp. Measurements were compared with reference IC measurements for AK, reference HVLs and calculated AGD, for two compression paddle heights for AK, to evaluate scatter effects from compression paddles. SStDs may require different positioning from current mammography measurement protocols. Results: Measurements of kVp were accurate in general for the SStDs (within −1.2 and +1.1 kVp) for all instruments over a wide range of set kVp’s and TFs and most accurate for Mo/Mo and W/Rh. Discrepancies between measurements and reference values were greater for HVL and AK. Measured HVL values differed from reference values by −6.5% to +3.5% depending on the SStD and

  12. Molecular biology methods in assessing radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, A. [University of Helsinki, Department of Biosciences, Division of Genetics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-12-01

    Effort to predict the genetic consequences for humans of exposure to ionising radiation has been one of the most important issues of human genetics over the past 60 years. To date, there has been little experimental knowledge on the genetic risks of human exposure to ionising radiation. Radiation-induced deleterious hereditary effects have not been detected in human populations - not even among the offspring of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This does not mean deleterious hereditary effects do not exist in humans, but rather that they are small and/or difficult to detect because the normal incidence of inherited abnormalities is quite high in the human population. Thus, assessment of radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans has been based on the common knowledge of human heredity and on animal experiments. However, recent data have suggested that hyper-variable tandem repeat minisatellite loci provide a useful and sensitive experimental approach for monitoring radiation-induced germline mutations in humans. In order to investigate the feasibility of the minisatellite mutation screening system in assessing radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans, we examined the amount of hereditary minisatellite mutations among the offspring of Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers. The men studied received a median radiation dose of 109 mSv while working on the cleanup activities after the Chernobyl accident. We compared the minisatellite mutation rates of 155 children born to 147 Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers after the accident to those of their 148 siblings born prior to it. In addition, 44 Estonian families, where the father had not been exposed to radiation, composed an additional control group. In all of these families, the paternity of the children was ascertained by using 5 minisatellite loci (APOB, HRAS, MCOB19, MCT118, and YNZ-22) in PCR-based analyses. Other 8 minisatellite loci (B6.7, CEB1, CEB15, CEB25, CEB36, MS1, MS31, and MS32) were used

  13. Synthesis, biological distribution and radiation dosimetry of Te-123m analogues of hexadecenoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Ice, R.D. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City (USA). College of Pharmacy); Mills, S.L. (Tennessee Univ., Memphis (USA). College of Pharmacy)

    1982-06-01

    The synthesis and biological distribution of four Te-123m analogues of hexadecenoic acid in rats, rabbits and dogs were described for use as possible myocardial imaging agents. The heart-to-blood ratios ranged from 0.13 for 3-telluranonadecenoic acid in rats at 5 mins to 6.25 for 18-methyl-17-tellura-9-nonadecenoic acid in dogs at 24 hrs. The biological half-life of the Te-123m labelled fatty acids ranged from 26 to 583 hrs in the hearts of the test animals. These Te-123m fatty acids were retained in the heart longer than radioiodinated fatty acids and have acceptable absorbed doses to the various target organs.

  14. 1987 Neutron and gamma personnel dosimeter intercomparison study using a D/sub 2/O-moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaja, R.E.; West, L.E.; Sims, C.S.; Welty, T.J.

    1989-05-01

    The thirteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 13) was conducted during April 1987 as a joint effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research Group and the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. A total of 48 organizations (34 from the US and 14 from abroad) participated in PDIS 13. Participants submitted a total of 1,113 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The dosimeters were transferred by mail and were handled by experimental personnel at ORNL and the University of Arkansas. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (49%), direct interaction TLD (31%), CR-39 (17%), film (3%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/, alone or in combination with CaSO/sub 4/, (69%), /sup 7/LiF (28%), natural LiF (3%). Radiation exposures in PDIS 13 were limited to 0.5 and 1.5 mSv from /sup 252/Cf moderated by 15-cm of D/sub 2/O. Traditional exposures using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) were not possible due to the fact that all reactors at ORNL, including the HPRR, were shutdown by order of the Department of Energy at the time the intercomparison was performed. Planned exposures using a /sup 238/PuBe source were negated by a faulty timing mechanism. Based on accuracy and precision, direct interaction TLD dosimeters exhibited the best performance in PDIS 13 neutron measurements. They were followed, in order of best performance, by CR-39, TLD albedo, and film. The Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ type TLD dosimeters exhibited the best performance in PDIS 13 gamma measurements. They were followed by natural LiF, /sup 7/LiF, and film. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. SU-E-T-253: Open-Source Automatic Software for Quantifying Biological Assays of Radiation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detappe, A [University of Lyon (France); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Korideck, H [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Makrigiorgos, G; Berbeco, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Clonogenic cell survival is a common assay for quantifying the effect of drugs and radiation. Manual counting of surviving colonies can take 30–90seconds per plate, a major limitation for large studies. Currently available automatic counting tools are not easily modified for radiation oncology research. Our goal is to provide an open-source toolkit for precise, accurate and fast analysis of biological assays in radiation oncology. Methods: As an example analysis, we used HeLa cells incubated with gadolinium nanoparticles prior to irradiation. After treatment, the cells are grown for 14days to allow for colony formation. To analyze the colony growth, we capture images of each dish for archiving and automatic computer-based analysis. A FujifilmX20 camera is placed at the top of a box setup, 20cm above the sample, which is backlit by a LED lamp placed at the bottom of the box. We use a Gaussian filter (width=1.3mm) and color threshold (19–255). The minimum size for a colony to be counted is 1mm. For this example, 20 dishes with a large range of colonies were analyzed. Each dish was counted 3 times manually by 3 different users and then compared to our counter. Results: Automatic counting of cell colonies takes an average of 7seconds, enabling the analysis process to be accelerated 4–12 times. The average precision of the automatic counter was 1.7%. The Student t-test demonstrated the non-significant differences between the two counting methods (p=0.64). The ICC demonstrated the reliability of each method with ICC>0.999 (automatic) and ICC=0.95 (manual). Conclusion: We developed an open-source automatic toolkit for the analysis of biological assays in radiation oncology and demonstrated the accuracy, precision and effort savings for clonogenic cell survival quantification. This toolkit is currently being used in two laboratories for routine experimental analysis and will be made freely available on our departmental website.

  16. The role of cell hydration in realization of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2015-09-01

    The weak knowledge on the nature of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological effects of NIR such as static magnetic field, infrasound frequency of mechanical vibration, extremely low frequency of electromagnetic fields and microwave serves as a main barrier for adequate dosimetry from the point of Public Health. The difficulty lies in the fact that the biological effects of NIR depend not only on their thermodynamic characteristics but also on their frequency and intensity "windows", chemical and physical composition of the surrounding medium, as well as on the initial metabolic state of the organism. Therefore, only biomarker can be used for adequate estimation of biological effect of NIR on organisms. Because of the absence of such biomarker(s), organizations having the mission to monitor hazardous effects of NIR traditionally base their instruction on thermodynamic characteristics of NIR. Based on the high sensitivity to NIR of both aqua medium structure and cell hydration, it is suggested that cell bathing medium is one of the primary targets and cell hydration is a biomarker for NIR effects on cells and organisms. The purpose of this article is to present a short review of literature and our own experimental data on the effects of NIR on plants' seeds germination, microbe growth and development, snail neurons and heart muscle, rat's brain and heart tissues.

  17. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    -B was demonstrated to decrease photosynthesis and shift carbon allocation from shoots to roots. Moreover, ambient UV-B increased plant stress with detrimental effects on electron processing in the photosynthetic apparatus. Plant responses did not lead to clear changes in the amount of fungal root symbionts...... on high-arctic vegetation. They supplement previous investigations from the Arctic focussing on other variables like growth etc., which have reported no or minor plant responses to UV-B, and clearly indicates that UV-B radiation is an important factor affecting plant life at high-arctic Zackenberg...

  18. Biological responses to current UV-B radiation in Arctic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; N. Mikkelsen, Teis; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    (mycorrhiza) or in the biomass of microbes in the soil of the root zone. However, the composition of the soil microbial community was different in the soils under ambient and reduced UV radiation after three treatment years. These results provide new insight into the negative impact of current UV-B fluxes......-B was demonstrated to decrease photosynthesis and shift carbon allocation from shoots to roots. Moreover, ambient UV-B increased plant stress with detrimental effects on electron processing in the photosynthetic apparatus. Plant responses did not lead to clear changes in the amount of fungal root symbionts...

  19. Age-dependent change in biological characteristics of stem cells in radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Yoshiya; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Chiba (Japan); Yasukawa-Barnes, Jane; Gould, Michael N.; Clifton, Kelly H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2003-07-01

    If you ask what types of cells are the targets for carcinogenesis, a popular answer would be that cancer arises from stem cells. Stem cells are cells that are capable of both self-renewal and generation of differentiated progenies. If the hypothesis of 'cancer as stem cell disease' is correct, the risk of carcinogenesis should be a function of the number of stem cells and their responsiveness of carcinogen-induced damage. In the present study, we addressed the feasibility of this hypothesis using the rat mammary carcinogenesis model. One of the important conclusions emerging from studies on atomic bomb survivors concerns age-related changes in the susceptibility to breast cancer. The relative risk of breast cancer is very high among women exposed to ionizing radiation before or during puberty, and it decreases thereafter. Little information is available, however, on age-related changes in the radiobiological nature of mammary stem cells. We examined age-associated changes in the number of mammary stem-like cells (clonogens) and their susceptibility to radiation in terms of cell death and carcinogenic initiation frequency. The results were as follows. (1) During the prepubertal period, the total number of mammary clonogens per rat increased exponentially with a population doubling time of {approx}4 days. After puberty, the doubling time lengthened to {approx}30 days. The total number of clonogens in abdominal and inguinal mammary glands was {approx}200 in 2-week-old rats, while it was {approx}5600 in 8-week-old rats. (2) The survival curves of clonogenic cells after irradiation indicated that radiation sensitivity of the cells before and during puberty was much higher than after puberty. (3) The initiation frequency of the clonogens from prepubertal rats after 5 Gy irradiation was four times higher than that of the clonogens from post-pubertal rats. These results suggest that changes in the number of stem cells and their radiobiological characteristics

  20. The effect of ionizing radiation on microbiological decontamination of medical herbs and biologically active compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, B.; Kedzia, B.; Holderna-Kedzia, E.; Segiet-Kujawa, E.

    1998-06-01

    Several thousand tons of medical herbs are produced annually by pharmaceutical industry in Poland. This product should be of highest quality and microbial purity. Recently, chemical methods of decontamination are recognized as less safe, thus irradiation technique was chosen to replace them in use. In the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology the national program on the application of irradiation to the decontamination of medical herbs is in progress now. The purpose of the program is to elaborate, on the basis of research work, the facility standards and technological instructions indispensable for the practice of radiation technology.

  1. Enhancing Cytogenetic Biological Dosimetry Capabilities of the Philippines for Nuclear Incident Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaad, Celia O.; Caraos, Gloriamaris L.; Robles, Gerardo Jose M.; Asa, Anie Day D. C.; Cobar, Maria Lucia C.; Asaad, Al-Ahmadgaid

    2016-01-01

    The utility of a biological dosimeter based on the analysis of dicentrics is invaluable in the event of a radiological emergency wherein the estimated absorbed dose of an exposed individual is crucial in the proper medical management of patients. The technique is also used for routine monitoring of occupationally exposed workers to determine radiation exposure. An in vitro irradiation study of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted to establish a dose-response curve for radiation-induced dicentric aberrations. Blood samples were collected from volunteer donors and together with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters and were irradiated at 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy using a cobalt-60 radiotherapy unit. Blood samples were cultured for 48 h, and the metaphase chromosomes were prepared following the procedure of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Emergency Preparedness and Response – Biodosimetry 2011 manual. At least 100 metaphases were scored for dicentric aberrations at each dose point. The data were analyzed using R language program. The results indicated that the distribution of dicentric cells followed a Poisson distribution and the dose-response curve was established using the estimated model, Ydic = 0.0003 (±0.0003) +0.0336 (±0.0115) × D + 0.0236 (±0.0054) × D2. In this study, the reliability of the dose-response curve in estimating the absorbed dose was also validated for 2 and 4 Gy using OSL dosimeters. The data were fitted into the constructed curve. The result of the validation study showed that the obtained estimate for the absorbed exposure doses was close to the true exposure doses. PMID:28217280

  2. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  3. The Impact of Adaptive and Non-targeted Effects in the Biological Responses to Low Dose/Low Fluence Ionizing-Radiation: The Modulating Effect of Linear Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    de Toledo, Sonia M.; Buonanno, Manuela; Li, Min; Asaad, Nesrin; Qin, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2011-01-01

    A large volume of laboratory and human epidemiological studies have shown that high doses of ionizing radiation engender significant health risks. In contrast, the health risks of low level radiation remain ambiguous and have been the subject of intense debate. To reduce the uncertainty in evaluating these risks, research advances in cellular and molecular biology are being used to characterize the biological effects of low dose radiation exposures and their underlying mechanisms. Radiation t...

  4. Biological monitoring of non-thermal effects of mobile phone radiation: recent approaches and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaestel, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    This review describes recent developments in analysing the influence of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs ) on biological systems by monitoring the cellular stress response as well as overall gene expression. Recent data on the initiation and modulation of the classical cellular stress response by RF-EMFs, comprising expression of heat shock proteins and stimulation of stress-activated protein kinases, are summarised and evaluated. Since isothermic RF-EMF exposure is assumed rather than proven there are clear limitations in using the stress response to describe non-thermal effects of RF-EMFs. In particular, further experiments are needed to characterise better the threshold of the thermal heat shock response and the homogeneity of the cellular response in the whole sample for each biological system used. Before then, it is proposed that the absence of the classical stress response can define isothermal experimental conditions and qualifies other biological effects of RF-EMFs detected under these conditions to be of non-thermal origin. To minimise the probability that by making this assumption valuable insights into the nature of biological effects of RF-EMFs could be lost, proteotoxic non-thermal RF-EMF effects should also be monitored by measuring activities of labile intracellular enzymes and/or levels of their metabolites before the threshold for the heat shock response is reached. In addition, non-thermal induction of the stress response via promoter elements distinct from the heat shock element (HSE) should be analysed using HSE-mutated heat shock promoter reporter constructs. Screening for non-thermal RF-EMF effects in the absence of a classical stress response should be performed by transcriptomics and proteomics. Recent approaches demonstrate that due to their high-throughput characteristics, these methods inherently generate false positive results and require statistical evaluation based on quantitative expression analysis from a sufficient

  5. Identification problem for stochastic models with application to carcinogenesis, cancer detection and radiation biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Hanin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A general framework for solving identification problem for a broad class of deterministic and stochastic models is discussed. This methodology allows for a unified approach to studying identifiability of various stochastic models arising in biology and medicine including models of spontaneous and induced Carcinogenesis, tumor progression and detection, and randomized hit and target models of irradiated cell survival. A variety of known results on parameter identification for stochastic models is reviewed and several new results are presented with an emphasis on rigorous mathematical development.

  6. Effect of radiation and fungal treatment on ligno celluloses and their biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, N.D.; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu E-mail: kume@taka.jaeri.go.jp

    2000-10-01

    Effects of high-dose irradiation and fungal treatment on some kinds of lignocellulose material were investigated in order to assess the potential effects of bioactive substances on plants. Each treatment and combination of treatments significantly altered the components of lignocellulose materials. Irradiation strongly affected all plant materials, causing a series of changes in physico-chemical parameters such as solubilization during solvent extraction and losses of fibre components. By these degradations, certain biologically active substances formed and acted as antagonists of auxin-induced growth.

  7. Influence of Age on the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ion Radiation for Induction of Rat Mammary Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: t_imaoka@nirs.go.jp [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kokubo, Toshiaki [Department of Technical Support and Development, Research Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Doi, Kazutaka [Regulatory Sciences Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Iizuka, Daisuke [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Molecular Radiobiology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimura, Yukiko [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Okutani, Tomomi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Takabatake, Masaru [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan); Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of developing secondary cancer after radiotherapy, especially after treatment of childhood cancers, remains a matter of concern. The high biological effects of carbon-ion radiation have enabled powerful radiotherapy, yet the approach is commonly restricted to the treatment of adults. Susceptibility of the fetus to particle radiation–induced cancer is also unclear. The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of carbon-ion irradiation in childhood on breast carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: We irradiated female Sprague-Dawley rats of various ages (embryonic days 3, 13, and 17 and 1, 3, 7, and 15 weeks after birth) with {sup 137}Cs γ rays or a 290-MeV/u monoenergetic carbonion beam (linear energy transfer, 13 keV/μm). All animals were screened weekly for mammary carcinoma by palpation until they were 90 weeks old. Results: Irradiation of fetal and mature (15-week-old) rats with either radiation source at a dose of 0.2 or 1 Gy did not substantially increase the hazard ratio compared with the nonirradiated group. Dose responses (0.2-2.0 Gy) to γ rays were similar among the groups of rats irradiated 1, 3, and 7 weeks after birth. The effect of carbon ions increased along with the age at the time of irradiation, indicating relative biological effectiveness values of 0.2 (−0.3, 0.7), 1.3 (1.0, 1.6), and 2.8 (1.8, 3.9) (mean and 95% confidence interval) for animals that were 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings imply that carbonion therapy may be associated with a risk of secondary breast cancer in humans, the extent of which may depend on the age of the patient at the time of irradiation.

  8. Investigation on the role of IGF-1 signal transduction in the biological radiation responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Oh, Soo Jin; Cho, Eun Hee; Eom, Hyun Soo; Ju, Eun Jin

    2009-05-15

    Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the IGF-1 related gene expressions and activations in various cell lines - Various expression patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R following {gamma}-irradiation were observed according to the cell lines - The increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in Balb/3T3 and NIH/3T3 cells - Among the IGF-1 downstream signaling molecules, the phosphorylated ERK5 were not changed by {gamma}-irradiation in all three examined cell lines, whereas the phosphorylated p65 were increased by {gamma} -irradiation in all cell lines. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in {gamma}-irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells - In MEF cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules were decreased and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by {gamma}-irradiation - The experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 signaling is involved but not essential in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence and that p38 MAP kinase play a important role in this cellular radiation response. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in {gamma}-irradiated mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell - In NIH/3T3 cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by {gamma} -irradiation. - However, the experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 and p38 signaling do not play a crucial role in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence in NIH/3T3 cells. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the expressions and activations on the genes related to the IGF-1 signaling in mouse tissues - In {gamma}-irradiated mice, the increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in the lung and kidney at 2 months after irradiation, and in all the tissues examined (lung, liver and kidney) at 6 months after irradiation. - In the lung of {gamma}-irradiated mice at 6 months after irradiation, the increases of IGF-1R, phosphorylated FOXO3a, p65, p38, p21 were observed. - The

  9. 生物电磁辐射实验装置的设计%Design of biological electromagnetic radiation devices for biological effects experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨思凡; 庞小峰; 李斌

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, people pay much attention to our health, but our life space is full of all kinds of strength of electric fields and magnetic fields. Due to the complexity of biological effects, the harm level of electromagnetic radiation pollution on hum%近年来,人们对健康的呼声越来越高,而现代生活空间中充满了各种强度的电场、磁场。由于生物效应的复杂性,这些电磁辐射污染对人体健康的危害程度以及是否会引起生物效应在学术界还存在分歧。因此要比较准确的研究电磁辐射危害健康的机理以及指导采取医学防护的措施就需要大量的动物实验或者人体实验。基于这一需要,设计一个可以比较科学的模拟空间电磁环境的实验装置就非常有必要了。这样就可以定量和定性分析电场、磁场以及更复杂的混合场对生物体产生的影响。

  10. Biological Studies On The Effect of Laser Radiation on Khapra Beetle Trogoderma granarium (Coleoptera : Dermestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nozahy, Adel M.; Ahmed, Salwa M. M. S.; Abdel-Kader, Mahomoud H.; Khalifa, Ibtesam A.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the effect of Argon-ion laser and carbon dioxide laser radiation on Khapra beetle Trogoderma granarium and induced sterility. Radiobiological effects of irradiation were determined on adult stage of resulted 2-3 days-old pupae at LD30. The radiobiological studies induced determination of mortality, of, LD30, LD50 emergence, preovipositio period, fecundity, sterility, incubation period, larval duration, pupal duration and emergence of 1st generation. Experiments were carried out to determine the latent effect of irradiation on the wheat grains germination as well as the effects on the chemical constituents. In this respect irradiation of grains had no effect on the above ntioned parameters.

  11. A new class of radiation-activating antitumor prodrugs releasing 5-fluorodeoxyuridine: synthesis, reactivity and biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakakibara, S.; Zhou, L.; Mori, M.; Hatta, H.; Nishimoto, S. [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ., Institute for Frontier Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    A number of 3-substituted 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (5-FdUrd) derivatives (1-6) were synthesized to evaluate their radiation reactivity and biological activity as a new class of prodrugs that can be radiation-activated to release 5-FdUrd. The compounds 2-6 bearing substituents with a 2-oxo group underwent radiolytic reduction to release 5-FdUrd in considerably high yields under anoxic conditions, while the compound 1 without 2-oxo substituent was inactive in releasing 5-FdUrd. The cytotoxicities of 2-6 toward P388 T cells of mouse leukemia were less than 5-FdUrd, as indicated by an MTT assay. The apparent cytotoxicities were significantly enhanced by X-irradiation under hypoxic conditions. A conclusion was that 2-6 have no antitumor effect in contrast to 5-FdUrd, but can potentiate the effect of cancer radiotherapy by releasing a cell-killing component 5-FdUrd. (author)

  12. Validation of QuickScan dicentric chromosome analysis for high throughput radiation biological dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegal, F N; Devantier, Y; Marro, L; Wilkins, R C

    2012-02-01

    Currently, the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) is used to estimate radiation doses to individuals following accidental radiological and nuclear overexposures when traditional dosimetry methods are not available. While being an exceptionally sensitive method for estimating doses by radiation, conventional DCA is time-intensive and requires highly trained expertise for analysis. For this reason, in a mass casualty situation, triage-quality conventional DCA struggles to provide dose estimations in a timely manner for triage purposes. In Canada, a new scoring technique, termed DCA QuickScan, has been devised to increase the throughput of this assay. DCA QuickScan uses traditional DCA sample preparation methods while adapting a rapid scoring approach. In this study, both conventional and QuickScan methods of scoring the DCA assay were compared for accuracy and sensitivity. Dose response curves were completed on four different donors based on the analysis of 1,000 metaphases or 200 events at eight to nine dose points by eight different scorers across two laboratories. Statistical analysis was performed on the data to compare the two methods within and across the laboratories and to test their respective sensitivities for dose estimation. This study demonstrated that QuickScan is statistically similar to conventional DCA analysis and is capable of producing dose estimates as low as 0.1 Gy but up to six times faster. Therefore, DCA QuickScan analysis can be used as a sensitive and accurate method for scoring samples for radiological biodosimetry in mass casualty situations or where faster dose assessment is required.

  13. Biological image construction by using Raman radiation and Pca: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez E, J. C. [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria, Campus Guanajuato, Av. Mineral de Valenciana 200, Col. Fracc. Industrial Puerto Interior, 36275 Silao, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cordova F, T. [Universidad de Guanajuato, DIC, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Hugo R, V., E-mail: jcmartineze@ipn.mx [Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de Tonala, Morelos No. 180, 69584 Tonala, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In the last years, the Raman spectroscopy (Rs) technique has had some applications in the study and analysis of biological samples, due to it is able to detect concentrations or presence of certain organic and inorganic compounds of medical interest. In this work, raw data were obtained through measurements in selected points on a square regions in order to detect specific organic / inorganic compounds on biological samples. Gold nano stars samples were prepared and coated with membrane markers (CD 10+ and CD 19+) and diluted in leukemic B lymphocytes. Each data block was evaluated independently by the method of principal component analysis (Pca) in order to find representative dimensionless values (Cp) for each Raman spectrum in a specific coordinate. Each Cp was normalized in a range of 0-255 in order to generate a representative image of 8 bits of the region under study. Data acquisition was performed with Raman microscopy system Renishaw in Via in the range of 550 to 1700 cm-1 with a 785 nm laser source, with a power of 17 m W and 15 s of exposure time were used for each spectrum. In preliminary results could detect the presence of molecular markers CD 10+ and CD 19+ with gold nano stars and discrimination between both markers. The results suggest conducting studies with specific concentrations organic and inorganic materials. (Author)

  14. FBX aqueous chemical dosimeter for measurement of dosimetric parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussous, O., E-mail: o.moussous@crna.d [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz Fanon B.P. 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Medjadj, T. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz Fanon B.P. 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Benguerba, M. [Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari-Boumediene USTHB, Alger (Algeria)

    2011-02-15

    We investigated the ferrous sulphate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange (FBX) aqueous chemical dosimeter for measurement of dosimetric parameters such as the output factor, backscatter factor and lateral beam profiles for different square fields sizes for {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. A water phantom was employed to measure these parameters. An ionization chamber (IC) was used for calibration and comparison. A comparison of the resulting measurements with an ionization chamber's measured parameters showed good agreement. We thus believe that the tissue equivalent FBX dosimetry system can measure the dosimetric parameters for {sup 60}Co with reasonable accuracy.

  15. Preliminary results on TL and OSL aluminium oxide dosimeters developed at IPEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumori, David T.; Yoshito, Walter K.; Ussui, Valter; Lazar, Dolores R.R.; Campos, Leticia L., E-mail: fukumori@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aluminum oxide composes the modern TL and OSL radiation dosimeters. TL and OSL phenomena are related to chemical elements in the crystalline structure of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The aim of this work was to develop materials based on aluminum oxide for use in TL and OSL dosimetry. The studies included the dosimetric properties of alumina samples obtained by electro fusion, adsorption and coprecipitation. Electro fused alumina commercially available as abrasive particles was used to produce the pellets by glass sintering. Adsorption and coprecipitation were the methods used to insert metal ions to alumina. The best results were achieved with electro fused alumina and Tm{sup 3+} doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} pellets. The electro fused alumina-glass pellets show TL and OSL signals and the TL curve has two peaks. Its minimum detectable radiation dose is 7.2 mGy and the linearity of TL response as function of dose is up to about 800 mGy. The {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tm pellets produced by sintering at 1550 deg C presented a meaningful TL glow curve so that it is worth studying their properties and viability of use in dosimetry. (author)

  16. Alcohol solutions of triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride as high-dose radiochromic dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, A.; Wojnarovits, L.; El-Assy, N.B.; Afeefy, H.Y.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Walker, M.L.; McLaughlin, W.L. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NML), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Ionizing Radiation Div.

    1995-10-01

    The radiolytic reduction of colorless tetrazolium salts in aqueous solution to the highly colored formazan dye is a well-known acid-forming radiation chemical reaction. Radiochromic thin films and three-dimensional hydrocolloid gels have been used for imaging and mapping absorbed dose distributions. The high solubility of 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) in alcohols provides a useful liquid dosimeter (45 mM TTC in aerated ethanol) and shows a linear response of absorbance increase ({lambda}{sub max} = 480 nm) with dose over the range 1-16 kGy. The linear molar absorption coefficient ({epsilon}{sub m}) for the formazan at the absorption peak is 1.5 x 10{sup 3} m{sup 2} mol{sup -1}, and the radiation chemical yield for the above solution is G (formazan) 0.014 {mu}mol J{sup -1}. The irradiation temperature coefficient is about 0.8 percent per degree Celsius rise in temperature over the temperature range 0-30 {sup o}C but is much larger between 30{sup o} and 60 {sup o}C. The unirradiated and irradiated solutions are stable over at least five days storage at normal laboratory temperature in the dark, but when stored in daylight at elevated temperature, the unirradiated solution in sealed amber glass ampoules undergoes slow photolytic dye formation, and the irradiated solution experiences initial fading and subsequent reversal (photochromism) when exposed to direct sunlight. (author).

  17. Development of a multichannel dosimeter for radiotherapy; Desenvolvimento de um dosimetro multicanal para radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Claudio Jose Mesquita

    2000-06-01

    In radiotherapy, verification of the patient dose is of great important for the success of the treatment. Uncertainties in the evaluation of this dose can produce serious complications such as the loss of the control of the disease and damage to normal tissue. Semiconductor detectors present advantages over other types of radiation detectors such as ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters including small dimensions, high sensitivity and fast response. In this work, a multichannel dosimetric system is linear with dose, for a 6 MV x-ray beam and also with a beam of cobalt-60 gamma rays. The coefficients of determination of the calibration curves were better then 0,9998 in all cases. The four sensors presented similar response with the dose for different field sizes. The variation of the response was smaller than 1%. In a related study, depth dose was measured, and the results showed a good agreement compared to theoretical values. The angular response of the detectors showed a variation of 7% for angles of 45 deg C. Using the Anderson Random phantom, dose at the isocenter was determined from measurements of the surface dose. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the dosimetric system developed is adequate for the evaluation of many parameters in radiation fields used in radiotherapy. This system can be used to measure the patient entrance dose under treatment conditions, and the equipment can be used in the radiotherapy quality assurance program. (author)

  18. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    rabbits, 11-12 months old, live weight 3.5-3.7 (n=11), Balb mice, 2-3 months old, live weight 20-22 g (n=33), Wistar rats, 3-4 months old, live weight 180-220 g(n=33). The studies were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee for ethical animal research equivalent, at each institution. Seven rabbits, ten mice, eleven Wistar rats were vaccinated with a UV antiradiation vaccine. A second group of animals was used as biological control which received vaccine but no UV Radiation and a third group of animals was used as control without any interventions. Before and after UV Radiation, Vaccination with the UV antiradiation vaccine were provided 17 days prior to UV exposure. The animals were irradiated by a DRT-1 UV generator lamp. The dose of irradiation for laboratory, experimental animals was 10-12 * Standard Erythema Dose (SED) at L=283,7 Laboratory animals were placed in to the box with ventilation. Results: Ultraviolet irradiation of the skin was performed with high doses and causes an inflammation or erythema in all experimental animals. However the grade of skin damage and inflammation was significantly different between animals protected by vaccination and non-protected, non-vaccinated animals. Animals UV-irradiated, but who did not receive the antiradiation vaccine suffered from extensive UV skin burns of second or third degree (grade 2-3). However, animals protected with the UV antiradiation vaccine demonstrated much mild forms of skin cellular injury - mainly erythema, first degree skin burns and a few small patches with second degree skin burns (grade 1-2). Discussion: The severity of skin damage depended on area of exposed skin, time and dose of UV irradiation. Skin injury could be divided into 4 major grades: 1. Faint erythema with dry desquamation. 2. Moderate to severe erythema. 3. Severe erythema with blistering, moist desquamation. 4. Toxic epidermal necrolysis. Mild doses of UV radiation and ionizing radiation can induce cell death by apoptosis and