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Sample records for biological motion recognition

  1. Brain correlates of recognition of communicative interactions from biological motion in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okruszek, Ł; Wordecha, M; Jarkiewicz, M; Kossowski, B; Lee, J; Marchewka, A

    2017-11-27

    Recognition of communicative interactions is a complex social cognitive ability which is associated with a specific neural activity in healthy individuals. However, neural correlates of communicative interaction processing from whole-body motion have not been known in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ). Therefore, the current study aims to examine the neural activity associated with recognition of communicative interactions in SCZ by using displays of the dyadic interactions downgraded to minimalistic point-light presentations. Twenty-six healthy controls (HC) and 25 SCZ were asked to judge whether two agents presented only by point-light displays were communicating or acting independently. Task-related activity and functional connectivity of brain structures were examined with General Linear Model and Generalized Psychophysiological Interaction approach, respectively. HC were significantly more efficient in recognizing each type of action than SCZ. At the neural level, the activity of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) was observed to be higher in HC compared with SCZ for communicative v. individual action processing. Importantly, increased connectivity of the right pSTS with structures associated with mentalizing (left pSTS) and mirroring networks (left frontal areas) was observed in HC, but not in SCZ, during the presentation of social interactions. Under-recruitment of the right pSTS, a structure known to have a pivotal role in social processing, may also be of importance for higher-order social cognitive deficits in SCZ. Furthermore, decreased task-related connectivity of the right pSTS may result in reduced use of additional sources of information (for instance motor resonance signals) during social cognitive processing in schizophrenia.

  2. Comparative Study on Interaction of Form and Motion Processing Streams by Applying Two Different Classifiers in Mechanism for Recognition of Biological Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Research on psychophysics, neurophysiology, and functional imaging shows particular representation of biological movements which contains two pathways. The visual perception of biological movements formed through the visual system called dorsal and ventral processing streams. Ventral processing stream is associated with the form information extraction; on the other hand, dorsal processing stream provides motion information. Active basic model (ABM) as hierarchical representation of the human object had revealed novelty in form pathway due to applying Gabor based supervised object recognition method. It creates more biological plausibility along with similarity with original model. Fuzzy inference system is used for motion pattern information in motion pathway creating more robustness in recognition process. Besides, interaction of these paths is intriguing and many studies in various fields considered it. Here, the interaction of the pathways to get more appropriated results has been investigated. Extreme learning machine (ELM) has been implied for classification unit of this model, due to having the main properties of artificial neural networks, but crosses from the difficulty of training time substantially diminished in it. Here, there will be a comparison between two different configurations, interactions using synergetic neural network and ELM, in terms of accuracy and compatibility. PMID:25276860

  3. Comparative Study on Interaction of Form and Motion Processing Streams by Applying Two Different Classifiers in Mechanism for Recognition of Biological Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardia Yousefi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on psychophysics, neurophysiology, and functional imaging shows particular representation of biological movements which contains two pathways. The visual perception of biological movements formed through the visual system called dorsal and ventral processing streams. Ventral processing stream is associated with the form information extraction; on the other hand, dorsal processing stream provides motion information. Active basic model (ABM as hierarchical representation of the human object had revealed novelty in form pathway due to applying Gabor based supervised object recognition method. It creates more biological plausibility along with similarity with original model. Fuzzy inference system is used for motion pattern information in motion pathway creating more robustness in recognition process. Besides, interaction of these paths is intriguing and many studies in various fields considered it. Here, the interaction of the pathways to get more appropriated results has been investigated. Extreme learning machine (ELM has been implied for classification unit of this model, due to having the main properties of artificial neural networks, but crosses from the difficulty of training time substantially diminished in it. Here, there will be a comparison between two different configurations, interactions using synergetic neural network and ELM, in terms of accuracy and compatibility.

  4. Deficient Biological Motion Perception in Schizophrenia: Results from a Motion Noise Paradigm

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    Jejoong eKim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficient processing of perceptual and cognitive information. However, it is not well understood how basic perceptual deficits contribute to higher level cognitive problems in this mental disorder. Perception of biological motion, a motion-based cognitive recognition task, relies on both basic visual motion processing and social cognitive processing, thus providing a useful paradigm to evaluate the potentially hierarchical relationship between these two levels of information processing. Methods: In this study, we designed a biological motion paradigm in which basic visual motion signals were manipulated systematically by incorporating different levels of motion noise. We measured the performances of schizophrenia patients (n=21 and healthy controls (n=22 in this biological motion perception task, as well as in coherent motion detection, theory of mind, and a widely used biological motion recognition task. Results: Schizophrenia patients performed the biological motion perception task with significantly lower accuracy than healthy controls when perceptual signals were moderately degraded by noise. A more substantial degradation of perceptual signals, through using additional noise, impaired biological motion perception in both groups. Performance levels on biological motion recognition, coherent motion detection and theory of mind tasks were also reduced in patients. Conclusion: The results from the motion-noise biological motion paradigm indicate that in the presence of visual motion noise, the processing of biological motion information in schizophrenia is deficient. Combined with the results of poor basic visual motion perception (coherent motion task and biological motion recognition, the association between basic motion signals and biological motion perception suggests a need to incorporate the improvement of visual motion perception in social cognitive remediation.

  5. Brief Report: Recognition of Emotional and Non-Emotional Biological Motion in Individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, B.; Wicker, B.; Moore, D. G.; Monfardini, E.; Duverger, H.; Da Fonseca, D.; Deruelle, C.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the perception of different components of biological movement in individuals with autism and Asperger syndrome. The ability to recognize a person's actions, subjective states, emotions, and objects conveyed by moving point-light displays was assessed in 19 participants with autism and 19 comparable typical control…

  6. Action Recognition using Motion Primitives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeslund, Thomas B.; Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft

    The number of potential applications has made automatic recognition of human actions a very active research area. Different approaches have been followed based on trajectories through some state space. In this paper we also model an action as a trajectory through a state space, but we represent...

  7. Motion Primitives for Action Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2007-01-01

    The number of potential applications has made automatic recognition of human actions a very active research area. Different approaches have been followed based on trajectories through some state space. In this paper we also model an action as a trajectory through a state space, but we represent t...

  8. Biological Motion Perception in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Cusack

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Typically developing adults can readily recognize human actions, even when conveyed to them via point-like markers placed on the body of the actor (Johansson, 1973. Previous research has suggested that children affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD are not equally sensitive to this type of visual information (Blake et al, 2003, but it remains unknown why ASD would impact the ability to perceive biological motion. We present evidence which looks at how adolescents and adults with autism are affected by specific factors which are important in biological motion perception, such as (eg, inter-agent synchronicity, upright/inverted, etc.

  9. Gait Recognition Using Wearable Motion Recording Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Snekkenes, Einar

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach, where gait is collected by the sensors attached to the person's body. Such wearable sensors record motion (e.g. acceleration) of the body parts during walking. The recorded motion signals are then investigated for person recognition purposes. We analyzed acceleration signals from the foot, hip, pocket and arm. Applying various methods, the best EER obtained for foot-, pocket-, arm- and hip- based user authentication were 5%, 7%, 10% and 13%, respectively. Furthermore, we present the results of our analysis on security assessment of gait. Studying gait-based user authentication (in case of hip motion) under three attack scenarios, we revealed that a minimal effort mimicking does not help to improve the acceptance chances of impostors. However, impostors who know their closest person in the database or the genders of the users can be a threat to gait-based authentication. We also provide some new insights toward the uniqueness of gait in case of foot motion. In particular, we revealed the following: a sideway motion of the foot provides the most discrimination, compared to an up-down or forward-backward directions; and different segments of the gait cycle provide different level of discrimination.

  10. Gait Recognition Using Wearable Motion Recording Sensors

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    Davrondzhon Gafurov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an alternative approach, where gait is collected by the sensors attached to the person's body. Such wearable sensors record motion (e.g. acceleration of the body parts during walking. The recorded motion signals are then investigated for person recognition purposes. We analyzed acceleration signals from the foot, hip, pocket and arm. Applying various methods, the best EER obtained for foot-, pocket-, arm- and hip- based user authentication were 5%, 7%, 10% and 13%, respectively. Furthermore, we present the results of our analysis on security assessment of gait. Studying gait-based user authentication (in case of hip motion under three attack scenarios, we revealed that a minimal effort mimicking does not help to improve the acceptance chances of impostors. However, impostors who know their closest person in the database or the genders of the users can be a threat to gait-based authentication. We also provide some new insights toward the uniqueness of gait in case of foot motion. In particular, we revealed the following: a sideway motion of the foot provides the most discrimination, compared to an up-down or forward-backward directions; and different segments of the gait cycle provide different level of discrimination.

  11. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer

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    Feng Hong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods.

  12. Human motion sensing and recognition a fuzzy qualitative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Honghai; Ji, Xiaofei; Chan, Chee Seng; Khoury, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the latest exciting advances in human motion sensing and recognition, from the theoretical development of fuzzy approaches to their applications. The topics covered include human motion recognition in 2D and 3D, hand motion analysis with contact sensors, and vision-based view-invariant motion recognition, especially from the perspective of Fuzzy Qualitative techniques. With the rapid development of technologies in microelectronics, computers, networks, and robotics over the last decade, increasing attention has been focused on human motion sensing and recognition in many emerging and active disciplines where human motions need to be automatically tracked, analyzed or understood, such as smart surveillance, intelligent human-computer interaction, robot motion learning, and interactive gaming. Current challenges mainly stem from the dynamic environment, data multi-modality, uncertain sensory information, and real-time issues. These techniques are shown to effectively address the ...

  13. Biological motion distorts size perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, Peter; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2017-02-01

    Visual illusions explore the limits of sensory processing and provide an ideal testbed to study perception. Size illusions - stimuli whose size is consistently misperceived - do not only result from sensory cues, but can also be induced by cognitive factors, such as social status. Here we investigate, whether the ecological relevance of biological motion can also distort perceived size. We asked observers to judge the size of point-light walkers (PLWs), configurations of dots whose movements induce the perception of human movement, and visually matched control stimuli (inverted PLWs). We find that upright PLWs are consistently judged as larger than inverted PLWs, while static point-light figures do not elicit the same effect. We also show the phenomenon using an indirect paradigm: observers judged the relative size of a disc that followed an inverted PLW larger than a disc following an upright PLW. We interpret this as a contrast effect: The upright PLW is perceived larger and thus the subsequent disc is judged smaller. Together, these results demonstrate that ecologically relevant biological-motion stimuli are perceived larger than visually matched control stimuli. Our findings present a novel case of illusory size perception, where ecological importance leads to a distorted perception of size.

  14. Action Recognition in Semi-synthetic Images using Motion Primitives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    This technical report describes an action recognition approach based on motion primitives. A few characteristic time instances are found in a sequence containing an action and the action is classified from these instances. The characteristic instances are defined solely on the human motion, hence...... motion primitives. The motion primitives are extracted by double difference images and represented by four features. In each frame the primitive, if any, that best explains the observed data is identified. This leads to a discrete recognition problem since a video sequence will be converted into a string...... achieving a recognition rate of 96.5%....

  15. Threats of Password Pattern Leakage Using Smartwatch Motion Recognition Sensors

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    Jihun Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the development of Internet of Things (IoT technologies, wearable markets have been growing rapidly. Smartwatches can be said to be the most representative product in wearable markets, and involve various hardware technologies in order to overcome the limitations of small hardware. Motion recognition sensors are a representative example of those hardware technologies. However, smartwatches and motion recognition sensors that can be worn by users may pose security threats of password pattern leakage. In the present paper, passwords are inferred through experiments to obtain password patterns inputted by users using motion recognition sensors, and verification of the results and the accuracy of the results is shown.

  16. View Invariant Gesture Recognition using 3D Motion Primitives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic recognition of human gestures. The method works with 3D image data from a range camera to achieve invariance to viewpoint. The recognition is based solely on motion from characteristic instances of the gestures. These instances are denoted 3D motion...... as a gesture using a probabilistic edit distance method. The system has been trained on frontal images (0deg camera rotation) and tested on 240 video sequences from 0deg and 45deg. An overall recognition rate of 82.9% is achieved. The recognition rate is independent of the viewpoint which shows that the method...

  17. Perception of biological motion from size-invariant body representations

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    Markus eLappe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The visual recognition of action is one of the socially most important and computationally demanding capacities of the human visual system. It combines visual shape recognition with complex non-rigid motion perception. Action presented as a point-light animation is a striking visual experience for anyone who sees it for the first time. Information about the shape and posture of the human body is sparse in point-light animations, but it is essential for action recognition. In the posturo-temporal filter model of biological motion perception posture information is picked up by visual neurons tuned to the form of the human body before body motion is calculated. We tested whether point-light stimuli are processed through posture recognition of the human body form by using a typical feature of form recognition, namely size invariance. We constructed a point-light stimulus that can only be perceived through a size-invariant mechanism. This stimulus changes rapidly in size from one image to the next. It thus disrupts continuity of early visuo-spatial properties but maintains continuity of the body posture representation. Despite this massive manipulation at the visuo-spatial level, size-changing point-light figures are spontaneously recognized by naive observers, and support discrimination of human body motion.

  18. Perception of biological motion from size-invariant body representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, Markus; Wittinghofer, Karin; de Lussanet, Marc H E

    2015-01-01

    The visual recognition of action is one of the socially most important and computationally demanding capacities of the human visual system. It combines visual shape recognition with complex non-rigid motion perception. Action presented as a point-light animation is a striking visual experience for anyone who sees it for the first time. Information about the shape and posture of the human body is sparse in point-light animations, but it is essential for action recognition. In the posturo-temporal filter model of biological motion perception posture information is picked up by visual neurons tuned to the form of the human body before body motion is calculated. We tested whether point-light stimuli are processed through posture recognition of the human body form by using a typical feature of form recognition, namely size invariance. We constructed a point-light stimulus that can only be perceived through a size-invariant mechanism. This stimulus changes rapidly in size from one image to the next. It thus disrupts continuity of early visuo-spatial properties but maintains continuity of the body posture representation. Despite this massive manipulation at the visuo-spatial level, size-changing point-light figures are spontaneously recognized by naive observers, and support discrimination of human body motion.

  19. Phosphate Recognition in Structural Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, Anna K.H.; Fischer, Felix R.; Diederich, François

    2007-01-01

    Drug-discovery research in the past decade has seen an increased selection of targets with phosphate recognition sites, such as protein kinases and phosphatases, in the past decade. This review attempts, with the help of database-mining tools, to give an overview of the most important principles in

  20. User-Independent Motion State Recognition Using Smartphone Sensors

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    Fuqiang Gu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of locomotion activities (e.g., walking, running, still is important for a wide range of applications like indoor positioning, navigation, location-based services, and health monitoring. Recently, there has been a growing interest in activity recognition using accelerometer data. However, when utilizing only acceleration-based features, it is difficult to differentiate varying vertical motion states from horizontal motion states especially when conducting user-independent classification. In this paper, we also make use of the newly emerging barometer built in modern smartphones, and propose a novel feature called pressure derivative from the barometer readings for user motion state recognition, which is proven to be effective for distinguishing vertical motion states and does not depend on specific users’ data. Seven types of motion states are defined and six commonly-used classifiers are compared. In addition, we utilize the motion state history and the characteristics of people’s motion to improve the classification accuracies of those classifiers. Experimental results show that by using the historical information and human’s motion characteristics, we can achieve user-independent motion state classification with an accuracy of up to 90.7%. In addition, we analyze the influence of the window size and smartphone pose on the accuracy.

  1. Arm Motion Recognition and Exercise Coaching System for Remote Interaction

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    Hong Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arm motion recognition and its related applications have become a promising human computer interaction modal due to the rapid integration of numerical sensors in modern mobile-phones. We implement a mobile-phone-based arm motion recognition and exercise coaching system that can help people carrying mobile-phones to do body exercising anywhere at any time, especially for the persons that have very limited spare time and are constantly traveling across cities. We first design improved k-means algorithm to cluster the collecting 3-axis acceleration and gyroscope data of person actions into basic motions. A learning method based on Hidden Markov Model is then designed to classify and recognize continuous arm motions of both learners and coaches, which also measures the action similarities between the persons. We implement the system on MIUI 2S mobile-phone and evaluate the system performance and its accuracy of recognition.

  2. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  3. Biologically inspired emotion recognition from speech

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    Buscicchio Cosimo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emotion recognition has become a fundamental task in human-computer interaction systems. In this article, we propose an emotion recognition approach based on biologically inspired methods. Specifically, emotion classification is performed using a long short-term memory (LSTM recurrent neural network which is able to recognize long-range dependencies between successive temporal patterns. We propose to represent data using features derived from two different models: mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC and the Lyon cochlear model. In the experimental phase, results obtained from the LSTM network and the two different feature sets are compared, showing that features derived from the Lyon cochlear model give better recognition results in comparison with those obtained with the traditional MFCC representation.

  4. Biological inspiration used for robots motion synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a biologically inspired method of gait generation. Bipedal gait pattern (for hip and knee joints) was taken into account giving the reference trajectories in a learning task. The four coupled oscillators were taught to generate the outputs similar to those in a human gait. After applying the correction functions the obtained generation method was validated using ZMP criterion. The formula suitable for real-time motion generation taking into account the positioning errors was also formulated. The small real robot prototype was tested to be able walk successfully following the elaborated motion pattern.

  5. Recognizing biological motion and emotions from point-light displays in autism spectrum disorders.

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    Evelien Nackaerts

    Full Text Available One of the main characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD are problems with social interaction and communication. Here, we explored ASD-related alterations in 'reading' body language of other humans. Accuracy and reaction times were assessed from two observational tasks involving the recognition of 'biological motion' and 'emotions' from point-light displays (PLDs. Eye movements were recorded during the completion of the tests. Results indicated that typically developed-participants were more accurate than ASD-subjects in recognizing biological motion or emotions from PLDs. No accuracy differences were revealed on two control-tasks (involving the indication of color-changes in the moving point-lights. Group differences in reaction times existed on all tasks, but effect sizes were higher for the biological and emotion recognition tasks. Biological motion recognition abilities were related to a person's ability to recognize emotions from PLDs. However, ASD-related atypicalities in emotion recognition could not entirely be attributed to more basic deficits in biological motion recognition, suggesting an additional ASD-specific deficit in recognizing the emotional dimension of the point light displays. Eye movements were assessed during the completion of tasks and results indicated that ASD-participants generally produced more saccades and shorter fixation-durations compared to the control-group. However, especially for emotion recognition, these altered eye movements were associated with reductions in task-performance.

  6. Speech recognition employing biologically plausible receptive fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Bothe, Hans-Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    The main idea of the project is to build a widely speaker-independent, biologically motivated automatic speech recognition (ASR) system. The two main differences between our approach and current state-of-the-art ASRs are that i) the features used here are based on the responses of neuronlike...... Model-based adaptation procedures. Two databases are used, TI46 for discrete speech a subset of the TIMIT database collected from speakers belonging to the New York dialect region. Each of the selection of 10 sentences is uttered once by each of 35 speakers. The major differences between the two data...... sets initiate the development and comparison of two distinct ASRs within the project, which will be presented in the following. Employing a reduced sampling frequency and bandwidth of the signals, the ASR algorithm reaches and goes beyond recognition results that are known from humans....

  7. Distribution-based dimensionality reduction applied to articulated motion recognition.

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    Nayak, Sunita; Sarkar, Sudeep; Loeding, Barbara

    2009-05-01

    Some articulated motion representations rely on frame-wise abstractions of the statistical distribution of low-level features such as orientation, color, or relational distributions. As configuration among parts changes with articulated motion, the distribution changes, tracing a trajectory in the latent space of distributions, which we call the configuration space. These trajectories can then be used for recognition using standard techniques such as dynamic time warping. The core theory in this paper concerns embedding the frame-wise distributions, which can be looked upon as probability functions, into a low-dimensional space so that we can estimate various meaningful probabilistic distances such as the Chernoff, Bhattacharya, Matusita, Kullback-Leibler (KL) or symmetric-KL distances based on dot products between points in this space. Apart from computational advantages, this representation also affords speed-normalized matching of motion signatures. Speed normalized representations can be formed by interpolating the configuration trajectories along their arc lengths, without using any knowledge of the temporal scale variations between the sequences. We experiment with five different probabilistic distance measures and show the usefulness of the representation in three different contexts-sign recognition (with large number of possible classes), gesture recognition (with person variations), and classification of human-human interaction sequences (with segmentation problems). We find the importance of using the right distance measure for each situation. The low-dimensional embedding makes matching two to three times faster, while achieving recognition accuracies that are close to those obtained without using a low-dimensional embedding. We also empirically establish the robustness of the representation with respect to low-level parameters, embedding parameters, and temporal-scale parameters.

  8. Image processing and recognition for biological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Seiichi

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which will be useful to analyze bioimages. Although this paper does not provide their technical details, it will be possible to grasp their main tasks and typical tools to handle the tasks. Image processing is a large research area to improve the visibility of an input image and acquire some valuable information from it. As the main tasks of image processing, this paper introduces gray-level transformation, binarization, image filtering, image segmentation, visual object tracking, optical flow and image registration. Image pattern recognition is the technique to classify an input image into one of the predefined classes and also has a large research area. This paper overviews its two main modules, that is, feature extraction module and classification module. Throughout the paper, it will be emphasized that bioimage is a very difficult target for even state-of-the-art image processing and pattern recognition techniques due to noises, deformations, etc. This paper is expected to be one tutorial guide to bridge biology and image processing researchers for their further collaboration to tackle such a difficult target. © 2013 The Author Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  9. Recognizing Biological Motion and Emotions from Point-Light Displays in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackaerts, Evelien; Wagemans, Johan; Helsen, Werner; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Wenderoth, Nicole; Alaerts, Kaat

    2012-01-01

    One of the main characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are problems with social interaction and communication. Here, we explored ASD-related alterations in ‘reading’ body language of other humans. Accuracy and reaction times were assessed from two observational tasks involving the recognition of ‘biological motion’ and ‘emotions’ from point-light displays (PLDs). Eye movements were recorded during the completion of the tests. Results indicated that typically developed-participants were more accurate than ASD-subjects in recognizing biological motion or emotions from PLDs. No accuracy differences were revealed on two control-tasks (involving the indication of color-changes in the moving point-lights). Group differences in reaction times existed on all tasks, but effect sizes were higher for the biological and emotion recognition tasks. Biological motion recognition abilities were related to a person’s ability to recognize emotions from PLDs. However, ASD-related atypicalities in emotion recognition could not entirely be attributed to more basic deficits in biological motion recognition, suggesting an additional ASD-specific deficit in recognizing the emotional dimension of the point light displays. Eye movements were assessed during the completion of tasks and results indicated that ASD-participants generally produced more saccades and shorter fixation-durations compared to the control-group. However, especially for emotion recognition, these altered eye movements were associated with reductions in task-performance. PMID:22970227

  10. Facial Expression Recognition Based on Facial Motion Patterns

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    Leila Farmohammadi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial expression is one of the most powerful and direct mediums embedded in human beings to communicate with other individuals’ feelings and abilities. In recent years, many surveys have been carried on facial expression analysis. With developments in machine vision and artificial intelligence, facial expression recognition is considered a key technique of the developments in computer interaction of mankind and is applied in the natural interaction between human and computer, machine vision and psycho- medical therapy. In this paper, we have developed a new method to recognize facial expressions based on discovering differences of facial expressions, and consequently appointed a unique pattern to each single expression.by analyzing the image by means of a neighboring window on it, this recognition system is locally estimated. The features are extracted as binary local features; and according to changes in points of windows, facial points get a directional motion per each facial expression. Using pointy motion of all facial expressions and stablishing a ranking system, we delete additional motion points that decrease and increase, respectively, the ranking size and strenghth. Classification is provided according to the nearest neighbor. In the conclusion of the paper, the results obtained from the experiments on tatal data of Cohn-Kanade demonstrate that our proposed algorithm, compared to previous methods (hierarchical algorithm combined with several features and morphological methods as well as geometrical algorithms, has a better performance and higher reliability.

  11. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

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    Gagliardi L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Results Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. Conclusion We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply.

  12. A Self-Powered Insole for Human Motion Recognition

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    Yingzhou Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomechanical energy harvesting is a feasible solution for powering wearable sensors by directly driving electronics or acting as wearable self-powered sensors. A wearable insole that not only can harvest energy from foot pressure during walking but also can serve as a self-powered human motion recognition sensor is reported. The insole is designed as a sandwich structure consisting of two wavy silica gel film separated by a flexible piezoelectric foil stave, which has higher performance compared with conventional piezoelectric harvesters with cantilever structure. The energy harvesting insole is capable of driving some common electronics by scavenging energy from human walking. Moreover, it can be used to recognize human motion as the waveforms it generates change when people are in different locomotion modes. It is demonstrated that different types of human motion such as walking and running are clearly classified by the insole without any external power source. This work not only expands the applications of piezoelectric energy harvesters for wearable power supplies and self-powered sensors, but also provides possible approaches for wearable self-powered human motion monitoring that is of great importance in many fields such as rehabilitation and sports science.

  13. Perception of biological motion and emotion in mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Julie D; Thompson, Claire; Rendell, Peter G; Phillips, Louise H; Carbert, Jessica; Sachdev, Perminder; Brodaty, Henry

    2012-09-01

    Participants diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia and controls completed measures that required decoding emotions from point-light displays of bodily motion, and static images of facial affect. Both of these measures tap social cognitive processes that are considered critical for social competency. Consistent with prior literature, both clinical groups were impaired on the static measure of facial affect recognition. The dementia (but not the MCI) group additionally showed difficulties interpreting biological motion cues. However, this did not reflect a specific deficit in decoding emotions, but instead a more generalized difficulty in processing visual motion (both to action and to emotion). These results align with earlier studies showing that visual motion processing is disrupted in dementia, but additionally show for the first time that this extends to the recognition of socially relevant biological motion. The absence of any MCI related impairment on the point-light biological emotion measure (coupled with deficits on the measure of facial affect recognition) also point to a potential disconnect between the processes implicated in the perception of emotion cues from static versus dynamic stimuli. For clinical (but not control) participants, performance on all recognition measures was inversely correlated with level of semantic memory impairment. (JINS, 2012, 18, 1-8).

  14. IQ Predicts Biological Motion Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M. D.; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2012-01-01

    Biological motion is easily perceived by neurotypical observers when encoded in point-light displays. Some but not all relevant research shows significant deficits in biological motion perception among those with ASD, especially with respect to emotional displays. We tested adults with and without ASD on the perception of masked biological motion…

  15. Human Action Recognition Using Ordinal Measure of Accumulated Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wonjun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for recognizing human actions from a single query action video. We propose an action recognition scheme based on the ordinal measure of accumulated motion, which is robust to variations of appearances. To this end, we first define the accumulated motion image (AMI using image differences. Then the AMI of the query action video is resized to a subimage by intensity averaging and a rank matrix is generated by ordering the sample values in the sub-image. By computing the distances from the rank matrix of the query action video to the rank matrices of all local windows in the target video, local windows close to the query action are detected as candidates. To find the best match among the candidates, their energy histograms, which are obtained by projecting AMI values in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, are compared with those of the query action video. The proposed method does not require any preprocessing task such as learning and segmentation. To justify the efficiency and robustness of our approach, the experiments are conducted on various datasets.

  16. TMS reveals flexible use of form and motion cues in biological motion perception

    OpenAIRE

    Mather, George; Battaglini, Luca; Campana, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    The perception of human movement is a key component of daily social interactions. Although extrastriate area MT+/V5 is closely associated with motion processing, its role in the processing of sparse ‘biological motion’ displays is still unclear. We developed two closed matched psychophysical tasks to assess simple coherent motion perception and biological motion perception, and measured changes in performance caused by application of TMS over MT+/V5. Performance of the simple motion discrimin...

  17. Self-Organizing Neural Integration of Pose-Motion Features for Human Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Ignacio Parisi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The visual recognition of complex, articulated human movements is fundamental for a wide range of artificial systems oriented towards human-robot communication, action classification, and action-driven perception. These challenging tasks may generally involve the processing of a huge amount of visual information and learning-based mechanisms for generalizing a set of training actions and classifying new samples. To operate in natural environments, a crucial property is the efficient and robust recognition of actions, also under noisy conditions caused by, for instance, systematic sensor errors and temporarily occluded persons. Studies of the mammalian visual system and its outperforming ability to process biological motion information suggest separate neural pathways for the distinct processing of pose and motion features at multiple levels and the subsequent integration of these visual cues for action perception. We present a neurobiologically-motivated approach to achieve noise-tolerant action recognition in real time. Our model consists of self-organizing Growing When Required (GWR networks that obtain progressively generalized representations of sensory inputs and learn inherent spatiotemporal dependencies. During the training, the GWR networks dynamically change their topological structure to better match the input space. We first extract pose and motion features from video sequences and then cluster actions in terms of prototypical pose-motion trajectories. Multi-cue trajectories from matching action frames are subsequently combined to provide action dynamics in the joint feature space. Reported experiments show that our approach outperforms previous results on a dataset of full-body actions captured with a depth sensor, and ranks among the best 21 results for a public benchmark of domestic daily actions.

  18. The contribution of the body and motion to whole person recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simhi, Noa; Yovel, Galit

    2016-05-01

    While the importance of faces in person recognition has been the subject of many studies, there are relatively few studies examining recognition of the whole person in motion even though this most closely resembles daily experience. Most studies examining the whole body in motion use point light displays, which have many advantages but are impoverished and unnatural compared to real life. To determine which factors are used when recognizing the whole person in motion we conducted two experiments using naturalistic videos. In Experiment 1 we used a matching task in which the first stimulus in each pair could either be a video or multiple still images from a video of the full body. The second stimulus, on which person recognition was performed, could be an image of either the full body or face alone. We found that the body contributed to person recognition beyond the face, but only after exposure to motion. Since person recognition was performed on still images, the contribution of motion to person recognition was mediated by form-from-motion processes. To assess whether dynamic identity signatures may also contribute to person recognition, in Experiment 2 we presented people in motion and examined person recognition from videos compared to still images. Results show that dynamic identity signatures did not contribute to person recognition beyond form-from-motion processes. We conclude that the face, body and form-from-motion processes all appear to play a role in unfamiliar person recognition, suggesting the importance of considering the whole body and motion when examining person perception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Perception of Biological Motion in Central and Peripheral Visual Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laicāne Ilze

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies analysing biological motion perception based on reduced number of dots have demonstrated that biological motion can be perceived even when only the lower part of the body is visible or when the number of dots representing the object is reduced. What is the minimal amount of information that enables biological motion to be distinguished from its scrambled version? The results of the current experiment demonstrate that biological motion can be distinguished from its scrambled version when the object is formed of approximately 5 (4.7 ± 0.1 dots. Additionally, we also investigated whether the threshold value for biological motion perception differs in central and peripheral visual fields. By using stimulus magnification, we demonstrate that the number of dots sufficient for biological motion perception is similar in the central visual field and near periphery. Hence, stimulus magnification can compensate for reduced task performance in the peripheral visual field. The current results suggest that reduced performance of biological motion perception in the peripheral visual field (as demonstrated in other studies is due to difficulties with the global perception of biological motion.

  20. Contribution of coherent motion to the perception of biological motion among persons with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine M Y Spencer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available People with schizophrenia (SCZ are impaired in several domains of visual processing, including thediscrimination and detection of biological motion. However, the mechanisms underlying SCZ-related biological motion processing deficits are unknown. Moreover, whether these impairments are specific to biological motion or represent a more widespread visual motion processing deficit is unclear. In the current study, three experiments were conducted to investigate the contribution of global coherent motion processing to biological motion perception among patients with SCZ. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with SCZ (n=33 and healthy controls (n=33 were asked to discriminate the direction of motion from upright and inverted point-light walkers in the presence and absence of a noise mask. Additionally, participants discriminated the direction of non-biological global coherent motion. In Experiment 3, participants discriminated the direction of motion from upright scrambled walkers (which contained only local motion information and upright random-position walkers (which contained only global form information. Consistent with previous research, results from Experiment 1 and 2 showed that people with SCZ exhibited deficits in the direction discrimination of point-light walkers; however, this impairment was accounted for by decreased performance in the coherent motion control task. Furthermore, results from Experiment 3 demonstrated similar performance in the discrimination of scrambled and random position point-light walkers.

  1. Impaired Perception of Biological Motion in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaywant, Abhishek; Shiffrar, Maggie; Roy, Serge; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined biological motion perception in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Biological motion perception is related to one’s own motor function and depends on the integrity of brain areas affected in PD, including posterior superior temporal sulcus. If deficits in biological motion perception exist, they may be specific to perceiving natural/fast walking patterns that individuals with PD can no longer perform, and may correlate with disease-related motor dysfunction. Method 26 non-demented individuals with PD and 24 control participants viewed videos of point-light walkers and scrambled versions that served as foils, and indicated whether each video depicted a human walking. Point-light walkers varied by gait type (natural, parkinsonian) and speed (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 m/s). Participants also completed control tasks (object motion, coherent motion perception), a contrast sensitivity assessment, and a walking assessment. Results The PD group demonstrated significantly less sensitivity to biological motion than the control group (pperception (p=.02, Cohen’s d=.68). There was no group difference in coherent motion perception. Although individuals with PD had slower walking speed and shorter stride length than control participants, gait parameters did not correlate with biological motion perception. Contrast sensitivity and coherent motion perception also did not correlate with biological motion perception. Conclusion PD leads to a deficit in perceiving biological motion, which is independent of gait dysfunction and low-level vision changes, and may therefore arise from difficulty perceptually integrating form and motion cues in posterior superior temporal sulcus. PMID:26949927

  2. Biological motion cues aid identification of self-motion from optic flow but not heading detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Hugh; Lappe, Markus

    2017-10-01

    When we move through the world, a pattern of expanding optic flow is generated on the retina. In completely rigid environments, this pattern signals one's direction of heading and is an important source of information for navigation. When we walk towards an oncoming person, the optic environment is not rigid, as the motion vectors generated by the other person represent a composite of that person's movement, his or her limb motion, and the observer's self-motion. Though this biological motion obfuscates the optic flow pattern, it also provides cues about the movement of other actors in the environment. It may be the case that the visual system takes advantage of these cues to simplify the decomposition of optic flow in the presence of other moving people. The current study sought to probe this possibility. In four experiments self-motion was simulated through an environment that was empty except for a single, walking point-light biological motion stimulus. We found that by using biological motion cues, observers were able to identify the presence of self-motion despite the lack of stable scene information. However, when estimating heading based on these stimuli, the pattern of observer heading estimates could be approximately reproduced by computing the vector sum of the walker's translation and the stimulated self-motion. This suggests that though biological motion can be used to disentangle self-motion in ambiguous situations, optic flow analysis does not use this information to derive heading estimates.

  3. TMS reveals flexible use of form and motion cues in biological motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, George; Battaglini, Luca; Campana, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    The perception of human movement is a key component of daily social interactions. Although extrastriate area MT+/V5 is closely associated with motion processing, its role in the processing of sparse 'biological motion' displays is still unclear. We developed two closed matched psychophysical tasks to assess simple coherent motion perception and biological motion perception, and measured changes in performance caused by application of TMS over MT+/V5. Performance of the simple motion discrimination task was significantly depressed by TMS stimulation, and highly correlated within observers in TMS conditions, but there was no significant decrement in performance of the biological motion task, despite low intra-observer correlations across TMS conditions. We conclude that extrastriate area MT+/V5 is an obligatory waypoint in the neural processing of simple coherent motion, but is not obligatory for the processing of biological motion. Results are consistent with a dual neural processing route for biological motion processing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. The application of biological motion research: biometrics, sport, and the military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Kylie; Ellem, Eathan; Baxter, David

    2015-02-01

    The body of research that examines the perception of biological motion is extensive and explores the factors that are perceived from biological motion and how this information is processed. This research demonstrates that individuals are able to use relative (temporal and spatial) information from a person's movement to recognize factors, including gender, age, deception, emotion, intention, and action. The research also demonstrates that movement presents idiosyncratic properties that allow individual discrimination, thus providing the basis for significant exploration in the domain of biometrics and social signal processing. Medical forensics, safety garments, and victim selection domains also have provided a history of research on the perception of biological motion applications; however, a number of additional domains present opportunities for application that have not been explored in depth. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the current applications of biological motion-based research and to propose a number of areas where biological motion research, specific to recognition, could be applied in the future.

  5. Impairments of biological motion perception in congenital prosopagnosia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Lange

    Full Text Available Prosopagnosia is a deficit in recognizing people from their faces. Acquired prosopagnosia results after brain damage, developmental or congenital prosopagnosia (CP is not caused by brain lesion, but has presumably been present from early childhood onwards. Since other sensory, perceptual, and cognitive abilities are largely spared, CP is considered to be a stimulus-specific deficit, limited to face processing. Given that recent behavioral and imaging studies indicate a close relationship of face and biological-motion perception in healthy adults, we hypothesized that biological motion processing should be impaired in CP. Five individuals with CP and ten matched healthy controls were tested with diverse biological-motion stimuli and tasks. Four of the CP individuals showed severe deficits in biological-motion processing, while one performed within the lower range of the controls. A discriminant analysis classified all participants correctly with a very high probability for each participant. These findings demonstrate that in CP, impaired perception of faces can be accompanied by impaired biological-motion perception. We discuss implications for dedicated and shared mechanisms involved in the perception of faces and biological motion.

  6. Action Recognition Using Motion Primitives and Probabilistic Edit Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe a recognition approach based on the notion of primitives. As opposed to recognizing actions based on temporal trajectories or temporal volumes, primitive-based recognition is based on representing a temporal sequence containing an action by only a few characteristic time.......3%. This is concluded to be a promising result but also leaves room for further improvements....

  7. Embodied Learning of a Generative Neural Model for Biological Motion Perception and Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eSchrodt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although an action observation network and mirror neurons for understanding the actions and intentions of others have been under deep, interdisciplinary consideration over recent years, it remains largely unknown how the brain manages to map visually perceived biological motion of others onto its own motor system. This paper shows how such a mapping may be established, even if the biologically motion is visually perceived from a new vantage point. We introduce a learning artificial neural network model and evaluate it on full body motion tracking recordings. The model implements an embodied, predictive inference approach. It first learns to correlate and segment multimodal sensory streams of own bodily motion. In doing so, it becomes able to anticipate motion progression, to complete missing modal information, and to self-generate learned motion sequences. When biological motion of another person is observed, this self-knowledge is utilized to recognize similar motion patterns and predict their progress. Due to the relative encodings, the model shows strong robustness in recognition despite observing rather large varieties of body morphology and posture dynamics. By additionally equipping the model with the capability to rotate its visual frame of reference, it is able to deduce the visual perspective onto the observed person, establishing full consistency to the embodied self-motion encodings by means of active inference. In further support of its neuro-cognitive plausibility, we also model typical bistable perceptions when crucial depth information is missing. In sum, the introduced neural model proposes a solution to the problem of how the human brain may establish correspondence between observed bodily motion and its own motor system, thus offering a mechanism that supports the development of mirror neurons.

  8. Biological and chemical terrorism: recognition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noeller, T P

    2001-12-01

    Primary care physicians will be on the front line in detecting and managing any future terrorist attacks that use chemical or biological agents. This article reviews how to recognize and treat disease caused by exposure to nerve agents, blistering agents, hydrogen cyanide, ricin, anthrax, smallpox, plague, and botulinum toxin.

  9. The Importance of Spatiotemporal Information in Biological Motion Perception: White Noise Presented with a Step-like Motion Activates the Biological Motion Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Akiko; Callan, Daniel; Ando, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Humans can easily recognize the motion of living creatures using only a handful of point-lights that describe the motion of the main joints (biological motion perception). This special ability to perceive the motion of animate objects signifies the importance of the spatiotemporal information in perceiving biological motion. The posterior STS (pSTS) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) region have been established by many functional neuroimaging studies as a locus for biological motion perception. Because listening to a walking human also activates the pSTS/pMTG region, the region has been proposed to be supramodal in nature. In this study, we investigated whether the spatiotemporal information from simple auditory stimuli is sufficient to activate this biological motion area. We compared spatially moving white noise, having a running-like tempo that was consistent with biological motion, with stationary white noise. The moving-minus-stationary contrast showed significant differences in activation of the pSTS/pMTG region. Our results suggest that the spatiotemporal information of the auditory stimuli is sufficient to activate the biological motion area.

  10. Development of biological movement recognition by interaction between active basis model and fuzzy optical flow division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Bardia; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003). Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human). Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach.

  11. An asymmetry of translational biological motion perception in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin eHastings

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Biological motion perception is served by a network of regions in the occipital, posterior temporal and parietal lobe, overlapping areas of reduced cortical volume in schizophrenia. The atrophy in these regions is assumed to account for deficits in biological motion perception described in schizophrenia but it is unknown whether the asymmetry of atrophy described in previous studies has a perceptual correlate. Here we look for possible differences in sensitivity to leftwards and rightwards translation of point-light biological motion in data collected for a previous study and explore its underlying neurobiology using functional imaging. Methods n=64 patients with schizophrenia and n=64 controls performed a task requiring the detection of leftward or rightward biological motion using a standard psychophysical staircase procedure. 6 control subjects took part in the functional imaging experiment. Results We found a deficit of leftward but not rightward biological motion (leftward biological motion % accuracy patients = 57.9%±14.3; controls = 63.6%±11.3 p=0.01; rightward biological motion patients = 62.7%±12.4; controls = 64.1%±11.7; p>0.05. The deficit reflected differences in distribution of leftward and rightward accuracy bias in the two populations. Directional bias correlated with functional outcome as measured by the Role Functioning Scale in the patient group when co-varying for negative symptoms (r=-0.272, p=0.016. Cortical regions with preferential activation for leftwards or rightwards translation were identified in both hemispheres suggesting the psychophysical findings could not be accounted for by selective atrophy or functional change in one hemisphere alone. Conclusions The findings point to translational direction as a novel functional probe to help understand the underlying neural mechanisms of wider cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  12. Maritime Group Motion Analysis: Representation, Learning, Recognition, and Deviation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    represent behaviors. Keywords: Group tracks, motion analysis, behavior pattern 1 Introduction Motion activity analysis of single and multiple...its decomposition into anti-symmetric, and symmetric (both with and without trace) elements of the velocity gradient tensor is attributed to Cauchy...orientation of the deformation axis (see Fig.1). These geometric invariants are simply the eigenvalues of the decomposed velocity gradient tensor , and

  13. Motion Imitation and Recognition using Parametric Hidden Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Dennis; Ude, Ales; Krüger, Volker

    2008-01-01

    The recognition and synthesis of parametric movements play an important role in human-robot interaction. To understand the whole purpose of an arm movement of a human agent, both its recognition (e.g., pointing or reaching) as well as its parameterization (i.e., where the agent is pointing at......) are important. Only together they convey the whole meaning of an action. Similarly, to imitate a movement, the robot needs to select the proper action and parameterize it, e.g., by the relative position of the object that needs to be grasped. We propose to utilize parametric hidden Markov models (PHMMs), which...... extend the classical HMMs by introducing a joint parameterization of the observation densities, to simultaneously solve the problems of action recognition, parameterization of the observed actions, and action synthesis. The proposed approach was fully implemented on a humanoid robot HOAP-3. To evaluate...

  14. Action Recognition Using Motion Primitives and Probabilistic Edit Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2006-01-01

    instances. The human whereabouts at these instances are extracted by double difference images and represented by four features. In each frame the primitive, if any, that best explains the observed data is identified. This leads to a discrete recognition problem since a video sequence will be converted...

  15. Fusion of Smartphone Motion Sensors for Physical Activity Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, M.; Bosch, S.; Durmaz, O.; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2014-01-01

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting

  16. Activity Recognition Invariant to Sensor Orientation with Wearable Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtman, Aras; Barshan, Billur

    2017-08-09

    Most activity recognition studies that employ wearable sensors assume that the sensors are attached at pre-determined positions and orientations that do not change over time. Since this is not the case in practice, it is of interest to develop wearable systems that operate invariantly to sensor position and orientation. We focus on invariance to sensor orientation and develop two alternative transformations to remove the effect of absolute sensor orientation from the raw sensor data. We test the proposed methodology in activity recognition with four state-of-the-art classifiers using five publicly available datasets containing various types of human activities acquired by different sensor configurations. While the ordinary activity recognition system cannot handle incorrectly oriented sensors, the proposed transformations allow the sensors to be worn at any orientation at a given position on the body, and achieve nearly the same activity recognition performance as the ordinary system for which the sensor units are not rotatable. The proposed techniques can be applied to existing wearable systems without much effort, by simply transforming the time-domain sensor data at the pre-processing stage.

  17. A modified multi-channel EMG feature for upper limb motion pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, An-Chih; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lin, Ta-Te

    2012-01-01

    The EMG signal is a well-known and useful biomedical signal. Much information related to muscles and human motions is included in EMG signals. Many approaches have proposed various methods that tried to recognize human motion via EMG signals. However, one of the critical problems of motion pattern recognition is that the performance of recognition is easily affected by the normalization procedure and may not work well on different days. In this paper, a modified feature of the multi-channel EMG signal is proposed and the normalization procedure is also simplified by using this modified feature. To recognize motion pattern, we applied the support vector machine (SVM) to build the motion pattern recognition model. In training and validation procedures, we used the 2-DoF exoskeleton robot arm system to do the designed pose, and the multi-channel EMG signals were obtained while the user resisted the robot. Experiment results indicate that the performance of applying the proposed feature (94.9%) is better than that of conventional features. Moreover, the performances of the recognition model, which applies the modified feature to recognize the motions on different days, are more stable than other conventional features.

  18. Telescopic Vector Composition and Polar Accumulated Motion Residuals for Feature Extraction in Arabic Sign Language Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaleh K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces two novel approaches for feature extraction applied to video-based Arabic sign language recognition, namely, motion representation through motion estimation and motion representation through motion residuals. In the former, motion estimation is used to compute the motion vectors of a video-based deaf sign or gesture. In the preprocessing stage for feature extraction, the horizontal and vertical components of such vectors are rearranged into intensity images and transformed into the frequency domain. In the second approach, motion is represented through motion residuals. The residuals are then thresholded and transformed into the frequency domain. Since in both approaches the temporal dimension of the video-based gesture needs to be preserved, hidden Markov models are used for classification tasks. Additionally, this paper proposes to project the motion information in the time domain through either telescopic motion vector composition or polar accumulated differences of motion residuals. The feature vectors are then extracted from the projected motion information. After that, model parameters can be evaluated by using simple classifiers such as Fisher's linear discriminant. The paper reports on the classification accuracy of the proposed solutions. Comparisons with existing work reveal that up to 39% of the misclassifications have been corrected.

  19. Telescopic Vector Composition and Polar Accumulated Motion Residuals for Feature Extraction in Arabic Sign Language Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Shanableh

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces two novel approaches for feature extraction applied to video-based Arabic sign language recognition, namely, motion representation through motion estimation and motion representation through motion residuals. In the former, motion estimation is used to compute the motion vectors of a video-based deaf sign or gesture. In the preprocessing stage for feature extraction, the horizontal and vertical components of such vectors are rearranged into intensity images and transformed into the frequency domain. In the second approach, motion is represented through motion residuals. The residuals are then thresholded and transformed into the frequency domain. Since in both approaches the temporal dimension of the video-based gesture needs to be preserved, hidden Markov models are used for classification tasks. Additionally, this paper proposes to project the motion information in the time domain through either telescopic motion vector composition or polar accumulated differences of motion residuals. The feature vectors are then extracted from the projected motion information. After that, model parameters can be evaluated by using simple classifiers such as Fisher's linear discriminant. The paper reports on the classification accuracy of the proposed solutions. Comparisons with existing work reveal that up to 39% of the misclassifications have been corrected.

  20. Motion Primitives and Probabilistic Edit Distance for Action Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    the actions as a sequence of temporal isolated instances, denoted primitives. These primitives are each defined by four features extracted from motion images. The primitives are recognized in each frame based on a trained classifier resulting in a sequence of primitives. From this sequence we recognize...

  1. Patient cloth with motion recognition sensors based on flexible piezoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngsu Cha; Kihyuk Nam; Doik Kim

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce a patient cloth for position monitoring using motion recognition sensors based on flexible piezoelectric materials. The motion recognition sensors are embedded in three parts, which are the knee, hip and back, in the patient cloth. We use polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as the flexible piezoelectric material for the sensors. By using the piezoelectric effect of the PVDF, we detect electrical signals when the cloth is bent or extended. We analyze the sensing values for our human motions by processing the sensor outputs in a custom-made program. Specifically, we focus on the transitions between standing and sitting, and sitting knee extension and supine position, which are important motions for patient monitoring.

  2. Handwriting Recognition in Free Space Using WIMU-Based Hand Motion Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashidhar Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a wireless-inertial-measurement-unit- (WIMU- based hand motion analysis technique for handwriting recognition in three-dimensional (3D space. The proposed handwriting recognition system is not bounded by any limitations or constraints; users have the freedom and flexibility to write characters in free space. It uses hand motion analysis to segment hand motion data from a WIMU device that incorporates magnetic, angular rate, and gravity sensors (MARG and a sensor fusion algorithm to automatically distinguish segments that represent handwriting from nonhandwriting data in continuous hand motion data. Dynamic time warping (DTW recognition algorithm is used to recognize handwriting in real-time. We demonstrate that a user can freely write in air using an intuitive WIMU as an input and hand motion analysis device to recognize the handwriting in 3D space. The experimental results for recognizing handwriting in free space show that the proposed method is effective and efficient for other natural interaction techniques, such as in computer games and real-time hand gesture recognition applications.

  3. Double-Windows-Based Motion Recognition in Multi-Floor Buildings Assisted by a Built-In Barometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maolin; Li, Huaiyu; Wang, Yuan; Li, Fei; Chen, Xiuwan

    2018-04-01

    Accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers in smartphones are often used to recognize human motions. Since it is difficult to distinguish between vertical motions and horizontal motions in the data provided by these built-in sensors, the vertical motion recognition accuracy is relatively low. The emergence of a built-in barometer in smartphones improves the accuracy of motion recognition in the vertical direction. However, there is a lack of quantitative analysis and modelling of the barometer signals, which is the basis of barometer's application to motion recognition, and a problem of imbalanced data also exists. This work focuses on using the barometers inside smartphones for vertical motion recognition in multi-floor buildings through modelling and feature extraction of pressure signals. A novel double-windows pressure feature extraction method, which adopts two sliding time windows of different length, is proposed to balance recognition accuracy and response time. Then, a random forest classifier correlation rule is further designed to weaken the impact of imbalanced data on recognition accuracy. The results demonstrate that the recognition accuracy can reach 95.05% when pressure features and the improved random forest classifier are adopted. Specifically, the recognition accuracy of the stair and elevator motions is significantly improved with enhanced response time. The proposed approach proves effective and accurate, providing a robust strategy for increasing accuracy of vertical motions.

  4. Hand based visual intent recognition algorithm for wheelchair motion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luhandjula, T

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available for wheelchair motion T. Luhandjula1,2, K. Djouani1, Y. Hamam1, B.J. van Wyk1, Q. Williams2 1. French South African Technical Institute in Electronics at the Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, RSA 2. Meraka Institute at the Council for Scientific... shown in Fig. 5 is used. From empirical study [1] the topology of the multilayer perceptron (MLP) is chosen to consist of a two neuron input layer, a 10 neuron hidden layer and the output. The training is performed using a backpropagation algorithm...

  5. Efficiencies for parts and wholes in biological-motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromfield, W Drew; Gold, Jason M

    2017-10-01

    People can reliably infer the actions, intentions, and mental states of fellow humans from body movements (Blake & Shiffrar, 2007). Previous research on such biological-motion perception has suggested that the movements of the feet may play a particularly important role in making certain judgments about locomotion (Chang & Troje, 2009; Troje & Westhoff, 2006). One account of this effect is that the human visual system may have evolved specialized processes that are efficient for extracting information carried by the feet (Troje & Westhoff, 2006). Alternatively, the motion of the feet may simply be more discriminable than that of other parts of the body. To dissociate these two possibilities, we measured people's ability to discriminate the walking direction of stimuli in which individual body parts (feet, hands) were removed or shown in isolation. We then compared human performance to that of a statistically optimal observer (Gold, Tadin, Cook, & Blake, 2008), giving us a measure of humans' discriminative ability independent of the information available (a quantity known as efficiency). We found that efficiency was highest when the hands and the feet were shown in isolation. A series of follow-up experiments suggested that observers were relying on a form-based cue with the isolated hands (specifically, the orientation of their path through space) and a motion-based cue with the isolated feet to achieve such high efficiencies. We relate our findings to previous proposals of a distinction between form-based and motion-based mechanisms in biological-motion perception.

  6. A robust and biologically plausible spike pattern recognition network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric; Perrone, Ben P; Sen, Kamal; Billimoria, Cyrus P

    2010-11-17

    The neural mechanisms that enable recognition of spiking patterns in the brain are currently unknown. This is especially relevant in sensory systems, in which the brain has to detect such patterns and recognize relevant stimuli by processing peripheral inputs; in particular, it is unclear how sensory systems can recognize time-varying stimuli by processing spiking activity. Because auditory stimuli are represented by time-varying fluctuations in frequency content, it is useful to consider how such stimuli can be recognized by neural processing. Previous models for sound recognition have used preprocessed or low-level auditory signals as input, but complex natural sounds such as speech are thought to be processed in auditory cortex, and brain regions involved in object recognition in general must deal with the natural variability present in spike trains. Thus, we used neural recordings to investigate how a spike pattern recognition system could deal with the intrinsic variability and diverse response properties of cortical spike trains. We propose a biologically plausible computational spike pattern recognition model that uses an excitatory chain of neurons to spatially preserve the temporal representation of the spike pattern. Using a single neural recording as input, the model can be trained using a spike-timing-dependent plasticity-based learning rule to recognize neural responses to 20 different bird songs with >98% accuracy and can be stimulated to evoke reverse spike pattern playback. Although we test spike train recognition performance in an auditory task, this model can be applied to recognize sufficiently reliable spike patterns from any neuronal system.

  7. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, M.; Bosch, S.; Durmaz, O.; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such

  8. Perception of social interactions for spatially scrambled biological motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Steven M; Lu, Hongjing

    2014-01-01

    It is vitally important for humans to detect living creatures in the environment and to analyze their behavior to facilitate action understanding and high-level social inference. The current study employed naturalistic point-light animations to examine the ability of human observers to spontaneously identify and discriminate socially interactive behaviors between two human agents. Specifically, we investigated the importance of global body form, intrinsic joint movements, extrinsic whole-body movements, and critically, the congruency between intrinsic and extrinsic motions. Motion congruency is hypothesized to be particularly important because of the constraint it imposes on naturalistic action due to the inherent causal relationship between limb movements and whole body motion. Using a free response paradigm in Experiment 1, we discovered that many naïve observers (55%) spontaneously attributed animate and/or social traits to spatially-scrambled displays of interpersonal interaction. Total stimulus motion energy was strongly correlated with the likelihood that an observer would attribute animate/social traits, as opposed to physical/mechanical traits, to the scrambled dot stimuli. In Experiment 2, we found that participants could identify interactions between spatially-scrambled displays of human dance as long as congruency was maintained between intrinsic/extrinsic movements. Violating the motion congruency constraint resulted in chance discrimination performance for the spatially-scrambled displays. Finally, Experiment 3 showed that scrambled point-light dancing animations violating this constraint were also rated as significantly less interactive than animations with congruent intrinsic/extrinsic motion. These results demonstrate the importance of intrinsic/extrinsic motion congruency for biological motion analysis, and support a theoretical framework in which early visual filters help to detect animate agents in the environment based on several fundamental

  9. Perception of social interactions for spatially scrambled biological motion.

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    Steven M Thurman

    Full Text Available It is vitally important for humans to detect living creatures in the environment and to analyze their behavior to facilitate action understanding and high-level social inference. The current study employed naturalistic point-light animations to examine the ability of human observers to spontaneously identify and discriminate socially interactive behaviors between two human agents. Specifically, we investigated the importance of global body form, intrinsic joint movements, extrinsic whole-body movements, and critically, the congruency between intrinsic and extrinsic motions. Motion congruency is hypothesized to be particularly important because of the constraint it imposes on naturalistic action due to the inherent causal relationship between limb movements and whole body motion. Using a free response paradigm in Experiment 1, we discovered that many naïve observers (55% spontaneously attributed animate and/or social traits to spatially-scrambled displays of interpersonal interaction. Total stimulus motion energy was strongly correlated with the likelihood that an observer would attribute animate/social traits, as opposed to physical/mechanical traits, to the scrambled dot stimuli. In Experiment 2, we found that participants could identify interactions between spatially-scrambled displays of human dance as long as congruency was maintained between intrinsic/extrinsic movements. Violating the motion congruency constraint resulted in chance discrimination performance for the spatially-scrambled displays. Finally, Experiment 3 showed that scrambled point-light dancing animations violating this constraint were also rated as significantly less interactive than animations with congruent intrinsic/extrinsic motion. These results demonstrate the importance of intrinsic/extrinsic motion congruency for biological motion analysis, and support a theoretical framework in which early visual filters help to detect animate agents in the environment based on

  10. Micro-motion Recognition of Spatial Cone Target Based on ISAR Image Sequences

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    Changyong Shu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accurate micro-motions recognition of spatial cone target is the foundation of the characteristic parameter acquisition. For this reason, a micro-motion recognition method based on the distinguishing characteristics extracted from the Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR sequences is proposed in this paper. The projection trajectory formula of cone node strong scattering source and cone bottom slip-type strong scattering sources, which are located on the spatial cone target, are deduced under three micro-motion types including nutation, precession, and spinning, and the correctness is verified by the electromagnetic simulation. By comparison, differences are found among the projection of the scattering sources with different micro-motions, the coordinate information of the scattering sources in the Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar sequences is extracted by the CLEAN algorithm, and the spinning is recognized by setting the threshold value of Doppler. The double observation points Interacting Multiple Model Kalman Filter is used to separate the scattering sources projection of the nutation target or precession target, and the cross point number of each scattering source’s projection track is used to classify the nutation or precession. Finally, the electromagnetic simulation data are used to verify the effectiveness of the micro-motion recognition method.

  11. Pattern recognition software and techniques for biological image analysis.

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    Lior Shamir

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays.

  12. Recognition of Biological Motion in Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parron, Carole; Da Fonseca, David; Santos, Andreia; Moore, David G.; Monfardini, Elisa; Deruelle, Christine

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that autistic children experience difficulties in processing and recognizing emotions. Most relevant studies have explored the perception of faces. However, context and bodily gestures are also sources from which we derive emotional meanings. We tested 23 autistic children and 23 typically developing control children on their…

  13. Human motion segmentation and recognition using machine vision for mechanical assembly operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiannan; Liu, Mingzhou; Wang, Xiaoqiao; Ge, Maogen; Lin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The observation, decomposition and record of motion are usually accomplished through artificial means during the process of motion analysis. This method not only has a heavy workload, its efficiency is also very low. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel method to segment and recognize continuous human motion automatically based on machine vision for mechanical assembly operation. First, the content-based dynamic key frame extraction technology was utilized to extract key frames from video stream, and then automatic segmentation of action was implemented. Further, the SIFT feature points of the region of interest (ROIs) were extracted, on the basis of which the characteristic vector of the key frame was derived. The feature vector can be used not only to represent the characteristic of motion, but also to describe the connection between motion and environment. Finally, the classifier is constructed based on support vector machine (SVM) to classify feature vectors, and the type of therblig is identified according to the classification results. Our approach enables robust therblig recognition in challenging situations (such as changing of light intensity, dynamic backgrounds) and allows automatic segmentation of motion sequences. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach achieves recognition rates of 96.00 % on sample video which captured on the assembly line.

  14. Impaired global, and compensatory local, biological motion processing in people with high levels of autistic traits

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    Jeroen J A Van Boxtel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD are hypothesized to have poor high-level processing but superior low-level processing, causing impaired social recognition, and a focus on non-social stimulus contingencies. Biological motion perception provides an ideal domain to investigate exactly how ASD modulates the interaction between low and high-level processing, because it involves multiple processing stages, and carries many important social cues. We investigated individual differences among typically developing observers in biological motion processing, and whether such individual differences associate with the number of autistic traits. In Experiment 1, we found that individuals with fewer autistic traits were automatically and involuntarily attracted to global biological motion information, whereas individuals with more autistic traits did not show this pre-attentional distraction. We employed an action adaptation paradigm in the second study to show that individuals with more autistic traits were able to compensate for deficits in global processing with an increased involvement in local processing. Our findings can be interpreted within a predictive coding framework, which characterizes the functional relationship between local and global processing stages, and explains how these stages contribute to the perceptual difficulties associated with ASD.

  15. The Default Mode Network Differentiates Biological From Non-Biological Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Eran; Sella, Irit; Mukovskiy, Albert; Douek, Yehonatan; Giese, Martin A; Malach, Rafael; Flash, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been implicated in an array of social-cognitive functions, including self-referential processing, theory of mind, and mentalizing. Yet, the properties of the external stimuli that elicit DMN activity in relation to these domains remain unknown. Previous studies suggested that motion kinematics is utilized by the brain for social-cognitive processing. Here, we used functional MRI to examine whether the DMN is sensitive to parametric manipulations of observed motion kinematics. Preferential responses within core DMN structures differentiating non-biological from biological kinematics were observed for the motion of a realistically looking, human-like avatar, but not for an abstract object devoid of human form. Differences in connectivity patterns during the observation of biological versus non-biological kinematics were additionally observed. Finally, the results additionally suggest that the DMN is coupled more strongly with key nodes in the action observation network, namely the STS and the SMA, when the observed motion depicts human rather than abstract form. These findings are the first to implicate the DMN in the perception of biological motion. They may reflect the type of information used by the DMN in social-cognitive processing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Biological agent detection and identification using pattern recognition

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    Braun, Jerome J.; Glina, Yan; Judson, Nicholas; Transue, Kevin D.

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses a novel approach for the automatic identification of biological agents. The essence of the approach is a combination of gene expression, microarray-based sensing, information fusion, machine learning and pattern recognition. Integration of these elements is a distinguishing aspect of the approach, leading to a number of significant advantages. Amongst them are the applicability to various agent types including bacteria, viruses, toxins, and other, ability to operate without the knowledge of a pathogen's genome sequence and without the need for bioagent-speciific materials or reagents, and a high level of extensibility. Furthermore, the approach allows detection of uncatalogued agents, including emerging pathogens. The approach offers a promising avenue for automatic identification of biological agents for applications such as medical diagnostics, bioforensics, and biodefense.

  17. Surface EMG signals based motion intent recognition using multi-layer ELM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhui; Qi, Lin; Wang, Xiao

    2017-11-01

    The upper-limb rehabilitation robot is regard as a useful tool to help patients with hemiplegic to do repetitive exercise. The surface electromyography (sEMG) contains motion information as the electric signals are generated and related to nerve-muscle motion. These sEMG signals, representing human's intentions of active motions, are introduced into the rehabilitation robot system to recognize upper-limb movements. Traditionally, the feature extraction is an indispensable part of drawing significant information from original signals, which is a tedious task requiring rich and related experience. This paper employs a deep learning scheme to extract the internal features of the sEMG signals using an advanced Extreme Learning Machine based auto-encoder (ELMAE). The mathematical information contained in the multi-layer structure of the ELM-AE is used as the high-level representation of the internal features of the sEMG signals, and thus a simple ELM can post-process the extracted features, formulating the entire multi-layer ELM (ML-ELM) algorithm. The method is employed for the sEMG based neural intentions recognition afterwards. The case studies show the adopted deep learning algorithm (ELM-AE) is capable of yielding higher classification accuracy compared to the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) scheme in 5 different types of upper-limb motions. This indicates the effectiveness and the learning capability of the ML-ELM in such motion intent recognition applications.

  18. Research on Three-dimensional Motion History Image Model and Extreme Learning Machine for Human Body Movement Trajectory Recognition

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    Zheng Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the traditional machine vision recognition technology and traditional artificial neural networks about body movement trajectory, this paper finds out the shortcomings of the traditional recognition technology. By combining the invariant moments of the three-dimensional motion history image (computed as the eigenvector of body movements and the extreme learning machine (constructed as the classification artificial neural network of body movements, the paper applies the method to the machine vision of the body movement trajectory. In detail, the paper gives a detailed introduction about the algorithm and realization scheme of the body movement trajectory recognition based on the three-dimensional motion history image and the extreme learning machine. Finally, by comparing with the results of the recognition experiments, it attempts to verify that the method of body movement trajectory recognition technology based on the three-dimensional motion history image and extreme learning machine has a more accurate recognition rate and better robustness.

  19. Reference repulsion in the categorical perception of biological motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Timothy D; Haroz, Steve; Whitney, David

    2012-07-01

    Perceiving biological motion is important for understanding the intentions and future actions of others. Perceiving an approaching person's behavior may be particularly important, because such behavior often precedes social interaction. To this end, the visual system may devote extra resources for perceiving an oncoming person's heading. If this were true, humans should show increased sensitivity for perceiving approaching headings, and as a result, a repulsive perceptual effect around the categorical boundary of leftward/rightward motion. We tested these predictions and found evidence for both. First, observers were especially sensitive to the heading of an approaching person; variability in estimates of a person's heading decreased near the category boundary of leftward/rightward motion. Second, we found a repulsion effect around the category boundary; a person walking approximately toward the observer was perceived as being repelled away from straight ahead. This repulsive effect was greatly exaggerated for perception of a very briefly presented person or perception of a chaotic crowd, suggesting that repulsion may protect against categorical errors when sensory noise is high. The repulsion effect with a crowd required integration of local motion and human form, suggesting an origin in high-level stages of visual processing. Similar repulsive effects may underlie categorical perception with other social features. Overall, our results show that a person's direction of walking is categorically perceived, with improved sensitivity at the category boundary and a concomitant repulsion effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Online Full-Body Motion Recognition Method Using Sparse and Deficient Signal Sequences

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    Chengyu Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to recognize continuous full-body human motion online by using sparse, low-cost sensors. The only input signals needed are linear accelerations without any rotation information, which are provided by four Wiimote sensors attached to the four human limbs. Based on the fused hidden Markov model (FHMM and autoregressive process, a predictive fusion model (PFM is put forward, which considers the different influences of the upper and lower limbs, establishes HMM for each part, and fuses them using a probabilistic fusion model. Then an autoregressive process is introduced in HMM to predict the gesture, which enables the model to deal with incomplete signal data. In order to reduce the number of alternatives in the online recognition process, a graph model is built that rejects parts of motion types based on the graph structure and previous recognition results. Finally, an online signal segmentation method based on semantics information and PFM is presented to finish the efficient recognition task. The results indicate that the method is robust with a high recognition rate of sparse and deficient signals and can be used in various interactive applications.

  1. Quaternion-Based Gesture Recognition Using Wireless Wearable Motion Capture Sensors

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    Shamir Alavi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the development and implementation of a unified multi-sensor human motion capture and gesture recognition system that can distinguish between and classify six different gestures. Data was collected from eleven participants using a subset of five wireless motion sensors (inertial measurement units attached to their arms and upper body from a complete motion capture system. We compare Support Vector Machines and Artificial Neural Networks on the same dataset under two different scenarios and evaluate the results. Our study indicates that near perfect classification accuracies are achievable for small gestures and that the speed of classification is sufficient to allow interactivity. However, such accuracies are more difficult to obtain when a participant does not participate in training, indicating that more work needs to be done in this area to create a system that can be used by the general population.

  2. Children’s looking preference for biological motion may be related to an affinity for mathematical chaos

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    Joshua eHaworth

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of biological motion is pervasive in early child development. Further, viewing the movement behavior of others is a primary component of a child’s acquisition of complex, robust movement repertoires, through imitation and real-time coordinated action. We theorize that inherent to biological movements are particular qualities of mathematical chaos and complexity. We further posit that this character affords the rich and complex inter-dynamics throughout early motor development. Specifically, we explored whether children’s preference for biological motion may be related to an affinity for mathematical chaos. Cross Recurrence Quantification Analysis (cRQA was used to investigate the coordination of gaze and posture with various temporal structures (periodic, chaotic, and aperiodic of the motion of an oscillating visual stimulus. Children appear to competently perceive and respond to chaotic motion, both in rate (cRQA-percent determinism and duration (cRQA-maxline of coordination. We interpret this to indicate that children not only recognize chaotic motion structures, but also have a preference for coordination with them. Further, stratification of our sample (by age uncovers the suggestion that this preference may become refined with age.

  3. A Motion-Based Feature for Event-Based Pattern Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clady, Xavier; Maro, Jean-Matthieu; Barré, Sébastien; Benosman, Ryad B

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an event-based luminance-free feature from the output of asynchronous event-based neuromorphic retinas. The feature consists in mapping the distribution of the optical flow along the contours of the moving objects in the visual scene into a matrix. Asynchronous event-based neuromorphic retinas are composed of autonomous pixels, each of them asynchronously generating "spiking" events that encode relative changes in pixels' illumination at high temporal resolutions. The optical flow is computed at each event, and is integrated locally or globally in a speed and direction coordinate frame based grid, using speed-tuned temporal kernels. The latter ensures that the resulting feature equitably represents the distribution of the normal motion along the current moving edges, whatever their respective dynamics. The usefulness and the generality of the proposed feature are demonstrated in pattern recognition applications: local corner detection and global gesture recognition.

  4. Exploring Biological Motion Processing in Parkinson's Disease Using Temporal Dilation.

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    Ruihua Cao

    Full Text Available Biological motion (BM perception is the compelling ability of the visual system to perceive complex animated movements effortlessly and promptly. A recent study has shown that BM can automatically lengthen perceived temporal duration independent of global configuration. The present study aimed mainly to investigate this temporal dilation effect of BM signals in Parkinson's disease (PD patients. We used the temporal dilation effect as an implicit measure of visual processing of BM. In all, 32 PD patients (under off-therapy conditions and 32 healthy controls (HCs participated in our study. In each trial, an upright BM sequence and an inverted BM sequence were presented within an interval in the center of the screen. We tested both canonical and scrambled BM sequences; the scrambled ones were generated by disturbing the global configuration of the canonical ones but preserving exactly the same local motion components. Observers were required to make a verbal two-alternative forced choice response to indicate which interval (the first or the second appeared longer. Statistical analyses were conducted on the points of subjective equality (PSEs. We found that the temporal dilation effect was significantly reduced for PD patients compared with HCs in both canonical and scrambled BM conditions. Moreover, no temporal dilation effects of scrambled BM were shown in both early- and late-stage PD patients, while the temporal dilation effect of canonical BM was relatively preserved in the early stages.

  5. Computational intelligence in multi-feature visual pattern recognition hand posture and face recognition using biologically inspired approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Pisharady, Pramod Kumar; Poh, Loh Ai

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of computational intelligence algorithms that addresses issues in visual pattern recognition such as high computational complexity, abundance of pattern features, sensitivity to size and shape variations and poor performance against complex backgrounds. The book has 3 parts. Part 1 describes various research issues in the field with a survey of the related literature. Part 2 presents computational intelligence based algorithms for feature selection and classification. The algorithms are discriminative and fast. The main application area considered is hand posture recognition. The book also discusses utility of these algorithms in other visual as well as non-visual pattern recognition tasks including face recognition, general object recognition and cancer / tumor classification. Part 3 presents biologically inspired algorithms for feature extraction. The visual cortex model based features discussed have invariance with respect to appearance and size of the hand, and provide good...

  6. Binding biological motion and visual features in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaowei; Zhao, Yangfan; Wu, Fan; Lu, Xiqian; Gao, Zaifeng; Shen, Mowei

    2015-06-01

    Working memory mechanisms for binding have been examined extensively in the last decade, yet few studies have explored bindings relating to human biological motion (BM). Human BM is the most salient and biologically significant kinetic information encountered in everyday life and is stored independently from other visual features (e.g., colors). The current study explored 3 critical issues of BM-related binding in working memory: (a) how many BM binding units can be retained in working memory, (b) whether involuntarily object-based binding occurs during BM binding, and (c) whether the maintenance of BM bindings in working memory requires attention above and beyond that needed to maintain the constituent dimensions. We isolated motion signals of human BM from non-BM sources by using point-light displays as to-be-memorized BM and presented the participants colored BM in a change detection task. We found that working memory capacity for BM-color bindings is rather low; only 1 or 2 BM-color bindings could be retained in working memory regardless of the presentation manners (Experiments 1-3). Furthermore, no object-based encoding took place for colored BM stimuli regardless of the processed dimensions (Experiments 4 and 5). Central executive attention contributes to the maintenance of BM-color bindings, yet maintaining BM bindings in working memory did not require more central attention than did maintaining the constituent dimensions in working memory (Experiment 6). Overall, these results suggest that keeping BM bindings in working memory is a fairly resource-demanding process, yet central executive attention does not play a special role in this cross-module binding. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Unaffected perceptual thresholds for biological and non-biological form-from-motion perception in autism spectrum conditions.

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    Ayse Pinar Saygin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Perception of biological motion is linked to the action perception system in the human brain, abnormalities within which have been suggested to underlie impairments in social domains observed in autism spectrum conditions (ASC. However, the literature on biological motion perception in ASC is heterogeneous and it is unclear whether deficits are specific to biological motion, or might generalize to form-from-motion perception.We compared psychophysical thresholds for both biological and non-biological form-from-motion perception in adults with ASC and controls. Participants viewed point-light displays depicting a walking person (Biological Motion, a translating rectangle (Structured Object or a translating unfamiliar shape (Unstructured Object. The figures were embedded in noise dots that moved similarly and the task was to determine direction of movement. The number of noise dots varied on each trial and perceptual thresholds were estimated adaptively. We found no evidence for an impairment in biological or non-biological object motion perception in individuals with ASC. Perceptual thresholds in the three conditions were almost identical between the ASC and control groups.Impairments in biological motion and non-biological form-from-motion perception are not across the board in ASC, and are only found for some stimuli and tasks. We discuss our results in relation to other findings in the literature, the heterogeneity of which likely relates to the different tasks performed. It appears that individuals with ASC are unaffected in perceptual processing of form-from-motion, but may exhibit impairments in higher order judgments such as emotion processing. It is important to identify more specifically which processes of motion perception are impacted in ASC before a link can be made between perceptual deficits and the higher-level features of the disorder.

  8. Biological object recognition in μ-radiography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, A.; Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Sopko, V.; Benes, J.; Zeman, J.; Jandejsek, I.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents an applicability of real-time microradiography to biological objects, namely to horse chestnut leafminer, Cameraria ohridella (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) and following image processing focusing on image segmentation and object recognition. The microradiography of insects (such as horse chestnut leafminer) provides a non-invasive imaging that leaves the organisms alive. The imaging requires a high spatial resolution (micrometer scale) radiographic system. Our radiographic system consists of a micro-focus X-ray tube and two types of detectors. The first is a charge integrating detector (Hamamatsu flat panel), the second is a pixel semiconductor detector (Medipix2 detector). The latter allows detection of single quantum photon of ionizing radiation. We obtained numerous horse chestnuts leafminer pupae in several microradiography images easy recognizable in automatic mode using the image processing methods. We implemented an algorithm that is able to count a number of dead and alive pupae in images. The algorithm was based on two methods: 1) noise reduction using mathematical morphology filters, 2) Canny edge detection. The accuracy of the algorithm is higher for the Medipix2 (average recall for detection of alive pupae =0.99, average recall for detection of dead pupae =0.83), than for the flat panel (average recall for detection of alive pupae =0.99, average recall for detection of dead pupae =0.77). Therefore, we conclude that Medipix2 has lower noise and better displays contours (edges) of biological objects. Our method allows automatic selection and calculation of dead and alive chestnut leafminer pupae. It leads to faster monitoring of the population of one of the world's important insect pest.

  9. Biological object recognition in μ-radiography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, A.; Dammer, J.; Benes, J.; Zeman, J.; Weyda, F.; Sopko, V.; Jandejsek, I.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an applicability of real-time microradiography to biological objects, namely to horse chestnut leafminer, Cameraria ohridella (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) and following image processing focusing on image segmentation and object recognition. The microradiography of insects (such as horse chestnut leafminer) provides a non-invasive imaging that leaves the organisms alive. The imaging requires a high spatial resolution (micrometer scale) radiographic system. Our radiographic system consists of a micro-focus X-ray tube and two types of detectors. The first is a charge integrating detector (Hamamatsu flat panel), the second is a pixel semiconductor detector (Medipix2 detector). The latter allows detection of single quantum photon of ionizing radiation. We obtained numerous horse chestnuts leafminer pupae in several microradiography images easy recognizable in automatic mode using the image processing methods. We implemented an algorithm that is able to count a number of dead and alive pupae in images. The algorithm was based on two methods: 1) noise reduction using mathematical morphology filters, 2) Canny edge detection. The accuracy of the algorithm is higher for the Medipix2 (average recall for detection of alive pupae =0.99, average recall for detection of dead pupae =0.83), than for the flat panel (average recall for detection of alive pupae =0.99, average recall for detection of dead pupae =0.77). Therefore, we conclude that Medipix2 has lower noise and better displays contours (edges) of biological objects. Our method allows automatic selection and calculation of dead and alive chestnut leafminer pupae. It leads to faster monitoring of the population of one of the world's important insect pest

  10. A Novel Model-Based Driving Behavior Recognition System Using Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minglin; Zhang, Sheng; Dong, Yuhan

    2016-10-20

    In this article, a novel driving behavior recognition system based on a specific physical model and motion sensory data is developed to promote traffic safety. Based on the theory of rigid body kinematics, we build a specific physical model to reveal the data change rule during the vehicle moving process. In this work, we adopt a nine-axis motion sensor including a three-axis accelerometer, a three-axis gyroscope and a three-axis magnetometer, and apply a Kalman filter for noise elimination and an adaptive time window for data extraction. Based on the feature extraction guided by the built physical model, various classifiers are accomplished to recognize different driving behaviors. Leveraging the system, normal driving behaviors (such as accelerating, braking, lane changing and turning with caution) and aggressive driving behaviors (such as accelerating, braking, lane changing and turning with a sudden) can be classified with a high accuracy of 93.25%. Compared with traditional driving behavior recognition methods using machine learning only, the proposed system possesses a solid theoretical basis, performs better and has good prospects.

  11. A Novel Model-Based Driving Behavior Recognition System Using Motion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglin Wu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a novel driving behavior recognition system based on a specific physical model and motion sensory data is developed to promote traffic safety. Based on the theory of rigid body kinematics, we build a specific physical model to reveal the data change rule during the vehicle moving process. In this work, we adopt a nine-axis motion sensor including a three-axis accelerometer, a three-axis gyroscope and a three-axis magnetometer, and apply a Kalman filter for noise elimination and an adaptive time window for data extraction. Based on the feature extraction guided by the built physical model, various classifiers are accomplished to recognize different driving behaviors. Leveraging the system, normal driving behaviors (such as accelerating, braking, lane changing and turning with caution and aggressive driving behaviors (such as accelerating, braking, lane changing and turning with a sudden can be classified with a high accuracy of 93.25%. Compared with traditional driving behavior recognition methods using machine learning only, the proposed system possesses a solid theoretical basis, performs better and has good prospects.

  12. Contribution of global and local biological motion information to speed perception and discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2018-03-01

    To respond to movements of others and understand the intention of others' actions, it is important to accurately extract motion information from body movements. Here, using original and spatially scrambled point-light biological motions in upright and inverted orientations, we investigated the effect of global and local biological motion information on speed perception and sensitivity. The speed discrimination task revealed that speed sensitivity was higher for the original than for scrambled stimuli (Experiment 1) and higher for upright than for inverted stimuli (Experiment 2). Perceived motion speed was slower for the original than for scrambled stimuli (Experiment 2), but regardless of the orientation of the display (Experiment 1). A subsequent experiment comparing different scrambled stimuli of the same actions showed that the higher speed discrimination sensitivity to upright stimuli was preserved even in the scrambled biological motions (Experiment 3). Taken together, our findings suggest that perception of the speed of biological movements emanates from both global and local biological motion signals.

  13. The Constitutionality of a Biological Father's Recognition as a Parent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Louw

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increased recognition afforded to biological fathers as legal parents, the Children's Act 38 of 2005 still does not treat fathers on the same basis as mothers as far as the automatic allocation of parental responsibilities and rights is concerned. This article investigates the constitutionality of the differential treatment of fathers in this respect, given South Africa's international obligations, especially in terms of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, to ensure that both parents have common responsibilities for the upbringing of their child. After a brief consideration of the constitutionality of the mother's position as parent, the constitutionality of the father's position is investigated, firstly, with reference to Section 9 of the Constitution and the question of whether the differentiation between mothers and fathers as far as the allocation of parental responsibilities and rights is concerned, amounts to unfair discrimination. The inquiry also considers whether the differentiation between committed fathers (that is, those who have shown the necessary commitment in terms of Sections 20 and 21 of the Children's Act to acquire parental responsibilities and rights and uncommitted fathers may amount to discrimination on an unspecified ground. Since the limitation of the father's rights to equality may be justifiable, the outcomes of both inquiries are shown to be inconclusive. Finally, the legal position of the father is considered in relation to the child's constitutional rights – the rights to parental care and the right of the child to the paramountcy of its interests embodied in Section 28 of the Constitution. While there appears to be some justification for the limitation of the child's right to committed paternal care, it is submitted that an equalisation of the legal position of mothers and fathers as far as the automatic acquisition of parental responsibilities and rights is concerned, is not

  14. Perception of biological motion from limited-lifetime stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, J.A.; Georg, K.; Lappe, M.

    2006-01-01

    The visual perception of human movement from sparse point-light walkers is often believed to rely on local motion analysis. We investigated the role of local motion in the perception of human walking, viewed from the side, in different tasks. The motion signal was manipulated by varying point

  15. Emotional cues and social anxiety resolve ambiguous perception of biological motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiltiz, Hörmet; Chen, Lihan

    2018-03-13

    Perceptions of ambiguous biological motion are modulated by different individual cognitive abilities (such as inhibition and empathy) and emotional states (such as anxiety). This study explored facing-the-viewer bias (FTV) in perceiving ambiguous directions of biological motion, and investigated whether task-irrelevant simultaneous face emotional cues in the background and the individual social anxiety traits could affect FTV. We found that facial motion cues as background affect sociobiologically relevant scenarios, including biological motion, but not non-biological situations (conveyed through random dot motion). Individuals with high anxiety traits demonstrated a more dominant FTV bias than individuals with low anxiety traits. Ensemble coding-like processing of task-irrelevant multiple emotional cues could magnify the facing-the-viewer bias than did in the single emotional cue. Overall, those findings suggest a correlation between high-level emotional processing and high-level motion perception (subjective to attentional control) contributes to facing-the-viewer bias.

  16. Biological Motion Preference in Humans at Birth: Role of Dynamic and Configural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Lara; Regolin, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses the hypothesis that detection of biological motion is an intrinsic capacity of the visual system guided by a non-species-specific predisposition for the pattern of vertebrate movement and investigates the role of global vs. local information in biological motion detection. Two-day-old babies exposed to a biological…

  17. Real-Time Biologically Inspired Action Recognition from Key Poses Using a Neuromorphic Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layher, Georg; Brosch, Tobias; Neumann, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    Intelligent agents, such as robots, have to serve a multitude of autonomous functions. Examples are, e.g., collision avoidance, navigation and route planning, active sensing of its environment, or the interaction and non-verbal communication with people in the extended reach space. Here, we focus on the recognition of the action of a human agent based on a biologically inspired visual architecture of analyzing articulated movements. The proposed processing architecture builds upon coarsely segregated streams of sensory processing along different pathways which separately process form and motion information (Layher et al., 2014). Action recognition is performed in an event-based scheme by identifying representations of characteristic pose configurations (key poses) in an image sequence. In line with perceptual studies, key poses are selected unsupervised utilizing a feature-driven criterion which combines extrema in the motion energy with the horizontal and the vertical extendedness of a body shape. Per class representations of key pose frames are learned using a deep convolutional neural network consisting of 15 convolutional layers. The network is trained using the energy-efficient deep neuromorphic networks ( Eedn ) framework (Esser et al., 2016), which realizes the mapping of the trained synaptic weights onto the IBM Neurosynaptic System platform (Merolla et al., 2014). After the mapping, the trained network achieves real-time capabilities for processing input streams and classify input images at about 1,000 frames per second while the computational stages only consume about 70 mW of energy (without spike transduction). Particularly regarding mobile robotic systems, a low energy profile might be crucial in a variety of application scenarios. Cross-validation results are reported for two different datasets and compared to state-of-the-art action recognition approaches. The results demonstrate, that (I) the presented approach is on par with other key pose based

  18. Biological Nanomotors with a Revolution, Linear, or Rotation Motion Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peixuan; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yengo, Christopher M; Zhao, Zhengyi; Grainge, Ian

    2016-03-01

    The ubiquitous biological nanomotors were classified into two categories in the past: linear and rotation motors. In 2013, a third type of biomotor, revolution without rotation (http://rnanano.osu.edu/movie.html), was discovered and found to be widespread among bacteria, eukaryotic viruses, and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages. This review focuses on recent findings about various aspects of motors, including chirality, stoichiometry, channel size, entropy, conformational change, and energy usage rate, in a variety of well-studied motors, including FoF1 ATPase, helicases, viral dsDNA-packaging motors, bacterial chromosome translocases, myosin, kinesin, and dynein. In particular, dsDNA translocases are used to illustrate how these features relate to the motion mechanism and how nature elegantly evolved a revolution mechanism to avoid coiling and tangling during lengthy dsDNA genome transportation in cell division. Motor chirality and channel size are two factors that distinguish rotation motors from revolution motors. Rotation motors use right-handed channels to drive the right-handed dsDNA, similar to the way a nut drives the bolt with threads in same orientation; revolution motors use left-handed motor channels to revolve the right-handed dsDNA. Rotation motors use small channels (3 nm) with room for the bolt to revolve. Binding and hydrolysis of ATP are linked to different conformational entropy changes in the motor that lead to altered affinity for the substrate and allow work to be done, for example, helicase unwinding of DNA or translocase directional movement of DNA. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Identification and simulation of strong earthquake ground motion by using pattern recognition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.

    1981-01-01

    This report deals with a schematic investigation concerning an identification of nonstationary characteristics of strong earthquake acceleration motions and those simulation technique for practical use. Pattern recognition technique is introduced in order to identify time and frequency dependent ground motion's characteristics. First the running power spectrum density (RPSD) function is estimated by dividing the whole earthquake duration into certain 'stationary' segments. This RPSD can be described as 2-dimensional pattern image onto time-frequency domain. Second thus obtained RPSD patterns are classified into several representative groups based on (1) number of dominant peaks, (2) peak shape and (3) spacial relation between the most intensive peak and the second one. Then RPSD pattern corresponding to a specific group is artificially simulated by using 'peak function' which determines evolutionary feature for an arbitrary point in time-frequency plane. Using this function 8 typical artificial standard RPSD patterns are finally proposed. Identification can be performed by Complex Threshold Method which is generally used in the field of radio graphic technology. (orig./WL)

  20. A Biological-Plausable Architecture for Shape Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-30

    found in literature. The state of the art of these methods is analyzed further in detail, and some experiments are described in section 5.1 4A similarity...architecture for shape processing developed at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT and the “VisNet,” proposed by Rolls and Deco in...is a neural network architecture for shape recognition developed by Rolls and Deco and described in their book [28]. The general philosophy involves

  1. Ocular tracking of biological and nonbiological motion: the effect of instructed agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickel, Jan; Hegele, Mathias; Grosjean, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Recent findings suggest that visuomotor performance is modulated by people's beliefs about the agency (e.g., animate vs. inanimate) behind the events they perceive. This study investigated the effect of instructed agency on ocular tracking of point-light motions with biological and nonbiological velocity profiles. The motions followed either a relatively simple (ellipse) or a more complex (scribble) trajectory, and agency was manipulated by informing the participants that the motions they saw were either human or computer generated. In line with previous findings, tracking performance was better for biological than for nonbiological motions, and this effect was particularly pronounced for the simpler (elliptical) motions. The biological advantage was also larger for the human than for the computer instruction condition, but only for a measure that captured the predictive component of smooth pursuit. These results suggest that ocular tracking is influenced by the internal forward model people choose to adopt.

  2. Ventral aspect of the visual form pathway is not critical for the perception of biological motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Lorenzi, Lauren J.; Rees, Geraint; Behrmann, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the movements of those around us is fundamental for many daily activities, such as recognizing actions, detecting predators, and interacting with others socially. A key question concerns the neurobiological substrates underlying biological motion perception. Although the ventral “form” visual cortex is standardly activated by biologically moving stimuli, whether these activations are functionally critical for biological motion perception or are epiphenomenal remains unknown. To address this question, we examined whether focal damage to regions of the ventral visual cortex, resulting in significant deficits in form perception, adversely affects biological motion perception. Six patients with damage to the ventral cortex were tested with sensitive point-light display paradigms. All patients were able to recognize unmasked point-light displays and their perceptual thresholds were not significantly different from those of three different control groups, one of which comprised brain-damaged patients with spared ventral cortex (n > 50). Importantly, these six patients performed significantly better than patients with damage to regions critical for biological motion perception. To assess the necessary contribution of different regions in the ventral pathway to biological motion perception, we complement the behavioral findings with a fine-grained comparison between the lesion location and extent, and the cortical regions standardly implicated in biological motion processing. This analysis revealed that the ventral aspects of the form pathway (e.g., fusiform regions, ventral extrastriate body area) are not critical for biological motion perception. We hypothesize that the role of these ventral regions is to provide enhanced multiview/posture representations of the moving person rather than to represent biological motion perception per se. PMID:25583504

  3. Motion Normalized Proportional Control for Improved Pattern Recognition-Based Myoelectric Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheme, Erik; Lock, Blair; Hargrove, Levi; Hill, Wendy; Kuruganti, Usha; Englehart, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two novel proportional control algorithms for use with pattern recognition-based myoelectric control. The systems were designed to provide automatic configuration of motion-specific gains and to normalize the control space to the user's usable dynamic range. Class-specific normalization parameters were calculated using data collected during classifier training and require no additional user action or configuration. The new control schemes were compared to the standard method of deriving proportional control using a one degree of freedom Fitts' law test for each of the wrist flexion/extension, wrist pronation/supination and hand close/open degrees of freedom. Performance was evaluated using the Fitts' law throughput value as well as more descriptive metrics including path efficiency, overshoot, stopping distance and completion rate. The proposed normalization methods significantly outperformed the incumbent method in every performance category for able bodied subjects (p < 0.001) and nearly every category for amputee subjects. Furthermore, one proposed method significantly outperformed both other methods in throughput (p < 0.0001), yielding 21% and 40% improvement over the incumbent method for amputee and able bodied subjects, respectively. The proposed control schemes represent a computationally simple method of fundamentally improving myoelectric control users' ability to elicit robust, and controlled, proportional velocity commands.

  4. Effect of buffer at nanoscale molecular recognition interfaces - electrostatic binding of biological polyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Ana C; Laurini, Erik; Vieira, Vânia M P; Pricl, Sabrina; Smith, David K

    2017-10-19

    We investigate the impact of an over-looked component on molecular recognition in water-buffer. The binding of a cationic dye to biological polyanion heparin is shown by isothermal calorimetry to depend on buffer (Tris-HCl > HEPES > PBS). The heparin binding of self-assembled multivalent (SAMul) cationic micelles is even more buffer dependent. Multivalent electrostatic molecular recognition is buffer dependent as a result of competitive interactions between the cationic binding interface and anions present in the buffer.

  5. Biologically motivated computationally intensive approaches to image pattern recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkov, Nikolay

    This paper presents some of the research activities of the research group in vision as a grand challenge problem whose solution is estimated to need the power of Tflop/s computers and for which computational methods have yet to be developed. The concerned approaches are biologically motivated, in

  6. Reading about the actions of others: biological motion imagery and action congruency influence brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Ben; McCarthy, Gregory

    2010-05-01

    Prior neuroimaging research has implicated regions within and near the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) in the visual processing of biological motion and of the intentions implied by specific movements. However, it is unknown whether this region is engaged during the processing of human motion at a conceptual level, such as during story comprehension. Here, we obtained functional magnetic resonance images from subjects reading brief stories that described a human character's background and then concluded with an action or decision made by the character. Half of the stories contained incidental descriptions of biological motion (such as the character's walking or grasping) while the remaining half did not. As a second factor, the final action of the story was either congruent or incongruent with the character's background and implied goals and intentions. Stories that contained biological motion strongly activated the pSTS bilaterally, along with ventral temporal areas, premotor cortex, left motor cortex, and the precuneus. Active regions of pSTS in individual subjects closely overlapped with regions identified with a separate biological motion localizer (point-light display) task. Reading incongruent versus congruent stories activated dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral anterior insula. These results support the hypothesis that reading can engage higher visual cortex in a content-specific manner, and suggest that the presence of biological motion should be controlled as a potential confound in fMRI studies using story comprehension tasks. 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. A neuromorphic architecture for object recognition and motion anticipation using burst-STDP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Nere

    Full Text Available In this work we investigate the possibilities offered by a minimal framework of artificial spiking neurons to be deployed in silico. Here we introduce a hierarchical network architecture of spiking neurons which learns to recognize moving objects in a visual environment and determine the correct motor output for each object. These tasks are learned through both supervised and unsupervised spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP. STDP is responsible for the strengthening (or weakening of synapses in relation to pre- and post-synaptic spike times and has been described as a Hebbian paradigm taking place both in vitro and in vivo. We utilize a variation of STDP learning, called burst-STDP, which is based on the notion that, since spikes are expensive in terms of energy consumption, then strong bursting activity carries more information than single (sparse spikes. Furthermore, this learning algorithm takes advantage of homeostatic renormalization, which has been hypothesized to promote memory consolidation during NREM sleep. Using this learning rule, we design a spiking neural network architecture capable of object recognition, motion detection, attention towards important objects, and motor control outputs. We demonstrate the abilities of our design in a simple environment with distractor objects, multiple objects moving concurrently, and in the presence of noise. Most importantly, we show how this neural network is capable of performing these tasks using a simple leaky-integrate-and-fire (LIF neuron model with binary synapses, making it fully compatible with state-of-the-art digital neuromorphic hardware designs. As such, the building blocks and learning rules presented in this paper appear promising for scalable fully neuromorphic systems to be implemented in hardware chips.

  8. A Neuromorphic Architecture for Object Recognition and Motion Anticipation Using Burst-STDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balduzzi, David; Tononi, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigate the possibilities offered by a minimal framework of artificial spiking neurons to be deployed in silico. Here we introduce a hierarchical network architecture of spiking neurons which learns to recognize moving objects in a visual environment and determine the correct motor output for each object. These tasks are learned through both supervised and unsupervised spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP). STDP is responsible for the strengthening (or weakening) of synapses in relation to pre- and post-synaptic spike times and has been described as a Hebbian paradigm taking place both in vitro and in vivo. We utilize a variation of STDP learning, called burst-STDP, which is based on the notion that, since spikes are expensive in terms of energy consumption, then strong bursting activity carries more information than single (sparse) spikes. Furthermore, this learning algorithm takes advantage of homeostatic renormalization, which has been hypothesized to promote memory consolidation during NREM sleep. Using this learning rule, we design a spiking neural network architecture capable of object recognition, motion detection, attention towards important objects, and motor control outputs. We demonstrate the abilities of our design in a simple environment with distractor objects, multiple objects moving concurrently, and in the presence of noise. Most importantly, we show how this neural network is capable of performing these tasks using a simple leaky-integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron model with binary synapses, making it fully compatible with state-of-the-art digital neuromorphic hardware designs. As such, the building blocks and learning rules presented in this paper appear promising for scalable fully neuromorphic systems to be implemented in hardware chips. PMID:22615855

  9. Visual processing and social cognition in schizophrenia: relationships among eye movements, biological motion perception, and empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yukiko; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients have impairments at several levels of cognition including visual attention (eye movements), perception, and social cognition. However, it remains unclear how lower-level cognitive deficits influence higher-level cognition. To elucidate the hierarchical path linking deficient cognitions, we focused on biological motion perception, which is involved in both the early stage of visual perception (attention) and higher social cognition, and is impaired in schizophrenia. Seventeen schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy controls participated in the study. Using point-light walker stimuli, we examined eye movements during biological motion perception in schizophrenia. We assessed relationships among eye movements, biological motion perception and empathy. In the biological motion detection task, schizophrenia patients showed lower accuracy and fixated longer than healthy controls. As opposed to controls, patients exhibiting longer fixation durations and fewer numbers of fixations demonstrated higher accuracy. Additionally, in the patient group, the correlations between accuracy and affective empathy index and between eye movement index and affective empathy index were significant. The altered gaze patterns in patients indicate that top-down attention compensates for impaired bottom-up attention. Furthermore, aberrant eye movements might lead to deficits in biological motion perception and finally link to social cognitive impairments. The current findings merit further investigation for understanding the mechanism of social cognitive training and its development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Trends in social neuroscience: from biological motion to joint actions

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Crivelli; Michela Balconi

    2009-01-01

    It has been argued that our social nature represents what makes us human. Social neuroscience aims at exploring biological basis of social cognition, interested in how social behaviour and context can influence short-term and long-term brain functioning and how the brain functioning can foster, create social behaviour, and actively process social context. This paper focuses on the recent progress in social perception and cognition by a neuropsychological point of view, and opens some question...

  11. Integrating biological motion: the role of grouping in the perception of point-light actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Poljac

    Full Text Available The human visual system is highly sensitive to biological motion and manages to organize even a highly reduced point-light stimulus into a vivid percept of human action. The current study investigated to what extent the origin of this saliency of point-light displays is related to its intrinsic Gestalt qualities. In particular, we studied whether biological motion perception is facilitated when the elements can be grouped according to good continuation and similarity as Gestalt principles of perceptual organization. We found that both grouping principles enhanced biological motion perception but their effects differed when stimuli were inverted. These results provide evidence that Gestalt principles of good continuity and similarity also apply to more complex and dynamic meaningful stimuli.

  12. Decreased reward value of biological motion among individuals with autistic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elin H; Cross, Emily S

    2018-02-01

    The Social Motivation Theory posits that a reduced sensitivity to the value of social stimuli, specifically faces, can account for social impairments in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Research has demonstrated that typically developing (TD) individuals preferentially orient towards another type of salient social stimulus, namely biological motion. Individuals with ASD, however, do not show this preference. While the reward value of faces to both TD and ASD individuals has been well-established, the extent to which individuals from these populations also find human motion to be rewarding remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the value assigned to biological motion by TD participants in an effort task, and further examined whether these values differed among individuals with more autistic traits. The results suggest that TD participants value natural human motion more than rigid, machine-like motion or non-human control motion, but this preference is attenuated among individuals reporting more autistic traits. This study provides the first evidence to suggest that individuals with more autistic traits find a broader conceptualisation of social stimuli less rewarding compared to individuals with fewer autistic traits. By quantifying the social reward value of human motion, the present findings contribute an important piece to our understanding of social motivation in individuals with and without social impairments. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I shall examine the cognitive, heuristic and theoretical functions of the concept of recognition. To evaluate both the explanatory power and the limitations of a sociological concept, the theory construction must be analysed and its actual productivity for sociological theory must...... be evaluated. In the first section, I will introduce the concept of recognition as a travelling concept playing a role both on the intellectual stage and in real life. In the second section, I will concentrate on the presentation of Honneth’s theory of recognition, emphasizing the construction of the concept...... and its explanatory power. Finally, I will discuss Honneth’s concept in relation to the critique that has been raised, addressing the debate between Honneth and Fraser. In a short conclusion, I will return to the question of the explanatory power of the concept of recognition....

  14. Why the long face? The importance of vertical image structure for biological "barcodes" underlying face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Morgan L; Storrs, Katherine R; Arnold, Derek H

    2014-07-29

    Humans are experts at face recognition. The mechanisms underlying this complex capacity are not fully understood. Recently, it has been proposed that face recognition is supported by a coarse-scale analysis of visual information contained in horizontal bands of contrast distributed along the vertical image axis-a biological facial "barcode" (Dakin & Watt, 2009). A critical prediction of the facial barcode hypothesis is that the distribution of image contrast along the vertical axis will be more important for face recognition than image distributions along the horizontal axis. Using a novel paradigm involving dynamic image distortions, a series of experiments are presented examining famous face recognition impairments from selectively disrupting image distributions along the vertical or horizontal image axes. Results show that disrupting the image distribution along the vertical image axis is more disruptive for recognition than matched distortions along the horizontal axis. Consistent with the facial barcode hypothesis, these results suggest that human face recognition relies disproportionately on appropriately scaled distributions of image contrast along the vertical image axis. © 2014 ARVO.

  15. Evidence for Distinct Contributions of Form and Motion Information to the Recognition of Emotions from Body Gestures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Anthony P.; Tunstall, Mary L.; Dittrich, Winand H.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of kinematics in emotion perception from body movement has been widely demonstrated. Evidence also suggests that the perception of biological motion relies to some extent on information about spatial and spatiotemporal form, yet the contribution of such form-related cues to emotion perception remains unclear. This study reports, for…

  16. Visual form Cues, Biological Motions, Auditory Cues, and Even Olfactory Cues Interact to Affect Visual Sex Discriminations

    OpenAIRE

    Rick Van Der Zwan; Anna Brooks; Duncan Blair; Coralia Machatch; Graeme Hacker

    2011-01-01

    Johnson and Tassinary (2005) proposed that visually perceived sex is signalled by structural or form cues. They suggested also that biological motion cues signal sex, but do so indirectly. We previously have shown that auditory cues can mediate visual sex perceptions (van der Zwan et al., 2009). Here we demonstrate that structural cues to body shape are alone sufficient for visual sex discriminations but that biological motion cues alone are not. Interestingly, biological motions can resolve ...

  17. Integrating Biological Motion: The Role of Grouping in the Perception of Point-Light Actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poljac, E.; Verfaillie, K.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    The human visual system is highly sensitive to biological motion and manages to organize even a highly reduced point-light stimulus into a vivid percept of human action. The current study investigated to what extent the origin of this saliency of point-light displays is related to its intrinsic

  18. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  19. When eyes drive hand: Influence of non-biological motion on visuo-motor coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoret, Etienne; Aramaki, Mitsuko; Bringoux, Lionel; Ystad, Sølvi; Kronland-Martinet, Richard

    2016-01-26

    Many studies stressed that the human movement execution but also the perception of motion are constrained by specific kinematics. For instance, it has been shown that the visuo-manual tracking of a spotlight was optimal when the spotlight motion complies with biological rules such as the so-called 1/3 power law, establishing the co-variation between the velocity and the trajectory curvature of the movement. The visual or kinesthetic perception of a geometry induced by motion has also been shown to be constrained by such biological rules. In the present study, we investigated whether the geometry induced by the visuo-motor coupling of biological movements was also constrained by the 1/3 power law under visual open loop control, i.e. without visual feedback of arm displacement. We showed that when someone was asked to synchronize a drawing movement with a visual spotlight following a circular shape, the geometry of the reproduced shape was fooled by visual kinematics that did not respect the 1/3 power law. In particular, elliptical shapes were reproduced when the circle is trailed with a kinematics corresponding to an ellipse. Moreover, the distortions observed here were larger than in the perceptual tasks stressing the role of motor attractors in such a visuo-motor coupling. Finally, by investigating the direct influence of visual kinematics on the motor reproduction, our result conciliates previous knowledge on sensorimotor coupling of biological motions with external stimuli and gives evidence to the amodal encoding of biological motion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Detecting Biological Motion for Human–Robot Interaction: A Link between Perception and Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Vignolo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental skills supporting safe and comfortable interaction between humans is their capability to understand intuitively each other’s actions and intentions. At the basis of this ability is a special-purpose visual processing that human brain has developed to comprehend human motion. Among the first “building blocks” enabling the bootstrapping of such visual processing is the ability to detect movements performed by biological agents in the scene, a skill mastered by human babies in the first days of their life. In this paper, we present a computational model based on the assumption that such visual ability must be based on local low-level visual motion features, which are independent of shape, such as the configuration of the body and perspective. Moreover, we implement it on the humanoid robot iCub, embedding it into a software architecture that leverages the regularities of biological motion also to control robot attention and oculomotor behaviors. In essence, we put forth a model in which the regularities of biological motion link perception and action enabling a robotic agent to follow a human-inspired sensory-motor behavior. We posit that this choice facilitates mutual understanding and goal prediction during collaboration, increasing the pleasantness and safety of the interaction.

  1. BIOCAT: a pattern recognition platform for customizable biological image classification and annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Lamichhane, Santosh; Sterne, Gabriella; Ye, Bing; Peng, Hanchuan

    2013-10-04

    Pattern recognition algorithms are useful in bioimage informatics applications such as quantifying cellular and subcellular objects, annotating gene expressions, and classifying phenotypes. To provide effective and efficient image classification and annotation for the ever-increasing microscopic images, it is desirable to have tools that can combine and compare various algorithms, and build customizable solution for different biological problems. However, current tools often offer a limited solution in generating user-friendly and extensible tools for annotating higher dimensional images that correspond to multiple complicated categories. We develop the BIOimage Classification and Annotation Tool (BIOCAT). It is able to apply pattern recognition algorithms to two- and three-dimensional biological image sets as well as regions of interest (ROIs) in individual images for automatic classification and annotation. We also propose a 3D anisotropic wavelet feature extractor for extracting textural features from 3D images with xy-z resolution disparity. The extractor is one of the about 20 built-in algorithms of feature extractors, selectors and classifiers in BIOCAT. The algorithms are modularized so that they can be "chained" in a customizable way to form adaptive solution for various problems, and the plugin-based extensibility gives the tool an open architecture to incorporate future algorithms. We have applied BIOCAT to classification and annotation of images and ROIs of different properties with applications in cell biology and neuroscience. BIOCAT provides a user-friendly, portable platform for pattern recognition based biological image classification of two- and three- dimensional images and ROIs. We show, via diverse case studies, that different algorithms and their combinations have different suitability for various problems. The customizability of BIOCAT is thus expected to be useful for providing effective and efficient solutions for a variety of biological

  2. How can selection of biologically inspired features improve the performance of a robust object recognition model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Ghodrati

    Full Text Available Humans can effectively and swiftly recognize objects in complex natural scenes. This outstanding ability has motivated many computational object recognition models. Most of these models try to emulate the behavior of this remarkable system. The human visual system hierarchically recognizes objects in several processing stages. Along these stages a set of features with increasing complexity is extracted by different parts of visual system. Elementary features like bars and edges are processed in earlier levels of visual pathway and as far as one goes upper in this pathway more complex features will be spotted. It is an important interrogation in the field of visual processing to see which features of an object are selected and represented by the visual cortex. To address this issue, we extended a hierarchical model, which is motivated by biology, for different object recognition tasks. In this model, a set of object parts, named patches, extracted in the intermediate stages. These object parts are used for training procedure in the model and have an important role in object recognition. These patches are selected indiscriminately from different positions of an image and this can lead to the extraction of non-discriminating patches which eventually may reduce the performance. In the proposed model we used an evolutionary algorithm approach to select a set of informative patches. Our reported results indicate that these patches are more informative than usual random patches. We demonstrate the strength of the proposed model on a range of object recognition tasks. The proposed model outperforms the original model in diverse object recognition tasks. It can be seen from the experiments that selected features are generally particular parts of target images. Our results suggest that selected features which are parts of target objects provide an efficient set for robust object recognition.

  3. Eye Tracking Reveals a Crucial Role for Facial Motion in Recognition of Faces by Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Naiqi G.; Quinn, Paul C.; Liu, Shaoying; Ge, Liezhong; Pascalis, Olivier; Lee, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Current knowledge about face processing in infancy comes largely from studies using static face stimuli, but faces that infants see in the real world are mostly moving ones. To bridge this gap, 3-, 6-, and 9-month-old Asian infants (N = 118) were familiarized with either moving or static Asian female faces, and then their face recognition was…

  4. 3-D Human Action Recognition by Shape Analysis of Motion Trajectories on Riemannian Manifold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanne, Maxime; Wannous, Hazem; Berretti, Stefano; Pala, Pietro; Daoudi, Mohamed; Del Bimbo, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Recognizing human actions in 3-D video sequences is an important open problem that is currently at the heart of many research domains including surveillance, natural interfaces and rehabilitation. However, the design and development of models for action recognition that are both accurate and efficient is a challenging task due to the variability of the human pose, clothing and appearance. In this paper, we propose a new framework to extract a compact representation of a human action captured through a depth sensor, and enable accurate action recognition. The proposed solution develops on fitting a human skeleton model to acquired data so as to represent the 3-D coordinates of the joints and their change over time as a trajectory in a suitable action space. Thanks to such a 3-D joint-based framework, the proposed solution is capable to capture both the shape and the dynamics of the human body, simultaneously. The action recognition problem is then formulated as the problem of computing the similarity between the shape of trajectories in a Riemannian manifold. Classification using k-nearest neighbors is finally performed on this manifold taking advantage of Riemannian geometry in the open curve shape space. Experiments are carried out on four representative benchmarks to demonstrate the potential of the proposed solution in terms of accuracy/latency for a low-latency action recognition. Comparative results with state-of-the-art methods are reported.

  5. Camera Motion and Surrounding Scene Appearance as Context for Action Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Heilbron, Fabian Caba

    2015-04-17

    This paper describes a framework for recognizing human actions in videos by incorporating a new set of visual cues that represent the context of the action. We develop a weak foreground-background segmentation approach in order to robustly extract not only foreground features that are focused on the actors, but also global camera motion and contextual scene information. Using dense point trajectories, our approach separates and describes the foreground motion from the background, represents the appearance of the extracted static background, and encodes the global camera motion that interestingly is shown to be discriminative for certain action classes. Our experiments on four challenging benchmarks (HMDB51, Hollywood2, Olympic Sports, and UCF50) show that our contextual features enable a significant performance improvement over state-of-the-art algorithms.

  6. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Motion is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind motion, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  7. S1-1: Individual Differences in the Perception of Biological Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Thornton

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to accurately perceive the actions of others based on reduced visual cues has been well documented. Previous work has suggested that this ability is probably made possible by separable mechanisms that can operate in either a passive, bottom-up fashion or an active, top-down fashion (Thornton, Rensink, & Shiffrar, 2002 Perception 31 837–853. One line of evidence for exploring the contribution of top-down mechanisms is to consider the extent to which individual differences in more general cognitive abilities, such as attention and working memory, predict performance on biological motion tasks. In this talk, I will begin by reviewing previous work that has looked at biological motion processing in clinical settings and as a function of domain-specific expertise. I will then introduce a new task that we are using in my lab to explore individual variation in action matching as a function of independently assessed attentional control and working memory capacity.

  8. Feature-based attentional tuning during biological motion detection measured with SSVEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Rakibul; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Grossman, Emily D

    2017-08-01

    Performance in detection tasks can be improved by directing attention to task-relevant features. In this study, we evaluate the direction tuning of selective attention to motion features when observers detect point-light biological motion in noise. Feature-based attention strategy is assessed by capitalizing on the sensitivity of unattended steady-state visual-evoked potential (SSVEP) to the spreading of feature-based attention to unattended regions of space. Participants monitored for the presence of a point-light walker embedded in uniform dynamic noise in the center of the screen. We analyzed the phase-locked electroencephalogram response to a flickering random-dot kinematogram (RDK) in an unattended peripheral annulus for the 1 s prior to the onset of the target. We found the highest SSVEP power to originate from electrodes over posterior parietal cortex (PPC), with power modulated by the direction of motion in the unattended annulus. The SSVEP was strongest on trials in which the unattended motion was opposite the facing direction of the walker, consistent with the backstroke of the feet and with the global direction of perceived background motion from a translating walker. Coherence between electrodes over PPC and other brain regions successfully predicted individual participant's d-prime, with the highest regression coefficients at electrodes over ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). The findings are evidence that functional connectivity between frontal and parietal cortex promote perceptual feature-based attention, and subsequent perceptual sensitivity, when segregating point-light figures from masking surround.

  9. Diffusion-advection within dynamic biological gaps driven by structural motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaro, Robert J.; Zhu, Qiang; Lin, Kuanpo

    2018-04-01

    To study the significance of advection in the transport of solutes, or particles, within thin biological gaps (channels), we examine theoretically the process driven by stochastic fluid flow caused by random thermal structural motion, and we compare it with transport via diffusion. The model geometry chosen resembles the synaptic cleft; this choice is motivated by the cleft's readily modeled structure, which allows for well-defined mechanical and physical features that control the advection process. Our analysis defines a Péclet-like number, AD, that quantifies the ratio of time scales of advection versus diffusion. Another parameter, AM, is also defined by the analysis that quantifies the full potential extent of advection in the absence of diffusion. These parameters provide a clear and compact description of the interplay among the well-defined structural, geometric, and physical properties vis-a ̀-vis the advection versus diffusion process. For example, it is found that AD˜1 /R2 , where R is the cleft diameter and hence diffusion distance. This curious, and perhaps unexpected, result follows from the dependence of structural motion that drives fluid flow on R . AM, on the other hand, is directly related (essentially proportional to) the energetic input into structural motion, and thereby to fluid flow, as well as to the mechanical stiffness of the cleftlike structure. Our model analysis thus provides unambiguous insight into the prospect of competition of advection versus diffusion within biological gaplike structures. The importance of the random, versus a regular, nature of structural motion and of the resulting transient nature of advection under random motion is made clear in our analysis. Further, by quantifying the effects of geometric and physical properties on the competition between advection and diffusion, our results clearly demonstrate the important role that metabolic energy (ATP) plays in this competitive process.

  10. Recurrent Convolutional Neural Networks: A Better Model of Biological Object Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerer, Courtney J; McClure, Patrick; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    Feedforward neural networks provide the dominant model of how the brain performs visual object recognition. However, these networks lack the lateral and feedback connections, and the resulting recurrent neuronal dynamics, of the ventral visual pathway in the human and non-human primate brain. Here we investigate recurrent convolutional neural networks with bottom-up (B), lateral (L), and top-down (T) connections. Combining these types of connections yields four architectures (B, BT, BL, and BLT), which we systematically test and compare. We hypothesized that recurrent dynamics might improve recognition performance in the challenging scenario of partial occlusion. We introduce two novel occluded object recognition tasks to test the efficacy of the models, digit clutter (where multiple target digits occlude one another) and digit debris (where target digits are occluded by digit fragments). We find that recurrent neural networks outperform feedforward control models (approximately matched in parametric complexity) at recognizing objects, both in the absence of occlusion and in all occlusion conditions. Recurrent networks were also found to be more robust to the inclusion of additive Gaussian noise. Recurrent neural networks are better in two respects: (1) they are more neurobiologically realistic than their feedforward counterparts; (2) they are better in terms of their ability to recognize objects, especially under challenging conditions. This work shows that computer vision can benefit from using recurrent convolutional architectures and suggests that the ubiquitous recurrent connections in biological brains are essential for task performance.

  11. Comparison of surface and intramuscular EMG pattern recognition for simultaneous wrist/hand motion classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren H; Hargrove, Levi J

    2013-01-01

    The simultaneous control of multiple degrees of freedom (DOFs) is important for the intuitive, life-like control of artificial limbs. The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of intramuscular electromyogram (EMG) improved pattern classification of simultaneous wrist/hand movements compared to surface EMG. Two pattern classification methods were used in this analysis, and were trained to predict 1-DOF and 2-DOF movements involving wrist rotation, wrist flexion/extension, and hand open/close. The classification methods used were (1) a single pattern classifier discriminating between 1-DOF and 2-DOF motion classes, and (2) a parallel set of three classifiers to predict the activity of each of the 3 DOFs. We demonstrate that in this combined wrist/hand classification task, the use of intramuscular EMG significantly decreases classification error compared to surface EMG for the parallel configuration (p<0.01), but not for the single classifier. We also show that the use of intramuscular EMG mitigates the increase in errors produced when the parallel classifier method is trained without 2-DOF motion class data.

  12. Integrated structural biology to unravel molecular mechanisms of protein-RNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlundt, Andreas; Tants, Jan-Niklas; Sattler, Michael

    2017-04-15

    Recent advances in RNA sequencing technologies have greatly expanded our knowledge of the RNA landscape in cells, often with spatiotemporal resolution. These techniques identified many new (often non-coding) RNA molecules. Large-scale studies have also discovered novel RNA binding proteins (RBPs), which exhibit single or multiple RNA binding domains (RBDs) for recognition of specific sequence or structured motifs in RNA. Starting from these large-scale approaches it is crucial to unravel the molecular principles of protein-RNA recognition in ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) to understand the underlying mechanisms of gene regulation. Structural biology and biophysical studies at highest possible resolution are key to elucidate molecular mechanisms of RNA recognition by RBPs and how conformational dynamics, weak interactions and cooperative binding contribute to the formation of specific, context-dependent RNPs. While large compact RNPs can be well studied by X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM, analysis of dynamics and weak interaction necessitates the use of solution methods to capture these properties. Here, we illustrate methods to study the structure and conformational dynamics of protein-RNA complexes in solution starting from the identification of interaction partners in a given RNP. Biophysical and biochemical techniques support the characterization of a protein-RNA complex and identify regions relevant in structural analysis. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to gain information on folding, stability and dynamics of RNAs and characterize RNPs in solution. It provides crucial information that is complementary to the static pictures derived from other techniques. NMR can be readily combined with other solution techniques, such as small angle X-ray and/or neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), which provide information about overall shapes, internal domain

  13. Toward attenuating the impact of arm positions on electromyography pattern-recognition based motion classification in transradial amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Electromyography (EMG) pattern-recognition based control strategies for multifunctional myoelectric prosthesis systems have been studied commonly in a controlled laboratory setting. Before these myoelectric prosthesis systems are clinically viable, it will be necessary to assess the effect of some disparities between the ideal laboratory setting and practical use on the control performance. One important obstacle is the impact of arm position variation that causes the changes of EMG pattern when performing identical motions in different arm positions. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of arm position variation on EMG pattern-recognition based motion classification in upper-limb amputees and the solutions for reducing these impacts. Methods With five unilateral transradial (TR) amputees, the EMG signals and tri-axial accelerometer mechanomyography (ACC-MMG) signals were simultaneously collected from both amputated and intact arms when performing six classes of arm and hand movements in each of five arm positions that were considered in the study. The effect of the arm position changes was estimated in terms of motion classification error and compared between amputated and intact arms. Then the performance of three proposed methods in attenuating the impact of arm positions was evaluated. Results With EMG signals, the average intra-position and inter-position classification errors across all five arm positions and five subjects were around 7.3% and 29.9% from amputated arms, respectively, about 1.0% and 10% low in comparison with those from intact arms. While ACC-MMG signals could yield a similar intra-position classification error (9.9%) as EMG, they had much higher inter-position classification error with an average value of 81.1% over the arm positions and the subjects. When the EMG data from all five arm positions were involved in the training set, the average classification error reached a value of around 10.8% for amputated arms. Using a

  14. Toward attenuating the impact of arm positions on electromyography pattern-recognition based motion classification in transradial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yanjuan; Zhou, Ping; Li, Guanglin

    2012-10-05

    Electromyography (EMG) pattern-recognition based control strategies for multifunctional myoelectric prosthesis systems have been studied commonly in a controlled laboratory setting. Before these myoelectric prosthesis systems are clinically viable, it will be necessary to assess the effect of some disparities between the ideal laboratory setting and practical use on the control performance. One important obstacle is the impact of arm position variation that causes the changes of EMG pattern when performing identical motions in different arm positions. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of arm position variation on EMG pattern-recognition based motion classification in upper-limb amputees and the solutions for reducing these impacts. With five unilateral transradial (TR) amputees, the EMG signals and tri-axial accelerometer mechanomyography (ACC-MMG) signals were simultaneously collected from both amputated and intact arms when performing six classes of arm and hand movements in each of five arm positions that were considered in the study. The effect of the arm position changes was estimated in terms of motion classification error and compared between amputated and intact arms. Then the performance of three proposed methods in attenuating the impact of arm positions was evaluated. With EMG signals, the average intra-position and inter-position classification errors across all five arm positions and five subjects were around 7.3% and 29.9% from amputated arms, respectively, about 1.0% and 10% low in comparison with those from intact arms. While ACC-MMG signals could yield a similar intra-position classification error (9.9%) as EMG, they had much higher inter-position classification error with an average value of 81.1% over the arm positions and the subjects. When the EMG data from all five arm positions were involved in the training set, the average classification error reached a value of around 10.8% for amputated arms. Using a two-stage cascade classifier

  15. Toward attenuating the impact of arm positions on electromyography pattern-recognition based motion classification in transradial amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Yanjuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electromyography (EMG pattern-recognition based control strategies for multifunctional myoelectric prosthesis systems have been studied commonly in a controlled laboratory setting. Before these myoelectric prosthesis systems are clinically viable, it will be necessary to assess the effect of some disparities between the ideal laboratory setting and practical use on the control performance. One important obstacle is the impact of arm position variation that causes the changes of EMG pattern when performing identical motions in different arm positions. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of arm position variation on EMG pattern-recognition based motion classification in upper-limb amputees and the solutions for reducing these impacts. Methods With five unilateral transradial (TR amputees, the EMG signals and tri-axial accelerometer mechanomyography (ACC-MMG signals were simultaneously collected from both amputated and intact arms when performing six classes of arm and hand movements in each of five arm positions that were considered in the study. The effect of the arm position changes was estimated in terms of motion classification error and compared between amputated and intact arms. Then the performance of three proposed methods in attenuating the impact of arm positions was evaluated. Results With EMG signals, the average intra-position and inter-position classification errors across all five arm positions and five subjects were around 7.3% and 29.9% from amputated arms, respectively, about 1.0% and 10% low in comparison with those from intact arms. While ACC-MMG signals could yield a similar intra-position classification error (9.9% as EMG, they had much higher inter-position classification error with an average value of 81.1% over the arm positions and the subjects. When the EMG data from all five arm positions were involved in the training set, the average classification error reached a value of around 10.8% for

  16. Pattern recognition analysis of satellite data for tropical cyclone motion and intensity forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Herbert; Nunez, Edwin; Barker, Llyle; Rodgers, ED

    1986-01-01

    An objective empirical analysis technique is employed to investigate the extent to which satellite-obtained measurements (GOES IR and TOVS data) of a tropical cyclone and its environment can be used to predict cyclone motion. The paper describes the procedure used to process the satellite derived data in order to optimize their possible predictive value, the technique used in developing the regression algorithms, and the results of testing these algorithms using the Lachenbrach and Mickey (1968) procedure. The data were examined alone and in conjunction with available nonsatellite climatological and persistence variables for each storm. These predictors are similar to those used in the National Hurricane Center (NHC) CLIPPER model. The performances obtained using the Nichols Research Corporation CLIPPER model and the NHC CLIPPER model are compared, using homogeneous data sets for the comparisons. Major differences in results were found to be related to differences in the models.

  17. Understanding recognition and self-assembly in biology using the chemist's toolbox. Insight into medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirolo, Z B; Benedini, L A; Sequeira, M A; Herrera, M G; Veuthey, T V; Dodero, V I

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal chemistry is intimately connected with basic science such as organic synthesis, chemical biology and biophysical chemistry among other disciplines. The reason of such connections is due to the power of organic synthesis to provide designed molecules; chemical biology to give tools to discover biological and/or pathological pathways and biophysical chemistry which provides the techniques to characterize and the theoretical background to understand molecular behaviour. The present review provides some selective examples of these research areas. Initially, template dsDNA organic synthesis and the spatio-temporal control of transcription are presenting following by the supramolecular entities used in drug delivery, such as liposomes and liquid crystal among others. Finally, peptides and protein self-assembly is connected with biomaterials and as an important event in the balance between health and disease. The final aim of the present review is to show the power of chemical tools not only for the synthesis of new molecules but also to improve our understanding of recognition and self-assembly in the biological context.

  18. Tactile input and empathy modulate the perception of ambiguous biological motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiltiz, Hörmetjan; Chen, Lihan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has shown that task-irrelevant auditory cues can bias perceptual decisions regarding directional information associated with biological motion, as indicated in perceptual tasks using point-light walkers (PLWs) (Brooks et al., 2007). In the current study, we extended the investigation of cross-modal influences to the tactile domain by asking how tactile input resolves perceptual ambiguity in visual apparent motion, and how empathy plays a role in this cross-modal interaction. In Experiment 1, we simulated the tactile feedback on the observers' fingertips when the (upright or inverted) PLWs (comprised of either all red or all green dots) were walking (leftwards or rightwards). The temporal periods between tactile events and critical visual events (the PLW's feet hitting the ground) were manipulated so that the tap could lead, synchronize, or lag the visual foot-hitting-ground event. We found that the temporal structures between tactile (feedback) and visual (hitting) events systematically biases the directional perception for upright PLWs, making either leftwards or rightwards more dominant. However, this effect was absent for inverted PLWs. In Experiment 2, we examined how empathy modulates cross-modal capture. Instead of giving tactile feedback on participants' fingertips, we gave taps on their ankles and presented the PLWs with motion directions of approaching (facing toward observer)/receding (facing away from observer) to resemble normal walking postures. With the same temporal structure, we found that individuals with higher empathy were more subject to perceptual bias in the presence of tactile feedback. Taken together, our findings showed that task-irrelevant tactile input can resolve the otherwise ambiguous perception of the direction of biological motion, and this cross-modal bias was mediated by higher level social-cognitive factors, including empathy.

  19. Tactile input and empathy ability modulate the perception of ambiguous biological motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hörmetjan eYiltiz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has shown that task-irrelevant auditory cues can bias perceptual decisions regarding directional information associated with biological motion, as indicated in perceptual tasks using point-light walkers (PLWs (Brooks et al., 2007. In the current study, we extended the investigation of cross-modal influences to the tactile domain by asking how tactile input resolves perceptual ambiguity in visual apparent motion, and how empathy ability plays a role in this cross-modal interaction. In Experiment 1, we simulated the tactile feedback on the observers’ fingertips when the (upright or inverted PLWs (comprised of either all red or all green dots were walking (leftwards or rightwards. The temporal periods between tactile events and critical visual events (the PLW’s feet hitting the ground were manipulated so that the tap could lead, synchronize, or lag with the visual foot-hitting-ground event. We found that the temporal structures between tactile (feedback and visual (hitting events systematically modulate the directional perception for upright PLWs, making either leftwards or rightwards more dominant. However, this temporal modulation effect was absent for inverted PLWs. In Experiment 2, we examined how empathy ability modulates cross-modal capture. Instead of generating tactile feedback on participant’s fingertips, we gave taps on their ankles and presented the PLWs with motion directions of approaching (facing towards observer/receding (facing away from observer to resemble normal walking postures. With the same temporal structure, we found that individuals with higher empathic ability were more subject to perceptual bias in the presence of tactile feedback. Taken together, our findings showed that task-irrelevant tactile input can resolve the otherwise ambiguous perception of the directional information of biological motion, whereas cross-modal modulation was mediated by higher level social-cognitive factors, including empathic

  20. The modulation of motor control by imitating non-biological motions: a study about motor resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Yu; Yamamoto, Taisei

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] Sensorimotor experience modulates motor resonance, such as motor interference, which occurs when observing others' movements; however, it is unclear how motor resonance is modulated by intentionally imitating others' movements. This study examined the effects of imitation experience on subsequent motor resonance. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven healthy participants performed horizontal arm movements while observing non-biological, incongruent (vertical) movements of a visual stimulus (triangle object) in pre- and post-test procedures. Thirteen participants in the imitation group imitated vertical movements (non-biological motion) of the triangle object between pre- and post-test procedures and fourteen participants in the non-imitation group observed that. [Results] Variance in the executed movements was measured as an index of motor resonance. Although there was no significant difference in the non-imitation group, there was a significantly smaller variance for post-test compared to pre-test in the imitation group. [Conclusion] Motor resonance was inhibited by intentionally imitating non-biological motions. Imitating movements different from one's own motor property might inhibit subsequent motor resonance. This finding might be applied to selectively using motor resonance as a form of rehabilitation.

  1. Effects of walker gender and observer gender on biological motion walking direction discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoying; Cai, Peng; Jiang, Yi

    2014-09-01

    The ability to recognize the movements of other biological entities, such as whether a person is walking toward you, is essential for survival and social interaction. Previous studies have shown that the visual system is particularly sensitive to approaching biological motion. In this study, we examined whether the gender of walkers and observers influenced the walking direction discrimination of approaching point-light walkers in fine granularity. The observers were presented a walker who walked in different directions and were asked to quickly judge the walking direction (left or right). The results showed that the observers demonstrated worse direction discrimination when the walker was depicted as male than when the walker was depicted as female, probably because the observers tended to perceive the male walkers as walking straight ahead. Intriguingly, male observers performed better than female observers at judging the walking directions of female walkers but not those of male walkers, a result indicating perceptual advantage with evolutionary significance. These findings provide strong evidence that the gender of walkers and observers modulates biological motion perception and that an adaptive perceptual mechanism exists in the visual system to facilitate the survival of social organisms. © 2014 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. The impact of stereoscopic imagery and motion on anatomical structure recognition and visual attention performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmele, Martin; Schmidt, Elena; Lingenfelder, Melissa; Martens, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Gross anatomy is located in a three-dimensional space. Visualizing aspects of structures in gross anatomy education should aim to provide information that best resembles their original spatial proportions. Stereoscopic three-dimensional imagery might offer possibilities to implement this aim, though some research has revealed potential impairments that may result from observing stereoscopic visualizations, such as discomfort. However, possible impairments of working memory such as decreased visual attention performance due to applying this technology in gross anatomy education have not yet been investigated. Similarly, in gross anatomy education the impact of stereoscopic imagery on learners' recognition of anatomical-spatial relationships and the impact of different presentation formats have only been investigated in a small number of studies. In this study, the performance of 171 teacher trainees working on the anatomy of hearing was examined, either with non-stereoscopic or stereoscopic imagery. Static and dynamic picture presentations were applied. Overall, benefits for stereoscopic imagery on estimating anatomical-spatial relations were found. The performance on a visual attention test indicates that the impact of stereoscopic visualizations on the human cognitive system varies more from person to person compared to non-stereoscopic visualizations. In addition, combinations of temporarily moving pictures and stereoscopic imagery lead to decreased visual attention performance compared to combinations of moving pictures and non-stereoscopic imagery. Anat Sci Educ 11: 15-24. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. The effect of oxytocin on biological motion perception in dogs (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Krisztina; Kis, Anna; Kanizsár, Orsolya; Hernádi, Anna; Gácsi, Márta; Topál, József

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that the neuropeptide oxytocin is involved in the regulation of several complex human social behaviours. There is, however, little research on the effect of oxytocin on basic mechanisms underlying human sociality, such as the perception of biological motion. In the present study, we investigated the effect of oxytocin on biological motion perception in dogs (Canis familiaris), a species adapted to the human social environment and thus widely used to model many aspects of human social behaviour. In a within-subjects design, dogs (N = 39), after having received either oxytocin or placebo treatment, were presented with 2D projection of a moving point-light human figure and the inverted and scrambled version of the same movie. Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were measured as physiological responses, and behavioural response was evaluated by observing dogs' looking time. Subjects were also rated on the personality traits of Neuroticism and Agreeableness by their owners. As expected, placebo-pretreated (control) dogs showed a spontaneous preference for the biological motion pattern; however, there was no such preference after oxytocin pretreatment. Furthermore, following the oxytocin pretreatment female subjects looked more at the moving point-light figure than males. The individual variations along the dimensions of Agreeableness and Neuroticism also modulated dogs' behaviour. Furthermore, HR and HRV measures were affected by oxytocin treatment and in turn played a role in subjects' looking behaviour. We discuss how these findings contribute to our understanding of the neurohormonal regulatory mechanisms of human (and non-human) social skills.

  4. Two-dimensional laser servoing for precision motion control of an ODV robotic license plate recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen; Moore, Kevin L.; Chen, YangQuan; Bahl, Vikas

    2003-09-01

    As an outgrowth of series of projects focused on mobility of unmanned ground vehicles (UGV), an omni-directional (ODV), multi-robot, autonomous mobile parking security system has been developed. The system has two types of robots: the low-profile Omni-Directional Inspection System (ODIS), which can be used for under-vehicle inspections, and the mid-sized T4 robot, which serves as a ``marsupial mothership'' for the ODIS vehicles and performs coarse resolution inspection. A key task for the T4 robot is license plate recognition (LPR). For a successful LPR task without compromising the recognition rate, the robot must be able to identify the bumper locations of vehicles in the parking area and then precisely position the LPR camera relative to the bumper. This paper describes a 2D-laser scanner based approach to bumper identification and laser servoing for the T4 robot. The system uses a gimbal-mounted scanning laser. As the T4 robot travels down a row of parking stalls, data is collected from the laser every 100ms. For each parking stall in the range of the laser during the scan, the data is matched to a ``bumper box'' corresponding to where a car bumper is expected, resulting in a point cloud of data corresponding to a vehicle bumper for each stall. Next, recursive line-fitting algorithms are used to determine a line for the data in each stall's ``bumper box.'' The fitting technique uses Hough based transforms, which are robust against segmentation problems and fast enough for real-time line fitting. Once a bumper line is fitted with an acceptable confidence, the bumper location is passed to the T4 motion controller, which moves to position the LPR camera properly relative to the bumper. The paper includes examples and results that show the effectiveness of the technique, including its ability to work in real-time.

  5. The computational measurement of apparent motion: a recurrent pattern recognition strategy as an approach to solve the correspondence problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuling, F H; Altena, P; Mastebroek, H A

    1990-01-01

    In short, the model consists of a two-dimensional set of edge detecting units, modelled according to the zero-crossing detectors introduced first by Marr and Ullman (1981). These detectors are located peripherally in our synthetic vision system and are the input elements for an intelligent recurrent network. The purpose of that network is to recognize and categorize the previously detected contrast changes in a multi-resolution representation of the original image in such a manner that the original information will be decomposed into a relatively small number N of well-defined edge primitives. The advantage of such a construction is that time-consuming pattern recognition has no longer to be done on the originally complex motion-blurred images of moving objects, but on a limited number of categorized forms. Based on a number M of elementary feature attributes for each individual edge primitive, the model is then able to decompose each edge pattern into certain features. In this way an M-dimensional vector can be constructed for each edge. For each sequence of two successive frames a tensor can be calculated containing the distances (measured in M-dimensional feature space) between all features in both images. This procedure yields a set of K-1 tensors for a sequence of K images. After cross-correlation of all N x M feature attributes from image (i) with those from image (i + 1), where i = 1,...,K-1, probability distributions can be computed. The final step is to search for maxima in these probability functions and then to construct from these extremes an optimal motion field. A number of simulation examples will be presented.

  6. Anomalous diffusion and multifractional Brownian motion: simulating molecular crowding and physical obstacles in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Lago, T T; Leier, A; Burrage, K

    2012-08-01

    There have been many recent studies from both experimental and simulation perspectives in order to understand the effects of spatial crowding in molecular biology. These effects manifest themselves in protein organisation on the plasma membrane, on chemical signalling within the cell and in gene regulation. Simulations are usually done with lattice- or meshless-based random walks but insights can also be gained through the computation of the underlying probability density functions of these stochastic processes. Until recently much of the focus had been on continuous time random walks, but some very recent work has suggested that fractional Brownian motion may be a good descriptor of spatial crowding effects in some cases. The study compares both fractional Brownian motion and continuous time random walks and highlights how well they can represent different types of spatial crowding and physical obstacles. Simulated spatial data, mimicking experimental data, was first generated by using the package Smoldyn. We then attempted to characterise this data through continuous time anomalously diffusing random walks and multifractional Brownian motion (MFBM) by obtaining MFBM paths that match the statistical properties of our sample data. Although diffusion around immovable obstacles can be reasonably characterised by a single Hurst exponent, we find that diffusion in a crowded environment seems to exhibit multifractional properties in the form of a different short- and long-time behaviour.

  7. Structural biology of antibody recognition of carbohydrate epitopes and potential uses for targeted cancer immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingjan, Tamir; Spendlove, Ian; Durrant, Lindy G; Scott, Andrew M; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Ramsland, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies represent the most successful class of biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancer. Mechanisms of action of therapeutic antibodies are very diverse and reflect their ability to engage in antibody-dependent effector mechanisms, internalize to deliver cytotoxic payloads, and display direct effects on cells by lysis or by modulating the biological pathways of their target antigens. Importantly, one of the universal changes in cancer is glycosylation and carbohydrate-binding antibodies can be produced to selectively recognize tumor cells over normal tissues. A promising group of cell surface antibody targets consists of carbohydrates presented as glycolipids or glycoproteins. In this review, we outline the basic principles of antibody-based targeting of carbohydrate antigens in cancer. We also present a detailed structural view of antibody recognition and the conformational properties of a series of related tissue-blood group (Lewis) carbohydrates that are being pursued as potential targets of cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Healthy Older Observers Cannot Use Biological-Motion Point-Light Information Efficiently within 4 m of Themselves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Legault

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is associated with a number of perceptual changes, but measures of biological-motion perception have yielded conflicting results. Biological motion provides information about a walker, from gender and identity to speed, direction, and distance. In our natural environment, as someone approaches us (closer distances, the walker spans larger areas of our field of view, the extent of which can be underutilized with age. Yet, the effect of age on biological-motion perception in such real-world scenarios remains unknown. We assessed the effect of age on discriminating walking direction in upright and inverted biological-motion patterns, positioned at various distances in virtual space. Findings indicate that discrimination is worse at closer distances, an effect exacerbated by age. Older adults' performance decreases at distances as far away as 4 m, whereas younger adults maintain their performance as close as 1 m (worse at 0.5 m. This suggests that older observers are limited in their capacity to integrate information over larger areas of the visual field and supports the notion that age-related effects are more apparent when larger neural networks are required to process simultaneous information. This has further implications for social contexts where information from biological motion is critical.

  9. Healthy older observers cannot use biological-motion point-light information efficiently within 4 m of themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Isabelle; Troje, Nikolaus F; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Healthy aging is associated with a number of perceptual changes, but measures of biological-motion perception have yielded conflicting results. Biological motion provides information about a walker, from gender and identity to speed, direction, and distance. In our natural environment, as someone approaches us (closer distances), the walker spans larger areas of our field of view, the extent of which can be underutilized with age. Yet, the effect of age on biological-motion perception in such real-world scenarios remains unknown. We assessed the effect of age on discriminating walking direction in upright and inverted biological-motion patterns, positioned at various distances in virtual space. Findings indicate that discrimination is worse at closer distances, an effect exacerbated by age. Older adults' performance decreases at distances as far away as 4 m, whereas younger adults maintain their performance as close as 1 m (worse at 0.5 m). This suggests that older observers are limited in their capacity to integrate information over larger areas of the visual field and supports the notion that age-related effects are more apparent when larger neural networks are required to process simultaneous information. This has further implications for social contexts where information from biological motion is critical.

  10. Investigating the Use of Term Recall and Recognition Tools in Learning Terminology and Concepts in a Senior Biology Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evergreen, Merrin; Cooper, Rebecca; Loughran, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the use of term recall and recognition tools for learning terminology and concepts in a senior biology classroom. The paper responded to a set of research questions from a teacher researcher perspective, making use of data collected from the teacher researcher's classrooms over several years, based on the implementation of…

  11. The pes of Australovenator wintonensis (Theropoda: Megaraptoridae: analysis of the pedal range of motion and biological restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt A. White

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The pedal range of motion in Australovenator wintonensis is investigated to determine what influence soft tissue had on range of motion in the foot. Fortunately, the theropod pes shares a close morphology with extant large cursorial birds. Therefore, to better understand the pedal range of motion of Australovenator, the pedal range of motion of Dromaius novaehollandiae (commonly known as the emu was analysed with and without soft tissue. We used a variety of innovative digital techniques to analyse the range of motion and biologically restore the Australovenator pes. Computed tomography scans of Dromaius pes in fully flexed and fully extended positions provided the soft tissue range of motion limits. The bone on bone range of motion of the same specimen was replicated following the removal of soft tissue. It was identified that there was an increase in range of motion potential with the removal of soft tissue. This variation provided a guide to develop the potential range of motion of a fully fleshed Australovenator pes. Additionally, the dissection of the Dromaius pes provided a guide enabling the replication of the corresponding soft tissue and keratin sheaths of the Australovenator pes.

  12. Real-time automated 3D sensing, detection, and recognition of dynamic biological micro-organic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Bahram; Yeom, Seokwon; Moon, Inkyu; Daneshpanah, Mehdi

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of three-dimensional (3D) optical imaging techniques for real-time automated sensing, visualization, and recognition of dynamic biological microorganisms. Real time sensing and 3D reconstruction of the dynamic biological microscopic objects can be performed by single-exposure on-line (SEOL) digital holographic microscopy. A coherent 3D microscope-based interferometer is constructed to record digital holograms of dynamic micro biological events. Complex amplitude 3D images of the biological microorganisms are computationally reconstructed at different depths by digital signal processing. Bayesian segmentation algorithms are applied to identify regions of interest for further processing. A number of pattern recognition approaches are addressed to identify and recognize the microorganisms. One uses 3D morphology of the microorganisms by analyzing 3D geometrical shapes which is composed of magnitude and phase. Segmentation, feature extraction, graph matching, feature selection, and training and decision rules are used to recognize the biological microorganisms. In a different approach, 3D technique is used that are tolerant to the varying shapes of the non-rigid biological microorganisms. After segmentation, a number of sampling patches are arbitrarily extracted from the complex amplitudes of the reconstructed 3D biological microorganism. These patches are processed using a number of cost functions and statistical inference theory for the equality of means and equality of variances between the sampling segments. Also, we discuss the possibility of employing computational integral imaging for 3D sensing, visualization, and recognition of biological microorganisms illuminated under incoherent light. Experimental results with several biological microorganisms are presented to illustrate detection, segmentation, and identification of micro biological events.

  13. A Biological Micro Actuator: Graded and Closed-Loop Control of Insect Leg Motion by Electrical Stimulation of Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Aziz, Mohamed Fareez Bin; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, ...

  14. Evaluating the influence of organ motion during photon vs. proton therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer using biological models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Kia; G Andersen, Andreas; Casares-Magaz, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    beam angles for pelvic irradiation, we aimed to evaluate the influence of organ motion for PT using biological models, and to compare this with contemporary photon-based RT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight locally advanced prostate cancer patients with a planning CT (pCT) and 8-9 repeated CT scans (r......BACKGROUND: Proton therapy (PT) may have a normal tissue sparing potential when co-irradiating pelvic lymph nodes in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, but may also be more sensitive towards organ motion in the pelvis. Building upon a previous study identifying motion-robust proton...

  15. Prediction of biological motion perception performance from intrinsic brain network regional efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengjian Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological motion perception (BMP is a vivid perception of the moving form of a human figure from a few light points on the joints of the body. BMP is commonplace and important, but there is great inter-individual variability in this ability. This study used multiple regression model analysis to explore the association between the BMP performance and intrinsic brain activity, in order to investigate the neural substrates underlying inter-individual variability of BMP performance. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI and BMP performance data were collected from 24 healthy participants. For each participant, the intrinsic brain network was constructed, and a graph-based network efficiency metric was measured. Then, a multiple linear regression model was used to explore the association between network regional efficiency and BMP performance. We found that the local and global network efficiency of many regions was significantly correlated with the BMP performance. Further analysis showed that the local efficiency rather than global efficiency could be used to explain most of the BMP inter-individual variability, and the regions involved were predominately located at the Default Mode Network (DMN. Additionally, the discrimination analysis showed that the local efficiency over regions including thalamus could be used to classify BMP performance across participants. Notably, the association pattern between the network nodal efficiency and the BMP was different from the association pattern that of the static directional/gender information perception. Overall, these findings showed that intrinsic brain network efficiency may be considered as a neural factor that explains BMP inter-individual variability. Keywords: Biological motion; Resting-state network; Network efficiency; Multiple linear regression model; Brain-behavior analysis

  16. Electrical Detection of Dengue Biomarker Using Egg Yolk Immunoglobulin as the Biological Recognition Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Alessandra; Vieira, Nirton C. S.; Dos Santos, Juliana F.; Janegitz, Bruno C.; Aoki, Sergio M.; Junior, Paulo P.; Lovato, Rodrigo L.; Nogueira, Maurício L.; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Guimarães, Francisco E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is secreted by dengue virus in the first days of infection and acts as an excellent dengue biomarker. Here, the direct electrical detection of NS1 from dengue type 2 virus has been achieved by the measurement of variations in open circuit potential (OCP) between a reference electrode and a disposable Au electrode containing immobilized anti-NS1 antibodies acting as immunosensor. Egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) was utilized for the first time as the biological recognition element alternatively to conventional mammalian antibodies in the detection of dengue virus NS1 protein. NS1 protein was detected in standard samples in a 0.1 to 10 µg.mL-1 concentration range with (3.2 +/- 0.3) mV/µg.mL-1 of sensitivity and 0.09 µg.mL-1 of detection limit. Therefore, the proposed system can be extended to detect NS1 in real samples and provide an early diagnosis of dengue.

  17. Comparison of motion-based approaches for multi-modal action and gesture recognition from RGB-D

    OpenAIRE

    Bertiche Argila, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Automatic action and gesture recognition research field has growth in interest over the last few years. Action recognition can be understood as the automatic classification of generic human actions or activities, such as walking, reading, jumping, etc. while gesture recognition focuses on the analysis of more concrete movements, usually from the upper body, which have a meaning by their own, as waving, saluting, negating, etc. Such interest on the domain comes mainly from its many...

  18. Investigating molecular recognition and biological function at interfaces using piscidins, antimicrobial peptides from fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Vollmar, Breanna S; Forseth, Kristen T; Manion, McKenna N; Jones, Shiela M; Wagner, Tim J; Endicott, RaeLynn M; Kyriss, Brandon P; Homem, Lorraine M; Pate, Michelle; He, Jing; Raines, Joshua; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Mitchell, Dan J; Auman, Ann J; Ellard-Ivey, Mary J; Blazyk, Jack; Cotten, Myriam

    2006-09-01

    We studied amidated and non-amidated piscidins 1 and 3, amphipathic cationic antimicrobial peptides from fish, to characterize functional and structural similarities and differences between these peptides and better understand the structural motifs involved in biological activity and functional diversity among amidated and non-amidated isoforms. Antimicrobial and hemolytic assays were carried out to assess their potency and toxicity, respectively. Site-specific high-resolution solid-state NMR orientational restraints were obtained from (15)N-labeled amidated and non-amidated piscidins 1 and 3 in the presence of hydrated oriented lipid bilayers. Solid-state NMR and circular dichroism results indicate that the peptides are alpha-helical and oriented parallel to the membrane surface. This orientation was expected since peptide-lipid interactions are enhanced at the water-bilayer interface for amphipathic cationic antimicrobial peptides. (15)N solid-state NMR performed on oriented samples demonstrate that piscidin experiences fast, large amplitude backbone motions around an axis parallel to the bilayer normal. Under the conditions tested here, piscidin 1 was confirmed to be more antimicrobially potent than piscidin 3 and antimicrobial activity was not affected by amidation. In light of functional and structural similarities between piscidins 1 and 3, we propose that their topology and fast dynamics are related to their mechanism of action.

  19. Time-Motion and Biological Responses in Simulated Mixed Martial Arts Sparring Matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coswig, Victor S; Ramos, Solange de P; Del Vecchio, Fabrício B

    2016-08-01

    Coswig, VS, Ramos, SdP, and Del Vecchio, FB. Time-motion and biological responses in simulated mixed martial arts sparring matches. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2156-2163, 2016-Simulated matches are a relevant component of training for mixed martial arts (MMA) athletes. This study aimed to characterize time-motion responses and investigate physiological stress and neuromuscular changes related to MMA sparring matches. Thirteen athletes with an average age of 25 ± 5 years, body mass of 81.3 ± 9.5 kg, height of 176.2 ± 5.5 cm, and time of practice in MMA of 39 ± 25 months participated in the study. The fighters executed three 5-minute rounds with 1-minute intervals. Blood and salivary samples were collected and physical tests and psychometric questionnaires administered at 3 time points: before (PRE), immediately after (POST), and 48 hours after the combat (48 h). Statistical analysis applied analysis of variance for repeated measurements. In biochemical analysis, significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) were identified between PRE and POST (glucose: 80.3 ± 12.7 to 156.5 ± 19.1 mg·ml; lactate: 4 ± 1.7 to 15.6 ± 4.8 mmol·dl), POST and 48 hours (glucose: 156.5 ± 19.1 to 87.6 ± 15.5 mg·ml; lactate: 15.6 ± 4.8 to 2.9 ± 3.5 mmol·dl; urea: 44.1 ± 8.9 to 36.3 ± 7.8 mg·ml), and PRE and 48 hours (creatine kinase [CK]: 255.8 ± 137.4 to 395.9 ± 188.7 U/L). In addition, time-motion analyses showed a total high:low intensity of 1:2 and an effort:pause ratio of 1:3. In conclusion, simulated MMA sparring matches feature moderate to high intensity and a low degree of musculoskeletal damage, which can be seen by absence of physical performance and decrease in CK. Results of the study indicate that sparring training could be introduced into competitive microcycles to improve technical and tactical aspects of MMA matches, due to the high motor specificity and low muscle damage.

  20. He Throws like a Girl (but Only when He's Sad): Emotion Affects Sex-Decoding of Biological Motion Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kerri L.; McKay, Lawrie S.; Pollick, Frank E.

    2011-01-01

    Gender stereotypes have been implicated in sex-typed perceptions of facial emotion. Such interpretations were recently called into question because facial cues of emotion are confounded with sexually dimorphic facial cues. Here we examine the role of visual cues and gender stereotypes in perceptions of biological motion displays, thus overcoming…

  1. [Comprehension of emotions accompanied by everyday actions: comparison of biological-motion pictures with real-person pictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiyama, Atsuki; Imoto, Hisato; Tsuinashi, Seiichi

    2005-12-01

    Forty participants viewed and interpreted videotapes that were composed of displays representing different human actions (e.g., running and washing hands) and emotions (pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant). Half the videotapes were usual movies of real persons and the other videotapes were biological motions as produced by 22 light points on a human body in otherwise total darkness. In each display, an expert or a novice played a series of large or small body actions under each emotion. We found that (1) pleasant-unpleasant feeling was well discriminated in the real-person displays and in the biological motion display of large body actions, but it was less discriminated in the biological-motion displays of small body actions, (2) actions by experts were rated to be pleasant, and (3) actions were successfully identified for the real displays of large actions by experts, but they were poorly identified for the biological-motion displays of small body actions by novices. These results suggested that the observers correctly judged the emotion of players that was represented through suitable actions.

  2. Body Image in Anorexia Nervosa: Body Size Estimation Utilising a Biological Motion Task and Eyetracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipou, Andrea; Rossell, Susan Lee; Gurvich, Caroline; Castle, David Jonathan; Troje, Nikolaus Friedrich; Abel, Larry Allen

    2016-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric condition characterised by a distortion of body image. However, whether individuals with AN can accurately perceive the size of other individuals' bodies is unclear. In the current study, 24 women with AN and 24 healthy control participants undertook two biological motion tasks while eyetracking was performed: to identify the gender and to indicate the walkers' body size. Anorexia nervosa participants tended to 'hyperscan' stimuli but did not demonstrate differences in how visual attention was directed to different body areas, relative to controls. Groups also did not differ in their estimation of body size. The hyperscanning behaviours suggest increased anxiety to disorder-relevant stimuli in AN. The lack of group difference in the estimation of body size suggests that the AN group was able to judge the body size of others accurately. The findings are discussed in terms of body image distortion specific to oneself in AN. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  3. A Biological Micro Actuator: Graded and Closed-Loop Control of Insect Leg Motion by Electrical Stimulation of Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Aziz, Mohamed Fareez Bin; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect–machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  4. A biological micro actuator: graded and closed-loop control of insect leg motion by electrical stimulation of muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Cao

    Full Text Available In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect-machine hybrid legged robot.

  5. Large Domain Motions in Ago Protein Controlled by the Guide DNA-Strand Seed Region Determine the Ago-DNA-mRNA Complex Recognition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhen; Huynh, Tien; Ren, Pengyu; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-01-01

    The recognition mechanism and cleavage activity of argonaute (Ago), miRNA, and mRNA complexes are the core processes to the small non-coding RNA world. The 5′ nucleation at the ‘seed’ region (position 2–8) of miRNA was believed to play a significant role in guiding the recognition of target mRNAs to the given miRNA family. In this paper, we have performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the related and recently revealed Ago-DNA:mRNA ternary complexes to study the dynamics of the guide-target recognition and the effect of mutations by introducing “damaging” C·C mismatches at different positions in the seed region of the DNA-RNA duplex. Our simulations show that the A-form-like helix duplex gradually distorts as the number of seed mismatches increases and the complex can survive no more than two such mismatches. Severe distortions of the guide-target heteroduplex are observed in the ruinous 4-sites mismatch mutant, which give rise to a bending motion of the PAZ domain along the L1/L2 “hinge-like” connection segment, resulting in the opening of the nucleic-acid-binding channel. These long-range interactions between the seed region and PAZ domain, moderated by the L1/L2 segments, reveal the central role of the seed region in the guide-target strands recognition: it not only determines the guide-target heteroduplex’s nucleation and propagation, but also regulates the dynamic motions of Ago domains around the nucleic-acid-binding channel. PMID:23382927

  6. Dance-the-Music: an educational platform for the modeling, recognition and audiovisual monitoring of dance steps using spatiotemporal motion templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Amelynck, Denis; Leman, Marc

    2012-12-01

    In this article, a computational platform is presented, entitled "Dance-the-Music", that can be used in a dance educational context to explore and learn the basics of dance steps. By introducing a method based on spatiotemporal motion templates, the platform facilitates to train basic step models from sequentially repeated dance figures performed by a dance teacher. Movements are captured with an optical motion capture system. The teachers' models can be visualized from a first-person perspective to instruct students how to perform the specific dance steps in the correct manner. Moreover, recognition algorithms-based on a template matching method-can determine the quality of a student's performance in real time by means of multimodal monitoring techniques. The results of an evaluation study suggest that the Dance-the-Music is effective in helping dance students to master the basics of dance figures.

  7. The Coding of Biological Information: From Nucleotide Sequence to Protein Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štambuk, Nikola

    The paper reviews the classic results of Swanson, Dayhoff, Grantham, Blalock and Root-Bernstein, which link genetic code nucleotide patterns to the protein structure, evolution and molecular recognition. Symbolic representation of the binary addresses defining particular nucleotide and amino acid properties is discussed, with consideration of: structure and metric of the code, direct correspondence between amino acid and nucleotide information, and molecular recognition of the interacting protein motifs coded by the complementary DNA and RNA strands.

  8. Prediction of Biological Motion Perception Performance from Intrinsic Brain Network Regional Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengjian; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Bishan; Chang, Song; Pan, Jinghua; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biological motion perception (BMP) refers to the ability to perceive the moving form of a human figure from a limited amount of stimuli, such as from a few point lights located on the joints of a moving body. BMP is commonplace and important, but there is great inter-individual variability in this ability. This study used multiple regression model analysis to explore the association between BMP performance and intrinsic brain activity, in order to investigate the neural substrates underlying inter-individual variability of BMP performance. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and BMP performance data were collected from 24 healthy participants, for whom intrinsic brain networks were constructed, and a graph-based network efficiency metric was measured. Then, a multiple linear regression model was used to explore the association between network regional efficiency and BMP performance. We found that the local and global network efficiency of many regions was significantly correlated with BMP performance. Further analysis showed that the local efficiency rather than global efficiency could be used to explain most of the BMP inter-individual variability, and the regions involved were predominately located in the Default Mode Network (DMN). Additionally, discrimination analysis showed that the local efficiency of certain regions such as the thalamus could be used to classify BMP performance across participants. Notably, the association pattern between network nodal efficiency and BMP was different from the association pattern of static directional/gender information perception. Overall, these findings show that intrinsic brain network efficiency may be considered a neural factor that explains BMP inter-individual variability. PMID:27853427

  9. Impaired Recognition of Emotions from Body Movements Is Associated with Elevated Motion Coherence Thresholds in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulties in recognizing emotions from body movements. Difficulties in perceiving coherent motion are also common in ASD. Yet it is unknown whether these two impairments are related. Thirteen adults with ASD and 16 age- and IQ-matched typically developing…

  10. Semantic Models of Sentences with Verbs of Motion in Standard Language and in Scientific Language Used in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita Banionytė

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The semantic models of sentences with verbs of motion in German standard language and in scientific language used in biology are analyzed in the article. In its theoretic part it is affirmed that the article is based on the semantic theory of the sentence. This theory, in its turn, is grounded on the correlation of semantic predicative classes and semantic roles. The combination of semantic predicative classes and semantic roles is expressed by the main semantic formula – proposition. In its practical part the differences between the semantic models of standard and scientific language used in biology are explained. While modelling sentences with verbs of motion, two groups of semantic models of sentences are singled out: that of action (Handlung and process (Vorgang. The analysis shows that the semantic models of sentences with semantic action predicatives dominate in the text of standard language while the semantic models of sentences with semantic process predicatives dominate in the texts of scientific language used in biology. The differences how the doer and direction are expressed in standard and in scientific language are clearly seen and the semantic cases (Agens, Patiens, Direktiv1 help to determine that. It is observed that in scientific texts of high level of specialization (biology science in contrast to popular scientific literature models of sentences with moving verbs are usually seldom found. They are substituted by denominative constructions. In conclusions it is shown that this analysis can be important in methodics, especially planning material for teaching professional-scientific language.

  11. A Digital Liquid State Machine With Biologically Inspired Learning and Its Application to Speech Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Peng; Jin, Yingyezhe; Choe, Yoonsuck

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a bioinspired digital liquid-state machine (LSM) for low-power very-large-scale-integration (VLSI)-based machine learning applications. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first work that employs a bioinspired spike-based learning algorithm for the LSM. With the proposed online learning, the LSM extracts information from input patterns on the fly without needing intermediate data storage as required in offline learning methods such as ridge regression. The proposed learning rule is local such that each synaptic weight update is based only upon the firing activities of the corresponding presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons without incurring global communications across the neural network. Compared with the backpropagation-based learning, the locality of computation in the proposed approach lends itself to efficient parallel VLSI implementation. We use subsets of the TI46 speech corpus to benchmark the bioinspired digital LSM. To reduce the complexity of the spiking neural network model without performance degradation for speech recognition, we study the impacts of synaptic models on the fading memory of the reservoir and hence the network performance. Moreover, we examine the tradeoffs between synaptic weight resolution, reservoir size, and recognition performance and present techniques to further reduce the overhead of hardware implementation. Our simulation results show that in terms of isolated word recognition evaluated using the TI46 speech corpus, the proposed digital LSM rivals the state-of-the-art hidden Markov-model-based recognizer Sphinx-4 and outperforms all other reported recognizers including the ones that are based upon the LSM or neural networks.

  12. A biologically plausible transform for visual recognition that is invariant to translation, scale and rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel eSountsov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Visual object recognition occurs easily despite differences in position, size, and rotation of the object, but the neural mechanisms responsible for this invariance are not known. We have found a set of transforms that achieve invariance in a neurally plausible way. We find that a transform based on local spatial frequency analysis of oriented segments and on logarithmic mapping, when applied twice in an iterative fashion, produces an output image that is unique to the object and that remains constant as the input image is shifted, scaled or rotated.

  13. Both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduce the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion perception.

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    Adam Heenan

    Full Text Available Biological motion stimuli, such as orthographically projected stick figure walkers, are ambiguous about their orientation in depth. The projection of a stick figure walker oriented towards the viewer, therefore, is the same as its projection when oriented away. Even though such figures are depth-ambiguous, however, observers tend to interpret them as facing towards them more often than facing away. Some have speculated that this facing-the-viewer bias may exist for sociobiological reasons: Mistaking another human as retreating when they are actually approaching could have more severe consequences than the opposite error. Implied in this hypothesis is that the facing-towards percept of biological motion stimuli is potentially more threatening. Measures of anxiety and the facing-the-viewer bias should therefore be related, as researchers have consistently found that anxious individuals display an attentional bias towards more threatening stimuli. The goal of this study was to assess whether physical exercise (Experiment 1 or an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2 would significantly affect facing-the-viewer biases. We hypothesized that both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation would decrease facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers, but not for bottom- or top-half-only human stimuli, as these carry less sociobiological relevance. On the other hand, we expected that the anxiety induction task (Experiment 2 would increase facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. In both experiments, participants completed anxiety questionnaires, exercised on a treadmill (Experiment 1 or performed an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2, and then immediately completed a perceptual task that allowed us to assess their facing-the-viewer bias. As hypothesized, we found that physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduced facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. Our

  14. Further explorations of the facing bias in biological motion perception: perspective cues, observer sex, and response times.

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    Ben Schouten

    Full Text Available The human visual system has evolved to be highly sensitive to visual information about other persons and their movements as is illustrated by the effortless perception of point-light figures or 'biological motion'. When presented orthographically, a point-light walker is interpreted in two anatomically plausible ways: As 'facing the viewer' or as 'facing away' from the viewer. However, human observers show a 'facing bias': They perceive such a point-light walker as facing towards them in about 70-80% of the cases. In studies exploring the role of social and biological relevance as a possible account for the facing bias, we found a 'figure gender effect': Male point-light figures elicit a stronger facing bias than female point-light figures. Moreover, we also found an 'observer gender effect': The 'figure gender effect' was stronger for male than for female observers. In the present study we presented to 11 males and 11 females point-light walkers of which, very subtly, the perspective information was manipulated by modifying the earlier reported 'perspective technique'. Proportions of 'facing the viewer' responses and reaction times were recorded. Results show that human observers, even in the absence of local shape or size cues, easily pick up on perspective cues, confirming recent demonstrations of high visual sensitivity to cues on whether another person is potentially approaching. We also found a consistent difference in how male and female observers respond to stimulus variations (figure gender or perspective cues that cause variations in the perceived in-depth orientation of a point-light walker. Thus, the 'figure gender effect' is possibly caused by changes in the relative locations and motions of the dots that the perceptual system tends to interpret as perspective cues. Third, reaction time measures confirmed the existence of the facing bias and recent research showing faster detection of approaching than receding biological motion.

  15. Further explorations of the facing bias in biological motion perception: perspective cues, observer sex, and response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Ben; Davila, Alex; Verfaillie, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The human visual system has evolved to be highly sensitive to visual information about other persons and their movements as is illustrated by the effortless perception of point-light figures or 'biological motion'. When presented orthographically, a point-light walker is interpreted in two anatomically plausible ways: As 'facing the viewer' or as 'facing away' from the viewer. However, human observers show a 'facing bias': They perceive such a point-light walker as facing towards them in about 70-80% of the cases. In studies exploring the role of social and biological relevance as a possible account for the facing bias, we found a 'figure gender effect': Male point-light figures elicit a stronger facing bias than female point-light figures. Moreover, we also found an 'observer gender effect': The 'figure gender effect' was stronger for male than for female observers. In the present study we presented to 11 males and 11 females point-light walkers of which, very subtly, the perspective information was manipulated by modifying the earlier reported 'perspective technique'. Proportions of 'facing the viewer' responses and reaction times were recorded. Results show that human observers, even in the absence of local shape or size cues, easily pick up on perspective cues, confirming recent demonstrations of high visual sensitivity to cues on whether another person is potentially approaching. We also found a consistent difference in how male and female observers respond to stimulus variations (figure gender or perspective cues) that cause variations in the perceived in-depth orientation of a point-light walker. Thus, the 'figure gender effect' is possibly caused by changes in the relative locations and motions of the dots that the perceptual system tends to interpret as perspective cues. Third, reaction time measures confirmed the existence of the facing bias and recent research showing faster detection of approaching than receding biological motion.

  16. Effectiveness of the Gaze Direction Recognition Task for Chronic Neck Pain and Cervical Range of Motion: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nobusako

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a mental task with gaze direction recognition (GDR by which subjects observed neck rotation of another individual from behind and attempted to recognize the direction of gaze. A randomized controlled trial was performed in test (=9 and control (=8 groups of subjects with chronic neck pain undergoing physical therapy either with or without the GDR task carried out over 12 sessions during a three-week period. Primary outcome measures were defined as the active range of motion and pain on rotation of the neck. Secondary outcome measures were reaction time (RT and response accuracy in the GDR task group. ANOVA indicated a main effect for task session and group, and interaction of session. Post hoc testing showed that the GDR task group exhibited a significant simple main effect upon session, and significant sequential improvement of neck motion and relief of neck pain. Rapid effectiveness was significant in both groups. The GDR task group had a significant session-to-session reduction of RTs in correct responses. In conclusion, the GDR task we developed provides a promising rehabilitation measure for chronic neck pain.

  17. Coupling carbon nanotubes through DNA linker using a biological recognition complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goux-Capes, L.; Filoramo, A.; Cote, D.; Bourgoin, J.-Ph.; Patillon, J.-N.

    2006-05-01

    We present a simple and versatile method for linking single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) together through DNA by non-covalent chemistry using streptavidin-biotin recognition complex. Streptavidin coated SWNTs are reacted with biotin or bis-biotin ended DNA double strands leading to SWNT-DNA and SWNT-DNA-SWNT adducts in high yield. This method avoids strong acidic treatment of SWNTs prior to functionalization as usually required in covalent routes. Complementary characterizations by gel electrophoresis and AFM demonstrated the efficiency of the present binding method. In addition, SWNTs bound to DNA can be aligned on a substrate using the combing properties of DNA strands, bringing a new tool into the toolkit for self-assembling SWNTs onto surfaces.

  18. Non-Covalent Binding of DNA to Carbon Nanotubes Controlled by Biological Recognition Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goux-Capes, Laurence; Filoramo, Arianna; Cote, Denis; Valentin, Emmanuel; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Patillon, Jean-Nöel

    2004-09-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) occupy a special place within molecular electronics. Indeed, they exist as semiconducting or metallic wires and have been used to demonstrate molecular devices like transistors, diodes or SET (single electron transistor). However, the future of this class of SWNT-based devices is strictly related to the development of a bottom-up self-assembly technique. The exceptional recognition properties of DNA molecule make it an ideal candidate for this task. Here, we describe a non-covalent method to connect carbon nanotubes to DNA strands using the streptavidin/biotin complex. Control experiments show that in absence of biotin, the DNA strand do not bind to SWNT. The binding of SWNT to DNA strand has also been carefully checked by washing experiments, showing the strength of the DNA anchorage on SWNTs. Combining this approach with molecular combing enable us to align nanotubes on substrate.

  19. Highly flexible self-powered sensors based on printed circuit board technology for human motion detection and gesture recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun

    2016-03-04

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new integration of printed circuit board (PCB) technology-based self-powered sensors (PSSs) and direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Integration with PCB technology is highly desirable for affordable mass production. In addition, we systematically investigate the effects of electrodes with intervals in the range of 0.15 mm to 0.40 mm on the resultant PSS output voltage and current. The results show that at a strain of 0.5% and 5 Hz, a PSS with a gap interval 0.15 mm produces a maximum output voltage of 3 V and a maximum output current of 220 nA. Under the same dimensional constraints, the MNFs are massively connected in series (via accumulation of continuous MNFs across the gaps ) and in parallel (via accumulation of parallel MNFs on the same gap) simultaneously. Finally, encapsulation in a flexible polymer with different interval electrodes demonstrated that electrical superposition can be realized by connecting MNFs collectively and effectively in serial/parallel patterns to achieve a high current and high voltage output, respectively. Further improvement in PSSs based on the effect of cooperativity was experimentally realized by rolling-up the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in a 130% increase in power output due to the cooperative effect. We assembled the piezoelectric MNF sensors on gloves, bandages and stockings to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including finger motion and various flexing and extensions of an ankle. The firmly glued PSSs were tested on the glove and ankle respectively to detect and harvest the various movements and the output voltage was recorded as ∼1.5 V under jumping movement (one PSS) and ∼4.5 V for the clenched fist with five fingers bent concurrently (five PSSs). This research shows that piezoelectric MNFs not only have a huge impact on harvesting various external

  20. Highly flexible self-powered sensors based on printed circuit board technology for human motion detection and gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new integration of printed circuit board (PCB) technology-based self-powered sensors (PSSs) and direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Integration with PCB technology is highly desirable for affordable mass production. In addition, we systematically investigate the effects of electrodes with intervals in the range of 0.15 mm to 0.40 mm on the resultant PSS output voltage and current. The results show that at a strain of 0.5% and 5 Hz, a PSS with a gap interval 0.15 mm produces a maximum output voltage of 3 V and a maximum output current of 220 nA. Under the same dimensional constraints, the MNFs are massively connected in series (via accumulation of continuous MNFs across the gaps ) and in parallel (via accumulation of parallel MNFs on the same gap) simultaneously. Finally, encapsulation in a flexible polymer with different interval electrodes demonstrated that electrical superposition can be realized by connecting MNFs collectively and effectively in serial/parallel patterns to achieve a high current and high voltage output, respectively. Further improvement in PSSs based on the effect of cooperativity was experimentally realized by rolling-up the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in a 130% increase in power output due to the cooperative effect. We assembled the piezoelectric MNF sensors on gloves, bandages and stockings to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including finger motion and various flexing and extensions of an ankle. The firmly glued PSSs were tested on the glove and ankle respectively to detect and harvest the various movements and the output voltage was recorded as ∼1.5 V under jumping movement (one PSS) and ∼4.5 V for the clenched fist with five fingers bent concurrently (five PSSs). This research shows that piezoelectric MNFs not only have a huge impact on harvesting various external

  1. RECOGNITION AND VALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL ASSETS IN TOURISM AREA. INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela NICHITA

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with the Financial Reporting Standards Board's international convergence and harmonization policy it is proposed that a new accounting regime will prescribe the financial reporting practice and minimum disclosure requirements for agricultural activities, including the fair value of biological assets. In any financial report, the inclusion of biological assets may confuse the reality of the income profit and the wealth profit. There are many reasons it may provide misleading figures, the most obvious would be because the entity may have reported the value of heritage properties that do not actually generate any income but rather they are properties, which actually generate expenses for the entity, for example in maintenance costs. For any regime that requires entities to account and report on biological assets there should be a clear classification system that takes into account the different types of ownership structures in a society. Therefore in Romania, it is important that any financial reporting regime on biological assets should provide for the difference between business assets and cultural assets.

  2. Facial Expression Recognition from Video Sequences Based on Spatial-Temporal Motion Local Binary Pattern and Gabor Multiorientation Fusion Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes novel framework for facial expressions analysis using dynamic and static information in video sequences. First, based on incremental formulation, discriminative deformable face alignment method is adapted to locate facial points to correct in-plane head rotation and break up facial region from background. Then, spatial-temporal motion local binary pattern (LBP feature is extracted and integrated with Gabor multiorientation fusion histogram to give descriptors, which reflect static and dynamic texture information of facial expressions. Finally, a one-versus-one strategy based multiclass support vector machine (SVM classifier is applied to classify facial expressions. Experiments on Cohn-Kanade (CK + facial expression dataset illustrate that integrated framework outperforms methods using single descriptors. Compared with other state-of-the-art methods on CK+, MMI, and Oulu-CASIA VIS datasets, our proposed framework performs better.

  3. Theoretical Investigation of Optical Detection and Recognition of Single Biological Molecules Using Coherent Dynamics of Exciton-Plasmon Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S M; Hood, B; Patty, K D; Mao, C-B

    2013-08-20

    We use quantum coherence in a system consisting of one metallic nanorod and one semi-conductor quantum dot to investigate a plasmonic nanosensor capable of digital optical detection and recognition of single biological molecules. In such a sensor the adsorption of a specific molecule to the nanorod turns off the emission of the system when it interacts with an optical pulse having a certain intensity and temporal width. The proposed quantum sensors can count the number of molecules of the same type or differentiate between molecule types with digital optical signals that can be measured with high certainty. We show that these sensors are based on the ultrafast upheaval of coherent dynamics of the system and the removal of coherent blockage of energy transfer from the quantum dot to the nanorod once the adsorption process has occurred.

  4. The role of pattern recognition in creative problem solving: a case study in search of new mathematics for biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Felix T

    2013-09-01

    Rosen classified sciences into two categories: formalizable and unformalizable. Whereas formalizable sciences expressed in terms of mathematical theories were highly valued by Rutherford, Hutchins pointed out that unformalizable parts of soft sciences are of genuine interest and importance. Attempts to build mathematical theories for biology in the past century was met with modest and sporadic successes, and only in simple systems. In this article, a qualitative model of humans' high creativity is presented as a starting point to consider whether the gap between soft and hard sciences is bridgeable. Simonton's chance-configuration theory, which mimics the process of evolution, was modified and improved. By treating problem solving as a process of pattern recognition, the known dichotomy of visual thinking vs. verbal thinking can be recast in terms of analog pattern recognition (non-algorithmic process) and digital pattern recognition (algorithmic process), respectively. Additional concepts commonly encountered in computer science, operations research and artificial intelligence were also invoked: heuristic searching, parallel and sequential processing. The refurbished chance-configuration model is now capable of explaining several long-standing puzzles in human cognition: a) why novel discoveries often came without prior warning, b) why some creators had no ideas about the source of inspiration even after the fact, c) why some creators were consistently luckier than others, and, last but not least, d) why it was so difficult to explain what intuition, inspiration, insight, hunch, serendipity, etc. are all about. The predictive power of the present model was tested by means of resolving Zeno's paradox of Achilles and the Tortoise after one deliberately invoked visual thinking. Additional evidence of its predictive power must await future large-scale field studies. The analysis was further generalized to constructions of scientific theories in general. This approach

  5. Impact of respiratory motion on variable relative biological effectiveness in 4D-dose distributions of proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Silke; Wieser, Hans-Peter; Cao, Wenhua; Mohan, Radhe; Bangert, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Organ motion during radiation therapy with scanned protons leads to deviations between the planned and the delivered physical dose. Using a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 linearly maps these deviations into RBE-weighted dose. However, a constant value cannot account for potential nonlinear variations in RBE suggested by variable RBE models. Here, we study the impact of motion on recalculations of RBE-weighted dose distributions using a phenomenological variable RBE model. 4D-dose calculation including variable RBE was implemented in the open source treatment planning toolkit matRad. Four scenarios were compared for one field and two field proton treatments for a liver cancer patient assuming (α∕β) x  = 2 Gy and (α∕β) x  = 10 Gy: (A) the optimized static dose distribution with constant RBE, (B) a static recalculation with variable RBE, (C) a 4D-dose recalculation with constant RBE and (D) a 4D-dose recalculation with variable RBE. For (B) and (D), the variable RBE was calculated by the model proposed by McNamara. For (C), the physical dose was accumulated with direct dose mapping; for (D), dose-weighted radio-sensitivity parameters of the linear quadratic model were accumulated to model synergistic irradiation effects on RBE. Dose recalculation with variable RBE led to an elevated biological dose at the end of the proton field, while 4D-dose recalculation exhibited random deviations everywhere in the radiation field depending on the interplay of beam delivery and organ motion. For a single beam treatment assuming (α∕β) x  = 2 Gy, D 95 % was 1.98 Gy (RBE) (A), 2.15 Gy (RBE) (B), 1.81 Gy (RBE) (C) and 1.98 Gy (RBE) (D). The homogeneity index was 1.04 (A), 1.08 (B), 1.23 (C) and 1.25 (D). For the studied liver case, intrafractional motion did not reduce the modulation of the RBE-weighted dose postulated by variable RBE models for proton treatments.

  6. The critical role of the Poison Center in the recognition, mitigation and management of biological and chemical terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzelok, E P

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) terrorism counter measures are a major priority with healthcare providers, municipalities, states and the federal government. Significant resources are being invested to enhance civilian domestic preparedness through training in anticipation of a NBC terroristic incident. The key to a successful response, in addition to education, is integration of efforts as well as thorough communication and understanding the role that each agency would play in an actual or impending NBC incident. In anticipation of a NBC event, a regional counter-terrorism task force was established in southwestern Pennsylvania to identify resources, establish responsibilities and coordinate the response to NBC terrorism. Members of the task force include first responders, hazmat, law enforcement (local, regional, national), government officials, health departments, the statewide emergency management agency and the regional poison information center. The poison center is one of several critical components of a regional counter-terrorism response force. It can conduct active and passive toxicosurveillance and identify sentinel events. To be responsive, the poison center staff must be knowledgeable about biological and chemical agents. The development of basic protocols and a standardized staff education program is essential. The use of the RaPID-T (R-recognition, P-protection, D-detection, T-triage/treatment) course can provide basic staff education for responding to this important but rare consultation to the poison center.

  7. Seeing the World Topsy-Turvy: The Primary Role of Kinematics in Biological Motion Inversion Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-Anne Fitzgerald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical inversion of whole or partial human body representations typically has catastrophic consequences on the observer's ability to perform visual processing tasks. Explanations usually focus on the effects of inversion on the visual system's ability to exploit configural or structural relationships, but more recently have also implicated motion or kinematic cue processing. Here, we systematically tested the role of both on perceptions of sex from upright and inverted point-light walkers. Our data suggest that inversion results in systematic degradations of the processing of kinematic cues. Specifically and intriguingly, they reveal sex-based kinematic differences: Kinematics characteristic of females generally are resistant to inversion effects, while those of males drive systematic sex misperceptions. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  8. Fuzzy method of recognition of high molecular substances in evidence-based biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olevskyi, V. I.; Smetanin, V. T.; Olevska, Yu. B.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays modern requirements to achieving reliable results along with high quality of researches put mathematical analysis methods of results at the forefront. Because of this, evidence-based methods of processing experimental data have become increasingly popular in the biological sciences and medicine. Their basis is meta-analysis, a method of quantitative generalization of a large number of randomized trails contributing to a same special problem, which are often contradictory and performed by different authors. It allows identifying the most important trends and quantitative indicators of the data, verification of advanced hypotheses and discovering new effects in the population genotype. The existing methods of recognizing high molecular substances by gel electrophoresis of proteins under denaturing conditions are based on approximate methods for comparing the contrast of electrophoregrams with a standard solution of known substances. We propose a fuzzy method for modeling experimental data to increase the accuracy and validity of the findings of the detection of new proteins.

  9. The Measurement of the Diffusive Motion of Protons in Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-02

    students in the Physics Department at Rice University. We have conducted our studies on the High Flux Isotope Reactor ( HFIR ) at Oak Ridge National...unaffected by long exposure ( -1 week) to neutrons, which permits the extended experiments necessary to obtain a complete spectral scan on the HFIR triple-axis...axis spectrometers at the HFIR reactor at ORNL are suitable for QNS studies on biological systems for momentum transfers hQ in the range 0.5 A < Q

  10. Applications of DNA Nanomechanical Devices to Molecular Biology and to Programmed Dynamic Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhua

    Not merely is DNA a favorable genetic material, but an effective supermolecular subunit for nanoconstruction as well. In structural DNA nanotechnology, rigid branched DNA motifs have been combined with sticky-ended cohesion to build DNA objects, arrays and devices for functional purposes. Reciprocating devices are key features in macroscopic machines. In Chapter II, I report the construction of two reciprocal PX-JX2 devices, wherein the control strands leading to the PX state in one device lead to the JX2 state in the other device, and vice versa. The formation, transformation and reciprocal motions of these two devices are confirmed utilizing gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy. This system is likely to be of use for molecular robotic applications where reciprocal motions are of value in addition its inherent contribution to molecular choreography and molecular aesthetics. Recently, several DNA-based nanomechanical devices have been developed as an attractive tool for fine measurements on nanoscale objects. In Chapter III, I have constructed a device wherein two DNA triple crossover (TX) molecules are connected by a shaft, similar to a previous device that measured the amount of work that can be performed by integration host factor [Shen, W., Bruist, M., Goodman, S. & Seeman, N. C., Angew. Chemie Int. Ed. 43, 4750-4752 (2004)]. In the present case, the binding site on the shaft contains the sequence recognized by apo-SoxR, the apo-form of a protein that is a redox-sensing transcriptional activator; previous data suggest that it distorts its binding site by an amount that corresponds to about two base pairs. A pair of dyes reports the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal between the two TX domains, reflecting changes in the shape of the device upon binding the protein. The TX domains are used to amplify the signal expected from a relatively small distortion of the DNA binding site. From FRET analysis of apo-SoxR binding, the effect of

  11. Unsupervised Learning and Pattern Recognition of Biological Data Structures with Density Functional Theory and Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Juan, Hung-Hui; Tsai, Meng-Yuan; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2018-01-11

    By introducing the methods of machine learning into the density functional theory, we made a detour for the construction of the most probable density function, which can be estimated by learning relevant features from the system of interest. Using the properties of universal functional, the vital core of density functional theory, the most probable cluster numbers and the corresponding cluster boundaries in a studying system can be simultaneously and automatically determined and the plausibility is erected on the Hohenberg-Kohn theorems. For the method validation and pragmatic applications, interdisciplinary problems from physical to biological systems were enumerated. The amalgamation of uncharged atomic clusters validated the unsupervised searching process of the cluster numbers and the corresponding cluster boundaries were exhibited likewise. High accurate clustering results of the Fisher's iris dataset showed the feasibility and the flexibility of the proposed scheme. Brain tumor detections from low-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging datasets and segmentations of high-dimensional neural network imageries in the Brainbow system were also used to inspect the method practicality. The experimental results exhibit the successful connection between the physical theory and the machine learning methods and will benefit the clinical diagnoses.

  12. Dynamic simulation and modeling of the motion modes produced during the 3D controlled manipulation of biological micro/nanoparticles based on the AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraee, Mahdieh B; Korayem, Moharam H

    2015-08-07

    Determining the motion modes and the exact position of a particle displaced during the manipulation process is of special importance. This issue becomes even more important when the studied particles are biological micro/nanoparticles and the goals of manipulation are the transfer of these particles within body cells, repair of cancerous cells and the delivery of medication to damaged cells. However, due to the delicate nature of biological nanoparticles and their higher vulnerability, by obtaining the necessary force of manipulation for the considered motion mode, we can prevent the sample from interlocking with or sticking to the substrate because of applying a weak force or avoid damaging the sample due to the exertion of excessive force. In this paper, the dynamic behaviors and the motion modes of biological micro/nanoparticles such as DNA, yeast, platelet and bacteria due to the 3D manipulation effect have been investigated. Since the above nanoparticles generally have a cylindrical shape, the cylindrical contact models have been employed in an attempt to more precisely model the forces exerted on the nanoparticle during the manipulation process. Also, this investigation has performed a comprehensive modeling and simulation of all the possible motion modes in 3D manipulation by taking into account the eccentricity of the applied load on the biological nanoparticle. The obtained results indicate that unlike the macroscopic scale, the sliding of nanoparticle on substrate in nano-scale takes place sooner than the other motion modes and that the spinning about the vertical and transverse axes and the rolling of nanoparticle occur later than the other motion modes. The simulation results also indicate that the applied force necessary for the onset of nanoparticle movement and the resulting motion mode depend on the size and aspect ratio of the nanoparticle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biologically-Inspired Spike-Based Automatic Speech Recognition of Isolated Digits Over a Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel real-time dynamic framework for quantifying time-series structure in spoken words using spikes. Audio signals are converted into multi-channel spike trains using a biologically-inspired leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF spike generator. These spike trains are mapped into a function space of infinite dimension, i.e., a Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space (RKHS using point-process kernels, where a state-space model learns the dynamics of the multidimensional spike input using gradient descent learning. This kernelized recurrent system is very parsimonious and achieves the necessary memory depth via feedback of its internal states when trained discriminatively, utilizing the full context of the phoneme sequence. A main advantage of modeling nonlinear dynamics using state-space trajectories in the RKHS is that it imposes no restriction on the relationship between the exogenous input and its internal state. We are free to choose the input representation with an appropriate kernel, and changing the kernel does not impact the system nor the learning algorithm. Moreover, we show that this novel framework can outperform both traditional hidden Markov model (HMM speech processing as well as neuromorphic implementations based on spiking neural network (SNN, yielding accurate and ultra-low power word spotters. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate its capabilities using the benchmark TI-46 digit corpus for isolated-word automatic speech recognition (ASR or keyword spotting. Compared to HMM using Mel-frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC front-end without time-derivatives, our MFCC-KAARMA offered improved performance. For spike-train front-end, spike-KAARMA also outperformed state-of-the-art SNN solutions. Furthermore, compared to MFCCs, spike trains provided enhanced noise robustness in certain low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR regime.

  14. SU-E-I-75: Development of New Biological Fingerprints for Patient Recognition to Identify Misfiled Images in a PACS Server

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Y; Yoon, Y; Iwase, K; Yasumatsu, S; Matsunobu, Y; Morishita, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We are trying to develop an image-searching technique to identify misfiled images in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) server by using five biological fingerprints: the whole lung field, cardiac shadow, superior mediastinum, lung apex, and right lower lung. Each biological fingerprint in a chest radiograph includes distinctive anatomical structures to identify misfiled images. The whole lung field was less effective for evaluating the similarity between two images than the other biological fingerprints. This was mainly due to the variation in the positioning for chest radiographs. The purpose of this study is to develop new biological fingerprints that could reduce influence of differences in the positioning for chest radiography. Methods: Two hundred patients were selected randomly from our database (36,212 patients). These patients had two images each (current and previous images). Current images were used as the misfiled images in this study. A circumscribed rectangular area of the lung and the upper half of the rectangle were selected automatically as new biological fingerprints. These biological fingerprints were matched to all previous images in the database. The degrees of similarity between the two images were calculated for the same and different patients. The usefulness of new the biological fingerprints for automated patient recognition was examined in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for the circumscribed rectangle of the lung, upper half of the rectangle, and whole lung field were 0.980, 0.994, and 0.950, respectively. The new biological fingerprints showed better performance in identifying the patients correctly than the whole lung field. Conclusion: We have developed new biological fingerprints: circumscribed rectangle of the lung and upper half of the rectangle. These new biological fingerprints would be useful for automated patient identification system

  15. Brief Report: A Preference for Biological Motion Predicts a Reduction in Symptom Severity One Year Later in Preschoolers with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Franchini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has consistently demonstrated reduced orienting to social stimuli in samples of young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. However, social orienting greatly varies between individual children on the spectrum. Better understanding this heterogeneity in social orienting may contribute to our comprehension of the mechanisms underlying autistic symptoms thereby improving our ability to intervene. Indeed, children on the autism spectrum who show higher levels of interest in social stimuli demonstrate reduced clinical symptoms and increased adaptive functioning. However, longitudinal studies examining the influence of social orienting on subsequent outcome are critically lacking. Here, we aim to explore the relationship between social interest at the age of 3 and changes in severity of autistic symptoms over the subsequent year, in 20 children with ASD and 20 age-matched typically developing (TD children. A visual preference for social stmuli was measured using an eye-tracking task at baseline, consisting of a previously studied visual preference paradigm presenting biological and geometric motion side-by-side. The task was altered for the current study by alternating presentation side for each type of stimuli to keep visual perseveration from influencing participants’ first fixation location. Clinical data were collected both at baseline and one year later at follow-up. As a group, we observed reduced interest for biological motion in children with ASD compared to TD children, corroborating previous findings. We also confirmed that a preference for biological motion is associated with better adaptive functioning in preschoolers with ASD. Most importantly, our longitudinal results showed that a preference for biological motion strongly predicted decreased severity of diagnostic symptoms. Participants who preferred social stimuli at the age of 3 showed drastic reductions in their severity level of autistic symptoms one year

  16. Soccer athletes are superior to non-athletes at perceiving soccer-specific and non-sport specific human biological motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eRomeas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that athletes’ domain specific perceptual-cognitive expertise can transfer to everyday tasks. Here we assessed the perceptual-cognitive expertise of athletes and non-athletes using sport specific and non-sport specific biological motion perception tasks. Using a virtual environment, university-level soccer players and university students’ non-athletes were asked to perceive the direction of a point-light walker and to predict the trajectory of a masked-ball during a point-light soccer kick. Angles of presentation were varied for orientation (upright, inverted and distance (2m, 4m, 16m. Accuracy and reaction time were measured to assess observers’ performance. The results highlighted athletes’ superior ability compared to non-athletes to accurately predict the trajectory of a masked soccer ball presented at 2m (reaction time, 4m (accuracy and reaction time and 16m (accuracy of distance. More interestingly, experts also displayed greater performance compared to non-athletes throughout the more fundamental and general point-light walker direction task presented at 2m (reaction time, 4m (accuracy and reaction time and 16m (reaction time of distance. In addition, athletes showed a better performance throughout inverted conditions in the walker (reaction time and soccer kick (accuracy and reaction time tasks. This implies that during human biological motion perception, athletes demonstrate an advantage for recognizing body kinematics that goes beyond sport specific actions.

  17. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based comprehensive metabolomics combined with pattern recognition and network analysis methods for characterization of metabolites and metabolic pathways from biological data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Han, Ying; Yan, Guang-li; Yuan, Ye; Song, Gao-chen; Yuan, Xiao-xia; Xie, Ning; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-08-06

    Metabolomics is the study of metabolic changes in biological systems and provides the small molecule fingerprints related to the disease. Extracting biomedical information from large metabolomics data sets by multivariate data analysis is of considerable complexity. Therefore, more efficient and optimizing metabolomics data processing technologies are needed to improve mass spectrometry applications in biomarker discovery. Here, we report the findings of urine metabolomic investigation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients by high-throughput ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) coupled with pattern recognition methods (principal component analysis, partial least-squares, and OPLS-DA) and network pharmacology. A total of 20 urinary differential metabolites (13 upregulated and 7 downregulated) were identified and contributed to HCV progress, involve several key metabolic pathways such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, histidine metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, and so forth. Metabolites identified through metabolic profiling may facilitate the development of more accurate marker algorithms to better monitor disease progression. Network analysis validated close contact between these metabolites and implied the importance of the metabolic pathways. Mapping altered metabolites to KEGG pathways identified alterations in a variety of biological processes mediated through complex networks. These findings may be promising to yield a valuable and noninvasive tool that insights into the pathophysiology of HCV and to advance the early diagnosis and monitor the progression of disease. Overall, this investigation illustrates the power of the UPLC-MS platform combined with the pattern recognition and network analysis methods that can engender new insights into HCV pathobiology.

  18. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on the recognition of bodily emotions from point light displays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharona eVonck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Perceiving human motion, recognizing actions and interpreting emotional body language are tasks we perform daily and which are supported by a network of brain areas including the human posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS. Here, we applied transcranial direct current stimulation with anodal (excitatory or cathodal (inhibitory electrodes mounted over right pSTS (target and orbito-frontal cortex (reference while healthy participants performed a bodily emotion recognition task using biological motion point light displays (PLDs. Performance (accuracy and reaction times was also assessed on a control task which was matched to the emotion recognition task in terms of cognitive and motor demands. Each subject participated in two experimental sessions, receiving either anodal or cathodal stimulation, which were separated by one week to avoid residual effects of previous stimulations.Overall, tDCS brain stimulation did not affect the recognition of emotional states from PLDs. However, when emotions with a negative or positive-neutral emotional valence were analyzed separately, effects of stimulation were shown for recognizing emotions with a negative emotional valence (sadness & anger, indicating increased recognition performance when receiving anodal (excitatory stimulation compared to cathodal (inhibitory stimulation over pSTS. No stimulation effects were shown for the recognition of emotions with positive-neutral emotional valences. These findings extend previous studies showing structure-function relationships between STS and biological motion processing from PLDs and provide indications that stimulation effects may be modulated by the emotional valence of the stimuli.

  19. It Is Not Just in Faces! Processing of Emotion and Intention from Biological Motion in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Okruszek

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Social neuroscience offers a wide range of techniques that may be applied to study the social cognitive deficits that may underlie reduced social functioning—a common feature across many psychiatric disorders. At the same time, a significant proportion of research in this area has been conducted using paradigms that utilize static displays of faces or eyes. The use of point-light displays (PLDs offers a viable alternative for studying recognition of emotion or intention inference while minimizing the amount of information presented to participants. This mini-review aims to summarize studies that have used PLD to study emotion and intention processing in schizophrenia (SCZ, affective disorders, anxiety and personality disorders, eating disorders and neurodegenerative disorders. Two main conclusions can be drawn from the reviewed studies: first, the social cognitive problems found in most of the psychiatric samples using PLD were of smaller magnitude than those found in studies presenting social information using faces or voices. Second, even though the information presented in PLDs is extremely limited, presentation of these types of stimuli is sufficient to elicit the disorder-specific, social cognitive biases (e.g., mood-congruent bias in depression, increased threat perception in anxious individuals, aberrant body size perception in eating disorders documented using other methodologies. Taken together, these findings suggest that point-light stimuli may be a useful method of studying social information processing in psychiatry. At the same time, some limitations of using this methodology are also outlined.

  20. Neuromorphic Configurable Architecture for Robust Motion Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Botella

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The robustness of the human visual system recovering motion estimation in almost any visual situation is enviable, performing enormous calculation tasks continuously, robustly, efficiently, and effortlessly. There is obviously a great deal we can learn from our own visual system. Currently, there are several optical flow algorithms, although none of them deals efficiently with noise, illumination changes, second-order motion, occlusions, and so on. The main contribution of this work is the efficient implementation of a biologically inspired motion algorithm that borrows nature templates as inspiration in the design of architectures and makes use of a specific model of human visual motion perception: Multichannel Gradient Model (McGM. This novel customizable architecture of a neuromorphic robust optical flow can be constructed with FPGA or ASIC device using properties of the cortical motion pathway, constituting a useful framework for building future complex bioinspired systems running in real time with high computational complexity. This work includes the resource usage and performance data, and the comparison with actual systems. This hardware has many application fields like object recognition, navigation, or tracking in difficult environments due to its bioinspired and robustness properties.

  1. Stable nanoconjugates of transferrin with alloyed quaternary nanocrystals Ag-In-Zn-S as a biological entity for tumor recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak-Brynda, Edyta; Bujak, Piotr; Augustin, Ewa; Kowalczyk, Agata; Mazerska, Zofia; Pron, Adam; Nowicka, Anna M

    2018-01-18

    One way to limit the negative effects of anti-tumor drugs on healthy cells is targeted therapy employing functionalized drug carriers. Here we present a biocompatible and stable nanoconjugate of transferrin anchored to Ag-In-Zn-S quantum dots modified with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (Tf-QD) as a drug carrier versus typical anticancer drug, doxorubicin. Detailed investigations of Tf-QD nanoconjugates without and with doxorubicin by fluorescence studies and cytotoxic measurements showed that the biological activity of both the transferrin and doxorubicin was fully retained in the nanoconjugate. In particular, the intercalation capabilities of free doxorubicin versus ctDNA remained essentially intact upon its binding to the nanoconjugate. In order to evaluate these capabilities, we studied the binding constant of doxorubicin attached to Tf-QDs with ctDNA as well as the binding site size on the ctDNA molecule. The binding constant slightly decreased compared to that of free doxorubicin while the binding site size, describing the number of consecutive DNA lattice residues involved in the binding, increased. It was also demonstrated that the QDs alone and in the form of a nanoconjugate with Tf were not cytotoxic towards human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H460 cell line) and the tumor cell sensitivity of the DOX-Tf-QD nanoconjugate was comparable to that of doxorubicin alone.

  2. Unification of automatic target tracking and automatic target recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    The subject being addressed is how an automatic target tracker (ATT) and an automatic target recognizer (ATR) can be fused together so tightly and so well that their distinctiveness becomes lost in the merger. This has historically not been the case outside of biology and a few academic papers. The biological model of ATT∪ATR arises from dynamic patterns of activity distributed across many neural circuits and structures (including retina). The information that the brain receives from the eyes is "old news" at the time that it receives it. The eyes and brain forecast a tracked object's future position, rather than relying on received retinal position. Anticipation of the next moment - building up a consistent perception - is accomplished under difficult conditions: motion (eyes, head, body, scene background, target) and processing limitations (neural noise, delays, eye jitter, distractions). Not only does the human vision system surmount these problems, but it has innate mechanisms to exploit motion in support of target detection and classification. Biological vision doesn't normally operate on snapshots. Feature extraction, detection and recognition are spatiotemporal. When vision is viewed as a spatiotemporal process, target detection, recognition, tracking, event detection and activity recognition, do not seem as distinct as they are in current ATT and ATR designs. They appear as similar mechanism taking place at varying time scales. A framework is provided for unifying ATT and ATR.

  3. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  4. Registration of Large Motion Blurred Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-09

    Large Motion Blurred Images . in IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshop on Registration of Very Large Images , pp. 315-322, 2014. 2. Vijay...Seetharaman, “Efficient change detection for very large motion blurred images ,” in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshops (CVPRW), 2014 IEEE...Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), 2010 IEEE Conference on, June 2010, pp. 2392–2399. 1 [13] E. Ringaby and P.-E. Forssén, “Efficient

  5. Pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoridis, Sergios

    2003-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a scientific discipline that is becoming increasingly important in the age of automation and information handling and retrieval. Patter Recognition, 2e covers the entire spectrum of pattern recognition applications, from image analysis to speech recognition and communications. This book presents cutting-edge material on neural networks, - a set of linked microprocessors that can form associations and uses pattern recognition to ""learn"" -and enhances student motivation by approaching pattern recognition from the designer's point of view. A direct result of more than 10

  6. Prenatal exposure to a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB congener influences fixation duration on biological motion at 4-months-old: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Doi

    Full Text Available Adverse effects of prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB congeners on postnatal brain development have been reported in a number of previous studies. However, few studies have examined the effects of prenatal PCB exposure on early social development. The present study sought to increase understanding of the neurotoxicity of PCBs by examining the relationship between PCB congener concentrations in umbilical cord blood and fixation patterns when observing upright and inverted biological motion (BM at four-months after birth. The development of the ability to recognize BM stimuli is considered a hallmark of socio-cognitive development. The results revealed a link between dioxin-like PCB #118 concentration and fixation pattern. Specifically, four-month-olds with a low-level of prenatal exposure to PCB #118 exhibited a preference for the upright BM over inverted BM, whereas those with a relatively high-level of exposure did not. This finding supports the proposal that prenatal PCB exposure impairs the development of social functioning, and indicates the importance of congener-specific analysis in the risk analysis of the adverse effects of PCB exposure on the brain development.

  7. Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Morariu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of speech recognition by pattern recognition techniques. Learning consists in determining the unique characteristics of a word (cepstral coefficients by eliminating those characteristics that are different from one word to another. For learning and recognition, the system will build a dictionary of words by determining the characteristics of each word to be used in the recognition. Determining the characteristics of an audio signal consists in the following steps: noise removal, sampling it, applying Hamming window, switching to frequency domain through Fourier transform, calculating the magnitude spectrum, filtering data, determining cepstral coefficients.

  8. Flexible Piezoelectric Sensor-Based Gait Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsu Cha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Most motion recognition research has required tight-fitting suits for precise sensing. However, tight-suit systems have difficulty adapting to real applications, because people normally wear loose clothes. In this paper, we propose a gait recognition system with flexible piezoelectric sensors in loose clothing. The gait recognition system does not directly sense lower-body angles. It does, however, detect the transition between standing and walking. Specifically, we use the signals from the flexible sensors attached to the knee and hip parts on loose pants. We detect the periodic motion component using the discrete time Fourier series from the signal during walking. We adapt the gait detection method to a real-time patient motion and posture monitoring system. In the monitoring system, the gait recognition operates well. Finally, we test the gait recognition system with 10 subjects, for which the proposed system successfully detects walking with a success rate over 93 %.

  9. Motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bles, Willem; Bos, Jelte E.; Kruit, Hans

    2000-01-01

    The number of recently published papers on motion sickness may convey the impression that motion sickness is far from being understood. The current review focusses on a concept which tends to unify the different manifestations and theories of motion sickness. The paper highlights the relations

  10. Object feature extraction and recognition model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Min; Xiang Rujian; Wan Yongxing

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of objects, especially flying objects, are analyzed, which include characteristics of spectrum, image and motion. Feature extraction is also achieved. To improve the speed of object recognition, a feature database is used to simplify the data in the source database. The feature vs. object relationship maps are stored in the feature database. An object recognition model based on the feature database is presented, and the way to achieve object recognition is also explained

  11. Peptide and Peptide-Dependent Motions in MHC Proteins: Immunological Implications and Biophysical Underpinnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Cory M; Corcelli, Steven A; Baker, Brian M

    2017-01-01

    Structural biology of peptides presented by class I and class II MHC proteins has transformed immunology, impacting our understanding of fundamental immune mechanisms and allowing researchers to rationalize immunogenicity and design novel vaccines. However, proteins are not static structures as often inferred from crystallographic structures. Their components move and breathe individually and collectively over a range of timescales. Peptides bound within MHC peptide-binding grooves are no exception and their motions have been shown to impact recognition by T cell and other receptors in ways that influence function. Furthermore, peptides tune the motions of MHC proteins themselves, which impacts recognition of peptide/MHC complexes by other proteins. Here, we review the motional properties of peptides in MHC binding grooves and discuss how peptide properties can influence MHC motions. We briefly review theoretical concepts about protein motion and highlight key data that illustrate immunological consequences. We focus primarily on class I systems due to greater availability of data, but segue into class II systems as the concepts and consequences overlap. We suggest that characterization of the dynamic "energy landscapes" of peptide/MHC complexes and the resulting functional consequences is one of the next frontiers in structural immunology.

  12. Peptide and Peptide-Dependent Motions in MHC Proteins: Immunological Implications and Biophysical Underpinnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory M. Ayres

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Structural biology of peptides presented by class I and class II MHC proteins has transformed immunology, impacting our understanding of fundamental immune mechanisms and allowing researchers to rationalize immunogenicity and design novel vaccines. However, proteins are not static structures as often inferred from crystallographic structures. Their components move and breathe individually and collectively over a range of timescales. Peptides bound within MHC peptide-binding grooves are no exception and their motions have been shown to impact recognition by T cell and other receptors in ways that influence function. Furthermore, peptides tune the motions of MHC proteins themselves, which impacts recognition of peptide/MHC complexes by other proteins. Here, we review the motional properties of peptides in MHC binding grooves and discuss how peptide properties can influence MHC motions. We briefly review theoretical concepts about protein motion and highlight key data that illustrate immunological consequences. We focus primarily on class I systems due to greater availability of data, but segue into class II systems as the concepts and consequences overlap. We suggest that characterization of the dynamic “energy landscapes” of peptide/MHC complexes and the resulting functional consequences is one of the next frontiers in structural immunology.

  13. A world in motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boynton, J.A. [SAE, Warrendale, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A World in Motion is a physical science curriculum supplement for grades four, five, and six which responds to the need to promote and teach sound science and mathematics concepts. Using the A World in Motion kits, teachers work in partnership with practicing engineer or scientists volunteers to provide students with fun, exciting, and relevant hands-on science and math experiences. During the A World in Motion experience, students work together in {open_quotes}Engineering Design Teams{close_quotes} exploring physics concepts through a series of activities. Each student is assigned a role as either a facilities engineer, development engineer, test engineer, or project engineer and is given responsibilities paralleling those of engineers in industry. The program culminates in a {open_quotes}Design Review{close_quotes} where students can communicate their results, demonstrate their designs, and receive recognition for their efforts. They are given a chance to take on responsibility and build self-esteem. Since January 1991, over 12,000 volunteers engineers have been involved with the program, with a distribution of 20,000 A World in Motion kit throughout the U.S. and Canada.

  14. Speaker Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Lasse Lohilahti; Jørgensen, Kasper Winther

    2005-01-01

    Speaker recognition is basically divided into speaker identification and speaker verification. Verification is the task of automatically determining if a person really is the person he or she claims to be. This technology can be used as a biometric feature for verifying the identity of a person...

  15. Nucleobase recognition at alkaline pH and apparent pK(a) of single DNA bases immobilised within a biological nanopore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransceschini, Lorenzo; Mikhailova, Ellina; Bayley, Hagan; Maglia, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The four DNA bases are recognized in immobilized DNA strands at high alkaline pH by nanopore current recordings. Ionic currents through the biological nanopores are also employed to measure the apparent pK(a) values of single nucleobases within the immobilised DNA strands.

  16. Sensing Movement: Microsensors for Body Motion Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansong Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of body posture and motion is an important physiological function that can keep the body in balance. Man-made motion sensors have also been widely applied for a broad array of biomedical applications including diagnosis of balance disorders and evaluation of energy expenditure. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art sensing components utilized for body motion measurement. The anatomy and working principles of a natural body motion sensor, the human vestibular system, are first described. Various man-made inertial sensors are then elaborated based on their distinctive sensing mechanisms. In particular, both the conventional solid-state motion sensors and the emerging non solid-state motion sensors are depicted. With their lower cost and increased intelligence, man-made motion sensors are expected to play an increasingly important role in biomedical systems for basic research as well as clinical diagnostics.

  17. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  18. Reverse control for humanoid robot task recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hak, Sovannara; Mansard, Nicolas; Stasse, Olivier; Laumond, Jean Paul

    2012-12-01

    Efficient methods to perform motion recognition have been developed using statistical tools. Those methods rely on primitive learning in a suitable space, for example, the latent space of the joint angle and/or adequate task spaces. Learned primitives are often sequential: A motion is segmented according to the time axis. When working with a humanoid robot, a motion can be decomposed into parallel subtasks. For example, in a waiter scenario, the robot has to keep some plates horizontal with one of its arms while placing a plate on the table with its free hand. Recognition can thus not be limited to one task per consecutive segment of time. The method presented in this paper takes advantage of the knowledge of what tasks the robot is able to do and how the motion is generated from this set of known controllers, to perform a reverse engineering of an observed motion. This analysis is intended to recognize parallel tasks that have been used to generate a motion. The method relies on the task-function formalism and the projection operation into the null space of a task to decouple the controllers. The approach is successfully applied on a real robot to disambiguate motion in different scenarios where two motions look similar but have different purposes.

  19. Motion Evaluation for Rehabilitation Training of the Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young; Park, Jun; Lim, Cheol-Su

    In this paper, a motion evaluation technique for rehabilitation training is introduced. Motion recognition technologies have been developed for determining matching motions in the training set. However, we need to measure how well and how much of the motion has been followed for training motion evaluation. We employed a Finite State Machine as a framework of motion evaluation. For similarity analysis, we used weighted angular value differences although any template matching algorithm may be used. For robustness under illumination changes, IR LED's and cameras with IR-pass filter were used. Developed technique was successfully used for rehabilitation training of the disabled. Therapists appraised the system as practically useful.

  20. Recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  1. Recognition tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Sankey, Otto [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 1862 53, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-02

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  2. Indirect recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Christian; Rachman, Noer Fauzi

    2018-01-01

    Government institutions and local people in Indonesia have entrenched, resurrected, and reinvented space through their different territorial and property claims. From colonial times, onward, government institutions have dissolved local political orders and territorialized and reordered spatial...... categories are struggled over, and groups of actors seek to legitimate their presence, their activities, and their resource use by occupation, mapping, and construction of "public" infrastructure. In the case of conservation in the Mount Halimun-Salak National Park, we find that rather than one overarching...... important legal and political work. After the authoritarian New Order regime, in particular, claims to citizenship worked as indirect property claims, and indirect recognition of such claims are important because they serve as pragmatic proxies for formal property rights. Two case studies examine how people...

  3. Slow molecular recognition by RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleitsman, Kristin R; Sengupta, Raghuvir N; Herschlag, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biological processes, function, and specificity. Proteins associate with ligands with a wide range of association rate constants, with maximal values matching the theoretical limit set by the rate of diffusional collision. As less is known about RNA association, we compiled association rate constants for all RNA/ligand complexes that we could find in the literature. Like proteins, RNAs exhibit a wide range of association rate constants. However, the fastest RNA association rates are considerably slower than those of the fastest protein associations and fall well below the diffusional limit. The apparently general observation of slow association with RNAs has implications for evolution and for modern-day biology. Our compilation highlights a quantitative molecular property that can contribute to biological understanding and underscores our need to develop a deeper physical understanding of molecular recognition events. © 2017 Gleitsman et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. A Survey of Face Recognition Technique | Omidiora | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review of face recognition techniques has been carried out. Face recognition has been an attractive field in the society of both biological and computer vision of research. It exhibits the characteristics of being natural and low-intrusive. In this paper, an updated survey of techniques for face recognition is made. Methods of ...

  5. Enzymatic recognition of DNA damage induced by UVB-photosensitized titanium dioxide and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Evidence for oxidatively DNA damage generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, A. Viviana; Deodato, Elder L.; Cardoso, Janine S.; Oliveira, Eliza F.; Machado, Sergio L.; Toma, Helena K.; Leitao, Alvaro C.; Padula, Marcelo de

    2010-01-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) has been considered to be biologically inert, finding use in cosmetics, paints and food colorants, recent reports have demonstrated that when TiO 2 is attained by UVA radiation oxidative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are observed in living cells. However, data concerning TiO 2 -UVB association is poor, even if UVB radiation represents a major environmental carcinogen. Herein, we investigated DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis induced by TiO 2 associated with UVB irradiation in vitro and in vivo using Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. It was found that TiO 2 plus UVB treatment in plasmid pUC18 generated, in addition to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), specific damage to guanine residues, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG), which are characteristic oxidatively generated lesions. In vivo experiments showed that, although the presence of TiO 2 protects yeast cells from UVB cytotoxicity, high mutation frequencies are observed in the wild-type (WT) and in an ogg1 strain (deficient in 8-oxoG and FapyG repair). Indeed, after TiO 2 plus UVB treatment, induced mutagenesis was drastically enhanced in ogg1 cells, indicating that mutagenic DNA lesions are repaired by the Ogg1 protein. This effect could be attenuated by the presence of metallic ion chelators: neocuproine or dipyridyl, which partially block oxidatively generated damage occurring via Fenton reactions. Altogether, the results indicate that TiO 2 plus UVB potentates UVB oxidatively generated damage to DNA, possibly via Fenton reactions involving the production of DNA base damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine.

  6. Enzymatic recognition of DNA damage induced by UVB-photosensitized titanium dioxide and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Evidence for oxidatively DNA damage generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, A. Viviana, E-mail: alicia.pinto@incqs.fiocruz.br [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Deodato, Elder L. [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cardoso, Janine S. [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, Eliza F.; Machado, Sergio L.; Toma, Helena K. [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Leitao, Alvaro C. [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Padula, Marcelo de [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-06-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) has been considered to be biologically inert, finding use in cosmetics, paints and food colorants, recent reports have demonstrated that when TiO{sub 2} is attained by UVA radiation oxidative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are observed in living cells. However, data concerning TiO{sub 2}-UVB association is poor, even if UVB radiation represents a major environmental carcinogen. Herein, we investigated DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis induced by TiO{sub 2} associated with UVB irradiation in vitro and in vivo using Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. It was found that TiO{sub 2} plus UVB treatment in plasmid pUC18 generated, in addition to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), specific damage to guanine residues, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG), which are characteristic oxidatively generated lesions. In vivo experiments showed that, although the presence of TiO{sub 2} protects yeast cells from UVB cytotoxicity, high mutation frequencies are observed in the wild-type (WT) and in an ogg1 strain (deficient in 8-oxoG and FapyG repair). Indeed, after TiO{sub 2} plus UVB treatment, induced mutagenesis was drastically enhanced in ogg1 cells, indicating that mutagenic DNA lesions are repaired by the Ogg1 protein. This effect could be attenuated by the presence of metallic ion chelators: neocuproine or dipyridyl, which partially block oxidatively generated damage occurring via Fenton reactions. Altogether, the results indicate that TiO{sub 2} plus UVB potentates UVB oxidatively generated damage to DNA, possibly via Fenton reactions involving the production of DNA base damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine.

  7. Recognition of 3D facial expression dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandbach, G.; Zafeiriou, S.; Pantic, Maja; Rueckert, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method that exploits 3D motion-based features between frames of 3D facial geometry sequences for dynamic facial expression recognition. An expressive sequence is modelled to contain an onset followed by an apex and an offset. Feature selection methods are applied in order

  8. Improved motion description for action classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir eJain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the importance of explicitly integrating motion characteristics in video descriptions has been demonstrated by several recent papers on action classification, our current work concludes that adequately decomposing visual motion into dominant and residual motions, i.e.: camera and scene motion, significantly improves action recognition algorithms. This holds true both for the extraction of the space-time trajectories and for computation of descriptors.We designed a new motion descriptor – the DCS descriptor – that captures additional information on local motion patterns enhancing results based on differential motion scalar quantities, divergence, curl and shear features. Finally, applying the recent VLAD coding technique proposed in image retrieval provides a substantial improvement for action recognition. These findings are complementary to each other and they outperformed all previously reported results by a significant margin on three challenging datasets: Hollywood 2, HMDB51 and Olympic Sports as reported in (Jain et al. (2013. These results were further improved by (Oneata et al. (2013; Wang and Schmid (2013; Zhu et al. (2013 through the use of the Fisher vector encoding. We therefore also employ Fisher vector in this paper and we further enhance our approach by combining trajectories from both optical flow and compensated flow. We as well provide additional details of DCS descriptors, including visualization. For extending the evaluation, a novel dataset with 101 action classes, UCF101, was added.

  9. Influence of oxytocin on emotion recognition from body language: A randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaerts, Sylvie; Berra, Emmely; Wenderoth, Nicole; Alaerts, Kaat

    2016-10-01

    The neuropeptide 'oxytocin' (OT) is known to play a pivotal role in a variety of complex social behaviors by promoting a prosocial attitude and interpersonal bonding. One mechanism by which OT is hypothesized to promote prosocial behavior is by enhancing the processing of socially relevant information from the environment. With the present study, we explored to what extent OT can alter the 'reading' of emotional body language as presented by impoverished biological motion point light displays (PLDs). To do so, a double-blind between-subjects randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted, assessing performance on a bodily emotion recognition task in healthy adult males before and after a single-dose of intranasal OT (24 IU). Overall, a single-dose of OT administration had a significant effect of medium size on emotion recognition from body language. OT-induced improvements in emotion recognition were not differentially modulated by the emotional valence of the presented stimuli (positive versus negative) and also, the overall tendency to label an observed emotional state as 'happy' (positive) or 'angry' (negative) was not modified by the administration of OT. Albeit moderate, the present findings of OT-induced improvements in bodily emotion recognition from whole-body PLD provide further support for a link between OT and the processing of socio-communicative cues originating from the body of others. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Hybrid gesture recognition system for short-range use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Akihiro; Fan, Wei; Katsuyama, Yutaka; Takebe, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Noriaki; Hotta, Yoshinobu; Sun, Jun

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, various gesture recognition systems have been studied for use in television and video games[1]. In such systems, motion areas ranging from 1 to 3 meters deep have been evaluated[2]. However, with the burgeoning popularity of small mobile displays, gesture recognition systems capable of operating at much shorter ranges have become necessary. The problems related to such systems are exacerbated by the fact that the camera's field of view is unknown to the user during operation, which imposes several restrictions on his/her actions. To overcome the restrictions generated from such mobile camera devices, and to create a more flexible gesture recognition interface, we propose a hybrid hand gesture system, in which two types of gesture recognition modules are prepared and with which the most appropriate recognition module is selected by a dedicated switching module. The two recognition modules of this system are shape analysis using a boosting approach (detection-based approach)[3] and motion analysis using image frame differences (motion-based approach)(for example, see[4]). We evaluated this system using sample users and classified the resulting errors into three categories: errors that depend on the recognition module, errors caused by incorrect module identification, and errors resulting from user actions. In this paper, we show the results of our investigations and explain the problems related to short-range gesture recognition systems.

  11. Auditory motion capturing ambiguous visual motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen eAlink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is demonstrated that moving sounds have an effect on the direction in which one sees visual stimuli move. During the main experiment sounds were presented consecutively at four speaker locations inducing left- or rightwards auditory apparent motion. On the path of auditory apparent motion, visual apparent motion stimuli were presented with a high degree of directional ambiguity. The main outcome of this experiment is that our participants perceived visual apparent motion stimuli that were ambiguous (equally likely to be perceived as moving left- or rightwards more often as moving in the same direction than in the opposite direction of auditory apparent motion. During the control experiment we replicated this finding and found no effect of sound motion direction on eye movements. This indicates that auditory motion can capture our visual motion percept when visual motion direction is insufficiently determinate without affecting eye movements.

  12. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christopher C; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect-an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  13. Wheelchair control by head motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajkanović Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electric wheelchairs are designed to aid paraplegics. Unfortunately, these can not be used by persons with higher degree of impairment, such as quadriplegics, i.e. persons that, due to age or illness, can not move any of the body parts, except of the head. Medical devices designed to help them are very complicated, rare and expensive. In this paper a microcontroller system that enables standard electric wheelchair control by head motion is presented. The system comprises electronic and mechanic components. A novel head motion recognition technique based on accelerometer data processing is designed. The wheelchair joystick is controlled by the system’s mechanical actuator. The system can be used with several different types of standard electric wheelchairs. It is tested and verified through an experiment performed within this paper.

  14. Developments in Molecular Recognition and Sensing at Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Endo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In biological systems, molecular recognition events occur mostly withininterfacial environments such as at membrane surfaces, enzyme reaction sites, or at theinterior of the DNA double helix. Investigation of molecular recognition at model interfacesprovides great insights into biological phenomena. Molecular recognition at interfaces notonly has relevance to biological systems but is also important for modern applications suchas high sensitivity sensors. Selective binding of guest molecules in solution to hostmolecules located at solid surfaces is crucial for electronic or photonic detection of analytesubstances. In response to these demands, molecular recognition at interfaces has beeninvestigated extensively during the past two decades using Langmuir monolayers, self-assembled monolayers, and lipid assemblies as recognition media. In this review, advancesof molecular recognition at interfaces are briefly summarized.

  15. Motion control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication. In today's manufacturing environment, Motion Control plays a major role in virtually every project.The Motion Control Report provides a comprehensive overview of the technology of Motion Control:* Design Considerations* Technologies* Methods to Control Motion* Examples of Motion Control in Systems* A Detailed Vendors List

  16. Dizziness and Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Dizziness and Motion Sickness Dizziness and Motion Sickness Patient Health Information News media interested in covering the latest ... medications Remember: Most cases of dizziness and motion sickness are ... Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head ...

  17. Face Detection and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    This report describes research efforts towards developing algorithms for a robust face recognition system to overcome many of the limitations found in existing two-dimensional facial recognition systems...

  18. Graphical symbol recognition

    OpenAIRE

    K.C. , Santosh; Wendling , Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The chapter focuses on one of the key issues in document image processing i.e., graphical symbol recognition. Graphical symbol recognition is a sub-field of a larger research domain: pattern recognition. The chapter covers several approaches (i.e., statistical, structural and syntactic) and specially designed symbol recognition techniques inspired by real-world industrial problems. It, in general, contains research problems, state-of-the-art methods that convey basic s...

  19. Recognition and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms...... or interpretations of recognition and toleration are considered, confusing and problematic uses of the terms are noted, and the compatibility of toleration and recognition is discussed. The article argues that there is a range of legitimate and importantly different conceptions of both toleration and recognition...

  20. The Application of Leap Motion in Astronaut Virtual Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingchao, Xie; Jiangang, Chao

    2017-03-01

    With the development of computer vision, virtual reality has been applied in astronaut virtual training. As an advanced optic equipment to track hand, Leap Motion can provide precise and fluid tracking of hands. Leap Motion is suitable to be used as gesture input device in astronaut virtual training. This paper built an astronaut virtual training based Leap Motion, and established the mathematics model of hands occlusion. At last the ability of Leap Motion to handle occlusion was analysed. A virtual assembly simulation platform was developed for astronaut training, and occlusion gesture would influence the recognition process. The experimental result can guide astronaut virtual training.

  1. Motion in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This review considers the management of motion in photon radiation therapy. An overview is given of magnitudes and variability of motion of various structures and organs, and how the motion affects images by producing artifacts and blurring. Imaging of motion is described, including 4DCT and 4DPE...

  2. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  3. Weak Ergodicity Breaking of Receptor Motion in Living Cells Stemming from Random Diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Massignan, Pietro; Lapeyre, Gerald J.; Lewenstein, Maciej; Garcia Parajo, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular transport in living systems regulates numerous processes underlying biological function. Although many cellular components exhibit anomalous diffusion, only recently has the subdiffusive motion been associated with nonergodic behavior. These findings have stimulated new questions for their implications in statistical mechanics and cell biology. Is nonergodicity a common strategy shared by living systems? Which physical mechanisms generate it? What are its implications for biological function? Here, we use single-particle tracking to demonstrate that the motion of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor with unique pathogen-recognition capabilities, reveals nonergodic subdiffusion on living-cell membranes In contrast to previous studies, this behavior is incompatible with transient immobilization, and, therefore, it cannot be interpreted according to continuous-time random-walk theory. We show that the receptor undergoes changes of diffusivity, consistent with the current view of the cell membrane as a highly dynamic and diverse environment. Simulations based on a model of an ordinary random walk in complex media quantitatively reproduce all our observations, pointing toward diffusion heterogeneity as the cause of DC-SIGN behavior. By studying different receptor mutants, we further correlate receptor motion to its molecular structure, thus establishing a strong link between nonergodicity and biological function. These results underscore the role of disorder in cell membranes and its connection with function regulation. Because of its generality, our approach offers a framework to interpret anomalous transport in other complex media where dynamic heterogeneity might play a major role, such as those found, e.g., in soft condensed matter, geology, and ecology.

  4. Training industrial robots with gesture recognition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piane, Jennifer; Raicu, Daniela; Furst, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose to use gesture recognition approaches to track a human hand in 3D space and, without the use of special clothing or markers, be able to accurately generate code for training an industrial robot to perform the same motion. The proposed hand tracking component includes three methods: a color-thresholding model, naïve Bayes analysis and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to detect the human hand. Next, it performs stereo matching on the region where the hand was detected to find relative 3D coordinates. The list of coordinates returned is expectedly noisy due to the way the human hand can alter its apparent shape while moving, the inconsistencies in human motion and detection failures in the cluttered environment. Therefore, the system analyzes the list of coordinates to determine a path for the robot to move, by smoothing the data to reduce noise and looking for significant points used to determine the path the robot will ultimately take. The proposed system was applied to pairs of videos recording the motion of a human hand in a „real‟ environment to move the end-affector of a SCARA robot along the same path as the hand of the person in the video. The correctness of the robot motion was determined by observers indicating that motion of the robot appeared to match the motion of the video.

  5. Galileo and the Problems of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Wallace Edd

    Galileo's science of motion changed natural philosophy. His results initiated a broad human awakening to the intricate new world of physical order found in the midst of familiar operations of nature. His thinking was always based squarely on the academic traditions of the spiritual old world. He advanced physics by new standards of judgment drawn from mechanics and geometry, and disciplined observation of the world. My study first determines the order of composition of the earliest essays on motion and physics, ca. 1588 -1592, from internal evidence, and bibliographic evidence. There are clear signs of a Platonist critique of Aristotle, supported by Archimedes, in the Ten Section Version of On Motion, written ca. 1588, and probably the earliest of his treatises on motion or physics. He expanded upon his opening Platonic -Archimedean position by investigating the ideas of scholastic critics of Aristotle, including the Doctores Parisienses, found in his readings of the Jesuit Professors at the Collegio Romano. Their influences surfaced clearly in Galileo's Memoranda on Motion and the Dialogue on Motion, and in On Motion, which followed, ca. 1590-1592. At the end of his sojourn in Pisa, Galileo opened the road to the new physics by solving an important problem in the mechanics of Pappus, concerning motion along inclined planes. My study investigates why Galileo gave up attempts to establish a ratio between speed and weight, and why he began to seek the ratios of time and distance and speed, by 1602. It also reconstructs Galileo's development of the 1604 principle, seeking to outline its invention, elaboration, and abandonment. Then, I try to show that we have a record of Galileo's moment of recognition of the direct relation between the time of fall and the accumulated speed of motion--that great affinity between time and motion and the key to the new science of motion established before 1610. Evidence also ties the discovery of the time affinity directly to Galileo

  6. Capturing Motion and Depth Before Cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Visual representations of biological states have traditionally faced two problems: they lacked motion and depth. Attempts were made to supply these wants over many centuries, but the major advances were made in the early-nineteenth century. Motion was synthesized by sequences of slightly different images presented in rapid succession and depth was added by presenting slightly different images to each eye. Apparent motion and depth were combined some years later, but they tended to be applied separately. The major figures in this early period were Wheatstone, Plateau, Horner, Duboscq, Claudet, and Purkinje. Others later in the century, like Marey and Muybridge, were stimulated to extend the uses to which apparent motion and photography could be applied to examining body movements. These developments occurred before the birth of cinematography, and significant insights were derived from attempts to combine motion and depth.

  7. Multimodal eye recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  8. Pattern recognition & machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Anzai, Y

    1992-01-01

    This is the first text to provide a unified and self-contained introduction to visual pattern recognition and machine learning. It is useful as a general introduction to artifical intelligence and knowledge engineering, and no previous knowledge of pattern recognition or machine learning is necessary. Basic for various pattern recognition and machine learning methods. Translated from Japanese, the book also features chapter exercises, keywords, and summaries.

  9. DNA recognition by synthetic constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2011-09-05

    The interaction of transcription factors with specific DNA sites is key for the regulation of gene expression. Despite the availability of a large body of structural data on protein-DNA complexes, we are still far from fully understanding the molecular and biophysical bases underlying such interactions. Therefore, the development of non-natural agents that can reproduce the DNA-recognition properties of natural transcription factors remains a major and challenging goal in chemical biology. In this review we summarize the basics of double-stranded DNA recognition by transcription factors, and describe recent developments in the design and preparation of synthetic DNA binders. We mainly focus on synthetic peptides that have been designed by following the DNA interaction of natural proteins, and we discuss how the tools of organic synthesis can be used to make artificial constructs equipped with functionalities that introduce additional properties to the recognition process, such as sensing and controllability. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. EMG Pattern Recognition based on Evidence Accumulation for Prosthesis Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.P. [Daewoo Electronics Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, S.H. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    We present a method of electromyography(EMG) pattern recognition to identify motion commands for the control of a prosthetic arm by evidence accumulation with multiple parameters. Integral absolute value, variance, autoregressive(AR) model coefficients, linear cepstrum coefficients, and adaptive cepstrum vector are extracted as feature parameters from several time segments of the EMG signals. Pattern recognition is carried out through the evidence accumulation procedure using the distances measured with reference parameters. A fuzzy mapping function is designed to transform the distances for the application of the evidence accumulation method. Results are presented to support the feasibility of the suggested approach for EMG pattern recognition. (author). 29 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Statistical Pattern Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Statistical pattern recognition relates to the use of statistical techniques for analysing data measurements in order to extract information and make justified decisions.  It is a very active area of study and research, which has seen many advances in recent years. Applications such as data mining, web searching, multimedia data retrieval, face recognition, and cursive handwriting recognition, all require robust and efficient pattern recognition techniques. This third edition provides an introduction to statistical pattern theory and techniques, with material drawn from a wide range of fields,

  12. Learned Non-Rigid Object Motion is a View-Invariant Cue to Recognizing Novel Objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Lewis L; Vuong, Quoc C; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that observers use learned object motion to recognize objects. For instance, studies have shown that reversing the learned direction in which a rigid object rotated in depth impaired recognition accuracy. This motion reversal can be achieved by playing animation sequences of moving objects in reverse frame order. In the current study, we used this sequence-reversal manipulation to investigate whether observers encode the motion of dynamic objects in visual memory, and whether such dynamic representations are encoded in a way that is dependent on the viewing conditions. Participants first learned dynamic novel objects, presented as animation sequences. Following learning, they were then tested on their ability to recognize these learned objects when their animation sequence was shown in the same sequence order as during learning or in the reverse sequence order. In Experiment 1, we found that non-rigid motion contributed to recognition performance; that is, sequence-reversal decreased sensitivity across different tasks. In subsequent experiments, we tested the recognition of non-rigidly deforming (Experiment 2) and rigidly rotating (Experiment 3) objects across novel viewpoints. Recognition performance was affected by viewpoint changes for both experiments. Learned non-rigid motion continued to contribute to recognition performance and this benefit was the same across all viewpoint changes. By comparison, learned rigid motion did not contribute to recognition performance. These results suggest that non-rigid motion provides a source of information for recognizing dynamic objects, which is not affected by changes to viewpoint.

  13. Advancements in Research on Micro-motion Feature Extraction in the Terahertz Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With years of development and accumulation, a considerable amount of research has focused on micro-motion, an important auxiliary feature in radar target detection and recognition. With the recent rise of terahertz, micro-motion feature extraction in the terahertz region has increasingly highlighted its advantages. Herein, we systematically surveyed the recent research on terahertz radar micro-motion feature extraction and discussed micro-motion feature analysis, micro-motion feature extraction, and micro-motion target imaging. And then we emphatically introduced the work of our research team, including the theoretical and experimental research on micro-motion feature analysis, micro-motion feature extraction and high-resolution/high-frame micro-motion target imaging. Furthermore, we analyzed the growing trend of micro-motion feature extraction in the terahertz region, and pointed out the new technology directions worth to be studied further and the technical challenges to be solved.

  14. Objects in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  15. Pattern recognition principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, J. T.; Gonzalez, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The present work gives an account of basic principles and available techniques for the analysis and design of pattern processing and recognition systems. Areas covered include decision functions, pattern classification by distance functions, pattern classification by likelihood functions, the perceptron and the potential function approaches to trainable pattern classifiers, statistical approach to trainable classifiers, pattern preprocessing and feature selection, and syntactic pattern recognition.

  16. Paradigms in object recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutihac, R.; Mutihac, R.C.

    1999-09-01

    A broad range of approaches has been proposed and applied for the complex and rather difficult task of object recognition that involves the determination of object characteristics and object classification into one of many a priori object types. Our paper revises briefly the three main different paradigms in pattern recognition, namely Bayesian statistics, neural networks, and expert systems. (author)

  17. Challenging ocular image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauca, V. Paúl; Forkin, Michael; Xu, Xiao; Plemmons, Robert; Ross, Arun A.

    2011-06-01

    Ocular recognition is a new area of biometric investigation targeted at overcoming the limitations of iris recognition performance in the presence of non-ideal data. There are several advantages for increasing the area beyond the iris, yet there are also key issues that must be addressed such as size of the ocular region, factors affecting performance, and appropriate corpora to study these factors in isolation. In this paper, we explore and identify some of these issues with the goal of better defining parameters for ocular recognition. An empirical study is performed where iris recognition methods are contrasted with texture and point operators on existing iris and face datasets. The experimental results show a dramatic recognition performance gain when additional features are considered in the presence of poor quality iris data, offering strong evidence for extending interest beyond the iris. The experiments also highlight the need for the direct collection of additional ocular imagery.

  18. Recognition and Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Reagan

    2016-01-01

    The complexities of the meanings of “to recognize” and “recognition” are important in their roles in the realm of justice. I include in the concept of justice, the judiciary, both civil and criminal; distributive justice; and, social and political justice. For each one of these, there are multiple meanings of recognition that are important to understanding their foundation and their scope. There are meanings of recognition that are relevant to other aspects of social justice as the recognition of marginal, oppressed, devalued, groups as deserving of being treated as equals. The structure of my paper is to go through the various meanings and categories of meanings of “to recognize” and “recognition.” I give an account of each of the types of justice and show how various kinds of recognition are relevant to each kind of justice.

  19. Detection of particle motion using image processing with particular emphasis on rolling motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, J R; Luzi, G; Han, J; Hwang, M; Lee, J; Wierschem, A

    2017-05-01

    Image-processing has been used in granular systems for detecting particle positions and motion near optically accessible surfaces like sediment flow and bedload transport. We review the image-processing techniques used for single and multiple particles. To enhance reliability in particle recognition, tools like Canny edge and Hough transform are intensively used. We show exemplarily how they can be applied to detect not only particle positions but also rotatory motion. The different steps are described in detail and the algorithm is applied to different examples, which are discussed in view of the obtained accuracy.

  20. Human body contour data based activity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagmarbayar, Nergui; Yuki, Yoshida; Imamoglu, Nevrez; Gonzalez, Jose; Otake, Mihoko; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    This research work is aimed to develop autonomous bio-monitoring mobile robots, which are capable of tracking and measuring patients' motions, recognizing the patients' behavior based on observation data, and providing calling for medical personnel in emergency situations in home environment. The robots to be developed will bring about cost-effective, safe and easier at-home rehabilitation to most motor-function impaired patients (MIPs). In our previous research, a full framework was established towards this research goal. In this research, we aimed at improving the human activity recognition by using contour data of the tracked human subject extracted from the depth images as the signal source, instead of the lower limb joint angle data used in the previous research, which are more likely to be affected by the motion of the robot and human subjects. Several geometric parameters, such as, the ratio of height to weight of the tracked human subject, and distance (pixels) between centroid points of upper and lower parts of human body, were calculated from the contour data, and used as the features for the activity recognition. A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed to classify different human activities from the features. Experimental results showed that the human activity recognition could be achieved with a high correct rate.

  1. [Progress of pattern recognition receptors of molluscs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian; Zhao, Qin-ping; Ma, Xiao-xue; Dong, Hui-fen

    2015-08-01

    Molluscs have established complete innate immunity to defense against pathogens. The pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are the sensory receptors of molluscs to resist outside invaders, as the first reactor to initiate the innate immune response. Some PRRs have been identified in several molluscs, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) , C-type lectins, galectins, lipopolysaccharide-β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP), Clq domain-containing protein (ClqDC), and peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP). PRRs have various biological activities and play important roles in the defense system of molluscs. This paper reviews the research progress of PRRs in molluscs.

  2. Does Teammate Recognition Accuracy Influence Movement Time in Ice Hockey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Steel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biological motion affords the observer a significant amount of relative information that allows the recognition of various features specific to an individual. These include; movement signatures based on locomotion, and gender, in addition to deception and intention. Recent research has also demonstrated it is possible to discriminate teammates from non-teammates when viewing brief (<500msec video footage of locomotion specific movement signatures. Further, correlations between recognition, familiarity, liking, reaction time, and movement time were present when observing familiar gait types (swimming and running. However it is not known whether these trends are also present for less common forms of gait such as ice-skating. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to investigate if; 1 ice hockey players could recognize teammates vs non-teammates from brief visual displays within sport relevant time and, 2 ice hockey players were influenced by factors such as familiarity and liking when making decisions associated with accuracy and latencies (RT, MT. Methodology: Participants (N=13 were required to determine the affiliation of skaters in a randomised video sequence of 23 skaters by indicating teammate or not using a latency device. The device captured choice accuracy, reaction time (RT and movement time (MT. They were then asked to complete two ranking tasks based on level of liking for each skater (social liking and pass choice liking. Results: Data analysis demonstrated that MT was significantly (p<0.05 longer when players perceived the skater as a non-teammate, regardless of decision accuracy, however no other analyses were significant. Conclusion: The results suggest that the perception of a less familiar (non-teammate individual presents a level of hesitation that affects MT. While this is less problematic within existing teams, newly formed representative teams may be more vulnerable to factors of familiarity or liking

  3. Rolling Shutter Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2015-06-07

    Although motion blur and rolling shutter deformations are closely coupled artifacts in images taken with CMOS image sensors, the two phenomena have so far mostly been treated separately, with deblurring algorithms being unable to handle rolling shutter wobble, and rolling shutter algorithms being incapable of dealing with motion blur. We propose an approach that delivers sharp and undis torted output given a single rolling shutter motion blurred image. The key to achieving this is a global modeling of the camera motion trajectory, which enables each scanline of the image to be deblurred with the corresponding motion segment. We show the results of the proposed framework through experiments on synthetic and real data.

  4. Smoothing Motion Estimates for Radar Motion Compensation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Simple motion models for complex motion environments are often not adequate for keeping radar data coherent. Eve n perfect motion samples appli ed to imperfect models may lead to interim calculations e xhibiting errors that lead to degraded processing results. Herein we discuss a specific i ssue involving calculating motion for groups of pulses, with measurements only available at pulse-group boundaries. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report was funded by General A tomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Mission Systems under Cooperative Re search and Development Agre ement (CRADA) SC08/01749 between Sandia National Laboratories and GA-ASI. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI), an affilia te of privately-held General Atomics, is a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and rel ated mission systems, includin g the Predator(r)/Gray Eagle(r)-series and Lynx(r) Multi-mode Radar.

  5. Vocal Tract Representation in the Recognition of Cerebral Palsied Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzicz, Frank; Hirst, Graeme; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors explored articulatory information as a means of improving the recognition of dysarthric speech by machine. Method: Data were derived chiefly from the TORGO database of dysarthric articulation (Rudzicz, Namasivayam, & Wolff, 2011) in which motions of various points in the vocal tract are measured during speech.…

  6. A survey on vision-based human action recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Ronald Walter

    Vision-based human action recognition is the process of labeling image sequences with action labels. Robust solutions to this problem have applications in domains such as visual surveillance, video retrieval and human–computer interaction. The task is challenging due to variations in motion

  7. Curves from Motion, Motion from Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    tautochrone and brachistochrone properties. To Descartes, however, the rectification of curves such as the spiral (3) and the cycloid (4) was suspect - they...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012017 TITLE: Curves from Motion, Motion from Curves DISTRIBUTION...Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: International Conference on Curves and Surfaces [4th

  8. Structural motion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This innovative volume provides a systematic treatment of the basic concepts and computational procedures for structural motion design and engineering for civil installations. The authors illustrate the application of motion control to a wide spectrum of buildings through many examples. Topics covered include optimal stiffness distributions for building-type structures, the role of damping in controlling motion, tuned mass dampers, base isolation systems, linear control, and nonlinear control. The book's primary objective is the satisfaction of motion-related design requirements, such as restrictions on displacement and acceleration. The book is ideal for practicing engineers and graduate students. This book also: ·         Broadens practitioners' understanding of structural motion control, the enabling technology for motion-based design ·         Provides readers the tools to satisfy requirements of modern, ultra-high strength materials that lack corresponding stiffness, where the motion re...

  9. Marine biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index

  10. A Motion Planning Approach to Studying Molecular Motions

    KAUST Repository

    Amato, Nancy M.

    2010-01-01

    While structurally very different, protein and RNA molecules share an important attribute. The motions they undergo are strongly related to the function they perform. For example, many diseases such as Mad Cow disease or Alzheimer\\'s disease are associated with protein misfolding and aggregation. Similarly, RNA folding velocity may regulate the plasmid copy number, and RNA folding kinetics can regulate gene expression at the translational level. Knowledge of the stability, folding, kinetics and detailed mechanics of the folding process may help provide insight into how proteins and RNAs fold. In this paper, we present an overview of our work with a computational method we have adapted from robotic motion planning to study molecular motions. We have validated against experimental data and have demonstrated that our method can capture biological results such as stochastic folding pathways, population kinetics of various conformations, and relative folding rates. Thus, our method provides both a detailed view (e.g., individual pathways) and a global view (e.g., population kinetics, relative folding rates, and reaction coordinates) of energy landscapes of both proteins and RNAs. We have validated these techniques by showing that we observe the same relative folding rates as shown in experiments for structurally similar protein molecules that exhibit different folding behaviors. Our analysis has also been able to predict the same relative gene expression rate for wild-type MS2 phage RNA and three of its mutants.

  11. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin R. Johnson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (biomolecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Recently, interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. We focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  12. Work and Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willig, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    individual and collective identity formation and has led to an increase in social pathological illnesses such as stress and depression. By juxtaposing these analyses with Honneth’s theory on recognition, we conclude that the contemporary logic of work is unable to provide adequate forms of recognition......The article deals with the relationship between work and recognition, taking Axel Honneth’s social-philosophical theory of the struggle for recognition as its point of departure. In order to give sociological substance to Honneth’s theory, we turn to three contemporary social theorists - Jean......-Pierre Le Goff, Christophe Dejours and Emmanuel Renault. In spite of many differences, their work is united by a critical description of the logic of work and its consequences for individual individuation. These theorists agree that the growth of autonomy, flexibility and mobility has destabilised...

  13. Forensic speaker recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwly, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The aim of forensic speaker recognition is to establish links between individuals and criminal activities, through audio speech recordings. This field is multidisciplinary, combining predominantly phonetics, linguistics, speech signal processing, and forensic statistics. On these bases, expert-based

  14. The Recognition Of Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsass, Peter; Jensen, Bodil; Mørup, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    Elsass P., Jensen B., Morup R., Thogersen M.H. (2007). The Recognition Of Fatigue: A qualitative study of life-stories from rehabilitation clients. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (2), 75-87......Elsass P., Jensen B., Morup R., Thogersen M.H. (2007). The Recognition Of Fatigue: A qualitative study of life-stories from rehabilitation clients. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (2), 75-87...

  15. Wood Species Recognition System

    OpenAIRE

    Bremananth R; Nithya B; Saipriya R

    2009-01-01

    The proposed system identifies the species of the wood using the textural features present in its barks. Each species of a wood has its own unique patterns in its bark, which enabled the proposed system to identify it accurately. Automatic wood recognition system has not yet been well established mainly due to lack of research in this area and the difficulty in obtaining the wood database. In our work, a wood recognition system has been designed based on pre-processing te...

  16. Evaluating music emotion recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do...... not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER system, and conclude with recommendations....

  17. Why recognition is rational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clintin P. Davis-Stober

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Recognition Heuristic (Gigerenzer and Goldstein, 1996; Goldstein and Gigerenzer, 2002 makes the counter-intuitive prediction that a decision maker utilizing less information may do as well as, or outperform, an idealized decision maker utilizing more information. We lay a theoretical foundation for the use of single-variable heuristics such as the Recognition Heuristic as an optimal decision strategy within a linear modeling framework. We identify conditions under which over-weighting a single predictor is a mini-max strategy among a class of a priori chosen weights based on decision heuristics with respect to a measure of statistical lack of fit we call ``risk''. These strategies, in turn, outperform standard multiple regression as long as the amount of data available is limited. We also show that, under related conditions, weighting only one variable and ignoring all others produces the same risk as ignoring the single variable and weighting all others. This approach has the advantage of generalizing beyond the original environment of the Recognition Heuristic to situations with more than two choice options, binary or continuous representations of recognition, and to other single variable heuristics. We analyze the structure of data used in some prior recognition tasks and find that it matches the sufficient conditions for optimality in our results. Rather than being a poor or adequate substitute for a compensatory model, the Recognition Heuristic closely approximates an optimal strategy when a decision maker has finite data about the world.

  18. Fusion of optical flow based motion pattern analysis and silhouette classification for person tracking and detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangelder, J.W.H.; Lebert, E.; Burghouts, G.J.; Zon, K. van; Den Uyl, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to detect persons in video by combining optical flow based motion analysis and silhouette based recognition. A new fast optical flow computation method is described, and its application in a motion based analysis framework unifying human tracking and detection is

  19. Brain Image Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In order to use such devices...... offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype...

  20. Motion and relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Infeld, Leopold

    1960-01-01

    Motion and Relativity focuses on the methodologies, solutions, and approaches involved in the study of motion and relativity, including the general relativity theory, gravitation, and approximation.The publication first offers information on notation and gravitational interaction and the general theory of motion. Discussions focus on the notation of the general relativity theory, field values on the world-lines, general statement of the physical problem, Newton's theory of gravitation, and forms for the equation of motion of the second kind. The text then takes a look at the approximation meth

  1. Sampling protein motion and solvent effect during ligand binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Vittorio; Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; La Motta, Concettina; Sartini, Stefania; Mugnaini, Laura; Da Settimo, Federico; Novellino, Ettore; Parrinello, Michele

    2012-01-01

    An exhaustive description of the molecular recognition mechanism between a ligand and its biological target is of great value because it provides the opportunity for an exogenous control of the related process. Very often this aim can be pursued using high resolution structures of the complex in combination with inexpensive computational protocols such as docking algorithms. Unfortunately, in many other cases a number of factors, like protein flexibility or solvent effects, increase the degree of complexity of ligand/protein interaction and these standard techniques are no longer sufficient to describe the binding event. We have experienced and tested these limits in the present study in which we have developed and revealed the mechanism of binding of a new series of potent inhibitors of Adenosine Deaminase. We have first performed a large number of docking calculations, which unfortunately failed to yield reliable results due to the dynamical character of the enzyme and the complex role of the solvent. Thus, we have stepped up the computational strategy using a protocol based on metadynamics. Our approach has allowed dealing with protein motion and solvation during ligand binding and finally identifying the lowest energy binding modes of the most potent compound of the series, 4-decyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-one. PMID:22238423

  2. Dynamic Time Warping Distance Method for Similarity Test of Multipoint Ground Motion Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmin Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reasonability of artificial multi-point ground motions and the identification of abnormal records in seismic array observations, are two important issues in application and analysis of multi-point ground motion fields. Based on the dynamic time warping (DTW distance method, this paper discusses the application of similarity measurement in the similarity analysis of simulated multi-point ground motions and the actual seismic array records. Analysis results show that the DTW distance method not only can quantitatively reflect the similarity of simulated ground motion field, but also offers advantages in clustering analysis and singularity recognition of actual multi-point ground motion field.

  3. Dynamic Features for Iris Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, R M; Gonzaga, A

    2012-08-01

    The human eye is sensitive to visible light. Increasing illumination on the eye causes the pupil of the eye to contract, while decreasing illumination causes the pupil to dilate. Visible light causes specular reflections inside the iris ring. On the other hand, the human retina is less sensitive to near infra-red (NIR) radiation in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1400 nm, but iris detail can still be imaged with NIR illumination. In order to measure the dynamic movement of the human pupil and iris while keeping the light-induced reflexes from affecting the quality of the digitalized image, this paper describes a device based on the consensual reflex. This biological phenomenon contracts and dilates the two pupils synchronously when illuminating one of the eyes by visible light. In this paper, we propose to capture images of the pupil of one eye using NIR illumination while illuminating the other eye using a visible-light pulse. This new approach extracts iris features called "dynamic features (DFs)." This innovative methodology proposes the extraction of information about the way the human eye reacts to light, and to use such information for biometric recognition purposes. The results demonstrate that these features are discriminating features, and, even using the Euclidean distance measure, an average accuracy of recognition of 99.1% was obtained. The proposed methodology has the potential to be "fraud-proof," because these DFs can only be extracted from living irises.

  4. Automated surgical step recognition in normalized cataract surgery videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Katia; Quellec, Gwénolé; Lamard, Mathieu; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Cochener, Béatrice; Cazuguel, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Huge amounts of surgical data are recorded during video-monitored surgery. Content-based video retrieval systems intent to reuse those data for computer-aided surgery. In this paper, we focus on real-time recognition of cataract surgery steps: the goal is to retrieve from a database surgery videos that were recorded during the same surgery step. The proposed system relies on motion features for video characterization. Motion features are usually impacted by eye motion or zoom level variations, which are not necessarily relevant for surgery step recognition. Those problems certainly limit the performance of the retrieval system. We therefore propose to refine motion feature extraction by applying pre-processing steps based on a novel pupil center and scale tracking method. Those pre-processing steps are evaluated for two different motion features. In this paper, a similarity measure adapted from Piciarelli's video surveillance system is evaluated for the first time in a surgery dataset. This similarity measure provides good results and for both motion features, the proposed preprocessing steps improved the retrieval performance of the system significantly.

  5. Image Recognition Techniques for Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, M.; Heaton, T. H.; Hauksson, E.

    2011-12-01

    When monitoring on his/her PC a map of seismic stations, whose colors scale with the real-time transmitted ground motions amplitudes observed in a dense seismic network, an experienced person will fairly easily recognize when and where an earthquake occurs. Using the maximum amplitudes at stations at close epicentral distances, he/she might even be able to roughly estimate the size of the event. From the number and distribution of stations turning 'red', the person might also be able to recognize the rupturing fault in a large earthquake (M>>7.0), and to estimate the rupture dimensions while the rupture is still developing. Following this concept, we are adopting techniques for automatic image recognition to provide earthquake early warning. We rapidly correlate a set of templates with real-time ground motion observations in a seismic network. If a 'suspicious' pattern of ground motion amplitudes is detected, the algorithm starts estimating the location of the earthquake and its magnitude. For large earthquakes the algorithm estimates finite source dimensions and the direction of rupture propagation. These predictions are continuously up-dated using the current 'image' of ground motion observations. A priori information, such as on the orientation of mayor faults, helps enhancing estimates in less dense networks. The approach will be demonstrated for multiple simulated and real events in California.

  6. Brownian motion of tethered nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Sadao; Li, Tongcang; Li, Yimin; Ye, Ziliang; Labno, Anna; Yin, Xiaobo; Alam, Mohammad-Reza; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    Brownian motion of slender particles near a boundary is ubiquitous in biological systems and in nanomaterial assembly, but the complex hydrodynamic interaction in those systems is still poorly understood. Here, we report experimental and computational studies of the Brownian motion of silicon nanowires tethered on a substrate. An optical interference method enabled direct observation of microscopic rotations of the slender bodies in three dimensions with high angular and temporal resolutions. This quantitative observation revealed anisotropic and angle-dependent hydrodynamic wall effects: rotational diffusivity in inclined and azimuth directions follows different power laws as a function of the length, ∼ L(-2.5) and ∼ L(-3), respectively, and is more hindered for smaller inclined angles. In parallel, we developed an implicit simulation technique that takes the complex wire-wall hydrodynamic interactions into account efficiently, the result of which agreed well with the experimentally observed angle-dependent diffusion. The demonstrated techniques provide a platform for studying the microrheology of soft condensed matters, such as colloidal and biological systems near interfaces, and exploring the optimal self-assembly conditions of nanostructures.

  7. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in motion Nanotechnology in motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-02-01

    , Toshio Ando from the University of Kanazawa provides an overview of developments that have allowed atomic force microscopy to move from rates of the order of one frame a minute to over a thousand frames per second in constant height mode, as reported by Mervyn Miles and colleagues at Bristol University and University College London [8]. Among the pioneers in the field, Ando's group demonstrated the ability to record the Brownian motion of myosin V molecules on mica with image capture rates of 100 x 100 pixels in 80 ms over a decade ago [9]. The developments unleash the potential of atomic force microscopy to observe the dynamics of biological and materials systems. If seeing is believing, the ability to present real motion pictures of the nanoworld cannot fail to capture the public imagination and stimulate burgeoning new avenues of scientific endeavour. Nearly 350 years on from the publication Micrographia, images in microscopy have moved from the page to the movies. References [1] Binnig G, Quate C F, and Gerber Ch 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930-3 [2] Ando T 2012 Nanotechnology 23 062001 [3] J G 1934 Nature 134 635-6 [4] Bharadwaj P, Anger P and Novotny L 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044017 [5] The Nobel Prize in Physics 1986 Nobelprize.org [6] Kim K K, Reina A, Shi Y, Park H, Li L-J, Lee Y H and Kong J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 285205 [7] Phillips D B, Grieve J A, Olof S N, Kocher S J, Bowman R, Padgett M J, Miles M J and Carberry D M 2011 Nanotechnology 22 285503 [8] Picco L M, Bozec L, Ulcinas A, Engledew D J, Antognozzi M, Horton M A and Miles M J 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044030 [9] Ando T, Kodera N, Takai E, Maruyama D, Saito K and Toda A 2001 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 98 12468

  8. Closing the Loop in Appearance-Guided Structure-from-Motion for Omnidirectional Cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Scaramuzza, Davide; Fraundorfer, Friedrich; Pollefeys, Marc; Siegwart, Roland

    2008-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present a method that allows us to recover a 400 meter tra jectory purely from monocular omnidirectional images very accurately. The method uses a novel combination of appearance-guided structure from motion and loop closing. The appearance-guided monocular structure-from-motion scheme is used for initial motion estimation. Appearance information is used to correct the rotation estimates computed from feature points only. A place recognition scheme is...

  9. Page Recognition: Quantum Leap In Recognition Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry

    1989-07-01

    No milestone has proven as elusive as the always-approaching "year of the LAN," but the "year of the scanner" might claim the silver medal. Desktop scanners have been around almost as long as personal computers. And everyone thinks they are used for obvious desktop-publishing and business tasks like scanning business documents, magazine articles and other pages, and translating those words into files your computer understands. But, until now, the reality fell far short of the promise. Because it's true that scanners deliver an accurate image of the page to your computer, but the software to recognize this text has been woefully disappointing. Old optical-character recognition (OCR) software recognized such a limited range of pages as to be virtually useless to real users. (For example, one OCR vendor specified 12-point Courier font from an IBM Selectric typewriter: the same font in 10-point, or from a Diablo printer, was unrecognizable!) Computer dealers have told me the chasm between OCR expectations and reality is so broad and deep that nine out of ten prospects leave their stores in disgust when they learn the limitations. And this is a very important, very unfortunate gap. Because the promise of recognition -- what people want it to do -- carries with it tremendous improvements in our productivity and ability to get tons of written documents into our computers where we can do real work with it. The good news is that a revolutionary new development effort has led to the new technology of "page recognition," which actually does deliver the promise we've always wanted from OCR. I'm sure every reader appreciates the breakthrough represented by the laser printer and page-makeup software, a combination so powerful it created new reasons for buying a computer. A similar breakthrough is happening right now in page recognition: the Macintosh (and, I must admit, other personal computers) equipped with a moderately priced scanner and OmniPage software (from Caere

  10. COMPARISON OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION, SOBEL, ADAPTIVE MOTION DETECTION, FRAME DIFFERENCES, AND ACCUMULATIVE DIFFERENCES IMAGES ON MOTION DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Incam Ramadhan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, digital image processing is not only used to recognize motionless objects, but also used to recognize motions objects on video. One use of moving object recognition on video is to detect motion, which implementation can be used on security cameras. Various methods used to detect motion have been developed so that in this research compared some motion detection methods, namely Background Substraction, Adaptive Motion Detection, Sobel, Frame Differences and Accumulative Differences Images (ADI. Each method has a different level of accuracy. In the background substraction method, the result obtained 86.1% accuracy in the room and 88.3% outdoors. In the sobel method the result of motion detection depends on the lighting conditions of the room being supervised. When the room is in bright condition, the accuracy of the system decreases and when the room is dark, the accuracy of the system increases with an accuracy of 80%. In the adaptive motion detection method, motion can be detected with a condition in camera visibility there is no object that is easy to move. In the frame difference method, testing on RBG image using average computation with threshold of 35 gives the best value. In the ADI method, the result of accuracy in motion detection reached 95.12%.

  11. Temporal logic motion planning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Seotsanyana, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a critical review on temporal logic motion planning is presented. The review paper aims to address the following problems: (a) In a realistic situation, the motion planning problem is carried out in real-time, in a dynamic, uncertain...

  12. Motion control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sabanovic, Asif

    2011-01-01

    "Presents a unified approach to the fundamental issues in motion control, starting from the basics and moving through single degree of freedom and multi-degree of freedom systems In Motion Control Systems, Šabanovic and Ohnishi present a unified approach to very diverse issues covered in motion control systems, offering know-how accumulated through work on very diverse problems into a comprehensive, integrated approach suitable for application in high demanding high-tech products. It covers material from single degree of freedom systems to complex multi-body non-redundant and redundant systems. The discussion of the main subject is based on original research results and will give treatment of the issues in motion control in the framework of the acceleration control method with disturbance rejection technique. This allows consistent unification of different issues in motion control ranging from simple trajectory tracking to topics related to haptics and bilateral control without and with delay in the measure...

  13. Locust Collective Motion and Its Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Ariel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, technological advances in experimental and animal tracking techniques have motivated a renewed theoretical interest in animal collective motion and, in particular, locust swarming. This review offers a comprehensive biological background followed by comparative analysis of recent models of locust collective motion, in particular locust marching, their settings, and underlying assumptions. We describe a wide range of recent modeling and simulation approaches, from discrete agent-based models of self-propelled particles to continuous models of integro-differential equations, aimed at describing and analyzing the fascinating phenomenon of locust collective motion. These modeling efforts have a dual role: The first views locusts as a quintessential example of animal collective motion. As such, they aim at abstraction and coarse-graining, often utilizing the tools of statistical physics. The second, which originates from a more biological perspective, views locust swarming as a scientific problem of its own exceptional merit. The main goal should, thus, be the analysis and prediction of natural swarm dynamics. We discuss the properties of swarm dynamics using the tools of statistical physics, as well as the implications for laboratory experiments and natural swarms. Finally, we stress the importance of a combined-interdisciplinary, biological-theoretical effort in successfully confronting the challenges that locusts pose at both the theoretical and practical levels.

  14. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  15. Editorial overview : Systems biology for biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Matthias; Pilpel, Yitzhak

    About 15 years ago, systems biology was introduced as a novel approach to biological research. On the one side, its introduction was a result of the recognition that through solely the reductionist approach, we would ulti- mately not be able to understand how biological systems function as a whole.

  16. Spatiotemporal flicker detector model of motion silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Lark Kwon; Bovik, Alan C; Cormack, Lawrence K

    2014-01-01

    Motion can impair the perception of other visual changes. Suchow and Alvarez (2011a, Current Biology, 21, 140-143) recently demonstrated a striking 'motion silencing' illusion, in which the salient changes among a group of objects' luminances (or colors, etc) appear to cease in the presence of large, coherent object motion. To understand why the visual system might be insensitive to changes in object luminances ('flicker') in the presence of object motion, we constructed similar stimuli and did a systematic spectral analysis of them. We conducted human psychophysical experiments to examine motion silencing as a function of stimulus velocity, flicker frequency, and spacing; and we created a simple filter-based model as a working hypothesis of motion silencing. From the results, we found that the threshold of silencing occurs when the log frequency of object replacement is roughly one quarter of the log flicker frequency (the mean slope is approximately 0.27). The dependence of silencing on object spacing may be explained as a phenomenon of temporal sampling of the stimuli by the visual system. Our proposed model successfully captures the psychophysical data over a wide range of velocities and flicker frequencies.

  17. THE ALLWISE MOTION SURVEY, PART 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Kellogg, Kendra; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Gelino, Christopher R.; Schurr, Steven D.; Cutri, Roc M.; Conrow, Tim [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schneider, Adam C.; Cushing, Michael C.; Greco, Jennifer [Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS 111, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606-3328 (United States); Mace, Gregory N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Wright, Edward L.; Logsdon, Sarah E.; Martin, Emily C.; McLean, Ian S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Sheppard, Scott S. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Lansbury, George B., E-mail: davy@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    We use the AllWISE Data Release to continue our search for Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE )-detected motions. In this paper, we publish another 27,846 motion objects, bringing the total number to 48,000 when objects found during our original AllWISE motion survey are included. We use this list, along with the lists of confirmed WISE -based motion objects from the recent papers by Luhman and by Schneider et al., and candidate motion objects from the recent paper by Gagné et al., to search for widely separated, common-proper-motion systems. We identify 1039 such candidate systems. All 48,000 objects are further analyzed using color–color and color–mag plots to provide possible characterizations prior to spectroscopic follow-up. We present spectra of 172 of these, supplemented with new spectra of 23 comparison objects from the literature, and provide classifications and physical interpretations of interesting sources. Highlights include: (1) the identification of three G/K dwarfs that can be used as standard candles to study clumpiness and grain size in nearby molecular clouds because these objects are currently moving behind the clouds, (2) the confirmation/discovery of several M, L, and T dwarfs and one white dwarf whose spectrophotometric distance estimates place them 5–20 pc from the Sun, (3) the suggestion that the Na i “D” line be used as a diagnostic tool for interpreting and classifying metal-poor late-M and L dwarfs, (4) the recognition of a triple system including a carbon dwarf and late-M subdwarf, for which model fits of the late-M subdwarf (giving [Fe/H] ≈ −1.0) provide a measured metallicity for the carbon star, and (5) a possible 24 pc distant K5 dwarf + peculiar red L5 system with an apparent physical separation of 0.1 pc.

  18. THE ALLWISE MOTION SURVEY, PART 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Kellogg, Kendra; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Gelino, Christopher R.; Schurr, Steven D.; Cutri, Roc M.; Conrow, Tim; Schneider, Adam C.; Cushing, Michael C.; Greco, Jennifer; Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L.; Logsdon, Sarah E.; Martin, Emily C.; McLean, Ian S.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Lansbury, George B.

    2016-01-01

    We use the AllWISE Data Release to continue our search for Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE )-detected motions. In this paper, we publish another 27,846 motion objects, bringing the total number to 48,000 when objects found during our original AllWISE motion survey are included. We use this list, along with the lists of confirmed WISE -based motion objects from the recent papers by Luhman and by Schneider et al., and candidate motion objects from the recent paper by Gagné et al., to search for widely separated, common-proper-motion systems. We identify 1039 such candidate systems. All 48,000 objects are further analyzed using color–color and color–mag plots to provide possible characterizations prior to spectroscopic follow-up. We present spectra of 172 of these, supplemented with new spectra of 23 comparison objects from the literature, and provide classifications and physical interpretations of interesting sources. Highlights include: (1) the identification of three G/K dwarfs that can be used as standard candles to study clumpiness and grain size in nearby molecular clouds because these objects are currently moving behind the clouds, (2) the confirmation/discovery of several M, L, and T dwarfs and one white dwarf whose spectrophotometric distance estimates place them 5–20 pc from the Sun, (3) the suggestion that the Na i “D” line be used as a diagnostic tool for interpreting and classifying metal-poor late-M and L dwarfs, (4) the recognition of a triple system including a carbon dwarf and late-M subdwarf, for which model fits of the late-M subdwarf (giving [Fe/H] ≈ −1.0) provide a measured metallicity for the carbon star, and (5) a possible 24 pc distant K5 dwarf + peculiar red L5 system with an apparent physical separation of 0.1 pc.

  19. Vision-Based Recognition of Activities by a Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounîm A. El-Yacoubi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an autonomous assistive robotic system for human activity recognition from video sequences. Due to the large variability inherent to video capture from a non-fixed robot (as opposed to a fixed camera, as well as the robot's limited computing resources, implementation has been guided by robustness to this variability and by memory and computing speed efficiency. To accommodate motion speed variability across users, we encode motion using dense interest point trajectories. Our recognition model harnesses the dense interest point bag-of-words representation through an intersection kernel-based SVM that better accommodates the large intra-class variability stemming from a robot operating in different locations and conditions. To contextually assess the engine as implemented in the robot, we compare it with the most recent approaches of human action recognition performed on public datasets (non-robot-based, including a novel approach of our own that is based on a two-layer SVM-hidden conditional random field sequential recognition model. The latter's performance is among the best within the recent state of the art. We show that our robot-based recognition engine, while less accurate than the sequential model, nonetheless shows good performances, especially given the adverse test conditions of the robot, relative to those of a fixed camera.

  20. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEAKER RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen ERTAŞ

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The explosive growth of information technology in the last decade has made a considerable impact on the design and construction of systems for human-machine communication, which is becoming increasingly important in many aspects of life. Amongst other speech processing tasks, a great deal of attention has been devoted to developing procedures that identify people from their voices, and the design and construction of speaker recognition systems has been a fascinating enterprise pursued over many decades. This paper introduces speaker recognition in general and discusses its relevant parameters in relation to system performance.

  1. Touchless palmprint recognition systems

    CERN Document Server

    Genovese, Angelo; Scotti, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    This book examines the context, motivation and current status of biometric systems based on the palmprint, with a specific focus on touchless and less-constrained systems. It covers new technologies in this rapidly evolving field and is one of the first comprehensive books on palmprint recognition systems.It discusses the research literature and the most relevant industrial applications of palmprint biometrics, including the low-cost solutions based on webcams. The steps of biometric recognition are described in detail, including acquisition setups, algorithms, and evaluation procedures. Const

  2. Galeotti on recognition as inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2008-01-01

    Anna Elisabetta Galeotti's theory of 'toleration as recognition' has been criticised by Peter Jones for being conceptually incoherent, since liberal toleration presupposes a negative attitude to differences, whereas multicultural recognition requires positive affirmation hereof. The paper spells...... out Galeotti's justification for recognition as a requirement of liberal justice in detail and asks in what sense the policies supported by Galeotti are policies of recognition. It is argued that Jones misrepresents Galeotti's theory, insofar as this sense of recognition actually is compatible...... in respects that need to be filled out in order to secure compatibility with liberalism, and that this may prove problematic. Keywords: liberalism; multiculturalism; recognition; toleration...

  3. Pattern recognition of neurotransmitters using multimode sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Moldoveanu, Iuliana; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick

    2014-05-30

    Pattern recognition is essential in chemical analysis of biological fluids. Reliable and sensitive methods for neurotransmitters analysis are needed. Therefore, we developed for pattern recognition of neurotransmitters: dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine a method based on multimode sensing. Multimode sensing was performed using microsensors based on diamond paste modified with 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrine, hemin and protoporphyrin IX in stochastic and differential pulse voltammetry modes. Optimized working conditions: phosphate buffer solution of pH 3.01 and KCl 0.1mol/L (as electrolyte support), were determined using cyclic voltammetry and used in all measurements. The lowest limits of quantification were: 10(-10)mol/L for dopamine and epinephrine, and 10(-11)mol/L for norepinephrine. The multimode microsensors were selective over ascorbic and uric acids and the method facilitated reliable assay of neurotransmitters in urine samples, and therefore, the pattern recognition showed high reliability (RSDneurotransmitters on biological fluids at a lower determination level than chromatographic methods. The sampling of the biological fluids referees only to the buffering (1:1, v/v) with a phosphate buffer pH 3.01, while for chromatographic methods the sampling is laborious. Accordingly with the statistic evaluation of the results at 99.00% confidence level, both modes can be used for pattern recognition and quantification of neurotransmitters with high reliability. The best multimode microsensor was the one based on diamond paste modified with protoporphyrin IX. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A framework for assessing inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetics using virtual human populations and integrating general knowledge of physical chemistry, biology, anatomy, physiology and genetics: A tale of 'bottom-up' vs 'top-down' recognition of covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamei, Masoud; Dickinson, Gemma L; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of failures in clinical stages of drug development have been related to the effects of candidate drugs in a sub-group of patients rather than the 'average' person. Expectation of extreme effects or lack of therapeutic effects in some subgroups following administration of similar doses requires a full understanding of the issue of variability and the importance of identifying covariates that determine the exposure to the drug candidates in each individual. In any drug development program the earlier these covariates are known the better. An important component of the drive to decrease this failure rate in drug development involves attempts to use physiologically-based pharmacokinetics 'bottom-up' modeling and simulation to optimize molecular features with respect to the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) processes. The key element of this approach is the separation of information on the system (i.e. human body) from that of the drug (e.g. physicochemical characteristics determining permeability through membranes, partitioning to tissues, binding to plasma proteins or affinities toward certain enzymes and transporter proteins) and the study design (e.g. dose, route and frequency of administration, concomitant drugs and food). In this review, the classical 'top-down' approach in covariate recognition is compared with the 'bottom-up' paradigm. The determinants and sources of inter-individual variability in different stages of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion are discussed in detail. Further, the commonly known tools for simulating ADME properties are introduced.

  5. Making Activity Recognition Robust against Deceptive Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Saeb

    Full Text Available Healthcare services increasingly use the activity recognition technology to track the daily activities of individuals. In some cases, this is used to provide incentives. For example, some health insurance companies offer discount to customers who are physically active, based on the data collected from their activity tracking devices. Therefore, there is an increasing motivation for individuals to cheat, by making activity trackers detect activities that increase their benefits rather than the ones they actually do. In this study, we used a novel method to make activity recognition robust against deceptive behavior. We asked 14 subjects to attempt to trick our smartphone-based activity classifier by making it detect an activity other than the one they actually performed, for example by shaking the phone while seated to make the classifier detect walking. If they succeeded, we used their motion data to retrain the classifier, and asked them to try to trick it again. The experiment ended when subjects could no longer cheat. We found that some subjects were not able to trick the classifier at all, while others required five rounds of retraining. While classifiers trained on normal activity data predicted true activity with ~38% accuracy, training on the data gathered during the deceptive behavior increased their accuracy to ~84%. We conclude that learning the deceptive behavior of one individual helps to detect the deceptive behavior of others. Thus, we can make current activity recognition robust to deception by including deceptive activity data from a few individuals.

  6. Gait Recognition and Walking Exercise Intensity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Shing Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular patients consult doctors for advice regarding regular exercise, whereas obese patients must self-manage their weight. Because a system for permanently monitoring and tracking patients’ exercise intensities and workouts is necessary, a system for recognizing gait and estimating walking exercise intensity was proposed. For gait recognition analysis, αβ filters were used to improve the recognition of athletic attitude. Furthermore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD was used to filter the noise of patients’ attitude to acquire the Fourier transform energy spectrum. Linear discriminant analysis was then applied to this energy spectrum for training and recognition. When the gait or motion was recognized, the walking exercise intensity was estimated. In addition, this study addressed the correlation between inertia and exercise intensity by using the residual function of the EMD and quadratic approximation to filter the effect of the baseline drift integral of the acceleration sensor. The increase in the determination coefficient of the regression equation from 0.55 to 0.81 proved that the accuracy of the method for estimating walking exercise intensity proposed by Kurihara was improved in this study.

  7. Recognition of fractal graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perepelitsa, VA; Sergienko, [No Value; Kochkarov, AM

    1999-01-01

    Definitions of prefractal and fractal graphs are introduced, and they are used to formulate mathematical models in different fields of knowledge. The topicality of fractal-graph recognition from the point of view, of fundamental improvement in the efficiency of the solution of algorithmic problems

  8. Optical Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  9. Tolerance and recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Marius Hansteen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though “toleration” and “recognition” designate opposing attitudes (to tolerate something, implies a negative stance towards it, whereas recognition seems to imply a positive one, the concepts do not constitute mutually exclusive alternatives. However, “toleration” is often associated with liberal universalism, focusing on individual rights, whereas “recognition” often connotes communitarian perspectives, focusing on relations and identity. This paper argues that toleration may be founded on recognition, and that recognition may imply toleration. In outlining a differentiated understanding of the relationship between toleration and recognition, it seems apt to avoid an all-to-general dichotomy between universalism and particularism or, in other words, to reach beyond the debate between liberalism and communitarianism in political philosophy.The paper takes as its starting point the view that the discussion on toleration and diversity in intercultural communication is one of the contexts where it seems important to get beyond the liberal/communitarian dichotomy. Some basic features of Rainer Forst’s theory of toleration and Axel Honneth’s theory of the struggle for recognition are presented, in order to develop a more substantial understanding of the relationship between the concepts of toleration and recognition. One lesson from Forst is that toleration is a normatively dependent concept, i.e., that it is impossible to deduce principles for toleration and its limits from a theory of toleration as such. A central lesson from Honneth is that recognition – understood as a basic human need – is always conflictual and therefore dynamic.Accordingly, a main point in the paper is that the theory of struggles for and about recognition (where struggles for designates struggles within an established order of recognition, and struggles about designates struggles that challenge established orders of recognition may clarify what

  10. Importance of ECM recognition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Importance of ECM recognition. Leishmaniasis transmitted by parasite injection into blood during blood meal of insect vector. Parasites home in macrophages of liver and spleen - adhere, penetrate, transform and replicate. Macrophage lysis - attack of neighbouring ...

  11. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  12. Visual recognition and tracking of objects for robot sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of techniques used for recognition and motion tracking of articulated 3-D objects. With recent advances in robust methods for model-based vision and improved performance of computer systems, it will soon be possible to build low-cost, high-reliability systems for model-based motion tracking. Such systems can be expected to open up a wide range of applications in robotics by providing machines with real-time information about their environment. This paper describes a number of techniques for efficiently matching parameterized 3-D models to image features. The matching methods are robust with respect to missing and ambiguous features as well as measurement errors. Unlike most previous work on model-based motion tracking, this system provides for the integrated treatment of matching and measurement errors during motion tracking. The initial application is in a system for real-time motion tracking of articulated 3-D objects. With the future addition of an indexing component, these same techniques can also be used for general model-based recognition. The current real-time implementation is based on matching straight line segments, but some preliminary experiments on matching arbitrary curves are also described. (author)

  13. Fast Optimal Motion Planning

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computationally-efficient, fast and real-time, and provably-optimal motion planner for systems with highly nonlinear dynamics that can be extended for cooperative...

  14. Motion Sickness: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... com. Accessed July 29, 2017. Priesol AJ. Motion sickness. https://www.uptodate.com/content/search. Accessed July 29, 2017. Brunette GW, et al. CDC Health Information for International Travel 2018. New York, N. ...

  15. Toying with Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  16. Motion of a Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Wynn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to derive and solve the equation of motion for a pendulum swinging at small angles in one dimension. The pendulum may be either a simple pendulum like a ball hanging from a string or a physical pendulum like a pendulum on a clock. For simplicity, we only considered small rotational angles so that the equation of motion becomes a harmonic oscillator.

  17. Object recognition and localization: the role of tactile sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Achint; Kirchner, Frank

    2014-02-18

    Tactile sensors, because of their intrinsic insensitivity to lighting conditions and water turbidity, provide promising opportunities for augmenting the capabilities of vision sensors in applications involving object recognition and localization. This paper presents two approaches for haptic object recognition and localization for ground and underwater environments. The first approach called Batch Ransac and Iterative Closest Point augmented Particle Filter (BRICPPF) is based on an innovative combination of particle filters, Iterative-Closest-Point algorithm, and a feature-based Random Sampling and Consensus (RANSAC) algorithm for database matching. It can handle a large database of 3D-objects of complex shapes and performs a complete six-degree-of-freedom localization of static objects. The algorithms are validated by experimentation in ground and underwater environments using real hardware. To our knowledge this is the first instance of haptic object recognition and localization in underwater environments. The second approach is biologically inspired, and provides a close integration between exploration and recognition. An edge following exploration strategy is developed that receives feedback from the current state of recognition. A recognition by parts approach is developed which uses the BRICPPF for object sub-part recognition. Object exploration is either directed to explore a part until it is successfully recognized, or is directed towards new parts to endorse the current recognition belief. This approach is validated by simulation experiments.

  18. Object Recognition and Localization: The Role of Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achint Aggarwal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors, because of their intrinsic insensitivity to lighting conditions and water turbidity, provide promising opportunities for augmenting the capabilities of vision sensors in applications involving object recognition and localization. This paper presents two approaches for haptic object recognition and localization for ground and underwater environments. The first approach called Batch Ransac and Iterative Closest Point augmented Particle Filter (BRICPPF is based on an innovative combination of particle filters, Iterative-Closest-Point algorithm, and a feature-based Random Sampling and Consensus (RANSAC algorithm for database matching. It can handle a large database of 3D-objects of complex shapes and performs a complete six-degree-of-freedom localization of static objects. The algorithms are validated by experimentation in ground and underwater environments using real hardware. To our knowledge this is the first instance of haptic object recognition and localization in underwater environments. The second approach is biologically inspired, and provides a close integration between exploration and recognition. An edge following exploration strategy is developed that receives feedback from the current state of recognition. A recognition by parts approach is developed which uses the BRICPPF for object sub-part recognition. Object exploration is either directed to explore a part until it is successfully recognized, or is directed towards new parts to endorse the current recognition belief. This approach is validated by simulation experiments.

  19. Neuroanatomical substrates involved in unrelated false facial recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzon-Gonzalez, Eliane; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R; Pasaye, Erick H; Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2017-11-22

    Identifying faces is a process central for social interaction and a relevant factor in eyewitness theory. False recognition is a critical mistake during an eyewitness's identification scenario because it can lead to a wrongful conviction. Previous studies have described neural areas related to false facial recognition using the standard Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, triggering related false recognition. Nonetheless, misidentification of faces without trying to elicit false memories (unrelated false recognition) in a police lineup could involve different cognitive processes, and distinct neural areas. To delve into the neural circuitry of unrelated false recognition, we evaluated the memory and response confidence of participants while watching faces photographs in an fMRI task. Functional activations of unrelated false recognition were identified by contrasting the activation on this condition vs. the activations related to recognition (hits) and correct rejections. The results identified the right precentral and cingulate gyri as areas with distinctive activations during false recognition events suggesting a conflict resulting in a dysfunction during memory retrieval. High confidence suggested that about 50% of misidentifications may be related to an unconscious process. These findings add to our understanding of the construction of facial memories and its biological basis, and the fallibility of the eyewitness testimony.

  20. Collective motion in populations of colloidal robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Dauchot, Olivier; Desreumaux, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Could the behavior of bacteria swarms, fish schools, and bird flocks be understood within a unified framework? Can one ignore the very details of the interaction mechanisms at the individual level to elucidate how strikingly similar collective motion emerges at the group level in this broad range of motile systems? These seemingly provocative questions have triggered significant advance in the physics and the biology, communities over the last decade. In the physics language these systems, made of motile individuals, can all be though as different realizations of ``active matter.'' In this talk, I will show how to gain more insight into this vivid field using self-propelled colloids as a proxy for motile organism. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors. Then, I will demonstrate that these archetypal populations display spontaneous transitions to swarming motion, and to global directed motion with very few density and orientation fluctuations.

  1. School IPM Recognition and Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools and school districts can get support and recognition for implementation of school IPM. EPA is developing a program to provide recognition for school districts that are working towards or have achieved a level of success with school IPM programs.

  2. Muscle Synergy-Driven Robust Motion Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyuengbo; Iwamoto, Masami; Kakei, Shinji; Kimpara, Hideyuki

    2018-04-01

    Humans are able to robustly maintain desired motion and posture under dynamically changing circumstances, including novel conditions. To accomplish this, the brain needs to optimize the synergistic control between muscles against external dynamic factors. However, previous related studies have usually simplified the control of multiple muscles using two opposing muscles, which are minimum actuators to simulate linear feedback control. As a result, they have been unable to analyze how muscle synergy contributes to motion control robustness in a biological system. To address this issue, we considered a new muscle synergy concept used to optimize the synergy between muscle units against external dynamic conditions, including novel conditions. We propose that two main muscle control policies synergistically control muscle units to maintain the desired motion against external dynamic conditions. Our assumption is based on biological evidence regarding the control of multiple muscles via the corticospinal tract. One of the policies is the group control policy (GCP), which is used to control muscle group units classified based on functional similarities in joint control. This policy is used to effectively resist external dynamic circumstances, such as disturbances. The individual control policy (ICP) assists the GCP in precisely controlling motion by controlling individual muscle units. To validate this hypothesis, we simulated the reinforcement of the synergistic actions of the two control policies during the reinforcement learning of feedback motion control. Using this learning paradigm, the two control policies were synergistically combined to result in robust feedback control under novel transient and sustained disturbances that did not involve learning. Further, by comparing our data to experimental data generated by human subjects under the same conditions as those of the simulation, we showed that the proposed synergy concept may be used to analyze muscle synergy

  3. Carbohydrate Recognition by Boronolectins, Small Molecules, and Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Reid, Suazette; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known to mediate a large number of biological and pathological events. Small and macromolecules capable of carbohydrate recognition have great potentials as research tools, diagnostics, vectors for targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents, and therapeutic agents. However, this potential is far from being realized. One key issue is the difficulty in the development of “binders” capable of specific recognition of carbohydrates of biological relevance. This review discusses systematically the general approaches that are available in developing carbohydrate sensors and “binders/receptors,” and their applications. The focus is on discoveries during the last five years. PMID:19291708

  4. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  5. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial Intelligence 17(1): 41–62. Hu M K 1962 Visual pattern recognition by moment invariants. IRE Trans. on Information Theory, IT-8,. 179–187. Huang F T, Zhou Z, Zhang H-J and Chen T 2000 Pose invariant face recognition, Proc. Fourth IEEE. International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, ...

  6. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Quaglia, Adamo; Epifano, Calogera M.

    2012-01-01

    The improvements of automatic face recognition during the last 2 decades have disclosed new applications like border control and camera surveillance. A new application field is forensic face recognition. Traditionally, face recognition by human experts has been used in forensics, but now there is a

  7. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  8. Cell motility as random motion: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Li, Liwen; Pedersen, Leif

    2008-01-01

    The historical co-evolution of biological motility models with models of Brownian motion is outlined. Recent results for how to derive cell-type-specific motility models from experimental cell trajectories are reviewed. Experimental work in progress, which tests the generality of this phenomenolo......The historical co-evolution of biological motility models with models of Brownian motion is outlined. Recent results for how to derive cell-type-specific motility models from experimental cell trajectories are reviewed. Experimental work in progress, which tests the generality...... of this phenomenological model building is reported. So is theoretical work in progress, which explains the characteristic time scales and correlations of phenomenological models in terms of the dynamics of cytoskeleton, lamellipodia, and pseudopodia....

  9. Simulated earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanmarcke, E.H.; Gasparini, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews current methods for generating synthetic earthquake ground motions. Emphasis is on the special requirements demanded of procedures to generate motions for use in nuclear power plant seismic response analysis. Specifically, very close agreement is usually sought between the response spectra of the simulated motions and prescribed, smooth design response spectra. The features and capabilities of the computer program SIMQKE, which has been widely used in power plant seismic work are described. Problems and pitfalls associated with the use of synthetic ground motions in seismic safety assessment are also pointed out. The limitations and paucity of recorded accelerograms together with the widespread use of time-history dynamic analysis for obtaining structural and secondary systems' response have motivated the development of earthquake simulation capabilities. A common model for synthesizing earthquakes is that of superposing sinusoidal components with random phase angles. The input parameters for such a model are, then, the amplitudes and phase angles of the contributing sinusoids as well as the characteristics of the variation of motion intensity with time, especially the duration of the motion. The amplitudes are determined from estimates of the Fourier spectrum or the spectral density function of the ground motion. These amplitudes may be assumed to be varying in time or constant for the duration of the earthquake. In the nuclear industry, the common procedure is to specify a set of smooth response spectra for use in aseismic design. This development and the need for time histories have generated much practical interest in synthesizing earthquakes whose response spectra 'match', or are compatible with a set of specified smooth response spectra

  10. Pattern recognition in calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Negra, M.

    1980-07-01

    It is probable that LEP detectors will often include 4π calorimeters. Since this is a novel technique, not much expertise exists yet in the field of pattern recognition for large calorimeter systems. A fast method to simulate calorimeter signals, based on an analytical parametrization of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, developped by the UAl software group on calorimetry, is presented. Some reconstruction problems are discussed, in particular the question of disentangling individual showers within an energetic jet

  11. Harmonization versus Mutual Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Guldager; Schröder, Philipp

    with the opportunity to start export sales. In contrast, harmonization, in particular the prospect that one’s own national (but not the foreign) standard becomes the only globally accepted standard, opens the foreign market without balancing entry at home. We study these scenarios in a reduced form lobby game with two......, harmonized standards may fail to harvest the full pro-competitive effects from trade liberalization compared to mutual recognition; moreover, the issue is most pronounced in markets featuring price competition....

  12. [Measuring human arm motion parameters based on high-speed camera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongbin; Zhang, Wenzeng; Sun, Zhenguo; Chen, Qiang

    2002-01-01

    A sensing method based on high-speed camera is proposed to recognize human arm motion in this paper. A sensing system for human arm motion was established. A fast image processing algorithm was developed to accurately extract marker positions in the image. Angle parameter results were further improved with the instantaneous joint center principle. The human motion information results can serve as the research references of medical treatment, gym, bionics, and so on. The sensing method can also be applied to other fields of the human motion recognition.

  13. Pattern Recognition Control Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambone, Elisabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft control algorithms must know the expected vehicle response to any command to the available control effectors, such as reaction thrusters or torque devices. Spacecraft control system design approaches have traditionally relied on the estimated vehicle mass properties to determine the desired force and moment, as well as knowledge of the effector performance to efficiently control the spacecraft. A pattern recognition approach was used to investigate the relationship between the control effector commands and spacecraft responses. Instead of supplying the approximated vehicle properties and the thruster performance characteristics, a database of information relating the thruster ring commands and the desired vehicle response was used for closed-loop control. A Monte Carlo simulation data set of the spacecraft dynamic response to effector commands was analyzed to establish the influence a command has on the behavior of the spacecraft. A tool developed at NASA Johnson Space Center to analyze flight dynamics Monte Carlo data sets through pattern recognition methods was used to perform this analysis. Once a comprehensive data set relating spacecraft responses with commands was established, it was used in place of traditional control methods and gains set. This pattern recognition approach was compared with traditional control algorithms to determine the potential benefits and uses.

  14. Measuring Behavior using Motion Capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, F.W.; van der Kooij, Herman; Ruttkay, Z.M.; van Welbergen, H.; Spink, A.J.; Ballintijn, M.R.; Bogers, N.D.; Grieco, F; Loijens, L.W.S.; Noldus, L.P.J.J.; Smit, G; Zimmerman, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    Motion capture systems, using optical, magnetic or mechanical sensors are now widely used to record human motion. Motion capture provides us with precise measurements of human motion at a very high recording frequency and accuracy, resulting in a massive amount of movement data on several joints of

  15. Audio-visual gender recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Xun; Huang, Thomas S.

    2007-11-01

    Combining different modalities for pattern recognition task is a very promising field. Basically, human always fuse information from different modalities to recognize object and perform inference, etc. Audio-Visual gender recognition is one of the most common task in human social communication. Human can identify the gender by facial appearance, by speech and also by body gait. Indeed, human gender recognition is a multi-modal data acquisition and processing procedure. However, computational multimodal gender recognition has not been extensively investigated in the literature. In this paper, speech and facial image are fused to perform a mutli-modal gender recognition for exploring the improvement of combining different modalities.

  16. An Efficient Solution for Hand Gesture Recognition from Video Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRODAN, R.-C.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a system of hand gesture recognition by image processing for human robot interaction. The recognition and interpretation of the hand postures acquired through a video camera allow the control of the robotic arm activity: motion - translation and rotation in 3D - and tightening/releasing the clamp. A gesture dictionary was defined and heuristic algorithms for recognition were developed and tested. The system can be used for academic and industrial purposes, especially for those activities where the movements of the robotic arm were not previously scheduled, for training the robot easier than using a remote control. Besides the gesture dictionary, the novelty of the paper consists in a new technique for detecting the relative positions of the fingers in order to recognize the various hand postures, and in the achievement of a robust system for controlling robots by postures of the hands.

  17. Neutron structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1999-01-01

    Neutron structural biology will be one of the most important fields in the life sciences which will interest human beings in the 21st century because neutrons can provide not only the position of hydrogen atoms in biological macromolecules but also the dynamic molecular motion of hydrogen atoms and water molecules. However, there are only a few examples experimentally determined at present because of the lack of neutron source intensity. Next generation neutron source scheduled in JAERI (Performance of which is 100 times better than that of JRR-3M) opens the life science of the 21st century. (author)

  18. DNA in a Tunnel: A Comfy Spot for Recognition - or -The Structure of BsoBI Complexed with DNA. What can we Learn about Function via Structure Determination and how can this be Applied to Bone or Muscle Biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The structure and function of a biologically active molecule are related. To understand its function, it is necessary (but not always sufficient) to know the structure of the molecule. There are many ways of relating the molecular function with the structure. Mutation analysis can identify pertinent amino acids of an enzyme, or alternatively structure comparison of the of two similar molecules with different function may lead to understanding which parts are responsible for a functional aspect, or a series of "structural cartoons" - enzyme structure, enzyme plus substrate, enzyme with transition state analog, and enzyme with product - may give insight in the function of a molecule. As an example we will discuss the structure and function of the restriction enzyme BsoBI from Bacillus stearothemzophilus in complex with its cognate DNA. The enzyme forms a unique complex with DNA in that it completely encircles the DNA. The structure reveals the enzyme-DNA contacts, how the DNA is distorted compared with the canonical forms, and elegantly shows how two distinct DNA sequences can be recognized with the same efficiency. Based on the structure we may also propose a hypothesis how the enzymatic mechanism works. The knowledge gained thru studies such as this one can be used to alter the function by changing the molecular structure. Usually this is done by design of inhibitors specifically active against and fitting into an active site of the enzyme of choice. In the case of BsoBI one of the objectives of the study was to alter the enzyme specificity. In bone biology there are many candidates available for molecular study in order to explain, alter, or (temporarily) suspend activity. For example, the understanding of a pathway that negatively regulates bone formation may be a good target for drug design to stimulate bone formation and have good potential as the basis for new countermeasures against bone loss. In principle the same approach may aid muscle atrophy, radiation

  19. Ground motion predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loux, P.C.

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear generated ground motion is defined and then related to the physical parameters that cause it. Techniques employed for prediction of ground motion peak amplitude, frequency spectra and response spectra are explored, with initial emphasis on the analysis of data collected at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NTS postshot measurements are compared with pre-shot predictions. Applicability of these techniques to new areas, for example, Plowshare sites, must be questioned. Fortunately, the Atomic Energy Commission is sponsoring complementary studies to improve prediction capabilities primarily in new locations outside the NTS region. Some of these are discussed in the light of anomalous seismic behavior, and comparisons are given showing theoretical versus experimental results. In conclusion, current ground motion prediction techniques are applied to events off the NTS. Predictions are compared with measurements for the event Faultless and for the Plowshare events, Gasbuggy, Cabriolet, and Buggy I. (author)

  20. The Complex Action Recognition via the Correlated Topic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-bin Tu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human complex action recognition is an important research area of the action recognition. Among various obstacles to human complex action recognition, one of the most challenging is to deal with self-occlusion, where one body part occludes another one. This paper presents a new method of human complex action recognition, which is based on optical flow and correlated topic model (CTM. Firstly, the Markov random field was used to represent the occlusion relationship between human body parts in terms of an occlusion state variable. Secondly, the structure from motion (SFM is used for reconstructing the missing data of point trajectories. Then, we can extract the key frame based on motion feature from optical flow and the ratios of the width and height are extracted by the human silhouette. Finally, we use the topic model of correlated topic model (CTM to classify action. Experiments were performed on the KTH, Weizmann, and UIUC action dataset to test and evaluate the proposed method. The compared experiment results showed that the proposed method was more effective than compared methods.

  1. Leap Motion development essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegelmock, Mischa

    2013-01-01

    This book is a fast-paced guide with practical examples that aims to help you understand and master the Leap Motion SDK.This book is for developers who are either involved in game development or who are looking to utilize Leap Motion technology in order to create brand new user interaction experiences to distinguish their products from the mass market. You should be comfortable with high-level languages and object-oriented development concepts in order to get the most out of this book.

  2. Ship Roll Motion Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Tristan; Blanke, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    The technical feasibility of roll motion control devices has been amply demonstrated for over 100 years. Performance, however, can still fall short of expectations because of deciencies in control system designs, which have proven to be far from trivial due to fundamental performance limitations....... This tutorial paper presents an account of the development of various ship roll motion control systems and the challenges associated with their design. The paper discusses how to assess performance, the applicability of dierent models, and control methods that have been applied in the past....

  3. Motion edges and regions guide image segmentation by colour.

    OpenAIRE

    Møller, P; Hurlbert, A C

    1997-01-01

    Image segmentation is an important early stage in visual processing in which the visual system groups together parts of the image that belong together, prior to or in conjunction with object recognition. Two principal processes may be involved in image segmentation: an edge-based process that uses feature contrasts to mark boundaries of coherent regions, and a region-based process that groups similar features over a larger scale. Earlier, we have shown that motion and colour interact strongly...

  4. The what, when, where, and how of visual word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiras, Manuel; Armstrong, Blair C; Perea, Manuel; Frost, Ram

    2014-02-01

    A long-standing debate in reading research is whether printed words are perceived in a feedforward manner on the basis of orthographic information, with other representations such as semantics and phonology activated subsequently, or whether the system is fully interactive and feedback from these representations shapes early visual word recognition. We review recent evidence from behavioral, functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, and biologically plausible connectionist modeling approaches, focusing on how each approach provides insight into the temporal flow of information in the lexical system. We conclude that, consistent with interactive accounts, higher-order linguistic representations modulate early orthographic processing. We also discuss how biologically plausible interactive frameworks and coordinated empirical and computational work can advance theories of visual word recognition and other domains (e.g., object recognition). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Re-thinking employee recognition: understanding employee experiences of recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread acceptance of the importance of employee recognition for both individuals and organisations and evidence of its increasing use in organisations, employee recognition has received relatively little focused attention from academic researchers. Particularly lacking is research exploring the lived experience of employee recognition and the interpretations and meanings which individuals give to these experiences. Drawing on qualitative interviews conducted as part of my PhD rese...

  6. MotionsFloorball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup, Jacob; Seidelin, Kåre

    Med denne "opskriftsbog" er I nu klar til at begynde med MotionsFloorball. Ingen vellykket middagsret tilbereder som bekendt sig selv - de vigtigste ingredienser til et succesfuldt forløb er vilje og handlingskraft. Tilsættes værktøjerne og vidensdelen fra denne bog, er der dog ikke langt fra tanke...

  7. Superluminal motion (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykin, G. B.; Romanets, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Prior to the development of Special Relativity, no restrictions were imposed on the velocity of the motion of particles and material bodies, as well as on energy transfer and signal propagation. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, it was shown that a charge that moves at a velocity faster than the speed of light in an optical medium, in particular, in vacuum, gives rise to impact radiation, which later was termed the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation. Shortly after the development of Special Relativity, some researchers considered the possibility of superluminal motion. In 1923, the Soviet physicist L.Ya. Strum suggested the existence of tachyons, which, however, have not been discovered yet. Superluminal motions can occur only for images, e.g., for so-called "light spots," which were considered in 1972 by V.L. Ginzburg and B.M. Bolotovskii. These spots can move with a superluminal phase velocity but are incapable of transferring energy and information. Nevertheless, these light spots may induce quite real generation of microwave radiation in closed waveguides and create the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in vacuum. In this work, we consider various paradoxes, illusions, and artifacts associated with superluminal motion.

  8. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  9. Algebraic Description of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidon, William C.

    1974-01-01

    An algebraic definition of time differentiation is presented and used to relate independent measurements of position and velocity. With this, students can grasp certain essential physical, geometric, and algebraic properties of motion and differentiation before undertaking the study of limits. (Author)

  10. Cargo recognition and cargo-mediated regulation of unconventional myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Li, Jianchao; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-10-21

    Organized motions are hallmarks of living organisms. Such motions range from collective cell movements during development and muscle contractions at the macroscopic scale all the way down to cellular cargo (e.g., various biomolecules and organelles) transportation and mechanoforce sensing at more microscopic scales. Energy required for these biological motions is almost invariably provided by cellular chemical fuels in the form of nucleotide triphosphate. Biological systems have designed a group of nanoscale engines, known as molecular motors, to convert cellular chemical fuels into mechanical energy. Molecular motors come in various forms including cytoskeleton motors (myosin, kinesin, and dynein), nucleic-acid-based motors, cellular membrane-based rotary motors, and so on. The main focus of this Account is one subfamily of actin filament-based motors called unconventional myosins (other than muscle myosin II, the remaining myosins are collectively referred to as unconventional myosins). In general, myosins can use ATP to fuel two types of mechanomotions: dynamic tethering actin filaments with various cellular compartments or structures and actin filament-based intracellular transport. In contrast to rich knowledge accumulated over many decades on ATP hydrolyzing motor heads and their interactions with actin filaments, how various myosins recognize their specific cargoes and whether and how cargoes can in return regulate functions of motors are less understood. Nonetheless, a series of biochemical and structural investigations in the past few years, including works from our own laboratory, begin to shed lights on these latter questions. Some myosins (e.g., myosin-VI) can function both as cellular transporters and as mechanical tethers. To function as a processive transporter, myosins need to form dimers or multimers. To be a mechanical tether, a monomeric myosin is sufficient. It has been shown for myosin-VI that its cellular cargo proteins can play critical roles

  11. Biosensor Recognition Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    and C, Simian immunodeficiency, Ebola, Rabies , Epstein–Barr, and Measles viruses as well as biological agents such as botulinum neurotoxin A/B...159 NS1, hemagglutinin, nucleoprotein, glycoproteins, M2 channel, virulence , polymerase, microarrays, vaccine design. Metagenomics Theory

  12. Signatures of molecular recognition from the topography of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    functional chemical sensors and molecular devices. Molecular recognition is thus a term that has been widely used in physics, chemistry and biology. The term essentially refers to the onset of interaction be- tween two molecular species. The interaction here could be a precursor to covalent bond formation or van der Waals ...

  13. Mechanical Motion Induced by Spatially Distributed Limit-Cycle Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Mukae, Yuuki

    2017-03-01

    Spatially distributed limited-cycle oscillators are seen in various physical and biological systems. In internal organs, mechanical motions are induced by the stimuli of spatially distributed limit-cycle oscillators. We study several mechanical motions by limit-cycle oscillators using simple model equations. One problem is deformation waves of radius oscillation induced by desynchronized limit-cycle oscillators, which is motivated by peristaltic motion of the small intestine. A resonance-like phenomenon is found in the deformation waves, and particles can be transported by the deformation waves. Another is the beating motion of the heart. The expansion and contraction motion is realized by a spatially synchronized limit-cycle oscillation; however, the strong beating disappears by spiral chaos, which is closely related to serious arrhythmia in the heart.

  14. Analysis of chemical signals in red fire ants by gas chromatography and pattern recognition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of gas chromatography and pattern recognition (GC/PR) analysis is a powerful tool for investigating complicated biological problems. Clustering, mapping, discriminant development, etc. are necessary to analyze realistically large chromatographic data sets and to seek meaningful relat...

  15. Human activity recognition and prediction

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a unique view of human activity recognition, especially fine-grained human activity structure learning, human-interaction recognition, RGB-D data based action recognition, temporal decomposition, and causality learning in unconstrained human activity videos. The techniques discussed give readers tools that provide a significant improvement over existing methodologies of video content understanding by taking advantage of activity recognition. It links multiple popular research fields in computer vision, machine learning, human-centered computing, human-computer interaction, image classification, and pattern recognition. In addition, the book includes several key chapters covering multiple emerging topics in the field. Contributed by top experts and practitioners, the chapters present key topics from different angles and blend both methodology and application, composing a solid overview of the human activity recognition techniques. .

  16. ALGORITHM OF OBJECT RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loktev Alexey Alexeevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The second important problem to be resolved to the algorithm and its software, that comprises an automatic design of a complex closed circuit television system, represents object recognition, by virtue of which an image is transmitted by the video camera. Since imaging of almost any object is dependent on many factors, including its orientation in respect of the camera, lighting conditions, parameters of the registering system, static and dynamic parameters of the object itself, it is quite difficult to formalize the image and represent it in the form of a certain mathematical model. Therefore, methods of computer-aided visualization depend substantially on the problems to be solved. They can be rarely generalized. The majority of these methods are non-linear; therefore, there is a need to increase the computing power and complexity of algorithms to be able to process the image. This paper covers the research of visual object recognition and implementation of the algorithm in the view of the software application that operates in the real-time mode

  17. Xerostomia: recognition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Philip C

    2008-01-01

    Awareness and recognition of xerostomia are essential in order to help patients minimize dryness symptoms, to institute preventive measures and to limit oral complications. The dental professional has the opportunity to ask every patient if they are experiencing dry mouth. In particular, complaints of dryness while eating, or difficulty swallowing dry foods, or the necessity of using liquids to ease swallowing are important clues that salivary function may be impaired. As part of a routine oral examination, one should examine the oral cavity carefully for signs of salivary gland dysfunction. Findings such as an increase in caries activity, mucosal alterations, infection or salivary gland enlargement may indicate salivary dysfunction. Evaluation should be conducted proactively at each patient visit. Early recognition will minimize damage and dysfunction and allow appropriate management to begin. Although the salivary dysfunction may be irreversible, preventive measures and conservative treatments can avoid or limit mucosal breakdown, infections and permanent damage to teeth. Adequate symptomatic relief is possible with local palliative and systemic measures in many patients. Appropriate management of symptoms and increasing saliva output may help patients feel more comfortable and improve their quality of life.

  18. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  19. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Computational structural biology: methods and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwede, Torsten; Peitsch, Manuel Claude

    2008-01-01

    ... sequencing reinforced the observation that structural information is needed to understand the detailed function and mechanism of biological molecules such as enzyme reactions and molecular recognition events. Furthermore, structures are obviously key to the design of molecules with new or improved functions. In this context, computational structural biology...

  1. Impaired perception of facial motion in autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin O'Brien

    Full Text Available Facial motion is a special type of biological motion that transmits cues for socio-emotional communication and enables the discrimination of properties such as gender and identity. We used animated average faces to examine the ability of adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD to perceive facial motion. Participants completed increasingly difficult tasks involving the discrimination of (1 sequences of facial motion, (2 the identity of individuals based on their facial motion and (3 the gender of individuals. Stimuli were presented in both upright and upside-down orientations to test for the difference in inversion effects often found when comparing ASD with controls in face perception. The ASD group's performance was impaired relative to the control group in all three tasks and unlike the control group, the individuals with ASD failed to show an inversion effect. These results point to a deficit in facial biological motion processing in people with autism, which we suggest is linked to deficits in lower level motion processing we have previously reported.

  2. The method of micro-motion cycle feature extraction based on confidence coefficient evaluation criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuanzi; Ren, Hongmei; Bo, Li; Jing, Huang

    2017-11-01

    In radar target recognition, the micro motion characteristics of target is one of the characteristics that researchers pay attention to at home and abroad, in which the characteristics of target precession cycle is one of the important characteristics of target movement characteristics. Periodic feature extraction methods have been studied for years, the complex shape of the target and the scattering center stack lead to random fluctuations of the RCS. These random fluctuations also exist certain periodicity, which has a great influence on the target recognition result. In order to solve the problem, this paper proposes a extraction method of micro-motion cycle feature based on confidence coefficient evaluation criteria.

  3. A statistical approach to identify candidate cues for nestmate recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle Stijn van Zweden

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of social insects to discriminate nestmates from non-nestmates is mainly achieved through chemical communication. To ultimately understand this recognition and its decision rules, identification of the recognition cues is essential. Although recognition cues are most likely cuticular hydrocarbons, identifying the exact cues for specific species has remained a daunting task, partly due to the sheer number of odor compounds. Perhaps unsurprisingly, one of the few species where the recognition cues have been identified, Formica exsecta, has only around ten major hydrocarbons on its cuticle. In this study we use previous results of this species to search for nestmate recognition cues in two other species of ants, Camponotus aethiops and Monomorium pharaonis. Employing chemical distances and observed aggression between colonies, we first ask which type of data normalization, centroid, and distance calculation is most diagnostic to discriminate between nestmate recognition cues and other compounds. We find that using a global centroid instead of a colony centroid significantly improves the analysis. One reason may be that this new approach, unlike previous ones, provides a biologically meaningful way to quantify the chemical distances between nestmates, allowing for within-colony variation in recognition cues. Next, we ask which subset of hydrocarbons most likely represents the cues that the ants use for nestmate recognition, which shows less clear results for C. aethiops and M. pharaonis than for F. exsecta, possibly due to less than ideal datasets. Nonetheless, some compound sets performed better than others, showing that this approach can be used to identify candidate compounds to be tested in bio-assays, and eventually crack the sophisticated code that governs nestmate recognition.

  4. Noisy Ocular Recognition Based on Three Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Beom Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the iris recognition system has been gaining increasing acceptance for applications such as access control and smartphone security. When the images of the iris are obtained under unconstrained conditions, an issue of undermined quality is caused by optical and motion blur, off-angle view (the user’s eyes looking somewhere else, not into the front of the camera, specular reflection (SR and other factors. Such noisy iris images increase intra-individual variations and, as a result, reduce the accuracy of iris recognition. A typical iris recognition system requires a near-infrared (NIR illuminator along with an NIR camera, which are larger and more expensive than fingerprint recognition equipment. Hence, many studies have proposed methods of using iris images captured by a visible light camera without the need for an additional illuminator. In this research, we propose a new recognition method for noisy iris and ocular images by using one iris and two periocular regions, based on three convolutional neural networks (CNNs. Experiments were conducted by using the noisy iris challenge evaluation-part II (NICE.II training dataset (selected from the university of Beira iris (UBIRIS.v2 database, mobile iris challenge evaluation (MICHE database, and institute of automation of Chinese academy of sciences (CASIA-Iris-Distance database. As a result, the method proposed by this study outperformed previous methods.

  5. Markov Models for Handwriting Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Plotz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Since their first inception, automatic reading systems have evolved substantially, yet the recognition of handwriting remains an open research problem due to its substantial variation in appearance. With the introduction of Markovian models to the field, a promising modeling and recognition paradigm was established for automatic handwriting recognition. However, no standard procedures for building Markov model-based recognizers have yet been established. This text provides a comprehensive overview of the application of Markov models in the field of handwriting recognition, covering both hidden

  6. Speech Recognition on Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Zheng-Hua; Lindberg, Børge

    2010-01-01

    The enthusiasm of deploying automatic speech recognition (ASR) on mobile devices is driven both by remarkable advances in ASR technology and by the demand for efficient user interfaces on such devices as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). This chapter presents an overview of ASR...... in the mobile context covering motivations, challenges, fundamental techniques and applications. Three ASR architectures are introduced: embedded speech recognition, distributed speech recognition and network speech recognition. Their pros and cons and implementation issues are discussed. Applications within...... command and control, text entry and search are presented with an emphasis on mobile text entry....

  7. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Asyraf Zulkifley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1 the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2 frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3 the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4 various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Odor Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anholt, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... We characterized the transduction pathway for the recognition of pheromones in the vomeronasal organ and also characterized subpopulations of olfactory neurons expressing different axonal G proteins...

  9. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriani, Nor Surayahani; Hussain, Aini; Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf

    2013-01-01

    Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1) the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2) frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3) the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4) various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition. PMID:23921828

  10. Shape Descriptors for Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Ayres, Virginia; Udpa, Lalita

    2003-03-01

    Direct investigation of, and interaction with, biological objects at the macromolecular level will provide insight into multiple physical regulatory processes. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have the potential to provide a direct interaction with living specimens at the macromolecular scale. A key enabling capability is to replace the current x-y raster scan with site-specific direct investigation. In the present research we will discuss the site-specific recognition techniques that are appropriate for tubular and globular biological features. The SPM image will be input to an image segmentation and boundary detection algorithm to extract closed boundaries of features in the image. The boundary information will be parameterized using Fourier descriptors, which are rotation invariant descriptors to be used for recognizing the segmented shape.

  11. Teaching systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, R; Vilaprinyo, E; Sorribas, A

    2011-03-01

    Advances in systems biology are increasingly dependent upon the integration of various types of data and different methodologies to reconstruct how cells work at the systemic level. Thus, teams with a varied array of expertise and people with interdisciplinary training are needed. So far this training was thought to be more productive if aimed at the Masters or PhD level. At this level, multiple specialised and in-depth courses on the different subject matters of systems biology are taught to already well-prepared students. This approach is mostly based on the recognition that systems biology requires a wide background that is hard to find in undergraduate students. Nevertheless, and given the importance of the field, the authors argue that exposition of undergraduate students to the methods and paradigms of systems biology would be advantageous. Here they present and discuss a successful experiment in teaching systems biology to third year undergraduate biotechnology students at the University of Lleida in Spain. The authors' experience, together with that from others, argues for the adequateness of teaching systems biology at the undergraduate level. [Includes supplementary material].

  12. Human activity recognition based on feature selection in smart home using back-propagation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongqing; He, Lei; Si, Hao; Liu, Peng; Xie, Xiaolei

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, Back-propagation(BP) algorithm has been used to train the feed forward neural network for human activity recognition in smart home environments, and inter-class distance method for feature selection of observed motion sensor events is discussed and tested. And then, the human activity recognition performances of neural network using BP algorithm have been evaluated and compared with other probabilistic algorithms: Naïve Bayes(NB) classifier and Hidden Markov Model(HMM). The results show that different feature datasets yield different activity recognition accuracy. The selection of unsuitable feature datasets increases the computational complexity and degrades the activity recognition accuracy. Furthermore, neural network using BP algorithm has relatively better human activity recognition performances than NB classifier and HMM. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fusion of Range and Intensity Information for View Invariant Gesture Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Fihl, Preben

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a system for view invariant gesture recognition. The approach is based on 3D data from a CSEM SwissRanger SR-2 camera. This camera produces both a depth map as well as an intensity image of a scene. Since the two information types are aligned, we can use the intensity image...... to define a region of interest for the relevant 3D data. This data fusion improves the quality of the range data and hence results in better recognition. The gesture recognition is based on finding motion primitives in the 3D data. The primitives are represented compactly and view invariant using harmonic...... shape context. A probabilistic Edit Distance classifier is applied to identify which gesture best describes a string of primitives. The approach is trained on data from one viewpoint and tested on data from a different viewpoint. The recognition rate is 92.9% which is similar to the recognition rate...

  14. Ground motion effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blume, J.A.

    1969-01-01

    Ground motion caused by natural earthquakes or by nuclear explosion causes buildings and other structures to respond in such manner as possibly to have high unit stresses and to be subject to damage or-in some cases-collapse. Even minor damage may constitute a hazard to persons within or adjacent to buildings. The risk of damage may well be the governing restraint on the uses of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Theory is advanced regarding structural-dynamic response but real buildings and structures are complex, highly variable, and often difficult to model realistically. This paper discusses the state of knowledge, the art of damage prediction and safety precautions, and shows ground motion effects from explosions of underground nuclear devices in the continental United States including events Salmon, Gasbuggy, Boxcar, Faultless and Benham. (author)

  15. Motion of the esophagus due to cardiac motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Palmer

    Full Text Available When imaging studies (e.g. CT are used to quantify morphological changes in an anatomical structure, it is necessary to understand the extent and source of motion which can give imaging artifacts (e.g. blurring or local distortion. The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of esophageal motion due to cardiac motion. We used retrospective electrocardiogram-gated contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography images for this study. The anatomic region from the carina to the bottom of the heart was taken at deep-inspiration breath hold with the patients' arms raised above their shoulders, in a position similar to that used for radiation therapy. The esophagus was delineated on the diastolic phase of cardiac motion, and deformable registration was used to sequentially deform the images in nearest-neighbor phases among the 10 cardiac phases, starting from the diastolic phase. Using the 10 deformation fields generated from the deformable registration, the magnitude of the extreme displacements was then calculated for each voxel, and the mean and maximum displacement was calculated for each computed tomography slice for each patient. The average maximum esophageal displacement due to cardiac motion for all patients was 5.8 mm (standard deviation: 1.6 mm, maximum: 10.0 mm in the transverse direction. For 21 of 26 patients, the largest esophageal motion was found in the inferior region of the heart; for the other patients, esophageal motion was approximately independent of superior-inferior position. The esophagus motion was larger at cardiac phases where the electrocardiogram R-wave occurs. In conclusion, the magnitude of esophageal motion near the heart due to cardiac motion is similar to that due to other sources of motion, including respiratory motion and intra-fraction motion. A larger cardiac motion will result into larger esophagus motion in a cardiac cycle.

  16. Object recognition with hierarchical discriminant saliency networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunhyoung eHan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of integrating attention and object recognition are investigated. While attention is frequently modeled as pre-processor for recognition, we investigate the hypothesis that attention is an intrinsic component of recognition and vice-versa. This hypothesis is tested with a recognitionmodel, the hierarchical discriminant saliency network (HDSN, whose layers are top-down saliency detectors, tuned for a visual class according to the principles of discriminant saliency. The HDSN has two possible implementations. In a biologically plausible implementation, all layers comply with the standard neurophysiological model of visual cortex, with sub-layers of simple and complex units that implement a combination of filtering, divisive normalization, pooling, and non-linearities. In a neuralnetwork implementation, all layers are convolutional and implement acombination of filtering, rectification, and pooling. The rectificationis performed with a parametric extension of the now popular rectified linearunits (ReLUs, whose parameters can be tuned for the detection of targetobject classes. This enables a number of functional enhancementsover neural network models that lack a connection to saliency, including optimal feature denoising mechanisms for recognition, modulation ofsaliency responses by the discriminant power of the underlying features,and the ability to detect both feature presence and absence.In either implementation, each layer has a precise statistical interpretation, and all parameters are tuned by statistical learning. Each saliency detection layer learns more discriminant saliency templates than its predecessors and higher layers have larger pooling fields. This enables the HDSN to simultaneously achieve high selectivity totarget object classes and invariance. The resulting performance demonstrates benefits for all the functional enhancements of the HDSN.

  17. Applications of chaotic neurodynamics in pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Bill; Freeman, Walter J.; Eeckman, Frank H.; Yao, Yong

    1991-08-01

    Network algorithms and architectures for pattern recognition derived from neural models of the olfactory system are reviewed. These span a range from highly abstract to physiologically detailed, and employ the kind of dynamical complexity observed in olfactory cortex, ranging from oscillation to chaos. A simple architecture and algorithm for analytically guaranteed associative memory storage of analog patterns, continuous sequences, and chaotic attractors in the same network is described. A matrix inversion determines network weights, given prototype patterns to be stored. There are N units of capacity in an N node network with 3N2 weights. It costs one unit per static attractor, two per Fourier component of each sequence, and three to four per chaotic attractor. There are no spurious attractors, and for sequences there is a Liapunov function in a special coordinate system which governs the approach of transient states to stored trajectories. Unsupervised or supervised incremental learning algorithms for pattern classification, such as competitive learning or bootstrap Widrow-Hoff can easily be implemented. The architecture can be ''folded'' into a recurrent network with higher order weights that can be used as a model of cortex that stores oscillatory and chaotic attractors by a Hebb rule. Network performance is demonstrated by application to the problem of real-time handwritten digit recognition. An effective system with on-line learning has been written by Eeckman and Baird for the Macintosh. It utilizes static, oscillatory, and/or chaotic attractors of two kinds--Lorenze attractors, or attractors resulting from chaotically interacting oscillatory modes. The successful application to an industrial pattern recognition problem of a network architecture of considerable physiological and dynamical complexity, developed by Freeman and Yao, is described. The data sets of the problem come in three classes of difficulty, and performance of the biological network is

  18. Force and motion

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Intimidated by inertia? Frightened by forces? Mystified by Newton s law of motion? You re not alone and help is at hand. The stop Faking It! Series is perfect for science teachers, home-schoolers, parents wanting to help with homework all of you who need a jargon-free way to learn the background for teaching middle school physical science with confidence. With Bill Roberton as your friendly, able but somewhat irreverent guide, you will discover you CAN come to grips with the basics of force and motion. Combining easy-to-understand explanations with activities using commonly found equipment, this book will lead you through Newton s laws to the physics of space travel. The book is as entertaining as it is informative. Best of all, the author understands the needs of adults who want concrete examples, hands-on activities, clear language, diagrams and yes, a certain amount of empathy. Ideas For Use Newton's laws, and all of the other motion principles presented in this book, do a good job of helping us to underst...

  19. Motion characterization scheme to minimize motion artifacts in intravital microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungon; Courties, Gabriel; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Vinegoni, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory- and cardiac-induced motion artifacts pose a major challenge for in vivo optical imaging, limiting the temporal and spatial imaging resolution in fluorescence laser scanning microscopy. Here, we present an imaging platform developed for in vivo characterization of physiologically induced axial motion. The motion characterization system can be straightforwardly implemented on any conventional laser scanning microscope and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of different motion stabilization schemes. This method is particularly useful to improve the design of novel tissue stabilizers and to facilitate stabilizer positioning in real time, therefore facilitating optimal tissue immobilization and minimizing motion induced artifacts.

  20. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  1. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  2. Iris Recognition Using Wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliq Masood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biometric systems are getting more attention in the present era. Iris recognition is one of the most secure and authentic among the other biometrics and this field demands more authentic, reliable and fast algorithms to implement these biometric systems in real time. In this paper, an efficient localization technique is presented to identify pupil and iris boundaries using histogram of the iris image. Two small portions of iris have been used for polar transformation to reduce computational time and to increase the efficiency of the system. Wavelet transform is used for feature vector generation. Rotation of iris is compensated without shifts in the iris code. System is tested on Multimedia University Iris Database and results show that proposed system has encouraging performance.

  3. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Physics of Marine Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Discusses ways in which marine biology can be integrated into the physics classroom. Topics suggested for incorporation include the harmonic motion of ocean waves, ocean currents, the interaction of visible light with ocean water, pressure, light absorption, and sound transfer in water. (MDH)

  5. Rolling motion in moving droplets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Drops moving on a substrate under the action of gravity display both rolling and sliding motions. The two limits of a thin sheet-like drop in sliding motion on a surface, and a spherical drop in roll, have been extensively studied. We are interested in intermediate shapes. We quantify the contribution of rolling motion ...

  6. Statistics of bicycle rider motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, J.K.; Hubbard, M.; Schwab, A.L.; Kooijman, J.D.G.; Peterson, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of bicycle and rider kinematic motions from a series of experimental treadmill tests is presented. The full kinematics of bicycles and riders were measured with an active motion capture system. Motion across speeds are compared graphically with box and whiskers plots. Trends and ranges

  7. Barrier island facies models and recognition criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhern, J.; Johnson, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Barrier island outcrops record transgressive shoreline motion at geologic timescales, providing integral clues to understanding how coastlines respond to rising sea levels. However, barrier island deposits are difficult to recognize. While significant progress has been made in understanding the modern coastal morphodynamics, this insight is not fully leveraged in existing barrier island facies models. Excellent outcrop exposures of the paralic Upper Cretaceous Straight Cliffs Formation of southern Utah provide an opportunity to revise facies models and recognition criteria for barrier island deposits. Preserved barrier islands are composed of three main architectural elements (shorefaces, tidal inlets, and tidal channels) which occur independently or in combination to create larger-scale barrier island deposits. Barrier island shorefaces record progradation, while barrier island tidal inlets record lateral migration, and barrier island tidal channels record aggradation within the tidal inlet. Four facies associations are used to describe and characterize these barrier island architectural elements. Barrier islands occur in association with backarrier fill and internally contain lower and upper shoreface, high-energy upper shoreface, and tidal channel facies. Barrier islands bound lagoons or estuaries, and are distinguished from other shoreface deposits by their internal facies and geometry, association with backbarrier facies, and position within transgressive successions. Tidal processes, in particular tidal inlet migration and reworking of the upper shoreface, also distinguish barrier island deposits. Existing barrier island models highlight the short term heterogeneous and dynamic nature of barrier island systems, yet overlook processes tied to geologic time scales, such as multi-directional motion, erosion, and reworking, and their expressions in preserved barrier island strata. This study uses characteristic outcrop expressions of barrier island successions to

  8. Superdiffusive-like motion of colloidal nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Daniel; Méndez, Vicenç

    2009-04-07

    In recent experiments, the temporal average C(t) of the mean square displacement for nanorods moving through a chemical monolayer was explored. The results showed a scaling C(t) approximately t(1.6), which suggest the existence of superdiffusive motion for these particles. In this paper, we interpret these results by means of a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model from which we can reproduce the exponent 1.6 and the curve C(t) versus time found in the experiments. We show that the behavior observed arises as a consequence of the superposition of different transport mechanisms: directional propulsion plus translational and rotational diffusion. Our model reveals that this superdiffusive-like scaling may also be found in other systems as in chemotactic biological motion, provided that the characteristic times for translational and rotational diffusions are very different.

  9. The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meulder, Maartje

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an analytical overview of the different types of explicit legal recognition of sign languages. Five categories are distinguished: constitutional recognition, recognition by means of general language legislation, recognition by means of a sign language law or act, recognition by means of a sign language law or act including…

  10. Methods of Teaching Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Martha H.; Bailey, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces the history and development of speech recognition, addresses its role in the business curriculum, outlines related national and state standards, describes instructional strategies, and discusses the assessment of student achievement in speech recognition classes. Methods: Research methods included a synthesis of…

  11. Iris Recognition - Beyond One Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matey, James R.; Kennell, Lauren R.

    Iris recognition Iris recognition is, arguably, the most robust form of biometric Biometrics identification. It has been deployed in large-scale systems that have been very effective. The systems deployed to date make use of iris Remote Biometric cameras that require significant user cooperation; that in turn imposes significant constraints on the deployment scenarios that are practical.

  12. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; van den Biggelaar, Olivier

    As a widely used biometrics, face recognition has many advantages such as being non-intrusive, natural and passive. On the other hand, in real-life scenarios with uncontrolled environment, pose variation up to side-view positions makes face recognition a challenging work. In this paper we discuss

  13. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Beside a few papers which focus on the forensic aspects of automatic face recognition, there is not much published about it in contrast to the literature on developing new techniques and methodologies for biometric face recognition. In this report, we review forensic facial identification which is

  14. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Side-view face recognition is a challenging problem with many applications. Especially in real-life scenarios where the environment is uncontrolled, coping with pose variations up to side-view positions is an important task for face recognition. In this paper we discuss the use of side view face

  15. Computer image processing and recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the concepts and techniques of computer image processing and recognition is presented. Consideration is given to such topics as image formation and perception; computer representation of images; image enhancement and restoration; reconstruction from projections; digital television, encoding, and data compression; scene understanding; scene matching and recognition; and processing techniques for linear systems.

  16. Systems Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Systems biology seeks to study biological systems as a whole, contrary to the reductionist approach that has dominated biology. Such a view of biological systems emanating from strong foundations of molecular level understanding of the individual components in terms of their form, function and interactions is promising to ...

  17. Bio-recognitive photonics of a DNA-guided organic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Seung Hyuk; Park, Jin Hyuk; Cui, Chunzhi; Ahn, Dong June

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of duplex DNA with higher molecular weights has attracted attention for a new opportunity towards a better organic light-emitting diode (OLED) capability. However, biological recognition by OLED materials is yet to be addressed. In this study, specific oligomeric DNA-DNA recognition is successfully achieved by tri (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), an organic semiconductor. Alq3 rods crystallized with guidance from single-strand DNA molecules show, strikingly, a unique distribution of the DNA molecules with a shape of an `inverted' hourglass. The crystal's luminescent intensity is enhanced by 1.6-fold upon recognition of the perfect-matched target DNA sequence, but not in the case of a single-base mismatched one. The DNA-DNA recognition forming double-helix structure is identified to occur only in the rod's outer periphery. This study opens up new opportunities of Alq3, one of the most widely used OLED materials, enabling biological recognition.

  18. Restoration of non-uniform exposure motion blurred image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuanhong; Xu, Tingfa; Wang, Ningming; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Restoring motion-blurred image is the key technologies in the opto-electronic detection system. The imaging sensors such as CCD and infrared imaging sensor, which are mounted on the motion platforms, quickly move together with the platforms of high speed. As a result, the images become blur. The image degradation will cause great trouble for the succeeding jobs such as objects detection, target recognition and tracking. So the motion-blurred images must be restoration before detecting motion targets in the subsequent images. On the demand of the real weapon task, in order to deal with targets in the complex background, this dissertation uses the new theories in the field of image processing and computer vision to research the new technology of motion deblurring and motion detection. The principle content is as follows: 1) When the prior knowledge about degradation function is unknown, the uniform motion blurred images are restored. At first, the blur parameters, including the motion blur extent and direction of PSF(point spread function), are estimated individually in domain of logarithmic frequency. The direction of PSF is calculated by extracting the central light line of the spectrum, and the extent is computed by minimizing the correction between the fourier spectrum of the blurred image and a detecting function. Moreover, in order to remove the strip in the deblurred image, windows technique is employed in the algorithm, which makes the deblurred image clear. 2) According to the principle of infrared image non-uniform exposure, a new restoration model for infrared blurred images is developed. The fitting of infrared image non-uniform exposure curve is performed by experiment data. The blurred images are restored by the fitting curve.

  19. Recognition memory impairments caused by false recognition of novel objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Lok-Kin; Ryan, Jennifer D; Cowell, Rosemary A; Barense, Morgan D

    2013-11-01

    A fundamental assumption underlying most current theories of amnesia is that memory impairments arise because previously studied information either is lost rapidly or is made inaccessible (i.e., the old information appears to be new). Recent studies in rodents have challenged this view, suggesting instead that under conditions of high interference, recognition memory impairments following medial temporal lobe damage arise because novel information appears as though it has been previously seen. Here, we developed a new object recognition memory paradigm that distinguished whether object recognition memory impairments were driven by previously viewed objects being treated as if they were novel or by novel objects falsely recognized as though they were previously seen. In this indirect, eyetracking-based passive viewing task, older adults at risk for mild cognitive impairment showed false recognition to high-interference novel items (with a significant degree of feature overlap with previously studied items) but normal novelty responses to low-interference novel items (with a lower degree of feature overlap). The indirect nature of the task minimized the effects of response bias and other memory-based decision processes, suggesting that these factors cannot solely account for false recognition. These findings support the counterintuitive notion that recognition memory impairments in this memory-impaired population are not characterized by forgetting but rather are driven by the failure to differentiate perceptually similar objects, leading to the false recognition of novel objects as having been seen before. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Spatiotemporal information during unsupervised learning enhances viewpoint invariant object recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Moqian; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing objects is difficult because it requires both linking views of an object that can be different and distinguishing objects with similar appearance. Interestingly, people can learn to recognize objects across views in an unsupervised way, without feedback, just from the natural viewing statistics. However, there is intense debate regarding what information during unsupervised learning is used to link among object views. Specifically, researchers argue whether temporal proximity, motion, or spatiotemporal continuity among object views during unsupervised learning is beneficial. Here, we untangled the role of each of these factors in unsupervised learning of novel three-dimensional (3-D) objects. We found that after unsupervised training with 24 object views spanning a 180° view space, participants showed significant improvement in their ability to recognize 3-D objects across rotation. Surprisingly, there was no advantage to unsupervised learning with spatiotemporal continuity or motion information than training with temporal proximity. However, we discovered that when participants were trained with just a third of the views spanning the same view space, unsupervised learning via spatiotemporal continuity yielded significantly better recognition performance on novel views than learning via temporal proximity. These results suggest that while it is possible to obtain view-invariant recognition just from observing many views of an object presented in temporal proximity, spatiotemporal information enhances performance by producing representations with broader view tuning than learning via temporal association. Our findings have important implications for theories of object recognition and for the development of computational algorithms that learn from examples. PMID:26024454

  1. Micro Expression Recognition Using the Eulerian Video Magnification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Zarezadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a new approach for facial micro expressions recognition. For this purpose the Eulerian Video Magnification (EVM method is used to retrieve the subtle motions of the face. The results of this method are obtained as in the magnified images sequence. In this study the numerical tests are performed on two databases: Spontaneous Micro expression (SMIC and Category and Sourcing Managers Executive (CASME. We evaluate our proposed method in two phases using the eigenface method. In phase 1 we recognize the type of a micro expression, for example emotional versus unemotional in SMIC database. Phase 2 classifies the recognized micro expression as negative versus positive in SMIC database and happiness versus disgust in CASME database. The results show that the eigenface method by the EVM method for the retrieval of subtle motions of the face increases the performance of micro expression recognition. Moreover, the proposed approach is more accurate and promising than the previous works in micro expressions recognition.

  2. Stochastic resonance in pattern recognition by a holographic neuron model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, R; Buchli, J; Keller, G; Steeb, W-H

    2003-06-01

    The recognition rate of holographic neural synapses, performing a pattern recognition task, is significantly higher when applied to natural, rather than artificial, images. This shortcoming of artificial images can be largely compensated for, if noise is added to the input pattern. The effect is the result of a trade-off between optimal representation of the stimulus (for which noise is favorable) and keeping as much as possible of the stimulus-specific information (for which noise is detrimental). The observed mechanism may play a prominent role for simple biological sensors.

  3. Detection and recognition of analytes based on their crystallization patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Victor [Manassas, VA; Bailey, Charles L [Cross Junction, VA; Vsevolodov, Nikolai N [Kensington, MD; Elliott, Adam [Manassas, VA

    2008-05-06

    The invention contemplates a method for recognition of proteins and other biological molecules by imaging morphology, size and distribution of crystalline and amorphous dry residues in droplets (further referred to as "crystallization pattern") containing predetermined amount of certain crystal-forming organic compounds (reporters) to which protein to be analyzed is added. It has been shown that changes in the crystallization patterns of a number of amino-acids can be used as a "signature" of a protein added. It was also found that both the character of changer in the crystallization patter and the fact of such changes can be used as recognition elements in analysis of protein molecules.

  4. Automated Three-Dimensional Microbial Sensing and Recognition Using Digital Holography and Statistical Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inkyu Moon

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We overview an approach to providing automated three-dimensional (3D sensing and recognition of biological micro/nanoorganisms integrating Gabor digital holographic microscopy and statistical sampling methods. For 3D data acquisition of biological specimens, a coherent beam propagates through the specimen and its transversely and longitudinally magnified diffraction pattern observed by the microscope objective is optically recorded with an image sensor array interfaced with a computer. 3D visualization of the biological specimen from the magnified diffraction pattern is accomplished by using the computational Fresnel propagation algorithm. For 3D recognition of the biological specimen, a watershed image segmentation algorithm is applied to automatically remove the unnecessary background parts in the reconstructed holographic image. Statistical estimation and inference algorithms are developed to the automatically segmented holographic image. Overviews of preliminary experimental results illustrate how the holographic image reconstructed from the Gabor digital hologram of biological specimen contains important information for microbial recognition.

  5. Human motion simulation predictive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Malek, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Simulate realistic human motion in a virtual world with an optimization-based approach to motion prediction. With this approach, motion is governed by human performance measures, such as speed and energy, which act as objective functions to be optimized. Constraints on joint torques and angles are imposed quite easily. Predicting motion in this way allows one to use avatars to study how and why humans move the way they do, given specific scenarios. It also enables avatars to react to infinitely many scenarios with substantial autonomy. With this approach it is possible to predict dynamic motion without having to integrate equations of motion -- rather than solving equations of motion, this approach solves for a continuous time-dependent curve characterizing joint variables (also called joint profiles) for every degree of freedom. Introduces rigorous mathematical methods for digital human modelling and simulation Focuses on understanding and representing spatial relationships (3D) of biomechanics Develops an i...

  6. 3D Interest Point Detection using Local Surface Characteristics with Application in Action Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Michael Boelstoft

    2014-01-01

    . The proposed Difference-of-Normals (DoN) 3D IP detector operates on the surface mesh, and evaluates the surface structure (curvature) locally (per vertex) in the mesh data. We present an exam- ple of application in action recognition from a sequence of 3-dimensional geometrical data, where local 3D motion de...

  7. Pattern recognition in cyclic and discrete skills performance from inertial measurement units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Ludovic; L'Hermette, Maxime; Komar, John; Orth, Dominic; Mell, Florian; Merriaux, Pierre; Grenet, Pierre; Caritu, Yanis; Hérault, Romain; Dovgalecs, Vladislavs; Davids, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare and validate an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) relative to an optic system, and to propose methods for pattern recognition to capture behavioural dynamics during sport performance. IMU validation was conducted by comparing the motions of the two arms of a

  8. A Neural Model of Face Recognition: a Comprehensive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stara, Vera; Montesanto, Anna; Puliti, Paolo; Tascini, Guido; Sechi, Cristina

    Visual recognition of faces is an essential behavior of humans: we have optimal performance in everyday life and just such a performance makes us able to establish the continuity of actors in our social life and to quickly identify and categorize people. This remarkable ability justifies the general interest in face recognition of researchers belonging to different fields and specially of designers of biometrical identification systems able to recognize the features of person's faces in a background. Due to interdisciplinary nature of this topic in this contribute we deal with face recognition through a comprehensive approach with the purpose to reproduce some features of human performance, as evidenced by studies in psychophysics and neuroscience, relevant to face recognition. This approach views face recognition as an emergent phenomenon resulting from the nonlinear interaction of a number of different features. For this reason our model of face recognition has been based on a computational system implemented through an artificial neural network. This synergy between neuroscience and engineering efforts allowed us to implement a model that had a biological plausibility, performed the same tasks as human subjects, and gave a possible account of human face perception and recognition. In this regard the paper reports on an experimental study of performance of a SOM-based neural network in a face recognition task, with reference both to the ability to learn to discriminate different faces, and to the ability to recognize a face already encountered in training phase, when presented in a pose or with an expression differing from the one present in the training context.

  9. WORKSHOP: Stable particle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro G.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Particle beam stability is crucial to any accelerator or collider, particularly big ones, such as Brookhaven's RHIC heavy ion collider and the larger SSC and LHC proton collider schemes. A workshop on the Stability of Particle Motion in Storage Rings held at Brookhaven in October dealt with the important issue of determining the short- and long-term stability of single particle motion in hadron storage rings and colliders, and explored new methods for ensuring it. In the quest for realistic environments, the imperfections of superconducting magnets and the effects of field modulation and noise were taken into account. The workshop was divided into three study groups: Short-Term Stability in storage rings, including chromatic and geometric effects and correction strategies; Long-Term Stability, including modulation and random noise effects and slow varying effects; and Methods for determining the stability of particle motion. The first two were run in parallel, but the third was attended by everyone. Each group considered analytical, computational and experimental methods, reviewing work done so far, comparing results and approaches and underlining outstanding issues. By resolving conflicts, it was possible to identify problems of common interest. The workshop reaffirmed the validity of methods proposed several years ago. Major breakthroughs have been in the rapid improvement of computer capacity and speed, in the development of more sophisticated mathematical packages, and in the introduction of more powerful analytic approaches. In a typical storage ring, a particle may be required to circulate for about a billion revolutions. While ten years ago it was only possible to predict accurately stability over about a thousand revolutions, it is now possible to predict over as many as one million turns. If this trend continues, in ten years it could become feasible to predict particle stability over the entire storage period. About ninety participants

  10. Combining supramolecular chemistry with biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenheuer, Dana A; Petkau, Katja; Brunsveld, Luc

    2010-08-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has primarily found its inspiration in biological molecules, such as proteins and lipids, and their interactions. Currently the supramolecular assembly of designed compounds can be controlled to great extent. This provides the opportunity to combine these synthetic supramolecular elements with biomolecules for the study of biological phenomena. This tutorial review focuses on the possibilities of the marriage of synthetic supramolecular architectures and biological systems. It highlights that synthetic supramolecular elements are for example ideal platforms for the recognition and modulation of proteins and cells. The unique features of synthetic supramolecular systems with control over size, shape, valency, and interaction strength allow the generation of structures fitting the demands to approach the biological problems at hand. Supramolecular chemistry has come full circle, studying the biology and its molecules which initially inspired its conception.

  11. Method through motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    context, I have been conducting a practice-led research project. Central to the project is construction of a design model describing sets of procedures, concepts and terminology relevant for design and studies of motion graphics in spatial contexts. The focus of this paper is the role of model...... construction as a support to working systematically practice-led research project. The design model is being developed through design laboratories and workshops with students and professionals who provide feedback that lead to incremental improvements. Working with this model construction-as-method reveals...

  12. Electromechanical motion devices

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Paul C; Pekarek, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    This text provides a basic treatment of modern electric machine analysis that gives readers the necessary background for comprehending the traditional applications and operating characteristics of electric machines-as well as their emerging applications in modern power systems and electric drives, such as those used in hybrid and electric vehicles. Through the appropriate use of reference frame theory, Electromagnetic Motion Devices, Second Edition introduces readers to field-oriented control of induction machines, constant-torque, and constant-power control of dc, permanent-magnet ac

  13. Speech Recognition: How Do We Teach It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barksdale, Karl

    2002-01-01

    States that growing use of speech recognition software has made voice writing an essential computer skill. Describes how to present the topic, develop basic speech recognition skills, and teach speech recognition outlining, writing, proofreading, and editing. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  14. Interactions between motion and form processing in the human visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George eMather

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The predominant view of motion and form processing in the human visual system assumes that these two attributes are handled by separate and independent modules. Motion processing involves filtering by direction-selective sensors, followed by integration to solve the aperture problem. Form processing involves filtering by orientation-selective and size-selective receptive fields, followed by integration to encode object shape. It has long been known that motion signals can influence form processing in the well-known Gestalt principle of common fate; texture elements which share a common motion property are grouped into a single contour or texture region. However recent research in psychophysics and neuroscience indicates that the influence of form signals on motion processing is more extensive than previously thought. First, the salience and apparent direction of moving lines depends on how the local orientation and direction of motion combine to match the receptive field properties of motion-selective neurons. Second, orientation signals generated by ‘motion-streaks’ influence motion processing; motion sensitivity, apparent direction and adaptation are affected by simultaneously present orientation signals. Third, form signals generated by human body shape influence biological motion processing, as revealed by studies using point-light motion stimuli. Thus form-motion integration seems to occur at several different levels of cortical processing, from V1 to STS.

  15. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  16. The constitutionality of a biological father's recognition as a parent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    31 In terms of S 9(3) of the Constitution: "The state may not unfairly discriminate directly or indirectly against anyone on one or more grounds, including ... gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin … and birth". 32 As required by S 21(1)(a) of the Children's Act. 33 As required by S 20 of the Children's Act.

  17. An investigation into biological recognition coatings for piezoelectric sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Sharron

    2002-07-01

    The concept of harvesting chemicals from nature and employing them with piezoelectric crystals for biosensor development is investigated. Literature is reviewed for information theory relating to molecular structure, biosensors, immobilisation techniques, piezoelectric transducers and biosensor applications of quartz crystals. Three types of molecules were investigated for their biosensing potential, saccharides (pectic acid and alginic acid), an enzyme (galactose oxidase) and an antibody (specific for Botrytis cinerea). Immobilisation procedures using {gamma}-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane, polyethyleneimine and glutaraldehyde cross-linking are developed for pectic acid, alginic acid, galactose oxidase and the Botrytis antibody. These materials are immobilised onto the gold electrode area of an AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance. Operating conditions, either dip and dry batch monitoring or dynamic real-time monitoring using a flow cell are outlined. Ageing of the piezoelectric crystal sensor through erosion of coatings or during physical cleaning of crystals, prior to recoating, is featured and is particularly important to future cost effective commercial piezoelectric crystal sensor systems. Scanning tunnel microscopy is selected and an example from literature is used to evidence possible mechanisms of primary coat bonding to the gold electrodes. The associated cleaning problems and explanation of memory effects are then postulated. Calibrating data with sensitivities and limits of detection are presented for Cu{sup 2+} (pectic acid coating, Cu{sup 2+} range of 0.002mM (0.128ppm) to 0.5mM (32ppm); galactose oxidase coating, Cu{sup 2+} range of 0.002mM (0.128ppm) to 0.5mM (32ppm)); and for Pb{sup 2+} (alginic acid coating, Pb{sup 2+} range of 0.002mM (0.414ppm) to 0.1mM (20.7ppm)). Interference effects of Pb, Co, Ni, Zn, Ca and Mg on Cu{sup 2+} detection and measurement are presented. Similarly interference effects of Cu, Co, Ni, Zn and Ca on Pb{sup 2+} detection and measurement are presented. Sauerbrey working of the data is presented, estimating the mass change at the crystal surfaces. The worked data from the dip and dry experiments indicate the mass of analyte bound to the crystal coatings. The data from the flow cell experiments are less conclusive as the saccharide coatings changed structure on contact with divalent ions and the resulting frequency shift relates not only the change in mass at the crystal surface but also the change in structure of the coatings. The results indicate the useful and problem areas of the coatings, when integrated with a quartz crystal to form an analyte specific qualitative and quantitative micromass chemical measurement system. (author)

  18. An investigation into biological recognition coatings for piezoelectric sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Sharron

    2002-01-01

    The concept of harvesting chemicals from nature and employing them with piezoelectric crystals for biosensor development is investigated. Literature is reviewed for information theory relating to molecular structure, biosensors, immobilisation techniques, piezoelectric transducers and biosensor applications of quartz crystals. Three types of molecules were investigated for their biosensing potential, saccharides (pectic acid and alginic acid), an enzyme (galactose oxidase) and an antibody (specific for Botrytis cinerea). Immobilisation procedures using γ-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane, polyethyleneimine and glutaraldehyde cross-linking are developed for pectic acid, alginic acid, galactose oxidase and the Botrytis antibody. These materials are immobilised onto the gold electrode area of an AT-cut quartz crystal microbalance. Operating conditions, either dip and dry batch monitoring or dynamic real-time monitoring using a flow cell are outlined. Ageing of the piezoelectric crystal sensor through erosion of coatings or during physical cleaning of crystals, prior to recoating, is featured and is particularly important to future cost effective commercial piezoelectric crystal sensor systems. Scanning tunnel microscopy is selected and an example from literature is used to evidence possible mechanisms of primary coat bonding to the gold electrodes. The associated cleaning problems and explanation of memory effects are then postulated. Calibrating data with sensitivities and limits of detection are presented for Cu 2+ (pectic acid coating, Cu 2+ range of 0.002mM (0.128ppm) to 0.5mM (32ppm); galactose oxidase coating, Cu 2+ range of 0.002mM (0.128ppm) to 0.5mM (32ppm)); and for Pb 2+ (alginic acid coating, Pb 2+ range of 0.002mM (0.414ppm) to 0.1mM (20.7ppm)). Interference effects of Pb, Co, Ni, Zn, Ca and Mg on Cu 2+ detection and measurement are presented. Similarly interference effects of Cu, Co, Ni, Zn and Ca on Pb 2+ detection and measurement are presented. Sauerbrey working of the data is presented, estimating the mass change at the crystal surfaces. The worked data from the dip and dry experiments indicate the mass of analyte bound to the crystal coatings. The data from the flow cell experiments are less conclusive as the saccharide coatings changed structure on contact with divalent ions and the resulting frequency shift relates not only the change in mass at the crystal surface but also the change in structure of the coatings. The results indicate the useful and problem areas of the coatings, when integrated with a quartz crystal to form an analyte specific qualitative and quantitative micromass chemical measurement system. (author)

  19. The constitutionality of a biological father's recognition as a parent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    5 For a comparative overview in this regard, see Louw Acquisition of Parental Responsibilities. 134–148. ... to international law, Sloth-Nielsen 2002 International Journal of Children's Rights 139 regards them as significant in so far as ...... advantage by trading off custody against maintenance payments, and it is sex-neutral: ...

  20. Biologically Inspired Target Recognition in Radar Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Qilian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the great mysteries of the brain is cognitive control. How can the interactions between millions of neurons result in behavior that is coordinated and appears willful and voluntary? There is consensus that it depends on the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Many PFC areas receive converging inputs from at least two sensory modalities. Inspired by human's innate ability to process and integrate information from disparate, network-based sources, we apply human-inspired information integration mechanisms to target detection in cognitive radar sensor network. Humans' information integration mechanisms have been modelled using maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE or soft-max approaches. In this paper, we apply these two algorithms to cognitive radar sensor networks target detection. Discrete-cosine-transform (DCT is used to process the integrated data from MLE or soft-max. We apply fuzzy logic system (FLS to automatic target detection based on the AC power values from DCT. Simulation results show that our MLE-DCT-FLS and soft-max-DCT-FLS approaches perform very well in the radar sensor network target detection, whereas the existing 2D construction algorithm does not work in this study.

  1. Autonomy, recognition and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Vitório Cenci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses Honneth’s concept of autonomy from two dimensions of his work, distinct, though inseparable. The first one is suggested through the subject’s positive practical self-relation linked to the patterns of reciprocal recognition of love, right and social esteem; the second is formulated as non-centered autonomy opposed to the present-day criticism of the modern autonomous subject encompassing three levels, namely: the capacity of linguistic articulation, the narrative coherence of life and the complementation of being guided by principles with some criteria of moral sensitivity to the context. We defend the position that, by metaphysically anchoring the concept of autonomy onto the intersubjective assumptions of his/her theory of the subject, and exploring it linked to the subject’s positive practical self-relation and to a non-centered meaning, Honneth has managed to renew it, which allows drawing important consequences of such effort to the field of education.

  2. Pattern recognition in spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebran, M.; Paletou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity ve sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones.

  3. Pattern recognition in spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebran, M; Paletou, F

    2017-01-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature T eff , surface gravity log g , metallicity [ Fe/H ], and equatorial projected rotational velocity v e sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones. (paper)

  4. Observing human-object interactions: using spatial and functional compatibility for recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhinav; Kembhavi, Aniruddha; Davis, Larry S

    2009-10-01

    Interpretation of images and videos containing humans interacting with different objects is a daunting task. It involves understanding scene/event, analyzing human movements, recognizing manipulable objects, and observing the effect of the human movement on those objects. While each of these perceptual tasks can be conducted independently, recognition rate improves when interactions between them are considered. Motivated by psychological studies of human perception, we present a Bayesian approach which integrates various perceptual tasks involved in understanding human-object interactions. Previous approaches to object and action recognition rely on static shape/appearance feature matching and motion analysis, respectively. Our approach goes beyond these traditional approaches and applies spatial and functional constraints on each of the perceptual elements for coherent semantic interpretation. Such constraints allow us to recognize objects and actions when the appearances are not discriminative enough. We also demonstrate the use of such constraints in recognition of actions from static images without using any motion information.

  5. Micro-Doppler Feature Extraction and Recognition Based on Netted Radar for Ballistic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Cun-qian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the complexities of using netted radar to recognize and resolve ballistic midcourse targets. The application of micro-motion feature extraction to ballistic mid-course targets is analyzed, and the current status of application and research on micro-motion feature recognition is concluded for singlefunction radar networks such as low- and high-resolution imaging radar networks. Advantages and disadvantages of these networks are discussed with respect to target recognition. Hybrid-mode radar networks combine low- and high-resolution imaging radar and provide a specific reference frequency that is the basis for ballistic target recognition. Main research trends are discussed for hybrid-mode networks that apply micromotion feature extraction to ballistic mid-course targets.

  6. Biological computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lamm, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Biological BackgroundBiological ComputationThe Influence of Biology on Mathematics-Historical ExamplesBiological IntroductionModels and Simulations Cellular Automata Biological BackgroundThe Game of Life General Definition of Cellular Automata One-Dimensional AutomataExamples of Cellular AutomataComparison with a Continuous Mathematical Model Computational UniversalitySelf-Replication Pseudo Code Evolutionary ComputationEvolutionary Biology and Evolutionary ComputationGenetic AlgorithmsExample ApplicationsAnalysis of the Behavior of Genetic AlgorithmsLamarckian Evolution Genet

  7. Stochastic Blind Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Lei

    2015-05-13

    Blind motion deblurring from a single image is a highly under-constrained problem with many degenerate solutions. A good approximation of the intrinsic image can therefore only be obtained with the help of prior information in the form of (often non-convex) regularization terms for both the intrinsic image and the kernel. While the best choice of image priors is still a topic of ongoing investigation, this research is made more complicated by the fact that historically each new prior requires the development of a custom optimization method. In this paper, we develop a stochastic optimization method for blind deconvolution. Since this stochastic solver does not require the explicit computation of the gradient of the objective function and uses only efficient local evaluation of the objective, new priors can be implemented and tested very quickly. We demonstrate that this framework, in combination with different image priors produces results with PSNR values that match or exceed the results obtained by much more complex state-of-the-art blind motion deblurring algorithms.

  8. Empirical ground motion prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Archuleta

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available New methods of site-specific ground motion prediction in the time and frequency domains are presented. A large earthquake is simulated as a composite (linear combination of observed small earthquakes (subevents assuming Aki-Brune functional models of the source time functions (spectra. Source models incorporate basic scaling relations between source and spectral parameters. Ground motion predictions are consistent with the entire observed seismic spectrum from the lowest to the highest frequencies. These methods are designed to use all the available empirical Green’s functions (or any subset of observations at a site. Thus a prediction is not biased by a single record, and different possible source-receiver paths are taken into account. Directivity is accounted for by adjusting the apparent source duration at each site. Our time-series prediction algorithm is based on determination of a non-uniform distribution of rupture times of subevents. By introducing a specific rupture velocity we avoid the major problem of deficiency of predictions around the main event's corner frequency. A novel notion of partial coherence allows us to sum subevents' amplitude spectra directly without using any information on their rupture times and phase histories. Predictions by this spectral method are not Jependent on details of rupture nucleation and propagation, location of asperities and other predominantly phase-affecting factors, responsible for uncertainties in time-domain simulations.

  9. Perceptually Uniform Motion Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Asmund; Turkay, Cagatay; Viola, Ivan

    2014-11-01

    Flow data is often visualized by animated particles inserted into a flow field. The velocity of a particle on the screen is typically linearly scaled by the velocities in the data. However, the perception of velocity magnitude in animated particles is not necessarily linear. We present a study on how different parameters affect relative motion perception. We have investigated the impact of four parameters. The parameters consist of speed multiplier, direction, contrast type and the global velocity scale. In addition, we investigated if multiple motion cues, and point distribution, affect the speed estimation. Several studies were executed to investigate the impact of each parameter. In the initial results, we noticed trends in scale and multiplier. Using the trends for the significant parameters, we designed a compensation model, which adjusts the particle speed to compensate for the effect of the parameters. We then performed a second study to investigate the performance of the compensation model. From the second study we detected a constant estimation error, which we adjusted for in the last study. In addition, we connect our work to established theories in psychophysics by comparing our model to a model based on Stevens' Power Law.

  10. Recognition Using Classification and Segmentation Scoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kimball, Owen; Ostendorf, Mari; Rohlicek, Robin

    1992-01-01

    .... We describe an approach to connected word recognition that allows the use of segmental information through an explicit decomposition of the recognition criterion into classification and segmentation scoring...

  11. Vision-Based Navigation and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    .... (4) Invariants -- both geometric and other types. (5) Human faces: Analysis of images of human faces, including feature extraction, face recognition, compression, and recognition of facial expressions...

  12. Vision-Based Navigation and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1998-01-01

    .... (4) Invariants: both geometric and other types. (5) Human faces: Analysis of images of human faces, including feature extraction, face recognition, compression, and recognition of facial expressions...

  13. Kernel learning algorithms for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Kernel Learning Algorithms for Face Recognition covers the framework of kernel based face recognition. This book discusses the advanced kernel learning algorithms and its application on face recognition. This book also focuses on the theoretical deviation, the system framework and experiments involving kernel based face recognition. Included within are algorithms of kernel based face recognition, and also the feasibility of the kernel based face recognition method. This book provides researchers in pattern recognition and machine learning area with advanced face recognition methods and its new

  14. Facial recognition in education system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithika, L. B.; Venkatesh, K.; Rathore, S.; Kumar, M. Harish

    2017-11-01

    Human beings exploit emotions comprehensively for conveying messages and their resolution. Emotion detection and face recognition can provide an interface between the individuals and technologies. The most successful applications of recognition analysis are recognition of faces. Many different techniques have been used to recognize the facial expressions and emotion detection handle varying poses. In this paper, we approach an efficient method to recognize the facial expressions to track face points and distances. This can automatically identify observer face movements and face expression in image. This can capture different aspects of emotion and facial expressions.

  15. Iris recognition via plenoptic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J.; Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Bolme, David S.

    2017-11-07

    Iris recognition can be accomplished for a wide variety of eye images by using plenoptic imaging. Using plenoptic technology, it is possible to correct focus after image acquisition. One example technology reconstructs images having different focus depths and stitches them together, resulting in a fully focused image, even in an off-angle gaze scenario. Another example technology determines three-dimensional data for an eye and incorporates it into an eye model used for iris recognition processing. Another example technology detects contact lenses. Application of the technologies can result in improved iris recognition under a wide variety of scenarios.

  16. Motion edges and regions guide image segmentation by colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, P; Hurlbert, A C

    1997-11-22

    Image segmentation is an important early stage in visual processing in which the visual system groups together parts of the image that belong together, prior to or in conjunction with object recognition. Two principal processes may be involved in image segmentation: an edge-based process that uses feature contrasts to mark boundaries of coherent regions, and a region-based process that groups similar features over a larger scale. Earlier, we have shown that motion and colour interact strongly in image segmentation by the human visual system. Here we explore the nature of this interaction in terms of edge- and region-based processes. We measure performance on a region-based colour segmentation task in the presence of distinct types of motion information, in the form of edges and regions which in themselves do not reveal the location of the colour target. The results show that both motion edges and regions may guide the integrative process required for this colour segmentation task. Motion edges appear to act by delimiting areas over which to integrate colour information, whereas motion similarities define primitive surfaces within which colour grouping and segmentation processes are deployed.

  17. Evaluating music emotion recognition:Lessons from music genre recognition?

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER syste...

  18. Recognition of dance-like actions: memory for static posture or dynamic movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicary, Staci A; Robbins, Rachel A; Calvo-Merino, Beatriz; Stevens, Catherine J

    2014-07-01

    Dance-like actions are complex visual stimuli involving multiple changes in body posture across time and space. Visual perception research has demonstrated a difference between the processing of dynamic body movement and the processing of static body posture. Yet, it is unclear whether this processing dissociation continues during the retention of body movement and body form in visual working memory (VWM). When observing a dance-like action, it is likely that static snapshot images of body posture will be retained alongside dynamic images of the complete motion. Therefore, we hypothesized that, as in perception, posture and movement would differ in VWM. Additionally, if body posture and body movement are separable in VWM, as form- and motion-based items, respectively, then differential interference from intervening form and motion tasks should occur during recognition. In two experiments, we examined these hypotheses. In Experiment 1, the recognition of postures and movements was tested in conditions in which the formats of the study and test stimuli matched (movement-study to movement-test, posture-study to posture-test) or mismatched (movement-study to posture-test, posture-study to movement-test). In Experiment 2, the recognition of postures and movements was compared after intervening form and motion tasks. These results indicated that (1) the recognition of body movement based only on posture is possible, but it is significantly poorer than recognition based on the entire movement stimulus, and (2) form-based interference does not impair memory for movements, although motion-based interference does. We concluded that, whereas static posture information is encoded during the observation of dance-like actions, body movement and body posture differ in VWM.

  19. A New Framework of Human Interaction Recognition Based on Multiple Stage Probability Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Ji

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual-based human interactive behavior recognition is a challenging research topic in computer vision. There exist some important problems in the current interaction recognition algorithms, such as very complex feature representation and inaccurate feature extraction induced by wrong human body segmentation. In order to solve these problems, a novel human interaction recognition method based on multiple stage probability fusion is proposed in this paper. According to the human body’s contact in interaction as a cut-off point, the process of the interaction can be divided into three stages: start stage, execution stage and end stage. Two persons’ motions are respectively extracted and recognizes in the start stage and the finish stage when there is no contact between those persons. The two persons’ motion is extracted as a whole and recognized in the execution stage. In the recognition process, the final recognition results are obtained by the weighted fusing these probabilities in different stages. The proposed method not only simplifies the extraction and representation of features, but also avoids the wrong feature extraction caused by occlusion. Experiment results on the UT-interaction dataset demonstrated that the proposed method results in a better performance than other recent interaction recognition methods.

  20. Clonal Selection Based Artificial Immune System for Generalized Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terry

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades has seen a rapid increase in the application of AIS (Artificial Immune Systems) modeled after the human immune system to a wide range of areas including network intrusion detection, job shop scheduling, classification, pattern recognition, and robot control. JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) has developed an integrated pattern recognition/classification system called AISLE (Artificial Immune System for Learning and Exploration) based on biologically inspired models of B-cell dynamics in the immune system. When used for unsupervised or supervised classification, the method scales linearly with the number of dimensions, has performance that is relatively independent of the total size of the dataset, and has been shown to perform as well as traditional clustering methods. When used for pattern recognition, the method efficiently isolates the appropriate matches in the data set. The paper presents the underlying structure of AISLE and the results from a number of experimental studies.

  1. Human Activity Recognition in a Car with Embedded Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Burbano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection and prediction of drowsiness is key for the implementation of intelligent vehicles aimed to prevent highway crashes. There are several approaches for such solution. In thispaper the computer vision approach will be analysed, where embedded devices (e.g.videocameras are used along with machine learning and pattern recognition techniques for implementing suitable solutions for detecting driver fatigue. Most of the research in computer vision systems focused on the analysis of blinks, this is a notable solution when it is combined with additional patterns like yawing or head motion for the recognition of drowsiness. The first step in this approach is the face recognition, where AdaBoost algorithm shows accurate results for the feature extraction, whereas regarding the detection of drowsiness the data-driven classifiers such as Support Vector Machine (SVM yields remarkable results. One underlying component for implementing a computer vision technology for detection of drowsiness is a database of spontaneous images from the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, where the classifier can be trained accordingly. This paper introduces a straightforward prototype for detection of drowsiness, where the Viola-Jones method is used for face recognition and cascade classifier is used for the detection of a contiguous sequence of eyes closed, which a reconsidered as drowsiness.

  2. The Perception of Depicted Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio Dobrez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Everyone knows that you can read a galloping horse in a still image as galloping. This paper asks how it is that we perceive motion in pictures. It considers perception of real motion in point-light experiments and the perception of motion in stills via the work of various psychologists, in the course of which it raises theoretical questions about the nature of visual perception. It then offers a detailed examination of knowledge regarding neural substrates for both real and depicted motion perception. Finally, it combines psychological and neurophysiological perspectives with phenomenologically-oriented observation of pictures, discussing both frontoparallel motion and motion in depth (in particular the phenomenon of “looming” in terms of two kinds of depictions, the “narrative” and the “performative”. Examples are drawn from all kinds of pictures, but focus is on world rock art, whose time depth is especially amenable to the universalist approach adopted by the paper.

  3. Nonlinear Synchronization for Automatic Learning of 3D Pose Variability in Human Motion Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozerov M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A dense matching algorithm that solves the problem of synchronizing prerecorded human motion sequences, which show different speeds and accelerations, is proposed. The approach is based on minimization of MRF energy and solves the problem by using Dynamic Programming. Additionally, an optimal sequence is automatically selected from the input dataset to be a time-scale pattern for all other sequences. The paper utilizes an action specific model which automatically learns the variability of 3D human postures observed in a set of training sequences. The model is trained using the public CMU motion capture dataset for the walking action, and a mean walking performance is automatically learnt. Additionally, statistics about the observed variability of the postures and motion direction are also computed at each time step. The synchronized motion sequences are used to learn a model of human motion for action recognition and full-body tracking purposes.

  4. Three-dimensional motion tracking correlates with skill level in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Sif H.; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Konge, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aim: Feedback is an essential part of training in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Virtual reality simulators provide limited feedback, focusing only on visual recognition with no feedback on the procedural part of training. Motion tracking identifies patterns of movement...... untrained medical students) were tested using a virtual reality simulator. A motion sensor was used to collect data regarding the distance between the hands, and height and movement of the scope hand. Test characteristics between groups were explored using Kruskal-Wallis H and Man-Whitney U exact tests....... Results: All motion-tracking metrics showed discriminative ability primarily between experts and novices in specific sequences. Conclusion: Motion tracking can discriminate between operators with different experience levels in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Motion tracking can be used to provide...

  5. Indoor navigation by image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Io Teng; Leong, Chi Chong; Hong, Ka Wo; Pun, Chi-Man

    2017-07-01

    With the progress of smartphones hardware, it is simple on smartphone using image recognition technique such as face detection. In addition, indoor navigation system development is much slower than outdoor navigation system. Hence, this research proves a usage of image recognition technique for navigation in indoor environment. In this paper, we introduced an indoor navigation application that uses the indoor environment features to locate user's location and a route calculating algorithm to generate an appropriate path for user. The application is implemented on Android smartphone rather than iPhone. Yet, the application design can also be applied on iOS because the design is implemented without using special features only for Android. We found that digital navigation system provides better and clearer location information than paper map. Also, the indoor environment is ideal for Image recognition processing. Hence, the results motivate us to design an indoor navigation system using image recognition.

  6. Pattern recognition and string matching

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xiuzhen

    2002-01-01

    The research and development of pattern recognition have proven to be of importance in science, technology, and human activity. Many useful concepts and tools from different disciplines have been employed in pattern recognition. Among them is string matching, which receives much theoretical and practical attention. String matching is also an important topic in combinatorial optimization. This book is devoted to recent advances in pattern recognition and string matching. It consists of twenty eight chapters written by different authors, addressing a broad range of topics such as those from classifica­ tion, matching, mining, feature selection, and applications. Each chapter is self-contained, and presents either novel methodological approaches or applications of existing theories and techniques. The aim, intent, and motivation for publishing this book is to pro­ vide a reference tool for the increasing number of readers who depend upon pattern recognition or string matching in some way. This includes student...

  7. Similarity measures for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vezzetti, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Face recognition has several applications, including security, such as (authentication and identification of device users and criminal suspects), and in medicine (corrective surgery and diagnosis). Facial recognition programs rely on algorithms that can compare and compute the similarity between two sets of images. This eBook explains some of the similarity measures used in facial recognition systems in a single volume. Readers will learn about various measures including Minkowski distances, Mahalanobis distances, Hansdorff distances, cosine-based distances, among other methods. The book also summarizes errors that may occur in face recognition methods. Computer scientists "facing face" and looking to select and test different methods of computing similarities will benefit from this book. The book is also useful tool for students undertaking computer vision courses.

  8. License plate recognition (phase B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    License Plate Recognition (LPR) technology has been used for off-line automobile enforcement purposes. The technology has seen mixed success with correct reading rate as high as 60 to 80% depending on the specific application and environment. This li...

  9. Effective indexing for face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochenkov, I.; Sochenkova, A.; Vokhmintsev, A.; Makovetskii, A.; Melnikov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Face recognition is one of the most important tasks in computer vision and pattern recognition. Face recognition is useful for security systems to provide safety. In some situations it is necessary to identify the person among many others. In this case this work presents new approach in data indexing, which provides fast retrieval in big image collections. Data indexing in this research consists of five steps. First, we detect the area containing face, second we align face, and then we detect areas containing eyes and eyebrows, nose, mouth. After that we find key points of each area using different descriptors and finally index these descriptors with help of quantization procedure. The experimental analysis of this method is performed. This paper shows that performing method has results at the level of state-of-the-art face recognition methods, but it is also gives results fast that is important for the systems that provide safety.

  10. Peculiarities of motion at low velocities. Motion in space and motion in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheludev, I.S.

    1982-01-01

    Motion referred to certain space coordinate x and described by space-time relationships of the special theory of relativity, is interpreted as a motion in space. The concept of motion referred to the certain moment of time t, is introduced and called as a motion in time. Space-time relationships for the latter case are followed from the transformations x→t, t→x, v→α (α=1/v, mod(αsub(t))=mod(vsub(s))), c→αsub(max)=1/c 0 , mod(c)=mod(αsub(max)). The invariable characteristic of inertial motion in time is determined by a given equation. The peculiar features of motion in time are found at low velocities (α→αsub(max)). The combined approach is based on both limiting quantities c and αsub(max). If the space coordinate x is measured through motion in space and time t through motion in time (parity frame-reference), all inertial movements have the same velocity, velocity of self-divergence v 0 = √cc 0 . There is no distortion of spatial and temporal scales when the motion is described in the parity frame-reference. The use of different intervals characterizing invariable quantities of inertial motion in space and times makes it possible to understand some problems of cosmological expansion of non-interacting galaxies (Hubble's law v = HR and, the ''low of limited distances'', v = R/t characterizing linear dimension of Universe etc.). (Auth.)

  11. Language Recognition via Sparse Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    exploiting variation of the nonzero locations and magnitude, we can build a discrimi- native pipeline for language recognition. Figure 1 describes a...classify each language as a target within six predefined language clusters. The language clusters are Ara- bic, Chinese, English , French, Slavic, and... Language Recognition via Sparse Coding† Youngjune L. Gwon1, William M. Campbell1, Douglas Sturim1, H. T. Kung2 1MIT Lincoln Laboratory 2Harvard

  12. An automatic image recognition approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Barbu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the graphical analysis domain. We propose an automatic image recognition technique. This approach consists of two main pattern recognition steps. First, it performs an image feature extraction operation on an input image set, using statistical dispersion features. Then, an unsupervised classification process is performed on the previously obtained graphical feature vectors. An automatic region-growing based clustering procedure is proposed and utilized in the classification stage.

  13. Backpropagation neural networks: pattern recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Studenikin, Oleg

    2005-01-01

    In this Master’s degree work artificial neural networks and back propagation learning algorithm for human faces and pattern recognition are analyzed. In the second part of work artificial neural networks and their architecture and structures models are analyzed. In the third part of article the backpropagation procedure and procedures theoretical learning principle are analyzed. In the fourth part different kinds of ANN methods and patterns extracting methods in recognition, learning and ...

  14. Activity Recognition in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0044 Activity Recognition in Social Media Subhasis Chaudhuri INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY Final Report 05/09/2016...DATES COVERED (From - To) 12 Aug 2013 to 30 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Activity Recognition in Social Media 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER...15. SUBJECT TERMS Social Media , AOARD, social interactions 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 15 19a

  15. Emotions are understood from biological motion across remote cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Carolyn; Walker, Trent T; Memmi, Sarah; Wheatley, Thalia

    2017-04-01

    Patterns of bodily movement can be used to signal a wide variety of information, including emotional states. Are these signals reliant on culturally learned cues or are they intelligible across individuals lacking exposure to a common culture? To find out, we traveled to a remote Kreung village in Ratanakiri, Cambodia. First, we recorded Kreung portrayals of 5 emotions through bodily movement. These videos were later shown to American participants, who matched the videos with appropriate emotional labels with above chance accuracy (Study 1). The Kreung also viewed Western point-light displays of emotions. After each display, they were asked to either freely describe what was being expressed (Study 2) or choose from 5 predetermined response options (Study 3). Across these studies, Kreung participants recognized Western point-light displays of anger, fear, happiness, sadness, and pride with above chance accuracy. Kreung raters were not above chance in deciphering an American point-light display depicting love, suggesting that recognizing love may rely, at least in part, on culturally specific cues or modalities other than bodily movement. In addition, multidimensional scaling of the patterns of nonverbal behavior associated with each emotion in each culture suggested that similar patterns of nonverbal behavior are used to convey the same emotions across cultures. The considerable cross-cultural intelligibility observed across these studies suggests that the communication of emotion through movement is largely shaped by aspects of physiology and the environment shared by all humans, irrespective of differences in cultural context. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Depth Cues and Perceived Audiovisual Synchrony of Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos César; Mendonça, Catarina; Mouta, Sandra; Silva, Rosa; Campos, José Creissac; Santos, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to their different propagation times, visual and auditory signals from external events arrive at the human sensory receptors with a disparate delay. This delay consistently varies with distance, but, despite such variability, most events are perceived as synchronic. There is, however, contradictory data and claims regarding the existence of compensatory mechanisms for distance in simultaneity judgments. Principal Findings In this paper we have used familiar audiovisual events – a visual walker and footstep sounds – and manipulated the number of depth cues. In a simultaneity judgment task we presented a large range of stimulus onset asynchronies corresponding to distances of up to 35 meters. We found an effect of distance over the simultaneity estimates, with greater distances requiring larger stimulus onset asynchronies, and vision always leading. This effect was stronger when both visual and auditory cues were present but was interestingly not found when depth cues were impoverished. Significance These findings reveal that there should be an internal mechanism to compensate for audiovisual delays, which critically depends on the depth information available. PMID:24244617

  17. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeanu, Sandra; Craik, Fergus I M; Alain, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent) varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  18. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Campeanu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  19. Structure and function in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirs, C.H.W.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the history of the developments of structural chemistry in biology beginning with the work of the bacteriologist Ehrlich leading to a comprehensive examination of the influence of size and configuration on the interaction between specific antibodies and side-chain determinants. Recent developments include the recognition of a higher order of specificity in the interaction of proteins with one another

  20. Respiratory impact on motion sickness induced by linear motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mert, A.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.; Bles, W.

    2009-01-01

    Motion sickness incidence (MSI) for vertical sinusoidal motion reaches a maximum at 0.167 Hz. Normal breathing frequency is close to this frequency. There is some evidence for synchronization of breathing with this stimulus frequency. If this enforced breathing takes place over a larger frequency

  1. Prehospital Cervical Spine Motion: Immobilization Versus Spine Motion Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Erik E; Tucker, W Steven; Nowak, Matthew; Roberto, Jason; Hollingworth, Amy; Decoster, Laura C; Trimarco, Thomas W; Mihalik, Jason P

    2018-02-16

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of two different spinal immobilization techniques on cervical spine movement in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. A counterbalanced crossover design was used to evaluate two different spinal immobilization techniques in a standardized environment. Twenty healthy male volunteers (age = 20.9 ± 2.2 yr) underwent ambulance transport from a simulated scene to a simulated emergency department setting in two separate conditions: utilizing traditional spinal immobilization (TSI) and spinal motion restriction (SMR). During both transport scenarios, participants underwent the same simulated scenario. The main outcome measures were cervical spine motion (cumulative integrated motion and peak range of motion), vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation), and self-reported pain. Vital signs and pain were collected at six consistent points throughout each scenario. Participants experienced greater transverse plane cumulative integrated motion during TSI compared to SMR (F 1,57 = 4.05; P = 0.049), and greater transverse peak range of motion during participant loading/unloading in TSI condition compared to SMR (F 1,57 = 17.32; P TSI compared to 25% of participants during SMR (χ 2 = 1.29; P = 0.453). Spinal motion restriction controlled cervical motion at least as well as traditional spinal immobilization in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. Given these results, along with well-documented potential complications of TSI in the literature, SMR is supported as an alternative to TSI. Future research should involve a true patient population.

  2. Motion direction discrimination training reduces perceived motion repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ke; Li, Sheng

    2017-04-01

    Participants often exaggerate the perceived angular separation between two simultaneously presented motion stimuli, which is referred to as motion repulsion. The overestimation helps participants differentiate between the two superimposed motion directions, yet it causes the impairment of direction perception. Since direction perception can be refined through perceptual training, we here attempted to investigate whether the training of a direction discrimination task changes the amount of motion repulsion. Our results showed a direction-specific learning effect, which was accompanied by a reduced amount of motion repulsion both for the trained and the untrained directions. The reduction of the motion repulsion disappeared when the participants were trained on a luminance discrimination task (control experiment 1) or a speed discrimination task (control experiment 2), ruling out any possible interpretation in terms of adaptation or training-induced attentional bias. Furthermore, training with a direction discrimination task along a direction 150° away from both directions in the transparent stimulus (control experiment 3) also had little effect on the amount of motion repulsion, ruling out the contribution of task learning. The changed motion repulsion observed in the main experiment was consistent with the prediction of the recurrent model of perceptual learning. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that training in direction discrimination can benefit the precise direction perception of the transparent stimulus and provide new evidence for the recurrent model of perceptual learning.

  3. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a supporting memorandum. Within 10 days after a written motion is served, or such other time period... writing. If made at the hearing, motions may be stated orally; but the Administrative Law Judge may require that they be reduced to writing and filed and served on all parties in the same manner as a formal...

  4. Visual motion influences the contingent auditory motion aftereffect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroomen, J.; de Gelder, B.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we show that the contingent auditory motion aftereffect is strongly influenced by visual motion information. During an induction phase, participants listened to rightward-moving sounds with falling pitch alternated with leftward-moving sounds with rising pitch (or vice versa).

  5. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    D student at the Frumkin Institute in Moscow attending hot theoretical seminars chaired by Benjamin Levich (1917-1986, a pupil of Landau and the founding father of physical-chemical hydrodynamics), I particularly remember one of his many jokes he used to spice up his seminar. When some overly enthusiastic speaker was telling us with 100% confidence how the electron transfers between atomic moieties in a solvent near an electrode, and what the molecules exactly do to promote the transfer, he used to ask the speaker: 'How do you know it? Have you been there?' Today this is no longer a question or even a joke. We have plenty of experimental tools to 'get there'. The list of such techniques is too long to cover fully, I may just refer to FIONA (fluorescence imaging with nanometer accuracy) which allows us to trace the motion of myosin on actin or kinesin on microtubules and similar aspects of protein motility in vivo and in vitro (fluorescence methods were at the center of the Biological and Molecular Machine Program at Kavli ITP, Santa Barbara, where the founders of those techniques taught us what we can learn using them) or visualizing the positions of adsorbed counterions on DNA by synchrotron radiation. Therefore, the following dogmas can be given: Dogma 1: 'Seeing is believing'. Once, I asked an Assistant Professor from one of the top US universities, who was preaching such methods, had he tried to plot his data in some coordinates, where I would have expected his data to lie on a straight line. The answer was, 'Come on, what you speak about is 20th century science; it's no longer interesting!' I am afraid he was not unique in his generation, voting for what I would call 'MTV-science'. This science does make you dance, but on its own is not sufficient without a deep theoretical analysis of what you actually see. Otherwise, 'what you see is what you get' and not more. Dogma 2: 'A theory must contain not more than exponential functions, logarithms and alike. Otherwise the

  6. Atoms of recognition in human and computer vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Shimon; Assif, Liav; Fetaya, Ethan; Harari, Daniel

    2016-03-08

    Discovering the visual features and representations used by the brain to recognize objects is a central problem in the study of vision. Recently, neural network models of visual object recognition, including biological and deep network models, have shown remarkable progress and have begun to rival human performance in some challenging tasks. These models are trained on image examples and learn to extract features and representations and to use them for categorization. It remains unclear, however, whether the representations and learning processes discovered by current models are similar to those used by the human visual system. Here we show, by introducing and using minimal recognizable images, that the human visual system uses features and processes that are not used by current models and that are critical for recognition. We found by psychophysical studies that at the level of minimal recognizable images a minute change in the image can have a drastic effect on recognition, thus identifying features that are critical for the task. Simulations then showed that current models cannot explain this sensitivity to precise feature configurations and, more generally, do not learn to recognize minimal images at a human level. The role of the features shown here is revealed uniquely at the minimal level, where the contribution of each feature is essential. A full understanding of the learning and use of such features will extend our understanding of visual recognition and its cortical mechanisms and will enhance the capacity of computational models to learn from visual experience and to deal with recognition and detailed image interpretation.

  7. Multiscale sampling model for motion integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbakov, Lena; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash

    2013-09-30

    Biologically plausible strategies for visual scene integration across spatial and temporal domains continues to be a challenging topic. The fundamental question we address is whether classical problems in motion integration, such as the aperture problem, can be solved in a model that samples the visual scene at multiple spatial and temporal scales in parallel. We hypothesize that fast interareal connections that allow feedback of information between cortical layers are the key processes that disambiguate motion direction. We developed a neural model showing how the aperture problem can be solved using different spatial sampling scales between LGN, V1 layer 4, V1 layer 6, and area MT. Our results suggest that multiscale sampling, rather than feedback explicitly, is the key process that gives rise to end-stopped cells in V1 and enables area MT to solve the aperture problem without the need for calculating intersecting constraints or crafting intricate patterns of spatiotemporal receptive fields. Furthermore, the model explains why end-stopped cells no longer emerge in the absence of V1 layer 6 activity (Bolz & Gilbert, 1986), why V1 layer 4 cells are significantly more end-stopped than V1 layer 6 cells (Pack, Livingstone, Duffy, & Born, 2003), and how it is possible to have a solution to the aperture problem in area MT with no solution in V1 in the presence of driving feedback. In summary, while much research in the field focuses on how a laminar architecture can give rise to complicated spatiotemporal receptive fields to solve problems in the motion domain, we show that one can reframe motion integration as an emergent property of multiscale sampling achieved concurrently within lamina and across multiple visual areas.

  8. Ultrafast shape recognition: method and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Pedro J

    2011-01-01

    Molecular shape complementarity is widely recognized as a key indicator of biological activity. Unfortunately, efficient computation of shape similarity is challenging, which severely limits the potential of shape-based virtual screening. Ultrafast shape recognition (USR) is a recent shape similarity technique that is characterized by its extremely high speed of operation. Here we review important methodological aspects for the optimal application of USR as well as its first applications to medicinal chemistry problems. These applications already include several particularly successful prospective virtual screens, which shows the important role that USR can play in identifying bioactive molecules to be used as chemical probes and potentially as starting points for the drug-discovery process.

  9. Activity Recognition Using Fusion of Low-Cost Sensors on a Smartphone for Mobile Navigation Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Saeedi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost inertial and motion sensors embedded on smartphones have provided a new platform for dynamic activity pattern inference. In this research, a comparison has been conducted on different sensor data, feature spaces and feature selection methods to increase the efficiency and reduce the computation cost of activity recognition on the smartphones. We evaluated a variety of feature spaces and a number of classification algorithms from the area of Machine Learning, including Naive Bayes, Decision Trees, Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machine classifiers. A smartphone app that performs activity recognition is being developed to collect data and send them to a server for activity recognition. Using extensive experiments, the performance of various feature spaces has been evaluated. The results showed that the Bayesian Network classifier yields recognition accuracy of 96.21% using four features while requiring fewer computations.

  10. REAL-TIME FACE RECOGNITION BASED ON OPTICAL FLOW AND HISTOGRAM EQUALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sathish Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is one of the intensive areas of research in computer vision and pattern recognition but many of which are focused on recognition of faces under varying facial expressions and pose variation. A constrained optical flow algorithm discussed in this paper, recognizes facial images involving various expressions based on motion vector computation. In this paper, an optical flow computation algorithm which computes the frames of varying facial gestures, and integrating with synthesized image in a probabilistic environment has been proposed. Also Histogram Equalization technique has been used to overcome the effect of illuminations while capturing the input data using camera devices. It also enhances the contrast of the image for better processing. The experimental results confirm that the proposed face recognition system is more robust and recognizes the facial images under varying expressions and pose variations more accurately.

  11. No strong evidence for lateralisation of word reading and face recognition deficits following posterior brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Marstrand, Lisbet; Starrfelt, Randi

    2014-01-01

    Face recognition and word reading are thought to be mediated by relatively independent cognitive systems lateralized to the right and left hemisphere respectively. In this case, we should expect a higher incidence of face recognition problems in patients with right hemisphere injury and a higher...... incidence of reading problems in patients with left hemisphere injury. We tested this hypothesis in a group of 31 patients with unilateral right or left hemisphere infarcts in the territory of the posterior cerebral arteries. In most domains tested (e.g., visual attention, object recognition, visuo......-construction, motion perception), we found that both patient groups performed significantly worse than a matched control group. In particular we found a significant number of face recognition deficits in patients with left hemisphere injury and a significant number of patients with word reading deficits following...

  12. Biological origins of color categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Alice E; Catchpole, Gemma; Abbott, Joshua T; Bosten, Jenny M; Franklin, Anna

    2017-05-23

    The biological basis of the commonality in color lexicons across languages has been hotly debated for decades. Prior evidence that infants categorize color could provide support for the hypothesis that color categorization systems are not purely constructed by communication and culture. Here, we investigate the relationship between infants' categorization of color and the commonality across color lexicons, and the potential biological origin of infant color categories. We systematically mapped infants' categorical recognition memory for hue onto a stimulus array used previously to document the color lexicons of 110 nonindustrialized languages. Following familiarization to a given hue, infants' response to a novel hue indicated that their recognition memory parses the hue continuum into red, yellow, green, blue, and purple categories. Infants' categorical distinctions aligned with common distinctions in color lexicons and are organized around hues that are commonly central to lexical categories across languages. The boundaries between infants' categorical distinctions also aligned, relative to the adaptation point, with the cardinal axes that describe the early stages of color representation in retinogeniculate pathways, indicating that infant color categorization may be partly organized by biological mechanisms of color vision. The findings suggest that color categorization in language and thought is partially biologically constrained and have implications for broader debate on how biology, culture, and communication interact in human cognition.

  13. Molecular biomimetics: nanotechnology through biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan; Jen, Alex K.-Y.; Schulten, Klaus; Baneyx, François

    2003-09-01

    Proteins, through their unique and specific interactions with other macromolecules and inorganics, control structures and functions of all biological hard and soft tissues in organisms. Molecular biomimetics is an emerging field in which hybrid technologies are developed by using the tools of molecular biology and nanotechnology. Taking lessons from biology, polypeptides can now be genetically engineered to specifically bind to selected inorganic compounds for applications in nano- and biotechnology. This review discusses combinatorial biological protocols, that is, bacterial cell surface and phage-display technologies, in the selection of short sequences that have affinity to (noble) metals, semiconducting oxides and other technological compounds. These genetically engineered proteins for inorganics (GEPIs) can be used in the assembly of functional nanostructures. Based on the three fundamental principles of molecular recognition, self-assembly and DNA manipulation, we highlight successful uses of GEPI in nanotechnology.

  14. Text mining for systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluck, Juliane; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Scientific communication in biomedicine is, by and large, still text based. Text mining technologies for the automated extraction of useful biomedical information from unstructured text that can be directly used for systems biology modelling have been substantially improved over the past few years. In this review, we underline the importance of named entity recognition and relationship extraction as fundamental approaches that are relevant to systems biology. Furthermore, we emphasize the role of publicly organized scientific benchmarking challenges that reflect the current status of text-mining technology and are important in moving the entire field forward. Given further interdisciplinary development of systems biology-orientated ontologies and training corpora, we expect a steadily increasing impact of text-mining technology on systems biology in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous Electro-Optical Tracking for Nanoparticle Recognition and Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Elena; Volpe, Andrea; Fanzio, Paola; Repetto, Luca; Firpo, Giuseppe; Guida, Patrizia; Lo Savio, Roberto; Wanunu, Meni; Valbusa, Ugo

    2015-09-09

    We present the first detailed experimental observation and analysis of nanoparticle electrophoresis through a nanochannel obtained with synchronous high-bandwidth electrical and camera recordings. Optically determined particle diffusion coefficients agree with values extracted from fitting electrical transport measurements to distributions from 1D Fokker-Planck diffusion-drift theory. This combined tracking strategy enables optical recognition and electrical characterization of nanoparticles in solution, which can have a broad range of applications in biology and materials science.

  16. Primate Auditory Recognition Memory Performance Varies With Sound Type

    OpenAIRE

    Chi-Wing, Ng; Bethany, Plakke; Amy, Poremba

    2009-01-01

    Neural correlates of auditory processing, including for species-specific vocalizations that convey biological and ethological significance (e.g. social status, kinship, environment),have been identified in a wide variety of areas including the temporal and frontal cortices. However, few studies elucidate how non-human primates interact with these vocalization signals when they are challenged by tasks requiring auditory discrimination, recognition, and/or memory. The present study employs a de...

  17. Rolling motion in moving droplets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-19

    Feb 19, 2015 ... Drops moving on a substrate under the action of gravity display both rolling and sliding motions. The two limits of a thin sheet-like drop in sliding motion on a surface, and a spherical drop in roll, have been extensively studied. We are interested in intermediate shapes. We quantify the contribution of rolling ...

  18. Algorithmic Issues in Modeling Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, P. K; Guibas, L. J; Edelsbrunner, H.

    2003-01-01

    This article is a survey of research areas in which motion plays a pivotal role. The aim of the article is to review current approaches to modeling motion together with related data structures and algorithms, and to summarize the challenges that lie ahead in producing a more unified theory...

  19. Rigid Motion and Adapted Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Stephen N.

    The aim here is to describe the rigid motion of a continuous medium in special and general relativity. Section 7.1 defines a rigid rod in special relativity, and Sect. 7.2 shows the link with the space coordinates of a certain kind of accelerating frame in flat spacetimes. Section 7.3 then sets up a notation for describing the arbitrary smooth motion of a continuous medium in general curved spacetimes, defining the proper metric of such a medium. Section 7.4 singles out rigid motions and shows that the rod in Sect. 7.1 undergoes rigid motion in the more generally defined sense. Section 7.5 defines a rate of strain tensor for a continuous medium in general relativity and reformulates the rigidity criterion. Section 7.6 aims to classify all possible rigid motions in special relativity, reemphasizing the link with semi-Euclidean frames adapted to accelerating observers in special relativity. Then, Sects. 7.7 and 7.8 describe rigid motion without rotation and rigid rotation, respectively. Along the way we introduce the notion of Fermi-Walker transport and discuss its relevance for rigid motions. Section 7.9 brings together all the above themes in an account of a recent generalization of the notion of uniform acceleration, thereby characterizing a wide class of rigid motions.

  20. Motion signals bias localization judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleman, David M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    In the flash-lag illusion, a moving object aligned with a flash is perceived to be offset in the direction of motion following the flash. In the “flash-drag” illusion, a flash is mislocalized in the direction of nearby motion. In the “flash-jump” illusion, a transient change in the appearance of a moving object (e.g., color) is mislocalized in the direction of subsequent motion. Finally, in the Frohlich illusion, the starting position of a suddenly appearing moving object is mislocalized in the direction of the subsequent motion. We demonstrate, in a series of experiments, a unified explanation for all these illusions: Perceptual localization is influenced by motion signals collected over ∼80 ms after a query is triggered. These demonstrations rule out “latency difference” and asynchronous feature binding models, in which objects appear in their real positions but misaligned in time. Instead, the illusions explored here are best understood as biases in localization caused by motion signals. We suggest that motion biasing exists because it allows the visual system to account for neural processing delays by retrospectively “pushing” an object closer to its true physical location, and we propose directions for exploring the neural mechanisms underlying the dynamic updating of location by the activity of motion-sensitive neurons. PMID:17461687

  1. Isynchronous motion in classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osypowski, E.; Olsson, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Those oscillatory motions for which the period is independent of the total energy are investigated. There is only one corresponding symmetric potential, the quadratic potential of the simple harmonic motion but infinite classes of asymmetric potentials must be considered. Geometric and analytic requirements of isochronism are discussed and several specific examples are given

  2. Motion simulator with exchangeable unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.A.; Beukers, A.; Baarspul, M.; Van Tooren, M.J.; De Winter, S.E.E.

    2001-01-01

    A motion simulator provided with a movable housing, preferably carried by a number of length-adjustable legs, in which housing projection means are arranged for visual information supply, while in the housing a control environment of a motion apparatus to be simulated is situated, the control

  3. Commercially available video motion detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    A market survey of commercially available video motion detection systems was conducted by the Intrusion Detection Systems Technology Division of Sandia Laboratories. The information obtained from this survey is summarized in this report. The cutoff date for this information is May 1978. A list of commercially available video motion detection systems is appended.

  4. Higher order equations of motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollini, C.G.; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that the motion of elementary particles be described by higher order differential equations induced by supersymmetry in higher dimensional space-time is discussed. The specific example of six dimensions writing the corresponding Lagrangian and equations of motion, is presented. (author) [pt

  5. Commercially available video motion detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A market survey of commercially available video motion detection systems was conducted by the Intrusion Detection Systems Technology Division of Sandia Laboratories. The information obtained from this survey is summarized in this report. The cutoff date for this information is May 1978. A list of commercially available video motion detection systems is appended

  6. Fast Radioactive Nuclide Recognition Method Study Based on Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Huo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on pattern recognition method, applied the nuclear radiation digital measurement and analysis system platform, through synthetically making use of the radioactive nuclide’s ray information, selected radiation characteristic information of the radioactive nuclide, established the characteristic arrays database of radioactive nuclides, the recognition method is designed and applied to the identification of radionuclide radiation while using middle or low-resolution detector in this paper. Verified by experiments, when the count value of the traditional low-resolution spectrometer system is not reach single full energy peak’s statistical lower limit value, the three kinds of mixed radioactive nuclides’ true discrimination rate reached more than 90 % in the digital measurement and analysis system using fast radionuclide recognition method. The results show that this method is obviously superior to the traditional methods, and effectively improve the rapid identification ability to radioactive nuclide.

  7. Pattern recognition and modelling of earthquake registrations with interactive computer support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manova, Katarina S.

    2004-01-01

    The object of the thesis is Pattern Recognition. Pattern recognition i.e. classification, is applied in many fields: speech recognition, hand printed character recognition, medical analysis, satellite and aerial-photo interpretations, biology, computer vision, information retrieval and so on. In this thesis is studied its applicability in seismology. Signal classification is an area of great importance in a wide variety of applications. This thesis deals with the problem of (automatic) classification of earthquake signals, which are non-stationary signals. Non-stationary signal classification is an area of active research in the signal and image processing community. The goal of the thesis is recognition of earthquake signals according to their epicentral zone. Source classification i.e. recognition is based on transformation of seismograms (earthquake registrations) to images, via time-frequency transformations, and applying image processing and pattern recognition techniques for feature extraction, classification and recognition. The tested data include local earthquakes from seismic regions in Macedonia. By using actual seismic data it is shown that proposed methods provide satisfactory results for classification and recognition.(Author)

  8. Assisting doctors on assessing movements in infants using motion tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mikkel; Herskind, Anna; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we consider the possibilities of having an automatic computer-based system for tracking the movements of infants. An existing motion tracking system is used to process recorded video sequences containing both color and spatial information of the infant's body pose and movements....... The system uses these sequences of data to estimate the underlying skeleton of the infant and parametrize the movements. Post-processing of these parameters can yield objective measurements of an infant's movement patterns. This could e.g. be quantification of (a)symmetry and recognition of certain gestures...

  9. Editorial Research recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Jacobs

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Only partly tongue in cheek, I suggested in ALT-N (number 18, July 1997 that we should consider mounting a Campaign for the Acknowledgement of Research into Educational Technology (CARET. I was astonished by the large number of responses in my mailbox, not one of them dissenting from the views I expressed, and many offering examples of how excellent peer-reviewed publications in good journals, sometimes associated with very respectable research grants, had vanished into the ether when it came to the last Research Assessment Exercise (RAE. Outside education as a discipline (and even there . . . , RAE subject panels appear to consider that research into learning technology is not really worth counting. University teachers of languages, history, biology, engineering and so on may produce seminal papers on learning technology within their subject-areas, and for the purposes of their department's RAE rating they might as well not have bothered - indeed, they may even be reprimanded for not having aimed more directly between the RAE goalposts. Even within disciplines such as computer science or psychology, where one might imagine that much research into educational technology would comfortably fit, I know of colleagues who have been on the receiving end of such discouragement.

  10. Graphene-Paper Pressure Sensor for Detecting Human Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lu-Qi; Zhang, Kun-Ning; Tian, He; Liu, Ying; Wang, Dan-Yang; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2017-09-26

    Pressure sensors should have an excellent sensitivity in the range of 0-20 kPa when applied in wearable applications. Traditional pressure sensors cannot achieve both a high sensitivity and a large working range simultaneously, which results in their limited applications in wearable fields. There is an urgent need to develop a pressure sensor to make a breakthrough in both sensitivity and working range. In this paper, a graphene-paper pressure sensor that shows excellent performance in the range of 0-20 kPa is proposed. Compared to most reported graphene pressure sensors, this work realizes the optimization of sensitivity and working range, which is especially suitable for wearable applications. We also demonstrate that the pressure sensor can be applied in pulse detection, respiratory detection, voice recognition, as well as various intense motion detections. This graphene-paper pressure sensor will have great potentials for smart wearable devices to achieve health monitoring and motion detection.

  11. Reading Emotion From Mouse Cursor Motions: Affective Computing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Takashi; Xiao, Kunchen

    2017-11-13

    Affective computing research has advanced emotion recognition systems using facial expressions, voices, gaits, and physiological signals, yet these methods are often impractical. This study integrates mouse cursor motion analysis into affective computing and investigates the idea that movements of the computer cursor can provide information about emotion of the computer user. We extracted 16-26 trajectory features during a choice-reaching task and examined the link between emotion and cursor motions. Participants were induced for positive or negative emotions by music, film clips, or emotional pictures, and they indicated their emotions with questionnaires. Our 10-fold cross-validation analysis shows that statistical models formed from "known" participants (training data) could predict nearly 10%-20% of the variance of positive affect and attentiveness ratings of "unknown" participants, suggesting that cursor movement patterns such as the area under curve and direction change help infer emotions of computer users. © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  12. Familiarity affects collective motion in shoals of guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scarlet; Lukeman, Ryan; Schaerf, Timothy M; Ward, Ashley J W

    2017-09-01

    The coordinated and synchronized movement of animals in groups often referred to as collective motion emerges through the interactions between individual animals within the group. Factors which affect these interactions have the potential to shape collective movement. One such factor is familiarity, or the tendency to bias behaviour towards individuals as a result of social recognition. We examined the effect of familiarity on the expression of collective motion in small shoals of female guppies ( Poecilia reticulata ). Groups comprising familiar individuals were more strongly polarized than groups of unfamiliar individuals, particularly when in novel surroundings. The ability to form more strongly polarized shoals potentially promotes information transfer and enhances the anti-predator benefits of grouping.

  13. Soliton trains in motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hause, A.; Mitschke, F.

    2010-01-01

    Two solitons in an optical fiber can form pairs in which the double-humped shape is maintained even when the pair is shifted in frequency by the Raman effect. We show here analytically that this is possible even when the two solitons have unequal power. We discuss the forces that cause relative motion of the two solitons, and determine a condition for balance, i.e., for a pair to maintain their separation while the phase keeps evolving. At a specific parameter point we find a solution in which even the phase profile of the pulse pair is maintained. We then discuss that this special point exists also for multipeak structures, or soliton trains. These trains can move as an entity due to Raman shifting. The results are tested by numerical simulation. A comparison to literature reveals that both the rotating phase pair and the constant phase soliton pair apparently have been seen before by others in numerical simulations. Our treatment provides the general framework.

  14. Measurement of shoulder motion fraction and motion ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeong Han

    2006-01-01

    This study was to understand about the measurement of shoulder motion fraction and motion ratio. We proposed the radiological criterior of glenohumeral and scapulothoracic movement ratio. We measured the motion fraction of the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic movement using CR (computed radiological system) of arm elevation at neutral, 90 degree, full elevation. Central ray was 15 .deg., 19 .deg., 22 .deg. to the cephald for the parallel scapular spine, and the tilting of torso was external oblique 40 .deg., 36 .deg., 22 .deg. for perpendicular to glenohumeral surface. Healthful donor of 100 was divided 5 groups by age (20, 30, 40, 50, 60). The angle of glenohumeral motion and scapulothoracic motion could be taken from gross arm angle and radiological arm angle. We acquired 3 images at neutral, 90 .deg. and full elevation position and measured radiographic angle of glenoheumeral, scapulothoracic movement respectively. While the arm elevation was 90 .deg., the shoulder motion fraction was 1.22 (M), 1.70 (W) in right arm and 1.31, 1.54 in left. In full elevation, Right arm fraction was 1.63, 1.84 and left was 1.57, 1.32. In right dominant arm (78%), 90 .deg. and Full motion fraction was 1.58, 1.43, in left (22%) 1.82, 1.94. In generation 20, 90 .deg. and Full motion fraction was 1.56, 1.52, 30' was 1.82, 1.43, 40' was 1.23, 1.16, 50' was 1.80, 1.28,60' was 1.24, 1.75. There was not significantly by gender, dominant arm and age. The criteria of motion fraction was useful reference for clinical diagnosis the shoulder instability

  15. Measurement of shoulder motion fraction and motion ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeong Han [Daegu Catholic University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    This study was to understand about the measurement of shoulder motion fraction and motion ratio. We proposed the radiological criterior of glenohumeral and scapulothoracic movement ratio. We measured the motion fraction of the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic movement using CR (computed radiological system) of arm elevation at neutral, 90 degree, full elevation. Central ray was 15 .deg., 19 .deg., 22 .deg. to the cephald for the parallel scapular spine, and the tilting of torso was external oblique 40 .deg., 36 .deg., 22 .deg. for perpendicular to glenohumeral surface. Healthful donor of 100 was divided 5 groups by age (20, 30, 40, 50, 60). The angle of glenohumeral motion and scapulothoracic motion could be taken from gross arm angle and radiological arm angle. We acquired 3 images at neutral, 90 .deg. and full elevation position and measured radiographic angle of glenoheumeral, scapulothoracic movement respectively. While the arm elevation was 90 .deg., the shoulder motion fraction was 1.22 (M), 1.70 (W) in right arm and 1.31, 1.54 in left. In full elevation, Right arm fraction was 1.63, 1.84 and left was 1.57, 1.32. In right dominant arm (78%), 90 .deg. and Full motion fraction was 1.58, 1.43, in left (22%) 1.82, 1.94. In generation 20, 90 .deg. and Full motion fraction was 1.56, 1.52, 30' was 1.82, 1.43, 40' was 1.23, 1.16, 50' was 1.80, 1.28,60' was 1.24, 1.75. There was not significantly by gender, dominant arm and age. The criteria of motion fraction was useful reference for clinical diagnosis the shoulder instability.

  16. Coupled motions direct electrons along human microsomal P450 Chains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Pudney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein domain motion is often implicated in biological electron transfer, but the general significance of motion is not clear. Motion has been implicated in the transfer of electrons from human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR to all microsomal cytochrome P450s (CYPs. Our hypothesis is that tight coupling of motion with enzyme chemistry can signal "ready and waiting" states for electron transfer from CPR to downstream CYPs and support vectorial electron transfer across complex redox chains. We developed a novel approach to study the time-dependence of dynamical change during catalysis that reports on the changing conformational states of CPR. FRET was linked to stopped-flow studies of electron transfer in CPR that contains donor-acceptor fluorophores on the enzyme surface. Open and closed states of CPR were correlated with key steps in the catalytic cycle which demonstrated how redox chemistry and NADPH binding drive successive opening and closing of the enzyme. Specifically, we provide evidence that reduction of the flavin moieties in CPR induces CPR opening, whereas ligand binding induces CPR closing. A dynamic reaction cycle was created in which CPR optimizes internal electron transfer between flavin cofactors by adopting closed states and signals "ready and waiting" conformations to partner CYP enzymes by adopting more open states. This complex, temporal control of enzyme motion is used to catalyze directional electron transfer from NADPH→FAD→FMN→heme, thereby facilitating all microsomal P450-catalysed reactions. Motions critical to the broader biological functions of CPR are tightly coupled to enzyme chemistry in the human NADPH-CPR-CYP redox chain. That redox chemistry alone is sufficient to drive functionally necessary, large-scale conformational change is remarkable. Rather than relying on stochastic conformational sampling, our study highlights a need for tight coupling of motion to enzyme chemistry to give vectorial electron

  17. Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H S.

    2006-06-01

    The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most biologists because it took us into increasingly familiar territory. It took mysterious processes, such as the replication of genetic material and assigned them parts that could be readily understood by the human mind. When we think of ''molecular machines'' as being the underlying basis of life, we are using a paradigm derived from everyday experience. However, the price that we paid was a relentless drive towards reductionism and the attendant balkanization of biology. Now along comes ''systems biology'' that promises us a solution to the problem of ''knowing more and more about less and less''. Unlike molecular biology, systems biology appears to be taking us into unfamiliar intellectual territory, such as statistics, mathematics and computer modeling. Not surprisingly, systems biology has met with widespread skepticism and resistance. Why do we need systems biology anyway and how does this new area of research promise to change the face of biology in the next couple of decades?

  18. Biological therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenstein, Ben; Brook, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    This introductory textbook covers all the main categories of biological medicines, including vaccines, hormonal preparations, drugs for rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases, drugs...

  19. Reciprocal Estimation of Pedestrian Location and Motion State toward a Smartphone Geo-Context Computing Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbin Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advance in mobile communications has made information and services ubiquitously accessible. Location and context information have become essential for the effectiveness of services in the era of mobility. This paper proposes the concept of geo-context that is defined as an integral synthesis of geographical location, human motion state and mobility context. A geo-context computing solution consists of a positioning engine, a motion state recognition engine, and a context inference component. In the geo-context concept, the human motion states and mobility context are associated with the geographical location where they occur. A hybrid geo-context computing solution is implemented that runs on a smartphone, and it utilizes measurements of multiple sensors and signals of opportunity that are available within a smartphone. Pedestrian location and motion states are estimated jointly under the framework of hidden Markov models, and they are used in a reciprocal manner to improve their estimation performance of one another. It is demonstrated that pedestrian location estimation has better accuracy when its motion state is known, and in turn, the performance of motion state recognition can be improved with increasing reliability when the location is given. The geo-context inference is implemented simply with the expert system principle, and more sophisticated approaches will be developed.

  20. Marker-Free Human Motion Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grest, Daniel

    Human Motion Capture is a widely used technique to obtain motion data for animation of virtual characters. Commercial optical motion capture systems are marker-based. This book is about marker-free motion capture and its possibilities to acquire motion from a single viewing direction. The focus...