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Sample records for biological properties electronic

  1. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurements show how the choice of support material and geometry can reduce specimen movement by more than an order of magnitude during low-dose imaging. We provide methods for fabrication of all-gold supports and preparation of vitrified specimens. We also analyse illumination geometry for optimal collection of high resolution, low-dose data. Together, the support structures and methods herein can improve the resolution and quality of images from any electron cryomicroscope. PMID:26592474

  2. Enhanced Physicochemical and Biological Properties of Ion-Implanted Titanium Using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Hegedűs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface properties of metallic implants play an important role in their clinical success. Improving upon the inherent shortcomings of Ti implants, such as poor bioactivity, is imperative for achieving clinical use. In this study, we have developed a Ti implant modified with Ca or dual Ca + Si ions on the surface using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS. The physicochemical and biological properties of ion-implanted Ti surfaces were analyzed using various analytical techniques, such as surface analyses, potentiodynamic polarization and cell culture. Experimental results indicated that a rough morphology was observed on the Ti substrate surface modified by ECRIS plasma ions. The in vitro electrochemical measurement results also indicated that the Ca + Si ion-implanted surface had a more beneficial and desired behavior than the pristine Ti substrate. Compared to the pristine Ti substrate, all ion-implanted samples had a lower hemolysis ratio. MG63 cells cultured on the high Ca and dual Ca + Si ion-implanted surfaces revealed significantly greater cell viability in comparison to the pristine Ti substrate. In conclusion, surface modification by electron cyclotron resonance Ca and Si ion sources could be an effective method for Ti implants.

  3. Wireless Biological Electronic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2017-10-09

    The development of wireless biological electronic sensors could open up significant advances for both fundamental studies and practical applications in a variety of areas, including medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and defense applications. One of the major challenges in the development of wireless bioelectronic sensors is the successful integration of biosensing units and wireless signal transducers. In recent years, there are a few types of wireless communication systems that have been integrated with biosensing systems to construct wireless bioelectronic sensors. To successfully construct wireless biological electronic sensors, there are several interesting questions: What types of biosensing transducers can be used in wireless bioelectronic sensors? What types of wireless systems can be integrated with biosensing transducers to construct wireless bioelectronic sensors? How are the electrical sensing signals generated and transmitted? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions in the development of wireless biological electronic sensors.

  4. Biological and Pharmacological properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Biological and Pharmacological properties. NOEA inhibits Ceramidase. Anandamide inhibits gap junction conductance and reduces sperm fertilizing capacity. Endogenous ligands for Cannabinoid receptors (anandamide and NPEA). Antibacterial and antiviral ...

  5. The electron beam deposition of titanium on polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and the resulting enhanced biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cheol-Min; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag; Kim, Keung N; Ha, Yoon; Kuh, Sung-Uk

    2010-05-01

    The surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was coated with a pure titanium (Ti) layer using an electron beam (e-beam) deposition method in order to enhance its biocompatibility and adhesion to bone tissue. The e-beam deposition method was a low-temperature coating process that formed a dense, uniform and well crystallized Ti layer without deteriorating the characteristics of the PEEK implant. The Ti coating layer strongly adhered to the substrate and remarkably enhanced its wettability. The Ti-coated samples were evaluated in terms of their in vitro cellular behaviors and in vivo osteointegration, and the results were compared to a pure PEEK substrate. The level of proliferation of the cells (MC3T3-E1) was measured using a methoxyphenyl tetrazolium salt (MTS) assay and more than doubled after the Ti coating. The differentiation level of cells was measured using the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and also doubled. Furthermore, the in vivo animal tests showed that the Ti-coated PEEK implants had a much higher bone-in-contact (BIC) ratio than the pure PEEK implants. These in vitro and in vivo results suggested that the e-beam deposited Ti coating significantly improved the potential of PEEK for hard tissue applications. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electron holography of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, P; Lichte, H; Formanek, P; Lehmann, M; Huhle, R; Carrillo-Cabrera, W; Harscher, A; Ehrlich, H

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we summarise the development of off-axis electron holography on biological samples starting in 1986 with the first results on ferritin from the group of Tonomura. In the middle of the 1990s strong interest was evoked, but then stagnation took place because the results obtained at that stage did not reach the contrast and the resolution achieved by conventional electron microscopy. To date, there exist only a few ( approximately 12) publications on electron holography of biological objects, thus this topic is quite small and concise. The reason for this could be that holography is mostly established in materials science by physicists. Therefore, applications for off-axis holography were powerfully pushed forward in the area of imaging, e.g. electric or magnetic micro- and nanofields. Unstained biological systems investigated by means of off-axis electron holography up to now are ferritin, tobacco mosaic virus, a bacterial flagellum, T5 bacteriophage virus, hexagonal packed intermediate layer of bacteria and the Semliki Forest virus. New results of the authors on collagen fibres and surface layer of bacteria, the so-called S-layer 2D crystal lattice are presented in this review. For the sake of completeness, we will shortly discuss in-line holography of biological samples and off-axis holography of materials related to biological systems, such as biomaterial composites or magnetotactic bacteria.

  7. Electronic transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of the electron transport properties of liquid alkali metals is described. Conductivity coefficients, Boltzmann theory, Ziman theory, alkali form factors, Ziman theory and alkalis, Faber-Ziman alloy theory, Faber-Ziman theory and alkali-alkali methods, status of Ziman theory, and other transport properties, are all discussed. (UK)

  8. New series of aromatic/ five-membered heteroaromatic butanesulfonyl hydrazones as potent biological agents: Synthesis, physicochemical and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamurcu, Fatma; Mamaş, Serhat; Ozdemir, Ummuhan Ozmen; Gündüzalp, Ayla Balaban; Senturk, Ozan Sanlı

    2016-08-01

    The aromatic/five-membered heteroaromatic butanesulfonylhydrazone derivatives; 5-bromosalicylaldehydebutanesulfonylhydrazone(1), 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydebutane sulfonylhydrazone(2), indole-3-carboxaldehydebutanesulfonylhydrazone (3), 2-acetylfuran- carboxyaldehydebutanesulfonylhydrazone(4), 2-acetylthiophenecarboxyaldehydebutane- sulfonylhydrazone(5) and 2-acetyl-5-chlorothiophenecarboxyaldehydebutanesulfonyl hydrazone (6) were synthesized by the reaction of butane sulfonic acid hydrazide with aldehydes/ketones and characterized by using elemental analysis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FT-IR technique. Their geometric parameters and electronic properties consist of global reactivity descriptors were also determined by theoretical methods. The electrochemical behavior of the butanesulfonylhydrazones were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV), controlled potential electrolysis and chronoamperometry (CA) techniques. The number of electrons transferred (n), diffusion coefficient (D) and standard heterogeneous rate constants (ks) were determined by electrochemical methods.

  9. Molecular ferroelectrics: where electronics meet biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangyu; Liu, Yuanming; Zhang, Yanhang; Cai, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2013-12-28

    In the last several years, we have witnessed significant advances in molecular ferroelectrics, with the ferroelectric properties of molecular crystals approaching those of barium titanate. In addition, ferroelectricity has been observed in biological systems, filling an important missing link in bioelectric phenomena. In this perspective, we will present short historical notes on ferroelectrics, followed by an overview of the fundamentals of ferroelectricity. The latest developments in molecular ferroelectrics and biological ferroelectricity will then be highlighted, and their implications and potential applications will be discussed. We close by noting molecular ferroelectric as an exciting frontier between electronics and biology, and a number of challenges ahead are also described.

  10. Laccase on Black Pearl 2000 modified glassy carbon electrode: Characterization of direct electron transfer and biological sensing properties for pyrocatechol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kunqi; Tang Juan; Zhang Zuoming; Gao Ying; Chen Gang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Laccase can complete direct electron transfer process on BP2000 matrices. ► Laccase immobilized on BP2000 matrices has catalytic oxidation effect to pyrocatechol. ► A pyrocatechol biosensor has constructed been using Nafion/Lac-BP2000/GC electrode. ► Detection limit and linear range of the biosensor are 0.003 mM and 0.003–5.555 mM. - Abstract: In this paper, it was found that Laccase (Lac) could be stably immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode modified with Black Pearl 2000 (BP2000) and Nafion by a simple technique. The adsorption behavior of Lac immobilized on BP2000 matrix was characterized by environment scanning electron microscope (ESEM), ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), which demonstrated that BP2000 could facilitate the electron exchange between the active center of Lac and modified electrode. The direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis behavior of Lac on the modified electrode were characterized by cyclic voltammogram (CV) which indicated that Lac immobilized on the modified electrode displayed a direct, nearly reversible and surface-controlled redox reaction with an enhanced electron-transfer rate constant of 1.940 s −1 at the scan rate of 100 mV s −1 in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) (pH 7.0). Furthermore, it was also discovered that, in the presence of O 2 , Lac immobilized on the modified electrode exhibited the electrocatalytic response to pyrocatechol, and the kinetic apparent Michaelis-constant (K M app ) obtained from the Lineweaver–Burk equation was 1.79 mM. The detection limit, linear range and sensitivity of the Lac biosensor were 0.003 mM, 0.003–5.555 mM and 99.84 μA mM −1 cm −2 , respectively.

  11. Evaluation of biological properties of electron beam melted Ti6Al4V implant with biomimetic coating in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High strength porous titanium implants are widely used for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects because of their similar mechanical properties to those of bone. The recent introduction of electron beam melting (EBM technique allows a direct digitally enabled fabrication of patient specific porous titanium implants, whereas both their in vitro and in vivo biological performance need further investigation. METHODS: In the present study, we fabricated porous Ti6Al4V implants with controlled porous structure by EBM process, analyzed their mechanical properties, and conducted the surface modification with biomimetic approach. The bioactivities of EBM porous titanium in vitro and in vivo were evaluated between implants with and without biomimetic apatite coating. RESULTS: The physical property of the porous implants, containing the compressive strength being 163 - 286 MPa and the Young's modulus being 14.5-38.5 GPa, is similar to cortical bone. The in vitro culture of osteoblasts on the porous Ti6Al4V implants has shown a favorable circumstance for cell attachment and proliferation as well as cell morphology and spreading, which were comparable with the implants coating with bone-like apatite. In vivo, histological analysis has obtained a rapid ingrowth of bone tissue from calvarial margins toward the center of bone defect in 12 weeks. We observed similar increasing rate of bone ingrowth and percentage of bone formation within coated and uncoated implants, all of which achieved a successful bridging of the defect in 12 weeks after the implantation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that the EBM porous Ti6Al4V implant not only reduced the stress-shielding but also exerted appropriate osteoconductive properties, as well as the apatite coated group. The results opened up the possibility of using purely porous titanium alloy scaffolds to reconstruct specific bone defects in the maxillofacial and orthopedic fields.

  12. Polysaccarides-based gels and solid-state electronic devices with memresistive properties: Synergy between polyaniline electrochemistry and biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Cifarelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new architecture of organic memristive device is proposed with a double-layered polyelectrolyte, one of which is a biological system that alone drives the memristive behavior. In the device the Physarum polycephalum was used as living organism, the polyaniline as conducting polymer for the source-drain channel. The key choice for the device functioning was the interposition of a biocompatible solid layer between polyaniline and living organism, that must result both electrochemically inert and able to preserve a good electrical conductivity of the polyaniline, notwithstanding the alkaline pH environment required for the surviving of living being, by avoiding strong acids. Pectin with a high degree of methylation and chitosan were tested as interlayer, but only the first one satisfied the essential requirements. It was demonstrated that only when the living organism was integrated in the device, the current-voltage characteristics showed the hysteretic rectifying trends typical of the memristive devices, which however disappeared if the Physarum polycephalum switched to its sclerotic state. The mould resulted to survive a series of at least three cycles of voltage-current measurements carried out in sequence.

  13. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe...

  14. Biological cryo‐electron microscopy in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cryo‐electron microscopy (cryo‐EM) plays an increasingly more important role in structural biology. With the construction of an arm of the Chinese National Protein Science Facility at Tsinghua University, biological cryo‐EM has entered a phase of rapid development in China. This article briefly reviews the history of biological cryo‐EM in China, describes its current status, comments on its impact on the various biological research fields, and presents future outlook. PMID:27534377

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuirulan Pushpanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries.

  16. Diamond electronic properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kania, Don R

    1995-01-01

    The use of diamond in electronic applications is not a new idea, but limitations in size and control of properties restricted the use of diamond to a few specialised applications. The vapour-phase synthesis of diamond, however, has facilitated serious interest in the development of diamond-based electronic devices. The process allows diamond films to be laid down over large areas. Both intrinsic and doped diamond films have a unique combination of extreme properties for high speed, high power and high temperature applications. The eleven chapters in Diamond: Electronic Properties and Applications, written by the world's foremost experts on the subject, give a complete characterisation of the material, in both intrinsic and doped forms, explain how to grow it for electronic applications, how to use the grown material, and a description of both passive and active devices in which it has been used with success. Diamond: Electronic Properties and Applications is a compendium of the available literature on the sub...

  17. Peptide π-Electron Conjugates: Organic Electronics for Biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoña, Herdeline Ann M; Tovar, John D

    2015-12-16

    Highly ordered arrays of π-conjugated molecules are often viewed as a prerequisite for effective charge-transporting materials. Studies involving these materials have traditionally focused on organic electronic devices, with more recent emphasis on biological systems. In order to facilitate the transition to biological environments, biomolecules that can promote hierarchical ordering and water solubility are often covalently appended to the π-electron unit. This review highlights recent work on π-conjugated systems bound to peptide moieties that exhibit self-assembly and aims to provide an overview on the development and emerging applications of peptide-based supramolecular π-electron systems.

  18. Allicin: Chemistry and Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Borlinghaus

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Allicin (diallylthiosulfinate is a defence molecule from garlic (Allium sativum L. with a broad range of biological activities. Allicin is produced upon tissue damage from the non-proteinogenic amino acid alliin (S-allylcysteine sulfoxide in a reaction that is catalyzed by the enzyme alliinase. Current understanding of the allicin biosynthetic pathway will be presented in this review. Being a thiosulfinate, allicin is a reactive sulfur species (RSS and undergoes a redox-reaction with thiol groups in glutathione and proteins that is thought to be essential for its biological activity. Allicin is physiologically active in microbial, plant and mammalian cells. In a dose-dependent manner allicin can inhibit the proliferation of both bacteria and fungi or kill cells outright, including antibiotic-resistant strains like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Furthermore, in mammalian cell lines, including cancer cells, allicin induces cell-death and inhibits cell proliferation. In plants allicin inhibits seed germination and attenuates root-development. The majority of allicin’s effects are believed to be mediated via redox-dependent mechanisms. In sub-lethal concentrations, allicin has a variety of health-promoting properties, for example cholesterol- and blood pressure-lowering effects that are advantageous for the cardio-vascular system. Clearly, allicin has wide-ranging and interesting applications in medicine and (green agriculture, hence the detailed discussion of its enormous potential in this review. Taken together, allicin is a fascinating biologically active compound whose properties are a direct consequence of the molecule’s chemistry.

  19. Electronic properties of physisorbed helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossler, Sarah

    2011-09-22

    This thesis deals with electronic excitations of helium physisorbed on metal substrates. It is studied to what extent the electronic properties change compared to the gas phase due to the increased helium density and the proximity of the metal. Furthermore, the influence of different substrate materials is investigated systematically. To this end, up to two helium layers were adsorbed onto Ru (001), Pt (111), Cu (111), and Ag (111) surfaces in a custom-made cryostat. These samples were studied spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation and a time-of-flight detector. The experimental results were then analyzed in comparison with extensive theoretical model calculations.

  20. Quantitative biological measurement in Transmission Electron Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantell, Judith M; Verkade, Paul; Arkill, Kenton P

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for some time that biological sections shrink in the transmission electron microscope from exposure to the electron beam. This phenomenon is especially important in Electron Tomography (ET). The effect on shrinkage of parameters such as embedding medium or sample type is less well understood. In addition anisotropic area shrinkage has largely been ignored. The intention of this study is to explore the shrinkage on a number of samples ranging in thickness from 200 nm to 500 nm. A protocol was developed to determine the shrinkage in area and thickness using the gold fiducials used in electron tomography. In brief: Using low dose philosophy on the section, a focus area was used prior to a separate virgin study area for a series of known exposures on a tilted sample. The shrinkage was determined by measurements on the gold beads from both sides of the section as determined by a confirmatory tomogram. It was found that the shrinkage in area (approximately to 90-95% of the original) and the thickness (approximately 65% of the original at most) agreed with pervious authors, but that a lmost all the shrinkage was in the first minute and that although the direction of the in-plane shrinkage (in x and y) was sometimes uneven the end result was consistent. It was observed, in general, that thinner samples showed more percentage shrinkage than thicker ones. In conclusion, if direct quantitative measurements are required then the protocol described should be used for all areas studied.

  1. Quantitative biological measurement in Transmission Electron Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantell, Judith M.; Verkade, Paul; Arkill, Kenton P.

    2012-07-01

    It has been known for some time that biological sections shrink in the transmission electron microscope from exposure to the electron beam. This phenomenon is especially important in Electron Tomography (ET). The effect on shrinkage of parameters such as embedding medium or sample type is less well understood. In addition anisotropic area shrinkage has largely been ignored. The intention of this study is to explore the shrinkage on a number of samples ranging in thickness from 200 nm to 500 nm. A protocol was developed to determine the shrinkage in area and thickness using the gold fiducials used in electron tomography. In brief: Using low dose philosophy on the section, a focus area was used prior to a separate virgin study area for a series of known exposures on a tilted sample. The shrinkage was determined by measurements on the gold beads from both sides of the section as determined by a confirmatory tomogram. It was found that the shrinkage in area (approximately to 90-95% of the original) and the thickness (approximately 65% of the original at most) agreed with pervious authors, but that a lmost all the shrinkage was in the first minute and that although the direction of the in-plane shrinkage (in x and y) was sometimes uneven the end result was consistent. It was observed, in general, that thinner samples showed more percentage shrinkage than thicker ones. In conclusion, if direct quantitative measurements are required then the protocol described should be used for all areas studied.

  2. Applications of Free Electron Lasers in Biology and Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, J.B.; Tybor, K.R.; Nietubyc, R.; Wrochna, G.

    2010-01-01

    The advent of free electron lasers opens up new opportunities to probe the dynamics of ultrafast processes and the structure of matter with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. New methods inaccessible with other known types of radiation sources can be developed, resulting in a breakthrough in deep understanding the fundamentals of life as well as in numerous medical and biological applications. In the present work the properties of free electron laser radiation that make the sources excellent for probing biological matter at an arbitrary wavelength, in a wide range of intensities and pulse durations are briefly discussed. A number of biophysical and biomedical applications of the new sources, currently considered among the most promising in the field, are presented. (author)

  3. Modeling Electronic Properties of Complex Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Karthik

    Complex oxides are a class of materials that have recently emerged as potential candidates for electronic applications owing to their interesting electronic properties. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a fundamental understanding of these electronic properties using a combination of first-principles approaches based on density functional theory (DFT), and Schrodinger-Poisson (SP) simulation (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.

  4. Biological and electrical properties of biosynthesized silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized biochemically at room temperature using aqueous extract of rhizome of Rheum australe plant. The as-synthesized AgNPs were further studied for their morphological, biological and electrical characterization. The morphological studies, such as scanning electron ...

  5. Synthetic Biology: game changer in intelectual property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens Landeweerd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology can be considered a game changer that plays an important role in the current NBIC, or BINC convergence of nano-, bio-, info and cognitive sciences. Although most synthetic biology experts are unaware of it, the field appeals to the imagination in its adherence to targets that were usually associated with premodern alchemist science. This paper elaborates several aspects of synthetic biology as well as its consequences for long held notions of intellectual property and the ontological categories of scientific discovery on the one hand and engineering on the other, the distinction between natural and artificial, the grown and the made.

  6. Biological and electrical properties of biosynthesized silver

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biological and electrical properties of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles. Madhulika ... Abstract. In this work, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized biochemically at room temperature using aqueous extract of rhizome of Rheum australe plant. ... The obtained results may have potential applications as sensors.

  7. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron transfer. (PET) is a very important process, with considerable chemical and biological relevance. GENERAL I ARTICLE of electrons, respectively. This has entirely changed the earlier framework of interpreting reactions in chemistry and biology. This shift in emphasis enables one to understand the elementary.

  8. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology -. The Primary Events in Photosynthesis. V Krishnan. One of the most important chemical reactions is electron transfer from one atomic/molecular unit to another. This reaction, accompanied by proton and hydrogen atom transfers, occurs in a cascade in many biological processes,.

  9. Electron Transfer Studies of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Biologically Important Phenolic Acids and Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-03-01

    The ruthenium(II) complexes having 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline derivatives are synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes at pH 12.5 are studied. The electron transfer reaction of biologically important phenolic acids and tyrosine are studied using absorption, emission and transient absorption spectral techniques. Semiclassical theory is applied to calculate the rate of electron transfer between ruthenium(II) complexes and biologically important phenolic acids.

  10. Biological Properties and Therapeutic Applications of Propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforcin, José M

    2016-06-01

    Propolis is a resinous material collected by bees from bud and exudates of the plants, mixed with bee enzymes, pollen and wax. In this review, the biological properties of propolis and some therapeutic applications are discussed. The same biological activities have been investigated until today, using samples from different geographic regions. Thus, the study of the biological properties of a given sample should always be associated with its chemical composition and botanical source, representing a particular sample of a given geographic area, exploring its biological potential and the role of its constituents. Efforts have been carried out to explain propolis' mechanisms of action in vivo and in vitro, but the majority of propolis' targets and actions are still unclear. The number of formulations containing propolis and patents have increased, although propolis extracts have been used deliberately with different recommendations, not always mentioning the chemical composition, vegetal source and the methods of extraction. Clinical studies will help to obtain criterious recommendations in view of the expected outcomes. Further investigation should explore the effects of common compounds found in the samples from all over the world in an attempt to standardize the research on propolis and to obtain new drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Electron probe analysis of biological fluids: Possibilities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roinel, N.

    1984-01-01

    Physical methods of investigation have become essential to investigations at the cellular or subcellular level. Nuclear magnetic resonance is the most recent and striking example, since it is not only a tool for fundamental physicists and organic chemists, but also an extraordinary powerful imaging tool for physicians. The absorption properties of X rays were used immediately after their discovery to image the bones of skeletons. Later, X rays were also found to be extremely efficient in the measurement of the elemental content of microvolumes irradiated by electron probes. The electron probe analyzer (EPA) was immediately adopted by numerous laboratories of metallurgy, geology, and mineral sciences. In the last fifteen years, since the use of this instrument was suggested for liquid analysis, and a preparative technique was developed, the EPA has been used by an increasing number of biological laboratories for measuring the concentrations of the elements contained in subnanoliter volumes of biological fluids. The so-called microdroplet technique has become a routine laboratory method, the only one able to measure the concentrations of an unlimited number of elements in a single 0.1-nl sample. This explains its use in fields as various as renal, reproductive, digestive, and plant physiology, zoology, etc. Several review papers discuss these applications. The possibilities and limitations of the technique are discussed below

  12. PLANT ISOFLAVONES: BIOSYNHTESIS, DETECTION AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Naumenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological properties, chemical structures and biosynthesis pathways of plant isoflavones, especially soybean isoflavones (daidzein, genistein and glycitein are reviewed. The structures of isoflavones, and their aglicone and glucosides (glycosides forms as well as isoflavone biosynthesis pathways are described. General information about the advanced methods for the detection of isoflavones and their conjugates are considered. The importance of the profiling of isoflavones, flavonoids and their conjugates by means of analytical tools and methods to dissolve some questions in biology and medicine is discussed. The review provides data on the major isoflavone content in some vegetable crops and in the tissues of different soybean varieties. Health benefits and treatment or preventive properties of isoflavones for cancer, cardiovascular, endocrine diseases and metabolic disorders are highlighted. The mechanisms that may explain their positive biological effects are considered. The information on the application of advanced technologies to create new plant forms producing isoflavonoids with a predicted level of isoflavones, which is the most favorable for the treatment is given. The possibilities to use the metabolic engineering for the increasing of accumulation and synthesis of isoflavones at the non-legume crops such as tobacco, Arabidopsis and maize are considered. The examples how the plant tissues, which are not naturally produced of the isoflavones, can obtain potential for the synthesis of biologically active compounds via inducing of the activity of the introduced enzyme isoflavon synthase, are given. Specific biochemical pathways for increasing the synthesis of isoflavone genistein in Arabidopsis thaliana tissues are discussed. It is concluded that plant genetic engineering which is focused on modification of the secondary metabolites contain in plant tissues, enables to create the new crop varieties with improved agronomic properties and

  13. Phytochemistry and Biological Properties of Glabridin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmler, Charlotte; Pauli, Guido F.; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2013-01-01

    Glabridin, a prenylated isoflavonoid of G. glabra L. roots (European licorice, Fabaceae), has been associated with a wide range of biological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic, regulation of energy metabolism, estrogenic, neuroprotective, anti-osteoporotic, skin-whitening. While glabridin is one of the most studied licorice flavonoids, a comprehensive literature survey linked to its numerous bioactivities is unavailable. The present review provides a comprehensive description of glabridin as a key chemical and biological marker of G. glabra, by covering both its phytochemical characterization and reported biological activities. Both glabridin and standardized licorice extracts have significant impact on food, dietary supplements (DSs) and cosmetic markets, as evidenced by the amount of available patents and scientific articles since 1976, when glabridin was first described. Nevertheless, a thorough literature survey also reveals that information about the isolation and chemical characterization of this important marker is scattered and less detailed than expected. Accordingly, the first part of this review gathers all analytical and spectroscopic data required for the comprehensive phytochemical characterization of glabridin. The four most frequently described and most relevant bioactivities of glabridin are its anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic, estrogenic-like effects, and its capacity to regulate energy metabolism. While all bioactivities reported for glabridin belong to a wide array of targets, its principal biological properties are likely interconnected. To this end, the current state of the literature suggests that the biological activity of glabridin mainly results from its capacity to down-regulate intracellular reactive oxygen species, bind to antioxidant effectors, and act on estrogen receptors, potentially as a plant-based Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (phytoSERM). PMID:23850540

  14. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, J.-M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of the actinide series shows the change between transition metal behavior and lanthanide behavior, between constant weak paramagnetism for thorium and strong Curie-Weiss paramagnetism for curium. Curium is shown to be the first metal of the actinide series to be magnetically ordered, its Neel temperature being 52K. The magnetic properties of the actinides depending on all the peripheral electrons, their electronic structure was studied and an attempt was made to determine it by means of a phenomenological model. Attempts were also made to interrelate the different physical properties which depend on the outer electronic structure [fr

  15. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated

  16. Interactions of electrons with biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisklova, K.; Papp, P.; Stano, M.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of interactions of low-energy electrons with the molecules in the gas phase, the authors used electron-molecule cross-beam apparatus. The experiment is carried out in high vacuum, where molecules of the tested compound are inducted through a capillary. For purposes of this experiment the sample was electrically heated to 180 Deg C., giving a bundle of GlyGly molecules into the gas phase. The resulting signals can be evaluated in two different modes: mass spectrum - at continuous electron energy (e.g. 100 eV) they obtained the signal of intensity of the ions according to their mass to charge ratio; ionization and resonance spectra - for selected ion mass when the authors received the signal of intensity of the ions, depending on the energy of interacting electron.

  17. Electron relaxation properties of Ar magnetron plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinjing, CAI; Xinxin, WANG; Xiaobing, ZOU

    2018-03-01

    An understanding of electron relaxation properties in plasmas is of importance in the application of magnetrons. An improved multi-term approximation of the Boltzmann equation is employed to study electron transport and relaxation properties in plasmas. Elastic, inelastic and nonconservative collisions between electrons and neutral particles are considered. The expressions for the transport coefficients are obtained using the expansion coefficients and the collision operator term. Numerical solutions of the matrix equations for the expansion coefficients are also investigated. Benchmark calculations of the Reid model are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the improved multi-term approximation. It is shown that the two-term approximation is generally not accurate enough and the magnetic fields can reduce the anisotropy of the velocity distribution function. The electron relaxation properties of Ar plasmas in magnetrons for various magnetic fields are studied. It is demonstrated that the energy parameters change more slowly than the momentum parameters.

  18. e-Biologics: Fabrication of Sustainable Electronics with "Green" Biological Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R

    2017-06-27

    The growing ubiquity of electronic devices is increasingly consuming substantial energy and rare resources for materials fabrication, as well as creating expansive volumes of toxic waste. This is not sustainable. Electronic biological materials (e-biologics) that are produced with microbes, or designed with microbial components as the guide for synthesis, are a potential green solution. Some e-biologics can be fabricated from renewable feedstocks with relatively low energy inputs, often while avoiding the harsh chemicals used for synthesizing more traditional electronic materials. Several are completely free of toxic components, can be readily recycled, and offer unique features not found in traditional electronic materials in terms of size, performance, and opportunities for diverse functionalization. An appropriate investment in the concerted multidisciplinary collaborative research required to identify and characterize e-biologics and to engineer materials and devices based on e-biologics could be rewarded with a new "green age" of sustainable electronic materials and devices. Copyright © 2017 Lovley.

  19. Synthesis, structure and biological properties of active spirohydantoin derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Anita M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirohidantoins represent an pharmacologically important class of heterocycles since many derivatives have been recognized that display interesting activities against a wide range of biological targets. First synthesis of cycloalkanespiro-5-hydantoins was performed by Bucherer and Lieb 1934 by the reaction of cycloalkanone, potassium cyanide and ammonium-carbonate at reflux in a mixture of ethanol and water. QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship studies showed that a wide range of biological activities of spirohydantoin derivatives strongly depend upon their structure. This paper describes different methods of synthesis of spirohydantoin derivatives, their physico-chemical properties and biological activity. It emphasizes the importance of cycloalkanespiro-5-hydantoins with anticonvulsant, antiproliferative, antipsychotic, antimicrobial and antiinflammatory properties as well as their importance in the treatment of diabetes. Numerous spirohydantoin compounds exhibit physiological activity such as serotonin and fibrinogen antagonist, inhibitors of the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptor also, antagonist of leukocyte cell adhesion, acting as allosteric inhibitors of the protein-protein interactions. Some spirohydantoin derivatives have been identified as antitumor agents. Their activity depends on the substituent presented at position N-3 of the hydantoin ring and increases in order alkene > ester > ether. Besides that, compounds that contain two electron withdrawing groups (e.g. fluorine or chlorine on the third and fourth position of the phenyl ring are better antitumor agents than compounds with a single electron withdrawing group. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172013

  20. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  1. Quantum effects in biological electron transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Lande, A.; Babcock, N. S.; Řezáč, Jan; Levy, B.; Sanders, B. C.; Salahub, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 17 (2012), s. 5902-5918 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * tunnelling * decoherence * semi-classical molecular dynamics * density functional theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.829, year: 2012

  2. Bioactive Phenothiazines and Benzo[a]phenothiazines: Spectroscopic Studies, and Biological and Biomedical Properties and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, J. J.; Gaye Seye, M. D.; Trajkovska, S.; Motohashi, N.

    Recent progress in spectroscopic, photophysical, photochemical and analytical studies, as well as in the biological and biomedical properties of bioactive phenothiazines and benzophenothiazines, is reviewed. Their electronic absorption and luminescence properties, and their complexation and interactions in organized media are discussed. Various applications, including analytical studies, relative to phenothiazines and benzophenothiazines are described. Among the important biological and biomedical properties of these compounds, their neurological effects, their antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiparasitic and antitumour activities, and their cytotoxicity are particularly reviewed.

  3. Distinct Properties Underlie Flavin-Based Electron Bifurcation in a Novel Electron Transfer Flavoprotein FixAB from Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Paul W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lubner, Carolyn E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duan, H. Diessel [University of Kentucky; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika [Montana State University; Gauss, George H. [Montana State University; Bothner, Brian [Montana State University; Peters, John W. [Washington State University; Miller, Anne-Frances [University of Kentucky

    2018-02-09

    A newly-recognized third fundamental mechanism of energy conservation in biology, electron bifurcation, uses free energy from exergonic redox reactions to drive endergonic redox reactions. Flavin-based electron bifurcation furnishes low potential electrons to demanding chemical reactions such as reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia. We employed the heterodimeric flavoenzyme FixAB from the diazotrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris to elucidate unique properties that underpin flavin-based electron bifurcation.

  4. Electronic, adsorption, and transport properties of diamondoid-based complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Bibek

    2017-01-01

    Quantum simulation is an invaluable tool to researchers from various fields of scientific research. It allows the investigation of various complex condensed matter in the regimes of physics, chemistry, and biology. In this work, we focused our attention in unraveling the physical, chemical, electronic, transport, and optical properties of diamondoids and their complexes through quantum simulations. We have implemented a bottom-up approach where we move from the doping and functionalization of...

  5. Connecting Biology to Electronics: Molecular Communication via Redox Modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Jinyang; Tschirhart, Tanya; Terrell, Jessica L; Kim, Eunkyoung; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Kelly, Deanna L; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-12-01

    Biology and electronics are both expert at for accessing, analyzing, and responding to information. Biology uses ions, small molecules, and macromolecules to receive, analyze, store, and transmit information, whereas electronic devices receive input in the form of electromagnetic radiation, process the information using electrons, and then transmit output as electromagnetic waves. Generating the capabilities to connect biology-electronic modalities offers exciting opportunities to shape the future of biosensors, point-of-care medicine, and wearable/implantable devices. Redox reactions offer unique opportunities for bio-device communication that spans the molecular modalities of biology and electrical modality of devices. Here, an approach to search for redox information through an interactive electrochemical probing that is analogous to sonar is adopted. The capabilities of this approach to access global chemical information as well as information of specific redox-active chemical entities are illustrated using recent examples. An example of the use of synthetic biology to recognize external molecular information, process this information through intracellular signal transduction pathways, and generate output responses that can be detected by electrical modalities is also provided. Finally, exciting results in the use of redox reactions to actuate biology are provided to illustrate that synthetic biology offers the potential to guide biological response through electrical cues. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Mechanical properties of nanostructure of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohua; Gao, Huajian

    2004-09-01

    Natural biological materials such as bone, teeth and nacre are nanocomposites of protein and mineral with superior strength. It is quite a marvel that nature produces hard and tough materials out of protein as soft as human skin and mineral as brittle as classroom chalk. What are the secrets of nature? Can we learn from this to produce bio-inspired materials in the laboratory? These questions have motivated us to investigate the mechanics of protein-mineral nanocomposite structure. Large aspect ratios and a staggered alignment of mineral platelets are found to be the key factors contributing to the large stiffness of biomaterials. A tension-shear chain (TSC) model of biological nanostructure reveals that the strength of biomaterials hinges upon optimizing the tensile strength of the mineral crystals. As the size of the mineral crystals is reduced to nanoscale, they become insensitive to flaws with strength approaching the theoretical strength of atomic bonds. The optimized tensile strength of mineral crystals thus allows a large amount of fracture energy to be dissipated in protein via shear deformation and consequently enhances the fracture toughness of biocomposites. We derive viscoelastic properties of the protein-mineral nanostructure and show that the toughness of biocomposite can be further enhanced by the viscoelastic properties of protein.

  7. Magnetic properties of confined electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felicio, J.R.D. de.

    1977-04-01

    The effects of confinement by a two or three-dimensional harmonic potential on the magnetic properties of a free electron gas are investigated using the grand-canonical ensemble framework. At high temperatures an extension of Darwin's, Felderhof and Raval's works is made taking into account spin effects at low temperature. A comprehensive description of the magnetic properties of a free electron gas is given. The system is regarded as finite, but the boundary condition psi=0 is not introduced. The limits of weak and strong confinement are also analysed [pt

  8. CMOS biomicrosystems where electronics meets biology

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    "The book will address the-state-of-the-art in integrated Bio-Microsystems that integrate microelectronics with fluidics, photonics, and mechanics. New exciting opportunities in emerging applications that will take system performance beyond offered by traditional CMOS based circuits are discussed in detail. The book is a must for anyone serious about microelectronics integration possibilities for future technologies. The book is written by top notch international experts in industry and academia. The intended audience is practicing engineers with electronics background that want to learn about integrated microsystems. The book will be also used as a recommended reading and supplementary material in graduate course curriculum"--

  9. Electronic properties of magnetically doped nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Electronic properties of magnetically doped nanotubes. KEIVAN ESFARJANI*, Z CHEN† and Y KAWAZOE†. Sharif Institute of Technology, and Institute for Physics and Mathematics, Tehran, Iran. †Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. Abstract. Effect of doping of carbon nanotubes by magnetic ...

  10. Shrinking properties of electron irradiated polyethylene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, Eddy Segura; Lima, Wanderley de; Silva, Leonardo G. de Andrade; Rzyski, Barbara Maria

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of shrinkable properties of a commercial polyethylene film irradiated with accelerated electrons. The shrinking ratio, elongation ratio and the shrinking effect value were used to compare the shrinkable performance of the film at different irradiation absorbed doses. The cross-linking density evolution was determined by gel fraction determination. (author)

  11. Electronic and optical properties of lead iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahuja, R.; Arwin, H.; Ferreira da Silva, A.

    2002-01-01

    The electronic properties and the optical absorption of lead iodide (PbI2) have been investigated experimentally by means of optical absorption and spectroscopic ellipsometry, and theoretically by a full-potential linear muffin-tin-orbital method. PbI2 has been recognized as a very promising...

  12. Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Flindt, C.

    2009-01-01

    Graphene antidot lattices constitute a novel class of nano-engineered graphene devices with controllable electronic and optical properties. An antidot lattice consists of a periodic array of holes that causes a band gap to open up around the Fermi level, turning graphene from a semimetal...... into a semiconductor. We calculate the electronic band structure of graphene antidot lattices using three numerical approaches with different levels of computational complexity, efficiency and accuracy. Fast finite-element solutions of the Dirac equation capture qualitative features of the band structure, while full...

  13. Oxides Surfaces and Novel Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Pratik

    The scope of this thesis extends to the study of surface structures and electronic properties in a number of complex oxides. The c(6x2) surface reconstruction on SrTiO3 (001) was solved using a combination of plan view transmission electron microscopy imaging, atomic resolution secondary electron imaging, and density functional theory calculations. This work provided fundamental insights on the effects of dielectric screening in secondary electron generation. A thorough analysis on the limitation and functionality of transmission plan view imaging showed that the kinematical approximations used in the separation of top and bottom surfaces is only valid in thin samples (˜5 nm or less for SrTiO3). The presence of an inversion center in the surface structure also made separation of the top and bottom surfaces more robust. Surface studies of two other oxides, KTaO3 and NdGaO3, provided understanding on the mechanism of surface heterogeneity and segregation. In the case of KTaO3, selective ion sputtering and the loss of K resulted in large stoichiometric variations at the surface. Annealing of such samples led to the formation of a potassium deficient tetragonal phase (K 6Ta10.8O30) on the surface. A similar phenomenon was also observed in NdGaO3. Exploratory surface studies of the rare earth scandates (ReScO3 , Re = Gd, Tb, Dy) led to the observation of large flexoelectric bending inside an electron microscope. Thin rods of these scandates bent by up to 90 degree under a focused electron beam; the bending was fully reversible. Ex-situ measurements of flexoelectric coe cient performed by an- other graduate student, Christopher Mizzi, confirmed that the scandates have a large flexocoupling voltage (˜42 V). Electronic structure of the lanthanide scandates was studied using temperature depen- dent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The amount of charging under X-ray illumination was greatly reduced with increasing

  14. Electronic and transport properties of kinked graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper Toft; Gunst, Tue; Bøggild, Peter

    2013-01-01

    for the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at linear bends in graphene. We find a significant barrier lowering (≈15%) for realistic radii of curvature (≈20 Å) and that adsorption along the linear bend leads to a stable linear kink. We compute the electronic transport properties of individual and multiple kink lines......Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we investigate the reaction barrier reduction......, and demonstrate how these act as efficient barriers for electron transport. In particular, two parallel kink lines form a graphene pseudo-nanoribbon structure with a semimetallic/semiconducting electronic structure closely related to the corresponding isolated ribbons; the ribbon band gap translates...

  15. Chapter 5:Biological Properties of Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous biological degradations that wood is exposed to in various environments. Biological damage occurs when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Biological organisms such as bacteria, mold, stain, decay fungi, insects, and marine borers depend heavily on temperature and moisture conditions to grow. Figure 5.1...

  16. Advancing Small Satellite Electronics Heritage for Microfluidic Biological Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bruce; Mazmanian, Edward; Tapio, Eric

    2016-01-01

    DLR's Eu:CROPIS (Euglena and Combined Regenerative Organic-Food Production in Space) mission, launching in 2017, will carry multiple biological payloads into a sun-synchronous orbit, including NASA Ames' PowerCell experiment. PowerCell will attempt to characterize the viability of synthetic biology at micro-g, Lunar, and Martian gravity levels. PowerCell experiment requirements demand an electronic system similar to previous microfluidic biology payloads, but with an expanded feature set. As such, the system was based on PharmaSat (Diaz-Aguado et al. 2009), a previous successful biology payload from NASA Ames, and improved upon. Newer, more miniaturized electronics allow for greater capability with a lower part count and smaller size. Two identical PowerCell enclosures will fly. Each enclosure contains two separate and identical experiments with a 48-segment optical density measurement system, grow light system, microfluidic system for nutrient delivery and waste flushing, plus thermal control and environmental sensing/housekeeping including temperature, pressure, humidity, and acceleration. Electronics consist of a single Master PCB that interfaces to the spacecraft bus and regulates power and communication, plus LED, Detector, and Valve Manifold PCBs for each experiment. To facilitate ease of reuse on future missions, experiment electronics were designed to be compatible with a standard 3U small sat form factor and power bus, or to interface with a Master power/comm PCB for use in a larger satellite as in the case of PowerCell's flight on Eu:CROPIS.

  17. Some examples of utilization of electron paramagnetic resonance in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemski, G.

    1982-10-01

    A short outline of the fundamentals of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is presented and is followed by examples of the application of EPR to biology. These include use of spin labels, as well as of ENDOR principally to problems of heme proteins, photosynthesis and lipids. (Author) [pt

  18. Flexible Organic Electronics in Biology: Materials and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Caizhi; Zhang, Meng; Yao, Mei Yu; Hua, Tao; Li, Li; Yan, Feng

    2015-12-09

    At the convergence of organic electronics and biology, organic bioelectronics attracts great scientific interest. The potential applications of organic semiconductors to reversibly transmit biological signals or stimulate biological tissues inspires many research groups to explore the use of organic electronics in biological systems. Considering the surfaces of movable living tissues being arbitrarily curved at physiological environments, the flexibility of organic bioelectronic devices is of paramount importance in enabling stable and reliable performances by improving the contact and interaction of the devices with biological systems. Significant advances in flexible organic bio-electronics have been achieved in the areas of flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), polymer electrodes, smart textiles, organic electrochemical ion pumps (OEIPs), ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs) and chemiresistors. This review will firstly discuss the materials used in flexible organic bioelectronics, which is followed by an overview on various types of flexible organic bioelectronic devices. The versatility of flexible organic bioelectronics promises a bright future for this emerging area. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Advances in cryo-electron tomography for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Koster, Abraham J; Sharp, Thomas H

    2018-05-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) utilizes a combination of specimen cryo-fixation and multi-angle electron microscopy imaging to produce three-dimensional (3D) volume reconstructions of native-state macromolecular and subcellular biological structures with nanometer-scale resolution. In recent years, cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) has experienced a dramatic increase in the attainable resolution of 3D reconstructions, resulting from technical improvements of electron microscopes, improved detector sensitivity, the implementation of phase plates, automated data acquisition schemes, and improved image reconstruction software and hardware. These developments also greatly increased the usability and applicability of CET as a diagnostic and research tool, which is now enabling structural biologists to determine the structure of proteins in their native cellular environment to sub-nanometer resolution. These recent technical developments have stimulated us to update on our previous review (Koning, R.I., Koster, A.J., 2009. Cryo-electron tomography in biology and medicine. Ann Anat 191, 427-445) in which we described the fundamentals of CET. In this follow-up, we extend this basic description in order to explain the aforementioned recent advances, and describe related 3D techniques that can be applied to the anatomy of biological systems that are relevant for medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron crystallography--the waking beauty of structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Christopher R; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2012-08-01

    Since its debut in the mid 1970s, electron crystallography has been a valuable alternative in the structure determination of biological macromolecules. Its reliance on single-layered or double-layered two-dimensionally ordered arrays and the ability to obtain structural information from small and disordered crystals make this approach particularly useful for the study of membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer environment. Despite its unique advantages, technological hurdles have kept electron crystallography from reaching its full potential. Addressing the issues, recent initiatives developed high-throughput pipelines for crystallization and screening. Adding progress in automating data collection, image analysis and phase extension methods, electron crystallography is poised to raise its profile and may lead the way in exploring the structural biology of macromolecular complexes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-Photoinduced Biological Properties of Verteporfin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibault, Floriane; Corvaisier, Matthieu; Bailly, Fabrice; Huet, Guillemette; Melnyk, Patricia; Cotelle, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Verteporfin is a porphyrinic photosensitizer clinically used for the photodynamic treatment of age-related macular degeneration. It has been identified almost simultaneously as a YAP/TEAD and an autophagosome inhibitor. Over the last few years, YAP (TAZ), the downstream effectors of the Hippo pathway, have emerged as promising anticancer targets, as shown by several experimental lines of evidence, showing the overproduction of YAP in several cancers. However, YAP was also found to be closely connected to autophagy, mitochondria and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. We herein, review the recent studies where VP was used without photoactivation as a YAP/TEAD inhibitor or protein oligomerization promoter, focusing on its effects on the YAP/TEAD gene targets and other biomarkers related to autophagy. Since the identification of VP as YAP/TEAD inhibitor, several in vitro and in vivo studies have revealed the new potential of this molecule in different cancers, where YAP is overexpressed. However, detailed structural information about its interaction with YAP is still lacking. Concomitantly, VP was identified as autophagosome inhibitor by promoting oligomerization of p62. Moreover, VP proves to be tumor-selective proteotoxic (by oligomerization of p62, STAT3) in colorectal cancer. Knowledge on the biological properties of the only YAP inhibitor available to date is vital for its pharmacological use on cellular and animal models. VP is a multi-target drug interacting with several proteins implicated in major cellular processes. Although this does not impact its clinical use, VP does not seem to be the ideal drug for pharmacological inhibitions of YAP/TEAD.

  2. Fabrication and Electronic Properties of CZTSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Douglas M.; McCandless, Brian E.; Haight, Richard; Mitzi, David B.; Birkmire, Robert W.

    2014-06-09

    To solve the open circuit voltage limitation in Cu2ZnSn(SSe)4 further understanding of defects and the fundamental properties of the bulk material are needed. Although there are a number of literature reports of single crystals, the vast majority are made with a flux agent such as iodine which could potentially act as a dopant or affect defect properties in the material. In this report 2-5 mm single crystals of CZTSe of different compositions were achieved by solid state reaction of elements in a sealed ampoule below the melt temperature without a flux agent. The bulk composition of single crystals are compared to electronic and opto-electronic properties from Hall and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Intergrain measurements showed record hole mobilities for pure CZTSe in excess of 100 cm2/Vs. PL intensity and uniformity were improved by removing inhomogeneities and surface phases through crystal polishing, followed by Br-methanol etching to remove polishing damage. Despite processing conditions more favorable to equilibrium crystal conditions, a broad PL peak is observed with significant luminescence below the band-gap similar to literature reports of band-tailing. A more detailed publication of results and further experiments will be reported in an upcoming Journal of Photovoltaics.

  3. Electronic and transport properties of kinked graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Toft Rasmussen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT, we investigate the reaction barrier reduction for the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at linear bends in graphene. We find a significant barrier lowering (≈15% for realistic radii of curvature (≈20 Å and that adsorption along the linear bend leads to a stable linear kink. We compute the electronic transport properties of individual and multiple kink lines, and demonstrate how these act as efficient barriers for electron transport. In particular, two parallel kink lines form a graphene pseudo-nanoribbon structure with a semimetallic/semiconducting electronic structure closely related to the corresponding isolated ribbons; the ribbon band gap translates into a transport gap for electronic transport across the kink lines. We finally consider pseudo-ribbon-based heterostructures and propose that such structures present a novel approach for band gap engineering in nanostructured graphene.

  4. Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, J A; Brandbyge, M; Jauho, A-P; Pedersen, J G; Mortensen, N A; Flindt, C; Pedersen, T G

    2009-01-01

    Graphene antidot lattices constitute a novel class of nano-engineered graphene devices with controllable electronic and optical properties. An antidot lattice consists of a periodic array of holes that causes a band gap to open up around the Fermi level, turning graphene from a semimetal into a semiconductor. We calculate the electronic band structure of graphene antidot lattices using three numerical approaches with different levels of computational complexity, efficiency and accuracy. Fast finite-element solutions of the Dirac equation capture qualitative features of the band structure, while full tight-binding calculations and density functional theory (DFT) are necessary for more reliable predictions of the band structure. We compare the three computational approaches and investigate the role of hydrogen passivation within our DFT scheme.

  5. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M

    2015-12-21

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  6. Systems biology: properties of reconstructed networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palsson, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    ... between the mathematical ideas and biological processes are made clear, the book reflects the irreversible trend of increasing mathematical content in biology education. Therefore to assist both teacher and student, Palsson provides problem sets, projects, and PowerPoint slides in an associated web site and keeps the presentation in the book concrete with illustrat...

  7. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  8. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Neetu, E-mail: neetumanish@gmail.com [Department of Physics, AISECT University Bhopal, 464993 (India); Srivastava, Vipul [Department of Engineering Physics, NRI Institute of Research & Technology, Raisen Road, Bhopal, 462021 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  9. Mechanical and biological properties of keratose biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Roche C; Merrill, Michelle R; Richter, Jillian R; Hamzi, Rawad I; Greengauz-Roberts, Olga K; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2011-11-01

    The oxidized form of extractable human hair keratin proteins, commonly referred to as keratose, is gaining interest as a biomaterial for multiple tissue engineering studies including those directed toward peripheral nerve, spinal cord, skin, and bone regeneration. Unlike its disulfide cross-linked counterpart, kerateine, keratose does not possess a covalently cross-linked network structure and consequently displays substantially different characteristics. In order to understand its mode(s) of action and potential for clinical translatability, detailed characterization of the composition, physical properties, and biological responses of keratose biomaterials are needed. Keratose was obtained from end-cut human hair fibers by peracetic acid treatment, followed by base extraction, and subsequent dialysis. Analysis of lyophilized keratose powder determined that it contains 99% proteins by mass with amino acid content similar to human hair cortex. Metallic elements were also found in minute quantities. Protein oxidation led to disulfide bond cleavage and drastic reduction of free thiols due to conversion of sulfhydryl to sulfonic acid, chain fragmentation, and amino acid modifications. Mass spectrometry identified the major protein constituents as a heterogeneous mixture of 15 hair keratins (type I: K31-35 and K37-39, and type II: K81-86) with small amounts of epithelial keratins which exist in monomeric, dimeric, multimeric, and even degraded forms. Re-hydration with PBS enabled molecular assembly into an elastic solid-like hydrogel. Highly-porous scaffolds formed by lyophilization of the gel had the compression behavior of a cellular foam material and reverted back to gel upon wetting. Cytotoxicity assays showed that the EC50 for various cell lines were attained at 8-10 mg/mL keratose, indicating the non-toxic nature of the material. Implantation in mouse subcutaneous tissue pockets demonstrated that keratose resorption follows a rectangular hyperbolic regression

  10. Electron Bifurcation: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Two-Electron Brokering in Biological Redox Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuly, Jonathon L.; Lubner, Carolyn E. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Mulder, David W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; King, Paul W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Peters, John W. [Institute; Beratan, David N. [Department

    2017-08-23

    How can proteins drive two electrons from a redox active donor onto two acceptors at very different potentials and distances? And how can this transaction be conducted without dissipating very much energy or violating the laws of thermodynamics? Nature appears to have addressed these challenges by coupling thermodynamically uphill and downhill electron transfer reactions, using two-electron donor cofactors that have very different potentials for the removal of the first and second electron. Although electron bifurcation is carried out with near perfection from the standpoint of energy conservation and electron delivery yields, it is a biological energy transduction paradigm that has only come into focus recently. This Account provides an exegesis of the biophysical principles that underpin electron bifurcation.

  11. Electron beam irradiation for biological decontamination of Spirulina platensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasoveanu, Mirela [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)]. E-mail: mirela@infim.ro; Nemtanu, Monica [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Minea, R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grecu, Maria Nicoleta [National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mazilu, Elena [Hofigal SA (Romania); Radulescu, Nora [Hofigal SA (Romania)

    2005-10-15

    The Cyanobacterium Spirulina is commercialized for its use in health foods and for therapeutic purposes due to its valuable constituents particularly proteins and vitamins. The aim of the paper is to study the Spirulina platensis behaviour when it is electron beam irradiated for biological decontamination. Microbial load, antioxidant activity, enzymatic inhibition, electron spin resonance (ESR) and UV-Vis spectra were measured for doses up to 80 kGy. The results were correlated with doses in order to find where decontamination is efficient, keeping the Spirulina qualities.

  12. Electron beam irradiation for biological decontamination of Spirulina platensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasoveanu, Mirela; Nemtanu, Monica; Minea, R.; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Mazilu, Elena; Radulescu, Nora

    2005-10-01

    The Cyanobacterium Spirulina is commercialized for its use in health foods and for therapeutic purposes due to its valuable constituents particularly proteins and vitamins. The aim of the paper is to study the Spirulina platensis behaviour when it is electron beam irradiated for biological decontamination. Microbial load, antioxidant activity, enzymatic inhibition, electron spin resonance (ESR) and UV-Vis spectra were measured for doses up to 80 kGy. The results were correlated with doses in order to find where decontamination is efficient, keeping the Spirulina qualities.

  13. Biological and electrical properties of biosynthesized silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Electrical characterization showed ... logy, catalysis and sensing technology.1 The scope of this paper is limited to the synthesis and ... chemicals for the synthesis protocol.2,3 Biological meth- ods of nanoparticle synthesis ...

  14. Electron scattering from molecules and molecular aggregates of biological relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2017-09-01

    In this Topical Review we survey the current state of the art in the study of low energy electron collisions with biologically relevant molecules and molecular clusters. We briefly describe the methods and techniques used in the investigation of these processes and summarise the results obtained so far for DNA constituents and their model compounds, amino acids, peptides and other biomolecules. The applications of the data obtained is briefly described as well as future required developments.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electronic properties of lithium titanate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla-Campos, Luis; Buljan, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Research on tritium breeder material is fundamental to the development of deuterium-tritium type fusion reactors for producing clean, non contaminating, electrical energy, since only energy and helium, a harmless gas, are produced from the fusion reaction. Lithium titanate ceramic is one of the possible candidates for the tritium breeder material. This last material is thought to form part of the first wall of the nucleus of the reactor which will provide the necessary tritium for the fusion and will also serve as a shield. Lithium titanate has advantageous characteristics compared to other materials. Some of these are low activation under the irradiation of neutrons, good thermal stability, high density of lithium atoms and relatively fast tritium release at low temperatures. However, there are still several physical and chemical properties with respect to the tritium release mechanism and mechanical properties that have not been studied at all. This work presents a theoretical study of the electronic properties of lithium titanate ceramic and the corresponding tritiated material. Band calculations using the Extended H kel Tight-Binding approach were carried out. Results show that after substituting lithium for tritium atoms, the electronic states for the latter appear in the middle of prohibited band gap which it is an indication that the tritiated material should behave as a semiconductor, contrary to Li 2 TiO 3 which is a dielectric isolator. A study was also carried out to determine the energetically most favorable sites for the substitution of lithium for tritium atoms. Additionally, we analyzed possible pathways for the diffusion of a tritium atom within the crystalline structure of the Li 2 TiO 3

  17. Electronic and optical properties of iron pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadkhiya, L. [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313 001, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313 001, Rajasthan (India)

    2011-02-10

    Research highlights: > First ever theoretical and experimental Compton profiles along with anisotropies in momentum densities. > Computation of electronic properties using LCAO (for the first time) and FP-LAPW (with the latest gradient functionals). > Optical properties (imaginary part of optical dielectric constants and absorption coefficients) and utility of FeS{sub 2} in solar cells. - Abstract: We have computed for the first time the energy bands, density of states and Compton profiles of FeS{sub 2} using linear combination of atomic orbital approach. To interpret the theoretical Compton profiles, we have measured the first ever experimental Compton profiles along [1 1 0] and [1 0 0] directions using 100 mCi {sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. The absolute profiles and the anisotropies in momentum densities are well explained by the hybridisation of Hartree-Fock scheme and density functional theory. In addition, to explore the utility of FeS{sub 2} in photovoltaics, we have also discussed the optical properties using full potential linearised augmented plane wave method.

  18. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback

  19. Electronic processes in organic electronics bridging nanostructure, electronic states and device properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kudo, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, Takashi; Ueno, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    The book covers a variety of studies of organic semiconductors, from fundamental electronic states to device applications, including theoretical studies. Furthermore, innovative experimental techniques, e.g., ultrahigh sensitivity photoelectron spectroscopy, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, spin-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and a material processing method with optical-vortex and polarization-vortex lasers, are introduced. As this book is intended to serve as a textbook for a graduate level course or as reference material for researchers in organic electronics and nanoscience from electronic states, fundamental science that is necessary to understand the research is described. It does not duplicate the books already written on organic electronics, but focuses mainly on electronic properties that arise from the nature of organic semiconductors (molecular solids). The new experimental methods introduced in this book are applicable to various materials (e.g., metals, inorganic and organic mater...

  20. Electron Bifurcation: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Two-Electron Brokering in Biological Redox Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuly, Jonathon L; Lubner, Carolyn E; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W; Peters, John W; Beratan, David N

    2017-09-19

    How can proteins drive two electrons from a redox active donor onto two acceptors at very different potentials and distances? And how can this transaction be conducted without dissipating very much energy or violating the laws of thermodynamics? Nature appears to have addressed these challenges by coupling thermodynamically uphill and downhill electron transfer reactions, using two-electron donor cofactors that have very different potentials for the removal of the first and second electron. Although electron bifurcation is carried out with near perfection from the standpoint of energy conservation and electron delivery yields, it is a biological energy transduction paradigm that has only come into focus recently. This Account provides an exegesis of the biophysical principles that underpin electron bifurcation. Remarkably, bifurcating electron transfer (ET) proteins typically send one electron uphill and one electron downhill by similar energies, such that the overall reaction is spontaneous, but not profligate. Electron bifurcation in the NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin: NADP + oxidoreductase I (Nfn) is explored in detail here. Recent experimental progress in understanding the structure and function of Nfn allows us to dissect its workings in the framework of modern ET theory. The first electron that leaves the two-electron donor flavin (L-FAD) executes a positive free energy "uphill" reaction, and the departure of this electron switches on a second thermodynamically spontaneous ET reaction from the flavin along a second pathway that moves electrons in the opposite direction and at a very different potential. The singly reduced ET products formed from the bifurcating flavin are more than two nanometers distant from each other. In Nfn, the second electron to leave the flavin is much more reducing than the first: the potentials are said to be "crossed." The eventually reduced cofactors, NADH and ferredoxin in the case of Nfn, perform crucial downstream redox

  1. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  2. Synthetic biology and intellectual property rights: six recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minssen, Timo; Rutz, Berthold; van Zimmeren, Esther

    2015-02-01

    On 26th November 2013, the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation organized an expert meeting on "Synthetic Biology & Intellectual Property Rights" in Copenhagen sponsored by the European Research Area Network in Synthetic Biology (ERASynBio). The meeting brought together ten experts from different countries with a variety of professional backgrounds to discuss emerging challenges and opportunities at the interface of synthetic biology and intellectual property rights. The aim of this article is to provide a summary of the major issues and recommendations discussed during the meeting. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Insight into Biological Apatite: Physiochemical Properties and Preparation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological apatite is an inorganic calcium phosphate salt in apatite form and nano size with a biological derivation. It is also the main inorganic component of biological hard tissues such as bones and teeth of vertebrates. Consequently, biological apatite has a wide application in dentistry and orthopedics by using as dental fillers and bone substitutes for bone reconstruction and regeneration. Given this, it is of great significance to obtain a comprehensive understanding of its physiochemical and biological properties. However, upon the previous studies, inconsistent and inadequate data of such basic properties as the morphology, crystal size, chemical compositions, and solubility of biological apatite were reported. This may be ascribed to the differences in the source of raw materials that biological apatite are made from, as well as the effect of the preparation approaches. Hence, this paper is to provide some insights rather than a thorough review of the physiochemical properties as well as the advantages and drawbacks of various preparation methods of biological apatite.

  4. Insight into biological apatite: physiochemical properties and preparation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Huang, Shishu; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Chen, Zhuofan; Pan, Haobo

    2013-01-01

    Biological apatite is an inorganic calcium phosphate salt in apatite form and nano size with a biological derivation. It is also the main inorganic component of biological hard tissues such as bones and teeth of vertebrates. Consequently, biological apatite has a wide application in dentistry and orthopedics by using as dental fillers and bone substitutes for bone reconstruction and regeneration. Given this, it is of great significance to obtain a comprehensive understanding of its physiochemical and biological properties. However, upon the previous studies, inconsistent and inadequate data of such basic properties as the morphology, crystal size, chemical compositions, and solubility of biological apatite were reported. This may be ascribed to the differences in the source of raw materials that biological apatite are made from, as well as the effect of the preparation approaches. Hence, this paper is to provide some insights rather than a thorough review of the physiochemical properties as well as the advantages and drawbacks of various preparation methods of biological apatite.

  5. Volume scanning electron microscopy for imaging biological ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titze, Benjamin; Genoud, Christel

    2016-11-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) has been a key imaging method to investigate biological ultrastructure for over six decades. In recent years, novel volume EM techniques have significantly advanced nanometre-scale imaging of cells and tissues in three dimensions. Previously, this had depended on the slow and error-prone manual tasks of cutting and handling large numbers of sections, and imaging them one-by-one with transmission EM. Now, automated volume imaging methods mostly based on scanning EM (SEM) allow faster and more reliable acquisition of serial images through tissue volumes and achieve higher z-resolution. Various software tools have been developed to manipulate the acquired image stacks and facilitate quantitative analysis. Here, we introduce three volume SEM methods: serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM), focused ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) and automated tape-collecting ultramicrotome SEM (ATUM-SEM). We discuss and compare their capabilities, provide an overview of the full volume SEM workflow for obtaining 3D datasets and showcase different applications for biological research. © 2016 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Electronic properties of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Using analytical and numerical methods, the electronic properties of the copper-oxygen plane in the normal phase of high Tc superconductors are described. Using the slave-boson technique in the saddle point, a theory of the metal insulator transition which generalizes the notions of a Mott insulator to the case of more than a single band for those planes is presented. A phase-diagram is obtained in the parameter space and effective masses, optical gaps and metallization are calculated as a function of the number of carriers. Based on the experimental evidence, the theory permits classification of superconducting compounds as charge transfer insulators in the stoichiometric case. The insulator state is characterized by a non-zero optical gap and a divergent effective mass which corresponds to the breakage of a Fermi-liquid scheme. The results obtained are applicable to metal-transition-oxides whose behaviour has been traditionally controversial and it is concluded that it is necessary to broaden the meaning of a Mott insulator to the case of more than a single band to better understand them. Based on the ideas of group renormalization in a real space, a lattice approximation is presented, which allows: a) To complement the treatment of slave-bosons in phase diagrams and optical gaps; b) Identification of an attraction mechanism between carriers originating from purely repulsive interactions. Numerical calculations in small clusters show the existence of a pairing mechanism showing a superconducting instability from a charge transfer insulator. (Author) [es

  7. Low Voltage Transmission Electron Microscopy in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendayan, Moise; Paransky, Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Low voltage transmission electron microscopy (LVTEM) was employed to examine biological tissues with accelerating voltages as low as 5kV. Tissue preparation was modified to take advantage of the low-voltage techniques. Treatments with heavy metals, such as post-fixation with osmium tetroxide, on block and counterstaining were omitted. Sections (40nm) were thinner than usual and generated highly contrasted images. General appearance of the cells remains similar to that of conventional TEM. New features were however revealed. The matrix of the pancreatic granules displays heterogeneity with partitions that may correspond to the inner-segregation of their secretory proteins. Mitochondria revealed the presence of the ATP synthase granules along their cristea. The nuclear dense chromatin displayed a honeycomb organization while distinct beads, nucleosomes, aligned along thin threads were seen in the dispersed chromatin. Nuclear pore protein complexes revealed their globular nature. The intercalated disks in cardiac muscle displayed their fine structural organization. These features correlate well with data described or predicted by cell and molecular biology. These new aspects are not revealed when thicker and conventionally osmicated tissue sections were examined by LVTEM, indicating that major masking effects are associated with standard TEM techniques. Immunogold was adapted to LVTEM further enhancing its potential in cell biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Optical Properties and Biological Applications of Electromagnetically Coupled Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan Nathan

    The optical properties of metallic particles change dramatically as the size shrinks to the nanoscale. The familiar mirror-like sheen of bulk metals is replaced by the bright, sharp, colorful plasmonic resonances of nanoparticles. The resonances of plasmonic metal nanoparticles are highly tunable throughout the visible spectrum, depending on the size, shape, local dielectric environment, and proximity to other optical resonances. Fundamental and applied research in the nanoscience community in the past few decades has sought to understand and exploit these phenomena for biological applications. In this work, discrete nanoparticle assemblies were produced through biomolecular interactions and studied at the single particle level with darkfield spectroscopy. Pairs of gold nanoparticles tethered by DNA were utilized as molecular rulers to study the dynamics of DNA bending by the restriction enzyme EcoRV. These results substantiated that nanoparticle rulers, deemed "plasmon rulers", could measure the dynamics of single biomolecules with high throughput, long lifetime, and high temporal resolution. To extend these concepts for live cell studies, a plasmon ruler comprised of peptide-linked gold nanoparticle satellites around a core particle was synthesized and utilized to optically follow cell signaling pathways in vivo at the single molecule level. The signal provided by these plasmon rulers allowed continuous observation of caspase-3 activation at the single molecule level in living cells for over 2 hours, unambiguously identifying early stage activation of caspase-3 in apoptotic cells. In the last section of this dissertation, an experimental and theoretical study of electomagnetic coupling in asymmetric metal nanoparticle dimers is presented. A "heterodimer" composed of a silver particle and a gold particle is observed to have a novel coupling between a plasmon mode (free electron oscillations) and an inter-band absorption process (bound electron transitions). The

  9. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  10. Biological shielding design and qualification of concreting process for construction of electron beam irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petwal, V.C.; Kumar, P.; Suresh, N.; Parchani, G.; Dwivedi, J.; Thakurta, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    A technology demonstration facility for irradiation of food and agricultural products is being set-up by RRCAT at Indore. The facility design is based on linear electron accelerator with maximum beam power of 10 kW and can be operated either in electron mode at 10 MeV or photon modes at 5/7.5 MeV. Biological shielding has been designed in accordance with NCRP 51 to achieve dose rate at all accessible points outside the irradiation vault less than the permissible limit of 0.1 mR/hr. In addition to radiation attenuation property, concrete must have satisfactory mechanical properties to meet the structural requirements. There are number of site specific variables which affect the structural, thermal and radiological properties of concrete, leading to considerable difference in actual values and design values. Hence it is essential to establish a suitable site and environmental specific process to cast the concrete and qualify the process by experimental measurement. For process qualification we have cast concrete test blocks of different thicknesses up to 3.25 m and evaluated the radiological and mechanical properties by radiometry, ultrasonic and mechanical tests. In this paper we describe the biological shielding design of the facility and analyse the results of tests carried out for qualification of the process. (author)

  11. [Oregano: properties, composition and biological activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcila-Lozano, Cynthia Cristina; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Lecona-Uribe, Salvador; González de Mejía, Elvira

    2004-03-01

    The oregano spice includes various plant species. The most common are the genus Origanum, native of Europe, and the Lippia, native of Mexico. Among the species of Origanum. their most important components are the limonene, gamma-cariofilene, rho-cymenene, canfor, linalol, alpha-pinene, carvacrol and thymol. In the genus Lippia, the same compounds can be found. The oregano composition depends on the specie, climate, altitude, time of recollection and the stage of growth. Some of the properties of this plant's extracts are being currently studied due to the growing interest for substituting synthetic additives commonly found in foods. Oregano has a good antioxidant capacity and also presents antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms like Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, among others. These are all characteristics of interest for the food industry because they may enhance the safety and stability of foods. There are also some reports regarding the antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effect of oregano; representing an alternative for the potential treatment and/or prevention of certain chronic ailments, like cancer.

  12. Electron impact phenomena and the properties of gaseous ions

    CERN Document Server

    Field, F H; Massey, H S W; Brueckner, Keith A

    1970-01-01

    Electron Impact Phenomena and the Properties of Gaseous Ions, Revised Edition deals with data pertaining to electron impact and to molecular gaseous ionic phenomena. This book discusses electron impact phenomena in gases at low pressure that involve low-energy electrons, which result in ion formation. The text also describes the use of mass spectrometers in electron impact studies and the degree of accuracy obtained when measuring electron impact energies. This book also reviews relatively low speed electrons and the transitions that result in the ionization of the atomic system. This text the

  13. Opto-electronic properties of charged conjugated molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fratiloiu, S.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to provide fundamental insight into the nature and opto-electronic properties of charge carriers on conjugated oligomers and polymers. Electronic structure, optical absorption properties and distribution of charge carriers along the chains of different conjugated materials

  14. Ab initio electronic properties of dual phosphorus monolayers in silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drumm, Daniel W.; Per, Manolo C.; Budi, Akin

    2014-01-01

    , investigating the fundamental electronic properties of monolayer pairs. Quantitative band splittings and the electronic density are presented, along with effects of the layers’ relative alignment and comments on disordered systems, and for the first time, the effective electronic widths of such device...

  15. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibil, Helen R; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  16. Biological properties of new viologen-phosphorus dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepluch, Karol; Katir, Nadia; El Kadib, Abdelkrim; Felczak, Aleksandra; Zawadzka, Katarzyna; Weber, Monika; Klajnert, Barbara; Lisowska, Katarzyna; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Bousmina, Mostapha; Bryszewska, Maria; Majoral, Jean Pierre

    2012-03-05

    Some biological properties of eight dendrimers incorporating both phosphorus linkages and viologen units within their cascade structure or at the periphery were investigated for the first time. In particular cytotoxicity, hemotoxicity, and antimicrobial and antifungal activity of these new macromolecules were examined. Even if for example all these species exhibited good antimicrobial properties, it was demonstrated that their behavior strongly depends on several parameters as their size and molecular weight, the number of viologen units and the nature of the terminal groups.

  17. Electronic properties of curved graphene sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Cortijo, Alberto; Vozmediano, Maria A. H.

    2006-01-01

    A model is proposed to study the electronic structure of slightly curved graphene sheets with an arbitrary number of pentagon-heptagon pairs and Stone-Wales defects based on a cosmological analogy. The disorder induced by curvature produces characteristic patterns in the local density of states that can be observed in scanning tunnel and transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Biological and therapeutic properties of chemical propolis constituents.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucci, MC

    1996-01-01

    Chemical composition of propolis, mainly the compounds identified in the last fourteen years, is presented. The chemical constituents which may be relevant to its biological and therapeutical activities are discussed. The antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities and pharmacological properties of propolis are presented. Some recent concepts about propolis and its use in medicine are showed.

  19. Biological influences on the quality properties of wool

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ties be produced to meet the requirements of the manu- facturer. The aim of this article is to identify quality dif- ferences of a biological nature, i.e. due to breeding, feeding and management, and to measure certain physical and chemi- cal fleece and fibre properties in monetary terms. By quality of wool is meant, specifically, ...

  20. Electronic, thermal and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, M S; Dresselhaus, G; Charlier, J C; Hernández, E

    2004-10-15

    A review of the electronic, thermal and mechanical properties of nanotubes is presented, with particular reference to properties that differ from those of the bulk counterparts and to potential applications that might result from the special structure and properties of nanotubes. Both experimental and theoretical aspects of these topics are reviewed.

  1. Electron reactions in model liquids and biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakale, G.; Gregg, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following studies: (1) Field-dependent electron attachment; (2) Dependence of electron attachment rate on electron-acceptor dipole moment; (3) Electron attachment in i-octane/TMS mixtures; (4) Electron attachment/detachment equilibria; (5) Electron attachment to reversed micelles; (6) Electron attachment to chemical carcinogens; (7) Radiation-induced bacterial mutagenesis; and (8) Bacterial mutagenicity of nitrobenzene derivatives. 14 references

  2. Electron energy loss spectroscopy microanalysis and imaging in the transmission electron microscope: example of biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diociaiuti, Marco

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports original results obtained in our laboratory over the past few years in the application of both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopy imaging (ESI) to biological samples, performed in two transmission electron microscopes (TEM) equipped with high-resolution electron filters and spectrometers: a Gatan model 607 single magnetic sector double focusing EEL serial spectrometer attached to a Philips 430 TEM and a Zeiss EM902 Energy Filtering TEM. The primary interest was on the possibility offered by the combined application of these spectroscopic techniques with those offered by the TEM. In particular, the electron beam focusing available in a TEM allowed us to perform EELS and ESI on very small sample volumes, where high-resolution imaging and electron diffraction techniques can provide important structural information. I show that ESI was able to improve TEM performance, due to the reduced chromatic aberration and the possibility of avoiding the sample staining procedure. Finally, the analysis of the oscillating extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) beyond the ionization edges characterizing the EELS spectra allowed me, in a manner very similar to the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the X-ray absorption spectra, to obtain short-range structural information for such light elements of biological interest as O or Fe. The Philips EM430 (250-300 keV) TEM was used to perform EELS microanalysis on Ca, P, O, Fe, Al and Si. The assessment of the detection limits of this method was obtained working with well-characterized samples containing Ca and P, and mimicking the actual cellular matrix. I applied EELS microanalysis to Ca detection in bone tissue during the mineralization process and to P detection in the cellular membrane of erythrocytes treated with an anti-tumoral drug, demonstrating that the cellular membrane is a drug target. I applied EELS microanalysis and selected area electron

  3. Electronic structure and properties of hydroxyalkyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosobutskij, V.S.; Majboroda, V.D.; Petryaev, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Quantum-chemical calculation using the MNDo method of hydroxymethyl and hydroxyethyl radicals and corresponding anion-radicals is made. Electron structure of radical particles differs considerably from the structure of initial alcohols. From the viewpoint of perturbation theory of molecular orbitals it is shown that noncoupled electron in hydroxyalkyl radicals and radical-anions occupies the loosening orbital. For this reason the above-mentioned particles easily enter the reactions of electron transfer on the acceptor and are not active in reactions of break-off and addition via binary bond. Theoretical concepts are confirmed by experimental data, obtained when studying gamma-radiolysis of methanol solution in water and in 5M NaOH aqueous solution (dose rate is 0.478 Gy/s, dose range is 0.796-4.293 kGy)

  4. Electronic structure and transport properties of intermetallics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, A.J.; Ellis, D.E.; Welsh, L.B.

    1975-12-01

    The electronic interactions responsible for the unusual properties of several important classes of materials (including the highly anisotropic layered dichalcogenides, and network and cage structure materials and pseudobinary alloys) have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The unique ability of NMR to probe the local electronic properties of the various constituents of an intermetallic compound or alloy has provided important new information including correlations with observed changes in superconducting transition temperatures. Novel theoretical models (including relativistic effects) are found to yield energy band structures, Fermi surfaces, transport properties, charge and spin densities, generalized magnetic susceptibilities, and optical properties in very good agreement with experimental determinations of these observable phenomena. (Author) (GRA)

  5. Electronic properties of magnetically doped nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    body of publications since their discovery in 1991 (Iijima. 1991). Recent experimental (Lee et al 1997; Rao et al. 1997; Grigorian et al 1998a, b) and theoretical (Miya- moto et al 1995; Esfarjani et al 1999) studies on doping nanotubes focused on doping by alkali metal or halogene elements as electron donors or acceptors, ...

  6. Spectrum properties of electrons in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avron, J.

    1975-11-01

    The electron spectra in the one-particle Bloch model is discussed. The presence of hamiltonian bands is proved, especially for the Dirac and Schrodinger hamiltonians. The analyticity of the quasimomentum k is described as well as the stability of the bands in singular disturbances. (B.G.)

  7. Electronic properties of magnetically doped nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of doping of carbon nanotubes by magnetic transition metal atoms has been considered in this paper. In the case of semiconducting tubes, it was found that the system has zero magnetization, whereas in metallic tubes the valence electrons of the tube screen the magnetization of the dopants: the coupling to the tube ...

  8. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures. G.U. Kulkarni. Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research. Bangalore, India. kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in.

  9. Structure, Electronic and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Furyloxazoles and Thienyloxazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagli, Ozlem; Gok, Rabia; Bahat, Mehmet; Ozbay, Akif

    2016-01-01

    Geometry optimization, electronic and nonlinear optical properties of isomers of furyloxazole and thienyloxazole molecules are carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level. The conformational analysis of 12 compounds have been studied as a function of torsional angle between rings. Electronic and NLO properties such as dipole moment, energy gap, polarizability and first hyperpolarizability were also calculated. (paper)

  10. The electronic properties of semiconductor quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, J.A.

    2000-10-01

    This work is an investigation into the electronic behaviour of semiconductor quantum dots, particularly self-assembled quantum dot arrays. Processor-efficient models are developed to describe the electronic structure of dots, deriving analytic formulae for the strain tensor, piezoelectric distribution and diffusion- induced evolution of the confinement potential, for dots of arbitrary initial shape and composition profile. These models are then applied to experimental data. Transitions due to individual quantum dots have a narrow linewidth as a result of their discrete density of states. By contrast, quantum dot arrays exhibit inhomogeneous broadening which is generally attributed to size variations between the individual dots in the ensemble. Interpreting the results of double resonance spectroscopy, it is seen that variation in the indium composition of the nominally InAs dots is also present. This result also explains the otherwise confusing relationship between the spread in the ground-state and excited-state transition energies. Careful analysis shows that, in addition to the variations in size and composition, some other as yet unidentified broadening mechanism must also be present. The influence of rapid thermal annealing on dot electronic structure is also considered, finding that the experimentally observed blue-shift and narrowing of the photoluminescence linewidth may both be explained in terms of normal In/Ga interdiffusion. InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots are commonly assumed to have a pyramidal geometry, so that we would expect the energy separation of the ground-state electron and hole levels in the dot to be largest at a positive applied field. This should also be the case for any dot of uniform composition whose shape tapers inwards from base to top, counter to the results of experimental Stark-shift spectroscopy which show a peak transition energy at a negative applied field. It is demonstrated that this inversion of the ground state

  11. Urban Biomining: Biological Extraction of Metals and Materials from Electronics Waste Using a Synthetic Biology Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Rothschild, L.

    2016-12-01

    End-of-life electronics waste (e-waste) containing toxic and valuable materials is a rapidly progressing human health and environmental issue. Using synthetic biology tools, we have developed a recycling method for e-waste. Our innovation is to use a recombinant version of a naturally-occurring silica-degrading enzyme to depolymerize the silica in metal- and glass- containing e-waste components, and subsequently, to use engineered bacterial surfaces to bind and separate metals from a solution. The bacteria with bound metals can then be used as "bio-ink" to print new circuits using a novel plasma jet electronics printing technology. Here, we present the results from our initial studies that focus on the specificity of metal-binding motifs for a cognate metal. The candidate motifs that show high affinity and specificity will be engineered into bacterial surfaces for downstream applications in biologically-mediated metal recycling. Since the chemistry and role of Cu in metalloproteins is relatively well-characterized, we are using Cu as a proxy to elucidate metal and biological ligand interactions with various metals in e-waste. We assess the binding parameters of 3 representative classes of Cu-binding motifs using isothermal titration calorimetry; 1) natural motifs found in metalloproteins, 2) consensus motifs, and 3) rationally designed peptides that are predicted, in silico, to bind Cu. Our results indicate that naturally-occurring motifs have relative high affinity and specificity for Cu (association constant for Cu Ka 104 M-1, Zn Ka 103 M-1) when competing ions are present in the aqueous milieu. However, motifs developed through rational design by applying quantum mechanical methods that take into account complexation energies of the elemental binding partners and molecular geometry of the cognate metal, not only show high affinity for the cognate metal (Cu Ka 106 M-1), but they show specificity and discrimination against other metal ions that would be

  12. ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING AND THE EVOLVING INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY REGIME

    OpenAIRE

    D. Langenberg

    2000-01-01

    As we leave the Industrial Age behind us and move into the Information Age, the transition from “bricks and mortar” commerce to electronic commerce and from paper to electronic publishing pose major challenges for international intellectual property regimes. Electronic commerce has taken off. Whatever concerns about consumer acceptance there were five years ago have given way to “click and mortar” business models where e-commerce has an established role complementing traditional commerce. The...

  13. Biological properties of water-soluble phosphorhydrazone dendrimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Caminade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are hyperbranched and perfectly defined macromolecules, constituted of branches emanating from a central core in an iterative fashion. Phosphorhydrazone dendrimers constitute a special family of dendrimers, possessing one phosphorus atom at each branching point. The internal structure of these dendrimers is hydrophobic, but hydrophilic terminal groups can induce the solubility of the whole structure in water. Indeed, the properties of these compounds are mainly driven by the type of terminal groups their bear; this is especially true for the biological properties. For instance, positively charged terminal groups are efficient for transfection experiments, as drug carriers, as anti-prion agents, and as inhibitor of the aggregation of Alzheimer's peptides, whereas negatively charged dendrimers have anti-HIV properties and can influence the human immune system, leading to anti-inflammatory properties usable against rheumatoid arthritis. This review will give the most representative examples of the biological properties of water-soluble phosphorhydrazone dendrimers, organized depending on the type of terminal groups they bear.

  14. Mass determination based on electron scattering in electron probe X-ray microanalysis of thin biological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linders, P.W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a method for mass determination of thin biological objects by quantitative electron microscopy. The practical realization of the mass determination consists of photographical recording with subsequent densitometry. (Auth.)

  15. Structure and thermodynamic properties of relativistic electron gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-07-01

    Relativistic effect is important in many quantum systems but theoretically complicated from both fundamental and practical perspectives. Herein we introduce an efficient computational procedure to predict the structure and energetic properties of relativistic quantum systems by mapping the Pauli principle into an effective pairwise-additive potential such that the properties of relativistic nonquantum systems can be readily predicted from conventional liquid-state methods. We applied our theoretical procedure to relativistic uniform electron gases and compared the pair correlation functions with those for systems of nonrelativistic electrons. A simple analytical expression has been developed to correlate the exchange-correlation free energy of relativistic uniform electron systems.

  16. Electronic and magnetic properties of ultrathin rhodium nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Bao Lin; Ren-Yun; Sun Hou Qian; Chen Xiao Shuang; Zhao Ji Jun

    2003-01-01

    The structures of ultrathin rhodium nanowires are studied using empirical molecular dynamics simulations with a genetic algorithm. Helical multishell cylindrical and pentagonal packing structures are found. The electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires are calculated using an spd tight-binding Hamiltonian in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The average magnetic moment and electronic density of states are obtained. Our results indicate that the electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires depend not only on the size of the wire but also on the atomic structure. In particular, centred pentagonal and hexagonal structures can be unusually ferromagnetic.

  17. Chitosan to Connect Biology to Electronics: Fabricating the Bio-Device Interface and Communicating Across This Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunkyoung Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Individually, advances in microelectronics and biology transformed the way we live our lives. However, there remain few examples in which biology and electronics have been interfaced to create synergistic capabilities. We believe there are two major challenges to the integration of biological components into microelectronic systems: (i assembly of the biological components at an electrode address, and (ii communication between the assembled biological components and the underlying electrode. Chitosan possesses a unique combination of properties to meet these challenges and serve as an effective bio-device interface material. For assembly, chitosan’s pH-responsive film-forming properties allow it to “recognize” electrode-imposed signals and respond by self-assembling as a stable hydrogel film through a cathodic electrodeposition mechanism. A separate anodic electrodeposition mechanism was recently reported and this also allows chitosan hydrogel films to be assembled at an electrode address. Protein-based biofunctionality can be conferred to electrodeposited films through a variety of physical, chemical and biological methods. For communication, we are investigating redox-active catechol-modified chitosan films as an interface to bridge redox-based communication between biology and an electrode. Despite significant progress over the last decade, many questions still remain which warrants even deeper study of chitosan’s structure, properties, and functions.

  18. Variable electronic properties of lateral phosphorene-graphene heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lin; Du, Yu; Gu, Juan; Xu, Jian-Bin; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-12-21

    Phosphorene and graphene have a tiny lattice mismatch along the armchair direction, which can result in an atomically sharp in-plane interface. The electronic properties of the lateral heterostructures of phosphorene/graphene are investigated by the first-principles method. Here, we demonstrate that the electronic properties of this type of heterostructure can be highly tunable by the quantum size effects and the externally applied electric field (Eext). At strong Eext, Dirac Fermions can be developed with Fermi velocities around one order smaller than that of graphene. Undoped and hydrogen doped configurations demonstrate three drastically different electronic phases, which reveal the strongly tunable potential of this type of heterostructure. Graphene is a naturally better electrode for phosphorene. The transport properties of two-probe devices of graphene/phosphorene/graphene exhibit tunnelling transport characteristics. Given these results, it is expected that in-plane heterostructures of phosphorene/graphene will present abundant opportunities for applications in optoelectronic and electronic devices.

  19. Electronic and ground state properties of ThTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, Purvee, E-mail: purveebhardwaj@gmail.com; Singh, Sadhna, E-mail: drsadhna100@gmail.com [High Pressure Research Lab. Department of Physics Barkatullah University, Bhopal (MP) 462026 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The electronic properties of ThTe in cesium chloride (CsCl, B2) structure are investigated in the present paper. To study the ground state properties of thorium chalcogenide, the first principle calculations have been calculated. The bulk properties, including lattice constant, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are obtained. The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  20. Electronic properties of doped gapped graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    One of the carbon atoms in each Bravais lattice unit cell of pristine graphene plane is substituted by a foreign atom leading to a band gap in the density of states of the system. Then, the gapped graphene is randomly doped by another impurity. The density of states, electronic heat capacity and electrical conductivity of the gapped and doped gapped graphene are investigated within random tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism. The results show that by presence of impurities in the gapped graphene the band gap moves towards lower (higher) values of energy when dopants act as acceptors (donors). The heat capacity decreases (increases) before (after) the Schottky anomaly as well. It is also found that the electrical conductivity of the doped gapped graphene reduces on all ranges of temperature.

  1. Investigation of electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Pt) using Ziman formalism. Our parameter free model potential which is realized on ionic and atomic radius has been incorporated with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system to study the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q). The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been studied by using different screening functions. The correlations of our results and others data with in addition experimental values are profoundly promising to the researchers working in this field. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable to explain the aforesaid electronic transport properties.

  2. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-01-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C

  3. Physical properties of biological entities: an introduction to the ontology of physics for biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Cook

    Full Text Available As biomedical investigators strive to integrate data and analyses across spatiotemporal scales and biomedical domains, they have recognized the benefits of formalizing languages and terminologies via computational ontologies. Although ontologies for biological entities-molecules, cells, organs-are well-established, there are no principled ontologies of physical properties-energies, volumes, flow rates-of those entities. In this paper, we introduce the Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB, a reference ontology of classical physics designed for annotating biophysical content of growing repositories of biomedical datasets and analytical models. The OPB's semantic framework, traceable to James Clerk Maxwell, encompasses modern theories of system dynamics and thermodynamics, and is implemented as a computational ontology that references available upper ontologies. In this paper we focus on the OPB classes that are designed for annotating physical properties encoded in biomedical datasets and computational models, and we discuss how the OPB framework will facilitate biomedical knowledge integration.

  4. Relationship between electronic properties and drug activity of seven quinoxaline compounds: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Roonasi, Payman; Assle taghipour, Khatoon; van der Spoel, David; Manzetti, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The quantum chemical calculations at the DFT/B3LYP level of theory were carried out on seven quinoxaline compounds, which have been synthesized as anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis agents. Three conformers were optimized for each compound and the lowest energy structure was found and used in further calculations. The electronic properties including EHOMO, ELUMO and related parameters as well as electron density around oxygen and nitrogen atoms were calculated for each compound. The relationship between the calculated electronic parameters and biological activity of the studied compounds were investigated. Six similar quinoxaline derivatives with possible more drug activity were suggested based on the calculated electronic descriptors. A mechanism was proposed and discussed based on the calculated electronic parameters and bond dissociation energies.

  5. Nanostructured hybrid films containing nanophosphor: Fabrication and electronic spectral properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, S.A.; Aoki, P.H.B.; Constantino, C.J.L.; Aroca, R.F.; Pires, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hybrid film containing the cationic polyelectrolyte PAH and Y 2 O 3 : Er, Yb nanophosphor. ► LbL film growth was monitored by absorbance x concentration in UV–Vis absorption. ► FTIR indicated existence of secondary interactions between PAH – nanophosphor layers. ► The morphology and the spatial distribution of the LbL film were analyzed by Raman. ► We observed intense electronic emission lines from doping ions in the micro-Raman. - Abstract: The intensive research of the optical properties of rare-earth ions is due to the high quantum efficiency of their emission, very narrow bands, and excellent fluorescence monochromaticity. The photoluminescence data presented here show that the nanophosphor remains a green emitter in Layer-by-Layer (LbL) films leading to potential application in optical devices or biological labeling. The LbL technique, an established method for thin film fabrication with molecular architecture control, is used in the manufacture of a hybrid film containing the cationic polyelectrolyte poly (allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and Y 2 O 3 : Er, Yb nanophosphor. The spectroscopic properties of this luminescent nanomaterial are extracted from the spectral data of the powder, cast film and LbL films. The growth of the LbL film was monitored by absorbance versus concentration plots in ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis) absorption spectroscopy. The presence of both PAH and nanophosphor in the LbL film was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy. The FTIR data also ruled out the existence of chemical interactions between the PAH and nanophosphor layers, which means that secondary interactions (like Van der Waals forces) might be the driving forces for LbL film growth. The morphology and the spatial distribution of the LbL film components along the film surface were probed with micrometer spatial resolution combining optical microscopy and Raman mapping. In addition, the observation of intense

  6. A combined experimental and computational study of 3-bromo-5-(2,5-difluorophenyl) pyridine and 3,5-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)pyridine: Insight into the synthesis, spectroscopic, single crystal XRD, electronic, nonlinear optical and biological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasuddin; Akram, Muhammad; Adeel, Muhammad; Khalid, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Khan, Muhammad Usman; Asghar, Muhammad Adnan; Ullah, Malik Aman; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2018-05-01

    Carbon-carbon coupling play a vital role in the synthetic field of organic chemistry. Two novel pyridine derivatives: 3-bromo-5-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyridine (1) and 3,5-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)pyridine (2) were synthesized via carbon-carbon coupling, characterized by XRD, spectroscopic techniques and also investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). XRD data and optimized DFT studies are found to be in good correspondence with each other. The UV-Vis analysis of compounds under study i.e. (1) and (2) was obtained by using "TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p)" level of theory to explain the vertical transitions. Calculated FT-IR and UV-Vis results are found to be in good agreement with experimental FT-IR and UV-Vis findings. Natural bond orbital (NBO) study was performed using B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) level to find the most stable molecular structure of the compounds. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analysis were performed at B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory, which indicates that the molecules might be bioactive. Moreover, the bioactivity of compounds (1) and (2) have been confirmed by the experimental activity in terms of zones of inhibition against bacteria and fungus. Chemical reactivity of compounds (1) and (2) was indicated by mapping molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) over the entire stabilized geometries of the compounds under study. The nonlinear optical properties were computed with B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory which are found greater than the value of urea due to conjugation effect. Two state model has been further employed to explain the nonlinear optical properties of compounds under investigation.

  7. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of wonder kelp--Laminaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Bhatnagar, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Laminaria is a kelp that finds its place in the brown algae family. It has been an area of study for past many years, and its wonderful biological properties have always attracted medical professionals and researchers to explore more and more from this wonder kelp. The constituents of Laminaria include iodine, potassium, magnesium, calcium and iron. Iodine compounds, TEA-hydroiodide in particular, are great lipolytic agents as they stimulate lipase activity. Laminarins on the other hand are used as a tumor angiogenic blocker. This genus of the kelps is also rich in algin, a high molecular weight polysaccharide that forms viscous colloidal solutions or gels in water leading to the use of kelp derivatives as bulk laxatives. It has great applications in cosmeceutical science, as well as some antibacterial properties have also been assigned to Laminaria. A deeper insight into the physical, biological, and chemical properties of this wonder kelp would lead to further exploitation of Laminaria for medicinal and cosmeceutical purpose. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biological fabrication of cellulose fibers with tailored properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalio, Filipe; Fuchs, Regina; Cohen, Sidney R.; Leitus, Gregory; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Paris, Oskar; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    Cotton is a promising basis for wearable smart textiles. Current approaches that rely on fiber coatings suffer from function loss during wear. We present an approach that allows biological incorporation of exogenous molecules into cotton fibers to tailor the material’s functionality. In vitro model cultures of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) are incubated with 6-carboxyfluorescein–glucose and dysprosium–1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid–glucose, where the glucose moiety acts as a carrier capable of traveling from the vascular connection to the outermost cell layer of the ovule epidermis, becoming incorporated into the cellulose fibers. This yields fibers with unnatural properties such as fluorescence or magnetism. Combining biological systems with the appropriate molecular design offers numerous possibilities to grow functional composite materials and implements a material-farming concept.

  9. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajashekar, V; Rao, E Upender; P, Srinivas

    2012-07-01

    Bada Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.) is perhaps the most useful traditional medicinal plant in India. Each part of the neem tree has some medicinal property and is thus commercially exploitable. During the last five decades, apart from the chemistry of the Pedalium murex compounds, considerable progress has been achieved regarding the biological activity and medicinal applications of this plant. It is now considered as a valuable source of unique natural products for development of medicines against various diseases and also for the development of industrial products. This review gives a bird's eye view mainly on the biological activities of some of this compounds isolated, pharmacological actions of the extracts, clinical studies and plausible medicinal applications of gokharu along with their safety evaluation.

  10. Biological Soil Properties in Integrated Crop-Livestock-Forest Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Camylla Ramos Assis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Currently, agricultural productivity and sustainable development are the desired bases for the creation of production systems. Farming for greater production and the efficient use of soil resources are at the core of modern systems. However, the way in which agricultural management and practices can change soil quality has become increasingly important. The aim of this study was to detect changes in soil biological properties caused by implementation of the integrated crop-livestock-forest system (iCLF and to identify the properties suitable for detecting changes in soil biological quality. Soil samples were collected from the 0.00-0.10 m layer in Nova Canaã do Norte, MT, Brazil, and Cachoeira Dourada, GO, Brazil, in areas of the iCLF with 1 (iCLF1 or 3 (iCLF3 eucalyptus rows and in areas of recovered and degraded pasture. In Cachoeira Dourada, in the iCLF1, samples were taken in the tree row and at 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 m from this row. In Nova Canaã in the iCLF3, samples were taken in the center row and at 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, and 12.0 m from this row. In Cachoeira Dourada, samples were taken in the center row and at 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, and 9.0 m from this row. All samples had five replicates. In Nova Canaã, the iCLF1 caused less disturbance in the microbial population than the degraded pasture, which was evidenced by the lower metabolic quotient and basal respiration. The sampling position in relation to the tree row had little effect on comparison of the iCLF with the degraded pasture in regard to soil biological properties. Carbon and N of the microbial biomass and the microbial quotient were the best properties for differentiating the iCLF from the degraded pasture. ICLFs have not yet led to improvements in soil biological quality in relation to the degraded pasture.

  11. Surface properties and microporosity of polyhydroxybutyrate under scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouf, A.A.; Samsudin, A.R.; Samian, R.; Akool, K.; Abdullah, N.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the surface properties especially surface porosity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using scanning electron microscopy. PHB granules were sprinkled on the double-sided sticky tape attached on a SEM aluminium stub and sputtered with gold (10nm thickness) in a Polaron SC515 Coater, following which the samples were placed into the SEM specimen chamber for viewing and recording. Scanning electron micrographs with different magnification of PHB surface revealed multiple pores with different sizes. (Author)

  12. Optical properties and electron transport in low-dimensional nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, 2-2 (2011), s. 4-13 ISSN 0021-3411 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : quantum dots * electron-photon interaction * optical properties * electron relaxation * DNA molecule Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics http:// elibrary .ru/contents.asp?issueid=1010336

  13. [Analysis on property of meridian supramolecules by biological evolution path].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kaiwen; Tao, Yeqin; Tang, Wenhan; He, Fuyuan; Liu, Wenlong; Shi, Jilian; Yang, Yantao; Zhou, Yiqun; Chang, Xiaorong

    2017-03-12

    With human placed in the whole nature, by following the biologic evolution path, the property of channel structure for "imprinting template" in meridian and zang-fu was explored with supramolecular chemistry. In the history of biologic evolution, each molecule in "molecule society" gradually developed into various highly-ordered supramolecular bodies based on self-identification, self-assembly, self-organization, self-replicating of"imprinting template", and thereby the original biochemical system was established, and finally evolved into human. In the forming process of supramolecular bodies, the channel structure of"imprinting template" in guest supramolecular bodies would be kept by host supramolecular bodies, and communicate with the outside to exchange materials, energy, information, otherwise life phenomenon could not continue, for which it was the chemical nature of biolo-gical supramolecular bodies for body to develop meridian. Therefore, the human was a gigantic and complicated supramolecules body in biological nature, and possessed the supramolecules "imprinting template" at each stage of evolution, for which the meridians were formed. When meridians converged, acupoints appeared; when acupointsconverged, zang-fu appeared. With the promotion of the blood from heart, according to"imprinting template", the guest supramolecular bodies and host meridian produced qi -analysis, which was the qi -phenomenon of guest in meridian. It presented as zang-fu image of physiology and pathology as well as action regularities of medication and acupuncture tolerance, by which current various meridian viewpoints could be explained and propose the hypothesis of meridian supramolecular bodies. The meridian and its phenomenon was decide by its "imprinting template" of supramolecular bodies and self-reaction regularities, which abided through the living nature. This was the substance for meridian biology.

  14. Electronic properties of graphene-based bilayer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkov, A.V., E-mail: arozhkov@gmail.com [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Sboychakov, A.O. [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rakhmanov, A.L. [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow, 127055 (Russian Federation); Nori, Franco, E-mail: fnori@riken.jp [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2016-08-23

    This article reviews the theoretical and experimental work related to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene systems. Three types of bilayer stackings are discussed: the AA, AB, and twisted bilayer graphene. This review covers single-electron properties, effects of static electric and magnetic fields, bilayer-based mesoscopic systems, spin–orbit coupling, dc transport and optical response, as well as spontaneous symmetry violation and other interaction effects. The selection of the material aims to introduce the reader to the most commonly studied topics of theoretical and experimental research in bilayer graphene.

  15. Avoiding artefacts during electron microscopy of silver nanomaterials exposed to biological environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Goode, A E; Skepper, J N; Thorley, A J; Seiffert, J M; Chung, K F; Tetley, T D; Shaffer, M S P; Ryan, M P; Porter, A E

    2016-02-01

    Electron microscopy has been applied widely to study the interaction of nanomaterials with proteins, cells and tissues at nanometre scale. Biological material is most commonly embedded in thermoset resins to make it compatible with the high vacuum in the electron microscope. Room temperature sample preparation protocols developed over decades provide contrast by staining cell organelles, and aim to preserve the native cell structure. However, the effect of these complex protocols on the nanomaterials in the system is seldom considered. Any artefacts generated during sample preparation may ultimately interfere with the accurate prediction of the stability and reactivity of the nanomaterials. As a case study, we review steps in the room temperature preparation of cells exposed to silver nanomaterials (AgNMs) for transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis. In particular, embedding and staining protocols, which can alter the physicochemical properties of AgNMs and introduce artefacts thereby leading to a misinterpretation of silver bioreactivity, are scrutinized. Recommendations are given for the application of cryogenic sample preparation protocols, which simultaneously fix both particles and diffusible ions. By being aware of the advantages and limitations of different sample preparation methods, compromises or selection of different correlative techniques can be made to draw more accurate conclusions about the data. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped

  17. Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Hydrogen Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Jie; Jaffe, Richard L.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We examined the electronic and mechanical properties of hydrogen functionalized carbon nanotubes. The functionalization pattern covers two extreme groups. One group has randomly selected functionalization sites including one to twenty percent of the carbon atoms. The other group has regularly patterned functional sites parallel to the tube axis. Metallic, small-gap semiconducting and large-gap semiconducting carbon nanotubes are studied. The results reveal that the electronic properties of the tubes are very sensitive to the degree of functionalization, with even one percent functionalization being enough to render metallic tubes semiconducting. On the other hand, the mechanical properties, like tensile modulus, are much less sensitive to functionalization. For carbon nanotubes functionalized with specific patterns, the electric properties depends strongly on the nature of the functionalization pattern.

  18. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  19. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  20. Electronic properties of bromine-doped carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Jhi, S H; Cohen, M L

    2002-01-01

    Intercalation of bromine molecules (Br2) into single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes is studied using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. Electronic and vibrational properties of the SWNT and Br2 are studied for various bromine concentrations. A drastic change in the charge transfer, bromine stretching-mode, and bromine bond-length is observed when the bromine-bromine distance decreases. Calculated electronic structures show that, at high bromine concentrations, the bromine ppsigma level broadens due to the interbromine interaction. These states overlap with the electronic bands of the SWNT near the Fermi level which results in a substantial charge transfer from carbon to bromine.

  1. Charge-transfer properties in the gas electron multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sanghyo; Kim, Yongkyun; Cho, Hyosung

    2004-01-01

    The charge transfer properties of a gas electron multiplier (GEM) were systematically investigated over a broad range of electric field configurations. The electron collection efficiency and the charge sharing were found to depend on the external fields, as well as on the GEM voltage. The electron collection efficiency increased with the collection field up to 90%, but was essentially independent of the drift field strength. A double conical GEM has a 10% gain increase with time due to surface charging by avalanche ions whereas this effect was eliminated with the cylindrical GEM. The positive-ion feedback is also estimated. (author)

  2. Specific heat properties of electrons in generalized Fibonacci quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriz, P. W.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the specific heat properties of electrons in one-dimensional quasiperiodic potentials, arranged in accordance with the generalized Fibonacci sequence. The electronic energy spectra are calculated using the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in a tight-binding approximation. Both analytical and numerical results on the temperature dependence of the electron's specific heat associated with their multiscale fractal energy spectra are presented. We compare our numerical results with those found for the ordinary Fibonacci structure. A rich and varied behavior is found for the specific heat oscillations when T→0, with interesting physical consequences.

  3. One-Electron Theory of Metals. Cohesive and Structural Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    The work described in the report r.nd the 16 accompanying publications is based upon a one-electron theory obtained within the local approximation to density-functional theory, and deals with the ground state of metals as obtained from selfconsistent electronic-structure calculations performed...... by means of the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method. It has been the goal of the work to establish how well this one-electron approach describes physical properties such as the crystal structures of the transition metals, the structural phase transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth...

  4. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural parameters, elastic constants, electronic and optical properties of the bi-alkali antimonides (Na2KSb, Na2RbSb, Na2CsSb, K2RbSb, K2CsSb and Rb2CsSb) were calculated using state-of-the-art density functional theory. Different exchange-correlation potentials were adopted to predict the physical properties.

  5. Millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric properties of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman Ansar

    Broadband dielectric properties of materials can be employed to identify, detect, and characterize materials through their unique spectral signatures. In this study, millimeter wave, submillimeter wave, and terahertz dielectric properties of biological substances inclusive of liquids, solids, and powders were obtained using Dispersive Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DFTS). Two broadband polarizing interferometers were constructed to test materials from 60 GHz to 1.2 THz. This is an extremely difficult portion of the frequency spectrum to obtain a material's dielectric properties since neither optical nor microwave-based techniques provide accurate data. The dielectric characteristics of liquids such as cyclohexane, chlorobenzene, benzene, ethanol, methanol, 1,4 dioxane, and 10% formalin were obtained using the liquid interferometer. Subsequently the solid interferometer was utilized to determine the dielectric properties of human breast tissues, which are fixed and preserved in 10% formalin. This joint collaboration with the Tufts New England Medical Center demonstrated a significant difference between the dielectric response of tumorous and non-tumorous breast tissues across the spectrum. Powders such as anthrax, flour, talc, corn starch, dry milk, and baking soda have been involved in a number of security threats and false alarms around the globe in the last decade. To be able to differentiate hoax attacks and serious security threats, the dielectric properties of common household powders were also examined using the solid interferometer to identify the powders' unique resonance peaks. A new sample preparation kit was designed to test the powder specimens. It was anticipated that millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric characterization will enable one to clearly distinguish one powder from the other; however most of the powders had relatively close dielectric responses and only Talc had a resonance signature recorded at 1.135 THz. Furthermore, due to

  6. Advances in imaging and electron physics time resolved electron diffraction for chemistry, biology and material science

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics merges two long-running serials-Advances in Electronics & Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  7. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Biological properties of acidic cosmetic water from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ting; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Pan, Jian-Liang; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chen, Shi-Hui; Liu, Po-Len; Wang, Hui-Chun; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Shu-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This current work was to investigate the biological effects of acidic cosmetic water (ACW) on various biological assays. ACW was isolated from seawater and demonstrated several bio-functions at various concentration ranges. ACW showed a satisfactory effect against Staphylococcus aureus, which reduced 90% of bacterial growth after a 5-second exposure. We used cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to test the properties of ACW in inflammatory cytokine release, and it did not induce inflammatory cytokine release from un-stimulated, normal PBMCs. However, ACW was able to inhibit bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine TNF-α released from PBMCs, showing an anti-inflammation potential. Furthermore, ACW did not stimulate the rat basophilic leukemia cell (RBL-2H3) related allergy response on de-granulation. Our data presented ACW with a strong anti-oxidative ability in a superoxide anion radical scavenging assay. In mass spectrometry information, magnesium and zinc ions demonstrated bio-functional detections for anti-inflammation as well as other metal ions such as potassium and calcium were observed. ACW also had minor tyrosinase and melanin decreasing activities in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn-MP) without apparent cytotoxicity. In addition, the cell proliferation assay illustrated anti-growth and anti-migration effects of ACW on human skin melanoma cells (A375.S2) indicating that it exerted the anti-cancer potential against skin cancer. The results obtained from biological assays showed that ACW possessed multiple bioactivities, including anti-microorganism, anti-inflammation, allergy-free, antioxidant, anti-melanin and anticancer properties. To our knowledge, this was the first report presenting these bioactivities on ACW.

  9. Biological Properties of Acidic Cosmetic Water from Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wen Hsiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This current work was to investigate the biological effects of acidic cosmetic water (ACW on various biological assays. ACW was isolated from seawater and demonstrated several bio-functions at various concentration ranges. ACW showed a satisfactory effect against Staphylococcus aureus, which reduced 90% of bacterial growth after a 5-second exposure. We used cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to test the properties of ACW in inflammatory cytokine release, and it did not induce inflammatory cytokine release from un-stimulated, normal PBMCs. However, ACW was able to inhibit bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine TNF-α released from PBMCs, showing an anti-inflammation potential. Furthermore, ACW did not stimulate the rat basophilic leukemia cell (RBL-2H3 related allergy response on de-granulation. Our data presented ACW with a strong anti-oxidative ability in a superoxide anion radical scavenging assay. In mass spectrometry information, magnesium and zinc ions demonstrated bio-functional detections for anti-inflammation as well as other metal ions such as potassium and calcium were observed. ACW also had minor tyrosinase and melanin decreasing activities in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn-MP without apparent cytotoxicity. In addition, the cell proliferation assay illustrated anti-growth and anti-migration effects of ACW on human skin melanoma cells (A375.S2 indicating that it exerted the anti-cancer potential against skin cancer. The results obtained from biological assays showed that ACW possessed multiple bioactivities, including anti-microorganism, anti-inflammation, allergy-free, antioxidant, anti-melanin and anticancer properties. To our knowledge, this was the first report presenting these bioactivities on ACW.

  10. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of MnB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The self-consistent ab-initio calculations, based on density functional theory approach and using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnB2 compounds. Polarized spin and spin–orbit coupling are included in calculations ...

  11. Understanding the structure and electronic properties of N-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-12

    Nov 12, 2014 ... Understanding the structure and electronic properties of N-doped graphene nanoribbons upon hydrogen saturation. MICHAEL MANANGHAYA. Department of Chemical Engineering, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, Manila 1004 Philippines e-mail: mikemananghaya@gmail.com. MS received 31 May ...

  12. Tailoring electronic properties of multilayer phosphorene by siliconization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Sopiha, Kostiantyn V.; Radchenko, Ihor; Wu, Ping; Persson, Clas

    Controlling a thickness dependence of electronic properties for two-dimensional (2d) materials is among primary goals for their large-scale applications. Herein, employing a first-principles computational approach, we predict that Si interaction with multilayer phosphorene (2d-P) can result in the formation of highly stable 2d-SiP and 2d-SiP$_2$ compounds with a weak interlayer interaction. Our analysis demonstrates that these systems are semiconductors with band gap energies that can be governed by varying the thickness and stacking order. Specifically, siliconization of phosphorene allows to design 2d-SiP$_x$ materials with significantly weaker thickness dependence of electronic properties than that in 2d-P and to develop ways for their tailoring. We also reveal the spatial dependence of electronic properties for 2d-SiP$_x$ highlighting difference in effective band gaps for different layers. Particularly, our results show that central layers in the multilayer 2d systems determine overall electronic properties, while the role of the outermost layers is noticeably smaller.

  13. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of MnB 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The self-consistent ab-initio calculations, based on density functional theory approach and using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnB2 compounds. Polarized spin and spin–orbit coupling are included in calculations within ...

  14. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nanotubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can behave ...

  15. Electronic properties and Compton profiles of silver iodide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have carried out an extensive study of electronic properties of silver iodide in - and -phases. The theoretical Compton profiles, energy bands, density of states and anisotropies in momentum densities are computed using density functional theories. We have also employed full-potential linearized augmented ...

  16. Understanding the structure and electronic properties of N-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Structures and electronic properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) with pyridine (3NVZGNR) functionalized by Scandium (Sc) at the edge were studied through quantum chemical calculations in the formalism of density-functional theory (DFT). Pyridine-like nitrogen defects is very crucial for ...

  17. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nanotubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can behave ...

  18. Structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic intermetallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic intermetallic YAuX (X = Ge and Si) crys- tallized in hexagonal phase have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented-plane wave (FP-. LAPW) method based on the density functional theory (DFT), within the generalized gradient ...

  19. Electronic absorption spectra and nonlinear optical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    These materials find numerous device applications, from lasers to optical switches and electronics. 1. So far, the organic π-conjugated molecules have been considered mostly for this pur- pose because of their easy functionalization to fine tune the desired properties and the ease of fabrica- tion and integration into devices.

  20. Electronic and optical properties of spodumene gemstone: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, A. F.; Souza, S. O.; Lalic, M. V.

    2008-03-01

    The spodumene (LiAlSi 2O 6) is a natural silicate with monoclinic structure, interesting for a jewel industry and possible application as a scintillator. In this paper we present the electronic structure and some of the basic optical properties of the pure spodumene crystal, as calculated by the first-principles, density functional based, full potential linear augmented plane wave method.

  1. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of MnB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of MnB2 ... University, Rabat, Morocco; Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, France; Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat, Morocco; Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat, Morocco ...

  2. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of MnB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat, Morocco. 5Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat, ... based on density functional theory approach and using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties.

  3. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    an ideal non-interacting hosts for these one-dimensional chains of metal atoms. Their electronic properties are insignificantly modified. Keywords. Intercalated boron–nitride nanotubes; quantum chemical calculations. 1. Introduction. According to theoretical studies, carbon nanotubes are pre- dicted to be either metallic or ...

  4. Properties of Commercial PVC Films with Respect to Electron Dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Liqing, Xie

    The properties of three commercially available polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film supplies and one made without additives were tested with respect to their application as routine dose monitors at electron accelerators. Dose fractionation was found to increase the response and the post-irradiation heat...

  5. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nano- tubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can ...

  6. Effect of alloying on the electronic structure and magnetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 26; Issue 1. Effect of alloying on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Fe, Co and Ni with Au and Ag. Ashish Bhattacharjee Mesbahuddin Ahmed Abhijit Mookerjee Amal Halder. Volume 26 Issue 1 January 2003 pp 199-205 ...

  7. Immunological and biological properties of recombinant Lol p 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Y; Lamontagne, P; Boulanger, J; Brunet, C; Hébert, J

    1997-03-01

    Current forms of allergy diagnosis and therapies are based on the use of natural allergenic extracts. Despite strong evidence that higher therapeutic efficacy may be achieved with purified allergens, the purification of multiple allergic components from extracts is a fastidious and sometimes an impossible task. However, the use of recombinant allergens may be an alternative to overcome this problem. In this study, we compared the immunological properties of recombinant (r) Lol p 1 with those of the natural protein. We cloned directly the gene encoding Lol p 1 from genomic DNA of ryegrass pollen. This gene was subcloned into the expression vector pMAL-c and expressed as fusion protein. Subsequently, rLol p 1 was cleaved from maltose-binding protein using factor Xa. Using binding inhibition and proliferative assays, we assessed the immunological properties of the recombinant allergens. The capacity of rLol p 1 to trigger basophil histamine release and to elicit a skin reaction was also assessed and compared to those of its natural counterpart. We found that the Lol p 1 gene has no introns since we amplified this gene directly from genomic DNA. We demonstrated that the binding sites of anti-Lol p 1 monoclonal antibody, specific human IgG and IgE antibody are well conserved on rLol p 1 as no difference in the binding inhibition profile was observed when using either natural or recombinant protein. At the T-cell level, rLol p 1 elicited a T-cell response in mice comparable to that observed with the natural protein. In addition, we demonstrated that the biological characteristics of rLol p 1 were comparable to those of the natural counterpart, in that rLol p 1 elicited a skin wheal reaction and induced basophil histamine release in grass-allergic patients only. The data indicate that natural Lol p 1 and rLol p 1 shared identical immunological and biological properties.

  8. Effect of impurity on electronic properties of carbon nano tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, S.; Jafari, M.; Habibian, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effect of impurity on electronic properties of single-walled carbon nano tubes using Density Functional Theory. Electronic band structures and density of states of (4, 4) and (7, 0) carbon nano tubes in the presence of different amount of B and N impurities were calculated. It was found that these impurities have significant effect on the conductivity of carbon nano tubes. The metallic (4, 4) nano tube remains to be metallic after doping with B and N. The electronic properties of small gap semiconducting (7, 0) tube can extensively change in the presence of impurity. Our results indicate that B-doped and N-doped (7, 0) carbon nano tubes can be p-type and n-type semiconductors, respectively

  9. Biomaterials-Based Electronics: Polymers and Interfaces for Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskovich, Meredith; Bettinger, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced polymeric biomaterials continue to serve as a cornerstone of new medical technologies and therapies. The vast majority of these materials, both natural and synthetic, interact with biological matter without direct electronic communication. However, biological systems have evolved to synthesize and employ naturally-derived materials for the generation and modulation of electrical potentials, voltage gradients, and ion flows. Bioelectric phenomena can be interpreted as potent signaling cues for intra- and inter-cellular communication. These cues can serve as a gateway to link synthetic devices with biological systems. This progress report will provide an update on advances in the application of electronically active biomaterials for use in organic electronics and bio-interfaces. Specific focus will be granted to the use of natural and synthetic biological materials as integral components in technologies such as thin film electronics, in vitro cell culture models, and implantable medical devices. Future perspectives and emerging challenges will also be highlighted. PMID:23184740

  10. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  11. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Harkay

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  12. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  13. Electronic and mechanical properties of chemically functionalized nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidasaria, Sanjay K.

    2009-12-01

    Organic and inorganic nanostructured materials, nano- and mesoscale objects and devices, and their integration into existing microelectronic technologies have been at the center of recent fundamental and applied research in nanotechnology. One of the critical needs is to develop an enhanced predictive capability of structure-property correlations and enable robust high performance systems by design. My thesis work was concerned with the theoretical and experimental studies of electronic and mechanical properties of chemically functionalized nanowires. I will first describe a theoretical approach for investigating structure-property correlations in atomic-sized metallic wires based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT) for structure calculations and the Non-equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) technique for electronic transport properties simulations. This synergistic approach is shown to yield the atomic structure of the smallest niobium nanowires. Furthermore, the method was applied to simulate electronic properties of chemically functionalized graphene nanoribbons. Further, I will demonstrate an experimental technique for simultaneous measurements of force and conductance in atomic-size objects based on quartz tuning fork piezoelectric sensors. A peculiar scaling effect, relevant for a broad range of test and measurement applications, namely the squeeze film effect, was observed during the development of the sensors. Using theoretical analysis based on finite element simulations of the hydrodynamic behavior of the sensors in a broad range of ambient conditions, I explain the observed phenomenon.

  14. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O

    2013-01-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure–property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost. (paper)

  15. Substitutionally doped phosphorene: electronic properties and gas sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvansinpan, Nawat; Hussain, Fayyaz; Zhang, Gang; Chiu, Cheng Hsin; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-02-12

    Phosphorene, a new elemental two-dimensional material, has attracted increasing attention owing to its intriguing electronic properties. In particular, pristine phospohorene, due to its ultrahigh surface-volume ratio and high chemical activity, has been shown to be promising for gas sensing (Abbas et al 2015 ACS Nano 9 5618). To further enhance its sensing ability, we perform first-principles calculations based on density functional theory to study substitutionally doped phosphorene with 17 different atoms, focusing on structures, energetics, electronic properties and gas sensing. Our calculations reveal that anionic X (X = O, C and S) dopants have a large binding energy and highly dispersive electronic states, signifying the formation of covalent X-P bonds and thus strong structural stability. Alkali atom (Li and Na) doping is found to donate most of the electrons in the outer s-orbital by forming ionic bonds with P, and the band gap decreases by pushing down the conduction band, suggesting that the optical and electronic properties of the doped phosphorene can be tailored. For doping with VIIIB-group (Fe, Co and Ni) elements, a strong affinity is predicted and the binding energy and charge transfer are correlated strongly with their electronegativity. By examining NO molecule adsorption, we find that these metal doped phosphorenes (MDPs) in general exhibit a significantly enhanced chemical activity compared with pristine phosphorene. Our study suggests that substitutionally doped phosphorene shows many intriguing electronic and optic properties different from pristine phosphorene and MDPs are promising in chemical applications involving molecular adsorption and desorption processes, such as materials growth, catalysis, gas sensing and storage.

  16. Physiochemical and biological properties of phosphorylated polysaccharides from Dictyophora indusiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Fu, Haitian; Xu, Jingjing; Shang, Jingying; Cheng, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to investigate the physiochemical and biological properties of water-soluble phosphorylated polysaccharides (P-DIP) obtained from a water-insoluble polysaccharide (DIP) extracted from Dictyophora indusiata. A series of physiochemical properties were determined, including morphology, water-solubility, molecular weight, and degree of substitution (DS). To investigate the antioxidant activity of P-DIP, we determined the scavenging activity of hydroxyl radicals and DPPH, as well as the reducing power. MTT assay was performed to determine the cytotoxic effects of DIP and P-DIP on the cellular proliferation of MCF-7 and B16 cells. Compared with DIP, P-DIP showed a satisfactory water-solubility and significant increase in the antioxidant properties. Moreover, P-DIP also showed more significant inhibitory effects on the growth of MCF-7 and B16 tumor cells than the water-insoluble DIP. These results indicated that phosphorylation might contribute to the improvement of water solubility, as well as antioxidant and anti-tumor activities of natural DIP.

  17. Coupling of mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Dahiyana; Benitez, Laura; Seminario, Jorge M

    2013-12-01

    Because of the potential importance of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in renewable energy and other fields, molecular orbital ab initio calculations are used to study the relation between mechanical and electronic properties of such structures. We estimate a modulus of elasticity of 1.3 TPa and find out that the mechanism of CNT structure deformation is dependent on their chirality. Armchair and chiral nanotubes have ductile deformation fracture while zigzag have both ductile and brittle; on the other hand armchair nanotubes fracture and form two caps while chiral nanotubes adopt a helical-structure conformation. In addition, the energy gap between occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals increases when nanotubes are under plastic deformation. This strong coupling between mechanical and electrical properties can be used to tune CNT mechanically to specific electronic bandgaps, affecting directly their electromagnetic absorption properties.

  18. Intellectual property in consumer electronics, software and technology startups

    CERN Document Server

    Halt, Jr , Gerald B; Stiles, Amber R; Fesnak, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive guide to procuring, utilizing and monetizing intellectual property rights, tailored for readers in the high-tech consumer electronics and software industries, as well as technology startups.  Numerous, real examples, case studies and scenarios are incorporated throughout the book to illustrate the topics discussed.  Readers will learn what to consider throughout the various creative phases of a product’s lifespan from initial research and development initiatives through post-production.  Readers will gain an understanding of the intellectual property protections afforded to U.S. corporations, methods to pro-actively reduce potential problems, and guidelines for future considerations to reduce legal spending, prevent IP theft, and allow for greater profitability from corporate innovation and inventiveness. • Offers a comprehensive guide to intellectual property for readers in high-tech consumer electronics, software and technology startups; • Uses real case studies...

  19. Iron-dependency of biological properties of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Leonov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candidal infections occur in individuals with humoral or cell immunity deficiency. Any disorders of iron metabolism promote immune deficiency and abnormal sensitivity to infections. Potential modification of biological properties of Candida spp. in disorders of iron metabolism has not been discussed. Aim: To clarify the effects of iron metabolism disorders on the modification of biological properties of C.  albicans. Materials and methods: Growth kinetics of reference strain (24433 АТСС and clinical isolates of C.  albicans (n=20 depending on the concentration of Fe2+ ions in the broth and serum of blood donors with various types of iron metabolism (n=2 was studied by turbidimetry. We also assessed the expression of the adhesion gen (als3, hemolytic phospholipase C genes (plb1, plb2, plс and aspartic protease gene (sap1 in serum of donors with various iron levels. Results: Growth parameters of all C. albicans strains studied depends on the iron levels in the medium. The calculated constant of affinity to Fe2+ (Ks for C. albicans strains was in the range from 179.5 to 1863.3 μM. Clinical isolates are more iron-dependent (179.5Biological properties of C. albicans are modified depending on the iron metabolism of the host. In those with normal iron metabolism, immune system suppresses Candida growth. Excess iron levels may promote candidiasis, whereas in iron

  20. Approaching an experimental electron density model of the biologically active trans -epoxysuccinyl amide group-Substituent effects vs. crystal packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Ming W.; Stewart, Scott G.; Sobolev, Alexandre N.; Dittrich, Birger; Schirmeister, Tanja; Luger, Peter; Hesse, Malte; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Spackman, Peter R.; Spackman, Mark A.; Grabowsky, Simon (Heinrich-Heine); (Freie); (UC); (Bremen); (JG-UM); (UWA)

    2017-01-24

    The trans-epoxysuccinyl amide group as a biologically active moiety in cysteine protease inhibitors such as loxistatin acid E64c has been used as a benchmark system for theoretical studies of environmental effects on the electron density of small active ingredients in relation to their biological activity. Here, the synthesis and the electronic properties of the smallest possible active site model compound are reported to close the gap between the unknown experimental electron density of trans-epoxysuccinyl amides and the well-known function of related drugs. Intramolecular substituent effects are separated from intermolecular crystal packing effects on the electron density, which allows us to predict the conditions under which an experimental electron density investigation on trans-epoxysuccinyl amides will be possible. In this context, the special importance of the carboxylic acid function in the model compound for both crystal packing and biological activity is revealed through the novel tool of model energy analysis.

  1. Methanol as electron donor for thermophilic biological sulfate and sulfite reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijma, J.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfur oxyanions (e.g. sulfate, sulfite) can be removed from aqueous waste- and process streams by biological reduction with a suitable electron donor to sulfide, followed by partial chemical or biological oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur. The aim of the research described in this

  2. Electron Density Determination, Bonding and Properties of Tetragonal Ferromagnetic Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiezorek, Jorg [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The project developed quantitative convergent-beam electron diffraction (QCBED) methods by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and used them in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the electron density distribution in metallic and intermetallic phases with different cubic and non-cubic crystal structures that comprise elements with d-electron shells. The experimental methods developed here focus on the bonding charge distribution as one of the quantum mechanical characteristics central for understanding of intrinsic properties and validation of DFT calculations. Multiple structure and temperature factors have been measured simultaneously from nano-scale volumes of high-quality crystal with sufficient accuracy and precision for comparison with electron density distribution calculations by DFT. The often anisotropic temperature factors for the different atoms and atom sites in chemically ordered phases can differ significantly from those known for relevant pure element crystals due to bonding effects. Thus they have been measured from the same crystal volumes from which the structure factors have been determined. The ferromagnetic ordered intermetallic phases FePd and FePt are selected as model systems for 3d-4d and 3d-5d electron interactions, while the intermetallic phases NiAl and TiAl are used to probe 3d-3p electron interactions. Additionally, pure transition metal elements with d-electrons have been studied. FCC metals exhibit well defined delocalized bonding charge in tetrahedral sites, while less directional, more distributed bonding charge attains in BCC metals. Agreement between DFT calculated and QCBED results degrades as d-electron levels fill in the elements, and for intermetallics as d-d interactions become prominent over p-d interactions. Utilizing the LDA+U approach enabled inclusion of onsite Coulomb-repulsion effects in DFT calculations, which can afford improved agreements with QCBED results

  3. Effect of calcium hydroxide on mechanical strength and biological properties of bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Asma Tufail; Batool, Madeeha; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Iqbal, Farasat; Javaid, Ayesha; Zahid, Saba; Ilyas, Kanwal; Bin Qasim, Saad; Khan, Ather Farooq; Khan, Abdul Samad; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham

    2016-08-01

    In this manuscript for the first time calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has been used for preparation of bioactive glass (BG-2) by co-precipitation method and compared with glass prepared using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate Ca(NO3)2·4H2O (BG-1), which is a conventional source of calcium. The new source positively affected physical, biological and mechanical properties of BG-2. The glasses were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetric Analysis/Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TGA-DSC), BET surface area analysis and Knoop hardness. The results showed that BG-2 possessed relatively larger surface properties (100m(2)g(-1) surface area) as compared to BG-1 (78m(2)g(-1)), spherical morphology and crystalline phases (wollastonite and apatite) after sintering at lower than conventional temperature. These properties contribute critical role in both mechanical and biological properties of glasses. The Knoop hardness measurements revealed that BG-2 possessed much better hardness (0.43±0.06GPa at 680°C and 2.16±0.46GPa at 980°C) than BG-1 (0.24±0.01 at 680°C and 0.57±0.07GPA at 980°C) under same conditions. Alamar blue Assay and confocal microscopy revealed that BG-2 exhibited better attachment and proliferation of MG63 cells. Based on the improved biological properties of BG-2 as a consequent of novel calcium source selection, BG-2 is proposed as a bioactive ceramic for hard tissue repair and regeneration applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Menthol: a simple monoterpene with remarkable biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatou, Guy P P; Vermaak, Ilze; Viljoen, Alvaro M; Lawrence, Brian M

    2013-12-01

    Menthol is a cyclic monoterpene alcohol which possesses well-known cooling characteristics and a residual minty smell of the oil remnants from which it was obtained. Because of these attributes it is one of the most important flavouring additives besides vanilla and citrus. Due to this reason it is used in a variety of consumer products ranging from confections such as chocolate and chewing gum to oral-care products such as toothpaste as well as in over-the-counter medicinal products for its cooling and biological effects. Its cooling effects are not exclusive to medicinal use. Approximately one quarter of the cigarettes on the market contain menthol and small amounts of menthol are even included in non-mentholated cigarettes. Natural menthol is isolated exclusively from Mentha canadensis, but can also be synthesised on industrial scale through various processes. Although menthol exists in eight stereoisomeric forms, (-)-menthol from the natural source and synthesised menthol with the same structure is the most preferred isomer. The demand for menthol is high and it was previously estimated that the worldwide use of menthol was 30-32,000 metric tonnes per annum. Menthol is not a predominant compound of the essential oils as it can only be found as a constituent of a limited number of aromatic plants. These plants are known to exhibit biological activity in vitro and in vivo such as antibacterial, antifungal, antipruritic, anticancer and analgesic effects, and are also an effective fumigant. In addition, menthol is one of the most effective terpenes used to enhance the dermal penetration of pharmaceuticals. This review summarises the chemical and biological properties of menthol and highlights its cooling effects and toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Uranium: properties and biological effects after internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, M.; Tissandie, E.; Racine, R.; Ben Soussan, H.; Rouas, C.; Grignard, E.; Dublineau, I.; Gourmelon, P.; Lestaevel, P.; Gueguen, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium is a radionuclide present in the environment since the origin of the Earth. In addition to natural uranium, recent deposits from industrial or military activities are acknowledged. Uranium's toxicity is due to a combination of its chemical (heavy metal) and radiological properties (emission of ionizing radiations). Acute toxicity induces an important weight loss and signs of renal and cerebral impairment. Alterations of bone growth, modifications of the reproductive system and carcinogenic effects are also often seen. On the contrary, the biological effects of a chronic exposure to low doses are unwell known. However, results from different recent studies suggest that a chronic contamination with low levels of uranium induces subtle but significant levels. Indeed, an internal contamination of rats for several weeks leads to detection of uranium in many cerebral structures, in association with an alteration of short-term memory and an increase of anxiety level. Biological effects of uranium on the metabolisms of xenobiotics, steroid hormones and vitamin D were described in the liver, testis and kidneys. These recent scientific data suggest that uranium could participate to increase of health risks linked to environmental pollution. (authors)

  6. Carbon nanotube on Si(001): structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, W.; Fazzio, A.; Miwa, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The promising nanoscale technology based on carbon nanotubes has attracted much attention due to the unique electronic, chemical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) provide an ideal atomically uniform one dimensional (1D) conductors, having a strong electronic confinement around its circumference, which can be retained up to room temperature[1]. This interesting property may lead one to consider SWCNs as 1D conductors for the development of nanoscale electronic devices. In this work the structural and electronic properties of the contact between a metallic (6,6) SWCN adsorbed on a silicon (001) surface are studied from first-principles total-energy calculations. We consider two adsorption sites for the tube on the Si(001) surface: on the top of the Si-dimer rows and on the surface 'trench' between two consecutive dimer rows. Our results show a chemical bond between the nanotube and Si(001) when the tube is located along the 'trench', which corresponds to the only bound structure. We find a binding energy per tube length of 0.21 eV/angstrom. We also verified that the binding energy depends on the rotation of the tube. Typically, a rotation of 15 deg can reduce the binding energy up to 0.07 eV/angstrom. Our calculated electronic properties indicate that the most stable structure shows a subband associated to the tube/surface bond that cross the Fermi level. This result indicates an enhanced metallic behavior along the tube/surface contact characterizing a 1D quantum wire. The charge transfer between the Si surface and the tube is also discussed. [1] Z. Yao, C. Dekker, and P. Avouris in Carbon Nanotubes, M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris Eds., (Springer, Berlin 2001), p. 147. (author)

  7. Magnetic properties and core electron binding energies of liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.; Cabral, Benedito J. C.

    2018-01-01

    The magnetic properties and the core and inner valence electron binding energies of liquid water are investigated. The adopted methodology relies on the combination of molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the Becke and Lee-Yang-Parr functionals for exchange and correlation, respectively, and includes an empirical correction (BLYP-D3) functional and classical molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005-F model were carried out. The Keal-Tozer functional was applied for predicting magnetic shielding and spin-spin coupling constants. Core and inner valence electron binding energies in liquid water were calculated with symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction. The relationship between the magnetic shielding constant σ(17O), the role played by the oxygen atom as a proton acceptor and donor, and the tetrahedral organisation of liquid water are investigated. The results indicate that the deshielding of the oxygen atom in water is very dependent on the order parameter (q) describing the tetrahedral organisation of the hydrogen bond network. The strong sensitivity of magnetic properties on changes of the electronic density in the nuclei environment is illustrated by a correlation between σ(17O) and the energy gap between the 1a1[O1s] (core) and the 2a1 (inner valence) orbitals of water. Although several studies discussed the eventual connection between magnetic properties and core electron binding energies, such a correlation could not be clearly established. Here, we demonstrate that for liquid water this correlation exists although involving the gap between electron binding energies of core and inner valence orbitals.

  8. Electron transport properties of ordered networks using carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo-Herrera, J M; Terrones, M; Terrones, H; Meunier, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of ordered networks using carbon nanotubes as building blocks (ON-CNTs) are investigated within the framework of a multiterminal Landauer-Buttiker formalism using an s,p x ,p y ,p z parameterization of the tight-binding Hamiltonian for carbon. The networks exhibit electron pathway selectiveness, which is shown to depend on the atomic structure of the network nodes imposed by the specific architecture of the network and the distribution of its defects (non-hexagonal rings). This work represents the first understandings towards leading current through well-defined trajectories along an organic nanocircuit

  9. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamdagni, Pooja, E-mail: j.poojaa1228@gmail.com; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Physics Department, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Physics Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India, 160014 (India); Thakur, Anil [Physics Department, Govt. Collage Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India,173212 (India)

    2015-05-15

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices.

  10. Polymeric Thin Films for Organic Electronics: Properties and Adaptive Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pignataro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the correlation between morphology, structure and performance of organic electronic devices including thin film transistors and solar cells. In particular, we report on solution processed devices going into the role of the 3D supramolecular organization in determining their electronic properties. A selection of case studies from recent literature are reviewed, relying on solution methods for organic thin-film deposition which allow fine control of the supramolecular aggregation of polymers confined at surfaces in nanoscopic layers. A special focus is given to issues exploiting morphological structures stemming from the intrinsic polymeric dynamic adaptation under non-equilibrium conditions.

  11. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamdagni, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Kumar, Ashok; Thakur, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices

  12. Acoustic and electronic properties of one-dimensional quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, F.; Rodriguez, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    We study the acoustic and electronic properties of one-dimensional quasicrystals. Both numerical (nonperturbative) and analytical (perturbative) results are shown. The phonon and electronic spectra exhibit a self-similar hierarchy of gaps and many localized states in the gaps. We study quasiperiodic structures with any number of layers and several types of boundary conditions. We discuss the connection between our phonon model and recent experiments on quasiperiodic GaAs-AlAs superlattices. We predict the existence of many gap states localized at the surfaces

  13. Acridones as antiviral agents: synthesis, chemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, C S; Fascio, M L; García, C C; D'Accorso, N B; Damonte, E B

    2013-01-01

    Acridones are a class of compounds that have attracted attention in recent years for their wide range of biological properties, including selective inhibition of diverse human pathogenic viruses. The wide spectrum of antiviral activity includes DNA and RNA viruses, such as herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, hepatitis C virus, dengue virus, and Junin virus, among others, indicative of the involvement of cellular factors as potential targets of acridone derivatives. At the present, their precise mode of action is not clearly determined, although the predominant action seems to be centered on the synthesis of nucleic acids. Regarding this point, inhibitory activity against cellular and viral enzymes and the ability to intercalate into nucleic acid molecules was demonstrated for some acridone compounds. Then, the possibility of a multiple effect on different targets renewed interest in these agents for virus chemotherapy allowing a potent inhibitory effectiveness associated to less feasibility of generating antiviral resistance. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the methods of synthesis, the antiviral properties of acridone derivatives, their mechanism of action, and structural characteristics related to antiviral activity as well as the perspectives of this class of compounds for clinical application against human viral infections.

  14. Biological Properties of Tocotrienols: Evidence in Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvaneswari Meganathan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E has been recognized as an essential vitamin since their discovery in 1922. Although the functions of tocopherols are well established, tocotrienols have been the unsung heroes of vitamin E. Due to their structural differences, tocotrienols were reported to exert distinctive properties compared to tocopherols. While most vegetable oils contain higher amount of tocopherols, tocotrienols were found abundantly in palm oil. Nature has made palm vitamin E to contain up to 70% of total tocotrienols, among which alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienols are the major constituents. Recent advancements have shown their biological properties in conferring protection against cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress and immune regulation. Preclinical results of these physiological functions were translated into clinical trials gaining global attention. This review will discuss in detail the evidence in human studies to date in terms of efficacy, population, disease state and bioavailability. The review will serve as a platform to pave the future direction for tocotrienols in clinical settings.

  15. Electronic and transport properties of BCN alloy nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi Gilan, Mahdi; Chegel, Raad

    2018-03-01

    The dependence of the carbon (C) concentration on the electronic and transport properties of boron carbonitride (BCN) alloy nanoribbons have been investigated using surface Green's functions technique and random Hamiltonian model by considering random hopping parameters including first and second nearest neighbors. Our calculations indicate that substituting boron (nitrogen) sites with carbon atoms induces a new band close to conduction (valence) band and carbon atoms behave like a donor (acceptor) dopants. Also, while both nitrogen and boron sites are substituted randomly by carbon atoms, new bands are induced close to both valence and conduction bands. The band gap decreases with C substituting and the number of charge carriers increases in low bias voltage. Far from Fermi level in the higher range of energy, transmission coefficient and current of the system are reduced by increasing the C concentration. Based on our results, tuning the electronic and transport properties of BCN alloy nanoribbons by random carbon dopants could be applicable to design nanoelectronics devices.

  16. Microscopical Studies of Structural and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of point defects in semiconductors, e.g. radiation defects, impurities or passivating defects can excellently be studied by the hyperfine technique of Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC). The serious limitation of this method, the small number of chemically different radioactive PAC probe atoms can be widely overcome by means of ISOLDE. Providing shortliving isotopes, which represent common dopants as well as suitable PAC probe atoms, the ISOLDE facility enables a much broader application of PAC to problems in semiconductor physics.\\\\ Using the probe atom $^{111m}$ Cd , the whole class of III-V compounds becomes accessible for PAC investigations. First successful experiments in GaAs, InP and GaP have been performed, concerning impurity complex formation and plasma induced defects. In Si and Ge, the electronic properties~-~especially their influence on acceptor-donor interaction~-~could be exemplarily st...

  17. Stability, elastic properties, and electronic structure of germanane nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Shan; Chen, Chang-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The stability, elastic properties, and electronic structure of germanane nanoribbons (GeNRs) are studied from first-principles calculations. When using atomic H as the hydrogen source, a germanane monolayer spontaneously breaks into ribbons. GeNRs can be easily stretched due to their small in-plane stiffness, suggesting that it is feasible to modulate their properties by strain. All GeNRs show direct band gaps at the Γ point when external strain is zero, with the gap value decreasing with increasing ribbon width. When axial tensile strain is applied, the band gap decreases, and a direct-to-indirect gap transition occurs. The transition can be attributed to different deformation potentials of different states in the valence band. These results suggest potential applications of GeNRs in the fields of pressure sensors and tunable optical electronics. (paper)

  18. Elastic properties and electron transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim

    2013-02-22

    The electron transport and elastic properties of InAs nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition on InAs (001) substrate were studied experimentally, in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A TEM holder allowing the measurement of a nanoforce while simultaneous imaging nanowire bending was used. Diffraction images from local areas of the wire were recorded to correlate elastic properties with the atomic structure of the nanowires. Another TEM holder allowing the application of electrical bias between the nanowire and an apex of a metallic needle while simultaneous imaging the nanowire in TEM or performing electron holography was used to detect mechanical vibrations in mechanical study or holographical observation of the nanowire inner potential in the electron transport studies. The combination of the scanning probe methods with TEM allows to correlate the measured electric and elastic properties of the nanowires with direct identification of their atomic structure. It was found that the nanowires have different atomic structures and different stacking fault defect densities that impacts critically on the elastic properties and electric transport. The unique methods, that were applied in this work, allowed to obtain dependencies of resistivity and Young's modulus of left angle 111 right angle -oriented InAs nanowires on defect density and diameter. It was found that the higher is the defect density the higher are the resistivity and the Young's modulus. Regarding the resistivity, it was deduced that the stacking faults increase the scattering of the electrons in the nanowire. These findings are consistent with the literature, however, the effect described by the other groups is not so pronounced. This difference can be attributed to the significant incompleteness of the physical models used for the data analysis. Regarding the elastic modulus, there are several mechanisms affecting the elasticity of the nanowires discussed in the thesis. It

  19. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of Pd sub(3)Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnen, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this work we study the electronic and magnetic properties of the Pd sub(3)Fe alloy. For the ordered phase of Pd sub(3)Fe we employed the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbitals Method, with the atomic sphere approximation, which is a first principles method and includes spin polarization. The theoretical results for the thermal and magnetic properties show good agreement with experience. Here we explain the formation of the localized magnetic moments from completely itinerant electrons. We investigate the influence of the hydrogen in the physical properties of the compound Pd sub(3)Fe, where we obtain a drastic reduction in the magnetic moments at the Pd and Fe sites. This reduction is confirmed by experience. The self consistent potentials of the Pd sub(3)Fe compound were used for an analysis of the influence of the disorder in the electronic structure of Pd sub(3)Fe alloy. To this end, we employ a spin polarized version of the Green's Function Method with the Coherent Potential Approximation (or KKR-CPA). The results obtained show that in random ferromagnetic alloys different degrees of disorder occurs for the different spin directions. The formation of the magnetic moments in these alloys were explained from the existence of 'virtual crystal' states for spin up electrons and 'split band' states for spin down electrons. Finally we employ the muffin-tin orbitals to calculate the X-ray photoemission spectra of the Pd sub(3)Fe and Pd sub(3)FeH compounds, which allows us a direct comparison between theory and experiment. (author)

  20. Signature properties of water: Their molecular electronic origins

    OpenAIRE

    Sokhan, Vlad P.; Jones, Andrew P.; Cipcigan, Flaviu S.; Crain, Jason; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2015-01-01

    Water challenges our fundamental understanding of emergent materials properties from a molecular perspective. It exhibits a uniquely rich phenomenology including dramatic variations in behavior over the wide temperature range of the liquid into water's crystalline phases and amorphous states. We show that many-body responses arising from water's electronic structure are essential mechanisms harnessed by the molecule to encode for the distinguishing features of its condensed states. We treat t...

  1. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural parameters, elastic constants, electronic and optical properties of the bi-alkali antimonides (Na 2 KSb, Na 2 RbSb, Na 2 CsSb, K 2 RbSb, K 2 CsSb and Rb 2 CsSb) were calculated using state-of-the-art density functional theory. Different exchange-correlation potentials were adopted to predict the physical ...

  2. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Nanocrystalline film at liquid-liquid interface · Slide 21 · Slide 22.

  3. Structural and electronic properties of hydrosilylated silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumer, A.

    2005-11-15

    The structural and electronic properties of alkyl-terminated Si surfaces prepared by thermallyinduced hydrosilylation have been studied in detail in the preceding chapters. Various surfaces have been used for the functionalization ranging from crystalline Si over amorphous hydrogenated Si to nanoscaled materials such as Si nanowires and nanoparticles. In each case, the alkyl-terminated surfaces have been compared to the native oxidized and H-terminated surfaces. (orig.)

  4. Local electronic and electrical properties of functionalized graphene nano flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutia, Arunabhiram; Sahnoun, Riadh; Deka, Ramesh C.; Zhu, Zhigang; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Miyamoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Based on experimental findings models of amorphous graphene related carbon materials were generated using graphene nano flakes. On the optimized structures detailed local electronic properties were investigated using density functional theory. The electrical conductivities of all these models were also estimated using an in-house program based on tight-binding method. The calculated electrical conductivity values of all the models agreed well with the trend of calculated energy gap and graphitic character.

  5. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural parameters, elastic constants, electronic and optical properties of the bi-alkali antimonides (Na 2 KSb, Na 2 RbSb, Na 2 CsSb, K 2 RbSb, K 2 CsSb and Rb 2 CsSb) were calculated using state-of-the-art density functional theory. Different exchange-correlation potentials were adopted to predict the physical ...

  6. Quasiparticle properties of a coupled quantum-wire electron-phonon system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, E. H.; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Sarma, S. Das

    1996-01-01

    We study leading-order many-body effects of longitudinal-optical phonons on electronic properties of one-dimensional quantum-wire systems. We calculate the quasiparticle properties of a weakly polar one-dimensional electron gas in the presence of both electron-phonon and electron-electron interac...

  7. Signature properties of water: Their molecular electronic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhan, Vlad P; Jones, Andrew P; Cipcigan, Flaviu S; Crain, Jason; Martyna, Glenn J

    2015-05-19

    Water challenges our fundamental understanding of emergent materials properties from a molecular perspective. It exhibits a uniquely rich phenomenology including dramatic variations in behavior over the wide temperature range of the liquid into water's crystalline phases and amorphous states. We show that many-body responses arising from water's electronic structure are essential mechanisms harnessed by the molecule to encode for the distinguishing features of its condensed states. We treat the complete set of these many-body responses nonperturbatively within a coarse-grained electronic structure derived exclusively from single-molecule properties. Such a "strong coupling" approach generates interaction terms of all symmetries to all orders, thereby enabling unique transferability to diverse local environments such as those encountered along the coexistence curve. The symmetries of local motifs that can potentially emerge are not known a priori. Consequently, electronic responses unfiltered by artificial truncation are then required to embody the terms that tip the balance to the correct set of structures. Therefore, our fully responsive molecular model produces, a simple, accurate, and intuitive picture of water's complexity and its molecular origin, predicting water's signature physical properties from ice, through liquid-vapor coexistence, to the critical point.

  8. Properties of Whistler Waves in Warm Electron Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinsong

    2017-11-01

    Dispersion relation and electromagnetic properties of obliquely propagating whistler waves are investigated on the basis of a warm electron fluid model. The magnetic field of whistler waves is nearly circularly polarized with respect to the wave vector in a plasma where the electron plasma frequency {{{Ω }}}{pe} is much larger than the electron cyclotron frequency {{{Ω }}}{ce}, and the magnetic field polarization can become elliptical, or even linear, polarization as {{{Ω }}}{pe}≲ {{{Ω }}}{ce}. In the plasmas with {{{Ω }}}{pe}fluid model. Near the resonant frequency, the whistler wave approximates a quasi-magnetostatic mode, not a quasi-electrostatic mode in the cold electron plasmas. Moreover, the detailed mode properties are given in Earth’s magnetosphere, the solar active region, and Jupiter’s polar cap. Furthermore, the study proposes that the ratio of the electrostatic to electromagnetic component of the electric field can be used to distinguish the whistler mode from the Z-mode in the frequency range of {{{Ω }}}{pe}< ω < {{{Ω }}}{ce} in the solar active region and Jupiter’s polar cap.

  9. 3D electron tomography of biological photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butz, Benjamin; Winter, Benjamin; Vieweg, Benito; Knoke, Isabel; Spallek, Stefanie; Spiecker, Erdmann [CENEM, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Schroeder-Turk, Gerd; Mecke, Klaus [Theoretische Physik I, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Photonic crystals, i.e. periodical nanostructures of materials with different dielectric constants, are highly interesting for applications in optics, optoelectronics, and sensing. By tailoring the geometrical parameters radically different and improved optical properties (e.g., optical band-gap structure, extreme refractive indices, or high anisotropy) can be achieved. Naturally occurring photonic crystals, like butterfly scales, exoskeletons of insects (chitin), or seashells (nacre), can serve as model systems for understanding the relationship between structure and optical properties. Butterfly scales are studied by TEM using a FEI Titan{sup 3} 80-300 instrument. An optimized FIB technique or ultramicrotome sectioning were used to prepare the sensitive specimens with desired thickness. Since the periodical structures have dimensions on the sub-{mu}m scale, HAADF-STEM tomography was employed for obtaining extended tilt series under conditions of atomic-number sensitive imaging. Since the solid crystal consists of chemically homogeneous chitin while the pores are unfilled, the distinct contrast in the images can easily be interpreted in terms of the local projected mass density allowing to reconstruct the chitin distribution within the optical unit cell of the scales with high 3D resolution.

  10. Biological denitrification using poly(butanediol succinate) as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-07-01

    Poly(butanediol succinate) (PBS), a biodegradable polymer, was used as both solid carbon source and biofilm carrier for biological nitrate removal process, in which PBS was filled in a packed-bed bioreactor. The denitrification performance and the microbial diversity of biofilm attached on the surface of PBS were investigated. The experimental results showed that the volumetric denitrification rate was 0.60 kg m(-3) day(-1) when NO3-N loading rate was 0.63 kg m(-3) day(-1), and the average NO2-N concentration was below 0.20 mg L(-1). The effluent pH value decreased slightly from a range of 6.98-7.87 to 6.46-7.18. The analysis of microbial community structure of biofilm by pyrosequencing method showed that Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum (89.87 %), and β-Proteobacteria represented the most abundant class. Among the 76 identified genera, Dechloromonas (10.26 %), Alicycliphilus (9.15 %), Azospira (8.92 %), and Sinobacteraceae-uncultured (8.75 %) were the abundant genera. PBS, as a promising alternative carbon source, is a suitable solid carbon source and biofilm carrier for nitrate removal.

  11. Technetium-99m nitrido radiopharmaceuticals with unprecedented biological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Duatti

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The chemical methods for the production of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals containing a terminal TcºN triple bond have been established more than a decade ago. From that time, the chemistry of nitrido Tc-99m complexes has provided a highly efficient tool for the design and preparation of novel classes of diagnostic agents, and a number of potentially useful radiopharmaceuticals have been discovered. In particular, nitrido technetium-99m tracers have been developed for heart perfusion imaging. In this short review, the chemical and biological properties of the neutral myocardial perfusion tracer bis(N-ethoxy, N-ethyl-dithiocarbamato nitrido Tc-99m (TcN-NOEt will be summarized along with the preparation and preliminary biological evaluation of the first class of monocationic nitrido technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals exhibiting improved biodistribution properties closer to those expected for an ideal perfusion imaging agent.Os métodos químicos para produção de radiofármacos marcados com tecnécio-99m contendo a ligação tripla terminal TcºN foram estabelecidos há mais de uma década. Desde esta época, a química dos complexos nitridos marcados com 99mTc tem sido uma ferramenta altamente eficiente para o desenho e preparo de novas classes de agentes para diagnóstico e, foi descoberto um número de radiofarmacos potencialmente úteis. Nesta pequena revisão, as propriedades biológicas e químicas do traçador para perfusão miocárdica neutra, o bis(N-etoxi, N-etil-ditiocarbamato nitrido 99mTc (TcN-NOEt, serão resumidas junto com o preparo e avaliação biológica preliminar da primeira classe de radiofármacos nitrido monocatiônico marcado com tecnécio-99m que exibe melhores propriedades em relação à biodistribuição, mais próximas daquelas esperadas para um agente perfusor ideal para imagens.

  12. Physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles

    KAUST Repository

    Longhin, Eleonora

    2016-05-15

    © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Diesel combustion and solid biomass burning are the major sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in urbanized areas. Cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, are possible outcomes of combustion particles exposure, but differences in particles properties seem to influence their biological effects.Here the physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles, produced under controlled laboratory conditions, have been characterized. Diesel UFP were sampled from a Euro 4 light duty vehicle without DPF fuelled by commercial diesel and run over a chassis dyno. Biomass UFP were collected from a modern automatic 25 kW boiler propelled by prime quality spruce pellet. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both diesel and biomass samples showed aggregates of soot particles, but in biomass samples ash particles were also present. Chemical characterization showed that metals and PAHs total content was higher in diesel samples compared to biomass ones.Human bronchial epithelial (HBEC3) cells were exposed to particles for up to 2 weeks. Changes in the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism were observed after exposure to both UFP already after 24 h. However, only diesel particles modulated the expression of genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), increased the release of inflammatory mediators and caused phenotypical alterations, mostly after two weeks of exposure.These results show that diesel UFP affected cellular processes involved in lung and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Biomass particles exerted low biological activity compared to diesel UFP. This evidence emphasizes that the study of different emission sources contribution to ambient PM toxicity may have a fundamental role in the development of more effective strategies for air quality improvement.

  13. Physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhin, Eleonora; Gualtieri, Maurizio; Capasso, Laura; Bengalli, Rossella; Mollerup, Steen; Holme, Jørn A; Øvrevik, Johan; Casadei, Simone; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Parenti, Paolo; Camatini, Marina

    2016-08-01

    Diesel combustion and solid biomass burning are the major sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in urbanized areas. Cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, are possible outcomes of combustion particles exposure, but differences in particles properties seem to influence their biological effects. Here the physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles, produced under controlled laboratory conditions, have been characterized. Diesel UFP were sampled from a Euro 4 light duty vehicle without DPF fuelled by commercial diesel and run over a chassis dyno. Biomass UFP were collected from a modern automatic 25 kW boiler propelled by prime quality spruce pellet. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both diesel and biomass samples showed aggregates of soot particles, but in biomass samples ash particles were also present. Chemical characterization showed that metals and PAHs total content was higher in diesel samples compared to biomass ones. Human bronchial epithelial (HBEC3) cells were exposed to particles for up to 2 weeks. Changes in the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism were observed after exposure to both UFP already after 24 h. However, only diesel particles modulated the expression of genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), increased the release of inflammatory mediators and caused phenotypical alterations, mostly after two weeks of exposure. These results show that diesel UFP affected cellular processes involved in lung and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Biomass particles exerted low biological activity compared to diesel UFP. This evidence emphasizes that the study of different emission sources contribution to ambient PM toxicity may have a fundamental role in the development of more effective strategies for air quality improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  14. Electronic and Thermal Properties of Graphene and Carbon Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Gilmore; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    We will present the general properties of carbon structures. The research involves the study of carbon structures: Graphene, Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), and Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs). A review of electrical and thermal conduction phenomena of the structures will be discussed. Particularly carbon nanoribbons and CNTs have many interesting physical properties, and have the potential for device applications. Our research interests include the study of electronic structures, electrical and thermal transport properties of the carbon structures. Results are produced analytically as well as by simulation. The numerical simulations are conducted using various tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), NanoHub at Purdue University and the Beowulf Cluster at Ball State University.

  15. Thin Films of Quasicrystals: Optical, Electronic, and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symko, Orest G.

    1998-03-01

    In order to extend some of the unusual properties of quasicrystals toward practical applications and to study fundamental aspects of these properties, we have developed a technology for the deposition of high quality thin films of quasicrystals on a variety of substrates. Mechanical support for the thin films is provided by the substrate as bulk quasicrystals are brittle. We have applied the thin films to studies of their optical, electrical, and mechanical properties as well as to coatings of biomedical devices. An important characteristic of a quasicrystal is its pseudogap in the electronic density of states; it is determined directly from optical transmission measurements. Optical and mechanical characteristics of the thin films provide strong support for the cluster nature of quasicrystals and emphasize their importance for coatings. When used in biomedical devices, thin film quasicrystalline coatings show remarkable strength, low friction, and non-stick behavior. This work was in collaboration with W. Park, E. Abdel-Rahman, and T. Klein.

  16. Structure, electronic properties and electron energy loss spectra of transition metal nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsokeras, L.E.; Matenoglou, G.M.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@cc.uoi.gr

    2013-01-01

    We present a thorough and critical study of the electronic properties of the mononitrides of the group IV–V–VI metals (TiN, ZrN, HfN, NbN, TaN, MoN, and WN) grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The microstructure and density of the films have been studied by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), while their optical properties were investigated by spectral reflectivity at vertical incidence and in-situ reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (R-EELS). We report the R-EELS spectra for all the binary TMN and we identify their features (metal-d plasmon and N-p + metal-d loss) based on previous ab-initio band structure calculations. The spectral positions of p + d loss peak are rationally grouped according to the electron configuration (i.e. of the respective quantum numbers) of the constituent metal. The assigned and reported R-EELS spectra can be used as a reference database for the colloquial in-situ surface analysis performed in most laboratories. - Highlights: ► Identification of the effect of ionization potential to the structure of PLD nitride films. ► Report of low energy electron loss spectra of NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, WN. ► Correlation of the Np+Med loss peak with the metal’s valence electron configuration.

  17. Manganites in Perovskite Superlattices: Structural and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Jilili, Jiwuer

    2016-07-13

    Perovskite oxides have the general chemical formula ABO3, where A is a rare-earth or alkali-metal cation and B is a transition metal cation. Perovskite oxides can be formed with a variety of constituent elements and exhibit a wide range of properties ranging from insulators, metals to even superconductors. With the development of growth and characterization techniques, more information on their physical and chemical properties has been revealed, which diversified their technological applications. Perovskite manganites are widely investigated compounds due to the discovery of the colossal magnetoresistance effect in 1994. They have a broad range of structural, electronic, magnetic properties and potential device applications in sensors and spintronics. There is not only the technological importance but also the need to understand the fundamental mechanisms of the unusual magnetic and transport properties that drive enormous attention. Manganites combined with other perovskite oxides are gaining interest due to novel properties especially at the interface, such as interfacial ferromagnetism, exchange bias, interfacial conductivity. Doped manganites exhibit diverse electrical properties as compared to the parent compounds. For instance, hole doped La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 is a ferromagnetic metal, whereas LaMnO3 is an antiferromagnetic insulator. Since manganites are strongly correlated systems, heterojunctions composed of manganites and other perovskite oxides are sunject to complex coupling of the spin, orbit, charge, and lattice degrees of freedom and exhibit unique electronic, magnetic, and transport properties. Electronic reconstructions, O defects, doping, intersite disorder, magnetic proximity, magnetic exchange, and polar catastrophe are some effects to explain these interfacial phenomena. In our work we use first-principles calculations to study the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of manganite based superlattices. Firstly, we investigate the electronic

  18. Hydration effects on the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis Oliveira, Leonardo Bruno; Fonseca, Tertius L.; Costa Cabral, Benedito J.; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical results for the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in the gas phase and water are presented. The building blocks presently investigated include the monomeric species DHI (5,6-dihydroxyindole) or hydroquinone (HQ), DHICA (5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid), indolequinone (IQ), quinone methide (MQ), two covalently bonded dimers [HM ≡ HQ + MQ and IM ≡ IQ + MQ], and two tetramers [HMIM ≡ HQ + IM, IMIM ≡ IM + IM]. The electronic properties in water were determined by carrying out sequential Monte Carlo/time dependent density functional theory calculations. The results illustrate the role played by hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions in the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in a polar environment. In water, the dipole moments of monomeric species are significantly increased ([54–79]%) relative to their gas phase values. Recently, it has been proposed that the observed enhancement of the higher-energy absorption intensity in eumelanin can be explained by excitonic coupling among eumelanin protomolecules [C.-T. Chen et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3859 (2014)]. Here, we are providing evidence that for DHICA, IQ, and HMIM, the electronic absorption toward the higher-energy end of the spectrum ([180–220] nm) is enhanced by long-range Coulombic interactions with the water environment. It was verified that by superposing the absorption spectra of different eumelanin building blocks corresponding to the monomers, dimers, and tetramers in liquid water, the behaviour of the experimental spectrum, which is characterised by a nearly monotonic decay from the ultraviolet to the infrared, is qualitatively reproduced. This result is in keeping with a “chemical disorder model,” where the broadband absorption of eumelanin pigments is determined by the superposition of the spectra associated with the monomeric and oligomeric building blocks.

  19. Hydration effects on the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis Oliveira, Leonardo Bruno [Instituto de Física da Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74690-900 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Departamento de Física - CEPAE, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74690-900 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Escola de Ciências Exatas e da Computação, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Goiás, 74605-010 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Fonseca, Tertius L. [Instituto de Física da Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74690-900 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Costa Cabral, Benedito J., E-mail: ben@cii.fc.ul.pt [Grupo de Física Matemática da Universidade de Lisboa and Departamento de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-28

    Theoretical results for the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in the gas phase and water are presented. The building blocks presently investigated include the monomeric species DHI (5,6-dihydroxyindole) or hydroquinone (HQ), DHICA (5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid), indolequinone (IQ), quinone methide (MQ), two covalently bonded dimers [HM ≡ HQ + MQ and IM ≡ IQ + MQ], and two tetramers [HMIM ≡ HQ + IM, IMIM ≡ IM + IM]. The electronic properties in water were determined by carrying out sequential Monte Carlo/time dependent density functional theory calculations. The results illustrate the role played by hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions in the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in a polar environment. In water, the dipole moments of monomeric species are significantly increased ([54–79]%) relative to their gas phase values. Recently, it has been proposed that the observed enhancement of the higher-energy absorption intensity in eumelanin can be explained by excitonic coupling among eumelanin protomolecules [C.-T. Chen et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3859 (2014)]. Here, we are providing evidence that for DHICA, IQ, and HMIM, the electronic absorption toward the higher-energy end of the spectrum ([180–220] nm) is enhanced by long-range Coulombic interactions with the water environment. It was verified that by superposing the absorption spectra of different eumelanin building blocks corresponding to the monomers, dimers, and tetramers in liquid water, the behaviour of the experimental spectrum, which is characterised by a nearly monotonic decay from the ultraviolet to the infrared, is qualitatively reproduced. This result is in keeping with a “chemical disorder model,” where the broadband absorption of eumelanin pigments is determined by the superposition of the spectra associated with the monomeric and oligomeric building blocks.

  20. Novel electronic and transport properties of graphene superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol-Hwan

    2009-03-01

    Charge carriers in graphene show linear and isotropic energy dispersion relation and chiral behavior, like massless neutrinos in particle physics. Because of these novel properties, many interesting and unconventional phenomena occur in graphene. On the other hand, since the 1970's, metallic and semiconducting superlattice structures -- man-made crystals -- have been extensively studied regarding to their fundamental electronic and optical properties as well as many applications. In this talk, I will present calculations on the properties of charge carriers in graphene under an external periodic potential (graphene superlattices) which are found to be greatly different from those of conventional two-dimensional electron gases in similar conditions [1-3]. I will discuss the anisotropies in the group velocity around the Dirac point and in the gap opening at the supercell Brillouin zone boundary [1]. Next, I will focus on the special cases where the group velocity along one direction becomes zero [1,2], emphasizing the phenomena of pseudospin collapse and possible electron beam supercollimation effects in these systems [2]. Finally, I will discuss the properties of a new generation of massless Dirac fermions at the supercell Brillouin zone boundaries and their experimental implications [3]. [4pt] [1] C. -H. Park, L. Yang, Y. -W. Son, M. L. Cohen, and S. G. Louie, Nature Phys. 4, 870 (2008). [0pt] [2] C. -H. Park, Y. -W. Son, L. Yang, M. L. Cohen, and S. G. Louie, Nano Lett. 8, 2920 (2008). [0pt] [3] C. -H. Park, L. Yang, Y. -W. Son, M. L. Cohen, and S. G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 126804 (2008).

  1. Biological properties of nitro-fatty acids in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Padilla, María N; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Valderrama, Raquel; Chaki, Mounira; Barroso, Juan B

    2018-03-27

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO 2 -FAs) are formed from the reaction between nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Knowledge concerning NO 2 -FAs has significantly increased within a few years ago and the beneficial actions of these species uncovered in animal systems have led to consider them as molecules with therapeutic potential. Based on their nature and structure, NO 2 -FAs have the ability to release nitric oxide (NO) in aqueous environments and the capacity to mediate post-translational modifications (PTM) by nitroalkylation. Recently, based on the potential of these NO-derived molecules in the animal field, the endogenous occurrence of nitrated-derivatives of linolenic acid (NO 2 -Ln) was assessed in plant species. Moreover and through RNA-seq technology, it was shown that NO 2 -Ln can induce a large set of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and different antioxidant systems suggesting this molecule may launch antioxidant and defence responses in plants. Furthermore, the capacity of this nitro-fatty acid to release NO has also been demonstrated. In view of this background, here we offer an overview on the biological properties described for NO 2 -FAs in plants and the potential of these molecules to be considered new key intermediaries of NO metabolism in the plant field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Essential oils from neotropical Myrtaceae: chemical diversity and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Pascoal, Aislan C R F; Salvador, Marcos J

    2011-01-01

    Myrtaceae family (121 genera, 3800-5800 spp.) is one of the most important families in tropical forests. They are aromatic trees or shrubs, which frequently produce edible fruits. In the neotropics, ca. 1000 species were found. Several members of this family are used in folk medicine, mainly as an antidiarrheal, antimicrobial, antioxidant, cleanser, antirheumatic, and anti-inflammatory agent and to decrease the blood cholesterol. In addition, some fruits are eaten fresh or used to make juices, liqueurs, and sweets very much appreciated by people. The flavor composition of some fruits belonging to the Myrtaceae family has been extensively studied due to their pleasant and intense aromas. Most of the essential oils of neotropical Myrtaceae analyzed so far are characterized by predominance of sesquiterpenes, some with important biological properties. In the present work, chemical and pharmacological studies carried out on neotropical Myrtaceae species are reviewed, based on original articles published since 1980. The uses in folk medicine and chemotaxonomic importance of secondary metabolites are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  3. Impact of temperature on the biological properties of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Agata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the response of soil microorganisms and enzymes to the temperature of soil. The effect of the temperatures: 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C on the biological properties of soil was investigated under laboratory conditions. The study was performed using four different soils differing in their granulometric composition. It was found that 15°C was the optimal temperature for the development of microorganisms in soil. Typically, in the soil, the highest activity of dehydrogenases was observed at 10-15°C, catalase and acid phosphatase - at 15°C, alkaline phosphatase at 20°C, urease and β-glucosidase at 25°C. The highest colony development index for heterotrophic bacteria was recorded in soils incubated at 25°C, while for actinomycetes and fungi at 15°C. The incubation temperature of soil only slightly changed the ecophysiological variety of the investigated groups of microorganisms. Therefore, the observed climate changes might have a limited impact on the soil microbiological activity, because of the high ability of microorganisms to adopt. The response of soil microorganisms and enzymes was more dependent on the soil granulometric composition, organic carbon, and total nitrogen than on its temperature.

  4. Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnell, Dawn A. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Final Report to the Department of Energy for period 6/1/2000 to 11/30/2014 for Grant # DE-FG02-00ER45813-A000 to the University of Pennsylvania Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces PI: Dawn Bonnell The behavior of grain boundaries and interfaces has been a focus of fundamental research for decades because variations of structure and composition at interfaces dictate mechanical, electrical, optical and dielectric properties in solids. Similarly, the consequence of atomic and electronic structures of surfaces to chemical and physical interactions are critical due to their implications to catalysis and device fabrication. Increasing fundamental understanding of surfaces and interfaces has materially advanced technologies that directly bear on energy considerations. Currently, exciting developments in materials processing are enabling creative new electrical, optical and chemical device configurations. Controlled synthesis of nanoparticles, semiconducting nanowires and nanorods, optical quantum dots, etc. along with a range of strategies for assembling and patterning nanostructures portend the viability of new devices that have the potential to significantly impact the energy landscape. As devices become smaller the impact of interfaces and surfaces grows geometrically. As with other nanoscale phenomena, small interfaces do not exhibit the same properties as do large interfaces. The size dependence of interface properties had not been explored and understanding at the most fundamental level is necessary to the advancement of nanostructured devices. An equally important factor in the behavior of interfaces in devices is the ability to examine the interfaces under realistic conditions. For example, interfaces and boundaries dictate the behavior of oxide fuel cells which operate at extremely high temperatures in dynamic high pressure chemical environments. These conditions preclude the characterization of local properties during fuel cell

  5. Electronic and magnetic properties of perfect and defected germanium nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Qing; Zhang Yan; Zhang Jianmin; Ji, Vincent; Xu Kewei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Perfect AGeNRs are NM semiconductor with three-branch band gaps and decaying profiles. · Perfect ZGeNRs are AFM semiconductor with a decreasing band gap as width increases. · The band gap of AGeNRs can be tuned by mono- or di-vacancy at different positions. · Metallization can be realized in ZGeNRs by mono- or di-vacancy at different positions. · Magnetic properties of ZGeNRs depend closely upon the vacancy positions. - Abstract: The electronic and magnetic properties of both perfect and defected germanium nanoribbons (GeNRs) are investigated by using projector-augmented wave method based on density-functional theory. All the GeNRs with different edge shapes (armchair or zigzag) and widths are cut from the buckled Ge hexagonal sheet which is found to be semi-metallic as the planar graphene sheet. The results show that the perfect armchair GeNRs are nonmagnetic semiconductors and their band gaps exhibit three branches with decaying profiles, while the perfect zigzag GeNRs show the stable antiferromagnetic semiconducting ground state and their band gaps monotonously decrease with increasing ribbon width. These properties of the GeNRs are similar to graphene nanoribbons and should be important for designing new functional Ge-based nanodevices. The effects of the monovacancy or divacancy on the electronic and magnetic properties of the GeNRs are also considered. We found that the band gap of armchair GeNRs can be easily tuned by a monovancancy or divacancy at different positions, which provides a way of band gap engineering of armchair GeNRs for actual applications. Different from the defected armchair GeNRs, the metallization can be realized in zigzag GeNRs by a monovacancy or a divacancy, however, their magnetic properties depend closely upon the vacancy positions.

  6. Electronic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeglund, J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the use of band-structure calculations for studying thermodynamic properties of solids. We discuss 3d-, 4d- and 5d-transition metal carbides and nitrides. Through a detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental results, we draw conclusions on the character of the atomic bonds in these materials. We show how electronic structure calculations can be used to give accurate predictions for bonding energies. Part of the thesis is devoted to the application of the generalized gradient approximation in electronic structure calculations on transition metals. For structures with vibrational disorder, we present a method for calculating averaged phonon frequencies without using empirical information. For magnetic excitations, we show how a combined use of theoretical results and experimental data can yield information on magnetic fluctuations at high temperatures. The main results in the thesis are: Apart for an almost constant shift, theoretically calculated bonding energies for transition metal carbides and nitrides agree with experimental data or with values from analysis of thermochemical information. The electronic spectrum of transition metal carbides and nitrides can be separated into bonding, antibonding and nonbonding electronic states. The lowest enthalpy of formation for substoichiometric vanadium carbide VC 1-X at zero temperature and pressure occurs for a structure containing vacancies (x not equal to 0). The generalized gradient approximation improves theoretical calculated cohesive energies for 3d-transition metals. Magnetic phase transitions are sensitive to the description of exchange-correlation effects in electronic structure calculations. Trends in Debye temperatures can be successfully analysed in electronic structure calculations on disordered lattices. For the elements, there is a clear dependence on the crystal structure (e.g., bcc, fcc or hcp). Chromium has fluctuating local magnetic moments at temperatures well above

  7. Electron spin interactions in chemistry and biology fundamentals, methods, reactions mechanisms, magnetic phenomena, structure investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the versatile and pivotal role of electron spin interactions in nature. It provides the background, methodologies and tools for basic areas related to spin interactions, such as spin chemistry and biology, electron transfer, light energy conversion, photochemistry, radical reactions, magneto-chemistry and magneto-biology. The book also includes an overview of designing advanced magnetic materials, optical and spintronic devices and photo catalysts. This monograph appeals to scientists and graduate students working in the areas related to spin interactions physics, biophysics, chemistry and chemical engineering.

  8. Electronic properties of Be and Al by Compton scattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, J.C.; Di Rocco, H.O.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, electronic properties of beryllium and aluminum are examined by using Compton scattering technique. The method is based on the irradiation of samples using a beam narrow of mono- energetic photons of 59.54 keV product of radioactive decay of Am -241 . Scattered radiation is collected by a high resolution semiconductor detector positioned at an angle of 90°. The measured spectrum is commonly called Compton profile and contains useful information about the electronic structure of the material. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations such as density functional theory showing a good agreement. However, these results show some discrepancies with many libraries used in codes such as Monte Carlo simulation. Since these libraries are based on the values tabulated by Biggs, Mendelsohn and Mann 1975 thus overestimating the scattered radiation on the material. (authors) [es

  9. Electronic properties and Compton scattering studies of monoclinic tungsten dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heda, N. L.; Ahuja, Ushma

    2015-01-01

    We present the first ever Compton profile measurement of WO2 using a 20 Ci 137Cs γ-ray source. The experimental data have been used to test different approximations of density functional theory in linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) scheme. It is found that theoretical Compton profile deduced using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) gives a better agreement than local density approximation and second order GGA. The computed energy bands, density of states and Mulliken's populations (MP) data confirm a metal-like behavior of WO2. The electronic properties calculated using LCAO approach are also compared with those obtained using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. The nature of bonding in WO2 is also compared with isoelectronic WX2 (X=S, Se) compounds in terms of equal-valence-electron-density profiles and MP data, which suggest an increase in ionic character in the order WSe2→WS2→WO2.

  10. Impact of electron beam irradiation on fish gelatin film properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbettaïeb, Nasreddine; Karbowiak, Thomas; Brachais, Claire-Hélène; Debeaufort, Frédéric

    2016-03-15

    The objective of this work was to display the effect of electron beam accelerator doses on properties of plasticized fish gelatin film. Electron spin resonance indicates free radical formation during irradiation, which might induce intermolecular cross-linking. Tensile strength for gelatin film significantly increases after irradiation (improved by 30% for 60 kGy). The vapour permeability is weakly affected by irradiation. Surface tension and its polar component increase significantly and are in accordance with the increase of wettability. So, irradiation may change the orientation of polar groups of gelatin at the film surface and crosslink the hydrophobic amino acids. No modification of the crystallinity of the film is observed. These findings suggest that if structure changes, it only occurs in the amorphous phase of the gelatin matrix. It is also observed that irradiation enhances the thermal stability of the gelatin film, by increasing the glass transition temperature and the degradation temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electronic transport properties of the armchair silicon carbide nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jiuxu; Yang Yintang; Liu Hongxia [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Guo Lixin [School of Science, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: songjiuxu@126.com [Information Science and Technology Institution, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2010-11-15

    The electronic transport properties of the armchair silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) are investigated by using the combined nonequilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory. In the equilibrium transmission spectrum of the nanotube, a transmission valley of about 2.12 eV is discovered around Fermi energy, which means that the nanotube is a wide band gap semiconductor and consistent with results of first principle calculations. More important, negative differential resistance is found in its current voltage characteristic. This phenomenon originates from the variation of density of states caused by applied bias voltage. These investigations are meaningful to modeling and simulation in silicon carbide nanotube electronic devices.

  12. Electronic properties of polycrystalline graphene under large local strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xin; Tang, Ning; Duan, Junxi; Mei, Fuhong; Meng, Hu; Lu, Fangchao; Xu, Fujun; Yang, Xuelin; Gao, Li; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo; Ge, Weikun

    2014-01-01

    To explore the transport properties of polycrystalline graphene under large tensile strain, a strain device has been fabricated using piezocrystal to load local strain onto graphene, up to 22.5%. Ionic liquid gate whose capability of tuning carrier density being much higher than that of a solid gate is used to survey the transfer characteristics of the deformed graphene. The conductance of the Dirac point and field effect mobility of electrons and holes is found to decrease with increasing strain, which is attributed to the scattering of the graphene grain boundaries, the strain induced change of band structure, and defects. However, the transport gap is still not opened. Our study is helpful to evaluate the application of graphene in stretchable electronics.

  13. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  14. A short comparison of electron and proton transfer processes in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The main differences between electron and proton transfers that take place in biological systems are examined. The relation between the distance dependence of the rate constant and the mass of the transferred particle is analyzed in detail. Differences between the two processes have important consequences at the experimental level, which are discussed. The various mechanisms that ensure the coupling between electron and proton transfers are briefly described

  15. Dynamical "in situ" observation of biological samples using variable pressure scanning electron microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 126, - (2008), 012046:1-4 ISSN 1742-6588. [Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference 2007 (EMAG 2007). Glasgow, 03.09.2007-07.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0886; GA AV ČR KJB200650602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : biological sample * VP-SEM * dynamical experiments Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. 2. Brazilian Congress on Cell Biology and 7. Brazilian Colloquium on Electron Microscopy - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Immunology, virology, bacteriology, genetics and protozoology are some of the subjects treated in the 2. Brazilian Congress on Cell Biology. Studies using radioisotopic techniques and ultrastructural cytological studies are presented. Use of optical - and electron microscopy in some of these studies is discussed. In the 7. Brazilian Colloquium on Electron Microscopy, the application of this technique to materials science is discussed (failure analysis in metallurgy, energy dispersion X-ray analysis, etc). (I.C.R.) [pt

  17. Electronic properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Mensah, N.G.; Nkrumah, G.

    2001-09-01

    The electronic properties of single-walled chiral carbon nanotube has been studied using the model based on infinitely long carbon atoms wrapped along a base helix of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs). The problem is solved semiclassically, and current density J, resistivity ρ, thermopower α z , and electrical power factor P calculated. It is noted that the current density j displays negative differential conductivity, whiles the resistivity ρ increases with increasing electrical field. ρ also slowly increases at low temperatures and then gradually increases with increasing temperature. The thermopower α z shows interesting behaviour. Very intriguing is the electrical power factor which shows relatively large values. (author)

  18. Quantum theory of the optical and electronic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Hartmut

    1990-01-01

    The current technological revolution in the development of computing devices has created a demand for a textbook on the quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. This book successfully fulfills this need. Based on lectures given by the authors, it is a comprehensive introduction for researchers or graduate-level students to the subject. Certain sections can also serve as a graduate-level textbook for use in solid state physics courses or for more specialized courses. The final chapters establish a direct link to current research in sem

  19. Stability and electronic properties of silicene on WSe2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie

    2015-03-17

    Many semiconducting substrates, such as GaS and MgBr2, have been explored for silicene. However, large lattice mismatches, complicated control of terminal layers and small band gaps are critical limiting factors. First-principles results on the stability and electronic properties of silicene on WSe2 show that the energy barriers for lateral translation between the two subsystems are very small due to weak van der Waals interactions. For the same reason, the Dirac physics of silicene is preserved. It turns out that the induced band gap is sufficient to withstand thermal fluctuations. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  20. Psychotria viridis: Chemical constituents from leaves and biological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DÉBORA B.S. SOARES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The phytochemical study of hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts from leaves of Psychotria viridis resulted in the identification of: the pentacyclic triterpenes, ursolic and oleanolic acid; the steroids, 24-methylene-cycloartanol, stigmasterol and β-sitosterol; the glycosylated steroids 3-O-β-D-glucosyl-β-sitosterol and 3-O-β-D-glucosyl-stigmasterol; a polyunsaturated triterpene, squalene; the esters of glycerol, 1-palmitoylglycerol and triacylglycerol; a mixture of long chain hydrocarbons; the aldehyde nonacosanal; the long chain fat acids hentriacontanoic, hexadecanoic and heptadenoic acid; the ester methyl heptadecanoate; the 4-methyl-epi-quinate and two indole alkaloids, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT and N-methyltryptamine. The chemical structures were determined by means of spectroscopic (IR, 1H and 13C NMR, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY and spectrometric (CG-MS and LCMS-ESI-ITTOF methods. The study of biologic properties of P. viridis consisted in the evaluation of the acetylcholinesterase inhibition and cytotoxic activities. The hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts, the substances 24-methylene-cycloartanol, DMT and a mixture of 3-O-β-D-glucosyl-β-sitosterol and 3-O-β-D-glucosyl-stigmasterol showed cholinesterase inhibiting activity. This activity induced by chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts was higher than 90%. The methanol and ethyl acetate extracts inhibit the growth and/or induce the death of the tumor cells strains B16F10 and 4T1, without damaging the integrity of the normal cells BHK and CHO. DMT also demonstrated a marked activity against tumor cell strains B16F10 and 4T1.

  1. Some biological properties of human chorionic follicle stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tojo, Shimpei; Ashitaka, Yoshihiko; Maruo, Takeshi; Nishimoto, Hiroyuki

    1975-01-01

    The biological properties of human chorionic FSH (hCFSH) for rat ovaries were investigated. Highly purified hCFSH had similar response to the ovarian augmentation test as bovine FSH and significantly enhanced 3 H-thymidine uptake by granulosa cells and theca cells in the ovary of hypophysectomized rat. In contrast, highly purified hCG little responded to the ovarian augmentation test and had no effect on 3 H-thymidine uptake by the ovary. These results indicate that hCFSH may promote the follicular growth of ovary resulting from granulosa cell proliferation and its enlargement. In addition, freshly harvested porcine granulosa cells were employed in an in vitro system to investigate specific binding of hCFSH to ovarian receptor. Radioiodinated hCFSH ( 125 I-hCFSH) and hCG ( 125 I-hCG) were respectively incubated with cell suspensions. Binding of these hormone preparations was proportional to the cell number and increased with the time of incubation through 120 minutes. The binding ability of 125 I-hCFSH to the cells was greater than that of 125 I-hCG. Increasing concentrations of unlabeled hCFSH in the incubation mixture progressively inhibited the uptake of 125 I-hCFSH by granulosa cells. Unlabeled hCG was not able to compete with 125 I-hCFSH binding. The similar phenomenon to inhibit the binding of 125 I-hCG to the cells was also recognized in the presence of unlabeled hCG. These findings suggest that granulosa cell has at least two different types of receptor sites: one for hCFSH and the other for hCG. (auth.)

  2. Complex structure of triangular graphene: electronic, magnetic and electromechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated electronic and magnetic properties of graphene nanodisks (nanosize triangular graphene) as well as electromechanical properties of graphene nanojunctions. Nanodisks are nanomagnets made of graphene, which are robust against perturbation such as impurities and lattice defects, where the ferromagnetic order is assured by Lieb's theorem. We can generate a spin current by spin filter, and manipulate it by a spin valve, a spin switch and other spintronic devices made of graphene nanodisks. We have analyzed nanodisk arrays, which have multi-degenerate perfect flat bands and are ferromagnet. By connecting two triangular graphene corners, we propose a nanomechanical switch and rotator, which can detect a tiny angle rotation by measuring currents between the two corners. By making use of the strain induced Peierls transition of zigzag nanoribbons, we also propose a nanomechanical stretch sensor, in which the conductance can be switched off by a nanometer scale stretching.

  3. Structure and Electronic Properties of Cerium Orthophosphate: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, Nicole; Mun, B. Simon; Ray, Hannah; Ross Jr, Phillip; Neaton, Jeffrey; De Jonghe, Lutgard

    2010-07-27

    Structural and electronic properties of cerium orthophosphate (CePO{sub 4}) are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the local spin-density approximation (LSDA+U), with and without gradient corrections (GGA-(PBE)+U), and compared to X-ray diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The density of states is found to change significantly as the Hubbard parameter U, which is applied to the Ce 4f states, is varied from 0 to 5 eV. The calculated structural properties are in good agreement with experiment and do not change significantly with U. Choosing U = 3 eV for LDSA provides the best agreement between the calculated density of states and the experimental photoemission spectra.

  4. Theory of electronic and optical properties of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewageegana, Prabath S.

    "There is plenty of room at the bottom." This bold and prophetic statement from Nobel laureate Richard Feynman back in 1950s at Cal Tech launched the Nano Age and predicted, quite accurately, the explosion in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Now this is a fast developing area in both science and technology. Many think this would bring the greatest technological revolution in the history of mankind. To understand electronic and optical properties of nanostructures, the following problems have been studied. In particular, intensity of mid-infrared light transmitted through a metallic diffraction grating has been theoretically studied. It has been shown that for s-polarized light the enhancement of the transmitted light is much stronger than for p-polarized light. By tuning the parameters of the diffraction grating enhancement can be increased by a few orders of magnitude. The spatial distribution of the transmitted light is highly nonuniform with very sharp peaks, which have the spatial widths about 10 nm. Furthermore, under the ultra fast response in nanostructures, the following two related goals have been proved: (a) the two-photon coherent control allows one to dynamically control electron emission from randomly rough surfaces, which is localized within a few nanometers. (b) the photoelectron emission from metal nanostructures in the strong-field (quasistationary) regime allows coherent control with extremely high contrast, suitable for nanoelectronics applications. To investigate the electron transport properties of two dimensional carbon called graphene, a localization of an electron in a graphene quantum dot with a sharp boundary has been considered. It has been found that if the parameters of the confinement potential satisfy a special condition then the electron can be strongly localized in such quantum dot. Also the energy spectra of an electron in a graphene quantum ring has been analyzed. Furthermore, it has been shown that in a double dot system some

  5. Stability and electronic properties of low-dimensional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jie

    As the devices used in daily life become smaller and more concentrated, traditional three-dimensional (3D) bulk materials have reached their limit in size. Low-dimensional nanomaterials have been attracting more attention in research and getting widely applied in many industrial fields because of their atomic-level size, unique advanced properties, and varied nanostructures. In this thesis, I have studied the stability and mechanical and electronic properties of zero-dimensional (0D) structures including carbon fullerenes, nanotori, metallofullerenes and phosphorus fullerenes, one-dimensional (1D) structures including carbon nanotubes and phosphorus nanotubes, as well as two-dimensional (2D) structures including layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), phosphorene and phosphorus carbide (PC). I first briefly introduce the scientific background and the motivation of all the work in this thesis. Then the computational techniques, mainly density functional theory (DFT), are reviewed in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, I investigate the stability and electronic structure of endohedral rare-earth metallofullerene La C60 and the trifluoromethylized La C60(CF3)n with n ≤ 5. Odd n is preferred due to the closed-shell electronic configuration or large HOMO-LUMO gap, which is also meaningful for the separation of C 60-based metallofullerenes. Mechanical and electronic properties of layered materials including TMDs and black phosphorus are studied in Chapter 4 and 5. In Chapter 4, a metallic NbSe2/semiconducting WSe2 bilayer is investigated and besides a rigid band shift associated with charge transfer, the presence of NbSe2 does not modify the electronic structure of WSe2. Structural similarity and small lattice mismatch results in the heterojunction being capable of efficiently transferring charge acrossthe interface. In Chapter 5, I investigate the dependence of stability and electronic band structure on the in-layer strain in bulk black phosphorus. In Chapters 6, 7 and

  6. Actinobacteria mediated synthesis of nanoparticles and their biological properties: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is gaining tremendous attention in the present century due to its expected impact on many important areas such as medicine, energy, electronics, and space industries. In this context, actinobacterial biosynthesis of nanoparticles is a reliable, eco-friendly, and important aspect of green chemistry approach that interconnects microbial biotechnology and nanobiotechnology. Antibiotics produced by actinobacteria are popular in almost all the therapeutic measures and it is known that these microbes are also helpful in the biosynthesis of nanoparticles with good surface and size characteristics. In fact, actinobacteria are efficient producers of nanoparticles that show a range of biological properties, namely, antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, anti-biofouling, anti-malarial, anti-parasitic, antioxidant, etc. This review describes the potential use of the actinobacteria as the novel sources for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles with improved biomedical applications.

  7. Effects of electron beam irradiation on fluoroelastomer properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Leitao Junior, Claudio B.; Carvalho, Alvaro A.S.; Pino, Eddy S.; Machado, Luci D.B.

    2005-01-01

    Fluoroelastomer is a polymer usually used as a sealing material due to some excellent properties comparing to other elastomers, such as good resistance to high temperatures and to the attack of chemical substances. The fluoroelastomer used in this work was a commercial product obtained from two monomers, vinylidene and hexafluoropropylene, containing also carbon black and inorganic fillers. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the ionizing radiation of electron beam (EB) on the tensile, hardness and thermal properties of this sealing material obtained by a conventional curing process. The overall doses applied were 10, 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200 and 250 kGy. Tension tests showed that the tensile stress at break increases 34 % in the range of radiation dose applied. On the other hand, the total strain decreases considerably, from 347 % to 109 %, with the increase of the radiation dose. Hardness Shore A values increase 15 % in the range of radiation dose studied. Thermogravimetric curves showed that there are no considerable variations on the onset temperatures for all samples in the range of radiation doses applied. These results indicate that EB radiation produces modifications on the fluoroelastomer mechanical properties, but without promoting considerable chain scission. The modifications on the mechanical properties can be related to a better adhesion, induced by radiation, between the fluoroelastomer and the fillers. (author)

  8. Glutarimides: Biological activity, general synthetic methods and physicochemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović-Đorđević Jelena B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutarimides, 2,6-dioxopiperidines are compounds that rarely occur in natural sources, but so far isolated ones exert widespread pharmacological activities, which makes them valuable as potential pharmacotherapeutics. Glutarimides act as androgen receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatory, anxiolytics, antibacterials, and tumor suppressing agents. Some synthetic glutarimide derivatives are already in use as immunosuppressive and sedative (e.g., thalidomide or anxiolytics (buspirone drugs. The wide applicability of this class of compounds, justify the interest of scientists to explore new pathways for its syntheses. General methods for synthesis of six-membered imide ring, are presented in this paper. These methods include: a reaction of dicarboxylic acids with ammonia or primary amine, b reactions of cyclization: amido-acids, diamides, dinitriles, nitrilo-acids, amido-nitriles, amido-esters, amidoacyl-chlorides or diacyl-chlorides, c adition of carbon-monoxide on a,b-unsaturated amides, d oxidation reactions, e Michael adition of active methylen compounds on methacrylamide or conjugated amides. Some of the described methods are used for closing glutarimide ring in syntheses of farmacological active compounds sesbanimide and aldose reductase inhibitors (ARI. Analyses of the geometry, as well as, the spectroscopic analyses (NMR and FT-IR of some glutarimides are presented because of their broad spectrum of pharmacological activity. To elucidate structures of glutarimides, geometrical parameters of newly synthesized tert-pentyl-1-benzyl-4-methyl-glutarimide-3-carboxylate (PBMG are analyzed and compared with the experimental data from X-ray analysis for glutarimide. Moreover, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP surface which is plotted over the optimized geometry to elucidate the reactivity of PBMG molecule is analyzed. The electronic properties of glutarimide derivatives are explained on the example of thalidomide. The Frontier Molecular Orbital

  9. Wood-Derived Materials for Green Electronics, Biological Devices, and Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Wei; Ciesielski, Peter N; Fang, Zhiqiang; Zhu, J Y; Henriksson, Gunnar; Himmel, Michael E; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-08-24

    goal of this study is to review the fundamental structures and chemistries of wood and wood-derived materials, which are essential for a wide range of existing and new enabling technologies. The scope of the review covers multiscale materials and assemblies of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin as well as other biomaterials derived from wood, in regard to their major emerging applications. Structure-properties-application relationships will be investigated in detail. Understanding the fundamental properties of these structures is crucial for designing and manufacturing products for emerging applications. Today, a more holistic understanding of the interplay between the structure, chemistry, and performance of wood and wood-derived materials is advancing historical applications of these materials. This new level of understanding also enables a myriad of new and exciting applications, which motivate this review. There are excellent reviews already on the classical topic of woody materials, and some recent reviews also cover new understanding of these materials as well as potential applications. This review will focus on the uniqueness of woody materials for three critical applications: green electronics, biological devices, and energy storage and bioenergy.

  10. Wood-Derived Materials for Green Electronics, Biological Devices, and Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Wei; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Fang, Zhiqiang; Zhu, J. Y.; Henriksson, Gunnar; Himmel, Michael E.; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-08-24

    goal of this study is to review the fundamental structures and chemistries of wood and wood-derived materials, which are essential for a wide range of existing and new enabling technologies. The scope of the review covers multiscale materials and assemblies of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin as well as other biomaterials derived from wood, in regard to their major emerging applications. Structure-properties-application relationships will be investigated in detail. Understanding the fundamental properties of these structures is crucial for designing and manufacturing products for emerging applications. Today, a more holistic understanding of the interplay between the structure, chemistry, and performance of wood and wood-derived materials is advancing historical applications of these materials. This new level of understanding also enables a myriad of new and exciting applications, which motivate this review. There are excellent reviews already on the classical topic of woody materials, and some recent reviews also cover new understanding of these materials as well as potential applications. This review will focus on the uniqueness of woody materials for three critical applications: green electronics, biological devices, and energy storage and bioenergy.

  11. Electronic and magnetic properties of MnAu nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrour, R.; Hlil, E.K.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Mounkachi, O; El moussaoui, H.

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations, based on DFT (Density Functional Theory) approach and using FLAPW (Full potential Linear Augmented Plane Wave) method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnAu nanoparticles. Polarized spin is included in calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic. The Mn magnetic moments where considered to be along c axes. Obtained data from ab initio calculations are used as input for the high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) calculations to compute other magnetic parameters. The zero-field high temperature static susceptibility series of the magnetic moment (m) and nearest-neighbour Heisenberg and XY models on a MnAu nanoparticles is thoroughly analyzed by means of a power series coherent anomaly method (CAM) for different nanoparticles. The exchanges interactions between the magnetic atoms are obtained for MnAu nanoparticles. - Highlights: • The electronic properties of the MnAu nanoparticles are studied using the DFT and FLAPW. • Magnetic moment is computed. • The ab initio calculations are used as input for HTSEs to compute other magnetic parameters. • The exchanges interactions and blocking temperature are obtained for MnAu nanoparticles

  12. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tao; Hong, Jisang, E-mail: hongj@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    We investigated the electronic structure and magnetism of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons (ZBPNRs) using first principles density functional theory calculations by changing the widths of ZBPNRs from 1.5 to 5 nm. In addition, the effect of H and O passivation was explored as well. The ZBPNRs displayed intra-edge antiferromagnetic ground state with a semiconducting band gap of ∼0.35 eV; and this was insensitive to the edge structure relaxation effect. However, the edge magnetism of ZBPNRs disappeared with H-passivation. Moreover, the band gap of H-passivated ZBPNRs was greatly enhanced because the calculated band gap was ∼1.77 eV, and this was almost the same as that of two-dimensional blue phosphorene layer. For O-passivated ZBPNRs, we also found an intra-edge antiferromagnetic state. Besides, both unpassivated and O-passivated ZBPNRs preserved almost the same band gap. We predict that the electronic band structure and magnetic properties can be controlled by means of passivation. Moreover, the edge magnetism can be also modulated by the strain. Nonetheless, the intrinsic physical properties are size independent. This feature can be an advantage for device applications because it may not be necessary to precisely control the width of the nanoribbon.

  13. Monitoring of biological odour filtration in closed environments with olfactometry and an electronic nose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willers, H.C.; Gijsel, de P.; Ogink, N.W.M.; Amico, D' A.; Martinelli, E.; Natale, Di C.; Ras, van N.; Waarde, van der J.

    2004-01-01

    Air treatment with a compact biological membrane filter, and air quality monitoring with an electronic nose were tested in the laboratory on air from a cage containing six mice. Additional analyses of air to and from the filter were performed using olfactometry and ammonia and hydrogen sulphide gas

  14. Biomaterials-based electronics: polymers and interfaces for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskovich, Meredith; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2012-05-01

    Advanced polymeric biomaterials continue to serve as a cornerstone for new medical technologies and therapies. The vast majority of these materials, both natural and synthetic, interact with biological matter in the absence of direct electronic communication. However, biological systems have evolved to synthesize and utilize naturally-derived materials for the generation and modulation of electrical potentials, voltage gradients, and ion flows. Bioelectric phenomena can be translated into potent signaling cues for intra- and inter-cellular communication. These cues can serve as a gateway to link synthetic devices with biological systems. This progress report will provide an update on advances in the application of electronically active biomaterials for use in organic electronics and bio-interfaces. Specific focus will be granted to covering technologies where natural and synthetic biological materials serve as integral components such as thin film electronics, in vitro cell culture models, and implantable medical devices. Future perspectives and emerging challenges will also be highlighted. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology-The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 12. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology – The Primary Events in Photosynthesis. V Krishnan. General Article Volume 2 Issue 12 December 1997 pp 77-86. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. How to observe small biological objects in low voltage electron microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nebesářová, Jana; Vancová, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2007), s. 248-249 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS600220501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : low voltage electron microscope * negative staining * flagella * Borrelia burgdorferi Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.941, year: 2007

  17. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy of biological samples on highly transparent carbon nanomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhinow, Daniel; Bueenfeld, Matthias; Weber, Nils-Eike; Beyer, Andre; Goelzhaeuser, Armin; Kuehlbrandt, Werner; Hampp, Norbert; Turchanin, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Ultrathin carbon nanomembranes (CNM) comprising crosslinked biphenyl precursors have been tested as support films for energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) of biological specimens. Due to their high transparency CNM are ideal substrates for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) of stained and unstained biological samples. Virtually background-free elemental maps of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and ferritin have been obtained from samples supported by ∼1 nm thin CNM. Furthermore, we have tested conductive carbon nanomembranes (cCNM) comprising nanocrystalline graphene, obtained by thermal treatment of CNM, as supports for cryoEM of ice-embedded biological samples. We imaged ice-embedded TMV on cCNM and compared the results with images of ice-embedded TMV on conventional carbon film (CC), thus analyzing the gain in contrast for TMV on cCNM in a quantitative manner. In addition we have developed a method for the preparation of vitrified specimens, suspended over the holes of a conventional holey carbon film, while backed by ultrathin cCNM. -- Research highlights: → We examine ultrathin carbon nanomembranes (CNM) as supports for biological TEM. → CNM comprise crosslinked biphenyl precursors. → CNM supports enable background-free elemental mapping of heavy and light elements. → We perform cryoEM of ice-embedded biological samples on graphene-like conductive CNM.

  18. Electronic properties of hydrogenated quasi-free-standing graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberer, D.; Knupfer, M.; Buechner, B. [IFW Dresden (Germany); Petaccia, L. [Elettra Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Trieste (Italy); Wang, Y.; Quian, H.; Irle, S. [Department of Chemistry, Nagoya University (Japan); Farjam, M. [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, S.A. [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sachdev, H. [Anorganische Chemie 8.11, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany); Federov, A.V.; Usachov, D.; Adamchuk, V.K. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyalikh, D.V.; Vilkov, O. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Dresden (Germany); Liu, X. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria); Grueneis, A. [IFW Dresden (Germany); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria)

    2011-11-15

    Tailoring the electronic properties of graphene is of fundamental interest regarding its application in electronic devices. One of the key strategies is chemical functionalization which modifies the {pi}-electron system and thus can induce band gaps. However, in order to control the degree of functionalization it is crucial to know the exact amount of the chemisorbed species. We show with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) the formation of a band gap in graphene and estimate the hydrogen coverage from the scattering rate. Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) we identify the chemical environments in hydrogenated graphene and determine the total hydrogen to carbon (H/C)-ratio directly from the spectra. We then compare ARPES and XPS as tools for determining the H/C-ratio and discuss the results from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Angle-resolved photoemission spectra of (left panel) pristine graphene intercalated with Au and (right panel) hydrogenated graphene on Au with an estimated H-coverage of 5.8%. Besides the formation of a band gap, a broadening is observable which can be used to determine the H amount. Both spectra show the {pi}-band at the K-point. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Distorted wave calculations for electron loss process induced by bare ion impact on biological targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, J.M.; Tachino, C.A.; Hanssen, J.; Fojón, O.A.; Galassi, M.E.; Champion, C.; Rivarola, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    Distorted wave models are employed to investigate the electron loss process induced by bare ions on biological targets. The two main reactions which contribute to this process, namely, the single electron ionization as well as the single electron capture are here studied. In order to further assess the validity of the theoretical descriptions used, the influence of particular mechanisms are studied, like dynamic screening for the case of electron ionization and energy deposition on the target by the impacting projectile for the electron capture one. Results are compared with existing experimental data. - Highlights: ► Distorted wave models are used to investigate ion-molecule collisions. ► Differential and total cross-sections for capture and ionization are evaluated. ► The influence of dynamic screening is determined. ► Capture reaction dominates the mean energy deposited by the projectile on the target

  20. Mechanical properties of the beetle elytron, a biological composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    We determined the relationship between composition and mechanical properties of elytral (modified forewing) cuticle of the beetles Tribolium castaneum and Tenebrio molitor. Elytra of both species have similar mechanical properties at comparable stages of maturation (tanning). Shortly after adult ecl...

  1. Correlation between biological activity and electron transferring of bovine liver catalase: Osmolytes effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrani, H. Sepasi; Moosavi-Movahedi, A.A.; Ghourchian, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Proline increases ET in Bovine Liver Catalase (BLC) whereas histidine decreases it. • Proline also increased the biological activity, whereas histidine decreased it. • Electron transferring and biological activity for BLC are directly correlated. • Proline causes favorable ET for BLC shown by positive E 1/2 (E°′) and negative ΔG. • Histidine makes ET unfavorable for BLC, manifested by E 1/2 (E°′) 0. -- Abstract: Catalase is a crucial antioxidant enzyme that protects life against detrimental effects of H 2 O 2 by disproportionating it into water and molecular oxygen. Effect of proline as a compatible and histidine as a non compatible osmolyte on the electron transferring and midpoint potential of catalase has been investigated. Proline increases the midpoint potential (ΔE m > 0), therefore causing the ΔG ET to be less positive and making the electron transfer reaction more facile whereas histidine decreases the E m (ΔE m ET , thereby rendering the electron transfer reaction less efficient. These results indicate the inhibitory effect of histidine evident by a −37% decrease in the cathodic peak current compared to 16% increase in the case of proline indicative of activation. The insight paves the tedious way towards our ultimate goal of elucidating a correlation between biological activity and electron transferring

  2. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farokhi, Mehdi [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanoechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidvar, Ramin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghizadeh, Majid, E-mail: sadeghma@modares.ac.ir [Department Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT.

  3. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Omidvar, Ramin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT

  4. [Physical properties of f electron systems]: Progress report, February 1987-January 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseborough, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress in research on f electron systems. The major properties discussed in this paper are: magnetic properties, transport properties, heavy fermion superconductivity, and photo-emission spectroscopy

  5. Electron processing at low energies: from basics to environmental and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illenberger, Eugen

    2006-10-01

    Electron initiated reactions play a key role in nearly any field of pure and applied sciences, in the gas phase as well as in condensed phases or at interfaces. This include substrate induced photochemistry, radiation damage of biological material (and, accordingly, the molecular mechanisms, how radio sensitizers used in tumour therapy operate), reactions induced by electrons in surface tunnelling microscopy (STM), or any kind of plasma used in industrial plasma processing. In each of these fields the electron-molecule interaction represents a key step within an eventually complex reaction sequence. A particularly interesting field is the interaction of electrons with molecules at energies below the level of electronic excitation. In this range many molecules exhibit large cross sections for resonant electron capture, often followed by the decomposition of the transient negative compound (M^-# ) according to e^- + M --> M^-# --> R + X^-.^ We report on such dissociative electron attachment (DEA) processes studied at different stages of aggregation, namely in single molecules under collision free conditions, in clusters formed by supersonic gas expansion, and on the surface of solids or in molecular nanofilms. In the meantime it has also been recognised that in the damage of living cells by high energy radiation the attachment of low energy secondary electrons to DNA is a key initial process leading to strand breaks. These secondary electrons are created along the ionisation track of the primary high-energy quantum. Apart from that, bio-molecular systems exhibit unique features in DEA, like bond and site selective decompositions.

  6. Modification of titanium alloys surface properties by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) and influence on biological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry-Rendón, Mónica; Galvis, Oscar; Aguirre, Robinson; Robledo, Sara; Castaño, Juan Guillermo; Echeverría, Félix

    2017-09-27

    Surface characteristics can mediate biological interaction improving or affecting the tissue integration after implantation of a biomaterial. Features such as topography, wettability, surface energy and chemistry can be key determinants for interactions between cells and materials. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a technique used to control this kind of parameters by the addition of chemical species and the production of different morphologies on the surfaces of titanium and its alloys. With the purpose to improve the biological response, surfaces of c.p titanium and Ti6Al4V were modified by using PEO. Different electrolytes, voltages, current densities and anodizing times were tested in order to obtain surfaces with different characteristics. The obtained materials were characterized by different techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). Wettability of the obtained surfaces were measured and the corresponding surface energies were calculated. Superhydrophilic surfaces with contact angles of about 0 degrees were obtained without any other treatment but PEO and this condition in some cases remains stable after several weeks of anodizing; crystal phase composition (anatase-rutile) of the anodic surface appears to be critical for obtaining this property. Finally, in order to verify the biological effect of these surfaces, osteoblast were seeded on the samples. It was found that cell behavior improves as SFE (surface free energy) and coating porosity increases whereas it is affected negatively by roughness. Techniques for surface modification allow changes in the coatings such as surface energy, roughness and porosity. As a consequence of this, biological response can be altered. In this paper, surfaces of c.p Ti and Ti6Al4V were modified by using plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in order to accelerate the cell adhesion process.

  7. Organic/metal interfaces. Electronic and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhm, Steffen

    2008-07-17

    This work addresses several important topics of the field of organic electronics. The focus lies on organic/metal interfaces, which exist in all organic electronic devices. Physical properties of such interfaces are crucial for device performance. Four main topics have been covered: (i) the impact of molecular orientation on the energy levels, (ii) energy level tuning with strong electron acceptors, (iii) the role of thermodynamic equilibrium at organic/ organic homo-interfaces and (iv) the correlation of interfacial electronic structure and bonding distance. To address these issues a broad experimental approach was necessary: mainly ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy was used, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, metastable atom electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing waves, to examine vacuum sublimed thin films of conjugated organic molecules (COMs) in ultrahigh vacuum. (i) A novel approach is presented to explain the phenomenon that the ionization energy in molecular assemblies is orientation dependent. It is demonstrated that this is due to a macroscopic impact of intramolecular dipoles on the ionization energy in molecular assemblies. Furthermore, the correlation of molecular orientation and conformation has been studied in detail for COMs on various substrates. (ii) A new approach was developed to tune hole injection barriers ({delta}{sub h}) at organic/metal interfaces by adsorbing a (sub-) monolayer of an organic electron acceptor on the metal electrode. Charge transfer from the metal to the acceptor leads to a chemisorbed layer, which reduces {delta}{sub h} to the COM overlayer. This concept was tested with three acceptors and a lowering of {delta}{sub h} of up to 1.2 eV could be observed. (iii) A transition from vacuum-level alignment to molecular level pinning at the homo-interface between a lying monolayer and standing multilayers of a COM was observed, which depended on the amount of a pre-deposited acceptor. The

  8. Electronic properties of thermally formed thin iron oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielant, J.; Goossens, V.; Hausbrand, R.; Terryn, H.

    2007-01-01

    The oxide layer, present between an organic coating and the substrate, guarantees adhesion of the coating and plays a determinating role in the delamination rate of the organic coating. The purpose of this study is to compare the resistive and semiconducting properties of thermal oxides formed on steel in two different atmospheres at 250 deg. C: an oxygen rich atmosphere, air, and an oxygen deficient atmosphere, N 2 . In N 2 , a magnetite layer grows while in air a duplex oxide film forms composed by an inner magnetite layer and a thin outer hematite scale. The heat treatment for different amounts of time at high temperature was used as method to sample the thickness variation and change in electronic and semiconducting properties of the thermal oxide layers. Firstly, linear voltammetric measurements were performed to have a first insight in the electrochemical behavior of the thermal oxides in a borate buffer solution. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the same buffer combined with the Mott-Schottky analysis were used to determine the semiconducting properties of the thermal oxides. By spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively, the thickness and roughness of the oxide layers were determined supporting the physical interpretation of the voltammetric and EIS data. These measurements clearly showed that oxide layers with different constitution, oxide resistance, flatband potential and doping concentration can be grown by changing the atmosphere

  9. White mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with calcium chloride dihydrate: chemical analysis and biological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the chemical and biological properties of fast-set white mineral trioxide aggregate (FS WMTA), which was WMTA combined with calcium chloride dihydrate (CaCl2·2H2O), compared to that of WMTA. Materials and Methods Surface morphology, elemental, and phase analysis were examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The cytotoxicity and cell attachment properties were evaluated on human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPLFs) using methyl-thiazol-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assay and under SEM after 24 and 72 hours, respectively. Results Results showed that the addition of CaCl2·2H2O to WMTA affected the surface morphology and chemical composition. Although FS WMTA exhibited a non-cytotoxic profile, the cell viability values of this combination were lesser than WMTA, and the difference was significant in 7 out of 10 concentrations at the 2 time intervals (p < 0.05). HPLFs adhered over the surface of WMTA and at the interface, after 24 hours of incubation. After 72 hours, there were increased numbers of HPLFs with prominent cytoplasmic processes. Similar findings were observed with FS WMTA, but the cells were not as confluent as with WMTA. Conclusions The addition of CaCl2·2H2O to WMTA affected its chemical properties. The favorable biological profile of FS WMTA towards HPLFs may have a potential impact on its clinical application for repair of perforation defects. PMID:28808634

  10. Electronic properties of antiferromagnetic UBi2 metal by exact exchange for correlated electrons method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ghasemikhah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the electronic properties of antiferromagnetic UBi2 metal by using ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT, employing the augmented plane waves plus local orbital method. We used the exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE method to calculate the exchange-correlation energy under a variety of hybrid functionals. Electric field gradients (EFGs at the uranium site in UBi2 compound were calculated and compared with the experiment. The EFGs were predicted experimentally at the U site to be very small in this compound. The EFG calculated by the EECE functional are in agreement with the experiment. The densities of states (DOSs show that 5f U orbital is hybrided with the other orbitals. The plotted Fermi surfaces show that there are two kinds of charges on Fermi surface of this compound.

  11. Standards, Data Exchange and Intellectual Property Rights in Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zimmeren, Esther; Rutz, Berthold; Minssen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    and qualitative data on biological processes and activities in much greater volumes, velocity, variety and veracity. The skilful integration of multiple heterogeneous data sets allows scientists to model and predict biological processes. SysBio’s interdisciplinary nature requires data, models and other research...... we provided a number of recommendations for a variety of stakeholders. The current article offers some deeper reflections about the interface between IPRs, standards and data exchange in Systems Biology resulting from an Expert Meeting funded by another ERA-Net, ERASysAPP. The meeting brought...... assets to be formatted and described in standard ways to enable exchange and reuse of high quality data. This allows a more effective utilisation of the enormous potential that rests in “big data” analysis. Finally, SysBio is often closely linked to or provides the foundation for Synthetic Biology (Syn...

  12. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  13. Electronic structure and properties of uranyl compounds. Problems of electron-donor conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebov, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Comparison of the series of the ligand mutual substitution in the uranyl compounds with the ligand series of d-elements and with the uranyl ''covalent model'', is made. The data on ionization potentials of the ligand higher valent levels and on the structure of some uranyl nitrate compounds are considered. It is concluded that the mechanism of the ligand effect on the properties of uranyl grouping is more complex, than it is supposed in the traditional representations on the nature of electron-donor interactions in the uranyl compounds

  14. Electronic Properties of Graphene–PtSe2 Contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Sattar, Shahid

    2017-04-26

    In this article, we study the electronic properties of graphene in contact with monolayer and bilayer PtSe2 using first-principles calculations. It turns out that there is no charge transfer between the components because of the weak van der Waals interaction. We calculate the work functions of monolayer and bilayer PtSe2 and analyze the band bending at the contact with graphene. The formation of an n-type Schottky contact with monolayer PtSe2 and a p-type Schottky contact with bilayer PtSe2 is demonstrated. The Schottky barrier height is very low in the bilayer case and can be reduced to zero by 0.8% biaxial tensile strain.

  15. Electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons: A density functional investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Sharma, Hitesh

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on graphene nano ribbons (GNRs) to investigate the electronic properties as a function of chirality, size and hydrogenation on the edges. The calculations were performed on GNRs with armchair and zigzag configurations with 28, 34, 36, 40, 50, 56, 62, 66 carbon atoms. The structural stability of AGNR and ZGNR increases with the size of nanoribbon where as hydrogenation of GNR tends to lowers their structural stability. All GNRs considered have shown semiconducting behavior with HOMO-LUMO gap decreasing with the increase in the GNR size. The hydrogenation of GNR decreases its HOMO-LUMO gap significantly. The results are in agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results

  16. Tuning of electronic properties of fullerene-oligothiophene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowska, Kornelia [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Pilarczyk, Kacper, E-mail: kacper.pilarczyk@fis.agh.edu.pl, E-mail: szacilow@agh.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Podborska, Agnieszka [Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Kim, Tae-Dong; Lee, Kwang-Sup [Department of Advanced Materials, Hannam University, 305-811 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Szaciłowski, Konrad, E-mail: kacper.pilarczyk@fis.agh.edu.pl, E-mail: szacilow@agh.edu.pl [Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-01-26

    Electronic properties of fullerene derivatives containing oligothiophene pendant chain (1–3 thiophene moieties) were investigated using the Kelvin probe technique and quantum chemistry methods. For electrochemical examination of these systems, Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) layers were prepared by the deposition on a gold substrate. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the value of the work function depends strongly on the length of oligothiophene chain. Similar dependence was also found for the surface photovoltage measurements conducted for the layers consisting of multiple LB films of the examined compounds deposited on gold surfaces. The assumption has been made that these changes are associated with the influence of oligothiophene chain on the electrostatic potential distribution near the surface of the sample. The hypothesis was confirmed by the results of DFT calculations, which revealed that the value of Fermi level energy shifts in the opposite direction to the determined work function. The key highlights of this study are as follows: electronic structure tuning by oligothiophene side chain; DFT calculation on fullerene-thiophene system; work function measurements of thin molecular layers.

  17. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  18. Electronic and magnetic properties of small rhodium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of rhodium-atomic clusters. The lowest energy structures at the semi-empirical level of rhodium clusters are first obtained from a novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as PTMBHGA, where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. The structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation. For the purpose of calculating the magnetic moment of a given cluster, we calculate the optimized structure as a function of the spin multiplicity within the DFT framework. The resultant magnetic moments with the lowest energies so obtained allow us to work out the magnetic moment as a function of cluster size. Rhodium atomic clusters are found to display a unique variation in the magnetic moment as the cluster size varies. However, Rh{sub 4} and Rh{sub 6} are found to be nonmagnetic. Electronic structures of the magnetic ground-state structures are also investigated within the DFT framework. The results are compared against those based on different theoretical approaches available in the literature.

  19. Electronic properties and Compton scattering studies of monoclinic tungsten dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heda, N.L.; Ahuja, Ushma

    2015-01-01

    We present the first ever Compton profile measurement of WO 2 using a 20 Ci 137 Cs γ-ray source. The experimental data have been used to test different approximations of density functional theory in linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) scheme. It is found that theoretical Compton profile deduced using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) gives a better agreement than local density approximation and second order GGA. The computed energy bands, density of states and Mulliken's populations (MP) data confirm a metal-like behavior of WO 2 . The electronic properties calculated using LCAO approach are also compared with those obtained using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. The nature of bonding in WO 2 is also compared with isoelectronic WX 2 (X=S, Se) compounds in terms of equal-valence-electron-density profiles and MP data, which suggest an increase in ionic character in the order WSe 2 →WS 2 →WO 2 . - Highlights: • Presented first-ever Compton profile (CP) measurements on WO 2 . • Analyzed CP data in terms of LCAO–DFT calculations. • Discussed energy band, DOS and Mulliken's population. • Discussed equally scaled CPs and bonding of isoelectronic WO 2 , WS 2 and WSe 2 . • Reported metallic character and Fermi surface topology of WO 2

  20. Structural and electronic properties of La C[sub 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, K.; Andreoni, W.; Parrinello, M. (Zurich Research Lab., Rueschlikon (Switzerland))

    1992-12-18

    The structural and electronic properties of the La C[sub 82] fullerene have been investigated by means of the Car-Parrinello method, which is based on the local density approximation of the density functional theory. The topological arrangement of the C[sub 82] cage was assumed to be a C[sub 3v] symmetry isomer. Three configurations were considered, one with the lanthanum atom at the center of the cluster, one with it along the threefold axis, and one with it at a low-symmetry, highly coordinated site. The structure was fully relaxed and it was found that the last of these configurations is energetically preferred. In this position, the lanthanum atom is nearly in a La[sup 3+] state and the unpaired electron is somewhat delocalized on the cage, in agreement with available experimental data. This arrangement suggests that the chemical shifts of the 5s and 5p lanthanum states can be used as a structural probe and as a way of further validating this picture. It is argued that this conclusion is not affected by the assumed fullerene structure.

  1. Edge effects on the electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Xihong, E-mail: xihong.peng@asu.edu [School of Letters and Sciences, Arizona State University, Mesa, Arizona 85212 (United States); Copple, Andrew [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Wei, Qun [School of Letters and Sciences, Arizona State University, Mesa, Arizona 85212 (United States); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2014-10-14

    Two dimensional few-layer black phosphorus crystal structures have recently been fabricated and have demonstrated great potential in electronic applications. In this work, we employed first principles density functional theory calculations to study the edge and quantum confinement effects on the electronic properties of the phosphorene nanoribbons (PNR). Different edge functionalization groups, such as H, F, Cl, OH, O, S, and Se, in addition to a pristine case were studied for a series of ribbon widths up to 3.5 nm. It was found that the armchair-PNRs (APNRs) are semiconductors for all edge groups considered in this work. However, the zigzag-PNRs (ZPNRs) show either semiconductor or metallic behavior in dependence on their edge chemical species. Family 1 edges (i.e., H, F, Cl, OH) form saturated bonds with P atoms in the APNRs and ZPNRs, and the edge states keep far away from the band gap. However, Family 2 edges (pristine, O, S, Se) form weak unsaturated bonds with the p{sub z} orbital of the phosphorus atoms and bring edge states within the band gap of the ribbons. For the ZPNRs, the edge states of Family 2 are present around the Fermi level within the band gap, which close up the band gap of the ZPNRs. For the APNRs, these edge states are located at the bottom of the conduction band and result in a reduced band gap.

  2. Electronic properties of carbon nanotubes complexed with a DNA nucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehelamirani, Morteza; da Silva, Maurício C; Salahub, Dennis R

    2017-03-08

    Electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) play an important role in their interactions with nano-structured materials. In this work, interactions of adenosine monophosphate (AMP), a DNA nucleotide, with metallic and semi-conducting CNTs are studied using the density functional tight binding (DFTB) method. The electronic structure of semi-conducting CNTs was found to be changed as they turned to metallic CNTs in a vacuum upon interaction with the nucleotide while metallic CNTs remain metallic. Specifically, the band gap of semi-conducting CNTs was decreased by 0.79 eV on average while nearly no change was found in the metallic tubes. However, our investigations showed that the presence of explicit water molecules prevents the metallicity change and only small changes in the CNT band gap occur. According to our charge analysis, the average negative charge accumulated on CNTs upon interaction with the AMP was determined to be 0.77 e in a vacuum while it was 0.03 e in solution. Therefore, it is essential to include explicit water molecules in simulating complexes formed by DNA nucleotides and CNTs which were ignored in several past studies performed using quantum mechanical approaches.

  3. Optical and electronic properties of semiconducting Sn2S3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We report the electronic and optical properties of Sn2S3 as obtained from first principles calculations with the modified Becke-Johnson potential. The electronic structure shows that Sn occurs in both divalent and tetravalent forms. The fundamental band gap of 0.82 eV is indirect. The direct gap is 0.97 eV, but the onset of strong optical absorption is much higher at ˜1.75 eV. This is as a consequence of the Sn2+ s and Sn4+ s characters of the valence and conduction band extrema, respectively. We also find strong and different anisotropies for conduction in p- and n-type Sn2S3. This should be taken into account in device structures in order to obtain efficient charge collection. The thermopowers are reasonably high for both p- and n-type materials. p-type Sn2S3 shows complex corrugated isosurface sections, while the n-type material shows multiple band extrema.

  4. The effect of terminal sterilization on the material properties and in vivo remodeling of a porcine dermal biologic scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearth, Christopher L; Keane, Timothy J; Carruthers, Christopher A; Reing, Janet E; Huleihel, Luai; Ranallo, Christian A; Kollar, Elizabeth W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2016-03-01

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix are commonly used in a variety of surgical procedures. The Food and Drug Administration typically regulates biologic scaffolds as medical devices, thus requiring terminal sterilization prior to clinical use. However, to date, no consensus exists for the most effective yet minimally destructive sterilization protocol for biologic scaffold materials. The objective of the present study was to characterize the effect of ethylene oxide, gamma irradiation and electron beam (e-beam) irradiation on the material properties and the elicited in vivo remodeling response of a porcine dermal biologic scaffold. Outcome measures included biochemical, structural, and mechanical properties as well as cytocompatibility in vitro. In vivo evaluation utilized a rodent model to examine the host response to the materials following 7, 14, and 35 days. The host response to each experimental group was determined by quantitative histologic methods and by immunolabeling for macrophage polarization (M1/M2). In vitro results show that increasing irradiation dosage resulted in a dose dependent decrease in mechanical properties compared to untreated controls. Ethylene oxide-treated porcine dermal ECM resulted in decreased DNA content, extractable total protein, and bFGF content compared to untreated controls. All ETO treated, gamma irradiated, and e-beam irradiated samples had similar cytocompatibility scores in vitro. However, in vivo results showed that increasing dosages of e-beam and gamma irradiation elicited an increased rate of degradation of the biologic scaffold material following 35 days. The FDA typically regulates biologic scaffolds derived from mammalian tissues as medical devices, thus requiring terminal sterilization prior to clinical use. However, there is little data and no consensus for the most effective yet minimally destructive sterilization protocol for such materials. The present study characterized the effect of common

  5. Preparation and biological properties of a novel composite scaffold of nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan/carboxymethyl cellulose for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengdong Xiong

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we report the physico-chemical and biological properties of a novel biodegradable composite scaffold made of nano-hydroxyapatite and natural derived polymers of chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose, namely, n-HA/CS/CMC, which was prepared by freeze-drying method. The physico-chemical properties of n-HA/CS/CMC scaffold were tested by infrared absorption spectra (IR, transmission electron microscope(TEM, scanning electron microscope(SEM, universal material testing machine and phosphate buffer solution (PBS soaking experiment. Besides, the biological properties were evaluated by MG63 cells and Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs culture experiment in vitro and a short period implantation study in vivo. The results show that the composite scaffold is mainly formed through the ionic crossing-linking of the two polyions between CS and CMC, and n-HA is incorporated into the polyelectrolyte matrix of CS-CMC without agglomeration, which endows the scaffold with good physico-chemical properties such as highly interconnected porous structure, high compressive strength and good structural stability and degradation. More important, the results of cells attached, proliferated on the scaffold indicate that the scaffold is non-toxic and has good cell biocompatibility, and the results of implantation experiment in vivo further confirm that the scaffold has good tissue biocompatibility. All the above results suggest that the novel degradable n-HA/CS/CMC composite scaffold has a great potential to be used as bone tissue engineering material.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of hybrid silicon-germanium nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. L. Pérez Sánchez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using first principles molecular calculations, based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT, structural and electronic properties of hybrid graphene—like silicon—germanium circular nanosheets of hexagonal symmetry are investigated. The exchange—correlation functional of Perdew—Wang (PW in the local spin density approximation (LSDA based on the pseudopotentials of Dolg—Bergnre is applied. The finite extension nanosheets are represented by the CnHm—like cluster model with mono—hydrogenated armchair edges. Changes of the physicochemical properties were analyzed to learn on the chemical composition. We have obtained that the corrugation of the hybrid nanosheets is maintained (with respect to the pristine nanosheets of Ge and Si and is more pronounced when there is a high percentage of germanium. Moreover, hybrid nanosheets have ionic bonds (polarity in the interval from 0.18 to 0.77 D and exhibit a semimetal behavior. Three types of chemical compositions are considered: 1 the one—one relationship, 2 formation of Ge dimers and 3 formation of Ge hexagons. In each case it is observed an increase in the chemical reactivity. Finally, analyzing the work function we conclude that in cases 1 and 2 the chemical compositions improve the efficiency of the field emission and thereby they could expand the scope of nanotechnology applications.

  7. Geometry, electronic structures and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tao; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Using a first principles approach, we investigated the geometry, electronic structures, and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs). Two possible 1D configurations, the so-called α-PNTs and β-PNTs, are proposed, which are structurally related to blue and black phosphorus monolayers, respectively. Hereby, we predict that both armchair and zigzag geometries can be synthesized in α-PNTs, but the zigzag form of β-PNT is highly unfavorable because of large strain and conformation energies. The band gap of α-PNTs is expected to be ∼2.67 eV, and this is insensitive to the chirality when the tube’s inner diameter is larger than 1.3 nm, while the armchair β-PNTs have a much smaller band gap. Interestingly, we find nearly flat band structures in the zigzag α-PNT system. This may indicate that an excited particle–hole pair has a huge effective mass. We also find asymmetric optical properties with respect to the polarization direction. The armchair α-PNT for parallel polarization shows a large refractive index of 2.6 near the ultraviolet wavelength, and also we find that the refractive index can be even smaller than 1 in certain frequency ranges. The zigzag tubes show very weak reflectivity for parallel polarization, while the armchair tube displays high reflectivity. (paper)

  8. Electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons with periodically hexagonal nanoholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, W.; Zeng, Y. C.; Zhang, Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    By using the first-principles method based on the density-functional theory, electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons punched with periodic nanoholes (GNRPNHs) are studied systematically. It has been shown that the zigzag-edge GNRPNH at the nonmagnetic state is always metal regardless of neck widths, but its metallic properties is obviously weakened due to nanohole effects, and at the anti-ferromagnetic states, its spin degeneracy still remains and the energy gap has only a smaller change. While for armchair-edge GNRPNHs, the situations are complicated. As compared with the perfect AGNRs, their band gaps become smaller or larger depending on the ribbon widths satisfying W = 3p + 1, 3p, or 3p - 1. The analysis in depth shows that underlying origins are closely related to the width and edge shape (zigzag or armchair) of the neck subprime nanoribbon and edge subprime nanoribbon, which leads to the different quantum confinement effect. And also shown is the phenomenon of the odd-even oscillation for the band gap with the change of the neck width. These findings presented here provide theoretical references for experimentally punching desirable periodic nanoholes on the graphene nanoribbons to meet the special characteristics requirements of nanodevices.

  9. Magnetic and electronic properties of porphyrin-based molecular nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Jia Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we performed theoretical investigations on the electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal embedded porphyrin-based nanowires (TM-PNWs, TM = Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn. Our results indicate that Ni-PNW and Zn-PNW are nonmagnetic while the rest species are magnetic, and the magnetic moments in TM-PNWs and their corresponding isolated monomer structures are found to be the same. In addition, the spin coupling in the magnetic nanowires can be ignored leading to their degenerate AFM and FM states. These results can be ascribed to the weak intermetallic interactions because of the relatively large distances between neighbor TM atoms. Among all TM-PNW structures considered here, only Mn-PNW shows a half-metallic property while the others are predicted to be semiconducting. The present work paves a new way of obtaining ferromagnetic porphyrin-based nanowires with TM atoms distributed separately and orderly, which are expected to be good candidates for catalysts, energy storage and molecular spintronics.

  10. Electronic properties of topological insulator candidate CaAgAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Jayita; Kumar, Nitesh; Wu, Shu-Chun; Shekhar, Chandra; Fink, Jӧrg; Rienks, Emile D. L.; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Sun, Yan; Felser, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    The topological phases of matter provide the opportunity to observe many exotic properties, such as the existence of 2D topological surface states in the form of Dirac cones in topological insulators and chiral transport through the open Fermi arc in Weyl semimetals. However, these properties affect the transport characteristics and, therefore, may be useful for applications only if the topological phenomena occur near the Fermi level. CaAgAs is a promising candidate for which the ab initio calculations predict line-nodes at the Fermi energy. However, the compound transforms into a topological insulator on considering spin–orbit interaction. In this study, we investigated the electronic structure of CaAgAs with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), ab initio calculations, and transport measurements. The results from ARPES show that the bulk valence band crosses the Fermi energy at the Γ-point. The measured band dispersion matches the ab initio calculations closely when shifting the Fermi energy in the calculations by  ‑0.5 eV. The ARPES results are in good agreement with transport measurements, which show abundant p-type carriers.

  11. Electronic properties of disordered Weyl semimetals at charge neutrality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Tobias; Huang, Chia-Wei; Ostrovsky, Pavel M.

    2017-11-01

    Weyl semimetals have been intensely studied as a three-dimensional realization of a Dirac-like excitation spectrum where the conduction bands and valence bands touch at isolated Weyl points in momentum space. Like in graphene, this property entails various peculiar electronic properties. However, recent theoretical studies have suggested that resonant scattering from rare regions can give rise to a nonzero density of states even at charge neutrality. Here, we give a detailed account of this effect and demonstrate how the semimetallic nature is suppressed at the lowest scales. To this end, we develop a self-consistent T -matrix approach to investigate the density of states beyond the limit of weak disorder. Our results show a nonvanishing density of states at the Weyl point, which exhibits a nonanalytic dependence on the impurity density. This unusually strong effect of rare regions leads to a revised estimate for the conductivity close to the Weyl point and emphasizes possible deviations from semimetallic behavior in dirty Weyl semimetals at charge neutrality even with very low impurity concentration.

  12. An ontology on property for physical, chemical, and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybkaer, René

    2004-01-01

    Current metrological literature, including the International vocabulary of basic and general terms in metrology (VIM 1993), presents a special language slowly evolved without consistent use of the procedures of terminological work; furthermore, nominal properties are excluded by definition. Both deficiencies create problems in fields, such as laboratory medicine, which have to report results of all types of property, preferably in a unified systematic format. The present text aims at forming a domain ontology around "property", with intensional definitions and systematic terms, mainly using the terminological tools--with some additions--provided by the International Standards ISO 704, 1087-1, and 10241. "System" and "component" are defined, "quantity" is discussed, and the generic concept "property" is given as 'inherent state- or process-descriptive feature of a system including any pertinent components'. Previously, the term 'kind-of-quantity' and quasi-synonyms have been used as primitives; the proposed definition of "kind-of-property" is 'common defining aspect of mutually comparable properties'. "Examination procedure", "examination method", "examination principle", and "examination" are defined, avoiding the term 'test'. The need to distinguish between instances of "characteristic", "property", "type of characteristic", "kind-of-property", and "property value" is emphasized; the latter is defined together with "property value scale". These fundamental concepts are presented in a diagram, and the effect of adding essential characteristics to give expanded definitions is exemplified. Substitution usually leads to unwieldy definitions, but reveals circularity as does exhaustive consecutive listing of defining concepts. The top concept may be generically divided according to many terminological dimensions, especially regarding which operators are allowed among the four sets =, not equal to; ; +, -; and x, :. The coordinate concepts defined are termed by the

  13. Biological properties of carbon powders synthesized using chemical vapour deposition and detonation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batory, M; Batory, D; Grabarczyk, J; Kaczorowski, W; Kupcewicz, B; Mitura, K; Nasti, T H; Yusuf, N; Niedzielski, P

    2012-12-01

    Carbon powders can be synthesized using variety of CVD and detonation methods. Several interesting properties of carbon powder particles make them a very attractive material examined in many laboratories all over the world. However there is a lack of information discussing investigation of carbon powders directed to its application in pharmaceutical-cosmetic industry and medicine. Earlier investigation results proved that diamond powders present properties fighting free radicals. Presented work discusses the influence of carbon powder particles manufactured using MW/RF PACVD, RF PACVD and detonation methods onto hydro-lipid skin coat. Before the biological examinations physicochemical properties of carbon powders were determined. Grain size, shape and chemical composition of carbon powders were determined using the scanning electron microscopy. Surface functional groups were characterized by IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Structure and phase composition were investigated by means of the Raman spectroscopy. Results of allergy tests performed on laboratory mice proved that carbon powder particles synthesized using different methods do not cause allergy. In the following stage, the group of 20 patients applied the formula including carbon powder on their face skin. The influence of carbon powder onto hydro-lipid skin coat was determined by measurement of such parameters as: pH reaction, skin temperature, lipid fotometry and level of hydration. Additionally, macro pictures of places where the cream had been applied were registered. As the result of the investigation it was found that powders synthesized using various methods present different physicochemical properties which may individually affect the face skin parameters. The noticeable improvement of hydro-lipid skin coat kilter was observed.

  14. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getoff, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.a [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hartmann, Johannes [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schittl, Heike [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Gerschpacher, Marion [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Quint, Ruth Maria [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light ({lambda}=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  15. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, Nikola; Hartmann, Johannes; Schittl, Heike; Gerschpacher, Marion; Quint, Ruth Maria

    2011-01-01

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light (λ=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  16. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besleaga, Cristina; Dumitru, Viorel; Trinca, Liliana Marinela; Popa, Adrian-Claudiu; Negrila, Constantin-Catalin; Kołodziejczyk, Łukasz; Luculescu, Catalin-Romeo; Ionescu, Gabriela-Cristina; Ripeanu, Razvan-George; Vladescu, Alina; Stan, George E

    2017-11-17

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors). AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate), corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c -axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C) on Si (100) substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films) for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors) is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  17. ZnO nanostructure fabrication in different solvents transforms physio-chemical, biological and photodegradable properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Attarad; Ambreen, Sidra; Javed, Rabia; Tabassum, Saira; Ul Haq, Ihsan; Zia, Muhammad

    2017-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are synthesized in various organic solvents (acetone, chloroform, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol) and water via coprecipitation process using zinc acetate as precursor. The resultant ZnO nanoparticles, nano rods and nano sheets are characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometric analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The variable size and geometry of nanoparticles depend upon medium used for synthesis. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures exhibit minor to moderate antioxidative (DPPH based free radical scavenging activity, total antioxidative potential and total reducing power) response. Mild to moderate antibacterial and antifungal activities, excellent antileishmanial potential (IC50 up to 3.76), and good cytotoxic perspective (LD50 up to 49.4) is also observed by the synthesized ZnO NPs. The nanoparticles also exhibit moderate α-amylase inhibition response. Furthermore the nanostructures are evaluated for methylene blue photodegradation response within 60min time period. It is found that organic solvent alters shape, size and other physio-chemical properties of ZnO that ultimately modulate the biological, chemical, and environmental properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Besleaga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Nitride (AlN has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors. AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate, corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c-axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C on Si (100 substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  19. Modelling low energy electron and positron tracks in biologically relevant media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Munoz, A.; Almeida, D.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Fuss, M.C.; Sanz, A.G.; Garcia, G.

    2013-01-01

    This colloquium describes an approach to incorporate into radiation damage models the effect of low and intermediate energy (0-100 eV) electrons and positrons, slowing down in biologically relevant materials (water and representative biomolecules). The core of the modelling procedure is a C++ computing programme named 'Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS)', which is compatible with available general purpose Monte Carlo packages. Input parameters are carefully selected from theoretical and experimental cross section data and energy loss distribution functions. Data sources used for this purpose are reviewed showing examples of electron and positron cross section and energy loss data for interactions with different media of increasing complexity: atoms, molecules, clusters and condense matter. Finally, we show how such a model can be used to develop an effective dosimetric tool at the molecular level (i.e. nanodosimetry). Recent experimental developments to study the fragmentation induced in biologically material by charge transfer from neutrals and negative ions are also included. (authors)

  20. Cryo-electron tomography-the cell biology that came in from the cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jonathan; Schaffer, Miroslava; Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén

    2017-09-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) provides high-resolution 3D views into cells pristinely preserved by vitrification. Recent technical advances such as direct electron detectors, the Volta phase plate and cryo-focused ion beam milling have dramatically pushed image quality and expanded the range of cryo-ET applications. Cryo-ET not only allows mapping the positions and interactions of macromolecules within their intact cellular context, but can also reveal their in situ structure at increasing resolution. Here, we review how recent work using cutting-edge cryo-ET technologies is starting to provide fresh views into different aspects of cellular biology at an unprecedented level of detail. We anticipate that these developments will soon make cryo-ET a fundamental technique in cell biology. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. Generalized Fokker-Planck theory for electron and photon transport in biological tissues: application to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrant, Edgar; Frank, Martin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we study a deterministic method for particle transport in biological tissues. The method is specifically developed for dose calculations in cancer therapy and for radiological imaging. Generalized Fokker-Planck (GFP) theory [Leakeas and Larsen, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 137 (2001), pp. 236-250] has been developed to improve the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation in cases where scattering is forward-peaked and where there is a sufficient amount of large-angle scattering. We compare grid-based numerical solutions to FP and GFP in realistic medical applications. First, electron dose calculations in heterogeneous parts of the human body are performed. Therefore, accurate electron scattering cross sections are included and their incorporation into our model is extensively described. Second, we solve GFP approximations of the radiative transport equation to investigate reflectance and transmittance of light in biological tissues. All results are compared with either Monte Carlo or discrete-ordinates transport solutions.

  2. Essential Oils of Oregano: Biological Activity beyond Their Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayely Leyva-López

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils of oregano are widely recognized for their antimicrobial activity, as well as their antiviral and antifungal properties. Nevertheless, recent investigations have demonstrated that these compounds are also potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and cancer suppressor agents. These properties of oregano essential oils are of potential interest to the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of this manuscript is to review the latest evidence regarding essential oils of oregano and their beneficial effects on health.

  3. Graphene as a transparent conductive support for studying biological molecules by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, R. R.; Anissimova, S.; Novoselov, K. S.; Blake, P.; Blake, J. R.; Geim, A. K.; Zan, R.; Bangert, U.; Golovanov, A. P.; Morozov, S. V.; Latychevskaia, T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of graphene as a support for imaging individual biological molecules in transmission electron microscope (TEM). A simple procedure to produce free-standing graphene membranes has been designed. Such membranes are extremely robust and can support practically any submicrometer object. Tobacco mosaic virus has been deposited on graphene samples and observed in a TEM. High contrast has been achieved even though no staining has been applied.

  4. Direct Electron Transfer of Enzymes in a Biologically Assembled Conductive Nanomesh Enzyme Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Ki-Young; Song, Yong-Won; Choi, Won Kook; Chang, Joonyeon; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-02-24

    Nondestructive assembly of a nanostructured enzyme platform is developed in combination of the specific biomolecular attraction and electrostatic coupling for highly efficient direct electron transfer (DET) of enzymes with unprecedented applicability and versatility. The biologically assembled conductive nanomesh enzyme platform enables DET-based flexible integrated biosensors and DET of eight different enzyme with various catalytic activities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. RGB color coded images in scanning electron microscopy of biological surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 349-352 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biological surfaces * Color image s * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  6. Electronic, Optical, and Thermal Properties of Reduced-Dimensional Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shouting

    Reduced-dimensional materials have attracted tremendous attention because of their new physics and exotic properties, which are of great interests for fundamental science. More importantly, the manipulation and engineering of matter on an atomic scale yield promising applications for many fields including nanoelectronics, nanobiotechnology, environments, and renewable energy. Because of the unusual quantum confinement and enhanced surface effect of reduced-dimensional materials, traditional empirical models suffer from necessary but unreliable parameters extracted from previously-studied bulk materials. In this sense, quantitative, parameter-free approaches are highly useful for understanding properties of reduced-dimensional materials and, furthermore, predicting their novel applications. The first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is proven to be a reliable and convenient tool. In particular, recent progress in many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) makes it possible to calculate excited-state properties, e.g., quasiparticle (QP) band gap and optical excitations, by the first-principles approach based on DFT. Therefore, during my PhD study, I employed first-principles calculations based on DFT and MBPT to systematically study fundamental properties of typical reduced-dimensional semiconductors, i.e., the electronic structure, phonons, and optical excitations of core-shell nanowires (NWs) and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) structures of current interests. First, I present first-principles studies on how to engineer band alignments of nano-sized radial heterojunctions, Si/Ge core-shell NWs. Our calculation reveals that band offsets in these one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures can be tailored by applying axial strain or varying core-shell sizes. In particular, the valence band offset can be efficiently tuned across a wide range and even be diminished via applied strain. Two mechanisms contribute to this tuning of band offsets. Furthermore, varying the

  7. Predictive Models of Nanotoxicity: Relationship of Physicochemical Properties to Particle Movement Through Biological Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the linkage between the physicochemical (PC) properties of nanoparticles (NP) and their activation of biological systems is poorly understood, yet fundamental to predicting nanotoxicity, idenitifying mode of actions and developing appropriate and effective regul...

  8. Marine Sponge Lectins: Actual Status on Properties and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Mascena Gomes Filho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are primitive metazoans that produce a wide variety of molecules that protect them against predators. In studies that search for bioactive molecules, these marine invertebrates stand out as promising sources of new biologically-active molecules, many of which are still unknown or little studied; thus being an unexplored biotechnological resource of high added value. Among these molecules, lectins are proteins that reversibly bind to carbohydrates without modifying them. In this review, various structural features and biological activities of lectins derived from marine sponges so far described in the scientific literature are discussed. From the results found in the literature, it could be concluded that lectins derived from marine sponges are structurally diverse proteins with great potential for application in the production of biopharmaceuticals, especially as antibacterial and antitumor agents.

  9. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Mishra, Pragya; Sachan, Neetu; Ghosh, Ashoke K

    2011-10-01

    Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp. (Sanskrit: Adhaki, Hindi: Arhar, English: Pigeon pea, Bengali: Tur) (family: Fabaceae) is the most important grain legume crop of rain-fed agriculture in semi-arid tropics. It is both a food crop and a cover/forage crop with high levels of proteins and important amino acids like methionine, lysine and tryptophan. During the last few decades extensive studies have been carried out regarding the chemistry of C. cajan and considerable progress has been achieved regarding its biological activities and medicinal applications. This review article gives an overview on the biological activities of the compounds isolated, pharmacological actions and clinical studies of C. cajan extracts apart from its general details.

  10. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Cajanus cajan (L Millsp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilipkumar Pal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cajanus cajan (L Millsp. (Sanskrit: Adhaki, Hindi: Arhar, English: Pigeon pea, Bengali: Tur (family: Fabaceae is the most important grain legume crop of rain-fed agriculture in semi-arid tropics. It is both a food crop and a cover/forage crop with high levels of proteins and important amino acids like methionine, lysine and tryptophan. During the last few decades extensive studies have been carried out regarding the chemistry of C. cajan and considerable progress has been achieved regarding its biological activities and medicinal applications. This review article gives an overview on the biological activities of the compounds isolated, pharmacological actions and clinical studies of C. cajan extracts apart from its general details.

  11. A measurement of biomechanical properties of soft biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Piotr; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Majchrzak, Jarosław; Waliszewski, Wojciech

    2007-12-01

    We present a method to determine the mechanical behaviour of soft biological tissues. This work presents ex vivo force response between laparoscopic tool and the pig liver. We used measurement system which is based on Staubli robot RX60 and a force sensor mounted at its end. Results of measurement will be used in surgery telerobotic system to create the force feedback to secure additionally the surgery.

  12. Imidazothiazole and related heterocyclic systems. Synthesis, chemical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fascio, Mirta L; Errea, María Inés; D'Accorso, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-27

    Fused heterobicyclic systems have gained much importance in the field of medicinal chemistry because of their broad spectrum of physiological activities. Among the heterocyclic rings containing bridgehead nitrogen atom, imidazothiazoles derivatives are especially attractive because of their different biological activities. Since many imidazothiazoles derivatives are effective for treating several diseases, is interesting to analyze the behavior of some isosteric related heterocycles, such as pirrolothiazoles, imidazothiadiazoles and imidazotriazoles. In this context, this review summarizes the current knowledge about the syntheses and biological behavior of these families of heterocycles. Traditional synthetic methodologies as well as alternative synthetic procedures are described. Among these last methodologies, the use of multicomponent reaction, novel and efficient coupling reagents, and environmental friendly strategies, like microwave assistance and solvent-free condition in ionic liquids are also summarized. This review includes the biological assessments, docking research and studies of mechanism of action performed in order to obtain the compounds leading to the development of new drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct observation of unstained wet biological samples by scanning-electron generation X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Analytical tools of nanometre-scale resolution are indispensable in the fields of biology, physics and chemistry. One suitable tool, the soft X-ray microscope, provides high spatial resolution of visible light for wet specimens. For biological specimens, X-rays of water-window wavelength between carbon (284 eV; 4.3 nm) and oxygen (540 eV; 2.3 nm) absorption edges provide high-contrast imaging of biological samples in water. Among types of X-ray microscope, the transmission X-ray microscope using a synchrotron radiation source with diffractive zone plates offers the highest spatial resolution, approaching 15-10 nm. However, even higher resolution is required to measure proteins and protein complexes in biological specimens; therefore, a new type of X-ray microscope with higher resolution that uses a simple light source is desirable. Here we report a novel scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM) that demonstrates direct imaging of unstained wet biological specimens. We deposited wet yeasts in the space between two silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) films. A scanning electron beam of accelerating voltage 5 keV and current 1.6 nA irradiates the titanium (Ti)-coated Si 3 N 4 film, and the soft X-ray signal from it is detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. The SGXM can theoretically achieve better than 5 nm resolution. Our method can be utilized easily for various wet biological samples of bacteria, viruses, and protein complexes.

  14. Physicochemical and biological properties of new steroid metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, R.

    1980-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was to prepare stable steroid metal chelates by chemical conversion of the natural steroid hormones testerone, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT) and estradiol and to characterize these by means of their spectroscopic and other physico-chemical properties. In addition, various measuring techniques for the qualitative and quantitative study of complex stabilities and hydrolytic properties were employed. The distribution of some tritiated steroid metal complexes in the tissues of rats was tested using whole animal autoradiography, mainly with a view to identifying whether selective concentration occurs in certain organs. (orig.) [de

  15. A stochastic model of protein conformational dynamics and electronic-conformational coupling in biological energy transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartling, Bo

    1985-11-01

    The principles of biological energy transduction are discussed by means of a mathematical model of a donor-acceptor system of electron transfer enzymes in which electronic and conformational states are coupled. The internal nuclear motion of the enzymes is considered to be composed of transitions between local potential energy wells, which define conformational states, and vibrations within these. The conformational transitions are treated as a stochastic process of the diffusion type on a conformational potential energy surface. Dissipative processes are avoided by restricting electron transfer with respect to conformational states and molecular mechanisms of such electron gating are discussed. Different types of transient kinetics, determined by the relative rates of electronic and conformational transitions, are demonstrated in terms of probability density functions, which describe the probability for the system to be in different electronic and conformational states as a function of time. The experimental basis for the concepts and mechanisms introduced is discussed and further experiments are proposed. The applicability of the mathematical model to other systems is indicated.

  16. Chemical and electronic properties of Fe/MgO/Ge heterostructures for spin electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, D; Cantoni, M; Rinaldi, C; Bertacco, R, E-mail: matteo.cantoni@polimi.it [LNESS, Dipartimento di Fisica - Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2011-04-01

    We report on the chemical and electronic properties of epitaxial Fe/MgO/Ge(001) heterostructures probed by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy. At variance with the Fe/MgO/Fe system, annealing at 570 K produces a sizable interdiffusion at the upper Fe/MgO interface, while at 470 K this process is inhibited. The XPS analysis of band alignment in heterostructures annealed at 470 K grown onto an intrinsic Ge substrate indicates that the Fermi level is placed at the center of the MgO gap and that the Schottky barrier height is 0.35{+-}0.1 eV, thus indicating a partial depinning of the Fermi level.

  17. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from...... is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale...... electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards...

  18. Electronic and Thermal Properties of Puckered Orthorhombic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Ruixiang

    Puckered orthorhombic crystals, such as black phosphorus and group IV monochalcogenides, are attracting tremendous attention because of their new exotic properties, which are of great interests for fundamental science and novel applications. Unlike those well studied layered hexagonal materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, the puckered orthorhombic crystals possess highly asymmetrical in-plane crystal structures. Understanding the unique properties emerginge from their low symmetries is an intriguing and useful process, which gives insight into experimental observation and sheds light on manipulating their properties. In this thesis, we study and predict various properties of orthorhombic materials by using appropriate theoretical techniques such as first-principles calculations, Monte-Carlo simulations, and k · p models. In the first part of the thesis, we deal with the anisotropic electric and thermal properties of a typical puckered orthorhombic crystal, black phosphorus. We first study the electric properties in monolayer and few-layer black phosphorus, where the unique, anisotropic electrical conductance is founded. Furthermore, we find that the anisotropy of the electrical conductance can be rotated by 90° through applying appropriate uniaxial or biaxial strain. Beyond electrical conductance, we, for the first time, predict that the thermal conductance of black phosphorus is also anisotropic and, particularly, the preferred conducting direction is perpendicular to the preferred electrical conducting direction. Within the reasonable estimation regime, the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) ultimately reaches 1 at room temperature using only moderate doping. The second part of this thesis focuses on the electronic polarization of non-centrosymmetric puckered materials-group IV monochalcogenide. We propose that monolayer group IV monochalcogenides are a new class of two-dimensional (2D) ferroelectric materials with spontaneous in

  19. Characterization of electronic structure and physicochemical properties of antiparasitic nifurtimox analogues: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Raya, A.; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    American trypanosomiasis, also known as Chagas' disease, is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is well known that trypanosomes, and particularly T. cruzi, are highly sensitive towards oxidative stress, i.e., to compounds than are able to produce free radicals. Generally, nifurtimox (NFX) and benznidazol are most effective in the acute phase of the disease; therefore, nitroheterocycles constitute good models to design other nitrocompounds with specific biological characteristics. Thus, we have performed an ab initio study at the Hartree-Fock and Density Functional Theory levels of theory of several NFX analogues recently synthesized, to characterize them by obtaining their electronic, structural, and physicochemical properties, which might be linked to the observed antichagasic activity. The antitrypanosomal activity scale previously reported for the NFX analogues studied in this work is in good agreement with our theoretical results, from which we can conclude that the activity seems to be related to the reactivity along with the acidity observed for the most active molecules.

  20. Biological Reclaiming of Recycled Rubber and Its Effect on Mechanical Properties of New Rubber Vulcanizates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mansourirad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to environmental concerns, there has been great attention to recycling and reclaiming of tires. Different methods have been used for reclaiming or desulfurization of rubber. One of these methods, in which desulfurization of rubber happens with no damage to the polymer structure, is desulfurization by biological microorganisms. In this research the application and performance of thermophilic and sulfur oxidizing bacteria, Acidianus brierleyi for this purpose was investigated. Ground tire rubber was detoxified with organic solvents, and the optimum conditions for growing microorganisms in the existence of rubber powder in the shaker flasks were determined. In order to accelerate the process, the suitable conditions for growth of bacteria and desulfurization in the bioreactor were adopted. Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were employed to characterize desulfurization of bio-treated powder from bioreactor. The results indicated that morphological changes on powder surface and reduction of sulfur bonds have occurred. Samples from bioreactors, with and without bacteria and also untreated rubber powder were compounded with virgin styrene butadiene rubber. Tensile and dynamic properties were investigated using uni-direction tensile test and dynamic-mechanical-thermal analysis, respectively. Although some differences in dynamic-mechanical-thermal properties of samples pointed to stronger interaction between rubber matrix and treated rubber powder, no significant improvements in the mechanical properties of vulcanizates containing A.brierleyi-treated powder were observed. Low concentration of sulfur in rubber vulcanizates, chemical bonds of sulfur, and low efficiency of A. brierleyi in breaking sulfur bonds and reclaiming rubber were considered as the reasons for low efficiency of this treatment process.

  1. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cram, G.P. Jr.; Copeland, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO 2 and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam registered (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO 2 laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO 2 laser. In super pulse mode, the CO 2 laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam registered or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO 2 and Nd:YAG appear to closely

  2. Electronic properties and stability of graphene oxyradical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinhua; Guo Liyuan; Li Zepeng

    2015-01-01

    An investigation about the electronic properties of a series of graphene patches with O-bonding to zigzag or armchair edges is performed by density functional theory (DFT). The stability, orbital hybridization, spin density, HOMO and LUMO energy for 4a4z-O, 5a5z-O and 6a6z-O graphene oxyradicals are discussed. The 4a4z-z2, 5a5z-z3 and 6a6z-z3 are the most stable structure in their individual graphene oxyradicals systems and the corresponding C=O bond length is about 0.1231 nm. This shows that the structure with O-bonding to central positions of zigzag edges is the most stable one indicating its “safe harbor” status. Meanwhile, spin density changes obviously after O-bonding to zigzag edge of graphene. As the presumptive outer effects, folding along an axis at z3 position would deprive the “safe harbor” status with O-bonding to zigzag edge. This inspires the exploration of new ways in absorbing or storage energy behavior and intermediate of combustion can be understood better. (author)

  3. Improvement in properties of plastic teeth by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Yuko, E-mail: sano@meirin-c.ac.jp [Department of Biomaterials, Meirin College, Masago 3-16-10, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2086 (Japan); Ishikawa, Shun-ichi [Toushinyoukou Co. Ltd., Masago 3-16-10, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2086 (Japan); Seguchi, Tadao [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Improvement of the comfort and esthetics of artificial plastic teeth is desirable for the recently increasing numbers of elderly in society. Plastic teeth made of polycarbonate (PC) were modified by electron beam (EB) irradiation under specific conditions, and the change in the chemical properties of the PC was investigated. The water absorption, glucose attachment, level of bis-phenol-A (BPA) extraction, maltose adhesion, and mucin adhesion on the PC teeth were measured before and after EB irradiation. EB irradiation to a dose of 3.5 kGy at 150 {sup o}C in a nitrogen gas atmosphere reduced the water absorption by 20%, glucose absorption by 40%, maltose adhesion by 20%, and the amount of various amino acids, formed as the hydrolysis products of mucin, adhering on the PC teeth were reduced by 60-99%. The BPA content was lower than the detection limit for analysis of both the original and the EB irradiated PC teeth. - Highlights: > Radiation improvement of polycarbonate for plastic teeth by EB irradiation 3.5 kGy at 150 {sup o}C in inert gas. > Water and glucose absorption and maltose adhesion on PC teeth were much reduced. > Bis-phenol-A content from PC teeth was lower than the detection limit after irradiation.

  4. The electronic transport properties of porous zigzag graphene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi; Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2013-12-01

    By omitting some carbon atoms from middle of a zigzag graphene cluster, and Hydrogen termination of sp2 orbital, we make the different porous zigzag graphene clusters, and investigate the electron transport properties of the structures by the non-equilibrium Green function method at zero bias regime. It is shown that, the conductance of porous clusters depends on the final symmetry of porous cluster and the local imbalance number (nA-nB), in which nA and nB are the number of omitted atoms from A-sublattice and B-sublattice respectively. Also it is shown that, if three carbon atoms (one type-A and two type-B sites) are omitted the conductance for |E-Ef|≥5 eV is significantly higher than the conductance of original zigzag graphene cluster due to the increment in less affected conducting channels. We show that, spin flipping occurs under Rashba spin orbit interaction at E=Ef, when three atoms are omitted from the original cluster. Therefore the local imbalance number and final symmetry of porous graphene cluster can be used as a rule for designing porous graphene devices and the device can be used in spintronic applications.

  5. Structural phase transition and electronic properties in samarium chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, Y. S., E-mail: yspanwar2011@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govt. New Science College Dewas-455001 (India); Aynyas, Mahendra [Department of Physics, C.S.A. Govt. P.G. College, Sehore, 466001 (India); Pataiya, J.; Sanyal, Sankar P. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal, 462026 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The electronic structure and high pressure properties of samarium monochalcogenides SmS, SmSe and SmTe have been reported by using tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The total energy as a function of volume is evaluated. It is found that these monochalcogenides are stable in NaCl-type structure under ambient pressure. We predict a structural phase transition from NaCl-type (B{sub 1}-phase) structure to CsCl-type (B{sub 2}-type) structure for these compounds. Phase transition pressures were found to be 1.7, 4.4 and 6.6 GPa, for SmS, SmSe and SmTe respectively. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed that these compounds exhibit metallic character. The calculated values of equilibrium lattice parameter and phase transition pressure are in general good agreement with available data.

  6. Dynamical photo-induced electronic properties of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltako, K.; Michelini, F.; Cavassilas, N.; Raymond, L.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale molecular-electronic devices and machines are emerging as promising functional elements, naturally flexible and efficient, for next-generation technologies. A deeper understanding of carrier dynamics in molecular junctions is expected to benefit many fields of nanoelectronics and power devices. We determine time-resolved charge current flowing at the donor-acceptor interface in molecular junctions connected to metallic electrodes by means of quantum transport simulations. The current is induced by the interaction of the donor with a Gaussian-shape femtosecond laser pulse. Effects of the molecular internal coupling, metal-molecule tunneling, and light-donor coupling on photocurrent are discussed. We then define the time-resolved local density of states which is proposed as an efficient tool to describe the absorbing molecule in contact with metallic electrodes. Non-equilibrium reorganization of hybridized molecular orbitals through the light-donor interaction gives rise to two phenomena: the dynamical Rabi shift and the appearance of Floquet-like states. Such insights into the dynamical photoelectronic structure of molecules are of strong interest for ultrafast spectroscopy and open avenues toward the possibility of analyzing and controlling the internal properties of quantum nanodevices with pump-push photocurrent spectroscopy.

  7. Ordering tendencies and electronic properties in quaternary Heusler derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neibecker, Pascal; Gruner, Markus E.; Xu, Xiao; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Petry, Winfried; Pentcheva, Rossitza; Leitner, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The phase stabilities and ordering tendencies in the quaternary full-Heusler alloys NiCoMnAl and NiCoMnGa have been investigated by in situ neutron diffraction, calorimetry, and magnetization measurements. NiCoMnGa was found to adopt the L 21 structure, with distinct Mn and Ga sublattices but a common Ni-Co sublattice. A second-order phase transition to the B 2 phase with disorder also between Mn and Ga was observed at 1160 K . In contrast, in NiCoMnAl slow cooling or low-temperature annealing treatments are required to induce incipient L 21 ordering, otherwise the system displays only B 2 order. Linked to L 21 ordering, a drastic increase in the magnetic transition temperature was observed in NiCoMnAl, while annealing affected the magnetic behavior of NiCoMnGa only weakly due to the low degree of quenched-in disorder. First principles calculations were employed to study the thermodynamics as well as order-dependent electronic properties of both compounds. It was found that a near half-metallic pseudogap emerges in the minority spin channel only for the completely ordered Y structure. However, this structure is energetically unstable compared to a tetragonal structure with alternating layers of Ni and Co, which is predicted to be the low-temperature ground state. The experimental inaccessibility of the totally ordered structures is explained by kinetic limitations due to the low ordering energies.

  8. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Oyama, A B; Silva-Molina, R A; Ruíz-García, J; Gámez-Corrales, R; Guirado-López, R A

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ~2 nm, lengths of approximately 100-300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ~0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH-MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH-MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  9. Magnetostructural, mechanical and electronic properties of manganese tetraboride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongcheng Liang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetostructural stabilities, mechanical behaviors and electronic structures of various phases of manganese tetraboride (MnB4 have been investigated systematically by density functional theory (DFT based first-principles methods. It is found that MnB4 undergoes temperature-induced phase transitions from the nonmagnetic (NM monoclinic mP20 structure to the ferromagnetic (FM orthorhombic oP10 structure at 438 K, then to the antiferromagnetic (AFM orthorhombic oP10 structure at 824 K. We reveal that the NM insulating mP20 phase stabilizes by the Peierls distortion breaking the structural degeneracy, while the FM and AFM metallic oP10 phases stabilize by the Stoner magnetism lifting the spin degeneracy. Furthermore, the calculated mechanical properties show that the NM mP20, FM oP10, and AFM oP10 phases exhibit low compressibility and high hardness, which originate from their three-dimensional covalent boron networks. Therefore, this unique temperature-assisted insulator-metal transition, strong stiffness and high hardness suggest that MnB4 may find promising technological applications as thermoelectric switches and field effect transistors at the extreme conditions.

  10. Optical properties of electron-irradiated gallium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailovskii, E.Yu.; Grigoryan, N.E.; Eritsyan, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Results of optical absorption and photoconductivity measurements in the 0.1 to 2.4 eV range of GaP crystals irradiated with 7.5 and 50 MeV electrons are presented. The absorption of irradiated crystals near the edge can be represented by two exponential regions. In the free carrier absorption region one can observe as a result of irradiation a decrease of the power index p in the dependence α proportional to lambdap. Photoconductivity with long-time relaxation takes place in the spectral interval where the additional absorption is observed. The quenching of residual conductivity can be observed at hν=1.0eV. Variations in absorption and photoconductivity are attributed to the 'tails' of density states near the zone edges arising at introduction of both point defects and disordered regions. At hν=2.1eV one can observe a resonance band which is attributed to intra-centre transitions on point defects. A recovery of the optical properties of GaP at annealing is studied. In heavily irradiated GaP crystals point defects can form gatherings which display themselves as disordered regions. (author)

  11. Electron donating and acid-base properties of cerium oxide and its mixed oxides with alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugunan, S.; Jalaja, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The electron donating properties of cerium oxide activated at 300, 500 and 800 degC and of its mixed oxides with alumina were examined based on the adsorption of electron acceptors exhibiting different electron affinities. The surface acidity/basicity of the oxides was determined by titrimetry; the H 0,max values are given. The limit of electron transfer from the oxide surface lies within the region of 1.77 and 2.40 eV in terms of the electron affinity of the electron acceptor. Cerium oxide promotes the electron donor nature of alumina while leaving the limit of electron transfer unchanged. 2 tabs., 4 figs., 13 refs

  12. [Physical properties of f electron systems]: Progress report, February 1986-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseborough, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress in research on f electron systems. The major properties discussed in this paper are: transport properties, heavy fermion superconductivity, and photo-emission spectroscopy

  13. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Yáñez-Mó

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological functions of both recipient and parent cells. While intensive investigation has targeted the role of EVs in different pathological processes, for example, in cancer and autoimmune diseases, the EV-mediated maintenance of homeostasis and the regulation of physiological functions have remained less explored. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the physiological roles of EVs, which has been written by crowd-sourcing, drawing on the unique EV expertise of academia-based scientists, clinicians and industry based in 27 European countries, the United States and Australia. This review is intended to be of relevance to both researchers already working on EV biology and to newcomers who will encounter this universal cell biological system. Therefore, here we address the molecular contents and functions of EVs in various tissues and body fluids from cell systems to organs. We also review the physiological mechanisms of EVs in bacteria, lower eukaryotes and plants to highlight the functional uniformity of this emerging communication system.

  14. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Siljander, Pia R.-M.; Andreu, Zoraida; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buzas, Edit I.; Buzas, Krisztina; Casal, Enriqueta; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Colás, Eva; Silva, Anabela Cordeiro-da; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Giebel, Bernd; Gimona, Mario; Graner, Michael; Gursel, Ihsan; Gursel, Mayda; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Hendrix, An; Kierulf, Peter; Kokubun, Katsutoshi; Kosanovic, Maja; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laitinen, Saara; Lässer, Cecilia; Lener, Thomas; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Linē, Aija; Lipps, Georg; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Marcilla, Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria; Nazarenko, Irina; Hoen, Esther N.M. Nolte-‘t; Nyman, Tuula A.; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Olivan, Mireia; Oliveira, Carla; Pállinger, Éva; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Reventós, Jaume; Rigau, Marina; Rohde, Eva; Sammar, Marei; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Santarém, N.; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Stoorvogel, Willem; Stukelj, Roman; Van der Grein, Susanne G.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Wauben, Marca H. M.; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological functions of both recipient and parent cells. While intensive investigation has targeted the role of EVs in different pathological processes, for example, in cancer and autoimmune diseases, the EV-mediated maintenance of homeostasis and the regulation of physiological functions have remained less explored. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the physiological roles of EVs, which has been written by crowd-sourcing, drawing on the unique EV expertise of academia-based scientists, clinicians and industry based in 27 European countries, the United States and Australia. This review is intended to be of relevance to both researchers already working on EV biology and to newcomers who will encounter this universal cell biological system. Therefore, here we address the molecular contents and functions of EVs in various tissues and body fluids from cell systems to organs. We also review the physiological mechanisms of EVs in bacteria, lower eukaryotes and plants to highlight the functional uniformity of this emerging communication system. PMID:25979354

  15. Electronic properties of interfaces produced by silicon wafer hydrophilic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trushin, Maxim

    2011-07-15

    The thesis presents the results of the investigations of electronic properties and defect states of dislocation networks (DNs) in silicon produced by wafers direct bonding technique. A new insight into the understanding of their very attractive properties was succeeded due to the usage of a new, recently developed silicon wafer direct bonding technique, allowing to create regular dislocation networks with predefined dislocation types and densities. Samples for the investigations were prepared by hydrophilic bonding of p-type Si (100) wafers with same small misorientation tilt angle ({proportional_to}0.5 ), but with four different twist misorientation angles Atw (being of < , 3 , 6 and 30 , respectively), thus giving rise to the different DN microstructure on every particular sample. The main experimental approach of this work was the measurements of current and capacitance of Schottky diodes prepared on the samples which contained the dislocation network at a depth that allowed one to realize all capabilities of different methods of space charge region spectroscopy (such as CV/IV, DLTS, ITS, etc.). The key tasks for the investigations were specified as the exploration of the DN-related gap states, their variations with gradually increasing twist angle Atw, investigation of the electrical field impact on the carrier emission from the dislocation-related states, as well as the establishing of the correlation between the electrical (DLTS), optical (photoluminescence PL) and structural (TEM) properties of DNs. The most important conclusions drawn from the experimental investigations and theoretical calculations can be formulated as follows: - DLTS measurements have revealed a great difference in the electronic structure of small-angle (SA) and large-angle (LA) bonded interfaces: dominating shallow level and a set of 6-7 deep levels were found in SA-samples with Atw of 1 and 3 , whereas the prevalent deep levels - in LA-samples with Atw of 6 and 30 . The critical twist

  16. Optimization of spatial frequency domain imaging technique for estimating optical properties of food and biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatial frequency domain imaging technique has recently been developed for determination of the optical properties of food and biological materials. However, accurate estimation of the optical property parameters by the technique is challenging due to measurement errors associated with signal acquis...

  17. Endowing carbon nanotubes with biological and biomedical properties by chemical modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battigelli, Alessia; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Da Ros, Tatiana; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    The scope of nanotechnology is gaining importance in biology and medicine. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as a promising tool due to their unique properties, high specific surface area, and capacity to cross biological barriers. These properties offer a variety of opportunities for applications in nanomedicine, such as diagnosis, disease treatment, imaging, and tissue engineering. Nevertheless, pristine CNTs are insoluble in water and in most organic solvents; thereby functionalization of their surface is necessary to increase biocompatibility. Derivatization of CNTs also gives the possibility to conjugate different biological and bioactive molecules including drugs, proteins, and targeting ligands. This review focuses on the chemical modifications of CNTs that have been developed to impart specific properties for biological and medical purposes. Biomolecules can be covalently grafted or non-covalently adsorbed on the nanotube surface. In addition, the inner core of CNTs can be exploited to encapsulate drugs, nanoparticles, or radioactive elements. © 2013.

  18. Chemical Composition and Biological Properties of Rhododendron anthopogon Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabbriella Innocenti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Rhododendron anthopogon was investigated by GC-MS, and seventeen compounds (representing approximately 98% of the oil were identified. The major components of the aerial parts of the oil were the monoterpenes α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene and the sesquiterpene δ-cadinene. Biological studies revealed a weak topical anti-inflammatory activity; a significant killing effect against some Gram-positive reference strains: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcusfecalis, Bacillus subtilis was measured; Mycobacterium tuberculosis reference strain and a clinical isolate of Candida, C. pseudotropicalis were killed by as low as 0.04% (v/v essential oil. Moreover, the oil was able to reduce cancer cell growth independently of the cell line and the treatment protocols used.

  19. Electronic properties of assemblies of zno quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, Aarnoud Laurens

    2003-01-01

    Electron transport in an assembly of ZnO quantum dots has been studied using an electrochemically gated transistor. The electron mobility shows a step-wise increase as a function of the electron occupation per quantum dot. When the occupation number is below two, transport occurs by tunnelling

  20. Cryo-electron microscopy for structural analysis of dynamic biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Wolf, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    Since the introduction of what became today's standard for cryo-embedding of biological macromolecules at native conditions more than 30years ago, techniques and equipment have been drastically improved and the structure of biomolecules can now be studied at near atomic resolution by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) while capturing multiple dynamic states. Here we review the recent progress in cryo-EM for structural studies of dynamic biological macromolecules. We provide an overview of the cryo-EM method and introduce contemporary studies to investigate biomolecular structure and dynamics, including examples from the recent literature. Cryo-EM is a powerful tool for the investigation of biological macromolecular structures including analysis of their dynamics by using advanced image-processing algorithms. The method has become even more widely applicable with present-day single particle analysis and electron tomography. The cryo-EM method can be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of biomacromolecules in near native condition at close to atomic resolution, and has the potential to reveal conformations of dynamic molecular complexes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biophysical Exploration of Dynamical Ordering of Biomolecular Systems" edited by Dr. Koichi Kato. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The integrative role of cryo electron microscopy in molecular and cellular structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Igor; Myasnikov, Alexander G; Andronov, Leonid; Natchiar, S Kundhavai; Khatter, Heena; Beinsteiner, Brice; Ménétret, Jean-François; Hazemann, Isabelle; Mohideen, Kareem; Tazibt, Karima; Tabaroni, Rachel; Kratzat, Hanna; Djabeur, Nadia; Bruxelles, Tatiana; Raivoniaina, Finaritra; Pompeo, Lorenza di; Torchy, Morgan; Billas, Isabelle; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2017-02-01

    After gradually moving away from preparation methods prone to artefacts such as plastic embedding and negative staining for cell sections and single particles, the field of cryo electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is now heading off at unprecedented speed towards high-resolution analysis of biological objects of various sizes. This 'revolution in resolution' is happening largely thanks to new developments of new-generation cameras used for recording the images in the cryo electron microscope which have much increased sensitivity being based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices. Combined with advanced image processing and 3D reconstruction, the cryo-EM analysis of nucleoprotein complexes can provide unprecedented insights at molecular and atomic levels and address regulatory mechanisms in the cell. These advances reinforce the integrative role of cryo-EM in synergy with other methods such as X-ray crystallography, fluorescence imaging or focussed-ion beam milling as exemplified here by some recent studies from our laboratory on ribosomes, viruses, chromatin and nuclear receptors. Such multi-scale and multi-resolution approaches allow integrating molecular and cellular levels when applied to purified or in situ macromolecular complexes, thus illustrating the trend of the field towards cellular structural biology. © 2016 The Authors. Biology of the Cell published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA on behalf of Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France.

  2. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  3. Investigation of the Biological Properties of (HeteroAromatic Thiosemicarbazones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Polanski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Two series of thiosemicarbazone-based iron chelators (twenty-seven compounds were designed and synthesized using a microwave-assisted approach. Quinoline and halogenated phenyl were selected as parent scaffolds on the basis of a similarity search. The lipophilicity of the synthesized compounds was measured using HPLC and then calculated. Primary in vitro screening of the synthesized compounds was performed against eight pathogenic fungal strains. Only a few compounds showed moderate activity against fungi, and (E-2-(quinolin-2-ylvinyl-N,N-dimethylhydrazine-carbothioamide appeared to be more effective than fluconazole against most of the fungal strains tested. Antiproliferative activity was measured using a human colon cancer cell line (HCT-116. Several of the tested compounds showed submicromolar antiproliferative activity. Compounds were also tested for their activity related to the inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport (PET in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts. The structure-activity relationships are discussed for all of the compounds.

  4. Electron Bio-Imaging Centre (eBIC): the UK national research facility for biological electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Daniel K; Siebert, C Alistair; Hecksel, Corey; Hagen, Christoph; Mordhorst, Valerie; Grange, Michael; Ashton, Alun W; Walsh, Martin A; Grünewald, Kay; Saibil, Helen R; Stuart, David I; Zhang, Peijun

    2017-06-01

    The recent resolution revolution in cryo-EM has led to a massive increase in demand for both time on high-end cryo-electron microscopes and access to cryo-electron microscopy expertise. In anticipation of this demand, eBIC was set up at Diamond Light Source in collaboration with Birkbeck College London and the University of Oxford, and funded by the Wellcome Trust, the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) to provide access to high-end equipment through peer review. eBIC is currently in its start-up phase and began by offering time on a single FEI Titan Krios microscope equipped with the latest generation of direct electron detectors from two manufacturers. Here, the current status and modes of access for potential users of eBIC are outlined. In the first year of operation, 222 d of microscope time were delivered to external research groups, with 95 visits in total, of which 53 were from unique groups. The data collected have generated multiple high- to intermediate-resolution structures (2.8-8 Å), ten of which have been published. A second Krios microscope is now in operation, with two more due to come online in 2017. In the next phase of growth of eBIC, in addition to more microscope time, new data-collection strategies and sample-preparation techniques will be made available to external user groups. Finally, all raw data are archived, and a metadata catalogue and automated pipelines for data analysis are being developed.

  5. Phytochrome from Green Plants: Properties and biological Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quail, Peter H.

    2014-07-25

    Plants constantly monitor the light environment for informational light signals used to direct adaptational responses to the prevailing conditions. One major such response, the Shade-Avaoidance Response (SAR), triggered when plants sense the presence of competing neighbors, results in enhanced channeling of photosynthetically-fixed carbon into stem elongation at the expense of deposition in reproductive tissues. This response has been selected against in many modern food crops to ensure maximum edible yield (e.g. seeds). Converse enhancement of the SAR, with consequent increased carbon channeling into vegetative cellulose, could contribute to the generation of crops with improved yield of tissues suitable for cellulosic biofuel production. The signal for this response is light enriched in far-red wavelengths. This signal is produced by sunlight filtered through, or reflected from, neighboring vegetation, as a result of preferential depletion of red photons through chlorophyll absorption. The plant phytochrome (phy) photoreceptor system (predominantly phyB) senses this signal through its capacity to switch reversibly, in milliseconds, between two molecular states: the biologically inactive Pr (red-light-absorbing) and biologically active Pfr (far-red-light-absorbing) conformers. The photoequilibrium established between these two conformers in light-grown plants is determined by the ratio of red-to-far-red wavelengths in the incoming signal. The levels of Pfr then dictate the recipient plant’s growth response: high levels suppress elongation growth; low levels promote elongation growth. Studies on seedling deetiolation have advanced our understanding considerably in recent years, of the mechanism by which the photoactivated phy molecule transduces its signal into cellular growth responses. The data show that a subfamily of phy-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIFs) promote skotomorphogenic seedling development in post-germinative darkness, but that the phy

  6. NMR studies of actinide carbide and nitride electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutard, Jean-Louis

    1976-12-01

    N.M.R. studies applied to 13 C and 15 N in the solid solutions ThCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), UCsub(1-x)Nsub(x) and in the compounds ThCsub(1-x) and U 2 C 3 , were undertaken to study carbon and nitrogen contribution to chemical bonds and magnetism. For THORIUM MONOCARBIDE AND CARBONITRIDE: ThCsub(1-x) and ThCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), the very strong orbital contribution to the frequency shift reveals an important covalent character of the valence band 6d metal and 2p metalloid states. The ThCsub(1-x) band structure stoichiometry variation is due to 6dγ metal states appearing at the Fermi level and is in-opposition to a rigid band model. A non-saturated bond mechanism is suggested. For URANIUM CARBONITRIDE: UCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), in the concentration range in which no magnetic order appears at low temperature (x<0.90), the results are in opposition to a localized 5f 2 configuration model, and show that the uranium fundamental state is non-magnetic. Nevertheless two qualitatively different behaviors exist: nitrogen concentration lower than 40%: and nitrogen concentration higher than 40%. A model is proposed to account for those domains: it relies on the 5f-2p hybridization parameter which is maximum on 2p band edge (UC) and almost nul for UN. For URANIUM SESQUICARBIDE: U 2 C 3 : the N.M.R. line observation at 4.2 K indicates a non-magnetic fundamental state although the magnetic susceptibility presents a maximum at 60 K. Spin fluctuations in 5f bands are proposed to describe the electronic properties of this compound. [fr

  7. Synthesis, electronic and optical properties of Si nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L.N.

    1996-09-01

    Silicon and silicon oxide nanostructures have been deposited on solid substrates, in an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber, by laser ablation or thermal vaporization. Laser ablation followed by substrate post annealing produced Si clusters with average size of a few nanometers, on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces. This technique, which is based on surface diffusion, is limited to the production of less than one layer of clusters on a given surface. The low coverage of Si clusters and the possibility of nonradiative decay of excitation in the Si cores to the HOPG substrates in these samples rendered them unsuitable for many optical measurements. Thermal vaporization of Si in an Ar buffer gas, on the contrary, yielded multilayer coverage of Si nanoclusters with a fairly narrow size distribution of about 2 nm, full width at half maximum (FWHM). As a result, further study was performed only on Si nanoclusters synthesized by thermal vaporization in a buffer gas. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that these nanoclusters were crystalline. However, during synthesis, if oxygen was the buffer gas, a network of amorphous Si oxide nanostructures (an-SiO{sub x}) with occasional embedded Si dots was formed. All samples showed strong infrared and/or visible photoluminescence (PL) with varying decay times from nanoseconds to microseconds depending on synthesis conditions. There were differences in PL spectra for hydrogen and oxygen passivated nc-Si, while many common PL properties between oxygen passivated nc-Si and an SiO{sub x} were observed. The observed experimental results can be best explained by a model involving absorption between quantum confined states in the Si cores and emission for which the decay times are very sensitive to surface and/or interface states.

  8. Biological properties of purified recombinant HCV particles with an epitope-tagged envelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hitoshi; Akazawa, Daisuke [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Toray Industries, Inc., Kanagawa (Japan); Kato, Takanobu; Date, Tomoko [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Shirakura, Masayuki [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Toray Industries, Inc., Kanagawa (Japan); Nakamura, Noriko; Mochizuki, Hidenori [Toray Industries, Inc., Kanagawa (Japan); Tanaka-Kaneko, Keiko; Sata, Tetsutaro [Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuhito [Department of Clinical Molecular Informative Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Mizokami, Masashi [Research Center for Hepatitis and Immunology, Kohnodai Hospital, International Medical Center of Japan, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Tetsuro [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Wakita, Takaji, E-mail: wakita@nih.go.jp [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-05-14

    To establish a simple system for purification of recombinant infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles, we designed a chimeric J6/JFH-1 virus with a FLAG (FL)-epitope-tagged sequence at the N-terminal region of the E2 hypervariable region-1 (HVR1) gene (J6/JFH-1/1FL). We found that introduction of an adaptive mutation at the potential N-glycosylation site (E2N151K) leads to efficient production of the chimeric virus. This finding suggests the involvement of glycosylation at Asn within the envelope protein(s) in HCV morphogenesis. To further analyze the biological properties of the purified recombinant HCV particles, we developed a strategy for large-scale production and purification of recombinant J6/JFH-1/1FL/E2N151K. Infectious particles were purified from the culture medium of J6/JFH-1/1FL/E2N151K-infected Huh-7 cells using anti-FLAG affinity chromatography in combination with ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy of the purified particles using negative staining showed spherical particle structures with a diameter of 40-60 nm and spike-like projections. Purified HCV particle-immunization induced both an anti-E2 and an anti-FLAG antibody response in immunized mice. This strategy may contribute to future detailed analysis of HCV particle structure and to HCV vaccine development.

  9. Biological properties of purified recombinant HCV particles with an epitope-tagged envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hitoshi; Akazawa, Daisuke; Kato, Takanobu; Date, Tomoko; Shirakura, Masayuki; Nakamura, Noriko; Mochizuki, Hidenori; Tanaka-Kaneko, Keiko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2010-01-01

    To establish a simple system for purification of recombinant infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles, we designed a chimeric J6/JFH-1 virus with a FLAG (FL)-epitope-tagged sequence at the N-terminal region of the E2 hypervariable region-1 (HVR1) gene (J6/JFH-1/1FL). We found that introduction of an adaptive mutation at the potential N-glycosylation site (E2N151K) leads to efficient production of the chimeric virus. This finding suggests the involvement of glycosylation at Asn within the envelope protein(s) in HCV morphogenesis. To further analyze the biological properties of the purified recombinant HCV particles, we developed a strategy for large-scale production and purification of recombinant J6/JFH-1/1FL/E2N151K. Infectious particles were purified from the culture medium of J6/JFH-1/1FL/E2N151K-infected Huh-7 cells using anti-FLAG affinity chromatography in combination with ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy of the purified particles using negative staining showed spherical particle structures with a diameter of 40-60 nm and spike-like projections. Purified HCV particle-immunization induced both an anti-E2 and an anti-FLAG antibody response in immunized mice. This strategy may contribute to future detailed analysis of HCV particle structure and to HCV vaccine development.

  10. Structures and physical properties of gaseous metal cationized biological ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Michael B; Fridgen, Travis D

    2012-01-01

    Metal chelation can alter the activity of free biomolecules by modifying their structures or stabilizing higher energy tautomers. In recent years, mass spectrometric techniques have been used to investigate the effects of metal complexation with proteins, nucleobases and nucleotides, where small conformational changes can have significant physiological consequences. In particular, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy has emerged as an important tool for determining the structure and reactivity of gas-phase ions. Unlike other mass spectrometric approaches, this method is able to directly resolve structural isomers using characteristic vibrational signatures. Other activation and dissociation methods, such as blackbody infrared radiative dissociation or collision-induced dissociation can also reveal information about the thermochemistry and dissociative pathways of these biological ions. This information can then be used to provide information about the structures of the ionic complexes under study. In this article, we review the use of gas-phase techniques in characterizing metal-bound biomolecules. Particular attention will be given to our own contributions, which detail the ability of metal cations to disrupt nucleobase pairs, direct the self-assembly of nucleobase clusters and stabilize non-canonical isomers of amino acids.

  11. Eosinophils: multifaceted biological properties and roles in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Hirohito

    2011-07-01

    Eosinophils are leukocytes resident in mucosal tissues. During T-helper 2 (Th2)-type inflammation, eosinophils are recruited from bone marrow and blood to the sites of immune response. While eosinophils have been considered end-stage cells involved in host protection against parasite infection and immunopathology in hypersensitivity disease, recent studies changed this perspective. Eosinophils are now considered multifunctional leukocytes involved in tissue homeostasis, modulation of adaptive immune responses, and innate immunity to certain microbes. Eosinophils are capable of producing immunoregulatory cytokines and are actively involved in regulation of Th2-type immune responses. However, such new information does not preclude earlier observations showing that eosinophils, in particular human eosinophils, are also effector cells with proinflammatory and destructive capabilities. Eosinophils with activation phenotypes are observed in biological specimens from patients with disease, and deposition of eosinophil products is readily seen in the affected tissues from these patients. Therefore, it would be reasonable to consider the eosinophil a multifaceted leukocyte that contributes to various physiological and pathological processes depending on their location and activation status. This review summarizes the emerging concept of the multifaceted immunobiology of eosinophils and discusses the roles of eosinophils in health and disease and the challenges and perspectives in the field. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Removal of diclofenac from surface water by electron beam irradiation combined with a biological aerated filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shijun; Wang, Jianlong; Ye, Longfei; Zhang, Youxue; Yu, Jiang

    2014-12-01

    The degradation of DCF was investigated in aqueous solution by using electron beam (EB) technology. When the initial concentration was between 10 and 40 mg/L, almost 100% of the DCF was degraded at a dose of 0.5 kGy. However, only about 6.5% of DCF was mineralized even at 2 kGy according to total organic carbon (TOC) measurements. A combined process of EB and biological aerated filter (BAF) was therefore developed to enhance the treatment of DCF contaminated surface water. The effluent quality of combined process was substantially improved by EB pretreatment due to the degradation of DCF and related intermediates. Both irradiation and biological treatment reduced the toxicity of the treated water. The experimental results showed that EB is effective for removing DCF from artificial aqueous solution and real surface water.

  13. Nano-Bio Electrochemical Interfacing-Linking Cell Biology and Micro-Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham-Diamand, Y.; Popovtzer, R.; Rishpon, Y.

    Integration of biological substance within electronic devices is an innovative and challenging area combining recent progress in molecular biology and micro technology. First, we introduce the concept of integrating living cells with Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Following a brief overview on "whole cell based biosensors" we describe the design, fabrication, and process of a biocompatible electrochemical "Lab-on-a-Chip" system. Demonstrating the application of electrochemical interfacing based whole cell bio chips, we present two different configurations: a. integration of prokaryotic cells (bacteria) for water toxicity detection, and b. integration of eukaryotic cells (human colon cancer cells) for rapid evaluation of the effectiveness of drug treatments. Both applications, with either microbes or mammalian cells integrated onto MEMS based biochips with liquid volume in the range of 100 nL-1 μL, function well and yield a detectable signal much higher than noise level after few minutes.

  14. Emerging opportunities in structural biology with X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Ilme; Miao, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FELs) produce X-ray pulses with extremely brilliant peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration. It has been proposed that radiation damage can be “outrun” by using an ultra intense and short X-FEL pulse that passes a biological sample before the onset of significant radiation damage. The concept of “diffraction-before-destruction” has been demonstrated recently at the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first operational hard X-ray FEL, for protein nanocrystals and giant virus particles. The continuous diffraction patterns from single particles allow solving the classical “phase problem” by the oversampling method with iterative algorithms. If enough data are collected from many identical copies of a (biological) particle, its three-dimensional structure can be reconstructed. We review the current status and future prospects of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) and single-particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) with X-FELs. PMID:22922042

  15. A geometric initial guess for localized electronic orbitals in modular biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, P. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Fattebert, J. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lau, E. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osei-Kuffuor, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Recent first-principles molecular dynamics algorithms using localized electronic orbitals have achieved O(N) complexity and controlled accuracy in simulating systems with finite band gaps. However, accurately deter- mining the centers of these localized orbitals during simulation setup may require O(N3) operations, which is computationally infeasible for many biological systems. We present an O(N) approach for approximating orbital centers in proteins, DNA, and RNA which uses non-localized solutions for a set of fixed-size subproblems to create a set of geometric maps applicable to larger systems. This scalable approach, used as an initial guess in the O(N) first-principles molecular dynamics code MGmol, facilitates first-principles simulations in biological systems of sizes which were previously impossible.

  16. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Lei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust, as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (P<0.05; and soil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R(2 = 0.494∼0.955, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological soil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  17. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties Of EuIn2P2

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra

    2011-10-25

    The electronic structures and, optical and magneto‐optical properties of a newly found Zintl compound EuIn2P2 have been investigated within the density‐functional theory using the highly precise full‐potential linear‐augmented‐plane‐wave method. Results of detailed investigation of the electronic structure and related properties are reported.

  18. Monitoring Chemical and Biological Electron Transfer Reactions with a Fluorogenic Vitamin K Analogue Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Mei-Ni; Godin, Robert; Durantini, Andrés M; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-12-21

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and characterization of a two-segment fluorogenic analogue of vitamin K, B-VK Q , prepared by coupling vitamin K 3 , also known as menadione (a quinone redox center), to a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophore (a lipophilic reporter segment). Oxidation-reduction reactions, spectroelectrochemical studies, and enzymatic assays conducted in the presence of DT-diaphorase illustrate that the new probe shows reversible redox behavior on par with that of vitamin K, provides a high-sensitivity fluorescence signal, and is compatible with biological conditions, opening the door to monitor remotely (i.e., via imaging) redox processes in real time. In its oxidized form, B-VK Q is non-emissive, while upon reduction to the hydroquinone form, B-VK QH 2 , BODIPY fluorescence is restored, with emission quantum yield values of ca. 0.54 in toluene. Density functional theory studies validate a photoinduced electron transfer intramolecular switching mechanism, active in the non-emissive quinone form and deactivated upon reduction to the emissive dihydroquinone form. Our results highlight the potential of B-VK Q as a fluorogenic probe to study electron transfer and transport in model systems and biological structures with optimal sensitivity and desirable chemical specificity. Use of such a probe may enable a better understanding of the role that vitamin K plays in biological redox reactions ubiquitous in key cellular processes, and help elucidate the mechanism and pathological significance of these reactions in biological systems.

  19. The BIOSCI electronic newsgroup network for the biological sciences. Final report, October 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofferson, D.; Mack, D.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report for a DOE funded project on BIOSCI Electronic Newsgroup Network for the biological sciences. A usable network for scientific discussion, major announcements, problem solving, etc. has been created.

  20. THREE-DIMENSIONAL OBSERVATIONS ON THICK BIOLOGICAL SPECIMENS BY HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Nagata

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Thick biological specimens prepared as whole mount cultured cells or thick sections from embedded tissues were stained with histochemical reactions, such as thiamine pyrophosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase, cytochrome oxidase, acid phosphatase, DAB reactions and radioautography, to observe 3-D ultrastructures of cell organelles producing stereo-pairs by high voltage electron microscopy at accerelating voltages of 400-1000 kV. The organelles demonstrated were Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, lysosomes, peroxisomes, pinocytotic vesicles and incorporations of radioactive compounds. As the results, those cell organelles were observed 3- dimensionally and the relative relationships between these organelles were demonstrated.

  1. Morphology and electronic properties of silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shu

    2007-12-01

    Several issues related to SiC surfaces are studied in the thesis using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Specific surfaces examined include electropolished SiC, epitaxial graphene on SiC, and vicinal (i.e. slightly miscut from a low-index direction) SiC that have been subjected to high temperature hydrogen-etching. The electropolished surfaces are meant to mimic electrochemically etched SiC, which forms a porous network. The chemical treatment of the surface is similar between electropolishing and electrochemical etching, but the etching conditions are slightly different such that the former produces a flat surface (that is amenable to STM study) whereas the latter produces a complex 3-dimensional porous network. We have used these porous SiC layers as semi-permeable membranes in a biosensor, and we find that the material is quite biocompatible. The purpose of the STM/STS study is to investigate the surface properties of the SiC on the atomic scale in an effort to explain this biocompatibility. The observed tunneling spectra are found to be very asymmetric, with a usual amount of current at positive voltages but no observable current at negative voltages. We propose that this behavior is due to surface charge accumulating on an incompletely passivated surface. Measurements on SiC surfaces prepared by various amounts of hydrogen-etching are used to support this interpretation. Comparison with tunneling computations reveals a density of about 10 13 cm-2 fixed charges on both the electro-polished and the H-etched surfaces. The relatively insulating nature observed on the electro-polished SiC surface may provide an explanation for the biocompatibility of the surface. Graphene, a monolayer of carbon, is a new material for electronic devices. Epitaxial graphene on SiC is fabricated by the Si sublimation method in which a substrate is heated up to about 1350°C in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The formation of the graphene is

  2. Ab Initio Calculations of the Electronic Structures and Biological Functions of Protein Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haoping

    2003-04-01

    The self-consistent cluster-embedding (SCCE) calculation method reduces the computational effort from M3 to about M1 (M is the number of atoms in the system) with unchanged calculation precision. So the ab initio, all-electron calculation of the electronic structure and biological function of protein molecule becomes a reality, which will promote new proteomics considerably. The calculated results of two real protein molecules, the trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of squash Cucurbita maxima (CMTI-I, 436 atoms) and the Ascaris trypsin inhibitor (912 atoms, two three-dimensional structures), are presented. The reactive sites of the inhibitors are determined and explained. The precision of structure determination of inhibitors are tested theoretically.

  3. Quantitative analysis of biological fluids by electron probe and X ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, Chantal

    1986-01-01

    In order to know the kidney normal operation and to have an insight on cellular transport mechanisms and hormonal regulations at the nephron level, a technique based on the use of an electron probe has been developed for the elemental analysis of micro-volumes of biological fluids. This academic document reports applications of this technique on animals on which such fluids have been sampled at different levels of the nephron. As these samples are available in too small volumes to be dosed by conventional methods, they have been quantitatively analysed by using an electronic probe based analyser in order to determine concentrations of all elements with an atomic number greater than that of carbon. After a presentation of the implemented method and hardware, the author thus describes how an analysis is performed, and reports and discusses an example (analysis conditions, data acquisition, data processing, minimum detectable concentration, reasons for measurement scattering)

  4. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine–C60 bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Herzig, Melanie; Knupfer, Martin; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C 60 (MnPc:C 60 ) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C 60 . Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C 60 bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C 60 to MnPc thin films

  5. Electronic properties of asymmetrical quantum dots dressed by laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibis, O.V. [Department of Applied and Theoretical Physics, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Karl Marx Avenue 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Slepyan, G.Ya.; Maksimenko, S.A. [Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, Bobruyskaya St. 11, 220050 Minsk (Belarus); Hoffmann, A. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    In the present paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the strong non-resonant interaction between asymmetrical quantum dots (QDs) and a laser field results in harmonic oscillations of their band gap. It is shown that such oscillations change the spectrum of elementary electron excitations in QDs: in the absence of the laser pumping there is only one resonant electron frequency, but QDs dressed by the laser field have a set of electron resonant frequencies. One expects that this modification of elementary electron excitations in QDs can be observable in optical experiments. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Hydrogen, metals, bifurcating electrons, and proton gradients: the early evolution of biological energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F

    2012-03-09

    Life is a persistent, self-specified set of far from equilibrium chemical reactions. In modern microbes, core carbon and energy metabolism are what keep cells alive. In very early chemical evolution, the forerunners of carbon and energy metabolism were the processes of generating reduced carbon compounds from CO(2) and the mechanisms of harnessing energy as compounds capable of doing some chemical work. The process of serpentinization at alkaline hydrothermal vents holds promise as a model for the origin of early reducing power, because Fe(2+) in the Earth's crust reduces water to H(2) and inorganic carbon to methane. The overall geochemical process of serpentinization is similar to the biochemical process of methanogenesis, and methanogenesis is similar to acetogenesis in that both physiologies allow energy conservation from the reduction of CO(2) with electrons from H(2). Electron bifurcation is a newly recognized cytosolic process that anaerobes use generate low potential electrons, it plays an important role in some forms of methanogenesis and, via speculation, possibly in acetogenesis. Electron bifurcation likely figures into the early evolution of biological energy conservation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Calculation of molecular response properties with the second-order coupled perturbed electron propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleuze, M.S.; Pickup, B.T.; Wilton, D.J.

    2000-04-05

    The authors present the theory of the electron propagator perturbed by an external electric field and show how it can be used to calculate a variety of one-electron linear response properties that are accurate through second order in electron correlation. Some illustrative calculations are discussed.

  8. Electronic transport properties of 4f shell elements of liquid metal using hard sphere Yukawa system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic transport properties are analyzed for 4f shell elements of liquid metals. To examine the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q), we used our own parameter free model potential with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system. The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been examined by using different screening functions like Hartree (H), Taylor (T) and Sarkar (S). The correlations of our resultsand other data with available experimental values are intensely promising. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable of explaining the above mentioned electronic transport properties.

  9. Electronic and magnetic properties of UPdSn: the itinerant 5f electrons approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sandratskii, L M

    1997-01-01

    Density functional theory, modified to include spin-orbit coupling and an effective orbital field to simulate Hound's second rule, is applied to investigate the magnetic structure and electronic properties of the compound Upends. Our theoretical results are in overall good agreement with experiment. Thus both theory and experiment find the magnetic structure of Upends to be non collinear, the calculated magnetic U-moments being in very good agreement with the measurements. Also, the calculated density of states is found to simulate closely the photoemission spectrum and the very low experimental value of 5 mJ mol sup - sup 1 K sup - sup 2 for the specific heat gamma is reproduced reasonably well by the calculated value of 7.5 mJ mol sup - sup 1 K sup - sup 2. Furthermore, the interconnection of the magnetic structure with the crystal structure is investigated. Here theory and experiment agree concerning the planar non collinear antiferromagnetic configuration in the orthorhombic crystal structure and for the ...

  10. Bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite composites: mechanical properties and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Devis; Sola, Antonella; Anesi, Alexandre; Salvatori, Roberta; Chiarini, Luigi; Cannillo, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite composites for bone tissue repair and regeneration have been produced and discussed. The use of a recently developed glass, namely BG_Ca/Mix, with its low tendency to crystallize, allowed one to sinter the samples at a relatively low temperature thus avoiding several adverse effects usually reported in the literature, such as extensive crystallization of the glassy phase, hydroxyapatite (HA) decomposition and reaction between HA and glass. The mechanical properties of the composites with 80wt.% BG_Ca/Mix and 20wt.% HA are sensibly higher than those of Bioglass® 45S5 reference samples due to the presence of HA (mechanically stronger than the 45S5 glass) and to the thermal behaviour of the BG_Ca/Mix, which is able to favour the sintering process of the composites. Biocompatibility tests, performed with murine fibroblasts BALB/3T3 and osteocites MLO-Y4 throughout a multi-parametrical approach, allow one to look with optimism to the produced composites, since both the samples themselves and their extracts do not induce negative effects in cell viability and do not cause inhibition in cell growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [SEROLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulygina, T V; Yakovleva, L M; Brovarska, O S; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The serological and phytotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of plant pathogens--Pantoea agglomerans were studied. It is known that the thin variations in the structure of the O-specific polysaccharides determining serological specificity of gram- negative bacteria and used as a molecular basis of serological classification schemes. For P. agglomerans still does not exist a classification scheme based on serology specificity of their LPS. The results of cross serological tests demonstrate immunochemical heterogeneity of species P agglomerans. Only three strains of the 8488, 8490 and 7969 according to the agglutination of O-antigens and direct hemagglutination and inhibition direct hemagglutination can be attributed to a single serogroup. Other strains--each separate group, although some have a relationship. Compared with control plants under the influence of seed treatment of LPS in plants may be reduced, and in some cases increased root length, height and weight sprout, depending on the strain from which the selected LPS. Dive seedlings of tomatoes in the solutions of the studied preparations FSC caused the loss, and after some time, restore turgor.

  12. Evaluation of biological properties and clinical effectiveness of Aloe vera: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, Maharjan H.; Laxmipriya, Nampoothiri P.

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera (蘆薈 lú huì) is well known for its considerable medicinal properties. This plant is one of the richest natural sources of health for human beings coming. The chemistry of the plant has revealed the presence of more than 200 different biologically active substances. Many biological properties associated with Aloe species are contributed by inner gel of the leaves. Most research has been centralized on the biological activities of the various species of Aloe, which include antibacterial and antimicrobial activities of the nonvolatile constituents of the leaf gel. Aloe species are widely distributed in the African and the eastern European continents, and are spread almost throughout the world. The genus Aloe has more than 400 species but few, such as A. vera, Aloe ferox, and Aloe arborescens, are globally used for trade. A. vera has various medicinal properties such as antitumor, antiarthritic, antirheumatoid, anticancer, and antidiabetic properties. In addition, A. vera has also been promoted for constipation, gastrointestinal disorders, and for immune system deficiencies. However, not much convincing information is available on properties of the gel. The present review focuses on the detailed composition of Aloe gel, its various phytocomponents having various biological properties that help to improve health and prevent disease conditions. PMID:26151005

  13. Reverse pharmacognosy: identifying biological properties for plants by means of their molecule constituents: application to meranzin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Quoc-Tuan; Lamy, Cécile; Renimel, Isabelle; Sauvan, Nancy; André, Patrice; Himbert, Franck; Morin-Allory, Luc; Bernard, Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Reverse pharmacognosy aims at finding biological targets for natural compounds by virtual or real screening and identifying natural resources that contain the active molecules. We report herein a study focused on the identification of biological properties of meranzin, a major component isolated from Limnocitrus littoralis (Miq.) Swingle. Selnergy, an IN SILICO biological profiling software, was used to identify putative binding targets of meranzin. Among the 400 screened proteins, 3 targets were selected: COX1, COX2 and PPARgamma. Binding tests were realised for these 3 protein candidates, as well as two negative controls. The predictions made by Selnergy were consistent with the experimental results, meaning that these 3 targets can be modulated by an extract containing this compound in a suitable concentration. These results demonstrate that reverse pharmacognosy and its inverse docking component is a powerful tool to identify biological properties for natural molecules and hence for plants containing these compounds.

  14. X-rays in the Cryo-Electron Microscopy Era: Structural Biology's Dynamic Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Susannah C; Ando, Nozomi

    2018-01-23

    Over the past several years, single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has emerged as a leading method for elucidating macromolecular structures at near-atomic resolution, rivaling even the established technique of X-ray crystallography. Cryo-EM is now able to probe proteins as small as hemoglobin (64 kDa) while avoiding the crystallization bottleneck entirely. The remarkable success of cryo-EM has called into question the continuing relevance of X-ray methods, particularly crystallography. To say that the future of structural biology is either cryo-EM or crystallography, however, would be misguided. Crystallography remains better suited to yield precise atomic coordinates of macromolecules under a few hundred kilodaltons in size, while the ability to probe larger, potentially more disordered assemblies is a distinct advantage of cryo-EM. Likewise, crystallography is better equipped to provide high-resolution dynamic information as a function of time, temperature, pressure, and other perturbations, whereas cryo-EM offers increasing insight into conformational and energy landscapes, particularly as algorithms to deconvolute conformational heterogeneity become more advanced. Ultimately, the future of both techniques depends on how their individual strengths are utilized to tackle questions at the frontiers of structural biology. Structure determination is just one piece of a much larger puzzle: a central challenge of modern structural biology is to relate structural information to biological function. In this perspective, we share insight from several leaders in the field and examine the unique and complementary ways in which X-ray methods and cryo-EM can shape the future of structural biology.

  15. Modeling of Electronic Properties in Organic Semiconductor Device Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiu-Chuang

    Organic semiconductors (OSCs) have recently become viable for a wide range of electronic devices, some of which have already been commercialized. With the mechanical flexibility of organic materials and promising performance of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) and organic bulk heterojunction devices, OSCs have been demonstrated in applications such as radio frequency identification tags, flexible displays, and photovoltaic cells. Transient phenomena play decisive roles in the performance of electronic devices and OFETs in particular. The dynamics of the establishment and depletion of the conducting channel in OFETs are investigated theoretically. The device structures explored resemble typical organic thin-film transistors with one of the channel contacts removed. By calculating the displacement current associated with charging and discharging of the channel in these capacitors, transient effects on the carrier transport in OSCs may be studied. In terms of the relevant models it is shown that the non-linearity of the process plays a key role. The non-linearity arises in the simplest case from the fact that channel resistance varies during the charging and discharging phases. Traps can be introduced into the models and their effects examined in some detail. When carriers are injected into the device, a conducting channel is established with traps that are initially empty. Gradual filling of the traps then modifies the transport characteristics of the injected charge carriers. In contrast, dc measurements as they are typically performed to characterize the transport properties of organic semiconductor channels investigate a steady state with traps partially filled. Numerical and approximate analytical models of the formation of the conducting channel and the resulting displacement currents are presented. For the process of transient carrier extraction, it is shown that if the channel capacitance is partially or completely discharged through the channel

  16. Electronic structure and equilibrium properties of hcp titanium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic structures of hexagonal-close-packed divalent titanium (3-d) and zirconium (4-d) transition metals are studied by using a non-local model potential method. From the present calculation of energy bands, Fermi energy, density of states and the electronic heat capacity of these two metals are determined and ...

  17. Electronic structure and optical properties of thorium monopnictides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have calculated the electronic density of states (DOS) and dielectric function for the ThX (X = P, As and Sb) using the linear muffin tin orbital method within atomic sphere approximation (LMTO–ASA) including the combined correction terms. The calculated electronic DOS of ThSb has been compared with the available ...

  18. Electronic structure and equilibrium properties of hcp titanium and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic structures of hexagonal-close-packed divalent titanium (3-d) and zirconium (4-d) transition metals are studied by using a non-local model potential method. From the present calculation of energy bands, Fermi energy, density of states and the electronic heat capacity of these two metals are determined and ...

  19. Electronic structure and optical properties of thorium monopnictides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. We have calculated the electronic density of states (DOS) and dielectric function for the ThX. (X = P, As and Sb) using the linear muffin tin orbital method within atomic sphere approximation (LMTO–. ASA) including the combined correction terms. The calculated electronic DOS of ThSb has been compared with the ...

  20. Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Trans-Polyacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Cruz, Luis R.

    In the first part of this work we present a study of the stability of soliton and polaron excitations in a single strand of trans-polyacetylene. We proceed by first solving exactly the continuum version of the SSH Hamiltonian for the single particle states that arise when n-doped electrons are added to a single polymer chain. The role of on-site (U), nearest-neighbor (V), and bond repulsion (W) Coulomb interactions are obtained from a first-order perturbative calculation with the exact single-particle states. By minimizing the total energy we show that, at a fixed doping level, a polaron lattice is favored over a soliton configuration provided that U and V exceed critical values. However, as the doping level is increased, we show that these critical values increase beyond experimentally -accepted estimates. Our work then supports the view of a soliton lattice that persists into the metallic phase of polyacetylene. In addition, we show that the bound state soliton levels merge to fill the gap sufficiently that the magnetic susceptibility becomes non-zero and comparable to the corresponding experimental values. This picture also accounts for the onset of a Pauli susceptibility at a doping level of 6% in terms of the rate of closure of the gap. In the second part, the transport properties in the highly doped regime are analyzed considering the density of states of an impurity in the chain. It is calculated as a function of the atomic impurity level and the hybridization energy. The inclusion of a gap in the spectrum of the chain takes into account the remaining charge alternation pattern observed in this high doping regime. It is shown that a Kondo-like resonance exists at the top of the gap and that a logT behavior should be exhibited in the resistivity of the sample, as experiments have revealed. It is shown that in order to observe the Kondo resonance, the gap must be smaller than the Kondo Temperature of the system without the gap. (Copies available exclusively

  1. Electron and Proton Transfer by the Grotthuss Mechanism in Aqueous Solution and in Biological Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, R.A.; Courant, R.A.; Johnson, D.S.

    1965-01-01

    TheFe ll -Fe III electron-exchange reaction and certain long-range biological redox reactions involve the transfer of electrons by a Grotthuss-type mechanism over water bridges. The Grotthuss mechanism is also responsible for the anomalously great electrical conductivity of acidic aqueous solutions. At ordinary pressures the rate-determining step of the Grotthuss mechanism is the rotation of H 2 O, or possibly H 3 O+, and not the actual proton flip itself. The Grotthuss mechanism is confined to the ''free'' rotatable monomeric water between the Frank-Wen clusters in liquid water and avoids areas of relative order. The concentration dependence of protonic conduction can be represented by an equation based upon a cube root of concentration extrapolation and containing Arrhenius terms in which the activation energies are those for the rotation of and the formation of ''holes'' in the solvent water. Thus chemical energy and/or electrical energy can be transmitted rapidly over relatively great distances by the Grotthuss mechanism. Such processes are involved in a variety of phenomena of biological significance, examples being muscular contraction and the chemistry of the respiratory pigments. (author) [fr

  2. Fractal Scaling of Particle Size Distribution and Relationships with Topsoil Properties Affected by Biological Soil Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-Lei; Ding, Guo-Dong; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Qin, Shu-Gao; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Bao, Yan-Feng; Liu, Yun-Dong; Wan, Li; Deng, Ji-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. Methodology/Principal Findings To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust), as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (Psoil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R2 = 0.494∼0.955, Psoil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions. PMID:24516668

  3. Biological Applications and Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewyn, Brian G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The research presented and discussed within involves the development of novel biological applications of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) and an investigation of mesoporous material by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mesoporous silica nanoparticles organically functionalized shown to undergo endocytosis in cancer cells and drug release from the pores was controlled intracellularly and intercellularly. Transmission electron microscopy investigations demonstrated the variety of morphologies produced in this field of mesoporous silica nanomaterial synthesis. A series of room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) containing mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) materials with various particle morphologies, including spheres, ellipsoids, rods, and tubes, were synthesized. By changing the RTIL template, the pore morphology was tuned from the MCM-41 type of hexagonal mesopores to rotational moire type of helical channels, and to wormhole-like porous structures. These materials were used as controlled release delivery nanodevices to deliver antibacterial ionic liquids against Escherichia coli K12. The involvement of a specific organosiloxane function group, covalently attached to the exterior of fluorescein doped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FITC-MSN), on the degree and kinetics of endocytosis in cancer and plant cells was investigated. The kinetics of endocystosis of TEG coated FITC-MSN is significantly quicker than FITC-MSN as determined by flow cytometry experiments. The fluorescence confocal microscopy investigation showed the endocytosis of TEG coated-FITC MSN triethylene glycol grafted fluorescein doped MSN (TEG coated-FITC MSN) into both KeLa cells and Tobacco root protoplasts. Once the synthesis of a controlled-release delivery system based on MCM-41-type mesoporous silica nanorods capped by disulfide bonds with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles was completed. The material was characterized by general methods and the dosage and kinetics of the

  4. Structure, reactivity, and biological properties of hidantoines; Estrutura, reatividade e propriedades biologicas de hidantoinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Silvania Maria de; Silva, Joao Bosco Paraiso da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Fundamental]. E-mail: paraiso@ufpe.br; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves de; Galdino, Suely Lins; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Antibioticos

    2008-07-01

    Hydantoin (imidazolidine-2,4-dione) is a 2,4-diketotetrahydroimidazole discovered by Baeyer in 1861. Thiohydantoins and derivatives were prepared, having chemical properties similar to the corresponding carbonyl compounds. Some biological activities (antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, schistosomicidal) are attributed to the chemical reactivity and consequent affinity of hydantoinic rings towards biomacromolecules. Therefore, knowledge about the chemistry of hydantoins has increased enormously. In this review, we present important aspects such as reactivity of hydantoins, acidity of hydantoins, spectroscopy and crystallographic properties, and biological activities of hydantoin and its derivatives. (author)

  5. New versatile staining reagents for biological transmission electron microscopy that substitute for uranyl acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakakoshi, Masamichi; Nishioka, Hideo; Katayama, Eisaku

    2011-12-01

    Aqueous uranyl acetate has been extensively used as a superb staining reagent for transmission electron microscopy of biological materials. However, recent regulation of nuclear fuel material severely restricts its use even for purely scientific purposes. Since uranyl salts are hazardous due to biological toxicity and remaining radioactivity, development of safe and non-radioactive substitutes is greatly anticipated. We examined two lanthanide salts, samarium triacetate and gadolinium triacetate, and found that 1-10% solution of these reagents was safe but still possess excellent capability for staining thin sections of plastic-embedded materials of animal and plant origin. Although post-fixation with osmium tetroxide was essential for high-contrast staining, post-staining with lead citrate could be eliminated if a slow-scan CCD camera is available for observation. These lanthanide salts can also be utilized as good negative-staining reagents to study supramolecular architecture of biological macromolecules. They were not as effective as a fixative of protein assembly, reflecting the non-hazardous nature of the reagents.

  6. Making of an electronic interferometer to study emissive properties of field-effect microtips. Diffraction and interferences of slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Py, C.

    1993-10-01

    The substitution of hot filaments by field-effect microtips has several advantages in many electronic applications. LETI has already proved the interest of this principle for flat panel displays; many people believe it could also provide novel microwave sources. Moreover, the properties of the emission enable to seek new electron optics applications that were not possible with hot filaments. An interferometry experiment was designed, developed and characterized in order to evaluate the potential of the microtips fabricated in the LETI for such applications. This experiment is composed of a Mollenstedt biprism, of electrostatic lenses and an imaging system composed of deflection plates, a small aperture diaphragm (1 μm) and a channel electron multiplier. Quantum wave effects have been observed, which confirms the good coherence properties of the source. Moreover, this experimental setup enables to better understand the physical phenomenon of the emission of the tips fabricated in the LETI, and to propose some technological improvements for the applications we seek. It is also designed for electron holography applications, and should allow the study of new compact electron optics apparatus taking account of the wave properties of the electrons emitted by microtips. (author). 68 figs. 2 annexes. 41 refs

  7. Electronic structure and properties of rare earth and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmayr, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    There are 188 contributions, experimental and theoretical, a few on rare earth and actinide elements but mostly on rare earth and actinide intermetallic compounds and alloys. The properties dealt with include 1) crystal structure, 2) magnetic properties and magnetic structure, 3) magnetic phase transformations and valence fluctuations, 4) electrical properties and superconductivity and their temperature, pressure and magnetic field dependence. A few papers deal with crystal growth and novel measuring methods. (G.Q.)

  8. Shape-dependent electronic properties of blue phosphorene nano-flakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Pradeep; Swaroop, Ram; Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: ashok@cup.ac.in [Center for Physical Sciences, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda-151001 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In recent year’s considerable attention has been given to the first principles method for modifying and controlling electronic properties of nano-materials. We performed DFT-based calculations on the electronic properties of zigzag-edged nano-flakes of blue phosphorene with three possible shapes namely rectangular, triangular and hexagonal. We observed that HOMO-LUMO gap of zigzag phosphorene nano-flakes with different shapes is ∼2.9 eV with H-passivations and ∼0.7 – 1.2 eV in pristine cases. Electronic properties of blue phosphorene nano-flakes show the strong dependence on their shape. We observed that distributions of molecular orbitals were strongly affected by the different shapes. Zigzag edged considered nanostructures are non-magnetic and semiconducting in nature. The shape dependent electronic properties may find applications in tunable nano-electronics.

  9. Thermodynamic and electronic properties of liquid Na-Bi alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, H.P.; Heus, R.J.; Egn, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of liquid Na-Bi alloys was measured between 850/sup 0/C and 900/sup 0/C for mole fractions of Na between 0.70 and 0.80. The behavior shows that Na/sub 3+delta/Bi is a liquid compound semiconductor. The Gibbs energy of mixing was also measured at 850/sup 0/C over the same composition range using a boiling point tehnique and an emf technique with CaF/sub 2/ as a solid electrolyte. Results were interpreted in terms of a simple model of Carl Wagner. The analysis yields the number of conduction electrons and electron holes as a function of composition as well as the mobility of electrons and electron holes.

  10. Structural and electronic properties of ion-implanted superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernas, H.; Nedellec, P.

    1980-01-01

    Recent work on ion implanted superconductors is reviewed. In situ x-ray, channeling, resistivity, and electron tunneling experiments now approach the relation between lattice order (or disorder) and superconductivity

  11. Quasirelativism, narrowband properties and forced dynamics of electrons in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlov, B S; Strepetov, A V

    2002-01-01

    The narrow-zone semiconductors, which are applied for creating the quantum networks, characterized by small effective masses of electrons at the Fermi level and consequently by high electron mobility in the lattice. The obviously soluble model, clarifying one of the possible mechanisms for the small effective masses origination, is constructed in the proposed work. The other mathematical model, constructed in this work, describes the possible mechanism for controlling the alternating quantum current by the one-dimensional lattice through a travelling wave

  12. Electronic Properties of Low-Dimensional Materials Under Periodic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamei, Mehdi

    In the quest for the further miniaturization of electronic devices, numerous fabrication techniques have been developed. The semiconductor industry has been able to manifest miniaturization in highly complex and ultra low-power integrated circuits and devices, transforming almost every aspect of our lives. However, we may have come very close to the end of this trend. While advanced machines and techniques may be able to overcome technological barriers, theoretical and fundamental barriers are inherent to the top-down miniaturization approach and cannot be circumvented. As a result, the need for novel and natural alternatives to replace old materials is valued now more than ever. Fortunately, there exists a large group of materials that essentially has low-dimensional (quasi-one- or quasi-two-dimensional) structures. Graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon, which has attracted a lot of attention in recent years, is a perfect example of a prime material from this group. Niobium tri-selenide (NbSe3), from a family of trichalcogenides, has a highly anisotropic structure and electrical conductivity. At sufficiently low temperatures, NbSe3 also exhibits two independent "sliding charge density waves"-- an exciting phenomenon, which could be altered by changing the overall size of the material. In NbSe3 (and Blue Bronze K0.3MoO3 which has a similar structure and electrical behavior), the effect of a periodic potential could be seen in creating a charge density wave (CDW) that is incommensurate to the underlying lattice. The required periodic potential is provided by the crystal ions when ordered in a particular way. The consequence is a peculiar non-linear conductivity behavior, as well as a unique narrow-band noise spectrum. Theoretical and experimental studies have concluded that the dynamic properties of resulting CDW are directly related to the crystal impurity density, and other pinning potentials. Therefore, reducing the overall size of the crystal could

  13. Imaging and elemental mapping of biological specimens with a dual-EDS dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.S.; Kim, A. M.; Bleher, R.; Myers, B.D.; Marvin, R. G.; Inada, H.; Nakamura, K.; Zhang, X.F.; Roth, E.; Li, S.Y.; Woodruff, T. K.; O'Halloran, T. V.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated analytical scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with dual energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors has been designed for complementary high performance imaging as well as high sensitivity elemental analysis and mapping of biological structures. The performance of this new design, based on a Hitachi HD-2300A model, was evaluated using a variety of biological specimens. With three imaging detectors, both the surface and internal structure of cells can be examined simultaneously. The whole-cell elemental mapping, especially of heavier metal species that have low cross-section for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), can be faithfully obtained. Optimization of STEM imaging conditions is applied to thick sections as well as thin sections of biological cells under low-dose conditions at room- and cryogenic temperatures. Such multimodal capabilities applied to soft/biological structures usher a new era for analytical studies in biological systems. PMID:23500508

  14. Electronic Properties of Functional Biomolecules at Metal/Aqueous Solution Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Kuznetsov, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    in electronic properties and stochastic single-molecule features and can be probed by new methods which approach the single-molecule level. Olle of these is in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in which single-molecule electronic properties directly in aqueous solution are probed. In situ STM combined...... single-molecule interfacial electron transfer (ET) steps. Theories of electrochemical ET and in situ STM of redox molecules as well as specific cases are addressed. Two-step in situ STM represents different molecular mechanisms and even new ET phenomena, related to coherent many-electron transfer...

  15. Electronic properties of single-molecule junction: Effect of the molecular distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.; Zhao, M.; Jiang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    For a model system consisting of a benzenedithio (BDT) molecule sandwiched between two Au plates, the electronic properties as a function of different BDT geometry are investigated using density functional theory. The distorted BDT structures are got through stretching the electrode distance. The corresponding electronic properties, including the spatial distribution of the frontier orbits, the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and density of states at the Fermi energy are determined. It reveals that the molecular distortion essentially determines electronic structures. The result should be beneficial to understand the stress-dependent or structure-dependent transport mechanism of electrons of the BDT junction.

  16. Dynamical and electronic properties of rare-earth aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Sharma, Yamini

    2018-04-01

    Rare-earth dialuminides belong to a large family of compounds that stabilize in cubic MgCu2 structure. A large number of these compounds are superconducting, amongst these YAl2, LaAl2 and LuAl2 have been chosen as reference materials for studying 4f-electron systems. In order to understand the role of the RE atoms, we have applied the FPLAPW and PAW methods within the density functional theory (DFT). Our results show that the contribution of RE atoms is dominant in both electronic structure and phonon dispersion. The anomalous behavior of superconducting LaAl2 is well explained from an analysis of the electron localization function (ELF), Bader charge analysis, density of electronic states as well as the dynamical phonon vibrational modes. The interaction of phonon modes contributed by low frequency vibrations of La atoms with the high density La 5d-states at EF in LaAl2 lead to strong electron-phonon coupling.

  17. Superconducting properties and electronic structure of NaBi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushwaha, S K; Krizan, J W; Gibson, Q D; Cava, R J; Xiong, J; Liang, T; Ong, N P; Klimczuk, T

    2014-01-01

    Resistivity, dc magnetization, and heat capacity measurements are reported for superconducting NaBi. T c , the electronic contribution to the specific heat γ, the ΔC p /γT c ratio, and the Debye temperature are found to be 2.15 K, 3.4 mJ mol −1  K −2 , 0.78, and 140 K respectively. The calculated electron–phonon coupling constant (λ ep = 0.62) implies that NaBi is a moderately coupled superconductor. The upper critical field and coherence length are found to be 250 Oe and 115 nm, respectively. Electronic structure calculations show NaBi to be a good metal, in agreement with the experiments; the p x and p y orbitals of Bi dominate the electronic states at the Fermi Energy. (fast track communication)

  18. Soil formation and soil biological properties post mining sites after coal mining in central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaneda, Satoshi; Frouz, Jan; Krištůfek, Václav; Elhottová, Dana; Pižl, Václav; Starý, Josef; Háněl, Ladislav; Tajovský, Karel; Chroňáková, Alica

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, - (2007), s. 13 ISSN 0288-5840. [Annual Meeting Japanese Society of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition . 22.08.2007, Setagaya city] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : soil formation * soil biological properties * post mining sites Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  19. Integrating soil physical and biological properties in contrasting tillage systems in organic and conventional farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crittenden, S.J.; Goede, de R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Though soil physical and soil biological properties are intrinsically linked in the soil environment they are often studied separately. This work adds value to analyses of soil biophysical quality of tillage systems under organic and conventional farming systems by correlating physical and

  20. Some aspect of the physico-chemical and biological properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some aspect of Physico-Chemical and Biological properties of Cross River was investigated once every month from May 2001-May 2002, measurements were made from the surface water at three locations, Ikot Okpora in Biase, Obubra, and Ikom. The temperature of the river varied from27.38±0.74°C at Ikot Okpora to ...

  1. Chemical and biological properties of supramolecular polymer systems based on oligocaprolactones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankers, Patricia Y. W.; van Leeuwen, Ellen N. M.; van Gemert, Gaby M. L.; Spiering, A. J. H.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Brouwer, Linda A.; Janssen, Henk M.; Bosman, Anton W.; van Luyn, Maria J. A.; Meijer, E. W.

    2006-01-01

    We show that materials with a diverse range of mechanical and biological properties can be obtained using a modular approach by simply mixing different ratios of oligocaprolactones that are either end-functionalized or chain-extended with quadruple hydrogen bonding ureido-pyrimidinone (UPy)

  2. Plasma sheath properties calculated using measured secondary electron emission coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedgley, J.M.; McCracken, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of secondary electron emission (SEE) are presented for graphite, hydrogen-implanted graphite and an amorphous graphite (a-C:H) carbon layer, over a wide range of energies and angles of incidence. These data have been integrated over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to simulate the effect of SEE due to plasma electrons. The SEE yields have then been used to calculate plasma sheath potentials, sheath heat transmission coefficients and sputtering yields for a range of ions as a function of plasma temperature. The increased SEE yield with temperature reduces the normalized sheath potential and increases the sheath transmission coefficient markedly. The role of space charge in the sheath is discussed. (Author)

  3. Electronic and gas sensing properties of soluble phthalocyanines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pochekaylov, Sergey; Rais, David; Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Rakušan, J.; Karásková, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2009), s. 781-795 ISSN 0137-1339. [International Conference on Electtrical and Related Properties of Organic Solids /11./. Wroclaw, 13.07.2008-17.07.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : substituted phthalocyanine * nitrogen dioxide sensor * optical properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.384, year: 2009

  4. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  5. Energies and physicochemical properties of cation-π interactions in biological structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qi-Shi; Meng, Jian-Zong; Liao, Si-Ming; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2012-04-01

    The cation-π interactions occur frequently within or between proteins due to six (Phe, Tyr, Trp, Arg, Lys, and His) of the twenty natural amino acids potentially interacting with metallic cations via these interactions. In this study, quantum chemical calculations and molecular orbital (MO) theory are used to study the energies and properties of cation-π interactions in biological structures. The cation-π interactions of H⁺ and Li⁺ are similar to hydrogen bonds and lithium bonds, respectively, in which the small, naked cations H⁺ and Li⁺ are buried deep within the π-electron density of aromatic molecules, forming stable cation-π bonds that are much stronger than the cation-π interactions of other alkali metal cations. The cation-π interactions of metallic cations with atomic masses greater than that of Li⁺ arise mainly from the coordinate bond comprising empty valence atomic orbitals (AOs) of metallic cations and π-MOs of aromatic molecules, though electrostatic interactions may also contribute to the cation-π interaction. The binding strength of cation-π interactions is determined by the charge and types of AOs in the metallic cations. Cation-π interaction energies are distance- and orientation-dependent; energies decrease with the distance (r) and the orientation angle (θ). In solution, the cation-π energies decrease with the increase of the dielectric constant (ɛ) of the solvent; however, solvation has less influence on the H⁺-π and H₃O⁺-π interactions than on interactions with other cations. The conclusions from this study provide useful theoretical insights into the nature of cation-π interactions and may contribute to the development of better force field parameters for describing the molecular dynamics of cation-π interactions within and between proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Topological Properties of Chemical Bonds from Static and Dynamic Electron Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatha Prathapa, Siriyara; Held, Jeanette; van Smaalen, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic and static electron densities (EDs) based on the independent spherical atom model (IAM) and multipole (MP) models of crambin were successfully computed, holding no series-termination effects. The densities are compared to EDs of small biological molecules at diverse temperatures. It is outlined that proteins exhibit an intrinsic flexibility, present as frozen disorder at 100 K, in contrast to small molecules. The flexibility of the proteins is reflected by atomic displacement parameters (B-factors), which are considerably larger than for small molecules at 298 K. Thus, an optimal deconvolution of deformation density and thermal motion is not guaranteed, which prevents a free refinement of MP parameters but allows an application of transferable, fixed MP parameters. The analysis of the topological properties, such as the density at bond critical points (BCPs) and the Laplacian, reveals systematic differences between static and dynamic EDs. Zero-point-vibrations, yet present in dynamic EDs at low temperature, affect but marginally the EDs of small molecules. The zero-point-vibrations cause a smearing of the ED, which becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. Topological properties, primarily the Laplacian, of covalent bonds appear to be more sensitive to effects by temperature and the polarity of the bonds. However, dynamic EDs at ca. 20 K based on MP models provide a good characterization of chemical bonding. Both the density at BCPs and the Laplacian of hydrogen bonds constitute similar values from static and dynamic EDs for all studied temperatures. Deformation densities demonstrate the necessity of the employment of MP parameters in order to comprise the nature of covalent bonds. The character of hydrogen bonds can be roughly pictured by IAM, whereas MP parameters are recommended for a classification of hydrogen bonds beyond a solely interpretation of topological properties. PMID:25995522

  7. An introduction to sample preparation and imaging by cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rebecca F.; Walker, Matt; Siebert, C. Alistair; Muench, Stephen P.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (EM) is a versatile technique that can be used to image biological specimens ranging from intact eukaryotic cells to individual proteins >150 kDa. There are several strategies for preparing samples for imaging by EM, including negative staining and cryogenic freezing. In the last few years, cryo-EM has undergone a ‘resolution revolution’, owing to both advances in imaging hardware, image processing software, and improvements in sample preparation, leading to growing number of researchers using cryo-EM as a research tool. However, cryo-EM is still a rapidly growing field, with unique challenges. Here, we summarise considerations for imaging of a range of specimens from macromolecular complexes to cells using EM. PMID:26931652

  8. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis

    2010-09-01

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  9. Do-it-yourself biology and electronic waste hacking: A politics of demonstration in precarious times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Ana; Callén, Blanca

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, there has been an explosion of do it yourself, maker and hacker spaces in Europe. Through makers and do-it-yourself initiatives, 'hacking' is moving into the everyday life of citizens. This article explores the collective and political nature of those hacks by reporting on empirical work on electronic waste and do-it-yourself biology hacking. Using Dewey's experimental approach to politics, we analyse hacks as 'inquiry' to see how they serve to articulate public and political action. We argue that do-it-yourself and makers' hacks are technical and political demonstrations. What do-it-yourself and makers' hacks ultimately demonstrate is that things can be done otherwise and that 'you' can also do it. In this sense, they have a potential viral effect. The final part of the article explores some potential shortcomings of such politics of demonstration.

  10. Innovation and development of exhibition electronic-commerce based on the properties of electronic-commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankang

    2017-06-01

    There are two roadmaps of accomplishing exhibition electronic-commerce innovation and development. The first roadmap is that the exhibition organizers should seek mutual benefit cooperation with professional electronic-commerce platform of correspondent area with exhibition projects, thus help exhibitors realize their market object. The second roadmap is to promote innovation and development of electronic-commerce (Business-to-Customer) between both exhibitors and purchasers. Exhibition electronic-commerce must focus on innovative development in the following functions: market research and information service; advertising and business negotiation; online trading and online payment. With the aid of electronic-commerce, exhibition enterprise could have distinctive strengths such as transactions with virtualization, transparency, high efficiency and low cost, enhancing market link during enterprise research and development, promoting the efficiency of internal team collaboration and the individuation of external service, and optimizing resource allocation.

  11. Investigating the Effect of Biological Crusts on Some Biological Properties of Soil (Case Study: Qare Qir Rangelands of Golestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kakeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physical and biological soil crusts are the principal types of soil crusts. Physical and biological soil crusts are distributed in arid, semi-arid and sub-humid regions which constitute over 40% of the earth terrestrial surface. Biological soil crusts (BSCs result from an intimate association between soil particles and cyanobacteria, algae, fungi, lichens and mosses in different proportions which live on the surface, or in the immediately uppermost millimeters of soil. Some of the functions that BSCs influences include: water absorption and retention, nutrient retention, Carbon and nitrogen fixation, biological activate and hydrologic Status. BSCs are important from the ecological view point and their effects on the environment, especially in rangeland, and desert ecosystems and this caused which researchers have a special attention to this component of the ecosystems more than before. Materials and Methods: This study carried out in the Qara Qir rangelands of Golestan province, northeast of Iran (37º15′ - 37º23′ N &54º33′ -54º39′ E, to investigate the effects of BSCs on some of soil biological properties. Four sites including with and without BSCs cover were selected. Soil biological properties such as microbial populations, soil respiration, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, as well as, other effective properties such asorganic carbon percent, total nitrogen, electrical conductivity, and available water content were measured in depths of 0-5 and 5-15 cm of soil with four replications. The gathered data were analyzed by nested plot, and the mean values were compared by Duncan test. Results and Discussion: The results showed that organic carbon and water content were higher at the surface under BSCs, followed by 5-15 cm soils under BSCs. Both soil depths of uncrusted soils showed substantially lower organic carbon and water content than the BSC-covered soils. Total nitrogen was far higher in BSC-encrusted surface

  12. Improvement of the titanium implant biological properties by coating with poly (ε-caprolactone)-based hybrid nanocomposites synthesized via sol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catauro, Michelina; Bollino, Flavia; Papale, Ferdinando [Department of Industrial and Information Engineering, Second University of Naples, Via Roma 21, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2016-05-18

    When bioactive coatings are applied to medical implants by means of sol-gel dip coating technique, the biological proprieties of the implant surface can be modified to match the properties of the surrounding tissues. In this study organo-inorganic nanocomposites materials were synthesized via sol-gel. They consisted of an inorganic zirconium-based and silica-based matrix, in which a biodegradable polymer (the poly-ε-caprolactone, PCL) was incorporated in different weight percentages. The synthesized materials, in sol phase, were used to dip-coat a substrate of commercially pure titanium grade 4 (CP Ti gr. 4) in order to improve its biological properties. A microstructural analysis of the obtained films was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Biological proprieties of the coated substrates were investigated by means of in vitro tests.

  13. Ab-initio investigations of the electronic properties of bulk wurtzite Beryllia and its derived nanofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2010-08-01

    In this Letter we investigate the electronic properties of the bulk and the nanofilm BeO in wurtzite structure. We performed a first-principles pseudo-potential method within the generalized gradient approximation. We will give more importance to the changes in band structure and density of states between the bulk structure and its derived nanofilms. The bonding characterization will be investigated via the analysis Mulliken population and charge density contours. It is found that the nanofilm retains the same properties as its bulk structure with slight changes in electronic properties and band structure which may offer some unusual transport properties. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of the electronic, magnetic and optical properties of newest carbon allotrope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Samira; Moradian, Rostam

    2018-05-01

    We investigate triple properties of monolayer pentagon graphene that include electronic, magnetic and optical properties based on density functional theory (DFT). Our results show that in the electronic and magnetic properties this structure with a direct energy gap of about 2.2 eV along Γ - Γ direction and total magnetic moment of 0.0013 μB per unit cell is almost a non-magnetic semiconductor. Also, its optical properties show that if this allotrope used in solar cell technology, its efficiency in the low energy will be better, because, in the range of energy, its loss energy function and reflectivity will be minimum.

  15. Mexican Arnica (Heterotheca inuloides Cass. Asteraceae: Astereae): Ethnomedical uses, chemical constituents and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Chávez, José Luis; Egas, Verónica; Linares, Edelmira; Bye, Robert; Hernández, Tzasna; Espinosa-García, Francisco J; Delgado, Guillermo

    2017-01-04

    Heterotheca inuloides Cass. (Asteraceae) has been traditionally used to treat a wide range of diseases in Mexico in the treatment of rheumatism, topical skin inflammation, muscular pain colic, and other painful conditions associated with inflammatory processes, additionally has been used to treat dental diseases, and gastrointestinal disorders. This species has also been used for the treatment of cancer and diabetes. This review provides up-to-date information on the botanical characterization, traditional uses, chemical constituents, as well as the biolological activities of H. inuloides. A literature search was conducted by analyzing the published scientific material. Information related to H. inuloides was collected from various primary information sources, including books, published articles in peer-reviewed journals, monographs, theses and government survey reports. The electronic search of bibliographic information was gathered from accepted scientific databases such as Scienfinder, ISI Web of Science, Scielo, LILACS, Redalyc, Pubmed, SCOPUS and Google Scholar. To date, more than 140 compounds have been identified from H. inuloides, including cadinane sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, phytosterols, triterpenes, benzoic acid derivatives, and other types of compounds. Many biological properties associated with H. inuloides. Many studies have shown that the extracts and some compounds isolated from this plant exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities such as antioxidant, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, and chelating activities, as well as insecticidal and phytotoxic activity. To date, reports on the toxicity of H. inuloides are limited. A comprehensive analysis of the literature obtained through the above-mentioned sources confirmed that ethnomedical uses of H. inuloides have been recorded in Mexico to treat rheumatism, pain, and conditions associated with inflammatory processes. Pharmacological studies have demonstrated the activity of certain

  16. Electronic properties and Compton profiles of silver iodide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scattering correction upto triple scattering. The contribution from the higher-order scattering is expected within the statistical errors of the experiment. Further, as suggested by our group [26], we have also corrected the experimental profile for the bremsstrahlung (BS) background due to photo and Compton recoiled electrons.

  17. Density functional study of : Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K C Bhamu

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... used as an inner layer of solar cells for electricity gen- eration. This peculiar characteristic has established a benchmark in invisible electronics and opened a new era in solar cell technology [5–9]. Dietrich and Jansen [10] synthesized and reported the 3R phase of AgScO2. Shannon et al [11] reported.

  18. Super heavy element Copernicium: Cohesive and electronic properties revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Mishra, Vinayak; Dey, G. K.; Sikka, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    First principles scalar relativistic (SR) calculations with and without including the spin orbit (SO) interactions have been performed for solid Copernicium (Cn) to determine its ground state equilibrium structure, volume, bulk modulus, pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, density of states and band structure. Both SR and SR+SO calculations have been performed with 6p levels treated as part of core electrons and also as part of valence electrons. These calculations have been performed for the rhombohedral, BCT, FCC, HCP, BCC and SC structures. Results have been compared with the results for Hg which is lighter homologue of Cn in the periodic table. We find hcp to be the stable crystal structure at SR level of theory and also at SR+SO level of theory when the 6p electrons are treated as part of core electrons. With 6p as part of valence electrons, SR+SO level of computations, however, yield bcc structure to be the most stable structure. Equilibrium volume (V0) of the most stable crystal structure at SR level of theory viz. hcp structure is 188.66 a.u.3whereas its value for the bcc structure, the equilibrium ground state structure at SR+SO level of theory is 165.71 a.u.3 i.e a large change due to relativistic effects is seen. The density of states at Fermi level is much smaller in Cn than in Hg, making it a poorer metal than mercury. In addition the cohesive energy of Cn is computed to be almost two times that of Hg for SR+SO case.

  19. Structural and optical properties of electron beam evaporated CdSe ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electronic applications such as photo detection or solar energy conversion, due to its optical and electrical properties, as well as its good chemical and mechanical stability. In order to explore the possibility of using this in optoelectronics, ...

  20. Proton disorder in cubic ice: Effect on the electronic and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuio, Viviana; Pulci, Olivia; Cascella, Michele; Kupchak, Igor; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo

    2015-01-01

    The proton disorder in ice has a key role in several properties such as the growth mode, thermodynamical properties, and ferroelectricity. While structural phase transitions from proton disordered to proton ordered ices have been extensively studied, much less is known about their electronic and optical properties. Here, we present ab initio many body perturbation theory-based calculations of the electronic and optical properties of cubic ice at different levels of proton disorder. We compare our results with those from liquid water, that acts as an example of a fully (proton- and oxygen-)disordered system. We find that by increasing the proton disorder, a shrinking of the electronic gap occurs in ice, and it is smallest in the liquid water. Simultaneously, the excitonic binding energy decreases, so that the final optical gaps result to be almost independent on the degree of proton disorder. We explain these findings as an interplay between the local dipolar disorder and the electronic correlation

  1. Electron transport and electrocatalytic properties of MWCNT/nickel nanocomposites: hydrazine and diethylaminoethanethiol as analytical probes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the electron transport and electrocatalytic properties of chemically-synthesized nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) platforms. Successful modification...

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy through-focal tilt-series on biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cédric; Perrot, Sylvie; Bastin, Philippe; Marco, Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Since scanning transmission electron microscopy can produce high signal-to-noise ratio bright-field images of thick (≥500 nm) specimens, this tool is emerging as the method of choice to study thick biological samples via tomographic approaches. However, in a convergent-beam configuration, the depth of field is limited because only a thin portion of the specimen (from a few nanometres to tens of nanometres depending on the convergence angle) can be imaged in focus. A method known as through-focal imaging enables recovery of the full depth of information by combining images acquired at different levels of focus. In this work, we compare tomographic reconstruction with the through-focal tilt-series approach (a multifocal series of images per tilt angle) with reconstruction with the classic tilt-series acquisition scheme (one single-focus image per tilt angle). We visualised the base of the flagellum in the protist Trypanosoma brucei via an acquisition and image-processing method tailored to obtain quantitative and qualitative descriptors of reconstruction volumes. Reconstructions using through-focal imaging contained more contrast and more details for thick (≥500 nm) biological samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. iBET: Immersive visualization of biological electron-transfer dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, C Masato; Moen, Erick; Byun, Hye Suk; Ma, Heng; Newman, Bradley; McDowell, Alexander; Wei, Tao; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2016-04-01

    Recently, we presented a computational framework named VizBET to simulate and visualize biological electron-transfer (ET) dynamics. The visualization process was encapsulated as a plugin to the Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) software. However, the user's ability to understand complex, multidimensional ET pathways was severely limited when visualized in 2D on traditional computer monitors. To provide a more accurate representation with enhanced depth perception, we here present an extension of VizBET named iBET to render the VMD model of ET dynamics in a commodity virtual reality (VR) platform. The paper describes detailed procedures to export VMD models into the Unity game engine and render it in an Oculus Rift head mounted display. With the increasing availability of low-cost VR systems like the Rift and rich programmability of game engines, the iBET framework provides a powerful means to explore and understand not only biological ET processes but also a unique experiential tool for broad scientific communities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Properties of meshes used in hernia repair: a comprehensive review of synthetic and biologic meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Vargas, Christina R; Colakoglu, Salih; Nguyen, John T; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2015-02-01

    Data on the mechanical properties of the adult human abdominal wall have been difficult to obtain rendering manufacture of the ideal mesh for ventral hernia repair a challenge. An ideal mesh would need to exhibit greater biomechanical strength and elasticity than that of the abdominal wall. The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare the biomechanical properties of the most commonly used synthetic and biologic meshes in ventral hernia repair and presents a comprehensive literature review. A narrative review of the literature was performed using the PubMed database spanning articles from 1982 to 2012 including a review of company Web sites to identify all available information relating to the biomechanical properties of various synthetic and biologic meshes used in ventral hernia repair. There exist differences in the mechanical properties and the chemical nature of different meshes. In general, most synthetic materials have greater stiffness and elasticity than what is required for abdominal wall reconstruction; however, each exhibits unique properties that may be beneficial for clinical use. On the contrary, biologic meshes are more elastic but less stiff and with a lower tensile strength than their synthetic counterparts. The current standard of practice for the treatment of ventral hernias is the use of permanent synthetic mesh material. Recently, biologic meshes have become more frequently used. Most meshes exhibit biomechanical properties over the known abdominal wall thresholds. Augmenting strength requires increasing amounts of material contributing to more stiffness and foreign body reaction, which is not necessarily an advantage. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Electronic properties of one-dimensional C36 polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yuanhe; Du Shixuan; Chen Yuanmei; Li Yuxue; Liu Ruozhuang

    2002-01-01

    Electronic structures for several neutral and anionic one-dimensional (1D) C 36 polymers are investigated by using the ab initio self-consistent-field crystal orbital method based on the B3LYP (Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr) density functional theory. Calculations show that all the neutral polymers are semiconductors with energy gaps in the range from 0.55 to 2.04 eV. The possibilities of superconducting and Peierls phase transitions are also explored for these metallic anionic polymers at the same time. It is found that the intramolecular electron-phonon (e-p) coupling in metallic 1D C 36 polymers plays an important role in producing high superconducting transition temperatures (T c ). The estimated Peierls phase transition temperatures (T p ) are very small due to the very weak intermolecular e-p interactions. (author)

  6. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.L.; Wang, J.L., E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Tian, B.B.; Liu, B.L.; Zou, Y.H.; Wang, X.D.; Sun, S.; Sun, J.L., E-mail: jlsun@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Meng, X.J.; Chu, J.H.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The ferroelectric polymer was fabricated by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • The electrons as the dominant injected carrier were conformed in the ferroelectric polymer films. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms in ferroelectric polymer were investigated. - Abstract: The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel–Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed.

  7. Properties of the steady state distribution of electrons in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscato, Orazio; Di Stefano, Vincenza [Catania Univ. degli Studi (Italy). Dipt. di Matematica e Informatica; Wagner, Wolfgang [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper studies a Boltzmann transport equation with several electronphonon scattering mechanisms, which describes the charge transport in semiconductors. The electric field is coupled to the electron distribution function via Poisson's equation. Both the parabolic and the quasi-parabolic band approximations are considered. The steady state behaviour of the electron distribution function is investigated by a Monte Carlo algorithm. More precisely, several nonlinear functionals of the solution are calculated that quantify the deviation of the steady state from a Maxwellian distribution with respect to the wave-vector. On the one hand, the numerical results illustrate known theoretical statements about the steady state and indicate possible directions for future studies. On the other hand, the nonlinear functionals provide tools that can be used in the framework of Monte Carlo algorithms for detecting regions in which the steady state distribution has a relatively simple structure, thus providing a basis for domain decomposition methods. (orig.)

  8. Protonated serotonin: Geometry, electronic structures and photophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyan, Reza; Amanollahi, Zohreh; Azimi, Gholamhassan

    2017-07-01

    The geometry and electronic structures of protonated serotonin have been investigated by the aim of MP2 and CC2 methods. The relative stabilities, transition energies and geometry of sixteen different protonated isomers of serotonin have been presented. It has been predicted that protonation does not exhibit essential alteration on the S1 ← S0 electronic transition energy of serotonin. Instead, more complicated photophysical nature in respect to its neutral analogue is suggested for protonated system owing to radiative and non-radiative deactivation pathways. In addition to hydrogen detachment (HD), hydrogen/proton transfer (H/PT) processes from ammonium to indole ring along the NH+⋯ π hydrogen bond have been predicted as the most important photophysical consequences of SERH+ at S1 excited state. The PT processes is suggested to be responsible for fluorescence of SERH+ while the HD driving coordinate is proposed for elucidation of its nonradiative deactivation mechanism.

  9. Flexible biological arsenite oxidation utilizing NOxand O2as alternative electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Wan, Junfeng; Wu, Zihao; Li, Hongli; Li, Haisong; Dagot, Christophe; Wang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of flexible microbial arsenite (As III ) oxidation coupled with the reduction of different electron acceptors was investigated. The results indicated the acclimated microorganisms could oxidize As III with oxygen, nitrate and nitrite as the alternative electron acceptors. A series of batch tests were conducted to measure the kinetic parameters of As III oxidation and to evaluate the effects of environmental conditions including pH and temperature on the activity of biological As III oxidation dependent on different electron acceptors. Kinetic results showed that oxygen-dependent As III oxidation had the highest oxidation rate (0.59 mg As g -1  VSS min -1 ), followed by nitrate- (0.40 mg As g -1  VSS min -1 ) and nitrite-dependent As III oxidation (0.32 mg As g -1  VSS min -1 ). The kinetic data of aerobic As III oxidation were fitted well with the Monod kinetic model, while the Haldane substrate inhibition model was better applicable to describe the inhibition of anoxic As III oxidation. Both aerobic and anoxic As III oxidation performed the optimal activity at the near neutral pH. Besides, the optimal temperature for oxygen-, nitrate- and nitrite-dependent As III oxidation was 30 ± 1 °C, 40 ± 1 °C and 20 ± 1 °C, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Bicarbonate, Sulfate, and Electron Donors on Biological reduction of Uranium and Microbial Community Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL; Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Yan, Tingfen [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 mM or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and geoundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction.

  11. Influence of bicarbonate, sulfate, and electron donors on biological reduction of uranium and microbial community composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Wensui [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Wu Wei-Min; Criddle, C.S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Yan Tingfen [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Jardine, P.M.; Gu Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Zhou Jizhong [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology

    2007-12-15

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low-bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high-bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and groundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction. (orig.)

  12. Structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic intermetallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. Structural and electronic ... S Méçabih1 B Abbar1 B Bouhafs1. Laboratoire de Modélisation et de Simulation en Sciences des Matériaux, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Djillali Liabès, Bp 89, Sidi Bel Abbes 22000, Algeria ...

  13. Vibrational properties of water under confinement: Electronic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donadio, D; Cicero, G; Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Galli, G

    2008-10-17

    We compare calculations of infrared (IR) spectra of water confined between non polar surfaces, carried out using ab initio and classical simulations. Ab-initio results show important differences between IR spectra and vibrational density of state, unlike classical simulations. These differences originate from electronic charge fluctuations at the interface, whose signature is present in IR spectra but not in the density of states. The implications of our findings for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed.

  14. Magnetic properties of metallic impurities with strongly correlated electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janiš, Václav; Ringel, Matouš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 1 (2009), s. 30-35 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : And erson impurity * strong electron correlations * spin-polarized solution * three-channel parquet equations * magnetic field Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.433, year: 2009 http://przyrbwn.icm.edu.pl/APP/ABSTR/115/a115-1-5.html

  15. Allenylidene Complexes of Ruthenium: Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Electron Transfer Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winter, R. F.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 248, 15/16 (2004), s. 1565-1583 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0821; GA MŠk OC D14.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : spectroscopy * allenylidine complexes of ruthenium * electron transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.446, year: 2004

  16. Electronic structure and equilibrium properties of hcp titanium and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The hcp structure is very common among the metals and the two atoms per unit cell gives an electronic structure which is more complex than that of the cubic metals. Quite a few .... into 384 sub-prisms. The centroid of each sub-prism is chosen as the g-point. To each g point so chosen, a weighting factor in proportion to the.

  17. TECHNIQUES FOR THE STUDY OF THE ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA, M.; RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2006-06-30

    The electronic structure of a solid is affected by size and altered from the continuous electronic levels forming a band, characteristic of bulk or microsized solids, to discrete-like or quantized levels. This is drastically observed when the particle size goes down to the nano-meter range and is the origin of the so-called ''quantum confinement'' terminology referring to this phenomenon. From a solid state point of view, electronic states of confined materials can be considered as being a superposition of bulk-like states with a concomitant increase of the oscillator strength. The valence/conduction band-width and position observables of a solid oxide are functions of the crystal potential and this, in turn, is perturbed by effect of the size in two ways; a short-range effect induced by the presence of ions with a different coordination number and bond distance, and a large-range one, induced by changes in the Madelung potential of the oxide. Theoretical analyses for oxides show a redistribution of charge when going from large periodic structures to small clusters which is roughly considered small for ionic solids and significantly important for covalent ones. Chapter 1 of this book describes the most recent theoretical frameworks employed to deal with these physical phenomena while here we will describe their influence in physico-chemical observables obtained by spectroscopical techniques.

  18. Mechanical properties and the electronic structure of transition of metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, R. J.; Drew, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    This interdiscipline research program was undertaken in an effort to investigate the relationship between the mechanical strength of Mo based alloys with their electronic structure. Electronic properties of these alloys were examined through optical studies, and the classical solid solution strengthening mechanisms were considered, based on size and molecular differences to determine if these mechanisms could explain the hardness data.

  19. Electronic properties of diphenyl-s-tetrazine and some related oligomers. An spectroscopic and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, Monica; Garcia, Gregorio [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain); Penas, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Organica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain); Garzon, Andres; Granadino-Roldan, Jose M. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain); Melguizo, Manuel [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Organica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain); Fernandez-Gomez, Manuel, E-mail: mfg@ujaen.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study properties of Ph{sub 2}Tz and (PhTz){sub n}Ph as candidates for organic electronics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis of Ph{sub 2}Tz was performed through a modified Pinner-type reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IR/Raman spectra allowed to conclude that Ph{sub 2}Tz is nearly planar in liquid phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure was studied by UV-Vis/TD-DFT methods in different solvents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bandgap, E{sub LUMO}, electron mobility predict some n-type character for limit polymer. -- Abstract: This work presents a theoretical and spectroscopic study on the electronic and structural properties of the diphenyl-s-tetrazine molecule (Ph{sub 2}Tz) and some oligomeric derivatives. Ph{sub 2}Tz was synthesized through a variation of Pinner-type reaction which uses N-acetylcysteine as catalyst. Insight into the structure and electronic properties of the title compound was obtained through IR, Raman, UV-Vis spectra in different solvents, and theoretical calculations. Theoretical studies have been extended to different n-mers derivatives up to an ideal molecular wire through the oligomeric approximation, predicting this way electronic properties such as LUMO energy levels, electron affinity and reorganization energy in order to assess their possible applications in molecular electronics.

  20. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of selected lanthanide and actinide intermetallic Laves-phase alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Brooks, M. S. S.

    1989-01-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of some yttrium and uranium Laves-phase pseudobinary alloys with 3d elements have been calculated. The calculations were done by simulating the electronic structure of the alloy by that of an ordered compound with the same stoichiometry. In general...

  1. Electronic properties and orbital-filling mechanism in Rb-intercalated copper phthalocyanine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evangelista, F.; Gotter, R.; Mahne, N.; Nannarone, S.; Ruocco, A.; Rudolf, P.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of the electronic properties of a thin film of copper phthalocyanine deposited on Al(100) and progressively intercalated with rubidium atoms was followed by photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Electron donation from the Rb atoms to the C32H16N8Cu molecules results in the

  2. Electronic absorption spectra and nonlinear optical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    To calculate the spectroscopic and NLO properties, we use correction vector method,. 24 which implicitly ... Lewis acid–Lewis base interactions within the CO2 molecules. The O–C–O angle in this case becomes ..... Ishii R, Okazaki S, Odawara O, Okada I, Misawa M and Fukunaga T 1995 Fluid Phase Equilibria 104 291. 16.

  3. Electronic absorption spectra and nonlinear optical properties of CO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have investigated the structural aspects of several carbon dioxide molecular aggregates and their spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties within the quantum chemical theory framework. We find that, although the single carbon dioxide molecule prefers to be in a linear geometry, the puckering of angles occur in ...

  4. Electronic properties of H-terminated diamond in electrolyte solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nebel, C.E.; Rezek, Bohuslav; Shin, D.; Watanabe, H.; Yamamoto, T.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 3 (2006), 033711/1-033711/4 ISSN 0021-8979 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : surface conductivity * electrochemical analytical methods * electrical properties of semiconductor–electrolyte contacts Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.316, year: 2006

  5. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and efficient method for the calculation of the ground-state properties of materials [22 ... Murnaghan equation of state [28]. The optimization curves for the compounds are shown in figure 2. In the ground state, a (Å), B (GPa) and Bo are evaluated. The calculated ... the cubic structure only three elastic constants are required.

  6. Density functional study of : Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K C Bhamu

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... the refractive index in zero frequency limits is 2.42. The absorption coefficient predicts the applicability of AgScO2 in solar cells and flat panel liquid crystal display as a transparent top window layer. Keywords. Density functional theory; band structure; optical properties. PACS Nos 71.15.Mb; 71.20.−b; 78.20.

  7. Electronic properties of germanane field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madhushankar, B.N.; Kaverzin, A.; Giousis, T.; Potsi, G.; Gournis, D.; Rudolf, P.; Blake, G.R.; van der Wal, C.H.; van Wees, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    A new two dimensional (2D) material—germanane—has been synthesised recently with promising electrical and optical properties. In this paper we report the first realisation of germanane field-effect transistors fabricated from multilayer single crystal flakes. Our germanane devices show transport in

  8. DFT study on structure, electronic properties, and reactivity of cis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bases (HSAB) principle. HSAB principle states that,. 'hard acids prefer to coordinate with hard bases and soft acids prefer to coordinate with soft bases for both their thermodynamic and kinetic properties'.24,25. The relationship between OC–Fe–CO bond angles and backbonding to CO for the isomers discussed above.

  9. First Principle Calculation of Electronic, Optical Properties and Photocatalytic Potential of CuO Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Faozan

    2016-01-01

    We have performed DFT calculations of electronic structure, optical properties and photocatalytic potential of the low-index surfaces of CuO. Photocatalytic reaction on the surface of semiconductor requires the appropriate band edge of the semiconductor surface to drive redox reactions. The calculation begins with the electronic structure of bulk system; it aims to determine realistic input parameters and band gap prediction. CuO is an antiferromagnetic material with strong electronic correla...

  10. Biological responses to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs depend on the physicochemical properties of the DEPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Park

    Full Text Available Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs are the main components of ambient particulate materials, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, n-PAHs, heavy metals, and gaseous materials. Many epidemiological, clinical, and toxicological studies have shown that ambient particles, including DEPs, are associated with respiratory disorders, such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and lung cancer. However, the relationship between the biological response to DEPs and their chemical composition remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the physicochemical properties of DEPs before toxicological studies, and then administered a single intratracheal instillation of DEPs to mice. The mice were then killed 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after DEP exposure to observe the biological responses induced by DEPs over time. Our findings suggest that DEPs engulfed into cells induced a Th2-type inflammatory response followed by DNA damage, whereas DEPs not engulfed into cells induced a Th1-type inflammatory response. Further, the physicochemical properties, including surface charge, particle size, and chemical composition, of DEPs play a crucial role in determining the biological responses to DEPs. Consequently, we suggest that the biological response to DEPs depend on cell-particle interaction and the physicochemical properties of the particles.

  11. Biologically active substances of hydrophytes Potamogeton perfoliatus L. and Zostera noltii: composition, properties, applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Novichenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary, the author places special emphasis on the study of traditional technologies for processing of geophytes. Modern development trends in biotechnology demand of expansion of the raw material base. The increase in needs medicine, food and feed industries in biologically active substances pay attention to new unconventional sources of renewable raw materials. From this perspective, higher aquatic plants Zostera noltii and Potamogeton perfoliatus L. can be considered as a perspective object due to its high content of unique biologically active substances with different properties. Rationale of choosing of plant material and identifications of optimum performance and operational conditions for the production of biologically active substances: alcohol extraction in the mixer at room temperature limited to 7-10 days. Studied the organoleptic, physicochemical and microbial properties of end products – aqueous-alcoholic extracts of hydrophytes. Experimentations (UV spectrophotometric analysis, thin layer chromatography, mass spectrometry indicate that the composition of plants and extracts contains different biologically active substances. The high content of quercetin and pigments in the extracts of Z. noltii and Potamogeton perfoliatus L. shows the future use of hydrophytes in the Volga river and the Northern Caspian sea as an additional natural source of flavonoids and antioxidants. Therefore, plant preparations (aqueousalcoholic extracts of zostera and pondweed are combinations of various compounds, which have a high biological activity with different properties: adsorptive capacity, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. Products of studied plants after extraction with water-alcohol can be used in the food industry as a source-native with minerals, carbohydrates, protein, vitamins, flavonoids, terpenoids, alcohols, aliphatic acids and etc. Find an opportunity of use of biologically active substances from eelgrass and pondweed

  12. Understanding the properties of inorganic benzenes based on π-electron densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjie; Li, Xiaoyan; Meng, Lingpeng; Zheng, Shijun; Zeng, Yanli

    2015-03-12

    The properties of inorganic benzenes have been investigated by means of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) studies. In this work, the σ- and π-electron densities were separated from the total electron densities, and it was therefore possible to evaluate the contributions of σ and π electrons to the chemical bonds and properties of inorganic benzenes. The following conclusions are given: (1) The π-attractors' positions correlate to their respective atomic radii. With increasing atomic number in the same period, the attractor of π-electron densities becomes closer to its respective nucleus. With increasing atomic number in the main group, the position of the π attractor becomes farther from its respective nucleus. (2) The strength of the chemical bonds of the inorganic benzene rings is determined by σ-electron densities, not π-electron densities; their bonding character is mainly determined by the σ-electron density; however, the role of the π-electron density cannot be neglected. (3) For the inorganic benzenes studied, the electron localization function for π (ELFπ) values are related to the differences of the electronegativity between the neighboring atoms of the inorganic benzene rings, Δχ(X,Y). The smaller the difference of Δχ(X,Y), the higher the value of ELFπ, resulting in more aromatic properties of the inorganic benzenes.

  13. Measurement of Mechatronic Property of Biological Gel with Micro-Vibrating Electrode at Ultrasonic Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A measurement system has been designed with a micro-vibrating electrode at ultrasonic frequency to measure local impedance of biological gel in vitro. The designed system consists of two electrodes, where one of the electrodes vibrates with a piezoelectric actuator. The component of variation at impedance between two electrodes with vibration of one electrode is analyzed at the corresponding spectrum. The manufactured system was applied to measure impedance of a physiological saline solution, a potassium chloride solution, a dextran aqueous solution, and an egg. The experimental results show that the designed system is effective to measure local mechatronic property of biological gel.

  14. Electronic and chemical properties of graphene-based structures:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanin, Marco

    of describing the core electrons employed - is also presented. The investigation of the binding of graphene on metallic model surfaces is presented comparing the results from traditional exchange and correlation functionals to the results obtained with a new type of non-local functional, which includes van der...... hydrogen passivation. A joint experimental and theoretical study of the mechanism by which suspended graphene is etched by catalytically active silver nanoparticles have been studied. The experimental observation of zigzag channels is elucidated by the DFT calculations, which show that the armchair edges...

  15. Structural and electronic properties of Ag-Pd superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Matthieu J.; Dumont, Jacques; Sporken, Robert; Johnson, R. L.; Wiame, Frédéric; Temst, Kristiaan; Swerts, Johan; Mirabella, Frédéric; Ghijsen, Jacques; Gonze, Xavier

    2004-11-01

    The electronic structure of silver-palladium heterostructures is investigated, both experimentally and through ab initio calculations. Synchrotron-radiation induced photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations of the work function and the valence band structure are compared to and explained by calculations of slab and bulk heterostructures. Work functions and equilibrium geometries are shown to be in agreement with synchrotron-radiation induced photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. Further insight into the differing behavior of the two terminating metal surfaces is extracted from the calculations.

  16. Structures and electronic properties of WmCun(n+m≤7) clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    46

    Keywords: WmCun(m+n≤7)clusters, structure and stability, electronic property, density functional theory. 1. Introduction ... studied physically and chemically on their unique properties for the characters like large specific surface and catalytic activity which are ..... No matter whether the average atomic binding energies of ...

  17. Role of first-neighbor geometry in the electronic and mechanical properties of atomic contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, C.; Dednam, W.; Calvo, M. R.; Fernández, M. A.; Untiedt, C.; Caturla, M. J.

    2018-02-01

    We study in detail, via experimental measurements, atomistic simulations, and density functional theory transport calculations, the process of formation and the resulting electronic properties of atomic-sized contacts made of Au, Ag, and Cu. Our data analysis of both experimental results and simulations leads to a precise relationship between geometry and electronic transmission—we reestablish the significant influence of the number of first neighbors on the electronic properties of atomic-sized contacts. This result allows us also to interpret subtle differences between the metals during the process of contact formation as well as the characteristics of the resulting contacts.

  18. Effects of breathing and oblong mode phonons on transport properties in a single-electron transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Norihiko; Wybourne, Martin N

    2010-02-17

    We investigate theoretically the transport characteristics of a single-electron transistor affected by the dynamic deformation of the device configuration due to phonons. By considering changes in capacitances and tunnel resistances caused by the breathing and oblong vibrations of the island that forms part of the transistor, we formulate the electron-phonon interaction peculiar to the device and derive its transport properties by means of the master equation. For a single electron transistor with a gold nanoparticle island of radius 1 nm, we demonstrate the contribution to the transport properties that originates from tunneling channels associated with THz phonon emission and absorption.

  19. Computation and analysis of the electron transport properties for nitrogen and air inductively-coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minghao; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    A relatively simple method for calculating accurately the third-order electron transport properties of nitrogen and air thermal plasmas is presented. The electron transport properties, such as the electrical conductivity and the electron thermal conductivity, were computed with the best and latest available collision cross-section data in the temperature and pressure ranges of T = 300 - 15000 K and p = 0.01 - 1.0 atm, respectively. The results obtained under the atmospheric pressure condition showed good agreements with the experimental and the high-accuracy theoretical results. The presently-introduced method has good application potential in numerical simulations of nitrogen and air inductively-coupled plasmas.

  20. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Migliorati, M.; Walker, R.

    2000-01-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources [it

  1. Electronic properties of core-shell nanowire resonant tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The electronic sub-band structure of InAs/InP/InAs/InP/InAs core-shell nanowire resonant tunneling diodes has been investigated in the effective mass approximation by varying the core radius and the thickness of the InP barriers and InAs shells. A top-hat, double-barrier potential profile and optimal energy configuration are obtained for core radii and surface shells >10 nm, InAs middle shells barriers. In this case, two sub-bands exist above the Fermi level in the InAs middle shell which belongs to the m = 0 and m = 1 ladder of states that have similar wave functions and energies. On the other hand, the lowest m = 0 sub-band in the core falls below the Fermi level but the m = 1 states do not contribute to the current transport since they reside energetically well above the Fermi level. We compare the case of GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs which may conduct current with smaller applied voltages due to the larger effective mass of electrons in GaAs and discuss the need for doping. PMID:25288912

  2. Compton profile study and electronic properties of tantalum diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raykar, Veera; Bhamu, K.C.; Ahuja, B.L.

    2013-01-01

    We have reported the first-ever experimental Compton profile (CP) of TaB 2 using 20 Ci 137 Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare the experimental data, we have also computed the theoretical CPs using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree–Fock (HF) within linear combination of the atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. In addition, we have reported energy bands and density of states of TaB 2 using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) methods. A real space analysis of CP of TaB 2 confirms its metallic character which is in tune with the cross-overs of Fermi level by energy bands and Fermi surface topology. A comparison of equal-valence-electron-density (EVED) experimental profiles of isoelectronic TaB 2 and NbB 2 show more covalent (or less ionic) character of TaB 2 than that of NbB 2 which is in agreement with available ionicity data. - Highlights: ► Reported first-ever experimental Compton profile (CP) of TaB 2 . ► Interpreted experimental CP using theoretical CP within density functional theory. ► Analyzed equal-valence-electron-density experimental CPs of TaB 2 and NbB 2 . ► Established metallic character by taking Fourier transform of experimental CP. ► Reported energy bands, DOS and Fermi surface of TaB 2 using LCAO and FP-LAPW

  3. Electronic Structure and Properties of Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical framework based on Huckel tight-binding model has been formulated to analyze the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes under uniform deformation. The model successfully quantifies the dispersion relation, density of states and bandgap change of nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending. Our analysis shows that the shifting of the Fermi point away from the Brillouin zone vertices is the key reason for these changes. As a result of this shifting, the electronic structure of deformed carbon nanotubes varies dramatically depending on their chirality and deformation mode. Treating the Fermi point as a function of strain and tube chirality, the analytical solution preserves the concise form of undeformed carbon nanotubes. It predicts the shifting, merging and splitting of the Van Hove singularities in the density of states and the zigzag pattern of bandgap change under strains. Four orbital tight-binding simulations of carbon nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending have been performed to verify the analytical solution. Extension to more complex systems are being performed to relate this analytical solution to the spectroscopic characterization, device performance and proposed quantum structures induced by the deformation. The limitations of this model will also be discussed.

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal doped graphyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangan, Abhijeet Sadashiv; Yadav, Asha S.; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2017-05-01

    We have theoretically investigated the interaction of few 3d (V,Mn) and 4d (Y,Zr) transition metals with the γ-graphyne structure using the spin-polarized density functional theory for its potentials application in Hydrogen storage, spintronics and nano-electronics. By doping different TMs we have observed that the system can be either metallic(Y), semi-conducting or half metallic. The system for Y and Zr doped graphyne becomes non-magnetic while V and Mn doped graphyne have a magnetic moments of l μB and 3 μB respectively From bader charge analysis it is seen that there is a charge transfer from the TM atom to the graphyne. Zr and Y have a net charge transfer of 2.15e and 1.73e respectively. Charge density analysis also shows the polarization on the carbon skeleton which becomes larger as the charge transfer for the TM atom increases. Thus we see Y and Zr are better candidates for hydrogen storage devices since they are non-magnetic and have less d electrons which is ideal for kubas-type interactions between hydrogen molecule and TM.

  5. Conformational assembly and biological properties of collagen mimetic peptides and their thermally responsive polymer conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Ohm Divyam

    2011-12-01

    Collagens are one of the most abundant proteins found in body tissues and organs, endowing structural integrity, mechanical strength, and multiple biological functions. Destabilized collagen inside human body leads to various degenerative diseases (ex. osteoarthritis) and ageing. This has continued to motivate the design of synthetic peptides and bio-synthetic polypeptides to closely mimic the native collagens in terms of triple helix structure and stability, potential for higher order assembly, and biological properties. However, the widespread application of de novo collagens has been limited in part by the need for hydroxylated proline in the formation of stable triple helical structures. To address this continued need, a hydroxyproline-free, thermally stable collagen-mimetic peptide (CLP-Cys) was rationally designed via the incorporation of electrostatically stabilized amino acid triplets. CLP-Cys was synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis. The formation and stability of the triple helical structure were indicated via circular dichroism (CD) experiments and confirmed via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results. CLP-Cys also self-assembled into nano-rods and micro-fibrils, as evidenced via a combination of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Given the high thermal stability and its propensity for higher-order assembly, CLP-Cys was further functionalized at both the ends with a thermally responsive polymer, poly(diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate), (PDEGMEMA) to synthesize a biohybrid triblock copolymer. The CD results indicated that the triple helical form is retained, the thermal unfolding is sustained and helix to coil transition is reversible in the triblock hybrid context. The LCST of PDEGMEMA homopolymer (26 °C) is increased (to 35 °C) upon conjugation to the hydrophilic collagen peptide domain. Further, a combination of static light scattering, Cryo-SEM, TEM and confocal microscopy elucidated that the

  6. Electronic and optical properties of 2D graphene-like ZnS: DFT calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashgari, Hamed; Boochani, Arash; Shekaari, Ashkan; Solaymani, Shahram; Sartipi, Elmira; Mendi, Rohollah Taghavi

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT has been applied to investigate the optical properties of 2D-ZnS and 3D-ZnS. • The electronic and the optical properties of 3D-ZnS and 2D-ZnS are compared. • At visible range of energies the transparency of 2D-ZnS is more than the 3D. - Abstract: Density-functional theory has been applied to investigate the electronic and optical properties of graphene-like two-dimensional ZnS in the (0001) direction of its Wurtzite phase. A comparison with 3D-ZnS has been carried out within the PBE- and EV-GGA. The electronic properties of 2D- and 3D-ZnS have been derived by the examination of the electronic band structures and density of states. The optical properties have been determined through the study of the dielectric function, reflectivity, electron loss function, refractive and extinction indices, the absorption index and optical conductivity. It is found that the transparency of 2D-ZnS is greater than the 3D over the visible range. A thorough study of the dielectric function has been performed so that the peaks and the transition bands have been specified. The electron loss function demonstrates that the plasmonic frequency for 2D- and 3D-ZnS is accrued at 11.22 and 19.93 eV within the PBE-GGA, respectively.

  7. Electronic and optical properties of 2D graphene-like ZnS: DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashgari, Hamed [Department of Physics, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Boochani, Arash, E-mail: arash_bch@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shekaari, Ashkan [Department of Physics, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Solaymani, Shahram [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sartipi, Elmira [Department of Physics, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mendi, Rohollah Taghavi [Department of Physics, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • DFT has been applied to investigate the optical properties of 2D-ZnS and 3D-ZnS. • The electronic and the optical properties of 3D-ZnS and 2D-ZnS are compared. • At visible range of energies the transparency of 2D-ZnS is more than the 3D. - Abstract: Density-functional theory has been applied to investigate the electronic and optical properties of graphene-like two-dimensional ZnS in the (0001) direction of its Wurtzite phase. A comparison with 3D-ZnS has been carried out within the PBE- and EV-GGA. The electronic properties of 2D- and 3D-ZnS have been derived by the examination of the electronic band structures and density of states. The optical properties have been determined through the study of the dielectric function, reflectivity, electron loss function, refractive and extinction indices, the absorption index and optical conductivity. It is found that the transparency of 2D-ZnS is greater than the 3D over the visible range. A thorough study of the dielectric function has been performed so that the peaks and the transition bands have been specified. The electron loss function demonstrates that the plasmonic frequency for 2D- and 3D-ZnS is accrued at 11.22 and 19.93 eV within the PBE-GGA, respectively.

  8. Disentangling the intricate atomic short-range order and electronic properties in amorphous transition metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, C A; Araujo, C Moyses; Ahuja, R; Niklasson, G A; Edvinsson, T

    2017-05-17

    Solid state materials with crystalline order have been well-known and characterized for almost a century while the description of disordered materials still bears significant challenges. Among these are the atomic short-range order and electronic properties of amorphous transition metal oxides [aTMOs], that have emerged as novel multifunctional materials due to their optical switching properties and high-capacity to intercalate alkali metal ions at low voltages. For decades, research on aTMOs has dealt with technological optimization. However, it remains challenging to unveil their intricate atomic short-range order. Currently, no systematic and broadly applicable methods exist to assess atomic-size structure, and since electronic localization is structure-dependent, still there are not well-established optical and electronic mechanisms for modelling the properties of aTMOs. We present state-of-the-art systematic procedures involving theory and experiment in a self-consistent computational framework to unveil the atomic short-range order and its role for the electronic properties. The scheme is applied to amorphous tungsten trioxide aWO 3 , which is the most studied electrochromic aTMO in spite of its unidentified atomic-size structure. Our approach provides a one-to-one matching of experimental data and corresponding model structure from which electronic properties can be directly calculated in agreement with the electronic transitions observed in the XANES spectra.

  9. Controlling the electronic properties of the graphene nanoflakes by BN impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed H.

    2018-01-01

    Electronic properties of the graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) can be controlled by using chemical doping method. First-principle of the density functional theory (DFT) method, which is implemented in the Gaussian 09W program are used to investigate the electronic properties, such as electronic band gap, DOS, total energy, dipole moment, HOMO, and LOMO energies of the GNFs with and without various concentrations of the BN impurities in various sites. There are very significant results. My founding results show that these properties of the GNFs depend on the concentrations of BN impurities and the geometrical pattern of the BN impurities in the GNFs. By increasing the distance between these impurities, the electronic band gap and the shape of the DOS are reduced and altered, respectively. So, the results offer that the electronic band gap value depends on the concentrations of BN impurities and sites of these impurities in the GNFs. The electronic dipole moments value is increased by increased the concentrations of the BN impurities. All structures became more stable due to the total energy is increased, excepted B, BN and B2N impurities, which is reduced and make GNFs structure unstable. Then, GNFs can be used in various applications because the electronic properties of the GNFs are controlled and modified with BN impurities.

  10. Electrical properties of irradiated PVA film by using ion/electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, M. M.; Osman, M.; Hashhash, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ion/electron beam bombardment has shown great potential for improving the surface properties of polymers. Low-energy charged (ion/electron) beam irradiation of polymers is a good technique to modify properties such as electrical conductivity, structural behavior, and their mechanical properties. This paper reports on the effect of nitrogen and electron beam irradiation on the electrical properties of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films. PVA films of 4 mm were exposed to a charged (ion/electron) beam for different treatment times (15, 30, and 60 minutes); the beam was produced from a dual beam source using nitrogen gas with the other ion/electron source parameters optimized. The dielectric loss tangent tan δ , electrical conductivity σ , and dielectric constant ɛ ^' } in the frequency range 100 Hz-100 kHz were measured at room temperature. The variation of dielectric constant and loss tangent as a function of frequency was also studied at room temperature. The dielectric constant was found to be strongly dependent on frequency for both ion and electron beam irradiation doses. The real (ɛ ^' }) and imaginary (ɛ ^' ' }) parts of the dielectric constant decreased with frequency for all irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The AC conductivity showed an increase with frequency for all samples under the influence of both ion and electron irradiation for different times. Photoluminescence (PL) spectral changes were also studied. The formation of clusters and defects (which serve as non-radiative centers on the polymer surface) is confirmed by the decrease in the PL intensity.

  11. Information Functional Theory: Electronic Properties as Functionals of Information for Atoms and Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia-Yu; Rong, Chunying; Lu, Tian; Zhou, Panpan; Liu, Shubin

    2016-05-26

    How to accurately predict electronic properties of a Columbic system with the electron density obtained from experiments such as X-ray crystallography is still an unresolved problem. The information-theoretic approach recently developed in the framework of density functional reactivity theory is one of the efforts to address the issue. In this work, using 27 atoms and 41 molecules as illustrative examples, we present a study to demonstrate that one is able to satisfactorily describe such electronic properties as the total energy and its components with information-theoretic quantities like Shannon entropy, Fisher information, Ghosh-Berkowitz-Parr entropy, and Onicescu information energy. Closely related to the earlier attempt of expanding density functionals using simple homogeneous functionals, this work not only confirms Nagy's proof that Shannon entropy alone should contain all the information needed to adequately describe an electronic system but also provides a feasible pathway to map the relationship between the experimentally available electron density and various electronic properties for Columbic systems such as atoms and molecules. Extensions to other electronic properties are straightforward.

  12. Study on the Electronic Transport Properties of Zigzag GaN Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Enling; Wang Xiqiang; Hou Liping; Zhao Danna; Dai Yuanbin [Sciences School, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an, China 710054 (China); Wang Xuewen [Electronic Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an, China 710068 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The electronic transport properties of zigzag GaN nanotubes (n, 0) (4 {<=} n {<=} 9) have been calculated using the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions method. Firstly, the density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimize and calculate the electronic structure of GaNNTs (n, 0) (4{<=}n{<=}9). Secondly, DFT and non-equilibrium Green function (NEGF) method are also used to predict the electronic transport properties of GaNNTs two-probe system. The results showed: there is a corresponding relation between the electronic transport properties and the valley of state density of each GaNNT. In addition, the volt-ampere curve of GaNNT is approximately linear.

  13. Review of temperature dependence of thermal properties, dielectric properties, and perfusion of biological tissues at hyperthermic and ablation temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmanna, Christian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The application of supraphysiological temperatures (>40°C) to biological tissues causes changes at the molecular, cellular, and structural level, with corresponding changes in tissue function and in thermal, mechanical and dielectric tissue properties. This is particularly relevant for image-guided thermal treatments (e.g. hyperthermia and thermal ablation) delivering heat via focused ultrasound (FUS), radiofrequency (RF), microwave (MW), or laser energy; temperature induced changes in tissue properties are of relevance in relation to predicting tissue temperature profile, monitoring during treatment, and evaluation of treatment results. This paper presents a literature survey of temperature dependence of electrical (electrical conductivity, resistivity, permittivity) and thermal tissue properties (thermal conductivity, specific heat, diffusivity). Data of soft tissues (liver, prostate, muscle, kidney, uterus, collagen, myocardium and spleen) for temperatures between 5 to 90°C, and dielectric properties in the frequency range between 460 kHz and 3 GHz are reported. Furthermore, perfusion changes in tumors including carcinomas, sarcomas, rhabdomyosarcoma, adenocarcinoma and ependymoblastoma in response to hyperthmic temperatures up to 46°C are presented. Where appropriate, mathematical models to describe temperature dependence of properties are presented. The presented data is valuable for mathematical models that predict tissue temperature during thermal therapies (e.g. hyperthermia or thermal ablation), as well as for applications related to prediction and monitoring of temperature induced tissue changes.

  14. Electronic transport properties of fullerene functionalized carbon nanotubes: Ab initio and tight-binding calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Hashemi, J.; Markussen, Troels

    2009-01-01

    techniques and tight-binding calculations to illustrate these materials' transmission properties and give physical arguments to interpret the numerical results. Specifically, above the Fermi energy we find a strong reduction in electron transmission due to localized states in certain regions of the structure......Fullerene functionalized carbon nanotubes-NanoBuds-form a novel class of hybrid carbon materials, which possesses many advantageous properties as compared to the pristine components. Here, we report a theoretical study of the electronic transport properties of these compounds. We use both ab initio...

  15. Experimental Investigation of Charging Properties of Interstellar Type Silica Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. Incident low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grains, leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available classical theoretical models for calculations of SEE yields are generally applicable for neutral, planar, or bulk surfaces. These models, however, are not valid for calculations of the electron impact charging properties of electrostatically charged micron/submicron-size dust grains in astrophysical environments. Rigorous quantum mechanical models are not yet available, and the SEE yields have to be determined experimentally for development of more accurate models for charging of individual dust grains. At the present time, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly for low energy electron impact. The experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated carried out by us in a unique facility at NASA-MSFC, based on an electrodynamic balance, indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (Abbas et al, 2010, 2012). In this paper, we discuss SEE charging properties of individual micron-size silica microspheres that are believed to be analogs of a class of interstellar dust grains. The measurements indicate charging of the 0.2m silica particles when exposed to 25 eV electron beams and discharging when exposed to higher energy electron beams. Relatively large size silica particles (5.2-6.82m) generally discharge to lower equilibrium potentials at both electron energies

  16. Electronic and magnetic properties of 3D transition-metal atom adsorbed arsenene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qing-Yuan; Huang, Yang; Li, Ze-Yu; Cao, Chao; He, Yao

    2018-03-01

    To utilize arsenene as the electronic and spintronic material, it is important to enrich its electronic properties and induce useful magnetic properties in it. In this paper, we theoretically studied the electronic and magnetic properties of arsenene functionalized by 3D transition-metal (TM) atoms (TM@As). Although pristine arsenene is a nonmagnetic material, the dilute magnetism can be produced upon TM atoms chemisorption, where the magnetism mainly originates from TM adatoms. We find that the magnetic properties can be tuned by a moderate external strain. The chemisorption of 3D TM atoms also enriches the electronic properties of arsenene, such as metallic, half-metallic, and semiconducting features. Interestingly, we can classify the semiconducting feature into three types according to the band-gap contribution of spin channels. On the other hand, the chemisorption properties can be modified by introducing monovacancy defect in arsenene. Present results suggest that TM-adsorbed arsenene may be a promising candidate for electronic and spintronic applications.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and biological properties of organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings on titanium substrates prepared by sol-gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catauro, Michelina; Bollino, Flavia; Papale, Ferdinando

    2014-02-01

    When surface-reactive (bioactive) coatings are applied to medical implants by means of the sol-gel dip-coating technique, the biological proprieties of the surface of the implant can be locally modified to match the properties of the surrounding tissues to provide a firm fixation of the implant. The aim of this study has been to synthesize, via sol-gel, organoinorganic nanoporous materials and to dip-coat a substrate to use in dental applications. Different systems have been prepared consisting of an inorganic zirconium-based matrix, in which a biodegradable polymer, the poly-ε-caprolactone was incorporated in different percentages. The materials synthesized by the sol-gel process, before gelation, when they were still in sol phase, have been used to coat a titanium grade 4 (Ti-4) substrate to change its surface biological properties. Thin films have been obtained by means of the dip-coating technique. A microstructural analysis of the obtained coatings was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The biological proprieties have been investigated by means of tests in vitro. The bone-bonding capability of the nanocomposite films has been evaluated by examining the appearance of apatite on their surface when plunged in a simulated body fluid (SBF) with ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. The examination of apatite formation on the nanocomposites, after immersion in SBF, has been carried out by SEM equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. To evaluate cells-materials interaction, human osteosarcoma cell line (Saos-2) has been seeded on specimens and cell vitality evaluated by WST-8 assay. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mechanical and thermal properties of electron beam-irradiated polypropylene reinforced with Kraft lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano-Segura, A. T. R.; Tavares, L. B.; Rizzi, J. G. F.; Rosa, D. S.; Salvadori, M. C.; dos Santos, D. J.

    2017-10-01

    Polypropylene reinforced with Kraft lignin composites (0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 wt% lignin) were submitted to electron beam (EB) irradiation at doses of 0, 50, 100 and 250 kGy. Kraft lignin incorporation maintained Young´s modulus values, even at electron beam doses up to 100 kGy (10 wt% lignin). The yield stress losses were also reduced by the addition of lignin to polypropylene. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed low formation of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups for composites containing lignin. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) curves indicated a synergistic effect between Kraft lignin and electron beam irradiation on the storage modulus (E´). Several properties evolved as a function of the Kraft lignin content. Synergistic effects between Kraft lignin incorporation and electron beam radiation contribute to applications that require the mechanical and thermal properties of iPP to be maintained, even after high doses of electron beam radiation.

  19. Phytochemistry and Biological Properties of Burnet Weed (Sanguisorba spp.: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anestis KARKANIS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Great burnet (Sanguisorba officinalis L. and small burnet (Sansguisorba minor Scop. are edible, perennial weeds widely distributed in the world. These are the most widespread Sanguisorba species. The bioactive components of Sanguisorba plants include phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids and neolignans and terpenoids. Large potential exists to use burnets as medicinal plants. Sanguisorba species are known to show anticancer properties, antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiviral activities. Also, Sanguisorba extracts show anti-Alzheimer and anti-inflammatory properties. Small burnet extracts could also be a useful alternative to synthetic fungicides for crop production. This review focuses on biological activities of Sanguisorba extracts and emphasizing their potential applications in pharmaceutical areas.

  20. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of radiocerium relevant to radiation protection guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Present knowledge of the relevant physical, chemical, and biological properties of radiocerium as a basis for establishing radiation protection guidelines is summarized. The first section of the report reviews the chemical and physical properties of radiocerium relative to the biological behavior of internally-deposited cerium and other lanthanides. The second section of the report gives the sources of radiocerium in the environment and the pathways to man. The third section of the report describes the metabolic fate of cerium in several mammalian species as a basis for predicting its metabolic fate in man. The fourth section of the report considers the biomedical effects of radiocerium in light of extensive animal experimentation. The last two sections of the report describe the history of radiation protection guidelines for radiocerium and summarize data required for evaluating the adequacy of current radiation protection guidelines. Each section begins with a summary of the most important findings that follow

  1. Electronic and Optical Properties of CuO Based on DFT+U and GW Approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F; Agusta, M K; Dipojono, H K

    2016-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations of electronic structure and optical properties of monoclinic CuO based on DFT+U and GW approximation. CuO is an antiferromagnetic material with strong electron correlations. Our calculation shows that DFT+U and GW approximation sufficiently reliable to investigate the material properties of CuO. The calculated band gap of DFT+U for reasonable value of U slightly underestimates. The use of GW approximation requires adjustment of U value to get realistic result. Hybridization Cu 3dxz, 3dyz with O 2p plays an important role in the formation of band gap. The calculated optical properties based on DFT+U and GW corrections by solving Bethe-Salpeter are in good agreement with the calculated electronic properties and the experimental result. (paper)

  2. Changes in diffusion properties of biological tissues associated with mechanical strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kenichiro; Imae, T.; Mima, Kazuo; Sekino, Masaki; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Shogo

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical strain in biological tissues causes a change in the diffusion properties of water molecules. This paper proposes a method of estimating mechanical strain in biological tissues using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measurements were carried out on uncompressed and compressed chicken skeletal muscles. A theoretical model of the diffusion of water molecules in muscle fibers was derived based on Tanner's equation. Diameter of the muscle fibers was estimated by fitting the model equation to the measured signals. Changes in the mean diffusivity (MD), the fractional anisotropy (FA), and diameter of the muscle fiber did not have any statistical significance. The intracellular diffusion coefficient (D int ) was changed by mechanical strain (p<.05). This method has potential applications in the quantitative evaluation of strain in biological tissues, a though it poses several technical challenges. (author)

  3. Synthesis and electrical properties of silver nanoplates for electronic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Nana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, silver nanoplates of 100 to 500 nm size were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate with N,Ndimethylformamide, using poly(vinylpyrolidone as a surfactant and ferric chloride as a controlling agent, at 120 to 160 °C for 5 to 24 hours. The influence of the concentration of ferric chloride, the reaction temperature and reaction time on the morphology of the product has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated that the products obtained at the low reaction temperature and short reaction time in the presence of FeCl3 in the reaction solution were in the form of silver nanoplates, whose morphology was mainly triangular and hexagonal. In addition, the size and thickness of the nanoplates increased with increasing of the FeCl3 concentration. At a high reaction temperature and long reaction time, the truncated triangle and hexagonal nanoplates were mainly produced. Furthermore, the sintering behavior of nanoplates was studied and the results showed that sintering of the silver nanoplates started at 180 °C, and a typical sintering behavior was observed at higher temperatures. The incorporation of the silver nanoplates into the polymer matrix with micro-sized silver flakes led to an increase in the matrix resistivity in almost all cases, especially at high fractions and low curing temperatures. The curing temperature had an influence on the resistivity of the conductive adhesives filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanoplates due to sintering of the silver nanoplates.

  4. Electronic computer prediction of properties of binary refractory transition metal compounds on the base of their simplificated electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutolin, S.A.; Kotyukov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to obtain calculation equations of macroscopic physico-chemical properties of transition metal refractory compounds (density, melting temperature, Debye characteristic temperature, microhardness, standard formation enthalpy, thermo-emf) using the method of the regression analysis. Apart from the compound composition the argument of the regression equation is the distribution of electron bands of d-transition metals, created by the energy electron distribution in the simplified zone structure of transition metals and approximated by Chebishev polynoms, by the position of Fermi energy on the map of distribution of electron band energy depending upon the value of quasi-impulse, multiple to the first, second and third Brillouin zone for transition metals. The maximum relative error of the regressions obtained as compared with the literary data is 15-20 rel.%

  5. Electronic structure and spectral properties of RCuSi (R=Nd,Gd) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knyazev, Yu.V., E-mail: knyazev@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Lukoyanov, A.V. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kuz’min, Yu.I. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gupta, Sachin; Suresh, K.G. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, 400076 Mumbai (India)

    2016-04-15

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of optical properties and electronic structure of NdCuSi and GdCuSi compounds. Optical characteristics have been studied employing ellipsometry in a spectral range 0.22–15 μm. Spin-polarized calculations of the electronic structure have been performed using LSDA+U method accounting for electronic correlations in the 4f shell of rare earth elements. Additionally, we probe our electronic structures by calculating the interband optical conductivities and comparing them with spectral measurement. We find that all main features of the experimental curves have been qualitative interpreted using the calculated densities of states.

  6. Electronic and Spectral Properties of RRhSn (R = Gd, Tb) Intermetallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Yu. V.; Lukoyanov, A. V.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.; Gupta, S.; Suresh, K. G.

    2018-02-01

    The investigations of electronic structure and optical properties of GdRhSn and TbRhSn were carried out. The calculations of band spectrum, taking into account the spin polarization, were performed in a local electron density approximation with a correction for strong correlation effects in 4f shell of rare earth metal (LSDA + U method). The optical studies were done by ellipsometry in a wide range of wavelengths, and the set of spectral and electronic characteristics was determined. It was shown that optical absorption in a region of interband transitions has a satisfactory explanation within a scope of calculations of density of electronic states carried out.

  7. Electronic Properties of Beryllium-Chalcogenides BeX (S, Se and Te)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjal, N.; Sharma, G.; Sharma, V.; Vyas, V.; Sharma, B. K.

    2011-10-01

    A first-principles method has been employed to investigate the electronic properties of Be-chalcogenides namely BeS, BeSe and BeTe. The electron momentum density, autocorrelation function, energy band gap and density of states have been computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The calculated electronic energy band gap and density of states are found to be in good agreement with available earlier data. The bonding in the BeX compounds also been compared on the basis of equal-valence-electron-density profiles and the trend of ionicity is found as BeS>BeSe>BeTe.

  8. Vacuum-ultraviolet electronic properties of liquids. Annual progress report, November 1, 1980-January 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reviewed on the following research areas: (1) electron mean free paths in liquid formamide; (2) yields and mean free paths of photoelectrons from liquid hexamethylphosphorictricamide; (3) evidence for collective electronic oscillations in electron bombarded liquid siloxane; (4) a new technique for measuring the reflectance of high vapor pressure liquids; (5) construction of soft x-ray monochromator; (6) electronic properties of benzene and methyl benzene derivatives; (7) optical and dielectric functions of squalane and squalene; and (8) photoemission of squalene and tetraglyme. Separate abstracts were prepared for the two papers included, and are entered in the data base separately

  9. Electronic and magnetic properties of orthorhombic iron selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, S. W.

    2016-02-01

    Iron orbitals in orthorhombic iron selenide (FeSe) can produce chargelike multipoles that are polar (parity-odd). Orbitals in question include Fe (3 d ), Fe (4 p ), and p -type ligands that participate in transport properties and bonding. The polar multipoles may contribute weak, space-group forbidden Bragg spots to diffraction patterns collected with x rays tuned in energy to a Fe atomic resonance (Templeton & Templeton scattering). Ordering of conventional, axial magnetic dipoles does not accompany the tetragonal-orthorhombic structural phase transition in FeSe, unlike other known iron-based superconductors. We initiate a new line of inquiry for this puzzling property of orthorhombic FeSe, using a hidden magnetic order that belongs to the m'm'm' magnetic crystal class. It is epitomized by the absence of ferromagnetism and axial magnetic dipoles and the appearance of magnetic monopoles and magnetoelectric quadrupoles. A similar magnetic order occurs in cuprate superconductors, yttrium barium copper oxide and Hg1201, where it was unveiled with the Kerr effect and in Bragg diffraction patterns revealed by polarized neutrons.

  10. Dawning of a new era in TRP channel structural biology by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej, M Gregor; Ziegler, Christine M

    2018-02-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) permits the determination of atomic protein structures by averaging large numbers of individual projection images recorded at cryogenic temperatures-a method termed single-particle analysis. The cryo-preservation traps proteins within a thin glass-like ice layer, making literally a freeze image of proteins in solution. Projections of randomly adopted orientations are merged to reconstruct a 3D density map. While atomic resolution for highly symmetric viruses was achieved already in 2009, the development of new sensitive and fast electron detectors has enabled cryo-EM for smaller and asymmetrical proteins including fragile membrane proteins. As one of the most important structural biology methods at present, cryo-EM was awarded in October 2017 with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The molecular understanding of Transient-Receptor-Potential (TRP) channels has been boosted tremendously by cryo-EM single-particle analysis. Several near-atomic and atomic structures gave important mechanistic insights, e.g., into ion permeation and selectivity, gating, as well as into the activation of this enigmatic and medically important membrane protein family by various chemical and physical stimuli. Lastly, these structures have set the starting point for the rational design of TRP channel-targeted therapeutics to counteract life-threatening channelopathies. Here, we attempt a brief introduction to the method, review the latest advances in cryo-EM structure determination of TRP channels, and discuss molecular insights into the channel function based on the wealth of TRP channel cryo-EM structures.

  11. Relationship Between Particle And Biological Properties Of Emulsion-Templated, Freeze-Dried Lopinavir Nanoparticle Dispersions

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Darren; Martin, Philip; McDonald, Tom; Giardiello, Marco; Owen, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Background\\ud Nanomedicine has the potential to enhance bioavailability and delivery of low-solubility compounds to sanctuary sites. Lopinavir (LPV) is a protease inhibitor (PI) with low bioavailability (B) permeability across Caco-2 monolayers was determined. Data were log transformed and models to describe relationships between particle properties and biological characteristics were constructed using multiple linear regression.\\ud \\ud Results\\ud Median (range) z-average, polydispersity, and...

  12. Structure-property relationship of quinuclidinium surfactants--Towards multifunctional biologically active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skočibušić, Mirjana; Odžak, Renata; Štefanić, Zoran; Križić, Ivana; Krišto, Lucija; Jović, Ozren; Hrenar, Tomica; Primožič, Ines; Jurašin, Darija

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by diverse biological and pharmacological activity of quinuclidine and oxime compounds we have synthesized and characterized novel class of surfactants, 3-hydroxyimino quinuclidinium bromides with different alkyl chains lengths (CnQNOH; n=12, 14 and 16). The incorporation of non conventional hydroxyimino quinuclidinium headgroup and variation in alkyl chain length affects hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of surfactant molecule and thereby physicochemical properties important for its application. Therefore, newly synthesized surfactants were characterized by the combination of different experimental techniques: X-ray analysis, potentiometry, electrical conductivity, surface tension and dynamic light scattering measurements, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Comprehensive investigation of CnQNOH surfactants enabled insight into structure-property relationship i.e., way in which the arrangement of surfactant molecules in the crystal phase correlates with their solution behavior and biologically activity. The synthesized CnQNOH surfactants exhibited high adsorption efficiency and relatively low critical micelle concentrations. In addition, all investigated compounds showed very potent and promising activity against Gram-positive and clinically relevant Gram-negative bacterial strains compared to conventional antimicrobial agents: tetracycline and gentamicin. The overall results indicate that bicyclic headgroup with oxime moiety, which affects both hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of CnQNOH molecule in addition to enabling hydrogen bonding, has dominant effect on crystal packing and physicochemical properties. The unique structural features of cationic surfactants with hydroxyimino quinuclidine headgroup along with diverse biological activity have made them promising structures in novel drug discovery. Obtained fundamental understanding how combination of different functionalities in a single surfactant molecule affects its physicochemical

  13. Properties of alternative microbial hosts used in synthetic biology: towards the design of a modular chassis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhyun; Salvador, Manuel; Saunders, Elizabeth; González, Jaime; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The chassis is the cellular host used as a recipient of engineered biological systems in synthetic biology. They are required to propagate the genetic information and to express the genes encoded in it. Despite being an essential element for the appropriate function of genetic circuits, the chassis is rarely considered in their design phase. Consequently, the circuits are transferred to model organisms commonly used in the laboratory, such as Escherichia coli, that may be suboptimal for a required function. In this review, we discuss some of the properties desirable in a versatile chassis and summarize some examples of alternative hosts for synthetic biology amenable for engineering. These properties include a suitable life style, a robust cell wall, good knowledge of its regulatory network as well as of the interplay of the host components with the exogenous circuits, and the possibility of developing whole-cell models and tuneable metabolic fluxes that could allow a better distribution of cellular resources (metabolites, ATP, nucleotides, amino acids, transcriptional and translational machinery). We highlight Pseudomonas putida, widely used in many different biotechnological applications as a prominent organism for synthetic biology due to its metabolic diversity, robustness and ease of manipulation. PMID:27903818

  14. Distinguishing Biologically Controlled Calcareous Biomineralization in Fossil Organisms Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päßler, Jan-Filip; Jarochowska, Emilia; Bestmann, Michel; Munnecke, Axel

    2018-02-01

    Although carbonate-precipitating cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems today, the criteria used to identify them in the geological record are subjective and rarely testable. Differences in the mode of biomineralization between cyanobacteria and eukaryotes, i.e. biologically induced calcification (BIM) vs. biologically controlled calcification (BCM), result in different crystallographic structures which might be used as a criterion to test cyanobacterial affinities. Cyanobacteria are often used as a ‘wastebasket taxon’, to which various microfossils are assigned. The lack of a testable criterion for the identification of cyanobacteria may bias their fossil record severely. We employed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to investigate the structure of calcareous skeletons in two microproblematica widespread in Palaeozoic marine ecosystems: Rothpletzella, hypothesized to be a cyanobacterium, and an incertae sedis microorganism Allonema. We used a calcareous trilobite shell as a BCM reference. The mineralized structure of Allonema has a simple single-layered structure of acicular crystals perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The c-axes of these crystals are parallel to the elongation and thereby normal to the surface of the organism. EBSD pole figures and misorientation axes distribution reveal a fibre texture around the c-axis with a small degree of variation (up to 30°), indicating a highly ordered structure. A comparable pattern was found in the trilobite shell. This structure allows excluding biologically induced mineralization as the mechanism of shell formation in Allonema. In Rothpletzella, the c-axes of the microcrystalline sheath show a broader clustering compared to Allonema, but still reveal crystals tending to be perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The misorientation axes of adjacent crystals show an approximately random distribution. Rothpletzella also shares morphological similarities with extant cyanobacteria. We

  15. Distinguishing Biologically Controlled Calcareous Biomineralization in Fossil Organisms Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Filip Päßler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although carbonate-precipitating cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems today, the criteria used to identify them in the geological record are subjective and rarely testable. Differences in the mode of biomineralization between cyanobacteria and eukaryotes, i.e., biologically induced calcification (BIM vs. biologically controlled calcification (BCM, result in different crystallographic structures which might be used as a criterion to test cyanobacterial affinities. Cyanobacteria are often used as a “wastebasket taxon,” to which various microfossils are assigned. The lack of a testable criterion for the identification of cyanobacteria may bias their fossil record severely. We employed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD to investigate the structure of calcareous skeletons in two microproblematica widespread in Palaeozoic marine ecosystems: Rothpletzella, hypothesized to be a cyanobacterium, and an incertae sedis microorganism Allonema. We used a calcareous trilobite shell as a BCM reference. The mineralized structure of Allonema has a simple single-layered structure of acicular crystals perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The c-axes of these crystals are parallel to the elongation and thereby normal to the surface of the organism. EBSD pole figures and misorientation axes distribution reveal a fiber texture around the c-axis with a small degree of variation (up to 30°, indicating a highly ordered structure. A comparable pattern was found in the trilobite shell. This structure allows excluding biologically induced mineralization as the mechanism of shell formation in Allonema. In Rothpletzella, the c-axes of the microcrystalline sheath show a broader clustering compared to Allonema, but still reveal crystals tending to be perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The misorientation axes of adjacent crystals show an approximately random distribution. Rothpletzella also shares morphological similarities with extant

  16. [REGULATING EFFECT OF ASSOCIATIVE MICROBIOTA ON THE RHYTHMS OF BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FUNGI AND BACTERIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhina, T Kh; Bukharin, O V; Nikolenko, M V; Paromova, Ya I; Perunova, N B

    2015-01-01

    Study the effect of exometabolites of associative microbiota on circadian dynamics of functional parameters, that reflect pathogenic and persistence properties of fungi and bacteria. Clinical isolates of Candida albicans, isolated-from intestine of healthy individuals and patients with candidosis, as well as clinical isolates and museum ATCC strains Staphylococcus. aureus 25923, Escherichia coli 35218 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27853 were taken for study of proliferative, adhesive, catalase, protease, phospholipase, hemolytic, anti-lysozyme, biofilm-forming activity. The results were treated statistically. C. albicans isolates, isolated from healthy individuals were revealed to be indifferent to the effect of bacterial metabolites. Chrono-infrastructure of biological properties of fungi altered under the effect of microbiota metabolites. Hospital isolates of S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa displayed a relative stability of physiological properties against the effect of bacterial-fungal metabolites as opposed to museum strains. The alterations of chrono-infrastructure of biological rhythms of microorganisms by bacterial-fungal metabolites of associants reflect the intensity of the biological system, that is inevitable during the process of formation of inter-microbial interactions.

  17. Physical characterization of functionalized spider silk: electronic and sensing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eden Steven, Jin Gyu Park, Anant Paravastu, Elsa Branco Lopes, James S Brooks, Ongi Englander, Theo Siegrist, Papatya Kaner and Rufina G Alamo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work explores functional, fundamental and applied aspects of naturally harvested spider silk fibers. Natural silk is a protein polymer where different amino acids control the physical properties of fibroin bundles, producing, for example, combinations of β-sheet (crystalline and amorphous (helical structural regions. This complexity presents opportunities for functional modification to obtain new types of material properties. Electrical conductivity is the starting point of this investigation, where the insulating nature of neat silk under ambient conditions is described first. Modification of the conductivity by humidity, exposure to polar solvents, iodine doping, pyrolization and deposition of a thin metallic film are explored next. The conductivity increases exponentially with relative humidity and/or solvent, whereas only an incremental increase occurs after iodine doping. In contrast, iodine doping, optimal at 70 °C, has a strong effect on the morphology of silk bundles (increasing their size, on the process of pyrolization (suppressing mass loss rates and on the resulting carbonized fiber structure (that becomes more robust against bending and strain. The effects of iodine doping and other functional parameters (vacuum and thin film coating motivated an investigation with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR to monitor doping-induced changes in the amino acid-protein backbone signature. MAS-NMR revealed a moderate effect of iodine on the helical and β-sheet structures, and a lesser effect of gold sputtering. The effects of iodine doping were further probed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, revealing a partial transformation of β-sheet-to-amorphous constituency. A model is proposed, based on the findings from the MAS-NMR and FTIR, which involves iodine-induced changes in the silk fibroin bundle environment that can account for the altered physical properties. Finally, proof

  18. Electronic structure, lattice dynamics, and optical properties of a novel van der Waals semiconductor heterostructure: InGaSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Hernández, Wilfredo; Elsayed, Hannan; Romero, Aldo H.; Bautista-Hernández, Alejandro; Olguín, Daniel; Cantarero, Andrés

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the property dependence of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of the number of layers and formation of heterostructures. Depending on the stacking, doping, edge effects, and interlayer distance, the properties can be modified, which opens the door to novel applications that require a detailed understanding of the atomic mechanisms responsible for those changes. In this work, we analyze the electronic properties and lattice dynamics of a heterostructure constructed by simultaneously stacking InSe layers and GaSe layers bounded by van der Waals forces. We have assumed the same space group of GaSe, P 6 ¯m 2 as it becomes the lower energy configuration for other considered stackings. The structural, vibrational, and optical properties of this layered compound have been calculated using density functional theory. The structure is shown to be energetically, thermally, and elastically stable, which indicates its possible chemical synthesis. A correlation of the theoretical physical properties with respect to its parent compounds is extensively discussed. One of the most interesting properties is the low thermal conductivity, which indicates its potential use in thermolectric applications. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of using electronic gap engineering methods, which can help us to tune the optical emission in a variable range close to that used in the field of biological systems (NIR). Finally, the importance of considering properly van der Waals dispersion in layered materials has been emphasized as included in the exchange correlation functional. As for the presence of atoms with important spin-orbit coupling, relativistic corrections have been included.

  19. Modification of electronic properties in insulators using ion microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, M.; Karlusic, M.; Bogdanovic Radovic, I.; Pastuovic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Medunic, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Development of techniques that use focused ion beams of MeV energy range for creation of new structures in materials by modifying their properties has been initiated in order to expand application possibilities of ion accelerators at the Ruder Boskovic Institute. In particular we have focused on heavy ions that create significantly larger radiation damage in materials when compared to protons and He ions. Structuring of radiation damage using the ion microbeam in crystalline materials has been developed and tested on silicon and diamond. Application possibilities of created structures came from the fact that radiation damage can decrease charge collection properties in silicon which may be of interest in production of position sensitive sensors. This approach has been demonstrated by creating position dependent response of silicon pin diodes. In the case of diamond, excessive radiation damage can increase conductivity which may be of interest for production of diamond based devices. Buried conductive lines have been produced in single crystal diamond. Additional application that use ion tracks created in different materials by heavy ion beams from 6.0 MV Tandem accelerator has also been developed. Application was first tested on polymers and subsequently on other materials of technological interest (such as SrTiO 3 ). Cl and I ion beams of energies above 18 MeV have been used in this application. Implantation of lower energy ions such as carbon between 800 and 2000 keV has been performed also, using both broad and micro beam in order to form nanodiamonds in SiO 2 . (author)

  20. Are Prompts Provided by Electronic Books as Effective for Teaching Preschoolers a Biological Concept as Those Provided by Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Gabrielle A.; Ganea, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Prior research indicates that shared book reading is an effective method for teaching biological concepts to young children. Adult questioning during reading enhances children's comprehension. We investigated whether adult prompting during the reading of an electronic book enhanced children's understanding of a biological…