WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological kinetic isotope

  1. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains nonsteady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic isotope fractionation often assumes first-order or Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the latter solved under the quasi-steady state assumption. Both formulations lead to a constant isotope fractionation factor, therefore they may return incorrect estimations of isotopic effects and misleading interpretations of isotopic signatures when fractionation is not a steady process. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitrification in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate (2006) in which high and variable 15N-N2O enrichment during N2O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N2O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. When Michaelis-Menten kinetics were coupled to Monod kinetics to describe biomass and enzyme dynamics, and the quasi-steady state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observed concentrations, and variable and inverse isotope fractionations. These results imply a substantial revision in modeling isotopic effects, suggesting that steady state kinetics such as first-order, Rayleigh, and classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics should be superseded by transient kinetics in conjunction with biomass and enzyme dynamics.

  2. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-06-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

  3. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proton transfer; promoter modes; kinetic isotope effect. 1. Introduction. Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is the dependence of the rate constant on the mass of the isotope of the atom in a chemical reaction. The primary kinetic isotope effect is the KIE when the bonds connecting that atom to the rest of the molecular frame are broken ...

  4. Reaction kinetics: mechanisms and isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    This chapter emphasized how the isotope effects are obtained, and the factors that govern their magnitude. Most of the discussion concerned hydrogen isotope effects. Of the other isotopes much work has been done on carbon. Less extensive studies were reported using the isotopes of chlorine ( 35 Cl, 37 Cl), sulfur ( 32 S, 34 S), nitrogen ( 14 N, 15 N), and oxygen ( 16 O, 17 O). The customary way of altering the symmetry of the transition state is to vary the strength of the base B. Very large primary kinetic hydrogen isotope effects have also been observed for nitrocompounds. Some hydrogen alien reactions which may also be characterized by small solvation changes exhibit extremely large K/sup H//K/sup D/ values. Recently the main application of secondary hydrogen isotope effects has been in the study of the ability of neighboring groups to alter the energetics of organic reactions. 1 figure, 5 tables

  5. Kinetic coefficients in isotopically disordered crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhernov, Arkadii P; Inyushkin, Alexander V

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of the behavior of kinetic coefficients, like thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, and thermoelectric power, in isotopically disordered materials are reviewed in detail. New experimental and theoretical results on the isotope effects in the thermal conductivity of diamond, Ge, and Si semiconductors are presented. The suppression effect of phonon-drag thermopower in the isotopically disordered Ge crystals is discussed. The influence of dynamic and static crystal lattice deformations on the electric conductivity of metals as well as on the ordinary phonon spectrum deformations is considered. (reviews of topical problems)

  6. Kinetic fractionation of stable nitrogen isotopes during amino acid transamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macko, S.A.; Fogel Estep, M.L.; Engel, M.H.; Hare, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluates a kinetic isotope effect involving 15 N, during the transamination reactions catalyzed by glutamic oxalacetic transaminase. During the transfer of amino nitrogen from glutamic acid to oxaloacetate to form aspartic acid, 14 NH 2 reacted 1.0083 times faster than 15 NH 2 . In the reverse reaction transferring NH 2 from aspartic acid to α-ketoglutarate, 14 NH 2 was incorporated 1.0017 times faster than 15 NH 2 . Knowledge of the magnitude and sign of these isotope effects will be useful in the interpretation of the distribution of 15 N in biological and geochemical systems. (author)

  7. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 1. Variation of kinetic isotope ... An extension of this to the concerted multiple proton transfer reactions implies that the kinetic isotope effect in such reaction depends exponentially on the number of protons that are being transferred. Computational evidence ...

  9. Assessing kinetic fractionation in brachiopod calcite using clumped isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Bajnai, David; Fiebig, Jens; Tomašových, Adam; Milner Garcia, Sara; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Raddatz, Jacek; Löffler, Niklas; Primo-Ramos, Cristina; Brand, Uwe

    2018-01-01

    Brachiopod shells are the most widely used geological archive for the reconstruction of the temperature and the oxygen isotope composition of Phanerozoic seawater. However, it is not conclusive whether brachiopods precipitate their shells in thermodynamic equilibrium. In this study, we investigated the potential impact of kinetic controls on the isotope composition of modern brachiopods by measuring the oxygen and clumped isotope compositions of their shells. Our results show that clumped and...

  10. Isotopic exchange reactions. Kinetics and efficiency of the reactors using them in isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoire, Jean

    1979-11-01

    In the first part, some definitions and the thermodynamic and kinetic isotopic effect concepts are recalled. In the second part the kinetic laws are established, in homogeneous and heterogeneous medium (one component being on occasions present in both phases), without and with isotopic effects. Emphasis is put on application to separation of isotopes, the separation factor α being close to 1, one isotope being in large excess with respect to the other one. Isotopic transfer is then given by: J = Ka (x - y/α) where x and y are the (isotopic) mole fractions in both phases, Ka may be either the rate of exchange or a transfer coefficient which can be considered as the 'same in both ways' if α-1 is small compared to the relative error on the measure of Ka. The third part is devoted to isotopic exchange reactors. Relationships between their efficiency and kinetics are established in some simple cases: plug cocurrent flow reactors, perfectly mixed reactors, countercurrent reactors without axial mixing. We treat only cases where α and the up flow to down flow ratio is close to 1 so that Murphee efficiency approximately overall efficiency (discrete stage contactors). HTU (phase 1) approximately HTU (phase 2) approximately HETP (columns). In a fourth part, an expression of the isotopic separative power of reactors is proposed and discussed [fr

  11. Quantum instanton evaluation of the kinetic isotope effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.; Castillo, Jesus F.; Aoiz, F.Javier

    2005-04-19

    A general quantum-mechanical method for computing kinetic isotope effects is presented. The method is based on the quantum instanton approximation for the rate constant and on the path integral Metropolis Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Boltzmann operator matrix elements. It computes the kinetic isotope effect directly, using a thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotope, thus avoiding the more computationally expensive process of computing the individual rate constants. The method is more accurate than variational transition-state theories or the semiclassical instanton method since it does not assume a single reaction path and does not use a semiclassical approximation of the Boltzmann operator. While the general Monte-Carlo implementation makes the method accessible to systems with a large number of atoms, we present numerical results for the Eckart barrier and for the collinear and full three-dimensional isotope variants of the hydrogen exchange reaction H+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}+H. In all seven test cases, for temperatures between 250 K and 600 K, the error of the quantum instanton approximation for the kinetic isotope effects is less than {approx}10%.

  12. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE's) have been determined for the reaction of methyl iodide with a series of reducing agents. Reagents which transfer hydride ion in an SN2 reaction show small inverse or small normal KIE's. Reagents which transfer an electron to methyl iodide to produce...

  13. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-01-01

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  14. Entering chloride kinetic isotope effects in protic and aprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cromartie, T.H.; Swain, C.G.

    1976-01-01

    Chlorine kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of ethylene oxide and chloride ion are normal ( 35 Cl/ 37 Cl greater than unity) in protic solvents and in acetone and dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of 1 equiv of 2,6-lutidinium ion. In the presence of 0.1 equiv of this cation (and 0.9 of Li + ) the isotope effect in DMF is inverse (0.9922). This is the first observation of an inverse entering-group heavy-atom isotope effect. The reaction of chloride ion with dimethyl sulfate is normal in water but inverse in DMF. The ''normal'' isotope effects are shown to be due in large measure to the dominance of changes in hydrogen bonding to chlorine over changes in carbon--chlorine bonding

  15. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  16. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Isotopic fractionation of tritium in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Pierre; Fromm, Michel; Vichot, Laurent; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Guétat, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Isotopic fractionation of tritium is a highly relevant issue in radiation protection and requires certain radioecological considerations. Sound evaluation of this factor is indeed necessary to determine whether environmental compartments are enriched/depleted in tritium or if tritium is, on the contrary, isotopically well-distributed in a given system. The ubiquity of tritium and the standard analytical methods used to assay it may induce biases in both the measurement and the signification that is accorded to the so-called fractionation: based on an exhaustive review of the literature, we show how, sometimes large deviations may appear. It is shown that when comparing the non-exchangeable fraction of organically bound tritium (neOBT) to another fraction of tritium (e.g. tritiated water) the preparation of samples and the measurement of neOBT reported frequently led to underestimation of the ratio of tritium to hydrogen (T/H) in the non-exchangeable compartment by a factor of 5% to 50%. In the present study, corrections are proposed for most of the biological matrices studied so far. Nevertheless, the values of isotopic fractionation reported in the literature remain difficult to compare with each other, especially since the physical quantities and units often vary between authors. Some improvements are proposed to better define what should encompass the concepts of exchangeable and non-exchangeable fractions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetic isotope effects and how to describe them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Karandashev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We review several methods for computing kinetic isotope effects in chemical reactions including semiclassical and quantum instanton theory. These methods describe both the quantization of vibrational modes as well as tunneling and are applied to the ⋅H + H2 and ⋅H + CH4 reactions. The absolute rate constants computed with the semiclassical instanton method both using on-the-fly electronic structure calculations and fitted potential-energy surfaces are also compared directly with exact quantum dynamics results. The error inherent in the instanton approximation is found to be relatively small and similar in magnitude to that introduced by using fitted surfaces. The kinetic isotope effect computed by the quantum instanton is even more accurate, and although it is computationally more expensive, the efficiency can be improved by path-integral acceleration techniques. We also test a simple approach for designing potential-energy surfaces for the example of proton transfer in malonaldehyde. The tunneling splittings are computed, and although they are found to deviate from experimental results, the ratio of the splitting to that of an isotopically substituted form is in much better agreement. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the potential-energy surface and based on our findings suggest ways in which it can be improved.

  19. Isotope separation factor and kinetic isotope effect of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishtalik, L.I.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of junified approach the experimentally observed dependences of kinetic isotopic effects (KIE) of the reaction of hydrogen electrolytic evolution on the value of potential on electrode were explained. It is shown that hydrogen isotope separation factor depends on KIE for two stages of the reaction, i.e. discharge on the electrode and electrochemical desorption, moreover, decrease in KIE with potential for the desorption stage overbalances its growth for the discharge stage. The reason for KIE decrease is non-activation character of the process, therefore, there is no dependence on potential of relative contribution of the product vibration-excited states [ru

  20. Kinetics of isotopic exchanges by using radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, S.

    1958-12-01

    After having noticed that iodine 131 under the form of sodium iodide has always been used as radioactive indicator in the CEA atomic pile located in Chatillon, this research report recalls the counting technique and some historical aspects of the notion of isotopic exchange and qualitative works, and presents some generalities on isotopic exchanges (reactions and calculation of rate constants of order 1 and 2, calculation of activation energy, spectro-photometric studies, Walden inversion, alkaline hydrolysis, influence of solvent on exchange kinetics, influence of the nature of the mineral halide). The author then addresses exchanges in aliphatic series (exchange with sodium iodide and with molecular iodine), exchanges in olefin series, exchanges in alicyclic series, and exchanges in aromatic series

  1. Kinetic Isotopic Fractionation of Cd and Zn During Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloquet, C.; Carignan, J.; Libourel, G.

    2005-12-01

    the first gas fraction to condense is depleted relative to the bulk composition of the gas. This is only compatible with kinetic isotopic fractionation which is mass dependant only. As the temperature dropped, most of the Cd and Zn gas condensed and mixed so that the isotopic composition of condensates is very similar to the bulk gas. The very last gas fraction had an isotopic composition enriched in heavy isotopes as a result of progressive condensation and isolation of condensates from the residual gas. It condensed on the cold plate of the heat transfer system and was included in the ash fraction having high metal concentrations. Considering the information on the behaviour observed during the gas cooling and the short time of the reactions, the Cd and Zn isotopic fractionation observed in the fly ashes are interpreted as the result of kinetic isotopic fractionation during condensation.

  2. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetic energy and momentum distribution of isotopic liquid helium mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninsegni, Massimo

    2018-03-14

    The momentum distribution and atomic kinetic energy of the two isotopes of helium in a liquid mixture at temperature T = 2 K are computed by quantum Monte Carlo simulations. Quantum statistics is fully included for 4 He, whereas 3 He atoms are treated as distinguishable. Comparison of theoretical estimates with a collection of the most recent experimental measurements shows reasonable agreement for the energetics of 4 He and pure 3 He. On the other hand, a significant discrepancy (already observed in previous studies) is reported between computed and measured values of the 3 He kinetic energy in the mixture, especially in the limit of low 3 He concentration. We assess quantitatively the importance of Fermi statistics and find it to be negligible for a 3 He concentration ≲20%. Our results for the momentum distribution lend support to what was already hypothesized by other authors, namely, that the discrepancy is likely due to underestimation of the 3 He kinetic energy contribution associated with the tail of the experimentally measured momentum distribution.

  4. Stochastic chemical kinetics theory and (mostly) systems biological applications

    CERN Document Server

    Érdi, Péter; Lente, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    This volume reviews the theory and simulation methods of stochastic kinetics by integrating historical and recent perspectives, presents applications, mostly in the context of systems biology and also in combustion theory. In recent years, due to the development in experimental techniques, such as optical imaging, single cell analysis, and fluorescence spectroscopy, biochemical kinetic data inside single living cells have increasingly been available. The emergence of systems biology brought renaissance in the application of stochastic kinetic methods.

  5. Stable isotope methods in biological and ecological studies of arthropods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hood-Nowotny, R.C.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    This is an eclectic review and analysis of contemporary and promising stable isotope methodologies to study the biology and ecology of arthropods. It is augmented with literature from other disciplines, indicative of the potential for knowledge transfer. It is demonstrated that stable isotopes can

  6. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a Grignard reagent to methyl iodide, and for reduction of methyl iodide with tributyltin hydride or with gaseous hydrogen iodide. Very small KIE's were found for electron transfer to methyl iodide from magnesium in ether or from sodium in ammonia. The reason may be that these reactions are transport......a-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE's) have been determined for the reaction of methyl iodide with a series of reducing agents. Reagents which transfer hydride ion in an SN2 reaction show small inverse or small normal KIE's. Reagents which transfer an electron to methyl iodide to produce...... methyl radical show large normal KIE's up to 20 % per a-D. Large KIE's were found for the reaction of methyl iodide with sodium, for Pd-catalyzed reaction of methyl iodide with hydrogen, for ET at a platinum cathode, for ET from benzophenone ketyl or from sodium naphthalenide, for iron catalyzed ET from...

  7. Stable isotopes: essential tools in biological and medical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P. D.; Hachey, D. L.; Kreek, M. J.; Schoeller, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of the stable isotopes, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, /sup 17/O, and /sup 18/O, as tracers in research studies in the fields of biology, medicine, pharmacology, and agriculture are briefly reviewed. (CH)

  8. Stable isotope studies of nicotine kinetics and bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. III; Denaro, C.; Jenkins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The stable isotope-labeled compound 3',3'-dideuteronicotine was used to investigate the disposition kinetics of nicotine in smokers, the systemic absorption of nicotine from cigarette smoke, and the bioavailability of nicotine ingested as oral capsules. Blood levels of labeled nicotine could be measured for 9 hours after a 30-minute intravenous infusion. Analysis of disposition kinetics in 10 healthy men revealed a multiexponential decline after the end of an infusion, with an elimination half-life averaging 203 minutes. This half-life was longer than that previously reported, indicating the presence of a shallow elimination phase. Plasma clearance averaged 14.6 ml/min/kg. The average intake of nicotine per cigarette was 2.29 mg. A cigarette smoke-monitoring system that directly measured particulate matter in smoke was evaluated in these subjects. Total particulate matter, number of puffs on the cigarette, total puff volume, and time of puffing correlated with the intake of nicotine from smoking. The oral bioavailability of nicotine averaged 44%. This bioavailability is higher than expected based on the systemic clearance of nicotine and suggests that there may be significant extrahepatic metabolism of nicotine

  9. Application of enriched stable isotopes as tracers in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stürup, Stefan; Hansen, Helle Rüsz; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The application of enriched stable isotopes of minerals and trace elements as tracers in biological systems is a rapidly growing research field that benefits from the many new developments in inorganic mass spectrometric instrumentation, primarily within inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry...... (ICP-MS) instrumentation, such as reaction/collision cell ICP-MS and multicollector ICP-MS with improved isotope ratio measurement and interference removal capabilities. Adaptation and refinement of radioisotope tracer experiment methodologies for enriched stable isotope experiments......, and the development of new methodologies coupled with more advanced compartmental and mathematical models for the distribution of elements in living organisms has enabled a broader use of enriched stable isotope experiments in the biological sciences. This review discusses the current and future uses of enriched...

  10. Heavy Atom Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect on H-Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, André K; Gerbig, Dennis; Schreiner, Peter R

    2018-02-08

    Although frequently employed, heavy atom kinetic isotope effects (KIE) have not been reported for quantum mechanical tunneling reactions. Here we examine the secondary KIE through 13 C-substitution of the carbene atom in methylhydroxycarbene (H 3 C-C̈-OH) in its [1,2]H-tunneling shift reaction to acetaldehyde (H 3 C-CHO). Our study employs matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy in various inert gases and quantum chemical computations. Depending on the choice of the matrix host gas, the KIE varies within a range of 1.0 in xenon to 1.4 in neon. A KIE of 1.1 was computed using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) CVT/SCT, and instanton approaches for the gas phase at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Computations with explicit consideration of the noble gas environment indicate that the surrounding atoms influence the tunneling reaction barrier height and width. The tunneling half-lives computed with the WKB approach are in good agreement with the experimental results in the different noble gases.

  11. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition in phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; Kasprzyk, G.; Gumolka, L.; Staedter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope effect fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid (LA) of natural isotopic composition by concentrated phosphoric acids (PA) and by 85% H 3 PO 4 has been studied in the temperature interval of 60-150 deg C. The values of the 13 C (1) isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid in 100% H 3 PO 4 , in pyrophosphoric acid and in more concentrated phosphoric acids are intermediate between the values calculated assuming that the C (1)- OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of dehydration and those calculated for rupture of the carbon-carbon bond in the transition state. In the temperature interval of 90-130 deg C the experimental 13 C fractionation factors determined in concentrated PA approach quite closely the 13 C fractionation corresponding to C (2)- C (1) bond scission. The 13 C (1) kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of LA in 85% orthophosphoric acid in the temperature range of 110-150 deg C coincide with the 13 C isotope effects calculated assuming that the frequency corresponding to the C (1) -OH vibration is lost in the transition state of decarbonylation. A change of the mechanism of decarbonylation of LA in going from concentrated PA medium to 85% H 3 PO 4 has been suggested. A possible secondary 18 O and a primary 18 O kinetic isotope effect in decarbonylation of lactic acid in phosphoric acids media have been discussed, too. (author) 21 refs.; 3 tabs

  12. Determination of zinc stable isotopes in biological materials using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, K.Y.; Veillon, Claude

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for using isotope dilution to determine both the amount of natural zinc and enriched isotopes of zinc in biological samples. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry offers a way to quantify not only the natural zinc found in a sample but also the enriched isotope tracers of zinc. Accurate values for the enriched isotopes and natural zinc are obtained by adjusting the mass count rate data for measurable instrumental biases. Analytical interferences from the matrix are avoided by extracting the zinc from the sample matrix using diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate. The extraction technique separates the zinc from elements which form interfering molecular ions at the same nominal masses as the zinc isotopes. Accuracy of the method is verified using standard reference materials. The detection limit is 0.06 μg Zn per sample. Precision of the abundance ratios range from 0.3-0.8%. R.S.D. for natural zinc concentrations is about 200-600 μg g -1 . The accuracy and precision of the measurements make it possible to follow enriched isotopic tracers of zinc in biological samples in metabolic tracer studies. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig., 4 tabs

  13. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR KINETIC STUDIES OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS: A REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  14. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcherkez, G.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  15. Effect of amino acids on the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Kubicki, James D.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2017-12-01

    frequency calculations of clusters derived from DFT structures vary by as much as 1.4‰. This suggests that the equilibrium fractionation factor for the bulk crystal can vary substantially, and that surface sorption can induce changes in αeq associated with gypsum precipitation. While we do not rule out the influence of kinetic isotope effects, our results clearly demonstrate that the mode of crystal growth can have a sizeable effect on the bulk fractionation factor (αs-f). Ultimately, our results suggest that the same mechanism by which organic molecules affect the morphology of a mineral can also impact the isotopic composition of the mineral. The results of our study provide valuable insight into the mechanism of Ca isotopic fractionation during gypsum precipitation. Our results are also important for establishing a framework for accurate interpretations of mineral-hosted Ca isotope records of the past, as we demonstrate a mechanistic pathway by which the biological and chemical environment can impact Ca isotopic fractionation during mineral precipitation.

  16. Cell kinetics and radiation biology (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.

    1986-01-01

    Variation in radiosensitivity around the cell cycle, and the extent of radiation-induced delay in cell cycle progression result in variable time of expression of radiation injury in normal tissues, ranging from a few days in intestine to weeks, months or years in slowly proliferating tissues. Radiosensitivity of tumours, to single doses, is dominated by hypoxic cells arising from the imbalance between tumour cell production and the proliferation and branching of blood vessels needed to bring oxygen and other nutrients to each cell. Response to fractionated radiotherapy schedules is also influenced by the cell kinetic parameters of the cells comprising each tissue or tumour. Slowly cycling cells show much more dramatic changes with fractionation, dose rate or l.e.t. Rapidly cycling cells redistribute around the cell cycle when the cells in sensitive phases have been killed, experiencing less mitotic delay than slowly proliferating cells. Reoxygenation seems more effective in tumours with rapidly cycling cells and high natural cell loss rates. Compensatory repopulation within a treatment schedule may spare skin and mucosa but not slowly proliferating tissues. Tumour cell proliferation during fractionated radiotherapy may be an important limiting factor of treatment success. (U.K.)

  17. Determination of urea kinetics by isotope dilution with [C-13]urea and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenburg, Wybe; Wolthers, BG; Stellaard, F; Elzinga, H; Tepper, T; deJong, PE; Huisman, RM

    1. Stable urea isotopes can be used to study urea kinetics in humans, The use of stable urea isotopes far studying urea kinetic parameters in humans on a large scale is hampered by the high costs of the labelled material, We devised a urea dilution for measurement of the distribution volume,

  18. Kinetic isotope effects significantly influence intracellular metabolite (13) C labeling patterns and flux determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenko, Thomas M; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    Rigorous mathematical modeling of carbon-labeling experiments allows estimation of fluxes through the pathways of central carbon metabolism, yielding powerful information for basic scientific studies as well as for a wide range of applications. However, the mathematical models that have been developed for flux determination from (13) C labeling data have commonly neglected the influence of kinetic isotope effects on the distribution of (13) C label in intracellular metabolites, as these effects have often been assumed to be inconsequential. We have used measurements of the (13) C isotope effects on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme from the literature to model isotopic fractionation at the pyruvate node and quantify the modeling errors expected to result from the assumption that isotope effects are negligible. We show that under some conditions kinetic isotope effects have a significant impact on the (13) C labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites, and the errors associated with neglecting isotope effects in (13) C-metabolic flux analysis models can be comparable in size to measurement errors associated with GC-MS. Thus, kinetic isotope effects must be considered in any rigorous assessment of errors in (13) C labeling data, goodness-of-fit between model and data, confidence intervals of estimated metabolic fluxes, and statistical significance of differences between estimated metabolic flux distributions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Kinetic isotope effects significantly influence intracellular metabolite 13C labeling patterns and flux determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenko, Thomas M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous mathematical modeling of carbon-labeling experiments allows estimation of fluxes through the pathways of central carbon metabolism, yielding powerful information for basic scientific studies as well as for a wide range of applications. However, the mathematical models that have been developed for flux determination from 13C labeling data have commonly neglected the influence of kinetic isotope effects on the distribution of 13C label in intracellular metabolites, as these effects have often been assumed to be inconsequential. We have used measurements of the 13C isotope effects on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme from the literature to model isotopic fractionation at the pyruvate node and quantify the modeling errors expected to result from the assumption that isotope effects are negligible. We show that under some conditions kinetic isotope effects have a significant impact on the 13C labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites, and the errors associated with neglecting isotope effects in 13C-metabolic flux analysis models can be comparable in size to measurement errors associated with GC–MS. Thus, kinetic isotope effects must be considered in any rigorous assessment of errors in 13C labeling data, goodness-of-fit between model and data, confidence intervals of estimated metabolic fluxes, and statistical significance of differences between estimated metabolic flux distributions. PMID:23828762

  20. Development of a kinetic model for biological sulphate reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further, in the BSR model the end-product sulphide has a gaseous equilibrium not in the UCTADM1 model, and hence the physical gas exchange for sulphide is included. The BSR biological, chemical and physical processes are integrated with those of the UCTADM1 model, to give a complete kinetic model for competitive ...

  1. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Appenzeller

    Full Text Available Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  2. Kinetic coefficients for the biological treatment of tannery wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Determination of kinetic coefficients for a particular wastewater is imperative for the rational design of biological treatment-facilities. The present study was undertaken with the objective of finding out kinetic coefficients for tannery wastewater. A bench-scale model of aerated lagoon, consisting of an aeration tank and final clarifier, was use to conduct the studies. The model was operated continuously for 96 days, by varying the detention times from 3 to 9 days. Influent for the aerated lagoon was settled tannery wastewater. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) of the influent and effluent and the mixed-liquor suspended solids (MLSS) of aeration tank were determined at various detention-times so as to generate data for kinetic coefficients. The kinetic coefficients k, Ks, Y and Ed were found to be 3.125 day/sup -1/, 488 mg/L, 0.64 and 0.035 day/sup -1/ respectively. Overall rate-constant of BOD, removal 'K' was also determined and was found to be 1.43 day/sup -1/. Kinetic coefficients were determined, at mean reactor-temperature of 30.2 degree C. These coefficients may be utilized for the design of biological-treatment facilities for tannery wastewater. (author)

  3. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have measured the 13 C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D 2 O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D 2 O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The 13 C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the 13 C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier

  4. Predictive Framework and Experimental Tests of the Kinetic Isotope Effect at Redox-Active Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavner, A.; John, S.; Black, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Electrochemical reactions provide a compelling framework to study kinetic isotope effects because redox-related processes are important for a wide variety of geological and environmental processes. In the laboratory, electrochemical reaction rates can be electronically controlled and measured in the laboratory using a potentiostat. This enables variation of redox reactions rates independent of changes in chemistry and, and the resulting isotope compositions of reactants and products can be separated and analyzed. In the past years, a series of experimental studies have demonstrated a large, light, and tunable kinetic isotope effect during electrodeposition of metal Fe, Zn, Li, Cu, and Mo from a variety of solutions (e.g. Black et al., 2009, 2010, 2011). A theoretical framework based on Marcus kinetic theory predicts a voltage-dependent kinetic isotope effect (Kavner et al., 2005, 2008), however while this framework was able to predict the tunable nature of the effect, it was not able to simultaneously predict absolute reaction rates and relative isotope rates. Here we present a more complete development of a statistical mechanical framework for simple interfacial redox reactions, which includes isotopic behavior. The framework is able to predict a kinetic isotope effect as a function of temperature and reaction rate, starting with three input parameters: a single reorganization energy which describes the overall kinetics of the electron transfer reaction, and the equilibrium reduced partition function ratios for heavy and light isotopes in the product and reactant phases. We show the framework, elucidate some of the predictions, and show direct comparisons against isotope fractionation data obtained during laboratory and natural environment redox processes. A. Kavner, A. Shahar, F. Bonet, J. Simon and E. Young (2005) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 69(12), 2971-2979. A. Kavner, S. G. John, S. Sass, and E. A. Boyle (2008), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, vol 72, pp. 1731

  5. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect in the thermal dehydration of boric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Ohshima, S.; Ichiba, S.; Negita, H.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetic deuterium isotope effect in the thermal dehydration process from H 3 BO 3 to HBO 2 (III) was determined using simultaneous TG and DSC. The rate constant ratio of H 3 BO 3 to D 3 BO 3 obtained by the analysis of isothermal TG and DSC curves was found to be smaller than unity. Both activation energy, E, and frequency factor, A, for the dehydration of H 3 BO 3 proved to be larger than those of D 3 BO 3 , using non-isothermal TG and DSC. The origin of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the thermal dehydration of boric acid is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  6. Probabilistic Model Checking of Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuti, Roberto; Levi, Francesca; Milazzo, Paolo; Scatena, Guido

    We present an abstraction of the probabilistic semantics of Multiset Rewriting to formally express systems of reactions with uncertain kinetic rates. This allows biological systems modelling when the exact rates are not known, but are supposed to lie in some intervals. On these (abstract) models we perform probabilistic model checking obtaining lower and upper bounds for the probabilities of reaching states satisfying given properties. These bounds are under- and over-approximations, respectively, of the probabilities one would obtain by verifying the models with exact kinetic rates belonging to the intervals.

  7. Kinetic isotope effect in dehydration of ionic solids. II. The kinetics of dehydration of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manche, E.P.; Carroll, B.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of the isothermal dehydration of the protonated and deuterated monohydrate of calcium oxalate has been investigated at 120, 150, and 170 0 C. The rate of dehydration for these salts was found to be k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.025 +- 0.012. This result rules out the enormous kinetic isotope effect as given in the literature. An isotope effect of a few percent is not ruled out; this magnitude is in keeping with that found by Heinzinger in other dehydration processes. An estimated difference of about 150 cal/mol between the heat of desorption for H 2 O and D 2 O should have led to a ratio, k/sub h//k/sub D/ = 1.20. The smaller observed ratio has been explained on the basis of a compensation effect and may be considered an example of the Barclay--Butler correlation

  8. Kinetics of the electrochemical evolution of isotopically enriched gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, C.R.; Hibbert, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described which follows, by mass spectrometry, the kinetics of 18 O 16 O evolution from an electrode surface enriched with 18 O. The kinetics on a platinum surface in acid and alkaline electrolyte were consistent with a mechanism of oxygen evolution which involves successive oxidations on a single platinum atom. The total number of platinum sites responsible for oxygen evolution was less than the total number of atoms at the surface. (author)

  9. Comparative study on ion-isotopic exchange reaction kinetics by application of tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.

    2007-01-01

    The radioactive isotopes 131 I and 82 Br were used to trace the ion-isotopic exchange reactions using industrial grade ion exchange resins Amberlite IRA-400. The experiments were performed to understand the effect of temperature and concentration of ionic solution on kinetics of exchange reactions. Both the exchange reactions were greatly influenced by rise in temperature, which result in higher percentage of ions exchanged. For bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions, the calculated values of specific reaction rate/min -1 , and amount of ions exchanged/mmol were obtained higher than that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reactions under identical experimental conditions. The observed variation in the results for two ion-isotopic exchange reactions was due to the difference in the ionic size of bromide and iodide ions. (orig.)

  10. Chemical biology of peroxynitrite: kinetics, diffusion, and radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Radi, Rafael

    2009-03-20

    Peroxynitrite is formed by the very fast reaction of nitric oxide and superoxide radicals, a reaction that kinetically competes with other routes that chemically consume or physically sequester the reagents. It can behave either as an endogenous cytotoxin toward host tissues or a cytotoxic effector molecule against invading pathogens, depending on the cellular source and pathophysiological setting. Peroxynitrite is in itself very reactive against a few specific targets that range from efficient detoxification systems, such as peroxiredoxins, to reactions eventually leading to enhanced radical formation (e.g., nitrogen dioxide and carbonate radicals), such as the reaction with carbon dioxide. Thus, the chemical biology of peroxynitrite is dictated by the chemical kinetics of its formation and decay and by the diffusion across membranes of the species involved, including peroxynitrite itself. On the other hand, most durable traces of peroxynitrite passing (such as 3-nitrotyrosine) are derived from radicals formed from peroxynitrite by routes that represent extremely low-yield processes but that have potentially critical biological consequences. Here we have reviewed the chemical kinetics of peroxynitrite as a biochemical transient species in order to estimate its rates of formation and decay and then its steady-state concentration in different intra- or extracellular compartments, trying to provide a quantitative basis for its reactivity; additionally, we have considered diffusion across membranes to locate its possible effects. Finally, we have assessed the most successful attempts to intercept peroxynitrite by pharmacological intervention in their potential to increment the existing biological defenses that routinely deal with this cytotoxin.

  11. You Are What You Eat: Mass spectrometry in paediatric kinetic studies using stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schierbeek (Henk)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAn overview will be presented about applications of stable isotopes in paediatric research. Mass spectrometry has proven to be an essential tool for unravelling kinetic studies in a large range of different research disciplines related to intestinal diseases, obesities, severe cerebral

  12. Kinetic Isotope Effects (KIE) and Density Functional Theory (DFT): A Match Made in Heaven?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Fristrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Determination of experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIE) is one of the most useful tools for the exploration of reaction mechanisms in organometallic chemistry. The approach has been further strengthened during the last decade with advances in modern computational chemistry. This allows for th...

  13. Isotope exchange kinetic of phosphorus in soils from Pernambuco State -Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, F.J.B. de.

    1989-12-01

    The applicability of isotopic exchange kinetics of 32 p to characterize phosphorus available to plants and to diagnose the reactivity of soil-fertilizer-P in six soils from Pernambuco is described. This methodology was compared with anion exchange resin, isotopic exchange equilibrium methods (E-value and L-value) and P absorption by plants. The first greenhouse experiment had the following treatments: 1) with P and, 2) with addition of 43.7 mg P/Kg of soil, incubated for O, 42 and 84 days before seeding. The kinetic of isotopic exchange (KIE), resin-P and E-value were determined before seeding and after harvesting pearl millet grown for 42 days. Results indicated that the KIE parameters rated the soils more efficiently, in terms of available P and soil-fertilizer-P reactivity, than resin-P, E-value and L-value. (author). 38 refs, 2 figs, 18 tabs

  14. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence of a kinetic isotope effect in nanoaluminum and water combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappan, Bryce C; Dirmyer, Matthew R; Risha, Grant A

    2014-08-25

    The normally innocuous combination of aluminum and water becomes violently reactive on the nanoscale. Research in the field of the combustion of nanoparticulate aluminum has important implications in the design of molecular aluminum clusters, hydrogen storage systems, as well as energetic formulations which could use extraterrestrial water for space propulsion. However, the mechanism that controls the reaction speed is poorly understood. While current models for micron-sized aluminum water combustion reactions place heavy emphasis on diffusional limitations, as reaction scales become commensurate with diffusion lengths (approaching the nanoscale) reaction rates have long been suspected to depend on chemical kinetics, but have never been definitely measured. The combustion analysis of nanoparticulate aluminum with H2O or D2O is presented. Different reaction rates resulting from the kinetic isotope effect are observed. The current study presents the first-ever observed kinetic isotope effect in a metal combustion reaction and verifies that chemical reaction kinetics play a major role in determining the global burning rate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Relative extents of hydrogen-deuterium exchange of nitrosamines: relevance to biological isotope effect studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, G.M.; Lijinsky, W.

    1979-01-01

    Relative extents of base-catalyzed, hydrogen-deuterium exchange have been determined for a number of nitrosamines. Observed trends in the exchanges are discussed in terms of substitution, ring size and conformation. The relevance of the exchanges to deuterium isotope effects in carcinogenesis tests is discussed. Those compounds which give pronounced biological isotope effects undergo exchange only to a small extent. No biological isotope effect is found for compounds which undergo extensive exchange. (author)

  17. Kinetics of isotopic exchange of [1-3H]saccharides with hydrogen using palladium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Kayumov, V.G.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics was studied of the isotopic exchange of [1- 3 H]saccharides with hydrogen on palladium catalysts. The effect was studied of different factors on the rate of isotopic exchange, e.g., of the composition and structure of saccharides, their concentration in the solution (C), the type of catalyst and of the buffer solution. It was found that by reduced rate of isotopic exchange with hydrogen, all studied saccharides may be arranged into a series independent of the type of catalyst in accordance with the sequence of declining coefficient of relative mobility of l-H atoms during the reaction. Linear dependence was found to exist between the rate constant of the isotopic exchange reaction (r) and the coefficient of relative lability. It was also found that in the range of low concentrations the observed rate constants of isotopic exchange were not dependent on concentration and in the range of higher concentrations, r decreased with increasing C. This character of dependence is justified by the side effect of the processes of sorption on the catalyst. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs

  18. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylations of lactic acid containing 13C at the natural abundance level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.

    1992-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition by sulfuric acid has been studied in the temperature range of 20-80 deg C. The 13 C (1) isotope separation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid depends strongly on the temperature above 40 deg C. Below this temperature the 13 C isotope effect in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid is normal similarly as has been found in the decarbonylation of lactic [1- 14 C] acid. The experimental values of k (12C) /k (13C) ratios of isotopic rate constants for 12 C and 13 C are close to, but slightly higher than theoretical 13 C-kinetic isotope effects calculated (neglecting tunneling) under the asumption that the C (1) -OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of the dehydration reaction. Dilution of concentrated sulfuric acid with water up to 1.4 molar (H 2 O)/(H 2 SO 4 ) ratio caused the increase of the 13 C isotope fractionation from 1.0273 found in concentrated sulfuric acid at 80.5 deg C to 1.0536±0.0008 (at 80.6 deg C). A discussion of the abnormally high temperature dependence of 14 C and 13 C isotope fractionation in this reaction and the discussion of the problem of relative 14 C/ 13 C kinetic isotope effects is given. (author) 18 refs.; 2 tabs

  19. Kinetic isotope effect studies of the S-adenosylmethionine synthetase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markham, G.D.; Parkin, D.W.; Schramm, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes a unique substitution reaction at the 5' carbon of MgATP. Kinetic isotope effect (V/K) measurements have been used to investigate the mechanism of AdoMet synthetase from E. coli. Changes in 3 H/ 14 C ratios when AdoMet is formed from a mixture of either ([5'- 14 C]ATP and [5'- 12 C,1'- 3 H]ATP) or ([5'- 3 H]ATP and [5'- 1 H,1'- 14 C]ATP) were examined. The effects of varying the concentrations of the co-substrate methionine and the monovalent cation activator K + were investigated. Substitution of 14 C for 12 C at the 5' position of ATP yields a primary V/K kinetic isotope effect ( 12 C/ 14 C) of 1.128 +/- 0.004 at low K + and methionine concentrations. The observed isotope effect diminishes slightly to 1.107 +/- 0.003 when both K + and methionine are present at saturating concentrations, suggesting that MgATP has only a low commitment to catalysis from at conditions near Vmax. No secondary V/K 3 H isotope effect from [5'- 3 H]ATP was detected ( 1 H/ 3 H) = 0.997 +/- 0.003. The magnitude of the primary 14 C isotope effect and the small secondary 3 H effect demonstrate that AdoMet synthesis occurs with a S/sub N/ 2 transition state which is symmetric with respect to the sulfur nucleophile and the departing tripolyphosphate group

  20. Determination of phosphorus in urban sewage sludge using the isotopic exchange kinetics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas de Tramontini, Susana; Barbaro, Nestor O.; Lopez, Silvia C.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the differences among soil available P, the use by the plants of sludge P, and of a water soluble fertilizer (Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 ) P, using isotopic exchange kinetics methods. The sludge was provided by the Sewage Sludge Treatment Plant of Tucuman City, Argentina. The isotopic exchange kinetics experiment, in which the fate of carrier free 32 PO 4 added to the soil solution at a steady state was studied, gives information on soil P exchangeability. The experiment was carried out in the laboratory, where sewage sludge and water soluble fertilizer were added to soil samples taken at a depth of 0-25 and 25-40 cm. Changes in the soil P isotopically exchangeable within 1 minute measurements in the soil with sludge and in the soil with water soluble fertilizer showed that the 0-25 cm deep soil samples had a low P sorption capacity (r1 /R values were low). The sludge had high total and organic P, but the P in the soil solution was lower than the P provided by the water soluble fertilizer. Therefore, despite its higher total P content, this sludge contained slow available forms of P

  1. Isotopic exchange between CO2 and H2O and labelling kinetics of photosynthetic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, Richard

    1971-01-01

    The reaction of carbon dioxide with water has been studied by measuring the rate of oxygen exchange between C 18 O 2 and H 2 16 O. The mathematical treatment of the kinetics allows to determine with accuracy the diffusion flow between the gas and the liquid phase, in the same way as the CO 2 hydration rate. The velocity constant of this last process, whose value gives the in situ enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase, has been established in the case of chloroplast and Euglena suspensions and of aerial leaves. The study of the isotopic exchange between C 18 O 2 and a vegetable submitted to alternations of dark and light has allowed to calculate the isotopic abundance of the metabolized CO 2 whose value has been compared to that of the intracellular water and that of photosynthetic oxygen. In addition, a new method using 13 C 18 O 2 gives the means to measure with accuracy eventual isotopic effects. The labelling kinetics of the oxygen evolved by Euglena suspensions whose water has been enriched with 18 O have been established at different temperatures. (author) [fr

  2. Impact of historical mining assessed in soils by kinetic extraction and lead isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camizuli, E.; Monna, F.; Bermond, A.; Manouchehri, N.; Besançon, S.; Losno, R.; Oort, F. van; Labanowski, J.; Perreira, A.; Chateau, C.; Alibert, P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the long-term behaviour of trace metals, in two soils differently impacted by past mining. Topsoils from two 1 km 2 zones in the forested Morvan massif (France) were sampled to assess the spatial distribution of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. The first zone had been contaminated by historical mining. As expected, it exhibits higher trace-metal levels and greater spatial heterogeneity than the second non-contaminated zone, supposed to represent the local background. One soil profile from each zone was investigated in detail to estimate metal behaviour, and hence, bioavailability. Kinetic extractions were performed using EDTA on three samples: the A horizon from both soil profiles and the B horizon from the contaminated soil. For all three samples, kinetic extractions can be modelled by two first-order reactions. Similar kinetic behaviour was observed for all metals, but more metal was extracted from the contaminated A horizon than from the B horizon. More surprising is the general predominance of the residual fraction over the “labile” and “less labile” pools. Past anthropogenic inputs may have percolated over time through the soil profiles because of acidic pH conditions. Stable organo-metallic complexes may also have been formed over time, reducing metal availability. These processes are not mutually exclusive. After kinetic extraction, the lead isotopic compositions of the samples exhibited different signatures, related to contamination history and intrinsic soil parameters. However, no variation in lead signature was observed during the extraction experiment, demonstrating that the “labile” and “less labile” lead pools do not differ in terms of origin. Even if trace metals resulting from past mining and metallurgy persist in soils long after these activities have ceased, kinetic extractions suggest that metals, at least for these particular forest soils, do not represent a threat for biota. - Highlights: • Trace

  3. Biological fractionation of lead isotopes in Sprague-Dawley rats lead poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    Full Text Available It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems.24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance and the low-lead animal feed (diet administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS.There are significant differences (p<0.05 in lead isotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of (204Pb/(206Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when (204Pb/(206Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group.The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for (204Pb/(206Pb ratio under high-dose exposure.

  4. Kinetics measurements in liquid-liquid exchange applied to isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalabreysse, M.C.; Neige, R.; Aubert, J.; Folcher, G.

    1979-01-01

    On laboratory scale, a method using calibrated drops, freely falling through a stationary continuous phase, was carried out to study the uranium isotope transfer between free ions dissolved in an aqueous phase and the corresponding complexes of an organic phase. We used an aqueous hydrochloric solution of U 4+ at an initial 235 U atom concentration of 0.72% and an organophosphorous extractant containing a U 4+ complex at an initial 235 U atom concentration of 0.5%. The isotopic mixing kinetics were measured. The aqueous phase was fed, as calibrated drops, through the stationary organic phase. 235 U concentration of the effluent stream was determined as a function of the drop residence time. An isotopic transfer coefficient ksub(A) (cm.s -1 ) was calculated. Its variations were investigated as a function of drop size. In the region of small drops the activation energy for ksub(A) was measured. The low value of 6 Kcalorie-mole allows interpretation in terms of diffusional more than chemical transfer resistance. The isotopic exchange has to be analysed by means of mathematic model based on physical characteristics of phases

  5. Kinetic mechanism and isotope effects of Pseudomonas cepacia 3-hydroxybenzoate-t-hydroxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.H.; Yu, Y.; Hamzah, R.Y.; Tu, S.C.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of Pseudomonas cepacia 3-hydroxybenzoate-6-hydroxylase has been delineated. Double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus m-hydroxybenzoate concentration at a constant level of oxygen and several fixed concentrations of NADH yielded a set of converging lines. Similar reciprocal plots of velocity versus NADH concentration at a constant oxygen level and several fixed m-hydroxybenzoate concentrations also showed converging lines. In contrast, double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus NADH concentration at a fixed m-hydroxybenzoate level and several oxygen concentrations showed a series of parallel lines. Parallel lines were also obtained from double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus m-hydroxybenzoate concentration at a fixed NADH level and varying oxygen concentrations. These results suggest a sequential binding of m-hydroxybenzoate and NADH by the hydroxylase. The enzyme-bound FAD is reduced and NAD is released. The reduced enzyme subsequently reacts with oxygen leading to the formation of other products. This hydroxylase exhibited a primary isotope effect of /sup D/V = 3.5 for (4R)-[4- 2 H] NADH but no isotope effect was observed with (4S)-[4- 2 H]NADH. An isotope effect of /sup T/V/K = 5.0 was also observed using (4R)-[4- 3 H]NADH. This tritium isotope effect was apparently independent of m-hydroxybenzoate concentration

  6. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, D.

    2010-10-15

    A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (R{sub p}) to the gross forward precipitation rate (R{sub f}), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of R{sub p} has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of R{sub f} is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, R{sub f} can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (R{sub b} or k{sub b}), since at equilibrium R{sub f} = R{sub b}, and R{sub p} = 0. Hence it can be inferred that R{sub f} {approx} R{sub p} + R{sub b}. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when R{sub p} (= R{sub f} - R{sub b}) << R{sub b}. For precipitation rates high enough that R{sub p} >> R{sub b}, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near R{sub p} {approx} R{sub b} for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate R{sub f} for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant at constant T and pH, but rather is dependent also on solution saturation state and hence R{sub p

  7. Fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy distributions of spontaneously fissioning plutonium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Bartel, J.; Schmitt, C.

    2018-03-01

    The fission-fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) distributions are evaluated in a quantum mechanical framework using elongation, mass asymmetry, neck degree of freedom as the relevant collective parameters in the Fourier shape parametrization recently developed by us. The potential energy surfaces (PES) are calculated within the macroscopic-microscopic model based on the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD), the Yukawa-folded (YF) single-particle potential and a monopole pairing force. The PES are presented and analysed in detail for even-even Plutonium isotopes with A = 236-246. They reveal deep asymmetric valleys. The fission-fragment mass and TKE distributions are obtained from the ground state of a collective Hamiltonian computed within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the WKB approach by introducing a neck-dependent fission probability. The calculated mass and total kinetic energy distributions are found in good agreement with the data.

  8. Biological fractionation of lead isotopes in Sprague-Dawley rats lead poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Duojian; Xie, Qing; Wang, Jingyu

    2012-01-01

    It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate) via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces) were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance) and the low-lead animal feed (diet) administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). There are significant differences (pblood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of (204)Pb/(206)Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when (204)Pb/(206)Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for (204)Pb/(206)Pb ratio under high-dose exposure.

  9. Biological Fractionation of Lead Isotopes in Sprague-Dawley Rats Lead Poisoned via the Respiratory Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Duojian; Xie, Qing; Wang, Jingyu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. Methods 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate) via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces) were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance) and the low-lead animal feed (diet) administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results There are significant differences (pisotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of 204Pb/206Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when 204Pb/206Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. Conclusions The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for 204Pb/206Pb ratio under high-dose exposure. PMID:23300678

  10. Isotopic insights into biological regulation of zinc in contaminated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanty, Richard B.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Wesner, Jeff S.; Walter, W. David; Schmidt, Travis S.; Podda, Francesca; De Giudici, G.; Stricker, Craig A.; Kraus, Johanna M.; Lattanzi, Pierfranco; Wolf, Ruth E.; Cidu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic organisms use a variety of biogeochemical reactions to regulate essential and non-essential trace metals. Many of these mechanisms can lead to isotopic fractionation, thus measurement of metal isotopes may yield insights into the processes by which organisms respond to metal exposure. We illustrate these concepts with two case studies, one involving an intra- and the other an extra-cellular mechanism of Zn sequestration. In the first study, the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer was grown in the laboratory, and fed a diet of Zn-doped diatoms at Zn levels exceeding the requirements for normal mayfly life functions. The N. triangulifer larvae consumed the diatoms and retained their Zn isotopic signature. Upon metamorphosis, the subimago life stage lost Zn mass either in the exuvia or by excretion, and the Zn retained was isotopically enriched. Thus, Zn uptake is nonfractionating, but Zn regulation favors the lighter isotope. Thus the Zn remaining in the subimago was isotopically heavier. In the second study, Zn was adsorbed on the cell walls and exopolysaccharide secretions of cyanobacteria, which favored the heavier Zn isotope. Continued adsorption eventually resulted in nucleation and biomineralization of hydrozincite {Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6}. These case studies demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes to provide insights into how aquatic insects respond to metal exposure.

  11. Deduction of kinetic mechanism in multisubstrate enzyme reactions from tritium isotope effects. Application to dopamine beta-hydroxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinman, J.P.; Humphries, H.; Voet, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Primary tritium isotope effects have been measured for the hydroxylation of [2-3H] dopamine catalyzed by dopamine beta-hydroxylase. Experimental values vary from 8.8 +/- 1.4 at 0.02 mM oxygen to 4.1 +/- 0.6 at 1.0 mM oxygen. It is shown that the observed dependence of the isotope effect on oxygen concentration provides unequivocal evidence for a kinetically significant dissociation of both dopamine and oxygen from enzyme, ternary complex. This approach, which is applicable to any multisubstrate enzyme characterized by detectable kinetic isotope effects, provides an alternate to classical methods for the elucidation of kinetic order in enzyme-catalyzed reactions

  12. The role and future of in-vitro isotopic techniques in molecular biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dar, L.; Khan, B.K.

    2004-01-01

    In this review we discuss isotopic in-vitro molecular biology techniques, and their advantages and applications. Isotopic methods have helped to shape molecular biology since its early days. Despite the availability of non-isotopic alternatives, isotopic methods continue to be used in molecular biology due to certain advantages, especially related to sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. Numerous techniques involving the use of isotopes help in the characterization of genes, including the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or mutations. Other isotopic molecular methods are utilized to study the phenotypic expression of gene sequences and their mutation. Emerging branches of molecular biology like functional genomics and proteomics are extremely important for exploiting the rapidly growing data derived from whole genomic sequencing of human and microbial genomes. Recent molecular biology applications like the high-throughput array techniques are relevant in the context of both structural and functional genomics. In proteomics, stable isotope based technology has found applications in the analysis of protein structure and interactions. (author)

  13. Reaction Kinetics of HBr with HO2: A New Channel for Isotope Scrambling Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jonathan R; Skodje, Rex T

    2016-11-03

    The gas phase reaction kinetics of HBr with the HO 2 radical are investigated over the temperature range of T = 200-1500 K using a theoretical approach based on transition state theory. The parameters for the potential energy surface are computed using density functional theory with the M11 exchange functional. The rate coefficient for the HBr + HO 2 → Br + H 2 O 2 abstraction channel is found to be somewhat larger than previous estimates at low temperatures due to quantum tunneling. The present study reveals the existence of a novel exchange pathway, HBr + H'O 2 → H'Br + HO 2 , which exhibits a much lower reaction barrier than does the abstraction route. The transition state for this process is a symmetrical planar five-membered-ring-shaped structure. At low temperatures, this concerted double hydrogen transfer reaction is several orders of magnitude faster than the abstraction channel. The exchange process may be observed using isotope scrambling reactions; such reactions may contribute to observed isotope abundances in the atmosphere. The rate coefficients for the isotopically labeled reactions are computed.

  14. A novel dynamic kinetic model of oxygen isotopic exchange on a supported metal catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galdikas, Arvaidas; Duprez, Daniel; Descorme, Claude

    2004-09-15

    A time-resolved kinetic analysis has been developed for modeling experimental results of {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O isotopic exchange over oxide-supported metal catalysts. Model is based on two very important points: (1) the parallel calculation of surface and bulk diffusion and (2) the implication of certain O species such as superoxides. The model includes adsorption-desorption processes on metal clusters and oxygen spillover from the metal to the surface of support and vice versa. Different mechanisms of exchange were also taken into account via mononuclear (O atoms, O{sup -}, OH) or binuclear (superoxides) oxygen species. A refined model taking into account surface diffusion, direct exchange on surface of support by binuclear oxygen species and bulk diffusion was also developed. Kinetic (reaction rates and diffusion coefficients) as well as thermodynamic parameters (activation energies) were derived by fitting theoretical and experimental curves of {sup 18}O{sub 2}, {sup 18}O{sup 16}O and {sup 16}O{sub 2} gas phase concentrations versus time. The experimental results of Pt/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst samples obtained in the 200-450 deg. C range of temperatures are examined. The refined model provides a very good fitting of the kinetic curves recorded with ceria-zirconia-supported catalysts. Moreover, values of diffusion coefficients and activation energies are in good agreement with already published values found by other methods. For a better understanding of all the steps of exchange, the kinetics of {sup 18}O and {sup 16}O distribution on the surface of metal clusters and on the surface of support are calculated and analyzed. On the basis of this model, a computer code is developed for analysis and calculations of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of automotive catalysts.

  15. Correlation between the binding energy of neutrons in nuclei and anomalous fractionation of isotopes in medico-biological objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykovskij, Yu.A.; Timoshin, V.T.; Laptev, I.D.; Manykin, Eh.A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser mass-spectrometry is used to investigate isotope ratio in medico-biological objects (MBO). Anomalous fractionation of carbon, oxygen, silicon, sulphur, potassium and calcium isotopes in MBO is detected. Correlation between neutron binding energy in isotopic nuclei and isotope anomalous fractionation of some elements in MBO is determined

  16. alfa-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects in reactions of methyllithium. Is better aggregation the cause of lower reactivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1996-01-01

    The value of kH/kD for alfa deuterium kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of methyllithium and methylmagnesium iodid with a series of substrates are consistently ca. 10-15 % higher for the lithium reagent. This may indicate a pre-equilibrium......The value of kH/kD for alfa deuterium kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of methyllithium and methylmagnesium iodid with a series of substrates are consistently ca. 10-15 % higher for the lithium reagent. This may indicate a pre-equilibrium...

  17. Carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis for amino acids from biological sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minagawa, Masao; Egawa, Saho; Kabaya, Yuko; Karasawa-Tsuru, Kyoko (Mitsubishi Kasei Inst. of Life Sciences, Machida, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    Evaluation was made for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses of amino acids which were hydrolyzed from biological samples. Alteration of isotopic compositions during chemical preparations was studied in incorporation with organic solvent, acid hydrolysis, and ion-exchange chromatography. Based on such assessment, analyses of isotope compositions of single amino acids were made for collagen and plant protein. The carbon isotope composition of soybean showed consistent pattern with algal amino acids. Similarity was also found in the intermolecular relationship of {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N between collagen and soybean protein. (author).

  18. A modified microdosimetric kinetic model for relative biological effectiveness calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yizheng; Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen

    2018-01-01

    In the heavy ion therapy, not only the distribution of physical absorbed dose, but also the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) weighted dose needs to be taken into account. The microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) can predict the RBE value of heavy ions with saturation-corrected dose-mean specific energy, which has been used in clinical treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. In the theoretical assumption of the MKM, the yield of the primary lesion is independent of the radiation quality, while the experimental data shows that DNA double strand break (DSB) yield, considered as the main primary lesion, depends on the LET of the particle. Besides, the β parameter of the MKM is constant with LET resulting from this assumption, which also differs from the experimental conclusion. In this study, a modified MKM was developed, named MMKM. Based on the experimental DSB yield of mammalian cells under the irradiation of ions with different LETs, a RBEDSB (RBE for the induction of DSB)-LET curve was fitted as the correction factor to modify the primary lesion yield in the MKM, and the variation of the primary lesion yield with LET is considered in the MMKM. Compared with the present the MKM, not only the α parameter of the MMKM for mono-energetic ions agree with the experimental data, but also the β parameter varies with LET and the variation trend of the experimental result can be reproduced on the whole. Then a spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBP) distribution of physical dose was simulated with Geant4 Monte Carlo code, and the biological and clinical dose distributions were calculated, under the irradiation of carbon ions. The results show that the distribution of clinical dose calculated with the MMKM is closed to the distribution with the MKM in the SOBP, while the discrepancy before and after the SOBP are both within 10%. Moreover, the MKM might overestimate the clinical dose at the distal end of the SOBP more than 5% because of its

  19. Determination of kinetic isotopic fractionation of water during bare soil evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Maria; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Graf, Alexander; Rothfuss, Youri

    2017-04-01

    A process-based understanding of the water cycle in the atmosphere is important for improving meteorological and hydrological forecasting models. Usually only net fluxes of evapotranspiration - ET are measured, while land-surface models compute their raw components evaporation -E and transpiration -T. Isotopologues can be used as tracers to partition ET, but this requires knowledge of the isotopic kinetic fractionation factor (αK) which impacts the stable isotopic composition of water pools (e.g., soil and plant waters) during phase change and vapor transport by soil evaporation and plant transpiration. It is defined as a function of the ratio of the transport resistances in air of the less to the most abundant isotopologue. Previous studies determined αK for free evaporating water (Merlivat, 1978) or bare soil evaporation (Braud et al. 2009) at only low temporal resolution. The goal of this study is to provide estimates at higher temporal resolution. We performed a soil evaporation laboratory experiment to determine the αK by applying the Craig and Gordon (1965) model. A 0.7 m high column (0.48 m i.d.) was filled with silt loam (20.1 % sand, 14.9 % loam, 65 % silt) and saturated with water of known isotopic composition. Soil volumetric water content, temperature and the isotopic composition (δ) of the soil water vapor were measured at six different depths. At each depth microporous polypropylene tubing allowed the sampling of soil water vapor and the measurement of its δ in a non-destructive manner with high precision and accuracy as detailed in Rothfuss et al. (2013). In addition, atmospheric water vapor was sampled at seven different heights up to one meter above the surface for isotopic analysis. Results showed that soil and atmospheric δ profiles could be monitored at high temporal and vertical resolutions during the course of the experiment. αK could be calculated by using an inverse modeling approach and the Keeling (1958) plot method at high temporal

  20. Relative rate study of the kinetic isotope effect in the 13CH3D + Cl reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Lars Magnus Torvald; Forecast, Roslyn; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    The 13CH3D/12CH4kinetic isotope effect, α13CH3D, of CH4 + Cl is determined for the first time, using the relative rate technique and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. α13CH3D is found to be 1.60 ± 0.04. In addition, a quantum chemistry/transition state theory model with tunneling...... correction is constructed and the primary cause for α13CH3D is found to be the substantially reduced reactivity of the D atom, which, in turn, can be explained by a significant increase in the reaction barrier due to changes in the vibrational zero point energy and to a lesser extent tunneling....

  1. Reaction rates and kinetic isotope effects of H2 + OH → H2O + H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-05-07

    We calculated reaction rate constants including atom tunneling of the reaction of dihydrogen with the hydroxy radical down to a temperature of 50 K. Instanton theory and canonical variational theory with microcanonical optimized multidimensional tunneling were applied using a fitted potential energy surface [J. Chen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 154301 (2013)]. All possible protium/deuterium isotopologues were considered. Atom tunneling increases at about 250 K (200 K for deuterium transfer). Even at 50 K the rate constants of all isotopologues remain in the interval 4 ⋅ 10(-20) to 4 ⋅ 10(-17) cm(3) s(-1), demonstrating that even deuterated versions of the title reaction are possibly relevant to astrochemical processes in molecular clouds. The transferred hydrogen atom dominates the kinetic isotope effect at all temperatures.

  2. Stable isotope labeled n-alkanes to assess digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Breuer, M.J.H.; Dijkstra, J.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon stable isotope (13C) labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically 13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four

  3. Data from: Stable isotope labeled n-alkanes to assess digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Breuer, M.J.H.; Dijkstra, J.; Pellikaan, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon stable isotope (13C) labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically 13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four

  4. The role of support oxygen in the epoxidation of propene over gold–titania catalysts investigated by isotopic transient kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, T.A.; Sacaliuc-Parvulescu, E.; Govender, N.S.; Schouten, J.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    Transient kinetic experiments were performed on gold–titania catalysts for the epoxidation of propene using hydrogen and oxygen to investigate the reaction mechanism. A ‘classical’ 1 wt% gold on titania catalyst was studied, as well as a 1 wt% gold on Ti-SBA-15 catalyst. Steady-State Isotopic

  5. Synthetic use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in hydrogen atom transfer 2: generation of captodatively stabilised radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mark E; Bissiriou, Sabine; Lowe, Christopher; Windeatt, Kim M

    2013-04-28

    Using C-3 di-deuterated morpholin-2-ones bearing N-2-iodobenzyl and N-3-bromobut-3-enyl radical generating groups, only products derived from the more stabilised C-3, rather than the less stabilised C-5 translocated radicals, were formed after intramolecular 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer, suggesting that any kinetic isotope effect present was not sufficient to offset captodative stabilisation.

  6. Pulmonary surfactant kinetics of the newborn infant: novel insights from studies with stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnielli, V P; Zimmermann, L J I; Hamvas, A; Cogo, P E

    2009-05-01

    Deficiency or dysfunction of the pulmonary surfactant plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases of the newborn. After a short review of the pulmonary surfactant, including its role in selected neonatal respiratory conditions, we describe a series of studies conducted by applying two recently developed methods to measure surfactant kinetics. In the first set of studies, namely 'endogenous studies', which used stable isotope-labeled intravenous surfactant precursors, we have shown the feasibility of measuring surfactant synthesis and kinetics in infants using several metabolic precursors, including plasma glucose, plasma fatty acids and body water. In the second set of studies, namely 'exogenous studies', which used a stable isotope-labeled phosphatidylcholine (PC) tracer given endotracheally, we estimated the surfactant disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) pool size and half-life. The major findings of our studies are presented here and can be summarized as follows: (a) the de novo synthesis and turnover rates of the surfactant (DSPC) in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) are very low with either precursor; (b) in preterm infants with RDS, pool size is very small and half-life much longer than what has been reported in animal studies; (c) patients recovering from RDS who required higher continuous positive airway pressure pressure after extubation or reintubation have a lower level of intrapulmonary surfactant than those who did well after extubation; (d) term newborn infants with pneumonia have greatly accelerated surfactant catabolism; and (e) infants with uncomplicated congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and on conventional mechanical ventilation have normal surfactant synthesis, but those requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenated (ECMO) do not. Information obtained from these studies in infants will help to better tailor exogenous surfactant treatment in neonatal lung diseases.

  7. Determination of the fractions of syntrophically oxidized acetate in a mesophilic methanogenic reactor through an (12)C and (13)C isotope-based kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Tito; Niedermayr, Andrea; Berzio, Stephan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Wichern, Marc; Lübken, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    In order to accurately describe the carbon flow in anaerobic digestion processes, this work investigates the acetate degradation pathways through the use of stable carbon isotope analysis and a mathematical model. Batch assays using labeled (13)C acetate were employed to distinguish the acetate consumption through methanogenic Archaea and acetate-oxidizing Bacteria. Suspended and sessile biomass, with over 400 days of retention time, from a mesophilic (36.5 °C) upflow anaerobic filter was used as inocula in these assays. A three-process model for acetoclastic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) was developed to allow for a precise quantification of the SAO contribution. The model distinguishes carbon atoms in light and heavy isotopes, (12)C and (13)C, respectively, which permitted the simulation of the isotope ratios variation in addition to gas production, gas composition and acetate concentrations. The model indicated oxidized fractions of acetate between 7 and 18%. Due to the low free ammonia inhibition potential for the acetoclastic methanogens in these assays these findings point to the biomass retention times as a driven factor for the SAO pathway. The isotope-based kinetic model developed here also describes the δ(13)C variations in unlabeled assays accurately and has the potential to determine biological (13)C fractionation factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 13C Kinetic isotopic effect of polymerization on monomers with multiple bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, E.L.; Polyakov, V.B.; Makovetskij, K.L.; Golenko, T.G.; Galimov, Eh.M.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii)

    1988-01-01

    13 C kinetic isotopic effect (KIE) of anionic and radical polymerization and metathesis reaction of monomers with multiple bonds are studied and correlation between the found KIE values of polymerization and the structure of transition state is established. 13 C KIE of polymerization reactions are investigated using monomers with natural content of the isotope. Polymerization was carried out using high-vacuum equipment: radical polymerization of methyl acrylate (MA) and vinyl acetate in benzene solution under the effect of benzoyl peroxide (60 deg C); anionic polymerization of MA, initiated by potassium butyl cellosolvolate, was realized in mass at 25 deg C; cyclopentene metathesis reaction was conducted in benzene under the effect of initiating system WCl 6 - (C 3 H 5 ) 2 Si(CH 3 ) 2 at -30 deg C; phenylacetylene polymers were prepared by polymerization in benzene solution at 20 deg C under the effect of WCl 6 . It is ascertained that 13 C KIE of radical and anionic polymerization of olefins and cycloolefin metathesis constitutes 2.0 -2.4%. Polymerization of compound with ternary bond is accompanied by a lower value of 13 C KIE (<1%), which is explained by double bond of reacting bond in transition state

  9. Kinetic α secondary deuterium isotope effects for O-ethyl S-phenyl benzaldehyde acetal hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz, J.P.; Cordes, E.H.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of hydrolysis of O-ethyl S-phenyl benzaldehyde acetal at 25 0 C in 20% dioxane--80% water is independent of pH over the range pH6-12; k/sub obsd/ = 1.9 x 10 -7 s -1 . Under more acidic conditions, the rate increases linearly with the activity of the hydrated proton; k 2 = 2.95 x 10 -2 M -1 s -1 . The kinetic α secondary deuterium isotope effect for acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of O-ethyl S-phenyl benzaldehyde acetal, measured at 25 0 C in 20% aqueous dioxane containing 0.05 M HCl, is k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.038 +- 0.008, a value consistent with a transition state in which the C--S bond is stretched rather little. In contrast, the corresponding isotope effect for the pH-independent hydrolysis of this substrate, measured at 42.5 0 C in 20% dioxane, is 1.13 +- 0.02, a value consistent with complete C--S bond cleavage in the transition state and rate-determining diffusion apart of the ion-pair formed as the initial intermediate, in accord with the suggestion of Jensen and Jencks. 1 figure, 4 tables

  10. Laboratory and field methods for stable isotope analysis in human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsema, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA; carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen) of human tissues offers a means for assessing diet among living humans. Stable isotope ratios of broad categories of food and drink food vary systematically, and stable isotope ratios in consumer tissues represent a composite of the isotopic ratios of food and drink consumed during an individual's life. Isotopic evidence for diet is independent of errors in informant recall, and accrues during time periods when researchers are absent. Beyond diet reconstruction, tissue stable isotope ratios are sensitive to excursions from homeostasis, such as starvation and rapid growth. Because of their relationship to diet, geographic location, hydration, and nutritional status, stable isotope signatures in human tissues offer a window into human biocultural adaptations, past and present. This article describes methods for SIA that may be usefully applied in studies of living humans, with emphasis placed on carbon and nitrogen. Some of the ecological, physiological, and evolutionary applications of stable isotope data among living humans are discussed. By incorporating SIA in research, human biologists facilitate a productive dialog with bioarchaeologists, who routinely use stable isotope evidence, mingling different perspectives on human biology and behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Kinetic quantification of vertical solid matter transfers in soils by a multi-isotopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagercikova, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Clay translocation is one of the major soil forming processes, however it is poorly quantified and modeled. We propose to quantify it together with bioturbation by combining different isotopic systems ( 137 Cs, 210 Pb (xs), meteoric 10 Be, 206/207 Pb, δ 13 C, 14 C) with numerical modeling based on a nonlinear diffusion-convection equation with depth dependent parameters. This novel method has been applied on Luvisol anthropo-sequences developed on loess, differing by their land use (cropping versus grassland or forest) and their agricultural practices (reduced tillage, no tillage and manure input). Our results show that as much as 91 ± 9 % and 80 ± 9 % of 137 Cs and 10 Be, respectively, are associated to the clay size fraction (0-2 μm) and can thus effectively trace vertical solid matter transfers in soils with pH > 5 and low organic carbon. Lead partitioning between different solid phases is more complex. Considering two spatial distributions of isotopes (macro-pores or soil matrix), we built up a multi-isotopic modelling approach that simulates the experimental data with the common set of transfer parameters and allowed us to quantify the relative contributions of vertical solid matter transfers to present-day 0-2 μm vertical distributions. Clay translocation is responsible for 9 to 66 % of the clay accumulations in the Bt-horizon. The diffusion coefficient also quantifies the rate of soil mixing by bioturbation. Modeling of the kinetics of solid matter transfer at multiple spatio-temporal scales should become a method of predilection in modern pedogenic and critical zone studies. (author) [fr

  12. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Asquith, Becca; Macallan, Derek

    2016-06-30

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Copper isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low temperature geochemistry and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moynier, Frédéric; Abe, Minori; Nemoto, Keisuke; Albarède, Francis

    2013-06-01

    Isotope fractionation between the common Cu species present in solution (Cu+, Cu2+, hydroxide, chloride, sulfide, carbonate, oxalate, and ascorbate) has been investigated using both ab initio methods and experimental solvent extraction techniques. In order to establish unambiguously the existence of equilibrium isotope fractionation (as opposed to kinetic isotope fractionation), we first performed laboratory-scale liquid-liquid distribution experiments. Upon exchange between HCl medium and a macrocyclic complex, the 65Cu/63Cu ratio fractionated by -1.06‰ to -0.39‰. The acidity dependence of the fractionation was appropriately explained by ligand exchange reactions between hydrated H2O and Cl- via intramolecular vibrations. The magnitude of the Cu isotope fractionation among important Cu ligands was also estimated by ab initio methods. The magnitude of the nuclear field shift effect to the Cu isotope fractionation represents only ˜3% of the mass-dependent fractionation. The theoretical estimation was expanded to chlorides, hydroxides, sulfides, sulfates, and carbonates under different conditions of pH. Copper isotope fractionation of up to 2‰ is expected for different forms of Cu present in seawater and for different sediments (carbonates, hydroxides, and sulfides). We found that Cu in dissolved carbonates and sulfates is isotopically much heavier (+0.6‰) than free Cu. Isotope fractionation of Cu in hydroxide is minimal. The relevance of these new results to the understanding of metabolic processes was also discussed. Copper is an essential element used by a large number of proteins for electron transfer. Further theoretical estimates of δ65Cu in hydrated Cu(I) and Cu(II) ions, Cu(II) ascorbates, and Cu(II) oxalate predict Cu isotope fractionation during the breakdown of ascorbate into oxalate and account for the isotopically heavy Cu found in animal kidneys.

  14. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12 -dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-06-08

    Coenzyme B12 -dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12 , it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  15. Kinetic isotope effects in complex reaction networks: formic acid electro-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Xia; Heinen, Martin; Jusys, Zenonas; Behm, Rolf Jürgen

    2007-02-19

    The determination of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for different reaction pathways and steps in a complex reaction network, where KIEs may affect the overall reaction in various different ways including dominant and minority pathways or the buildup of a reaction-inhibiting adlayer, is demonstrated for formic acid electrooxidation on a Pt film electrode by quantitative electrochemical in situ IR spectroscopic measurements under controlled mass-transport conditions. The ability to separate effects resulting from different contributions--which is not possible using purely electrochemical kinetic measurements--allows conclusions on the nature of the rate-limiting steps and their transition state in the individual reaction pathways. The potential-independent values of approximately 1.9 for the KIE of formic acid dehydration (CO(ad) formation) in the indirect pathway and approximately 3 for the CO(ad) coverage-normalized KIE of formic acid oxidation to CO2 (direct pathway) indicate that 1) C-H bond breaking is rate-limiting in both reaction steps, 2) the transition states for these reactions are different, and 3) the configurations of the transition states involve rather strong bonds to the transferred D/H species, either in the initial or in the final state, for the direct pathway and--even more pronounced--for formic acid dehydration (CO(ad) formation).

  16. Probing Reversible Chemistry in Coenzyme B12-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia Lyase with Kinetic Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12, it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. PMID:25950663

  17. Linear free energy relationship and deuterium kinetic isotope effect observed on phospho and thiophosphoryl transfer reactions in some organophosphorous compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumbiny, B J; Islam, M A; Rahman, M; Hui, Z; Quader, M A

    2014-01-01

    Tetracoordinated organophosphorous compounds were synthesized, characterized and nucleophilic substitution reaction were investigated by varying substituents around phosphorous centre or in nucleophile considering its utility in biological and environmental system. The reactivity is expressed in terms of second-order rate constant, k 2 and measured conductometrically. Linear Free Energy Relationship (LFER) tools mainly Hammett (ρ), Brönsted (β) LFER coefficients and deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) being determined for the pyridinolysis of 4 – chlorophenyl 4 – methoxy phenyl chlorophosphate, 1 in acetonitrile at 5.0 °C. The experimental data's were compared with those of structurally similar organophosphorous compounds reported earlier in quest for the mechanistic information. Nice linear correlation being found for Hammett (logk 2 vs σ x ), having negative value of the ρ X = −5.85 and Brönsted (logk 2 vs pK a(x) ) plots having large positive value for β X = 1.18 for 1 can be interpreted as S N 2 process with greater extent of bond formation in transition state (TS) of 1. The observed k H /k D values of 1 is 1.00 ± 0.05 and net KIE, 1.32 suggests the primary KIE and indicates frontside nucleophilic attack through the partial deprotonation of pyridine occurs by the hydrogen bonding in the rate-determining step.

  18. Reliability of stable Pb isotopes to identify Pb sources and verifying biological fractionation of Pb isotopes in goats and chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hokuto; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Yabe, John; Liazambi, Allan; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Darwish, Wageh Sobhy; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Stable Pb isotope ratios (Pb-IRs) have been recognized as an efficient tool for identifying sources. This study carried out at Kabwe mining area, Zambia, to elucidate the presence or absence of Pb isotope fractionation in goat and chicken, to evaluate the reliability of identifying Pb pollution sources via analysis of Pb-IRs, and to assess whether a threshold for blood Pb levels (Pb-B) for biological fractionation was present. The variation of Pb-IRs in goat decreased with an increase in Pb-B and were fixed at certain values close to those of the dominant source of Pb exposure at Pb-B > 5 μg/dL. However, chickens did not show a clear relationship for Pb-IRs against Pb-B, or a fractionation threshold. Given these, the biological fractionation of Pb isotopes should not occur in chickens but in goats, and the threshold for triggering biological fractionation is at around 5 μg/dL of Pb-B in goats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of temperature on kinetics of phosphorus isotope sorption by soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osztoics, E.; Konya, J.; Nagy, N.; Varallyay, L.

    1994-01-01

    Sorption of water soluble P by soils may be approximated by a rapid plus a slow processes. The rapid process of P sorption was studied on samples of five characteristic Hungarian soil types (meadow soil from Hajduboszormeny, brown forest soil from Keszthely, chernozem soil from Oroshaza and sandy soil from Orbottyan), using 32 P isotope technique. Kinetics of 32 P sorption and the effect of temperature (0, 25, and 40 o C) on the processes were investigated. The kinetic data were evaluated using the Christiansen equation. The activation energy and activation entropy of the processes were calculated from the temperature-dependence of the kinetic constants. The following conclusions were drawn: 1. The amount of sorbed P increases with increasing temperature, the increase is different in different soil types depending on soil characteristics. 2. Two processes of different velocity may be distinguished in the rapid P sorption under our experimental conditions. 3. The activation energy of the faster process is 25-50 kJ/mol. This suggests that film diffusion of phosphorus is the rate-limiting process in the first step of P sorption. 4. The activation energy of the slower process of rapid sorption is less than that of the faster process. 5. In contrast, the activation entropy of the slower process is twice as high (in absolute values) as that of the first, instantaneous process. The slower process is probably connected with a structural rearrangement of the sorption layer, i.e. the phosphorus becomes more firmly held. 6. This rearrangement is supported also by our previous studies on the reversibility of 32 P sorption. (author)

  20. Kinetic α-deuterium isotope effect as a probe of transition state structure and reaction mechanism in nucleoside hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical equilibrium α-deuterium isotope effects were calculated for systems modeling nucleoside and glycoside hydrolyses using a computer program (Burton, G.W., Sims, L.B., Wilson, J.C., and Fry, A.J., J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 99, 3374(1977)) which computes isotope effects directly from the expression of Biegeleisen and Mayer (Biegeleisen, J. and Mayer, M.G., J. Chem. Phys., 17, 675(1949)). For nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate, KH/KD = 1.21 to 1.25; while for nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate KH/KD = 1.15 to 1.19. The models used in the calculations were generated systematically and involved a minimum of subjectivity in the selection of molecular parameters. The isotope effects calculated formed the basis for the interpretation of experimental kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects for nucleoside and glycoside hydrolysis

  1. Investigation of the enzymatic mechanism of yeast orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase using 13C kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiley, J.A.; Bell, J.B.; Jones, M.E.; Paneth, P.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays an observed 13 C kinetic isotope effect of 1.0247 ± 0.0008 at 25 C, pH 6.8. The observed isotope effect is sensitive to changes in the reaction medium, such as pH, temperature, or glycerol content. The value of 1.0494 ± 0.0006 measured at pH 4.0, 25 C, is not altered significantly by temperature or glycerol, and thus the intrinsic isotope effect for the reaction is apparently being observed under these conditions and decarboxylation is almost entirely rate-determining. These data require a catalytic mechanism with freely reversible binding and one in which a very limited contribution to the overall rate is made by chemical steps preceding decarboxylation; the zwitterion mechanism of Beak and Siegel, which involves only protonation of the pyrimidine ring, is such a mechanism. With use of an intrinsic isotope effect of 1.05, a partitioning factor of less than unity is calculated for ODCase at pH 6.0, 25 C. A quantitative kinetic analysis using this result excludes the possibility of an enzymatic mechanism involving covalent attachment of an enzyme nucleophile to C-5 of the pyrimidine ring. These data fit a kinetic model in which an enzyme proton necessary for catalysis is titrated at high pH, thus providing evidence for the catalytic mechanism of Beak and Siegal

  2. Study of reversible ion-isotopic self diffusion reaction kinetics using 82Br as a radioactive tracer isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive tracers as a sensitive analytical technique have been used to study the reversible ion-isotopic self-diffusion reactions. In forward self-diffusion reactions, the ion exchangers in bromide form were equilibrated with bromide ion solution (labelled with 82B r as a radioactive tracer isotope) in the concentration range of 0.005-0.100 M. In reverse ion-isotopic self-diffusion reactions, the labelled ion exchangers in the range of 0.7500-1.2500 g were equilibrated with 0.0100 M bromide ion solution concentration. The results of reversible ion-isotopic self-diffusion reaction indicate that under identical experimental parameters, the reaction rates (min -1 ) are calculated to be nearly same, indicating that forward and reverse ion-isotopic self-diffusion reactions are complementary to each other. (author)

  3. Catalytic Mechanism of Cruzain from Trypanosoma cruzi As Determined from Solvent Kinetic Isotope Effects of Steady-State and Pre-Steady-State Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiang; Meek, Thomas D

    2018-02-02

    Cruzain, an important drug target for Chagas disease, is a member of clan CA of the cysteine proteases. Understanding the catalytic mechanism of cruzain is vital to the design of new inhibitors. To this end, we have determined pH-rate profiles for substrates and affinity agents and solvent kinetic isotope effects in pre-steady-state and steady-state modes using three substrates: Cbz-Phe-Arg-AMC, Cbz-Arg-Arg-AMC, and Cbz-Arg-Ala-AMC. The pH-rate profile of k cat /K m for Cbz-Arg-Arg-AMC indicated pK 1 = 6.6 (unprotonated) and pK 2 ∼ 9.6 (protonated) groups were required for catalysis. The temperature dependence of the pK = 6.2-6.6 group exhibited a ΔH ion value of 8.4 kcal/mol, typical of histidine. The pH-rate profile of inactivation by iodoacetamide confirmed that the catalytic cysteine possesses a pK a of 9.8. Normal solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed for both D 2 O k cat (1.6-2.1) and D 2 O k cat /K m (1.1-1.4) for all three substrates. Pre-steady-state kinetics revealed exponential bursts of AMC production for Cbz-Phe-Arg-AMC and Cbz-Arg-Arg-AMC, but not for Cbz-Arg-Ala-AMC. The overall solvent isotope effect on k cat can be attributed to the solvent isotope effect on the deacylation step. Our results suggest that cruzain is unique among papain-like cysteine proteases in that the catalytic cysteine and histidine have neutral charges in the free enzyme. The generation of the active thiolate of the catalytic cysteine is likely preceded (and possibly triggered) by a ligand-induced conformational change, which could bring the catalytic dyad into the proximity to effect proton transfer.

  4. Kinetics, isotope effects, and mechanism for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Masuda, H.; Imai, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Baba, S.; Murakami, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Kinetics and hydrogen-deuterium isotope effects in the methanation of adsorbed CO molecules on a Ni/SiO 2 catalyst were precisely measured by using pulse surface reaction rate analysis (PSRA). When a CO pulse was injected into flowing hydrogen, it was immediately adsorbed on the catalyst and gradually hydrogenated to CH 4 and H 2 O. The amounts of CH 4 and H 2 O produced by the hydrogenation of the adsorbed CO were determined up to various times, and it was found that CH 4 and H 2 O were produced at the same rate. When O 2 instead of CO was injected, H 2 O was immediately produced. From these results, the rate-determining step of the reaction was found to be C-O bond dissociation of an adsorbed CO molecule or a partially hydrogenated CO species. By PSRA, the rate constant for the C-O bond dissocition process per adsorbed CO molecule (k/sub H/) was determined at various temperatures, and the Arrhenius parameters of the rate constant were obtained. The rate constant in flowing deuterium (k/sub D/) was also determined. it was found that k/sub D/ is considerably larger than k/sub H/, indicating an inverse isotope effect. The average value of k/sub H//k/sub D/ was 0.75. From these results, it was concluded that adsorbed CO is not directly dissociated to surface carbon and oxygen atoms but it is partially hydrogenated before C-O bond dissociation under the conditions of the PSRA experiment. 8 figures

  5. Calculations of kinetic isotope effects in the syn-eliminations of (2-phenylethyl)dimethylamine oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiei-Kermani, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    Transition state theory (TST) calculations of kinetic isotope effects (KIE) for the syn-elimination of (2-phenylethyl)dimethylamine oxides have been carried out for a series of transition state (TS) models encompassing both E1-like and E1cB-like regions of the E2 mechanistic spectrum. A large number of different reaction coordinates were explored for both unsolvated and for coordination of solvent dimethylsulfoxide in the cyclic transition state models. The models of reaction for both solvated and unsolvated models of proton transfer are presented. A simplified method for easier initial screening of reaction coordinate contributions is developed, discussed, and found to produce accurate approximations to the full model KIE values. Both unsolvated and solvated models show E1-like E2 mechanism and the calculated values from both models are in extremely good agreement with experimentally measured KIE. Both models were used to investigate para-substituted derivatives (Z = CL, OCH 3 ) of the parent compound (Z = H). The transition states are related by a shift in structure parallel to the central E2 diagonal of an O'Ferrall-Jencks-Fry reaction diagram, as predicted by Thornton, indicating that in the absence of other factors, the extent to which negative charge is accumulated at C/sub β/ in the transition state is a function primarily of the leaving group. All of the structural parameters such as bond distances and bond angles were related to independent bond orders. Beta-deuterium isotope effects produced by both solvated and nonsolvated models are temperature dependent

  6. Electron transfer in reactions of ketones with organolithium reagents. A carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamataka, H.; Fujimura, N.; Kawafuji, Y.; Hanafusa, T.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects have been determined for reactions of ketones labeled with carbon-14 at the carbonyl carbon with MeLi and Me 2 CuLi in diethyl ether at 0 0 C. Observed isotope effects were as follows: (C 6 H 5 ) 2 C double bonds O + MeLi, 12 k/ 14 k = 1.000 +/- 0.002; (C 6 H 5 ) 2 C double bonds O + Me 2 CuLi, 1.029 +/- 0.005; 2,4,6-Me 3 C 6 H 2 COC 6 H 5 + MeLi, 1.023 +/- 0.004. The relative reactivities of ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted benzophenones with these reagents were also determined by the competition experiments. These results are consistent with an electron-transfer step which is followed by a carbon-carbon bond-forming step that is or is not rate determining depending on the structure of ketones and reagents. The reaction of benzophenone with MeLi proceeds via rate-determining electron transfer; the change in nucleophile from MeLi to Me 2 CuLi shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination; the change in ketone from benzophenone to 2,4,6-trimethylbenzophenone also shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination because the latter step becomes slower for the more hindered ketone. The extent of the geometrical change of the substrate at the electron-transfer transition state of the reaction of benzophenone with MeLi was estimated to be small on the basis of the magnitude of the KIE and the rho value of the Hammett correlation

  7. Structural and kinetic isotope effect studies of nicotinamidase (Pnc1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian C; Anderson, Mark A; Hoadley, Kelly A; Keck, James L; Cleland, W Wallace; Denu, John M

    2012-01-10

    Nicotinamidases catalyze the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to nicotinic acid and ammonia. Nicotinamidases are absent in mammals but function in NAD(+) salvage in many bacteria, yeast, plants, protozoa, and metazoans. We have performed structural and kinetic investigations of the nicotinamidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Pnc1). Steady-state product inhibitor analysis revealed an irreversible reaction in which ammonia is the first product released, followed by nicotinic acid. A series of nicotinamide analogues acting as inhibitors or substrates were examined, revealing that the nicotinamide carbonyl oxygen and ring nitrogen are critical for binding and reactivity. X-ray structural analysis revealed a covalent adduct between nicotinaldehyde and Cys167 of Pnc1 and coordination of the nicotinamide ring nitrogen to the active-site zinc ion. Using this structure as a guide, the function of several residues was probed via mutagenesis and primary (15)N and (13)C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on V/K for amide bond hydrolysis. The KIE values of almost all variants were increased, indicating that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting; however, a decreased KIE for D51N was indicative of a stronger commitment to catalysis. In addition, KIE values using slower alternate substrates indicated that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting with nicotinamide to highly rate limiting with thionicotinamide. A detailed mechanism involving nucleophilic attack of Cys167, followed by elimination of ammonia and then hydrolysis to liberate nicotinic acid, is discussed. These results will aid in the design of mechanism-based inhibitors to target pathogens that rely on nicotinamidase activity.

  8. Structural and Kinetic Isotope Effect Studies of Nicotinamidase (Pnc1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Brian C.; Anderson, Mark A.; Hoadley, Kelly A.; Keck, James L.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Denu, John M. (UW)

    2012-05-08

    Nicotinamidases catalyze the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to nicotinic acid and ammonia. Nicotinamidases are absent in mammals but function in NAD{sup +} salvage in many bacteria, yeast, plants, protozoa, and metazoans. We have performed structural and kinetic investigations of the nicotinamidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Pnc1). Steady-state product inhibitor analysis revealed an irreversible reaction in which ammonia is the first product released, followed by nicotinic acid. A series of nicotinamide analogues acting as inhibitors or substrates were examined, revealing that the nicotinamide carbonyl oxygen and ring nitrogen are critical for binding and reactivity. X-ray structural analysis revealed a covalent adduct between nicotinaldehyde and Cys167 of Pnc1 and coordination of the nicotinamide ring nitrogen to the active-site zinc ion. Using this structure as a guide, the function of several residues was probed via mutagenesis and primary {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on V/K for amide bond hydrolysis. The KIE values of almost all variants were increased, indicating that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting; however, a decreased KIE for D51N was indicative of a stronger commitment to catalysis. In addition, KIE values using slower alternate substrates indicated that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting with nicotinamide to highly rate limiting with thionicotinamide. A detailed mechanism involving nucleophilic attack of Cys167, followed by elimination of ammonia and then hydrolysis to liberate nicotinic acid, is discussed. These results will aid in the design of mechanism-based inhibitors to target pathogens that rely on nicotinamidase activity.

  9. Structural and Kinetic Isotope Effect Studies of Nicotinamidase (Pnc1) from S. cerevisiae†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian C.; Anderson, Mark A.; Hoadley, Kelly A.; Keck, James L.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Denu, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamidases catalyze the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to nicotinic acid and ammonia. Nicotinamidases are absent in mammals but function in NAD+ salvage in many bacteria, yeast, plants, protozoa, and metazoans. We have performed structural and kinetic investigations of the nicotinamidase from S. cerevisiae (Pnc1). Steady-state product inhibitor analysis revealed an irreversible reaction where ammonia is the first product released, followed by nicotinic acid. A series of nicotinamide analogs acting as inhibitors or substrates were examined revealing that the nicotinamide carbonyl oxygen and ring nitrogen are critical for binding and reactivity. X-ray structural analysis revealed a covalent adduct between nicotinaldehyde and Cys167 of Pnc1 and coordination of the nicotinamide ring nitrogen to the active-site zinc ion. Using this structure as a guide, the function of several residues was probed via mutagenesis and primary 15N and 13C kinetic isotope effects (KIE) on V/K for amide bond hydrolysis. The KIE values of almost all variants were increased indicating that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting; however, a decreased KIE for D51N was observed indicative of a higher commitment to catalysis. In addition, KIE values using slower alternate substrates indicated that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting with nicotinamide to highly rate limiting with thionicotinamide. A detailed mechanism is discussed involving nucleophilic attack of Cys167, followed by elimination of ammonia and then hydrolysis to liberate nicotinic acid. These results will aid design of mechanism-based inhibitors to target pathogens that rely on nicotinamidase activity. PMID:22229411

  10. Structural and Kinetic Isotope Effect Studies of Nicotinamidase (Pnc1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Brian C.; Anderson, Mark A.; Hoadley, Kelly A.; Keck, James L.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Denu, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinamidases catalyze the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to nicotinic acid and ammonia. Nicotinamidases are absent in mammals but function in NAD + salvage in many bacteria, yeast, plants, protozoa, and metazoans. We have performed structural and kinetic investigations of the nicotinamidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Pnc1). Steady-state product inhibitor analysis revealed an irreversible reaction in which ammonia is the first product released, followed by nicotinic acid. A series of nicotinamide analogues acting as inhibitors or substrates were examined, revealing that the nicotinamide carbonyl oxygen and ring nitrogen are critical for binding and reactivity. X-ray structural analysis revealed a covalent adduct between nicotinaldehyde and Cys167 of Pnc1 and coordination of the nicotinamide ring nitrogen to the active-site zinc ion. Using this structure as a guide, the function of several residues was probed via mutagenesis and primary 15 N and 13 C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on V/K for amide bond hydrolysis. The KIE values of almost all variants were increased, indicating that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting; however, a decreased KIE for D51N was indicative of a stronger commitment to catalysis. In addition, KIE values using slower alternate substrates indicated that C-N bond cleavage is at least partially rate limiting with nicotinamide to highly rate limiting with thionicotinamide. A detailed mechanism involving nucleophilic attack of Cys167, followed by elimination of ammonia and then hydrolysis to liberate nicotinic acid, is discussed. These results will aid in the design of mechanism-based inhibitors to target pathogens that rely on nicotinamidase activity.

  11. Cu Isotopic Composition in Surface Environments and in Biological Systems: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuhong; Chen, Jiubin; Zhang, Ting

    2017-05-18

    Copper (Cu) is a transition metal and an essential micronutrient for organisms, but also one of the most widespread toxic inorganic contaminants at very high content. The research on Cu isotopes has grown rapidly in the last decade. Hitherto, a large number of studies have been published on the theoretical fractionation mechanisms, experimental data and natural variations of Cu isotopes in variable environments and ecosystems. These studies reported a large variation of δ 65 Cu (-16.49 to +20.04‰) in terrestrial samples and showed that Cu isotopes could be fractionated by various biogeochemical processes to different extent. Several papers have previously reviewed the coupling of Cu and Zn isotope systematics, and we give here a tentative review of the recent publications only on Cu isotopesin variable surface repositories, animals and human beings, with a goal to attract much attention to research on Cu (and other metals) behaviors in the environment and biological systems.

  12. Cu Isotopic Composition in Surface Environments and in Biological Systems: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuhong Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is a transition metal and an essential micronutrient for organisms, but also one of the most widespread toxic inorganic contaminants at very high content. The research on Cu isotopes has grown rapidly in the last decade. Hitherto, a large number of studies have been published on the theoretical fractionation mechanisms, experimental data and natural variations of Cu isotopes in variable environments and ecosystems. These studies reported a large variation of δ65Cu (−16.49 to +20.04‰ in terrestrial samples and showed that Cu isotopes could be fractionated by various biogeochemical processes to different extent. Several papers have previously reviewed the coupling of Cu and Zn isotope systematics, and we give here a tentative review of the recent publications only on Cu isotopesin variable surface repositories, animals and human beings, with a goal to attract much attention to research on Cu (and other metals behaviors in the environment and biological systems.

  13. Fuzzy Stochastic Petri Nets for Modeling Biological Systems with Uncertain Kinetic Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Heiner, Monika; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic Petri nets (SPNs) have been widely used to model randomness which is an inherent feature of biological systems. However, for many biological systems, some kinetic parameters may be uncertain due to incomplete, vague or missing kinetic data (often called fuzzy uncertainty), or naturally vary, e.g., between different individuals, experimental conditions, etc. (often called variability), which has prevented a wider application of SPNs that require accurate parameters. Considering the strength of fuzzy sets to deal with uncertain information, we apply a specific type of stochastic Petri nets, fuzzy stochastic Petri nets (FSPNs), to model and analyze biological systems with uncertain kinetic parameters. FSPNs combine SPNs and fuzzy sets, thereby taking into account both randomness and fuzziness of biological systems. For a biological system, SPNs model the randomness, while fuzzy sets model kinetic parameters with fuzzy uncertainty or variability by associating each parameter with a fuzzy number instead of a crisp real value. We introduce a simulation-based analysis method for FSPNs to explore the uncertainties of outputs resulting from the uncertainties associated with input parameters, which works equally well for bounded and unbounded models. We illustrate our approach using a yeast polarization model having an infinite state space, which shows the appropriateness of FSPNs in combination with simulation-based analysis for modeling and analyzing biological systems with uncertain information.

  14. Kinetic Isotope Effect on Transport Mediated by Clc-Type H+/CL- Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picollo, Alessandra; Malvezzi, Mattia; Accardi, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    CLC transporters mediate the stoichiometric exchange of 2 Cl- ions for 1 H+ across the membranes of cellular compartments, mostly endosomes and lysosomes. Despite intense biophysical, structural and electrophysiological scrutiny the H+ transfer mechanism of these exchangers remains largely unknown. Previous work showed that two conserved Glutamates define the extremities of the H+ pathway in CLC exchangers. However, we don't know whether H+ transfer between these residues takes place along a series of protonatable moieties, via a Grotthuss mechanism and by diffusion of an H3+O cation and if at any step H+ tunneling plays a role. To differentiate between these possible mechanisms we measured the deuterium kinetic isotope effect on the transport rate of CLC-ec1 and CLC-5, respectively a prokaryotic and a eukaryotic CLC exchanger. We found that transport mediated by both proteins is slowed by ˜20-40% when H2O is replaced by D2O. This result suggests that the rate limiting step for H+ transport takes place along a hydrogen-bonded pathway, possibly formed by water molecules. However, we found that the voltage dependence of CLC-5 inhibition by extracellular H+ is eliminated by this substitution. This suggests that the voltage dependence of this process arises from a mechanism that is exquisitely sensitive to particle mass such as proton tunneling.

  15. Secondary. cap alpha. -deuterium kinetic isotope effects in solvolyses of ferrocenylmethyl acetate and benzoate in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutic, D. (Univ. of Zagreb, Yugoslavia); Asperger, S.; Borcic, S.

    1982-12-17

    Secondary ..cap alpha..-deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) in solvolyses of ferrocenyldideuteriomethyl acetate and benzoate were determined in 96% (v/v) ethanol, at 25/sup 0/C, as k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.24 and 1.26, respectively. The KIEs were also determined in the presence of 0.1 mol dm/sup -3/ lithium perchlorate: the k/sub H//k/ sub D/ values were 1.23 and 1.22 for acetate and benzoate complexes, respectively. The maximum KIE for the C-O bond cleavage of a primary substrate is as large as, or larger than, that of secondary derivatives, which is estimated to be 1.23 per deuterium. The measured KIE of about 12% per D therefore represents a strongly reduced effect relative to its maximum. The solvolyses exhibit ''a special salt effect''. This effect indicates the presence of solvent-separated ion pairs and the return to tight pairs. As the maximum KIE is expected in solvolyses involving transformation of one type of ion pair into another, the strongly reduced ..cap alpha..-D KIE supports the structure involving direct participation of electrons that in the ground state are localized at the iron atom. The alkyl-oxygen cleavage is accompanied by 10-15% acyl-oxygen cleavage.

  16. High secondary [alpha]-deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the acetolysis and formolysis of dideuterioferrocenylmethyl benzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, S. (Research Center of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Zagreb (Croatia)); Kukric, Z.; Sutic, D. (Sarajevo Univ. (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics); Saunders, W.H. Jr. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-02-01

    Acetolysis and formolysis of dideuterioferrocenylmethyl benzoate exhibit large secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects and an abnormal temperature dependence. In the presence of LiClO[sub 4], which prevents the reversion from solvent-separated to contact ion-pairs, K[sub H]/K[sub D] at 25 [sup o]C amount to 1.53 [+-] 0.02 (acetolysis) and 1.48 [+-] 0.03 (formolysis). In the presence of LiClO[sub 4] the ratios of Arrhenius pre-exponential factors, A[sub H]/A[sub D], are significantly less than unity and amount to 0.49 [+-] 0.01 (acetolysis) and 0.38 [+-] 0.04 (formolysis). In the absence of LiClO[sub 4] the A[sub H]/A[sub D] ratios are much smaller (0.02 both in acetolysis and formolysis). We suggest that these surprisingly low values result from a change in rate-determining step over the temperature range, from formation of the solvent-separated ion-pair at low temperatures to reaction of the dissociated carbocation with solvent at the highest temperatures. Whether tunnelling plays any role in these solvolyses is discussed. (Author).

  17. Recycling of an amino acid label with prolonged isotope infusion: Implications for kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, W.F.; Tsalikian, E.; Beaufrere, B.; Haymond, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate whether recycling of a labeled amino acid would occur after 24 h of infusion, two groups of normal volunteers were infused with [ 3 H]leucine and alpha-[ 14 C]-ketoisocaproate for 4 h and [ 2 H 3 ]leucine for either 4 or 24 h (groups I and II, respectively). Entry of [ 2 H 3 ]leucine at steady state into the plasma space was indistinguishable from its infusion rate for group I but 30% higher (P less than 0.001) than this rate for group II, demonstrating significant recycling of label. After discontinuation of the infusions, isotope disappearance from the plasma space was followed for 2 h. The 3 H and 14 C decay data for both groups suggest that plasma leucine and alpha- ketoisocaproate are derived from a single intracellular pool in the postabsorptive state. In group I, the 3 H and 2 H labels decayed identically; whereas, in group II, the decay of [ 2 H 3 ]-leucine and alpha- [ 2 H 3 ]ketoisocaproate was slower (P less than 0.01) than the decay of [ 3 H]leucine and alpha-[ 3 H]ketoisocaproate, confirming re-entry of label after a 24-h infusion. Therefore kinetic values calculated from models assuming no recycling of labeled amino acids are most likely not quantitative and must be interpreted with care when flux does not change or decreases

  18. Proton NMR investigation of heme pocket mobility in hemoglobin via hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic mobility of heme cavity, the active site of Hb, was investigated by analyzing the hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of the proximal histidyl ring NH of various kinds of Hbs with the aid of the high field Fourier Transform 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The exchange reaction occurs faster in oxy or R-state Hb than in deoxy or T-state Hb and there exists a good correlation between the oxygen affinity of Hb and the heme pocket mobility reflected in the hydrogen exchange rate. The effect of pH on the exchange is dramatically different for the two subunits of Hb A. Studying the exchange characteristics of mutant Hbs and chemically modified Hbs not only showed the existence of three well-defined localized paths for transmission of conformational changes between different heme pockets through a 1 b 2 subunit interface, but also indicated that the heme pocket mobility is regulated by the quaternary state of Hb as well as by the ligation state of Hb. Finally, the effect of the quaternary state on the heme pocket mobility is separated from that of the ligation by following the exchange reactions in Hbs where only their quaternary structure transition can be achieved without changing their ligation states by adjusting experimental conditions such as adding inositol hexaphosphate

  19. Research of biological isotope effect of deuterium in Anabaena azollae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongbo; Wang Wenqing; Shi Dingji; Luo Shanggeng

    1996-01-01

    Anabaena azollae is cultured in BG-11 medium whose mass fraction of heavy water is 0%, 10%, 30%, 60% and 90%, respectively. During different time, activities of photosynthesis, respiration and nitrogenase are measured. In addition, growth-curve, absorption spectrum and low temperature fluorescence spectrum are given. The change of cellular morphology is observed with scanning electron microscope. The results show that the addition of heavy water causes lagging of the exponential period of growth, and inhibits the activities of photosynthesis respiration and nitrogenase markedly. Absorption spectrum shows that the ratio of phycobilins to carotenoid decreases with increasing percentage of heavy water. Low temperature fluorescence spectrum indicates that the ratio of F 733 /F 695 decreases and photo-energy distributed to system II is more than to system I. According to the maximum of net photosynthesis, the isotope effect is also discussed

  20. Experimental Evidence for Heavy-Atom Tunneling in the Ring-Opening of Cyclopropylcarbinyl Radical from Intramolecular 12C/13C Kinetic Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-James, Ollie M.; Zhang, Xue; Datta, Ayan; Hrovat, David A.; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Singleton, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    The intramolecular 13C kinetic isotope effects for the ring-opening of cyclopropylcarbinyl radical were determined over a broad temperature range. The observed isotope effects are unprecedentedly large, ranging from 1.062 at 80 °C to 1.163 at −100 °C. Semi-classical calculations employing canonical variational transition state theory drastically underpredict the observed isotope effects, but the predicted isotope effects including tunneling by a small-curvature tunneling model match well with experiment. These results and a curvature in the Arrhenius plot of the isotope effects support the recently predicted importance of heavy-atom tunneling in cyclopropylcarbinyl ring-opening. PMID:20722415

  1. Development of a kinetic model for biological sulphate reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rhodes BioSUREÆÊ Process is a low-cost active treatment system for acid mine drainage (AMD) waters. Central to this process is biological sulphate reduction (BSR) using primary sewage sludge (PSS) as the electron donor and organic carbon source, with the concomitant reduction of sulphate to sulphide and ...

  2. Kinetics of biological treatment of phenolic wastewater in a three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... (isolated from mangrove soil) immobilized on activated carbon particle. The phenol removal rates with biofilm are determined both theoretically and experimentally. The biological characteristic constant, useful for establishing the reactor design, is also presented. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Apparatus.

  3. Absolute rate constant, kinetic isotope effect, and mechanism of the reaction of ethylene oxide with oxygen(3P) atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogan, D.J.; Hand, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of ethylene oxide with O( 3 P) atoms has been investigated in detail using a discharge flow system with mass spectrometric and photometric detection. Absolute measurements of the rate constant, kinetic isotope effect, and stoichiometry have been made. The overall stoichiometry is 3 +- 1 oxygen atoms consumed per ethylene oxide molecule. Arrhenius parameters for the reaction of C 2 H 4 O with O are A = 10/sup (9.28+-0.08)/ L mol -1 s -1 and E = 5250 +- 150 cal mol -1 over the temperature range 298 to 691 0 K, and Arrhenius parameters for the kinetic isotope effect are A/sub H//A/sub D/ = 0.9 +- 0.20 and E/sub D/--E/sub H/ = 1460 +- 230 cal mol -1 , over the temperature range 482 to 691 0 K. The magnitude of the preexponential factor and the temperature dependence of the isotope effect establish that hydrogen abstraction, rather than insertion to form a dioxetane intermediate, is the sole reactive channel for ethylene oxide plus O( 3 P). The Arrhenius parameters are discussed and compared to other hydrogen abstraction reactions of O( 3 P). Comparison is also made to the reactions of O( 3 P) with other strained three-membered ring compounds. The final products H 2 , H 2 O, HCHO, CO, and CO 2 were identified, and a mechanism is proposed to account for their formation from the radical products of the initial step

  4. Kinetics of quasi-isoenergetic transition processes in biological macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; Teslenko, V.I.

    2010-01-01

    A master equation describing the evolution of averaged molecular state occupancies in molecular systems where alternation of molecular energy levels is caused by discrete dichotomous and trichotomous stochastic fields, is derived. This study is focused on the kinetics of quasi-isoenergetic transition processes in the presence of moderately high frequency stochastic field. A novel physical mechanism for temperature-independent transitions in flexible molecular systems is proposed. This mechanism becomes effective when the conformation transitions between quasi-isoenergetic molecular states take place. At room temperatures, stochastic broadening of molecular energy levels predominates the energy of low-frequency vibrations accompanying the transition. This leads to a cancellation of the temperature dependence in the stochastically averaged rate constants. As examples, physical interpretations of the temperature-independent onset of P2X 3 receptor desensitization in neuronal membranes, as well as degradation of PER2 protein in embrionic fibroblasts, are provided.

  5. Stable isotope compositions (O-C) of reef fish otoliths from the Taiaro lagoon (Tuamotu, French Polynesia): isotopic and biologic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blamart, D.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Ouahdi, R.; Escoubeyrou, K.; Lecomte-Finiger, R.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclei (larval stage) and outer parts (adult stage) of fish otoliths from the Taiaro closed lagoon (French Polynesia) and adjacent ocean have been analysed for the C-O isotopic compositions. δ 18 O values of the nuclei of both populations indicate that isotopic equilibrium is reached. This implies that the lagoonal fish population has done its complete biological cycle in the lagoon and represents an adaptation in a closed system. δ 18 O values of the outer parts show a slight isotopic disequilibrium ( 13 C values exhibit a strong isotopic disequilibrium related to metabolic activity. (authors)

  6. Cross-Course Collaboration in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum: Primary Kinetic Isotope Effect in the Hypochlorite Oxidation of 1-Phenylethanol in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Robert J.; Fitch, Richard W.; Kjonaas, Richard A.; Wyatt, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    A kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiment is described for the physical chemistry laboratory. Students conduct a hypochlorite (household bleach) oxidation of an equimolar mixture of 1-phenylethanol and 1-deuterio-1-phenylethanol to acetophenone. The reaction occurs in a biphasic reaction mixture and follows first-order kinetics with respect to…

  7. Stable isotope labeled n-alkanes to assess digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of ruminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Warner

    Full Text Available We describe the use of carbon stable isotope ((13C labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically (13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four rumen-cannulated lactating dairy cows receiving four contrasting ryegrass silage treatments that differed in nitrogen fertilization level (45 or 90 kg nitrogen ha(-1 and maturity (early or late. Passage kinetics through the gastrointestinal tract were derived from the δ(13C (i.e. the ratio (13C:(12C in apparently undigested fecal material. Isotopic enrichment was observed in a wide range of long-chain n-alkanes (C27-C36 and passage kinetics were determined for the most abundant C29, C31 and C33 n-alkanes, for which a sufficiently high response signal was detected by combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Basal diet treatment and carbon chain length of n-alkanes did not affect fractional passage rates from the rumen (K 1 among individual n-alkanes (3.71-3.95%/h. Peak concentration time and transit time showed a quantitatively small, significant (p≤0.002 increase with carbon chain length. K 1 estimates were comparable to those of the (13C labeled digestible dry matter fraction (3.38%/h; r = 0.61 to 0.71; p≤0.012. A literature review has shown that n-alkanes are not fermented by microorganisms in the rumen and affirms no preferential depletion of (13C versus (12C. Our results suggest that (13C labeled n-alkanes can be used as nutrient passage tracers and support the reliability of the δ(13C signature of digestible feed nutrients as a tool to measure nutrient-specific passage kinetics.

  8. The kinetics of Dissolution of Biologically Formed Calcific Deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokidi, Stamatia; Koutsoukos, Petros

    2015-04-01

    The calcification of aortic valves results in the formation of non stoichiometric apatitic deposits which may have serious health implications because of the fact that these minerals adhere tenaciously on tissues like heart valves and arteries causing permanent damage which is partly due to their low solubility. In the present work, calcium phosphate biominerals were extracted from clinically removed tissues and were characterized with respect to their mineralogical constituents and other properties including morphology, specific surface area analyses and thermogravimetric analysis. In all cases, the biominerals may be described as non stoichiometric apatitic materials, although traces of the precursor phase of octacalcium phosphate (Ca8H2(PO4)6•5H2O, OCP) were identified on the basis of their morphological examination. The kinetics of dissolution of the biomineral deposits was investigated in solutions undersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3OH, HAP) at conditions of constant undersaturation at pH 7.40, 37°C, 0.15M NaCl. Synthetic stoichiometric HAP was used as the control mineral. The experiments in the present work used solutions prepared from calcium chloride and sodium hydrogen phosphate and the relative undersaturation, σ, was in the range 0.38-0.74 with respect to HAP and 0.49-0.85 with respect to OCP (σ=1 in water). The dissolution process started immediately upon the introduction of an accurately weighted amount of powdered biomineral in the undersaturated solutions homogenized by magnetic stirring. Inert atmosphere was ensured with the bubbling of water vapor saturated nitrogen through the demineralizing solutions. A glass/Ag/AgCl combination electrode was used as a probe to monitor the process and to control the addition of diluent solutions with the stoichiometry of the dissolving mineral. The measurements of the rates of crystal dissolution, showed a parabolic dependence on the relative solution undersaturation for HAP and higher

  9. Equilibrium isotope exchange kinetics of native and site-specific mutant forms of E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedler, F.C.; Hsuanyu, Y.; Kantrowitz, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Isotope exchange kinetics at equilibrium (EIEK) have been used to probe the kinetic and regulatory mechanisms of native aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from E. coli at pH 7.0, 30 0 . Substrate saturation patterns were most consistent with a preferred order random kinetic mechanism: C-P prior to L-Asp, C-Asp released before Pi, with the Asp ↔ C-Asp exchange rate 5X faster than C-P ↔ Pi. Computer simulations allow one to fit the EIEK experimental data and to arrive at the best set of kinetic constants for a given enzyme state. These approaches have been applied to modified ATCase. Bound CTP and ATP were observed, respectively, to inhibit and activate differentially Asp ↔ C-Asp, but not C-P ↔ Pi, indicating that these modifiers alter the association-dissociation rates of L-Asp and C-Asp but not of C-P or Pi. Low levels of PALA activated both exchange rates (due to shifting the T-R equilibrium), but higher [PALA] completely blocked both exchanges. The effects of a site-specific mutation of Tyr240 Phe have been similarly probed by EIEK methods. The Phe240 mutant enzyme exhibited kinetic properties markedly different from native ATCase: the data indicate that Phe240 ATCase is much closer to an R-state enzyme than is native enzyme

  10. Kinetic isotope effects in the CH4 + H→CH3 + H2 system. Predictions of the LMR six-body potential-energy reaction hypersurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriott, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Scope of Study: The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, it served to test, in part, the usefulness of the LMR six-body potential-energy surface (LMR-PES) for transition-state theory predictions of the kinetic isotope effects for both the forward and reverse reactions of CH 4 + H reversible CH 3 + H 2 . In this regard the agreement between experimental and theoretical isotope effects, assuming the former to be accurate, provides information about the accuracy of the curvature of the potential energy surface for motion both parallel and perpendicular to the reaction coordinate. Second, these isotope effects were used to assess the validity of a number of qualitative and semi-quantitative interpretations of kinetic isotope effects developed in physical organic chemistry with regard to this reaction system. The force constants and geometries obtained numerically from the LMR-PES were found to produce reasonable harmonic approximations to the reactant normal mode frequencies. Neglecting tunneling, the LMR-PES reasonably reproduces the experimental k/sub H//k/sub D/ values for the reactions CH 4 + H(D), CH 3 + HD(DH) and CD 2 + HD(DH). Since previous theoretical treatments of primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have neglected the bending normal mode frequencies, a semi-quantitative study of the effect of neglecting bending frequencies on the VP, EXC, and ZPE elements as well as the transition-state theory kinetic isotope effects was performed. The Swain-Schaad relationship between primary deuterium and tritium kinetic isotope effects was shown to hold to a reasonable degree of accuracy for the LMR-PES reaction system. A relationship between 13-carbon and 14-carbon kinetic isotope effects similar to the Swain-Schaad relationship was derived

  11. Soil solution phosphorus turnover: derivation, interpretation, and insights from a global compilation of isotope exchange kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Julian; Jegminat, Jannes; McLaren, Timothy I.; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    The exchange rate of inorganic phosphorus (P) between the soil solution and solid phase, also known as soil solution P turnover, is essential for describing the kinetics of bioavailable P. While soil solution P turnover (Km) can be determined by tracing radioisotopes in a soil-solution system, few studies have done so. We believe that this is due to a lack of understanding on how to derive Km from isotopic exchange kinetic (IEK) experiments, a common form of radioisotope dilution study. Here, we provide a derivation of calculating Km using parameters obtained from IEK experiments. We then calculated Km for 217 soils from published IEK experiments in terrestrial ecosystems, and also that of 18 long-term P fertilizer field experiments. Analysis of the global compilation data set revealed a negative relationship between concentrations of soil solution P and Km. Furthermore, Km buffered isotopically exchangeable P in soils with low concentrations of soil solution P. This finding was supported by an analysis of long-term P fertilizer field experiments, which revealed a negative relationship between Km and phosphate-buffering capacity. Our study highlights the importance of calculating Km for understanding the kinetics of P between the soil solid and solution phases where it is bioavailable. We argue that our derivation can also be used to calculate soil solution turnover of other environmentally relevant and strongly sorbing elements that can be traced with radioisotopes, such as zinc, cadmium, nickel, arsenic, and uranium.

  12. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology; Isotopie biologique. Introduction aux effets isotopiques et a leurs applications en biologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tcherkez, G.

    2010-07-01

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  13. Transport phenomena and kinetic theory applications to gases, semiconductors, photons, and biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gabetta, Ester

    2007-01-01

    The study of kinetic equations related to gases, semiconductors, photons, traffic flow, and other systems has developed rapidly in recent years because of its role as a mathematical tool in many applications in areas such as engineering, meteorology, biology, chemistry, materials science, nanotechnology, and pharmacy. Written by leading specialists in their respective fields, this book presents an overview of recent developments in the field of mathematical kinetic theory with a focus on modeling complex systems, emphasizing both mathematical properties and their physical meaning. The overall presentation covers not only modeling aspects and qualitative analysis of mathematical problems, but also inverse problems, which lead to a detailed assessment of models in connection with their applications, and to computational problems, which lead to an effective link of models to the analysis of real-world systems. "Transport Phenomena and Kinetic Theory" is an excellent self-study reference for graduate students, re...

  14. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) in copper-induced LDL peroxidation: Interrelated effects of on inhibition and propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Ilya; Lichtenberg, Dov

    2017-06-01

    LDL peroxidation plays a major role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. The mechanisms of LDL peroxidation induced by transition metal ions have therefore been studied intensively. It has been proposed that the mechanism involves free radical production that occurs via decomposition of hydroperoxides. This, in turn, requires the cleavage of O-H bonds. Cleavage of O-D bond is slower and comparison of the kinetics in D 2 O to the kinetics in H 2 O is therefore a straightforward way to test this aspect of the alleged mechanism. The kinetics of peroxidation exhibit marked deuterium kinetic isotope effects at all the stages of oxidation under all the studied conditions. We found that the rate of propagation of copper-induced peroxidation is a monotonically decreasing function of D 2 O fraction in D 2 O/H 2 O mixtures. The only elementary reaction that involves "exchangeable" hydrogen at this stage is copper-induced decomposition of conjugated hydroperoxides. Therefore, we conclude that the latter step is rate-limiting reaction including cleavage of oxygen-hydrogen bond of hydroperoxide. The lag preceding rapid peroxidation exhibits a biphasic dependence on the fraction of D 2 O. This may be understood on the basis of the effect of substituting hydrogen atoms by deuterium. Specifically, such substitution is expected to decrease both the rate of initiation of peroxidation and the potency of the antioxidant. We interpret our results in terms of the effects of isotopic substitution on the rates of the reactions that involve the abstraction of "exchangeable" hydrogen atoms of OH groups in tocopherol and hydroperoxides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Iron Isotope Fractionation in Microbial and Non-Biological Precipitates, and the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Boettcher, M. E.; Hofmann, B.; Walczyk, T.

    2001-12-01

    We have investigated biotic and abiotic stable iron isotope fractionation pathways in experiments, the low-T natural environment, and the human body. Fe samples were analysed using a Nu Plasma Multicollector ICP-MS. All measured samples plot on the theoretically predicted exponential fractionation line in the Delta57Fe versus Delta56Fe space, demonstrating absence of ArN or ArO interferences. An experimental calibration of Fe isotope fractionation during abiotic formation of iron (III) oxyhydroxide and iron(II) minerals from aqueous solution resulted in significant differences: (a) During fast precipitation of FeOOH during alkalization of a Fe(III)Cl3 solution at room temperature the solid is only slightly enriched by about 0.1permil in 57Fe compared to the solution. (b) Slow precipitation of akaganeite (beta-FeOOH) from aqueous Fe(III)Cl3 solution leads to a depletion of 57Fe by about -2.2permil in the solid phase without a significant influence of temperature. (c) Precipitation of FeOOH during oxidation of aqueous Fe(II) solutions by oxygen yields an enrichment of up to 4.8permil in 57Fe in the solid phase. (d) Iron(II) carbonate precipitation between 20 and 60C leads to an almost negligible depletion in 57Fe compared to aqueous ferrous ions. Interpretation: Large enrichment of the heavy isotope is observed where Fe is oxidised, whereas small to interme-diate depletions of heavy Fe isotopes occur upon forma-tion of Fe-minerals without change in redox state. Addi-tionally, kinetic effects, the speciation of the aqueous solution, or the effect of crystal structures may have to be considered. Biotic isotope fractionation by microorganisms was investigated at two field sites. In a Fe mine (Gonzen, Switzerland), Fe-precipitating microbes (Gallionella ferrugina and Leptohrix ochtraceae) have formed Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides that are ca. 0.6permil heavier in Delta57Fe than the Fe-rich parent solutions. At Cady Mts, California, filamentous fabrics of goethite, thought to

  16. Phosphate oxygen isotopic evidence for a temperate and biologically active Archaean ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Ruth E; Chang, Sae Jung; Lepland, Aivo

    2010-04-15

    Oxygen and silicon isotope compositions of cherts and studies of protein evolution have been interpreted to reflect ocean temperatures of 55-85 degrees C during the early Palaeoarchaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago). A recent study combining oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of cherts, however, makes a case for Archaean ocean temperatures being no greater than 40 degrees C (ref. 5). Ocean temperature can also be assessed using the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate. Recent studies show that (18)O:(16)O ratios of dissolved inorganic phosphate (delta(18)O(P)) reflect ambient seawater temperature as well as biological processing that dominates marine phosphorus cycling at low temperature. All forms of life require and concentrate phosphorus, and as a result of biological processing, modern marine phosphates have delta(18)O(P) values typically between 19-26 per thousand (VSMOW), highly evolved from presumed source values of approximately 6-8 per thousand that are characteristic of apatite in igneous rocks and meteorites. Here we report oxygen isotope compositions of phosphates in sediments from the 3.2-3.5-billion-year-old Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We find that delta(18)O(P) values range from 9.3 per thousand to 19.9 per thousand and include the highest values reported for Archaean rocks. The temperatures calculated from our highest delta(18)O(P) values and assuming equilibrium with sea water with delta(18)O = 0 per thousand (ref. 12) range from 26 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The higher delta(18)O(P) values are similar to those of modern marine phosphate and suggest a well-developed phosphorus cycle and evolved biologic activity on the Archaean Earth.

  17. Vapor pressure isotope effect in 13CClF3/12CClF3 by cryogenic distillation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieck, H.J.; Ishida, T.

    1975-08-01

    The vapor pressure of 13 CClF 3 relative to the vapor pressure of 12 CClF 3 was measured as a function of temperature between 169 0 and 206 0 K by using a modified Bigeleisen distillation column. The transient build-up of the isotopic concentration gradient along the length of the packed column during the start-up period was monitored by taking samples from the condenser section as a function of time. The gaseous samples were completely oxidized to carbon dioxide in the presence of a platinum catalyst and a large excess of oxygen at temperatures between 1050 and 1100 0 C. The combustion products were purified by means of gas chromatography, and the purified carbon dioxide samples were analyzed in a Nier-type isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. The data of each distillation run were reduced in the light of Cohen's theory of the kinetics of square cascade of close-separation stages. The vapor pressure isotope effect for the carbon substitution in CClF 3 at temperatures between 169 0 and 206 0 K was found to be an inverse effect and to be rather insensitive to changes in temperature. The relative vapor pressure may be expressed 1n(P'/P) = [(1.5 +- 14.1)/T 2 ] - [(0.159 +- 0.076)/T], or 1n(P'/P) = [(0.173 +- 0.098)/T] - [(0.11 +- 0.53) x 10 -3 ], where P' and P are the vapor pressures of 12 CClF 3 and 13 CClF 3 , respectively. To the first-order, the presence of chlorine isotopes would not affect the fractionation of carbon isotopes by the distillation of CClF 3

  18. Ion-Isotopic Exchange Reaction Kinetics using Anion Exchange Resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.U. Singare

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the characterization of ion exchange resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A based on kinetics of ion-isotopic exchange reactions for which the short lived radioactive isotopes 131I and 82Br were used as a tracers. The study was performed for different concentration of ionic solution varying from 0.001 mol/L to 0.004 mol/L and temperature in the range of 30.0 °C to 45.0 °C. The results indicate that as compared to bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, iodide exchange reaction take place at the faster rate. For both the ion-isotopic exchange reactions, under identical experimental conditions, the values of specific reaction rate increases with increase in the ionic concentration and decreases with rise in temperature. It was observed that at 35.00C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.002 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1, amount of ion exchanged (mmol, initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min and log Kd were 0.270, 0.342, 0.092 and 11.8 respectively for Dowex 550A LC resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.156, 0.241, 0.038 and 7.4 as that obtained for Indion-930A resins. From the results, it appears that Dowex 550A LC resins show superior performance over Indion-930A resins under identical experimental conditions.

  19. Carbon Isotope Fractionation of 1,2-Dibromoethane by Biological and Abiotic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster van Groos, Paul G; Hatzinger, Paul B; Streger, Sheryl H; Vainberg, Simon; Philp, R Paul; Kuder, Tomasz

    2018-03-20

    1,2-Dibromethane (EDB) is a toxic fuel additive that likely occurs at many sites where leaded fuels have impacted groundwater. This study quantified carbon (C) isotope fractionation of EDB associated with anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation, abiotic degradation by iron sulfides, and abiotic hydrolysis. These processes likely contribute to EDB degradation in source zones (biodegradation) and in more dilute plumes (hydrolysis). Mixed anaerobic cultures containing dehalogenating organisms (e.g., Dehaloccoides spp.) were examined, as were aerobic cultures that degrade EDB cometabolically. Bulk C isotope enrichment factors (ε bulk ) associated with biological degradation covered a large range, with mixed anaerobic cultures fractionating more (ε bulk from -8 to -20‰) than aerobic cultures (ε bulk from -3 to -6‰). ε bulk magnitudes associated with the abiotic processes (dihaloelimination by FeS/FeS 2 and hydrolysis) were large but fairly well constrained (ε bulk from -19 to -29‰). As expected, oxidative mechanisms fractionated EDB less than dihaloelimination and substitution mechanisms, and biological systems exhibited a larger range of fractionation, potentially due to isotope masking effects. In addition to quantifying and discussing ε bulk values, which are highly relevant for quantifying in situ EDB degradation, an innovative approach for constraining the age of EDB in the aqueous phase, based on fractionation during hydrolysis, is described.

  20. Kinetic isotope effects as probes of the mechanism of reaction of 1-naphthylcarbene with cyclohexane and toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, G.W.; Horn, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The rates of reaction of 1-naphthylcarbene (1-NC) in hydrocarbon solution have been measured with excimer laser flash photolysis of 1-naphthyldiazomethane. The kinetic data were obtained by monitoring the growth of the 1-naphthylmethyl radical (1-NCH) at 370 nm. The observed kinetic deuterium isotope effect for the reaction of 1-NC with cyclohexane (cyclohexane-d 12 ) in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.32 +/- 0.17) and the high CH insertion to H-atom abstraction product ratio are consistent with largely singlet reactivity for 1-NC. In toluene, where addition to the aromatic ring is favored over hydrogen atom abstraction, the measured inverse isotope effect (k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 0.52 +/- 0.05) also argues for predominantly singlet reactivity and a small singlet-triplet energy gap. The Arrhenius activation parameters measured for the reaction of NC with cyclohexane and toluene were E/sub act/ = 2.43 +/- 0.19 kcal/mol, log (a, s -1 ) = 7.70 +/- 0.15 and E/sub act/ = 1.93 +/- 0.38 kcal/mol, log (A, s -1 ) = 7.28 +/- 0.30, respectively

  1. Elemental and isotopic imaging of biological samples using NanoSIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L

    2014-01-01

    With its low detection limits and the ability to analyze most of the elements in the periodic table, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) represents one of the most versatile in situ analytical techniques available, and recent developments have resulted in significant advantages for the use of imaging mass spectrometry in biological and biomedical research. Increases in spatial resolution and sensitivity allow detailed interrogation of samples at relevant scales and chemical concentrations. Advances in dynamic SIMS, specifically with the advent of NanoSIMS, now allow the tracking of stable isotopes within biological systems at subcellular length scales, while static SIMS combines subcellular imaging with molecular identification. In this chapter, we present an introduction to the SIMS technique, with particular reference to NanoSIMS, and discuss its application in biological and biomedical research.

  2. Surface oceanographic fronts influencing deep-sea biological activity: Using fish stable isotopes as ecological tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzao, Maite; Navarro, Joan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; de Sola, Luis Gil; Forero, Manuela G.

    2017-06-01

    Ecotones can be described as transition zones between neighbouring ecological systems that can be shaped by environmental gradients over a range of space and time scales. In the marine environment, the detection of ecotones is complex given the highly dynamic nature of marine systems and the paucity of empirical data over ocean-basin scales. One approach to overcome these limitations is to use stable isotopes from animal tissues since they can track spatial oceanographic variability across marine systems and, in turn, can be used as ecological tracers. Here, we analysed stable isotopes of deep-sea fishes to assess the presence of ecological discontinuities across the western Mediterranean. We were specifically interested in exploring the connection between deep-sea biological activity and particular oceanographic features (i.e., surface fronts) occurring in the pelagic domain. We collected samples for three different abundant deep-sea species in May 2004 from an experimental oceanographic trawling cruise (MEDITS): the Mictophydae jewel lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus and two species of the Gadidae family, the silvery pout Gadiculus argenteus and the blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou. The experimental survey occurred along the Iberian continental shelf and the upper and middle slopes, from the Strait of Gibraltar in the SW to the Cape Creus in the NE. The three deep-sea species were highly abundant throughout the study area and they showed geographic variation in their isotopic values, with decreasing values from north to south disrupted by an important change point around the Vera Gulf. Isotopic latitudinal gradients were explained by pelagic oceanographic conditions along the study area and confirm the existence of an ecotone at the Vera Gulf. This area could be considered as an oceanographic boundary where waters of Atlantic origin meet Mediterranean surface waters forming important frontal structures such as the Almeria-Oran front. In fact, our results

  3. Hybrid quantum and classical methods for computing kinetic isotope effects of chemical reactions in solutions and in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiali; Major, Dan T; Fan, Yao; Lin, Yen-Lin; Ma, Shuhua; Wong, Kin-Yiu

    2008-01-01

    A method for incorporating quantum mechanics into enzyme kinetics modeling is presented. Three aspects are emphasized: 1) combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical methods are used to represent the potential energy surface for modeling bond forming and breaking processes, 2) instantaneous normal mode analyses are used to incorporate quantum vibrational free energies to the classical potential of mean force, and 3) multidimensional tunneling methods are used to estimate quantum effects on the reaction coordinate motion. Centroid path integral simulations are described to make quantum corrections to the classical potential of mean force. In this method, the nuclear quantum vibrational and tunneling contributions are not separable. An integrated centroid path integral-free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM) method along with a bisection sampling procedure was summarized, which provides an accurate, easily convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT), these three aspects of quantum mechanical effects can be individually treated, providing useful insights into the mechanism of enzymatic reactions. These methods are illustrated by applications to a model process in the gas phase, the decarboxylation reaction of N-methyl picolinate in water, and the proton abstraction and reprotonation process catalyzed by alanine racemase. These examples show that the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects is essential for enzyme kinetics simulations.

  4. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between strontium polymolybdate and strontium ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, Gulten; Bilgin, Binay; Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2002-01-01

    A heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction of strontium polymolybdate in strontium chloride solution was studied using 90 Sr as a tracer. The effects of low and high strontium chloride concentration on the rate and mechanism of the isotopic exchange reaction were investigated. It was found that, at high concentrations, the rate is independent of strontium concentration, but, at low concentrations, the rate is proportional to the strontium concentration. These results support a hypothesis that, at low concentrations, the rate is controlled by film diffusion, whereas at high concentrations it is controlled by particle diffusion. Experiments were performed at 293, 303 and 313 K. Activation energy of isotopic exchange reaction and thermodynamic parameters ΔH*, ΔS*, and ΔG* were calculated using the Arrhenius and Eyring equations. The results also indicated that recrystallization is a predominant factor in the present exchange reaction

  5. Dual-isotope technique for determination of in vivo ketone body kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, J.M.; Schwenk, W.F.; McClean, K.L.; Haymond, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    Total ketone body specific activity has been widely used in studies of ketone body metabolism to circumvent so-called isotope disequilibrium between the two major ketone body pools, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate. Recently, this approach has been criticized on theoretical grounds. In the present studies, [13C]acetoacetate and beta-[14C]hydroxybutyrate were simultaneously infused in nine mongrel dogs before and during an infusion of either unlabeled sodium acetoacetate or unlabeled sodium beta-hydroxybutyrate. Ketone body turnover was determined using total ketone body specific activity, total ketone body moles % enrichment, and an open two-pool model, both before and during the exogenous infusion of unlabeled ketone bodies. Basal ketone body turnover rates were significantly higher using [13C]acetoacetate than with either beta-[14C]hydroxybutyrate alone or the dual-isotope model (3.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.2 and 2.7 +/- 0.2 mumol X kg-1 X min-1, respectively, P less than 0.05). During exogenous infusion of unlabeled sodium acetoacetate, the dual-isotope model provided the best estimate of ketone body inflow, whereas 14C specific activity underestimated the known rate of acetoacetate infusion by 55% (P less than 0.02). During sodium beta-hydroxybutyrate infusion, [13C]-acetoacetate overestimated ketone body inflow by 55% (P = NS), while better results were obtained with 14C beta-hydroxybutyrate alone and the two-pool model. Ketone body interconversion as estimated by the dual-isotope technique increased markedly during exogenous ketone body infusion. In conclusion, significant errors in estimation of ketone body inflow were made using single-isotope techniques, whereas a dual-isotope model provided reasonably accurate estimates of ketone body inflow during infusion of exogenous acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate

  6. Evaluating Volatility-controlled Isotope Fractionation During Planet Formation: Kinetics versus Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E. D.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in our ability to measure stable isotope ratios of light, rock-forming elements, including those for Zn, K, Fe, Si, and Mg, among others, has resulted in an emerging hypothesis that collisions among rocky planetesimals, planetary embryos, and/or proto-planets caused losses of moderately volatile elements (e.g., K) and "common" or moderately refractory elements (e.g., Mg and Si). The primary evidence is in the form of heavy isotope enrichments in rock-forming elements relative to the chondrite groups that are thought to be representative of planetary precursors. Equilibrium volatility-controlled isotope fractionation for planetesimal magma oceans might have occurred for bodies larger than 0.1% of an Earth mass (½ the mass of Pluto) as these bodies had sufficient gravity to overpower the escape velocities of hot gas at 2000K. Both Jean's escape and viscous drag hydrodynamic escape can obviate the escape velocity limit but will fractionate by mass, not by volatility. Equilibrium vapor/melt fractionation is qualitatively consistent with the greater disparity in 29Si/28Si between Earth and chondrites than in 25Mg/24Mg. However, losses of large masses of vapor are required to record the fractionation in the melts. We consider that if Earth was derived from E chondrite-like materials, the bulk composition of the Earth, assuming refractory Ca was retained, requires > 60% loss of Mg. This is a lot of vapor loss for a process relying on at least intermittent equilibrium, although it comports with the isotopic lever-rule requirements. Paradoxically, the alternative of evaporative loss of rock-forming elements requires less total mass loss. For example, the calculated Mg and Si isotopic compositions of residues resulting from evaporation of chondritic melts can fit the Mg and Si isotopic compositions of Earth, Mars, and angrites with varying background pressures and with total mass losses of near 5% or less. These mass losses are closer to, and even lower than

  7. Influence of water on clumped-isotope bond reordering kinetics in calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Dana C.; Passey, Benjamin H.; Stolper, Daniel A.

    2018-03-01

    Oxygen self-diffusion in calcite and many other minerals is considerably faster under wet conditions relative to dry conditions. Here we investigate whether this "water effect" also holds true for solid-state isotope exchange reactions that alter the abundance of carbonate groups with multiple rare isotopes ('clumped' isotope groups) via the process of solid-state bond reordering. We present clumped-isotope reordering rates for optical calcite heated under wet, high-pressure (100 MPa) conditions. We observe only modest increases in reordering rates under such conditions compared with rates for the same material reacted in dry CO2 under low-pressure conditions. Activation energies under wet, high-pressure conditions are indistinguishable from those for dry, low-pressure conditions, while rate constants are resolvably higher (up to ∼3 times) for wet, high-pressure relative to dry, low-pressure conditions in most of our interpretations of experimental results. This contrasts with the water effect for oxygen self-diffusion in calcite, which is associated with lower activation energies, and diffusion coefficients that are ≥103 times higher compared with dry (pure CO2) conditions in the temperature range of this study (385-450 °C). The water effect for clumped-isotopes leads to calculated apparent equilibrium temperatures ("blocking temperatures") for typical geological cooling rates that are only a few degrees higher than those for dry conditions, while O self-diffusion blocking temperatures in calcite grains are ∼150-200 °C lower in wet conditions compared with dry conditions. Since clumped-isotope reordering is a distributed process that occurs throughout the mineral volume, our clumped-isotope results support the suggestion of Labotka et al. (2011) that the water effect in calcite does not involve major changes in bulk (volume) diffusivity, but rather is primarily a surface phenomenon that facilitates oxygen exchange between the calcite surface and external

  8. Removal of antibiotics from piggery wastewater by biological aerated filter system: Treatment efficiency and biodegradation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Liu, You-Sheng; Zhang, Jin-Na; Yang, Yong-Qiang; Hu, Li-Xin; Yang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Chen, Fan-Rong; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the removal efficiency and mechanism for antibiotics in swine wastewater by a biological aerated filter system (BAF system) in combination with laboratory aerobic and anaerobic incubation experiments. Nine antibiotics including sulfamonomethoxine, sulfachloropyridazine, sulfamethazine, trimethoprim, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, lincomycin, leucomycin and oxytetracycline were detected in the wastewater with concentrations up to 192,000ng/L. The results from this pilot study showed efficient removals (>82%) of the conventional wastewater pollutants (BOD 5 , COD, TN and NH 3 -N) and the detected nine antibiotics by the BAF system. Laboratory simulation experiment showed first-order dissipation kinetics for the nine antibiotics in the wastewater under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The biodegradation kinetic parameters successfully predicted the fate of the nine antibiotics in the BAF system. This suggests that biodegradation was the dominant process for antibiotic removal in the BAF system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exogenous surfactant kinetics in infant respiratory distress syndrome : A novel method with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torresin, M; Zimmermann, LJI; Cogo, PE; Cavicchioli, P; Badon, T; Giordano, G; Zacchello, F; Sauer, PJJ; Carnielli, VP

    Little is known about surfactant metabolism in newborn infants, since radioactive isotopes cannot be used in humans. We describe here a new method for studying exogenous surfactant pharmacokinetics in vivo. We measured surfactant half-life, pool size, and turnover time in eight preterm infants

  10. The stable isotopic signature of biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2 is characterised by a very strong depletion in deuterium. Although the biological source to the atmosphere is small compared to photochemical or combustion sources, it makes an important contribution to the global isotope budget of H2. Large uncertainties exist in the quantification of the individual production and degradation processes that contribute to the atmospheric budget, and isotope measurements are a tool to distinguish the contributions from the different sources. Measurements of δ D from the various H2 sources are scarce and for biologically produced H2 only very few measurements exist. Here the first systematic study of the isotopic composition of biologically produced H2 is presented. In a first set of experiments, we investigated δ D of H2 produced in a biogas plant, covering different treatments of biogas production. In a second set of experiments, we investigated pure cultures of several H2 producing microorganisms such as bacteria or green algae. A Keeling plot analysis provides a robust overall source signature of δ D = −712‰ (±13‰ for the samples from the biogas reactor (at 38 °C, δ DH2O= +73.4‰, with a fractionation constant ϵH2-H2O of −689‰ (±20‰ between H2 and the water. The five experiments using pure culture samples from different microorganisms give a mean source signature of δ D = −728‰ (±28‰, and a fractionation constant ϵH2-H2O of −711‰ (±34‰ between H2 and the water. The results confirm the massive deuterium depletion of biologically produced H2 as was predicted by the calculation of the thermodynamic fractionation factors for hydrogen exchange between H2 and water vapour. Systematic errors in the isotope scale are difficult to assess in the absence of international standards for δ D of H2. As expected for a thermodynamic equilibrium, the fractionation factor is temperature dependent, but largely independent of the

  11. An exceptional kinetic quantum sieving separation effect of hydrogen isotopes on commercially available carbon molecular sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yanlong; Cai, Jinjun; Li, Liangjun; Yang, Menglong; Zhao, Xuebo

    2014-08-14

    The quantum sieving effect of H2/D2 at 77 K on commercially available carbon molecular sieves (1.5GN-H and 3KT-172) was studied. An exceptional reverse kinetic quantum effect is observed on 1.5GN-H where D2 diffuses much faster than H2 with a ratio of up to 5.83 at low pressure, and the difference is still very evident even as the pressure increases up to 1 bar. D2 also diffuses faster than H2 on 3KT-172 with a ratio of up to 1.86. However, the reverse kinetic sieving disappears in a polymer-based carbon (PC). The present kinetic quantum sieving effect of H2 and D2 at 77 K on 1.5GN-H is the highest to date.

  12. Hydride Transfer in DHFR by Transition Path Sampling, Kinetic Isotope Effects, and Heavy Enzyme Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) is used to study fundamental principles of enzyme catalysis. It remains controversial whether fast protein motions are coupled to the hydride transfer catalyzed by ecDHFR. Previous studies with heavy ecDHFR proteins labeled with 13C, 15N, and nonexchangeable 2H reported enzyme mass-dependent hydride transfer kinetics for ecDHFR. Here, we report refined experimental and computational studies to establish that hydride transfer is independent of protein mass. Instead, we found the rate constant for substrate dissociation to be faster for heavy DHFR. Previously reported kinetic differences between light and heavy DHFRs likely arise from kinetic steps other than the chemical step. This study confirms that fast (femtosecond to picosecond) protein motions in ecDHFR are not coupled to hydride transfer and provides an integrative computational and experimental approach to resolve fast dynamics coupled to chemical steps in enzyme catalysis. PMID:26652185

  13. Kinetics of isotope exchange between [3-(iodophenyl)methyl]guanidine (mIBG) and [131I]-iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesic, M.; Ratkovic, M.; Dondur, V.; Jankov, R.

    1992-01-01

    The reaction of isotope exchange betweeen [3-(iodophenyl)methyl]guanidine, mIBG, and [ 131 I]-iodide in relatively concentrated solutions, in the presence of different ammonium salts, in a closed system, over the temperature range from 130 to 150 C deg, has been investigated. The reaction occurs either with (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 or CH 3 COOH, which indicates that the reaction goes through some intermediate stages. Kinetic studies show the influence of the additives. The activation energies for the reaction with (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 /H 2 O, (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 /CH 3 COOH and CH 3 COOH are 121.1, 115.1 and 84.5 kJ * mol -1 , respectively. (author) 15 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  14. The kinetics and mechanism of bromide ion isotope exchange reaction in strongly basic anion-exchange resin duolite A-162 determined by the radioactive tracer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, R. S.; Singare, P. U.; Karthikeyan, P.

    2007-11-01

    In the present investigation, 82Br radioactive isotope was used as a tracer to study the kinetics and mechanism of exchange reaction between an ion exchange resin and an external bromide ion solution. In an attempt to study the reversible bromide ion isotopic exchange reaction kinetics, it was expected that whether the initial step was the exchange of radioactive bromide ions from the solution into the ion exchange resin (forward reaction) or from the ion exchange resin into the solution (reverse reaction), two ion isotopic exchange reactions should occur simultaneously, which was further confirmed by the experimental specific reaction rates of 0.130 and 0.131 min-1, respectively. The results can be used to standardize process parameters so as to optimize the utilization of ion exchange resins in various industrial applications.

  15. Deuterium Isotope Effects During HMX Combustion: Chemical Kinetic Burn Rate Control Mechanism Verified

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    niiriso Ihcnm DIte NiriciurtI sides at poiertul fites" and general technique: lt systemitical\\ Properties anld lictermri~ Reaictisn isIi t Nes11 t andlI...intitritets doped stith cI /bId Nlcehtinmic C tindensed I’s Dlteiuni Isotope ccitutd1 IXd moP eilt-s rither than a lsh\\ stal mixture iii I Lect ANnat %ii

  16. DeuteRater: a tool for quantifying peptide isotope precision and kinetic proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Bradley C; Porter, Michael T; Wilson, Elise; Herring, Adam; Lofthouse, Spencer; Hannemann, Austin; Piccolo, Stephen R; Rockwood, Alan L; Price, John C

    2017-05-15

    Using mass spectrometry to measure the concentration and turnover of the individual proteins in a proteome, enables the calculation of individual synthesis and degradation rates for each protein. Software to analyze concentration is readily available, but software to analyze turnover is lacking. Data analysis workflows typically don't access the full breadth of information about instrument precision and accuracy that is present in each peptide isotopic envelope measurement. This method utilizes both isotope distribution and changes in neutromer spacing, which benefits the analysis of both concentration and turnover. We have developed a data analysis tool, DeuteRater, to measure protein turnover from metabolic D 2 O labeling. DeuteRater uses theoretical predictions for label-dependent change in isotope abundance and inter-peak (neutromer) spacing within the isotope envelope to calculate protein turnover rate. We have also used these metrics to evaluate the accuracy and precision of peptide measurements and thereby determined the optimal data acquisition parameters of different instruments, as well as the effect of data processing steps. We show that these combined measurements can be used to remove noise and increase confidence in the protein turnover measurement for each protein. Source code and ReadMe for Python 2 and 3 versions of DeuteRater are available at https://github.com/JC-Price/DeuteRater . Data is at https://chorusproject.org/pages/index.html project number 1147. Critical Intermediate calculation files provided as Tables S3 and S4. Software has only been tested on Windows machines. jcprice@chem.byu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface describing the gas-phase Cl + C2H6 reaction and kinetics study of rate constants and kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Cipriano; Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin

    2018-02-07

    activation energy and the kinetics isotope effects reproduce the experimental information.

  18. Kinetic and mechanistic considerations to assess the biological fate of peroxynitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballal, Sebastián; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    Peroxynitrite, the product of the reaction between superoxide radicals and nitric oxide, is an elusive oxidant with a short half-life and a low steady-state concentration in biological systems; it promotes nitroxidative damage. We will consider kinetic and mechanistic aspects that allow rationalizing the biological fate of peroxynitrite from data obtained by a combination of methods that include fast kinetic techniques, electron paramagnetic resonance and kinetic simulations. In addition, we provide a quantitative analysis of peroxynitrite production rates and conceivable steady-state levels in living systems. The preferential reactions of peroxynitrite in vivo include those with carbon dioxide, thiols and metalloproteins; its homolysis represents only peroxynitrite consumption leading to the formation of strong one-electron oxidants, carbonate radicals and nitrogen dioxide. On the other hand, peroxynitrite is rapidly reduced by peroxiredoxins, which represent efficient thiol-based peroxynitrite detoxification systems. Glutathione, present at mM concentration in cells and frequently considered a direct scavenger of peroxynitrite, does not react sufficiently fast with it in vivo; glutathione mainly inhibits peroxynitrite-dependent processes by reactions with secondary radicals. The detection of protein 3-nitrotyrosine, a molecular footprint, can demonstrate peroxynitrite formation in vivo. Basal peroxynitrite formation rates in cells can be estimated in the order of 0.1 to 0.5μMs(-1) and its steady-state concentration at ~1nM. The analysis provides a handle to predict the preferential fate and steady-state levels of peroxynitrite in living systems. This is useful to understand pathophysiological aspects and pharmacological prospects connected to peroxynitrite. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Current methods to study reactive oxygen species - pros and cons and biophysics of membrane proteins. Guest Editor: Christine Winterbourn. © 2013.

  19. Site-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Propane: Mass spectrometric methods, equilibrium temperature dependence, and kinetics of exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Ponton, C.; Kitchen, N.; Lloyd, M. K.; Lawson, M.; Formolo, M. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Intramolecular isotope ordering can constrain temperatures of synthesis, mechanisms of formation, and/or source substrates of organic compounds. Here we explore site-specific hydrogen isotope variations of propane. Statistical thermodynamic models predict that at equilibrium methylene hydrogen (-CH2-) in propane will be 10's of per mil higher in D/H ratio than methyl hydrogen (-CH3) at geologically relevant temperatures, and that this difference is highly temperature dependent ( 0.5-1 ‰/°C). Chemical-kinetic controls on site-specific D/H in propane could constrain the mechanisms, conditions and extents of propane synthesis or destruction. We have developed a method for measuring the difference in D/H ratio between methylene and methyl hydrogen in propane by gas source mass spectrometry. The data were measured using the Thermo Fisher Double Focusing Sector high resolution mass spectrometer (DFS), and involve comparison of the D/H ratios of molecular ion (C3H8+) and the ethyl fragmental ion (C2H5+). We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of this method through analysis of D-labeled and independently analyzed propanes. In the exchange experiments, propane was heated (100-200 oC) either alone or in the presence of D-enriched water (δD=1,1419 ‰ SMOW), with or without one of several potentially catalytic substrates for hours to weeks. Propane was found to exchange hydrogen with water vigorously at 200 °C in the presence of metal catalysts. In the presence of Ni catalyst, methylene hydrogen exchanges 2.5 times faster than methyl hydrogen. Hydrogen exchange in the presence of Pd catalyst is more effective and can equilibrate hydrogen isotope distribution on propane on the order of 7 days. Isotopic exchange in the presence of natural materials have also been tested, but is only measurable in the methylene group at 200 °C. High catalytic activity of Pd permits attainment of a bracketed, time-invariant equilibrium state that we use to calibrate the site

  20. Hydrogen Isotopes as a Sentinel of Biological Invasion by the Japanese Beetle, Popillia japonica (Newman).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Bruce A; Kearns, Diana N; Ogle, Kiona; Caron, Melanie; Marks, Jane C; Rogg, Helmuth W

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species alter ecosystems, threaten native and endangered species, and have negative economic impacts. Knowing where invading individuals are from and when they arrive to a new site can guide management. Here, we evaluated how well the stable hydrogen isotope composition (δ2H) records the recent origin and time since arrival of specimens of the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) captured near the Portland International Airport (Oregon, U.S.A.). The δ2H of Japanese beetle specimens collected from sites across the contiguous U.S.A. reflected the δ2H of local precipitation, a relationship similar to that documented for other organisms, and one confirming the utility of δ2H as a geographic fingerprint. Within weeks after experimental relocation to a new isotopic environment, the δ2H of beetles changed linearly with time, demonstrating the potential for δ2H to also mark the timing of arrival to a new location. We used a hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate the recent geographical origin and timing of arrival of each specimen based on its δ2H value. The geographic resolution was broad, with values consistent with multiple regions of origin in the eastern U.S.A., slightly favoring the southeastern U.S.A. as the more likely source. Beetles trapped from 2007-2010 had arrived 30 or more days prior to trapping, whereas the median time since arrival declined to 3-7 days for beetles trapped from 2012-2014. This reduction in the time between arrival and trapping at the Portland International Airport supports the efficacy of trapping and spraying to prevent establishment. More generally, our analysis shows how stable isotopes can serve as sentinels of biological invasions, verifying the efficacy of control measures, or, alternatively, indicating when those measures show signs of failure.

  1. Hydrogen Isotopes as a Sentinel of Biological Invasion by the Japanese Beetle, Popillia japonica (Newman.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Hungate

    Full Text Available Invasive species alter ecosystems, threaten native and endangered species, and have negative economic impacts. Knowing where invading individuals are from and when they arrive to a new site can guide management. Here, we evaluated how well the stable hydrogen isotope composition (δ2H records the recent origin and time since arrival of specimens of the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman captured near the Portland International Airport (Oregon, U.S.A.. The δ2H of Japanese beetle specimens collected from sites across the contiguous U.S.A. reflected the δ2H of local precipitation, a relationship similar to that documented for other organisms, and one confirming the utility of δ2H as a geographic fingerprint. Within weeks after experimental relocation to a new isotopic environment, the δ2H of beetles changed linearly with time, demonstrating the potential for δ2H to also mark the timing of arrival to a new location. We used a hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate the recent geographical origin and timing of arrival of each specimen based on its δ2H value. The geographic resolution was broad, with values consistent with multiple regions of origin in the eastern U.S.A., slightly favoring the southeastern U.S.A. as the more likely source. Beetles trapped from 2007-2010 had arrived 30 or more days prior to trapping, whereas the median time since arrival declined to 3-7 days for beetles trapped from 2012-2014. This reduction in the time between arrival and trapping at the Portland International Airport supports the efficacy of trapping and spraying to prevent establishment. More generally, our analysis shows how stable isotopes can serve as sentinels of biological invasions, verifying the efficacy of control measures, or, alternatively, indicating when those measures show signs of failure.

  2. Hepatoblastoma Biology Using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Utility of a Unique Technique for the Analysis of Oncological Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Taran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatoblastoma is the most common primary liver tumor in children. However, it occurs rarely, with an incidence of 0.5-1.5 cases per million children. There is no clear explanation of the relationship between clinicopathologic features, therapy, and outcome in hepatoblastoma cases, so far. One of the most widely accepted prognostic factors in hepatoblastoma is histology of the tumor. The aim of the study was to determine the potential differences in biology of hepatoblastoma histological subtypes at the atomic level using the unique method of isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which is especially valuable in examination of small groups of biological samples.Material/Methods: Twenty-four measurements of nitrogen stable isotope ratio, carbon stable isotope ratio and total carbon to nitrogen mass ratio in fetal and embryonal hepatoblastoma tissue were performed using a Sercon 20-22 Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (CF-IRMS coupled with a Sercon SL elemental analyzer for simultaneous carbon-nitrogen-sulfur (NCS analysis.Results: A difference of about 1.781‰ in stable nitrogen isotope 15N/14N ratio was found between examined hepatoblastoma histological subtypes.Conclusions: The prognosis in liver tumors cases in children may be challenging particularly because of the lack of versatile methods of its evaluation. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry allows one to determine the difference between hepatoblastoma histological subtypes and clearly indicates the cases with the best outcome.

  3. Possible differences in biological availability of isotopes of plutonium: Report of a workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercher, J.R.; Gallegos, G.M. [eds.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a workshop conducted on the apparent different bioavailability of isotopes {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu. There is a substantial body of evidence that {sup 238}Pu as commonly found in the environment is more biologically available than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Trinity Site, Nevada Test Site from nonnuclear and nuclear events, Rocky Flats, Enewetak and Bikini, and the arctic tundra support this conclusion and indicate that the bioavailability of {sup 238}Pu is more than an order of magnitude greater than that of {sup 239}Pu. Plant and soil studies from controlled environments and from Savannah River indicate no isotopic difference in availability of Pu to plants; whereas studies at the Trinity Site do suggest a difference. While it is possible that these observations can be explained by problems in the experimental procedure and analytical techniques, this possibility is remote given the ubiquitous nature of the observations. Studies of solubility of Pu in the stomach contents of cattle grazing at the Nevada Test Site and from fish from Bikini Atoll both found that {sup 238}Pu was more soluble than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Los Alamos effluent stream indicate that as particle size decreases, the content of {sup 238}Pu relative to {sup 239}Pu increases.

  4. Possible differences in biological availability of isotopes of plutonium: Report of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercher, J.R.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a workshop conducted on the apparent different bioavailability of isotopes 238 Pu and 239 Pu. There is a substantial body of evidence that 238 Pu as commonly found in the environment is more biologically available than 239 Pu. Studies of the Trinity Site, Nevada Test Site from nonnuclear and nuclear events, Rocky Flats, Enewetak and Bikini, and the arctic tundra support this conclusion and indicate that the bioavailability of 238 Pu is more than an order of magnitude greater than that of 239 Pu. Plant and soil studies from controlled environments and from Savannah River indicate no isotopic difference in availability of Pu to plants; whereas studies at the Trinity Site do suggest a difference. While it is possible that these observations can be explained by problems in the experimental procedure and analytical techniques, this possibility is remote given the ubiquitous nature of the observations. Studies of solubility of Pu in the stomach contents of cattle grazing at the Nevada Test Site and from fish from Bikini Atoll both found that 238 Pu was more soluble than 239 Pu. Studies of the Los Alamos effluent stream indicate that as particle size decreases, the content of 238 Pu relative to 239 Pu increases

  5. Method for determination of radioactive iodine isotopes in environmental objects and biologic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubynin, O.D.; Pogodin, R.I.

    1981-01-01

    The method proposed for determination of radioactive iodine isotopes content in environmental objects and biologic materials is based on the extraction of iodine with carbon tetrachloride and subsequent precipitation of bismuthyl iodine (BiOI) in perchloric medium. Sample preparation for analysis is carried out using conventional alkaline ashing methods. Quantitative iodine separation is hampered if macroquantities of Cl - , Br - , SO 4 2 - , SO 8 2 - , Cr 2 O 7 2 - and other ions are present in the solution. Iodine extraction is carried out before its precipitation. Separated iodine preparation activity is measured using scintillation (NaI) Tl gamma spectrometer. The method's sensitivity when measuring iodine-131 preparations makes up 0.07 Bq per 1 sample with the error +-25 %

  6. Transition-state analysis of a Vmax mutant of AMP nucleosidase by the application of heavy-atom kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.W.; Mentch, F.; Banks, G.A.; Horenstein, B.A.; Schramm, V.L.

    1991-01-01

    The transition state of the V max mutant of AMP nucleosidase from Azotobacter vinelandii has been characterized by heavy-atom kinetic isotope effects in the presence and absence of MgATP, the allosteric activator. The enzyme catalyzes hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of AMP at approximately 2% of the rate of the normal enzyme with only minor changes in the K m for substrate, the activation constant for MgATP, and the K i for formycin 5'-phosphate, a tight-binding competitive inhibitor. Isotope effects were measured as a function of the allosteric activator concentration that increases the turnover number of the enzyme from 0.006 s -1 . The kinetic isotope effects were measured with the substrates [1'- 3 H]AMP, [2'- 2 H]AMP, [9- 15 N]AMP, and [1',9- 14 C, 15 N]AMP. All substrates gave significant kinetic isotope effects in a pattern that establishes that the reaction expresses intrinsic kinetic isotope effects in the presence or absence of MgATP. Transition-state analysis using bond-energy and bond-order vibrational analysis indicated that the transition state for the mutant enzyme has a similar position in the reaction coordinate compared to that for the normal enzyme. The mutant enzyme is less effective in stabilizing the carbocation-like intermediate and in the ability to protonate N7 of adenine to create a better leaving group. This altered transition-state structure was confirmed by an altered substrate specificity for the mutant protein

  7. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  8. Utilization of kinetic isotope effects for the concentration of tritium. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.M.; Meyer, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    'The objective of this research program is to develop methods for concentrating tritium in water based on large primary isotope effects in catalytic redox processes. Basic research is being conducted to develop the chemistry of a complete cyclic process. Because tritium [generally present as tritiated water (HTO)] is in a rapidly established equilibrium with water, it moves with groundwater and separation from water cannot be achieved by the usual pump-and-treat methods using sorbents. The general methodology developed in this work will be applicable to a number of US Department of Energy waste streams, and as a consequence of the process, tritium could be incorporated in an organic polymer, a form that will prevent its ready transport in groundwater.'

  9. Kinetic-fluid coupling in the field of the atomic vapor laser isotopic separation: Numerical results in the case of a monospecies perfect gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellacherie, Stephane

    2003-01-01

    To describe the uranium gas expansion in the field of the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotopic Separation (AVLIS; SILVA in french) with a reasonable CPU time, we have to couple the resolution of the Boltzmann equation with the resolution of the Euler system. The resolution of the Euler system uses a kinetic scheme and the boundary condition at the kinetic-fluid interface - which defines the boundary between the Boltzmann area and the Euler area - is defined with the positive and negative half fluxes of the kinetic scheme. Moreover, in order to take into account the effect of the Knudsen layer through the resolution of the Euler system, we propose to use a Marshak condition to asymptoticaly match the Euler area with the uranium source. Numerical results show an excellent agreement between the results obtained with and without kinetic-fluid coupling

  10. The determination of B and Sr isotopes of quaternary biologic fossils in Yanghuzhuang Yanqing basin and their living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yingkai; Xiao Jun; Zhao Zhiqi; He Maoyong; Li Shizhen

    2007-01-01

    The B and Sr isotopic compositions of early Quaternary biologic fossils in Yanghuzhuang and living bivalves in Weishui river were measured. Comparing with the data of marine foraminifer, the results show a non-marine living environment for these foraminifers lived in early Quaternary in Yanghuzhuang, Yanqing; Basin. (authors)

  11. Mechanistic and kinetic implications on the ORR on a Au(100) electrode: pH, temperature and H-D kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Dong; He, Zheng Da; Zheng, Yong Li; Jiang, Dao Chuan; Chen, Yan-Xia

    2014-07-21

    pH, temperature and H-D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on the ORR on Au(100) have been examined systematically using a hanging meniscus rotating disk electrode system. We found that for the cases with pH > 7, the ORR mainly goes through a 4-electron reduction to OH(-) at E > pzc (potential of zero charge) without any pH and H-D KIEs. When the pH at the electrode/electrolyte interface (pH(s)) is below 7, O2 only reduces to H2O2, its activity increases with pH(s), and a H-D KIE of above 2 is observed in 0.1 M HClO4. According to the experimental results in acid solution, a mechanism with O2 + H(+) + e → HO(2,ad) as the rate determining step followed by decoupled electron and proton transfer steps is proposed. The high activation barrier for O-O bond breaking and the fast oxidation of H2O2 or HO2(-) to O2 render the ORR observable only at potentials negative of the equilibrium potential (Eeq) of the redox of H2O2/O2 in acidic media or of HO2(-)/O2 in an alkaline environment. The apparent activation energy (E(a,app)) for O2 reduction to H2O2 is ca. 35 ± 3 kJ mol(-1) and to OH(-) is 60 ± 6 kJ mol(-1), while the pre-exponential factor (A) for the former is ca. 3-6 orders of magnitude smaller than that of the latter. The lower activity for O2 reduction to H2O2 on Au(100) is attributed to the small pre-exponential factor.

  12. Isotopic modeling of water and sodium distribution and exchange kinetics in 7 stable hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamoiseau, S.; Bertrou, L.; Pujo, J.M.; Massol, M.

    1988-01-01

    Sequential serum sampling over 24 h. has been performed in 7 hemodialysis patients after simultaneous intra-venous injection of tritiated water and 24 Na. Each time-activity curve fits a biexponential pattern. A compartment analysis leads to describe either a simple but incomplete single compartment model or a much more satisfactory open two-compartment mamillary model featuring 2 intercompartment transfer rate constants k 21 and k 12 , and a loss out of the system, k 01 . These constants can be related to intrabody resistances to sodium and water transfers. Compartment analysis allows a comprehensive quantitated description of the exchange and transfer kinetics of sodium and water throughout the system. Evidence for a sodium reservoir, probably located in bone, can be drawn from the results and leads to propose a strategy for a targetted bone sodium removal [fr

  13. Surfactant disaturated-phosphatidylcholine kinetics in acute respiratory distress syndrome by stable isotopes and a two compartment model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cogo Paola E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, it is well known that only part of the lungs is aerated and surfactant function is impaired, but the extent of lung damage and changes in surfactant turnover remain unclear. The objective of the study was to evaluate surfactant disaturated-phosphatidylcholine turnover in patients with ARDS using stable isotopes. Methods We studied 12 patients with ARDS and 7 subjects with normal lungs. After the tracheal instillation of a trace dose of 13C-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, we measured the 13C enrichment over time of palmitate residues of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine isolated from tracheal aspirates. Data were interpreted using a model with two compartments, alveoli and lung tissue, and kinetic parameters were derived assuming that, in controls, alveolar macrophages may degrade between 5 and 50% of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, the rest being lost from tissue. In ARDS we assumed that 5–100% of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine is degraded in the alveolar space, due to release of hydrolytic enzymes. Some of the kinetic parameters were uniquely determined, while others were identified as lower and upper bounds. Results In ARDS, the alveolar pool of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was significantly lower than in controls (0.16 ± 0.04 vs. 1.31 ± 0.40 mg/kg, p de novo synthesis of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine were also significantly lower, while mean resident time in lung tissue was significantly higher in ARDS than in controls. Recycling was 16.2 ± 3.5 in ARDS and 31.9 ± 7.3 in controls (p = 0.08. Conclusion In ARDS the alveolar pool of surfactant is reduced and disaturated-phosphatidylcholine turnover is altered.

  14. Synthetical Analysis for Morphology, biological Species, and stable Isotopes (SAMSI) of single-cell planktonic foraminifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Y.; Kimoto, K.; Ishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifers are widely used in the studies of paleontology and paleoceanography, because the morphology of their calcareous shells is enough highly variable to identify the morphospecies and the chemical composition of the shells reflect ambient seawater condition. Although the morphospecies were believed to represent environments associating with latitudinal temperature range of the world ocean, molecular phylogeographic studies have unveiled the presence of multiple biological species in a single morphospecies and their species-specific distributions. This implicates the actual complexity of planktonic foraminiferal ecology. Conversely, these biological species have a high potential for providing novel ecological and environmental information to us. In order to reassess the morphological and geochemical characters of biological species, the DNA extraction method with the guanidium isothiocyanate buffer was developed to preserve the calcareous shells. The present study carefully tested the physical and chemical damages of the DNA extraction process to the shells, by our novel approaches with geochemical analysis of the shells after non-destructive analysis for morphometrics on a same specimen. First, we checked the changes of the shell densities between pre- and post-DNA extraction by using the micro-focus X-ray CT (MXCT) scanning. Based on the simultaneous measurement of a sample and the standard material, we confirmed no significant changes to the shell densities through the DNA extraction process. As a next step, we compared stable oxygen and carbon isotopes among individuals of three sample sets: (1) no chemical and incubation as control, (2) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 40 minutes as standard way, and (3) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 120 minutes, by using the microscale isotopic analytical system (MICAL3c). Consequently, there were no significant differences among the three sample sets. These

  15. KiMoSys: a web-based repository of experimental data for KInetic MOdels of biological SYStems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael S; Veríssimo, André; Vinga, Susana

    2014-08-13

    The kinetic modeling of biological systems is mainly composed of three steps that proceed iteratively: model building, simulation and analysis. In the first step, it is usually required to set initial metabolite concentrations, and to assign kinetic rate laws, along with estimating parameter values using kinetic data through optimization when these are not known. Although the rapid development of high-throughput methods has generated much omics data, experimentalists present only a summary of obtained results for publication, the experimental data files are not usually submitted to any public repository, or simply not available at all. In order to automatize as much as possible the steps of building kinetic models, there is a growing requirement in the systems biology community for easily exchanging data in combination with models, which represents the main motivation of KiMoSys development. KiMoSys is a user-friendly platform that includes a public data repository of published experimental data, containing concentration data of metabolites and enzymes and flux data. It was designed to ensure data management, storage and sharing for a wider systems biology community. This community repository offers a web-based interface and upload facility to turn available data into publicly accessible, centralized and structured-format data files. Moreover, it compiles and integrates available kinetic models associated with the data.KiMoSys also integrates some tools to facilitate the kinetic model construction process of large-scale metabolic networks, especially when the systems biologists perform computational research. KiMoSys is a web-based system that integrates a public data and associated model(s) repository with computational tools, providing the systems biology community with a novel application facilitating data storage and sharing, thus supporting construction of ODE-based kinetic models and collaborative research projects.The web application implemented using Ruby

  16. Applications of Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry in Sports Drug Testing Accounting for Isotope Fractionation in Analysis of Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Thomas; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The misuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) in sports aiming at enhancing athletic performance has been a challenging matter for doping control laboratories for decades. While the presence of a xenobiotic AAS or its metabolite(s) in human urine immediately represents an antidoping rule violation, the detection of the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone necessitates comparably complex procedures. Concentration thresholds and diagnostic analyte ratios computed from urinary steroid concentrations of, e.g., testosterone and epitestosterone have aided identifying suspicious doping control samples in the past. These ratios can however also be affected by confounding factors and are therefore not sufficient to prove illicit steroid administrations. Here, carbon and, in rare cases, hydrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has become an indispensable tool. Importantly, the isotopic signatures of pharmaceutical steroid preparations commonly differ slightly but significantly from those found with endogenously produced steroids. By comparing the isotope ratios of endogenous reference compounds like pregnanediol to that of testosterone and its metabolites, the unambiguous identification of the urinary steroids' origin is accomplished. Due to the complex urinary matrix, several steps in sample preparation are inevitable as pure analyte peaks are a prerequisite for valid IRMS determinations. The sample cleanup encompasses steps such as solid phase or liquid-liquid extraction that are presumably not accompanied by isotopic fractionation processes, as well as more critical steps like enzymatic hydrolysis, high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation, and derivatization of analytes. In order to exclude any bias of the analytical results, each step of the analytical procedure is optimized and validated to exclude, or at least result in constant, isotopic fractionation. These efforts are explained in detail. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcium isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low-temperature geochemistry, biology and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Moynier; Toshiyuki Fujii

    2017-01-01

    Stable Ca isotopes are fractionated between bones, urine and blood of animals and between soils, roots and leaves of plants by >1000?ppm for the 44Ca/40Ca ratio. These isotopic variations have important implications to understand Ca transport and fluxes in living organisms; however, the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation are unclear. Here we present ab initio calculations for the isotopic fractionation between various aqueous species of Ca and show that this fractionation can be up to 3000?...

  18. Partitioning and kinetics of methylmercury among organs in captive mink (Neovison vison): A stable isotope tracer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R Douglas; Hickie, Brendan; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Wang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Despite the importance of methylmercury (MeHg) as a neurotoxin, we have relatively few good data on partitioning and kinetics of MeHg among organs, particularly across the blood-brain barrier, for mammals that consume large quantities of fish. The objective of this study was to determine the partition coefficients between blood and brain, liver and kidney and fur for MeHg under steady-state conditions and to measure the half-lives for MeHg in these organs. Captive mink (Neovison vison) were fed a diet enriched with two stable isotopes of Hg, Me(199)Hg and Me(201)Hg for a period of 60 days. After a period of 10 days the diet was changed to contain only Me(201)Hg so that, between days 10 and 60, we were able to measure both uptake and elimination rates from blood, brain, liver kidney and fur. Liver and kidney response was very rapid, closely following changes in blood concentrations but there was a small lag time between peak blood concentrations and peak brain concentrations. Half-lives for MeHg were 15.4, 10.2 and 13.4 days for brain, liver and kidney, respectively. There was no measurable conversion of the MeHg to inorganic Hg (IHg) in the brain over the 60 day period, unlike in liver and kidney. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phosphorus kinetics in ovine fed with different phosphorus sources, using the isotopic dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitti, D.M.S.S.; Abdalla, A.L.; Meirelles, C.F.

    1992-01-01

    Phosphorus kinetics in fluids and tissues of sheep was studied. Sixteen castrated sheep were kept in metabolism cages, receiving a semipuried diet containing as phosphorus sources dicalcium phosphate (BIC), monoammonium phosphate (MAP), superphosphate (SPT) and Tapita phosphate (TAP) 200 μCi P-32 was intravenously injected in each sheep and blood and feces were collected for eight days. From the specific activities in feces and plasma the endogenous phosphorus and the absorption coefficient were calculated. plasma P-32 half-life was determined. Nine days after injection the animals were killed and liver, kidney and muscle and bone samples were collected. P-32 retention and specific activities in tissues were determined. Endogenous phosphorus and absorption coefficient values were 54.44 ± 15.31 mh/kg live weight and 0.60; 47.98 ± 12.44 and 0.56; 39.70 ± 7.29 and 0.49; 59.11 ± 17.12 and 0.58 respectively bor BIC, MAP, TAP and SPT. P-32 retention by tissues was 0.29 ± 0.09; 0.27 ± 0.06; 0.16 ± 0.04 and 0.08 ± 0.03 dose/g fresh matter, respectively for bone, liver, kidney and muscle. It was concluded that animals which received TAP showed differences in absorption, distribution and P-32 retention by fluids and tissues. Phosphorus availability was lower for this source. (author)

  20. Application of tracer isotope in kinetic study of first order ion exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of first order ion exchange reaction rates at different temperatures (27 deg- 48 degC) and particularly at low concentration of potassium iodide solution (electrolyte) ranging from 0.005 M to 0.040 M is carried out by application of radioactive tracer isotope 131 I. With increase in concentration of electrolyte, amount of iodide ion exchanged in millimoles increases. Specific reaction rates of ion exchange reaction are calculated for different temperatures and for different amount of ion exchange resins. It is observed that with increase in temperature, reaction rate increases but the increase is more pronounced for increase in amount of ion exchange resins. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte, the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 at 27 degC to 0.178 min -1 at 48 degC. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 at 27 degC to 0.178 min 1 at 48 degC. For 0.005 M solution of electrolyte at 27 degC the reaction rate increases from 0.121 min -1 for 1.0 g of resin to 0.368 min -1 for 5.0 g of resin. From the reaction rates calculated at different temperatures, energy of activation in kJ/mole is calculated. It is observed that for 0.005 M solution of electrolyte, energy of activation is 4.62 kJ/mole which decreases to 2.87 kJ/mole for increase in concentration of electrolyte to 0.100 M. (author)

  1. Process of inorganic nitrogen transformation and design of kinetics model in the biological aerated filter reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gang; Xu, Xia; Yao, Lirong; Lu, Liqiao; Zhao, Tingting; Zhang, Wenyi

    2011-04-01

    As one of the plug-flow reactors, biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor was divided into four sampling sectors to understand the characteristics of elemental nitrogen transformation during the reaction process, and then the different characteristics of elemental nitrogen transformation caused by different NH(3)-N loadings, biological quantities and activities in each section were obtained. The results showed that the total transformation ratio in the nitrifying reactor was more than 90% in the absence of any organic carbon resource, at the same time, more than 65% NH(3)-N in the influent were nitrified at the filter height of 70 cm below under the conditions of the influent runoff 9-19 L/h, the gas-water ratio 4-5:1, the dissolved oxygen 3.0-5.8 mg/L and the NH(3)-N load 0.28-0.48 kg NH(3)-N/m(3) d. On the base of the Eckenfelder mode, the kinetics equation of the NH(3)-N transformation along the reactor was S(e)=S(0) exp(-0.0134D/L(1.2612)). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon-14 kinetic isotope effects and mechanisms of addition of 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfenyl chloride to substituted styrenes-1-14C and styrenes-2-14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanska, M.; Fry, A.

    1983-01-01

    As the first reported examples of carbon isotope effects in simple electrophilic addition reactions we have measured the carbon-14 kinetic isotope effects in the addition of 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfenyl chloride to a series of para-substituted α and β-labeled styrenes in acetic acid at 30.1 0 C: for para substituents Cl, H, and CH 3 the k/ 14 K values for α labeling are 1.027, 1.022, and 1.004, and the k/ 14 k values for β labeling are 1.035, 1.032, and 1.037, all +/-approx.0.004. The kinetics of the reaction were measured for the p-CH 3 O,p-CH 3 , unsubstituted, p-Cl, and m-NO 2 styrenes; electron-donating groups strongly accelerate the reaction, and electron-withdrawing groups retard it. The Hammett plot is curved with p + values ranging from about -4.6 at the electron-donating group (EDG) end to about -1.8 at the electron-withdrawing group (EWG) end. Both the isotope effect and kinetic data, and related data from the literature, are interpreted in terms of a changing mechanism, with the activated complexes of the rate-determining steps having much open carbenium ion (ion pair) character for EDG-substituted styrenes and much cyclic thiiranium io (ion par) character for EWG-substituted styrenes. 1 figure, 2 tables

  3. [Kinetic model of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with mixed acetic and propionic acids as carbon sources. (I): Model constitution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-03-01

    Based on activated sludge model No. 2 (ASM2), the anaerobic/aerobic kinetic model of phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAO) was established with mixed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as the base substance in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The characteristic of the PAO model was that the anaerobic metabolism rates of glycogen degradation, poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates synthesis and polyphosphate hydrolysis were expressed by SCFAs uptake equation, and the effects of anaerobic maintenance on kinetics and stoichiometry were considered. The PAO kinetic model was composed of 3 soluble components, 4 particulate components and a pH parameter, which constituted the matrix of stoichiometric coefficients. On the basis of PAO model, the GAO kinetic model was established, which included 7 processes, and phosphorus content influenced the aerobic metabolism only.

  4. Determining of clearance levels of radioactive biological and Organic wastes from the isotopes center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador Balbona, Zayda; Cornejo Diaz, Nestor

    2001-01-01

    The use of unsealed sources for production of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled compounds in the Isotopes Center of Cuba results in the generation of various kinds of radioactive wastes. Much of them are segregated into low level activity and have relatively short half-lives. Since 1996 these wastes have disposed of following storage to allow for decay to very conservative clearance levels of the Institutional License of the Regulatory Authority. This paper describes three methods and models for the assessment of the effect of releases of radionuclides to the environment reported by IAEA, NRC and CIEMAT-CPHR. Each methodology were used taking account of site specific factors as meteorological characteristics, which were obtained during observations from last fifteen years, and the design of an industrial incinerator. The determined generic clearance levels for the incineration of biological and organic wastes are similar by any method and the results show that is possible to recommend the change of actual limits and in this case to reduce management costs. Verification of clearance levels was performed within the framework of a quality assurance system. For the first time this kind of work is made in a radioactive facility of our country

  5. Calcium isotope fractionation between aqueous compounds relevant to low-temperature geochemistry, biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    Stable Ca isotopes are fractionated between bones, urine and blood of animals and between soils, roots and leaves of plants by >1000 ppm for the 44Ca/40Ca ratio. These isotopic variations have important implications to understand Ca transport and fluxes in living organisms; however, the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation are unclear. Here we present ab initio calculations for the isotopic fractionation between various aqueous species of Ca and show that this fractionation can be up to 3000 ppm. We show that the Ca isotopic fractionation between soil solutions and plant roots can be explained by the difference of isotopic fractionation between the different first shell hydration degree of Ca2+ and that the isotopic fractionation between roots and leaves is controlled by the precipitation of Ca-oxalates. The isotopic fractionation between blood and urine is due to the complexation of heavy Ca with citrate and oxalates in urine. Calculations are presented for additional Ca species that may be useful to interpret future Ca isotopic measurements.

  6. The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effects of dihydrofolate reductase from Thermotoga maritima is influenced by intersubunit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveridge, E Joel; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2010-06-29

    Dihydrofolate reductase from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima (TmDHFR) is unique among structurally characterized chromosomal DHFRs in that it forms a stable homodimer. Dimerization is believed to play a key role in the high thermal stability of TmDHFR, which is reflected in a melting temperature in excess of 85 degrees C. The dimer interface of TmDHFR is composed of a hydrophobic core with charged residues around the periphery. In particular, Lys129 of each subunit forms three-membered salt bridges with Glu136 and Glu138 of the other subunit. To probe the role of these salt bridges in the dimerization and thermal stability of TmDHFR, we generated a series of variants (TmDHFR-K129E, TmDHFR-E136K, TmDHFR-E138K, and TmDHFR-E136K/E138K) in which these residues were exchanged for residues whose side chains bear the opposite charge. Our results indicate that these salt bridges are key for the high thermal stability of TmDHFR but are not a requirement for dimerization. Although the rate of dihydrofolate reduction by TmDHFR is not significantly affected by the loss of the K129-E136-E138 salt bridges, changes to the temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on hydride transfer are observed. These changes are in agreement with the proposal that DHFR catalysis may be affected by changes to the conformational ensemble of the enzyme rather than only to the coupling of protein motions to the reaction coordinate.

  7. Mechanism of inactivation of human leukocyte elastase by a chloromethyl ketone: kinetic and solvent isotope effect studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.L.; Trainor, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of inactivation of human leukocyte elastase (HLE) by the chloromethyl ketone MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-CH 2 Cl was investigated. The dependence of the first-order rate constant for inactivation on concentration of chloromethyl ketone is hyperbolic and suggests formation of a reversible Michaelis complex prior to covalent interaction between the enzyme and inhibitor. However, the observed Ki value is 10 microM, at least 10-fold lower than dissociation constants for complexes formed from interaction of HLE with structurally related substrates or reversible inhibitors, and suggests that Ki is a complex kinetic constant, reflecting the formation and accumulation of both the Michaelis complex and a second complex. It is proposed that this second complex is a hemiketal formed from attack of the active site serine on the carbonyl carbon of the inhibitor. The accumulation of this intermediate may be a general feature of reactions of serine proteases and chloromethyl ketones derived from specific peptides and accounts for the very low Ki values observed for these reactions. The solvent deuterium isotope effect (SIE) on the inactivation step (ki) is 1.58 +/- 0.07 and is consistent with rate-limiting, general-catalyzed attack of the active site His on the methylene carbon of the inhibitor with displacement of chloride anion. The general catalyst is thought to be the active site Asp. In contrast, the SIE on the second-order rate constant for HLE inactivation, ki/Ki, is inverse and equals 0.64 +/- 0.05

  8. NMR stratagems for the study of multiple kinetic hydrogen/deuterium isotope effects of proton exchange. Example: Di-p-fluorophenylformamidine/THF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbach, H.H.; Meschede, L.; Scherer, G.

    1989-01-01

    Stratagems are presented for the determination of kinetic isotope effects of proton exchange reactions by dynamic NMR spectroscopy. In such experiments, lineshape analyses and/or polarization transfer experiments are performed on the exchanging protons or deuterons as well as on remote spins, as a function of the deuterium fraction in the mobile proton sites. These methods are NMR analogs of previous proton inventory techniques involving classical kinetic methods. A theory is developed in order to derive the kinetic isotope effects as well as the number of transferred protons from the experimental NMR spectra. The technique is then applied to the problem of proton exchange in the system 15 N, 15 N'-di-p-fluorophenylformamidine, a nitrogen analog of formic acid, dissolved in tetrahydrofuran-d 8 (THF). DFFA forms two conformers in THF to which s-trans and s-cis structures have been assigned. Only the s-trans conformer is able to dimerize and exchange protons. Lineshape simulations and magnetization transfer experiments were carried out at 189,2 K, at a concentration of 0.02 mol l -1 , as a function of the deuterium fraction D in the 1 H- 15 N sites. Using 1 H NMR spectroscopy, a linear dependence of the inverse proton lifetimes on D was observed. From this it was concluded that two protons are transported in the rate limiting step of the proton exchange. This result is expected for a double proton transfer in an s-trans dimer with a cyclic structure. The full kinetic HH/HD/DD isotope effects of 233:11:1 at 189 K were determined through 19 F NMR experiments on the same samples. The deviation from the rule of geometric mean, although substantial, is much smaller than found in previous studies of intramolecular HH transfer reactions. Possible causes of this effect are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kouji H; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53-3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake.

  10. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji H Harada

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults.Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53-3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake.

  11. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kouji H.; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53–3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake. PMID:26731104

  12. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation, Book I, Agricultural, Animal and Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.; Sisworo, E.L.; Maha, M.; Ismachin, M.; Hilmy, N.; Sumatra, M.; Mugiono; Wandowo; Soebianto, Y.S

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the 10 t h Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  13. Exploring the aryl esterase catalysis of paraoxonase-1 through solvent kinetic isotope effects and phosphonate-based isosteric analogues of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavec, Aljoša; Knez, Damijan; Makovec, Tomaž; Stojan, Jure; Gobec, Stanislav; Goličnik, Marko

    2014-11-01

    Although a recent study of Debord et al. in Biochimie (2014; 97:72-77) described the thermodynamics of the catalysed hydrolysis of phenyl acetate by human paraoxonase-1, the mechanistic details along the reaction route of this enzyme remain unclear. Therefore, we briefly present the solvent kinetic isotope effects on the phenyl acetate esterase activity of paraoxonase-1 and its inhibition with the phenyl methylphosphonate anion, which is a stable isosteric analogue that mimics the high-energy tetrahedral intermediate on the hydroxide-promoted hydrolysis pathway. The data show normal isotope effects, while proton inventory analysis indicates that two protons contribute to the kinetic isotope effect. Coherently, moderate competitive inhibition with the phenyl methylphosphonate anion reveals that the rate-limiting transition state suboptimally resembles the tetrahedral intermediate. The implications of these findings can be attributed to two possible reaction mechanisms that might occur during the paraoxonase-1-catalysed hydrolysis of phenyl acetate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  15. Kinetic stable Cr isotopic fractionation between aqueous Cr(III)-Cl-H2O complexes at 25 °C: Implications for Cr(III) mobility and isotopic variations in modern and ancient natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babechuk, Michael G.; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Reitter, Elmar; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2018-02-01

    The stable Cr isotope fractionation preserved in natural substances has been attributed predominantly to Cr(III)-Cr(VI) redox transformations. However, non-redox reaction pathways (e.g., ligand-promoted dissolution, ligand exchange, adsorption of Cr(III)) are liable to contribute to isotopic fractionation in natural systems given that soluble Cr(III)-ligands have been directly documented or modeled in several marine, continental, and hydrothermal environments. This study isolates the stable Cr isotope fractionation accompanying Cl-H2O ligand exchange during the transformation of three aqueous species in the Cr(III)-Cl-H2O system, [CrCl2(H2O)4]+aq (abr. CrCl2+ or S1), [CrCl(H2O)5]2+aq (abr. CrCl2+ or S2), and [Cr(H2O)6]3+aq (abr. Cr3+ or S3), at low pH (≤2). In dilute HCl (0.01 to 1 M), Cr3+ is the kinetically favoured species and transformation of CrCl2+ to CrCl2+ to Cr3+ via 2 steps of dechlorination/hydrolyzation begins immediately upon dissolution of a Cr(III)-Cl solid. Individual species are separated with cation exchange chromatography at different stages of transformation and inter- and intra-species (across an elution peak of one species) isotopic fractionation of up to 1 and 2‰ (δ53/52Cr), respectively, is documented. Comparison of peak elution characteristics with Cr-Cl-H-O isotopologue mass abundances suggests mass-dependent sorting of isotopologues alone cannot explain intra-species fractionation, supporting a previously published proposal that preferential adsorption of light Cr isotopes on the resin is driven by vibrational energy effects. The transformation of CrCl2+ to CrCl2+ is faster than CrCl2+ to Cr3+ and the rates of both transformations increase with solution pH. Preferential reaction of light Cr(III) isotopes into product species occurs during each transformation, consistent with closed-system, kinetic fractionation during Cl-H2O ligand exchange. Inter-species fractionation is assessed using time-series experiments beginning from the

  16. Late production of hydrocarbon gases in sedimentary basins: kinetic and isotopic study; Genese tardive des gaz hydrocarbures dans les bassins sedimentaires: etude cinetique et isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorant, F.

    1999-06-23

    The thermal decomposition of sedimentary organic matter, or kerogen, within the metagenesis zone (T > 170 deg. C) leads to the formation of large amounts of late gas, mainly composed by methane. The work reported in this dissertation aims at understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of late methane generation and isotopic fractionation. With this purpose, natural samples of Type II and Type III mature kerogens (Ro > 1.3%, H/C < 0.65), were artificially heated in both open (T = 350 to 900 deg. C at 25 deg. C/min) and closed (T = 375 to 550 deg. C with t = 1 to 216 h) systems. For each experiment, mass and atomic (C, H, O) balances were obtained by recovering, fractionating and quantifying the entire pyrolysis effluents. Moreover, the isotopic compositions ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios) of methane and insoluble residue produced in closed system were measured. These experimental simulations have shown that the amounts of methane generated in an open-pyrolysis system (9 to 40 mg/gC) are systematically inferior to that observed in a closed-pyrolysis system (44 to 68 mg/gC), even after correction of the possible C{sub 2}-C{sub 5} and C{sub 6+} hydrocarbons secondary cracking. This shift, which is larger for Type II kerogens compared to coals and Type II-S kerogens, seems to be correlated with the pyrite content of the samples. Based on the closed-pyrolysis system data, a kinetic scheme, suitable for both Type II and Type III kerogens, was established. It includes three consecutive reactions, whose apparent kinetic parameters do not allow accounting for the corresponding rate constants observed in open system: E{sub 1} = 64.7 kcal/mol and A{sub 1} = 2.58 x 10{sup 15} s{sup -1}, E{sub 2} = 52.8 kcal/mol and A{sub 2} = 5.50 x 10{sup 10} s{sup -1}, E{sub 3} = 55-58 kcal/mol and A{sub 3} = 7.52 x 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. By extrapolation to geological setting, it was thus predicted that kerogens might generate about 15 mg/gC of late methane between 170 and 200 deg. C. In order

  17. Isotopically exchangeable phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, N.O.

    1984-01-01

    A critique revision of isotope dilution is presented. The concepts and use of exchangeable phosphorus, the phosphate adsorption, the kinetics of isotopic exchange and the equilibrium time in soils are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Efficient Estimators for Quantum Instanton Evaluation of theKinetic Isotope Effects: Application to the Intramolecular HydrogenTransfer in Pentadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.

    2007-06-13

    The quantum instanton approximation is used to compute kinetic isotope effects for intramolecular hydrogen transfer in cis-1,3-pentadiene. Due to the importance of skeleton motions, this system with 13 atoms is a simple prototype for hydrogen transfer in enzymatic reactions. The calculation is carried out using thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotopes and a path integral Monte Carlo evaluation of relevant thermodynamic quantities. Efficient 'virial' estimators are derived for the logarithmic derivatives of the partition function and the delta-delta correlation functions. These estimators require significantly fewer Monte Carlo samples since their statistical error does not increase with the number of discrete time slices in the path integral. The calculation treats all 39 degrees of freedom quantum-mechanically and uses an empirical valence bond potential based on a modified general AMBER force field.

  19. Kinetics and isotope fractionation in deuterium exchange between N1-methyl-N2-phenylthiourea and S-deuterated t-butylthiol in aprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawer, A.; Szydlowski, J.

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics and isotope fractionation of deuterium in the exchange reaction between N 1 -methyl-N 2 -phenylthiourea and S-deuterated t-butylthiol in selected aprotic solvents: methylene chloride, tetrahydrofuran, acetone, dimethyl sulphoxide and acetonitrile have been determined. The rate of the deuterium exchange in N 1 H site is higher than that in N 2 H site and both depend visibly on the solvent. The higher the polarity of the solvent the lower the rate constant constant of the exchange reaction. The equilibrium isotope effect is relatively high and depends on the solvent, however, no distinct correlation could be found between the fractionation factor and electron donor or acceptor properties of the solvent. (author)

  20. Quantum instanton calculation of rate constant for CH4 + OH → CH3 + H2O reaction: torsional anharmonicity and kinetic isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenji; Zhao, Yi

    2012-12-07

    Thermal rate constants for the title reaction are calculated by using the quantum instanton approximation within the full dimensional Cartesian coordinates. The results reveal that the quantum effect is remarkable for the reaction at both low and high temperatures, and the obtained rates are in good agreement with experimental measurements at high temperatures. Compared to the harmonic approximation, the torsional anharmonic effect of the internal rotation has a little influence on the rates at low temperatures, however, it enhances the rate by about 20% at 1000 K. In addition, the free energy barriers for the isotopic reactions and the temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects are also investigated. Generally speaking, for the title reaction, the replacement of OH with OD will reduce the free energy barrier, while substituting D for H (connected to C) will increase the free energy barrier.

  1. Electron Bifurcation: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Two-Electron Brokering in Biological Redox Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuly, Jonathon L; Lubner, Carolyn E; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W; Peters, John W; Beratan, David N

    2017-09-19

    processes of their own. We dissect the thermodynamics and kinetics of electron bifurcation in Nfn and find that the key features of electron bifurcation are (1) spatially separated transfer pathways that diverge from a two-electron donor, (2) one thermodynamically uphill and one downhill redox pathway, with a large negative shift in the donor's reduction potential after departure of the first electron, and (3) electron tunneling and activation factors that enable bifurcation, producing a 1:1 partitioning of electrons onto the two pathways. Electron bifurcation is found in the CO 2 reducing pathways of methanogenic archaea, in the hydrogen pathways of hydrogenases, in the nitrogen fixing pathway of Fix, and in the mitochondrial charge transfer chain of complex III, cytochrome bc 1 . While crossed potentials may offer the biological advantage of producing tightly regulated high energy reactive species, neither kinetic nor thermodynamic considerations mandate crossed potentials to generate successful electron bifurcation. Taken together, the theoretical framework established here, focusing on the underpinning electron tunneling barriers and activation free energies, explains the logic of electron bifurcation that enables energy conversion and conservation in Nfn, points toward bioinspired schemes to execute multielectron redox chemistry, and establishes a roadmap for examining novel electron bifurcation networks in nature.

  2. Biodistribution, kinetics, and biological fate of SPION microbubbles in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrefelt A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Åsa Barrefelt,1,2,* Maryam Saghafian,2,* Raoul Kuiper,3 Fei Ye,4 Gabriella Egri,5 Moritz Klickermann,5 Torkel B Brismar,1 Peter Aspelin,1 Mamoun Muhammed,4 Lars Dähne,5 Moustapha Hassan2,6 1Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, and Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Experimental Cancer Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Karolinska Institute Core Facility for Morphologic Phenotype Analysis, Clinical Research Center, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Division of Functional Materials, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; 5Surflay Nanotec GmbH, Berlin, Germany; 6Clinical Research Center, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: In the present investigation, we studied the kinetics and biodistribution of a contrast agent consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA microbubbles containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPION trapped between the PVA layers (SPION microbubbles. Methods: The biological fate of SPION microbubbles was determined in Sprague-Dawley rats after intravenous administration. Biodistribution and elimination of the microbubbles were studied in rats using magnetic resonance imaging for a period of 6 weeks. The rats were sacrificed and perfusion-fixated at different time points. The magnetic resonance imaging results obtained were compared with histopathologic findings in different organs. Results: SPION microbubbles could be detected in the liver using magnetic resonance imaging as early as 10 minutes post injection. The maximum signal was detected between 24 hours and one week post injection. Histopathology showed the presence of clustered SPION microbubbles predominantly in the lungs from

  3. The delayed fluorescence kinetics as a method of biological tissue diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letuta, Sergey N.; Maryakhina, Valeriya S.

    2011-03-01

    Delayed fluorescence kinetics of exogenous fluorophores in tumor and normal mice mammary tissue cells was researched. Delayed fluorescence kinetics of fluorophores in two types of cells was researched on in its specific features and regularities. The investigation results are discussed in the context of early fluorescent diagnostics method of tissue pathological states.

  4. Use of fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB MS) for the analysis of zinc stable isotopes in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peirce, P.; Fennessey, P.; Hambidge, M.; Miller, L.; Goss, C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes offer a means of measuring human metabolism of trace metals in populations in which radioisotopes are contraindicated. The objective of this research has been to develop stable isotope methodology for the measurement of zinc in biological samples and to apply this methodology in pilot studies of intestinal zinc absorption. Analyses were made with a VG 7070E HF sector mass spectrometer at a resolution of 3000. Samples of 10 μl containing approximately 1 μg Zn were applied directly to a gold target, dried and inserted into the FAB source for ionization. Precision at the 1% level of enrichment was 2% (RSD). Pilot studies of the clinical application have been undertaken on two subjects to each of whom a single oral dose of enriched 70 Zn was administered after an overnight fast. A comparison of aqueous standards and prepared fecal samples showed undetectable levels of contamination at the 64 Zn to 70 Zn masses. Precision of fecal samples is comparable to that of aqueous standards. Calculated absorption after an overnight fast was between 60-65% of the administered dose. The FAB MS provides a simple, sensitive and precise technique for the measurement of zinc stable isotopes in biological samples

  5. Thermal Rate Coefficients and Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Reaction OH + CH4 → H2O + CH3 on an ab Initio-Based Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-15

    Thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction and its various isotopologues are computed using a tunneling-corrected transition-state theory on a global potential energy surface recently developed by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points. The calculated rate coefficients are found to agree well with the measured ones in a wide temperature range, validating the accuracy of the potential energy surface. Strong non-Arrhenius effects are found at low temperatures. In addition, the calculations reproduced the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects. These results confirm the strong influence of tunneling to this heavy-light-heavy hydrogen abstraction reaction.

  6. Assessment of Biological Kinetics in a Conventional Municipal WWTP by Means of the Oxygen Uptake Rate Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Torretta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pollution control of surface water bodies requires stringent checks on wastewater treatment plants performances. The satisfactory operation of biological treatment, commonly performed by means of activated sludge processes, requires a number of controlling and monitoring procedures. Suitable respirometric techniques for the determination of the kinetic parameters that regulate biological processes have been implemented in order to achieve this aim. This paper describes the results of an experimental research carried out in a conventional Italian municipal wastewater treatment plant. Particularly, the research has been finalized to both evaluate the biological process for the removal of biodegradable pollutants, such as carbonaceous substrates and ammonia nitrogen, and to collect data in order to evaluate a possible plant upgrade. Heterotrophic and autotrophic biomass kinetic parameters have been examined using respirometric techniques based on oxygen uptake measurements. The research performed makes a valuable contribution toward verifying the reliability of the values proposed in the literature for some kinetic parameters, which have been commonly used for a long time.

  7. CARBOHYDRATE USE AND ASSIMILATION BY LITTER AND SOIL FUNGI ASSESSED BY CARBON ISOTOPES AND BIOLOG ASSAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil fungi are integral to decomposition in forests, yet identification of probable functional roles of different taxa is problematic. Here, we compared carbohydrate assimilation patterns derived from stable isotope analyses on cultures with those produced from cultures on Biolo...

  8. Matrix separation by chelation to prepare biological materials for isotopic zinc analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrant, S.F.; Krushevska, A.; Amarasiriwardena, D.; Argentine, M.D.; Romon-Guesnier, S.; Barnes, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Following an evaluation of three chelating resins [Chelex-100, poly(dithiocarbamate) (PDTC) and carboxymethylated poly(ethyleneimine)-poly(methylenepolyphenylene) isocyanate (CPPI)], a procedure was established with the last of these for the separation of Zn from biological matrix elements prior to 70 Zn: 68 Zn isotopic analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method was verified by establishing Zn recoveries and by determining its effectiveness in removing Cl and Na from buffered test solutions. Calcium, Na, and Zn concentration data were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Chlorine was measured by electrothermal vaporization ICP-MS. The efficacy of the technique was demonstrated by the determination of zinc isotope ratios in bovine milk and human urine. (Author)

  9. Biological nitrogen fixation by faba bean, pea and vetch, using isotopic techniques (N-15) and two reference crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvache, Marcelo; Bernal, Gustavo

    1991-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out on a Typic Dystrandept soil at Santa Catalina Experimental Station, Cutuglagua, Pichincha, Ecuador. The objectives were to quantify faba bean (Vicia faba) pea (Pisum sativum) and vetch (Vicia sativa) biological nitrogen fixation using N-15 isotopic technique and to evaluate suitability of reference crops for such quantification. Higher values of biological nitrogen fixation were obtained using maize (Zea mays L.) than using wheat (Triticum vurgare) as reference crops. The average values were 85 and 81 per cent for vetch; 73 and 69 per cent for faba bean; and 34 and 18 per cent for pea, respectively. It was assumed that nitrogen use efficiency should be the same for fixing and no fixing crop, but it was observed that a reference crop with low nitrogen use efficiency underestimates legume biological nitrogen fixation. Results suggest that greater caution is needed when selecting reference crops for legumes with low nitrogen fixation

  10. Transmutation of stable isotopes and deactivation of radioactive waste in growing biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysotskii, Vladimir I.; Kornilova, Alla A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The phenomena of isotope transmutation in growing microbiological cultures were investigated. ► Transmutation in microbiological associations is 20 times more effective than in pure cultures. ► Transmutation of radioactive nuclei to stable isotopes in such associations was investigated. ► The most accelerated rate of Cs 137 to stable Ba 138 isotope transmutation was 310 days. ► “Microbiological deactivation” may be used for deactivation of Chernobyl and Fukushima areas. - Abstract: The report presents the results of qualifying examinations of stable and radioactive isotopes transmutation processes in growing microbiological cultures. It is shown that transmutation of stable isotopes during the process of growth of microbiological cultures, at optimal conditions in microbiological associations, is 20 times more effective than the same transmutation process in the form of “one-line” (pure) microbiological cultures. In the work, the process of direct, controlled decontamination of highly active intermediate lifetime and long-lived reactor isotopes (reactor waste) through the process of growing microbiological associations has been studied. In the control experiment (flask with active water but without microbiological associations), the “usual” law of nuclear decay applies, and the life-time of Cs 137 isotope was about 30 years. The most rapidly increasing decay rate, which occurred with a lifetime τ * ≈ 310 days (involving an increase in rate, and decrease in lifetime by a factor of 35 times) was observed in the presence of Ca salt in closed flask with active water contained Cs 137 solution and optimal microbiological association

  11. Role of stable isotope mass spectroscopy in hydrological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesari, Tirumalesh

    2017-01-01

    Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is a specialized technique used to provide information about a given sample about its geographic, chemical, physical and biological origin. The ability to determine the source of water molecule stems from the relative isotopic abundances of its constituent elements, viz., hydrogen and oxygen or sometimes through its dissolved elements such as carbon, nitrogen and sulphur etc. Since the isotope ratios of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen can become locally enriched or depleted through a variety of kinetic and thermodynamic factors, measurement of the isotope ratios can be used to unravel the processes and differentiate water samples which otherwise exhibit similar chemical signatures. For brevity, this article focuses mainly on measurement of water isotopes, common notation for expressing isotope data and standards, theory of isotope hydrology, field applications and advances

  12. Hydrolysis of N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid by the Haemophilus influenzae dapE-encoded desuccinylase: metal activation, solvent isotope effects, and kinetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, T L; Zheng, R; Blanchard, J S

    1998-07-21

    Hydrolysis of N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid by the dapE-encoded desuccinylase is required for the bacterial synthesis of lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid. We have investigated the catalytic mechanism of the recombinant enzyme from Haemophilus influenzae. The desuccinylase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Steady-state kinetic experiments verified that the enzyme is metal-dependent, with a Km for N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid of 1.3 mM and a turnover number of 200 s-1 in the presence of zinc. The maximal velocity was independent of pH above 7 but decreased with a slope of 1 below pH 7. The pH dependence of V/K was bell-shaped with apparent pKs of 6.5 and 8.3. Both L,L- and D,L-diaminopimelic acid were competitive inhibitors of the substrate, but d,d-diaminopimelic acid was not. Solvent kinetic isotope effect studies yielded inverse isotope effects, with values for D2OV/K of 0.62 and D2OV of 0.78. Determination of metal stoichiometry by ICP-AES indicated one tightly bound metal ion, while sequence homologies suggest the presence of two metal binding sites. On the basis of these observations, we propose a chemical mechanism for this metalloenzyme, which has a number of important structurally defined homologues.

  13. Kinetics of liquid-phase catalytic heterogeneous protium-tritium isotope exchange with participation of gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kayumov, V.G.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of catalytic (PdO/BaSO 4 (Al 2 O 3 ) catalyst) heterogeneous protium - tritium isotopic exchange D - [1- 3 H] of carbohydrates and gaseous oxygen have been measured. It is ascertained that the rate of isotopic exchange depends on the nature of carbohydrate, catalyst, buffer and medium acidity. The value of concentration of carbohydrate acyclic forms plays the determining role in the process

  14. Experimental formulation of a kinetic model describing the nitrification process in biological aerated filters filled with plastic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Alessio; De Rosa, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The present work reports the results of a series of experimental tests performed on cylindrically shaped biological aerated filters (BAFs) to define a new model for reactors design. The nitrification performance was analysed by monitoring a laboratory pilot plant over a six-month period; the dependence of the nitrification rate from the biomass surface density, from ammonia nitrogen concentration and dissolved oxygen concentration was determined using kinetic batch tests. The controls performed on the pilot plant exhibited a nitrification efficiency of approximately 98% at loadings up to [Formula: see text]. Over this value, the pilot plant performance decreased without a correlation with the applied loads. In response to the inlet ammonia loading increase, the bacterial surface density showed a logistic growing trend. The results of kinetic tests proved that the nitrification rate was not affected by the ammonia nitrogen concentration; instead, a first-order kinetic with respect to the dissolved oxygen concentration was detected. Moreover, it was observed that a minimum oxygen concentration, which was proportional to the bacterial surface density, was necessary to initiate the nitrification process. The reaction rate related to bacterial surface density exhibited an increasing trend that was followed by a subsequent decreasing behaviour. The results of kinetic tests and the identification of the relationship between bacterial surface density and ammonia loading permitted the formulation of a mathematical model to predict BAFs' nitrification efficiency.

  15. Kinetic target-guided synthesis in drug discovery and chemical biology: a comprehensive facts and figures survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosc, Damien; Jakhlal, Jouda; Deprez, Benoit; Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    For the last 15 years, kinetic target-guided syntheses, including in situ click chemistry, have been used as alternative methods to find ligands to therapeutically relevant proteins. In this review, a comprehensive survey of biological targets used in kinetic target-guided synthesis covers historical and recent examples. The chemical reactions employed and practical aspects, including controls, library sizes and product detection, are presented. A particular focus is on the reagents and warhead selection and design with a critical overview of the challenges encountered. As protein supply remains a key success factor, it appears that increased efforts should be taken toward miniaturization in order to expand the scope of this strategy and qualify it as a fully fledged drug discovery tool.

  16. Intercomparison of enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, R.M.; Clements, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an intercomparison exercise organized by the IAEA during the latter part of 1988 and 1989. Data are presented for 13 different kinds of enriched stable isotope reference material containing 2 H, 13 C, 15 N and 18 O. Results were submitted by forty participants in twenty countries. 2 refs, 13 figs, 18 tabs

  17. High Precision Zinc Stable Isotope Measurement of Certified Biological Reference Materials Using the Double Spike Technique and Multiple Collector-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Rebekah E T; Larner, Fiona; Coles, Barry J; Rehkämper, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Biological reference materials with well-characterised stable isotope compositions are lacking in the field of 'isotope biochemistry', which seeks to understand bodily processes that rely on essential metals by determining metal stable isotope ratios. Here, we present Zn stable isotope data for six biological reference materials with certified trace metal concentrations: fish muscle, bovine muscle, pig kidney, human hair, human blood serum and human urine. Replicate analyses of multiple aliquots of each material achieved reproducibilities (2sd) of 0.04-0.13‰ for δ 66/64 Zn (which denotes the deviation of the 66 Zn/ 64 Zn ratio of a sample from a pure Zn reference material in parts per 1000). This implies only very minor isotopic heterogeneities within the samples, rendering them suitable as quality control materials for Zn isotope analyses. This endorsement is reinforced by (i) the close agreement of our Zn isotope data for two of the samples (bovine muscle and human blood serum) to previously published results for different batches of the same material and (ii) the similarity of the isotopic data for the samples (δ 66/64 Zn ≈ -0.8 to 0.0‰) to previously published Zn isotope results for similar biological materials. Further tests revealed that the applied Zn separation procedure is sufficiently effective to enable accurate data acquisition even at low mass resolving power (M/ΔM ≈ 400), as measurements and analyses conducted at much higher mass resolution (M/ΔM ≈ 8500) delivered essentially identical results.

  18. Predicting in vivo effect levels for repeat-dose systemic toxicity using chemical, biological, kinetic and study covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Lisa; Ouedraogo, Gladys; Pham, LyLy; Clouzeau, Jacques; Loisel-Joubert, Sophie; Blanchet, Delphine; Noçairi, Hicham; Setzer, Woodrow; Judson, Richard; Grulke, Chris; Mansouri, Kamel; Martin, Matthew

    2018-02-01

    In an effort to address a major challenge in chemical safety assessment, alternative approaches for characterizing systemic effect levels, a predictive model was developed. Systemic effect levels were curated from ToxRefDB, HESS-DB and COSMOS-DB from numerous study types totaling 4379 in vivo studies for 1247 chemicals. Observed systemic effects in mammalian models are a complex function of chemical dynamics, kinetics, and inter- and intra-individual variability. To address this complex problem, systemic effect levels were modeled at the study-level by leveraging study covariates (e.g., study type, strain, administration route) in addition to multiple descriptor sets, including chemical (ToxPrint, PaDEL, and Physchem), biological (ToxCast), and kinetic descriptors. Using random forest modeling with cross-validation and external validation procedures, study-level covariates alone accounted for approximately 15% of the variance reducing the root mean squared error (RMSE) from 0.96 log 10 to 0.85 log 10  mg/kg/day, providing a baseline performance metric (lower expectation of model performance). A consensus model developed using a combination of study-level covariates, chemical, biological, and kinetic descriptors explained a total of 43% of the variance with an RMSE of 0.69 log 10  mg/kg/day. A benchmark model (upper expectation of model performance) was also developed with an RMSE of 0.5 log 10  mg/kg/day by incorporating study-level covariates and the mean effect level per chemical. To achieve a representative chemical-level prediction, the minimum study-level predicted and observed effect level per chemical were compared reducing the RMSE from 1.0 to 0.73 log 10  mg/kg/day, equivalent to 87% of predictions falling within an order-of-magnitude of the observed value. Although biological descriptors did not improve model performance, the final model was enriched for biological descriptors that indicated xenobiotic metabolism gene expression, oxidative stress, and

  19. Comparison of Kinetic Study and Protective Effects of Biological Dipeptide and Two Porphyrin Derivatives on Metal Cytotoxicity Toward Human Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Khosravi, Maryam; Rahimi, Rahmatollah; pourahmad, Jalal; Zarei, Mohammad Hadi; Rabbani, Mahboubeh

    2017-01-01

    In this research, dipeptide (his-β-alanine) and porphyrin derivatives were choosen for comparing chelating ability of toxic metals such as Al3+, Cu2+, Hg2+ and Pb2 + in-vitro. The reason for choosing these two compounds is that both of them are naturally present in biological systems and comparison of chelating ability of these two compounds has not yet been done. Synthesis and comparison of kinetic study of dipeptide (his-β-alanine), meso-tetrakis(4-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TAPP) and T...

  20. Investigation the Kinetic Models of Biological Removal of Petroleum Contaminated Soil Around Oil Pipeline Using Ryegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghaheri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The industrial revolution of the past century has resulted in significant damage to environmental resources such as air, water and soil. Petroleum contamination of soil is a serious problem throughout the oil producer countries. Remediation of petroleum contamination of soils is generally a slow and expensive process. Phytoremediation is a potentially less-damaging, cost-effective, but needs longer-term for remediation of contaminated land compared to the alternative methods. In this study the kinetics of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils in Khozestan were investigated. For this paper Ryegrass (Lolium perenne plant selected and the decline of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH was analyzed after growth stage, every 10 days up to 90 days. The results of TPH concentration was fitted with zero-order kinetic, first-order kinetic and Higuchi model. The result indicated that degradation of TPH with presence of plants as a function of time was well fitted with the first-order kinetic model. The first-order rate constants (K and half-lives (T1/2 for TPH degradation were 0.0098 1/day and 71 day; respectively. The results of phytoremediation showed that there were 65% decreases in TPH concentration with Ryegrass during the 17 weeks.

  1. Use of isotopes for increasing biological nitrogen fixation and yield of pastures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yunyin

    1992-05-01

    The N-15 natural abundance and N-15 isotope dilution (ID) methods for measuring dinitrogen fixation and nitrogen transfer in alfalfa and alfalfa intercropped with meadow fescue were compared in three experiments. Although both methods gave essentially the same estimates the precision of the values obtained differed, and values obtained by the isotope dilution method were more precise. Similarly, the N-15 natural abundance method was not very suitable for detecting N transfer from legume to non-legume. Greater amounts of N transfer were detected by the ID method, and with a greater precision. Mixed cropping sometimes gave slight to high increases in % nitrogen fixation compared to alfalfa cropped alone. On the whole alfalfa was found to be a high nitrogen fixer, with fixation values from the second harvest onwards almost always greater than 80% and often close to 100%. 23 refs, 30 tabs

  2. Influence of deuterium on kinetics of methane isotope exchange with surface deuteroxy groups of Pt/SiO2 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musoyan, L.M.; Aliev, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction of isotope methane exchange with surface deuteroxy groups of 2 % Pt/SiO 2 catalyst was studied. It is shown that preliminarily chemisorbed deuterium does not decelerate the exchange reaction, but changes its mechanism. Activation energy of exchange on clean surface is equal to 25 kJ/mol; it grows in the presence of deuterium on the surface

  3. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Chemical and Biological Agents Release from Biopolymeric Microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceković, Marko; Jurić, Slaven; Đermić, Edyta; Topolovec-Pintarić, Snježana

    2017-11-08

    Kinetics and mechanisms of copper cations and Trichoderma viride spores release from uncoated and chitosan coated alginate microcapsules were investigated. The gelation of a fixed amount of sodium alginate at different concentrations of copper ion solutions resulted in distinct kinetics and release mechanisms. The increase in copper cation concentration promoted, but the presence of the chitosan layer on the microcapsule surface and the increase in microcapsule size reduced the rate of active agent release. Fitting to simple Korsmeyer-Peppas empirical model revealed that the underlying release mechanism (Fickian diffusion or a combination of the diffusion and erosion mechanisms) depends on the copper cation concentration and presence of T. viride spores. The investigation pointed out that the proper selection of formulation variables helps in designing microcapsules with the desirable release of copper ions and T. viride for plant protection and nutrition.

  4. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the oxidation of deuteriated butyric acid-D7 with chromium trioxide in 85% orthophosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, A.; Zielinski, M.

    2001-01-01

    A comparative study of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the oxidation of the deuteriated butyric acid-D 7 with Cr(VI) in 85% orthophosphoric acid has been carried out. The (k HH /k DD ) KIE values between 5.7 and 7.0 indicate that the tunnelling is not involved in oxidation of deuteriated aliphatic carboxylic acids with chromium trioxide in acidic media and the oxidation KIE is determined by the zero point energy difference corresponding to the C-H/C-D stretching vibrations lost in the transition state. The results were compared with the large D-KIE observed in the oxidation of butyrate-D 7 with alkaline manganate caused by the simultaneous operation of zeropoint energy effect and tunnelling. (author)

  5. An Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Kinetic Isotope Effect of C2H6 and C2D6 Reaction with OH

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2015-10-30

    We report experimental and theoretical results for the deuterated kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) of the reaction of OH with ethane (C2H6) and deuterated ethane (C2D6). The reactions were investigated behind reflected shock waves over 800–1350 K by monitoring OH radicals near 306.69 nm using laser absorption. In addition, high level CCSD(T)/cc-pV(T,Q)Z//MP2/cc-pVTZ quantum chemical and statistical rate theory calculations were performed which agreed very well with the experimental findings. The results reported herein provide the first experimental evidence that DKIE for alkanes asymptotes to a value of 1.4 at high temperatures.

  6. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  7. Kinetic isotope effects in the gas phase reactions of OH and Cl with CH3Cl, CD3Cl, and 13CH3Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of CH3Cl, 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH radicals and Cl atoms were studied in relative rate experiments at 298±2 K and 1013±10 mbar. The reactions were carried out in a smog chamber using long path FTIR detection and the spectroscopic data analyzed employing a non-linear least squares spectral fitting method using measured high-resolution infrared spectra as well as absorption cross sections from the HITRAN database. The reaction rates of 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH and Cl were determined relative to CH3Cl as: kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+13CH3Cl}kOH+13CH3Cl=1.059±0.008, kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+CD3ClkOH+CD3Cl=3.9±0.4, kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+13CH3ClkCl+13CH3Cl =1.070±0.010 and kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+CD3ClkCl+CD3Cl=4.91±0.07. The uncertainties given are 2σ from the statistical analyses and do not include possible systematic errors. The unexpectedly large 13C kinetic isotope effect in the OH reaction of CH3Cl has important implications for the global emission inventory of CH3Cl.

  8. Biological availability of phosphorus from natural phosphates for bovine s by the isotope dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Lopes, H.O. da; Pereira, E.A.; Moraes, E.A. de; Vitti, D.M.S.; Abdala, A.L.; Silva Filho, J.C. da; Fichtner, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    A metabolism trial was carried out with steers to study the true absorption of phosphorus from dicalcium phosphate (DICAL) and natural rock phosphates from Patos de Minas (FP) and Tapira (FT) - DF., Brazil. Twenty-seven steers were assigned to the three treatment groups (DICAL, FP and FT) in a randomized block design. The animals were confined in metabolic cages and received a basal ration of Brachiaria decumbens hay and a concentrate with the appropriate phosphorus source. The endogenous fecal loss of phosphorus was estimated by the isotope dilution method using 32 p as a tracer. (M.A.C.)

  9. Biological and land use controls on the isotopic composition of aquatic carbon in the Upper Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Britta; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Aiken, George R.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2017-01-01

    Riverine ecosystems receive organic matter (OM) from terrestrial sources, internally produce new OM, and biogeochemically cycle and modify organic and inorganic carbon. Major gaps remain in the understanding of the relationships between carbon sources and processing in river systems. Here we synthesize isotopic, elemental, and molecular properties of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) system above Wabasha, MN, including the main stem Mississippi River and its four major tributaries (Minnesota, upper Mississippi, St. Croix, and Chippewa Rivers). Our goal was to elucidate how biological processing modifies the chemical and isotopic composition of aquatic carbon pools during transport downstream in a large river system with natural and man-made impoundments. Relationships between land cover and DOC carbon-isotope composition, absorbance, and hydrophobic acid content indicate that DOC retains terrestrial carbon source information, while the terrestrial POC signal is largely replaced by autochthonous organic matter, and DIC integrates the influence of in-stream photosynthesis and respiration of organic matter. The UMR is slightly heterotrophic throughout the year, but pools formed by low-head navigation dams and natural impoundments promote a shift towards autotrophic conditions, altering aquatic ecosystem dynamics and POC and DIC composition. Such changes likely occur in all major river systems affected by low-head dams and need to be incorporated into our understanding of inland water carbon dynamics and processes controlling CO2 emissions from rivers, as new navigation and flood control systems are planned for future river and water resources management.

  10. The application of the radioactive tracer technique to study the kinetics of bromide isotope exchange reaction with the participation of strongly basic anion exchange resin indion FF-IP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, R. S.; Singare, P. U.; Prabhavalkar, T. S.

    2008-09-01

    In the present investigation, the 82Br radioactive isotope was used as a tracer to study the kinetics and mechanism of the exchange reaction between an ion exchange resin and an external solution of bromide ions. In an attempt to study the reversible bromide isotope exchange reaction kinetics, it was expected that whether the initial step was the exchange of radioactive bromide ions from the solution to the ion exchange resin (forward reaction) or from the ion exchange resin to the solution (reverse reaction), the two ion-isotope exchange reactions should occur simultaneously, which was further confirmed by the experimental values of specific reaction rates, 0.142 and 0.141 min-1, respectively. The results will be useful to standardize the process parameters so as to achieve optimum use of ion exchange resins in various industrial applications.

  11. Investigating the Mechanism of Heteroaromatic Decarboxylation Using Solvent Kinetic Isotope Effects and Eyring Transition-State Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundle, Scott O. C.; Opinska, Liliana Guevara; Kluger, Ronald; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    An upper-level mechanistic organic experiment is outlined where undergraduates measure kinetic rate constants for decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid by the initial-rates method. UV spectroscopy is used to monitor reactant disappearance in both hydrochloric acid and deuterium chloride at different temperatures. Individual data are pooled…

  12. Synthesis and radioiodination of di-iodo-Evan's blue via isotopic exchange reaction in the molten state and evaluation of the kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Azony, K.M.; Hot Lab. Center, Cairo; Bier, D.; Coenen, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    Many aryl halides were synthesized from aryl amines such as iodo-trypan, iodo-methylene blue and iodo-toluidine. Methylene blue and toludine blue are phenothiazinium dyes and were used to localize parathyroid glands visually during surgery. Radioiodination of these compounds by using iodine-123 analogues for scintgraphic localization of parathyroids was reported. Radiolabelled dyes administered may also localize in tumor tissues. Evan's blue dye was used to study altered sarcolemmal permeability in dystrophic muscle fibers, and in animals to study muscular dystrophy. In this work Diiodo-Evan's blue was synthesized via Sandmeyer reaction and characterized by mass spectrum analysis. A procedure for labelling DIEB with Na 131 I via isotopic exchange in molten medium was developed. The labelling conditions studied for the isotopic exchange of 131 I-for-I in DIEB included the effect of temperature and solvents (melt of acetamide, benzoic and pivalic acid). Kinetic studies were performed to obtain [ 131 I] DIEB with more reliable reaction conditions. Quality control for the final product ([ 131 I] DIEB) was performed by HPLC. (orig.)

  13. Subcellular imaging of isotopically labeled carbon compounds in a biological sample by ion microprobe (NanoSIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clode, Peta L; Stern, Richard A; Marshall, Alan T

    2007-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the technique of nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry, utilizing the Cameca NanoSIMS50 ion microprobe, to detect and image the metabolism of an isotopically labeled compound (NaH(13)CO(3)) in a biological sample. In particular, we have designed and verified protocols for imaging the subcellular distribution and determining the relative abundance of labeled (13)C, within the coral Galaxea fascicularis. Analyses were conducted on 1-mum thick sections of resin-embedded material, using both scanned (mapping) and static (spot analysis) Cs(+) primary ion beam of approximately 100 nm diameter. Using these samples we establish that NanoSIMS has adequate mass resolution to reliably distinguish (13)C from potential isobaric interference by (12)C(1)H and that data extracted from ion maps are comparable to those acquired by spot analyses. Independent of the method of acquisition, ratioing of (13)C to the naturally abundant (12)C is essential if meaningful data, which can be statistically compared to standard and control samples, are to be obtained. These results highlight the potential of NanoSIMS for intracellular tracking of a variety of organic and inorganic compounds labeled with stable isotopes of C, N, O, S, P, and halogens. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Thermodynamics proposes, kinetics decides, speciation dares: speciation of actinides in biological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.

    2005-06-01

    After having recalled the content and purpose of his research thesis, the author proposes a detailed overview of the research works he performed thereafter in the field of the speciation of actinides at the level of the organism entry gates and in target tissues. These works therefore concern four important areas of research in radioprotection: bio-kinetic, toxicology, decorporation, and dosimetry studies. The author outlines how speciation studies can be useful for these different areas, and to better understand and describe, and therefore foresee, the biokinetics and toxicity of radionuclides

  15. Isotope effects in gas-phase chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of isotope effects in chemical reactions and photochemical reactions are presented. Most studies consider kinetic isotope effects with emphasis on hydrogen, deuterium, and muonium containing molecules and atoms. Theoretical origins of kinetic isotope effects are considered in several papers. A few of the latter papers consider atmospheric chemistry with respect to isotope effects

  16. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction. Mechanisms. 3. Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect. Uday Maitra and. J Chandrasekhar are members of the Organic. Chemistry faculty in. Indian Institute of. Science at Bangalore. The previous articles of this series were: 1. Isotopes as markers, May. 1997. 2. Primary kinetic isotope effect.

  17. Stable isotope deltas: tiny, yet robust signatures in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B

    2012-09-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including (14)C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. (13)C, (2)H, and (18)O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as-25 per mil can be written as-25 mUr (or-2.5 cUr or-0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg 'units' are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  18. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  19. Isotopic yields and kinetic energies of primary residues in 1 A GeV 208Pb + p reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, T.; Wlazlo, W.; Armbruster, P.

    2000-09-01

    The production of primary residual nuclei in the reaction 1 A GeV 208 Pb on proton has been studied by measuring isotopic distributions for all elements from titanium (Z=22) to lead (Z=82). Kinematical properties of the residues were also determined and used to disentangle the relevant reaction mechanisms, spallation (projectile fragmentation) and fission. The fragment separator FRS at GSI, Darmstadt, was used to separate and identify the reaction products. The measured production cross sections are highly relevant for the design of accelerator-driven subcritical reactors and for the planning of future radioactive-beam facilities. (orig.)

  20. Kinetic isotope effect and tunnelling in the reaction between 4-nitrophenylnitromethane and pentamethylguanidine in acetonitrile and toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanch, J.H.; Rogne, O.; Rossemyr, L.I.

    1980-01-01

    Rates and activation parameters for the proton and deuteron transfer reaction of 4-nitrophenylnitromethane with pentamethylguanidine in acetonitrile have been determined. The isotope effect and differences in activation parameters are larger than the semiclassical limits and suggest a small but significant tunnel correction. The results are well accounted for by Bell's equation for tunnelling through a parabolic barrier. Comparison of the results for acetonitrile with previously obtained values for toluene show that there is no significant effect of the solvent polarity on the tunnel correction. (author)

  1. Development and application of kinetic model on biological anoxic/aerobic filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngnoh; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Lee, Yong-Woo; Chung, Jinwook

    2008-01-01

    An up-flow biological anoxic filter (BANF) has been developed to achieve high removal performance of suspended solids and BOD removal as well as nitrogen. With a view to understand treatment mechanisms, we developed a filtration model that incorporates filtration, deposit scoring and biological reactions simultaneously. The biological reactions consist of four types of reaction; dissolution of organic particles; utilization of dissolved organic matter; denitrification; and self-degradation of bacteria. Whereas the reactor is generally assumed to be a plug flow reactor in the filtration model, it is assumed a continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) in the model of biological reactions. The hydrodynamics is supposed that the filter bottom (the portion sludge settled) is a CSTR and the filter bed (the portion filled with filter media) consists of number of CSTR of equal size arranged in series. The model obtained in this study was verified and simulated using experimental results taken from a pilot-scale plant and predicted the experimental data well, applying to design and operate BANF.

  2. Stable Isotope Group 1983 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1984-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and related fields, and mass spectrometer instrumentation, during 1983, is described

  3. Stable Isotope Group 1982 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1983-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences during 1982, in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and mass spectrometer instrumentation, is described

  4. Spatio-temporal thermal kinetics of in situ MWCNT heating in biological tissues under NIR laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picou, Laura; McMann, Casey; Boldor, Dorin [Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 149 E B Doran Building, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4505 (United States); Elzer, Philip H; Enright, Frederick M [Department of Veterinary Sciences, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, 111 Dalrymple Building, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Biris, Alexandru S, E-mail: DBoldor@agcenter.lsu.edu [Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas-Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, ETAS 151, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099 (United States)

    2010-10-29

    Carbon nanotubes have many potential applications in life sciences and engineering as they have very high absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum, while biological tissues do not. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 1064 nm NIR laser power levels on the spatial temperature distribution and the temperature kinetics in mammalian tissue at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The model tissue was the 'flat' of a chicken wing (the section containing the radius and ulna), which was injected under the skin in the subcutaneous layer of tissue. Specimens were exposed to laser radiation and an infrared thermography system was used to measure and record the temperature distributions in the specimens at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales. Experimental results concluded that power levels of 1536 mW easily achieved hyperthermic temperatures with localized values as high as 172.7 deg. C.

  5. Isotope partitioning for NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum confirms a steady-state random kinetic mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Y.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-01-12

    Isotope partitioning studies beginning with E-(/sup 14/C)NAD, E-(/sup 14/C) malate, E-(/sup 14/C) NAD-Mg/sup 2 +/, and E-Mg-(/sup 14/C)malate suggest a steady-state random mechanism for the NAD-malic enzyme. Isotope trapping beginning with E-(/sup 14/C)NAD and with varying concentrations of Mg/sup 2 +/ and malate in the chase solution indicates that Mg/sup 2 +/ is added in rapid equilibrium and must be added prior to malate for productive ternary complex formation. Equal percentage trapping from E-(/sup 14/C)NAD-Mg and E-Mg-(/sup 14/C) malate indicates the mechanism is steady-state random with equal off-rates for NAD and malate from E-NAD-Mg-malate. The off-rates for both do not change significantly in the ternary E-Mg-malate and E-NAD-Mg complexes, nor does the off-rate change for NAD from E-NAD. No trapping of malate was obtained from E-(/sup 14/C) malate, suggesting that this complex is nonproductive. A quantitative analysis of the data allows an estimation of values for a number of the rate constants along the reaction pathway.

  6. Isotope partitioning for NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum confirms a steady-state random kinetic mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.Y.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Isotope partitioning studies beginning with E-[ 14 C]NAD, E-[ 14 C] malate, E-[ 14 C] NAD-Mg 2+ , and E-Mg-[ 14 C]malate suggest a steady-state random mechanism for the NAD-malic enzyme. Isotope trapping beginning with E-[ 14 C]NAD and with varying concentrations of Mg 2+ and malate in the chase solution indicates that Mg 2+ is added in rapid equilibrium and must be added prior to malate for productive ternary complex formation. Equal percentage trapping from E-[ 14 C]NAD-Mg and E-Mg-[ 14 C] malate indicates the mechanism is steady-state random with equal off-rates for NAD and malate from E-NAD-Mg-malate. The off-rates for both do not change significantly in the ternary E-Mg-malate and E-NAD-Mg complexes, nor does the off-rate change for NAD from E-NAD. No trapping of malate was obtained from E-[ 14 C] malate, suggesting that this complex is nonproductive. A quantitative analysis of the data allows an estimation of values for a number of the rate constants along the reaction pathway

  7. Chemical kinetic mechanistic models to investigate cancer biology and impact cancer medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stites, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Traditional experimental biology has provided a mechanistic understanding of cancer in which the malignancy develops through the acquisition of mutations that disrupt cellular processes. Several drugs developed to target such mutations have now demonstrated clinical value. These advances are unequivocal testaments to the value of traditional cellular and molecular biology. However, several features of cancer may limit the pace of progress that can be made with established experimental approaches alone. The mutated genes (and resultant mutant proteins) function within large biochemical networks. Biochemical networks typically have a large number of component molecules and are characterized by a large number of quantitative properties. Responses to a stimulus or perturbation are typically nonlinear and can display qualitative changes that depend upon the specific values of variable system properties. Features such as these can complicate the interpretation of experimental data and the formulation of logical hypotheses that drive further research. Mathematical models based upon the molecular reactions that define these networks combined with computational studies have the potential to deal with these obstacles and to enable currently available information to be more completely utilized. Many of the pressing problems in cancer biology and cancer medicine may benefit from a mathematical treatment. As work in this area advances, one can envision a future where such models may meaningfully contribute to the clinical management of cancer patients. (paper)

  8. Kinetic Modeling of Arsenic Cycling by a Freshwater Cyanobacterium as Influenced by N:P Ratios: A Potential Biologic Control in an Iron-Limited Drainage Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, C. T.; Herbert, B. E.

    2004-12-01

    Elevated As levels are common in South Texas surface waters, where As is derived from the natural weathering of geogenic sources and a byproduct of historical uranium mining. The impacted surface waters of the Nueces River drainage basin supply Lake Corpus Christi (LCC), a major drinking water reservoir for the Corpus Christi area. The soils and sediments of the Nueces River drainage basin generally have low levels of reactive iron (average concentration of 2780 mg/kg), limiting the control of iron oxyhydroxides on As geochemistry and bioavailability. Given these conditions, biologic cycling of As may have a large influence on As fate and transport in LCC. Sediment cores from LCC show evidence for cyanobacterial blooms after reservoir formation based upon stable isotopes, total organic matter and specific elemental correlations. While algae have been shown to accumulate and reduce inorganic As(V), few studies have reported biologic cycling of As by cyanobacteria. Therefore, As(V) uptake, accumulation, reduction, and excretion in a 1.0 μ M As(V) solution by the freshwater cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120, was measured over time as a function of low, middle and high N:P ratios (1.2, 12, 120) to determine nutrient effects on As cycling by the cyanobacterium. Total As(V) reduction was observed in all three conditions upon completion of the ten-day experiment. Maximum As(V) reduction rates ranged from (0.013 mmol g C-1 day-1) in the low N:P solution to (0.398 mmol g C-1 day-1) in the high N:P solution. Increased cell biomass in the low N:P ratio solution compensated for the low maximum reduction rate to allow total As(V) reduction. Kinetic equations commonly used to model algal-nutrient interactions were utilized in modeling the current data. The Michaelis-Menten enzyme saturation equation modified with a competitive inhibition term adequately modeled As(III) excretion in the high and middle N:P ratio test conditions. The low N:P test condition further

  9. Biological nitrogen fixation in Crotalaria species estimated using the 15N isotope dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samba, R.T.; Neyra, M.; Gueye, M.; Sylla, S.N.; Ndoye, I.; Dreyfus, B.

    2002-01-01

    Growing in Senegal by using 15 N direct isotope dilution technique. Two non-fixing plants, Senna obtusifolia and Senna occidentalis served as reference plants. The amount of nitrogen fixed two months after planting was obtained using the average of the two reference plants. The atom % 15 N excess in the Crotalaria species was significantly lower than that of the reference plants, indicating that significant nitrogen fixation occurred in the three plants. Significant differences were observed between the Crotalaria species; C. ochroleuca yielded more dry matter weight and total nitrogen than did C. perrottetti and C. retusa. The % nitrogen derived from atmosphere (%Ndfa) in leaves and stems was also higher in C. ochroleuca. There was no significant difference in %Ndfa in the whole plant between the three Crotalaria species (47% to 53%). In contrast, interspecific variability was observed based on the %Ndfa. C. ochroleuca significantly exhibited the higher amount of total nitrogen fixed, equivalent to 83 kg of nitrogen fixed per hectare. Based on these data, it was concluded that C. ochroleuca could be used in multiple cropping systems in Senegal for making more nitrogen available to other plants. (author)

  10. Temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects for the OH + HBr reaction and H/D isotopic variants at low temperatures (53-135 K) measured using a pulsed supersonic Laval nozzle flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Christopher; Smith, Mark A

    2005-05-05

    The reactions of OH + HBr and all isotopic variants have been measured in a pulsed supersonic Laval nozzle flow reactor between 53 and 135 K, using a pulsed DC discharge to create the radical species and laser induced fluorescence on the A 2sigma HBr) = (10.84 +/- 0.31) x 10(-12) (T/298)(-0.67+/-0.02) cm3/s, k2 (OD + HBr) = (6.43 +/- 2.60) x 10(-12) (T/298)(-1.19+/-0.26) cm3/s, k3 (OH + DBr) = (5.89 +/- 1.93) x 10(-12) (T/298)(-0.76+/-0.22) cm3/s, and k4 (OD + DBr) = (4.71 +/- 1.56) x 10(-12) (T/298)(-1.09+/-0.21) cm3/s. A global fit of k vs T over the temperature range 23-360 K, including the new OH + HBr data, yields kT = (1.06 +/- 0.02) x 10(-11) (T/298)(-0.90+/-0.11) cm3/s, and (0.96 +/- 0.02) x 10(-11) (T/298)(-0.90+/-0.03) exp((-2.88+/-1.82 K)/T) cm3/s, in accord with previous fits. In addition, the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects are found to be independent of temperature within experimental error over the range investigated and take on the value of (kH/kD)(AVG) = 1.64 for the primary effect and (kH/kD)(AVG) = 0.87 for the secondary effect. These results are discussed within the context of current experimental and theoretical work.

  11. Kinetics of deuterium isotope exchange between 2-methylpropane-2-thiol and propane-2-thiol in aprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawer, A.

    1986-01-01

    The rate constants for bimolecular deuterium isotope exchange between 2-methylpropane-2-thiol and propane-2-thiol in C 6 D1 2 , CCl 4 , (CD 3 ) 2 CO, HCON(CH 3 ) 2 , (CD 2 ) 4 O, and (CH 3 ) 2 SO solutions were determined by use of H n.m.r. analysis. The rate constants, k, and activation enthalpy, ΔH decrease, and entropy, -ΔS, increases, with increase in ability of the solvents to form hydrogen bonds with alkanethiols. The rate constant of concerted hydrogen transfer inside the cyclic dimer of alkanethiols with two H-bonds, k 3 , increases with increasing dielectric constant of the solvent. (author)

  12. Biological dose estimation for charged-particle therapy using an improved PHITS code coupled with a microdosimetric kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Kase, Yuki; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Niita, Koji; Sihver, Lembit

    2009-01-01

    Microdosimetric quantities such as lineal energy, y, are better indexes for expressing the RBE of HZE particles in comparison to LET. However, the use of microdosimetric quantities in computational dosimetry is severely limited because of the difficulty in calculating their probability densities in macroscopic matter. We therefore improved the particle transport simulation code PHITS, providing it with the capability of estimating the microdosimetric probability densities in a macroscopic framework by incorporating a mathematical function that can instantaneously calculate the probability densities around the trajectory of HZE particles with a precision equivalent to that of a microscopic track-structure simulation. A new method for estimating biological dose, the product of physical dose and RBE, from charged-particle therapy was established using the improved PHITS coupled with a microdosimetric kinetic model. The accuracy of the biological dose estimated by this method was tested by comparing the calculated physical doses and RBE values with the corresponding data measured in a slab phantom irradiated with several kinds of HZE particles. The simulation technique established in this study will help to optimize the treatment planning of charged-particle therapy, thereby maximizing the therapeutic effect on tumors while minimizing unintended harmful effects on surrounding normal tissues.

  13. The double radio-isotope derivative techniques for the assay of drugs in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, W.

    1977-01-01

    The neuroleptic drug opipramol and its deshydroxyethyl metabolite can be determined simultaneously in the same biological sample. Known amounts of 14 C-labelled opipramol and 14 C-labelled metabolite are added to the sample to serve as internal standards. After suitable extraction, both compounds are acetylated by 3 H-labelled acetic anhydride. Together with μg-amounts of carrier compounds, the O-acetyl derivative of opipramol and the N-acetyl derivative of the metabolite are purified and separated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Each of the derivatives is isolated and counted for 14 C- and 3 H-activity. The 14 C-activities recovered serve to determine the overall yield of the opipramol and metabolite, and to convert the measured 3 H-activity to 100% theoretical yield. From analyses of standard samples, the specific 3 H-activities of the acetyl derivatives were calculated and these values were used to convert the measured 3 H-activites from biological samples to concentrations of original opipramol and metabolite. For both compounds the standard deviations of blank samples were +- 1 ng/ml. For concentrations up to 100 ng/ml the standard deviation was +- 3 ng/ml

  14. Electron Bifurcation: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Two-Electron Brokering in Biological Redox Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuly, Jonathon L.; Lubner, Carolyn E. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Mulder, David W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; King, Paul W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Peters, John W. [Institute; Beratan, David N. [Department

    2017-08-23

    How can proteins drive two electrons from a redox active donor onto two acceptors at very different potentials and distances? And how can this transaction be conducted without dissipating very much energy or violating the laws of thermodynamics? Nature appears to have addressed these challenges by coupling thermodynamically uphill and downhill electron transfer reactions, using two-electron donor cofactors that have very different potentials for the removal of the first and second electron. Although electron bifurcation is carried out with near perfection from the standpoint of energy conservation and electron delivery yields, it is a biological energy transduction paradigm that has only come into focus recently. This Account provides an exegesis of the biophysical principles that underpin electron bifurcation.

  15. Space radiation-induced bystander effect: kinetics of biologic responses, mechanisms, and significance of secondary radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonon, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Widespread evidence indicates that exposure of cell cultures to a particles results in significant biological changes in both the irradiated and non-irradiated bystander cells in the population. The induction of non-targeted biological responses in cell cultures exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation and to radiotherapy. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the induction of stressful effects in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to low fluences of 1000 MeV/u iron ions (linear energy transfer (LET) 151 keV/μm), 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET 50 keV/μm) or 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET 13 keV/μm). We compared the results with those obtained in cell cultures exposed, in parallel, to low fluences of 0.92 MeV/u a particles (LET 109 keV/μm). Induction of DNA damage, changes in gene expression, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation during 24 h after exposure of confluent cultures to mean doses as low as 0.2 cGy of iron or silicon ions strongly supported the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to bystander cells. At a mean dose of 0.2 cGy, only 1 and 3 % of the cells would be targeted through the nucleus by an iron or silicon ion, respectively. Within 24 h post-irradiation, immunoblot analyses revealed significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21Waf1 (also known as CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation. The magnitude of the responses suggested participation of non-targeted cells in the response. Furthermore, when the irradiated cell populations were subcultured in fresh medium shortly after irradiation, greater than expected increases in the levels of these markers were also observed during 24 h. Together, the results imply a rapidly propagated and persistent bystander effect. In situ analyses in confluent cultures showed 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage, in

  16. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics of mineral pairs in closed and open systems: Applications to problems of hydrothermal alteration of igneous rocks and Precambrian iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R.T.; Criss, R.E.; Taylor, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    The systematics of stable-isotope exchange between minerals and fluids are examined in the context of modal mineralogical variations and mass-balance considerations, both in closed and in open systems. On mineral-pair ??18O plots, samples from terranes that have exchanged with large amounts of fluid typically map out steep positively-sloped non-equilibrium arrays. Analytical models are derived to explain these effects; these models allow for different exchange rates between the various minerals and the external fluids, as well as different fluid fluxes. The steep arrays are adequately modelled by calculated isochron lines that involve the whole family of possible exchange trajectories. These isochrons have initially-steep near-vertical positive slopes that rotate toward a 45?? equilibrium slope as the exchange process proceeds to completion. The actual data-point array is thus analogous to the hand of an "isotopic clock" that measures the duration of the hydrothermal episode. The dimensionless ratio of the volumetric fluid flux to the kinetic rate parameter ( u k) determines the shape of each individual exchange trajectory. In a fluid-buffered system ( u k ??? 1), the solutions to the equations: (1) are independent of the mole fractions of the solid phases; (2) correspond to Taylor's open-system water/rock equation; and (3) yield straight-line isochrons that have slopes that approach 1 f, where f is the fraction reacted of the more sluggishly exchanging mineral. The isochrons for this simple exchange model are closely congruent with the isochrons calculated for all of the more complex models, thereby simplifying the application of theory to actual hydrothermal systems in nature. In all of the models an order of magnitude of time (in units of kt) separates steep non-equilibrium arrays (e.g., slope ??? 10) from arrays approaching an equilibrium slope of unity on a ??-?? diagram. Because we know the approximate lifetimes of many hydrothermal systems from geologic and

  17. A measuring system for the fast simultaneous isotope ratio and elemental analysis of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur in food commodities and other biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieper, Hans-Peter; Kupka, Hans-Joachim; Williams, Tony; Rossmann, Andreas; Rummel, Susanne; Tanz, Nicole; Schmidt, Hanns-Ludwig

    2006-01-01

    The isotope ratio of each of the light elements preserves individual information on the origin and history of organic natural compounds. Therefore, a multi-element isotope ratio analysis is the most efficient means for the origin and authenticity assignment of food, and also for the solution of various problems in ecology, archaeology and criminology. Due to the extraordinary relative abundances of the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in some biological material and to the need for individual sample preparations for H and S, their isotope ratio determination currently requires at least three independent procedures and approximately 1 h of work. We present here a system for the integrated elemental and isotope ratio analysis of all four elements in one sample within 20 min. The system consists of an elemental analyser coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer with an inlet system for four reference gases (N(2), CO(2), H(2) and SO(2)). The combustion gases are separated by reversible adsorption and determined by a thermoconductivity detector; H(2)O is reduced to H(2). The analyser is able to combust samples with up to 100 mg of organic material, sufficient to analyse samples with even unusual elemental ratios, in one run. A comparison of the isotope ratios of samples of water, fruit juices, cheese and ethanol from wine, analysed by the four-element analyser and by classical methods and systems, respectively, yielded excellent agreements. The sensitivity of the device for the isotope ratio measurement of C and N corresponds to that of other systems. It is less by a factor of four for H and by a factor of two for S, and the error ranges are identical to those of other systems. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Metal and hydrogen catalysis in isotopic hydrogen exchange in some biologically important heterocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Joly, H.A.; Jones, J.R.; Onyido, I.

    1989-01-01

    This study reports on the catalytic roles of metal and hydrogen ions in tritium exchange in some heterocyclic substrates which occur as residues in many biologically important molecules. We have found that detritiation of 1-methyl[2- 3 H]imidazole is inhibited by a number of metal ions. As well, inhibition of exchange rates was noted with Ag(I) and Cu(II) for [2- 3 H]thiazole and 1-methyl[8- 3 H]inosine, with Ag(I) for [2- 3 H]benzothiazole, and with Cu(II) for 1-methyl[8- 3 H]guanosine. A complete mechanistic description, which includes the various metal ion-coordinated species generated under the experimental conditions, is presented. The results demonstrate the reactivity order: protonated >> metal-coordinated >> neutral substrates. The differential catalytic effects of metal and hydrogen ions in these processes are discussed in terms of the extent of charge developed on the ligating heteroatom in the reaction intermediate. (author). 13 refs.; 1 fig

  19. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  20. Comparison of Kinetic Study and Protective Effects of Biological Dipeptide and Two Porphyrin Derivatives on Metal Cytotoxicity Toward Human Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Maryam; Rahimi, Rahmatollah; Pourahmad, Jalal; Zarei, Mohammad Hadi; Rabbani, Mahboubeh

    2017-01-01

    In this research, dipeptide (his- β -alanine) and porphyrin derivatives were choosen for comparing chelating ability of toxic metals such as Al 3+ , Cu 2+ , Hg 2+ and Pb 2 + in-vitro . The reason for choosing these two compounds is that both of them are naturally present in biological systems and comparison of chelating ability of these two compounds has not yet been done. Synthesis and comparison of kinetic study of dipeptide (his- β -alanine), meso-tetrakis(4-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TAPP) and Tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS 4 ) were carried out by our team. In addition, cytotoxicity assays of metals and chelators were also performed using methylthiazoletetrazolium (MTT) test. Furthermore we investigated the protective effect of chelators against cytotoxicity, induced by differenrt toxic metals such as Al 3+ , Cu 2+ , Hg 2+ and Pb 2+ on human lymphocytes. EC 50 values on human lymphocytes obtained after 12 h. incubation for Al 3+ , Cu 2+ and Hg 2+ were 30, 51, 3 µM respectively and for Pb 2+ no cytotoxicity was observed on human lymphocyte up to 1000 µM concentration. EC 50 obtained for chelators dipeptide, TPPS 4 and TAPP were 948, 472 and 175 µM respectively. Pretreatment of human lymphocyte with subtoxic concentations of chelators reduced toxicity of the metals against human blood lymphocytes.

  1. Single lipid vesicle assay for characterizing single-enzyme kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis in a complex biological fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Rabe, Michael; Zetterberg, Henrik; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2013-09-25

    Imaging of individual lipid vesicles is used to track single-enzyme kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis. The method is employed to quantify the catalytic activity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in both pure and complex biological fluids. The measurements are demonstrated to offer a subpicomolar limit of detection (LOD) of human secretory PLA2 (sPLA2) in up to 1000-fold-diluted cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). An additional new feature provided by the single-enzyme sensitivity is that information about both relative concentration variations of active sPLA2 in CSF and the specific enzymatic activity can be simultaneously obtained. When CSF samples from healthy controls and individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are analyzed, the specific enzymatic activity is found to be preserved within 7% in the different CSF samples whereas the enzyme concentration differs by up to 56%. This suggests that the previously reported difference in PLA2 activity in CSF samples from healthy and AD individuals originates from differences in the PLA2 expression level rather than from the enzyme activity. Conventional ensemble averaging methods used to probe sPLA2 activity do not allow one to obtain such information. Together with an improvement in the LOD of at least 1 order of magnitude compared to that of conventional assays, this suggests that the method will become useful in furthering our understanding of the role of PLA2 in health and disease and in detecting the pharmacodynamic effects of PLA2-targeting drug candidates.

  2. Vitamin A metabolism, kinetic behavior and utilization: Rationale for the continued development and use of an isotope dilution technique for assessing vitamin A stores in human populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses the applicability of isotope dilution method in general and oral isotope dilution in particular to the assessment of vitamin A status in humans. It also highlights some aspects of vitamin A intake and metabolism as related to isotope dilution method. Areas of methodological research and development in vitamin A research are also proposed

  3. Biological Nitrogen Fixation and Microbial Biomass N in the Rhizosphere of Chickpea as Estimated by 15N Isotope Dilution Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galal, Y. G. M.; El-Ghandour, I. A.; Abdel Raouf, A. M. N.; Osman, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Pot experiment was carried out with chickpea that cultivated in virgin sandy soil and inoculated with Rhizobium (Rh), mycorrhizea (VAM) and mixture of both. The objective of this work is the estimation of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and microbial biomass N (MBN) contribution as affected by inoculation and N and P fertilizers levels under chickpea plants. Nitrogen gained from air (Ndf A) was determined using 15 N isotope dilution technique, while the MBN was detected through the fumigation-extraction method. Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers were applied at three levels, 0; 10 ppm N and 3.3 ppm P and 20 ppm Nand 6.6 ppm P in the form of ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and super-phosphate, respectively. The effect of inoculation and chemical fertilizers on dry matter (DM), N and P uptake (shoot and grain), BNF and MBN were traced. The obtained data revealed that the highest DM and N uptake by chickpea shoot were recorded with the dual inoculation (Rh + VAM) at the moderate level of N and P fertilizers, while the highest DM, N and P uptake by grain were recorded with Rh solely at the same rate of fertilizers. It was clear that inoculation with Rh either alone or in combination with VAM substituted considerable amounts of N via BNF process. In this respect, dual inoculation is still superior over single inoculation. Percentages of N 2 -fixed was ranged from 45% to 73% in shoot while it was 27% to 69% in grain according to inoculation and fertilization treatments. Fixed N utilized by shoot was positively affected by increasing the N fertilizer rate while that derived by grain was not affected. The fluctuation in the soil microbial biomass N did not gave us a chance to recognize, exactly, the impact of inoculation and/or fertilization levels. (Authors)

  4. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Tomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  5. Biochemical ripening of dredged sediments. Part 1. Kinetics of biological organic matter mineralization and chemical sulfur oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Johan; van Gool, Martine P M; Dorleijn, Arne S; Joziasse, Jan; Bruning, Harry; Rulkens, Wim H; Grotenhuis, J T C Tim

    2007-12-01

    After dredged sediments have settled in a temporary upland disposal site, ripening starts, which turns waterlogged sediment into aerated soil. Aerobic biological mineralization of organic matter (OM) and chemical oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds are the major biochemical ripening processes. Quantitative data describing these processes are scarce. Therefore, aerobic oxidation and mineralization of five previously anaerobic dredged sediments were studied during a 160-d laboratory incubation experiment at 30 degrees C. A double exponential decay model could adequately describe sulfur oxidation and OM mineralization kinetics. During the first 7 d of incubation, 23 to 80% of the total sulfur was oxidized, after which no further sulfur oxidation was observed. Oxygen used for sulfur oxidation amounted up to 95% of the total oxygen uptake in the first 7 d and up to 45% of the oxygen uptake during the entire incubation period. Mineralization rates of the rapidly mineralizable OM fractions that degraded during the first 14 to 28 d of incubation were 10(2) to 10(3) times higher than the mineralization rates of the slowly mineralizable OM during the remaining period. First-order mineralization rates of the slowly mineralizable OM were 0.22 x 10(-3) to 0.54 x 10(-3) d(-1) and can be compared with those of terrestrial soils. Yields of biomass on substrate ranged from 0.08 to 0.45 g C(biomass)/g C(OM) and appeared to be higher for rapidly mineralizing OM than for slowly mineralizing OM. The results of this study can be used to optimize conditions during temporary disposal of sediments, to estimate the potential decrease in OM, and for future studies on the possible link between OM mineralization and degradation of hydrophobic organic contaminants.

  6. Using Stable Isotopes to Link Nutrient Sources in the Everglades and Biological Sinks in Florida Bay: A Biogeochemical Approach to Evaluate Ecosystem Response to Changing Nutrient Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, A. M.; Hollander, D. J.; Heil, C.; Glibert, P.; Murasko, S.; Revilla, M.; Alexander, J.

    2005-05-01

    Anthropogenic influences in South Florida have led to deterioration of its two major ecosystems, the Everglades wetlands and the Florida Bay estuary. Consequently, the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan has been proposed to restore the Everglades ecosystem; however, restoration efforts will likely exert new ecological changes in the Everglades and ultimately Florida Bay. The success of the Florida Everglades restoration depends on our understanding and ability to predict how regional changes in the distribution and composition of dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients will direct the downstream biogeochemical dynamics of Florida Bay. While the transport of freshwater and nutrients to Florida Bay have been studied, much work remains to directly link nutrient dynamics in Florida Bay to nutrient sources in the Everglades. Our study uses stable C and N isotopic measurements of chemical and biological materials from the Everglades and Florida Bay as part of a multi-proxy approach to link nutrient sources in the Everglades to biological sinks in Florida Bay. Isotopic analyses of dissolved and particulate species of water, aquatic vegetation and sedimentary organic matter show that the watersheds within the Everglades are chemically distinct and that these signatures are also reflected in the bay. A large east-west gradient in both carbon and nitrogen (as much as 10‰ for δ15N POM) reflect differing nutrient sources for each region of Florida Bay and is strongly correlated with upstream sources in the Everglades. Isotopic signatures also reflect seasonal relationships associated with wet and dry periods. High C and N measurements of DOM and POM measurements suggest significant influence from waste water in Canal C-111 in eastern Florida Bay, particularly during the dry season. These observations show that nutrients from the Everglades watersheds enter Florida Bay and are important in controlling biogeochemical processes in the bay. This study proves that

  7. Kinetic Isotope Effect Determination Probes the Spin of the Transition State, Its Stereochemistry, and Its Ligand Sphere in Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Oxoiron(IV) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Debasish; Mallick, Dibyendu; Shaik, Sason

    2018-01-16

    This Account outlines interplay of theory and experiment in the quest to identify the reactive-spin-state in chemical reactions that possess a few spin-dependent routes. Metalloenzymes and synthetic models have forged in recent decades an area of increasing appeal, in which oxometal species bring about functionalization of hydrocarbons under mild conditions and via intriguing mechanisms that provide a glimpse of Nature's designs to harness these reactions. Prominent among these are oxoiron(IV) complexes, which are potent H-abstractors. One of the key properties of oxoirons is the presence of close-lying spin-states, which can mediate H-abstractions. As such, these complexes form a fascinating chapter of spin-state chemistry, in which chemical reactivity involves spin-state interchange, so-called two-state reactivity (TSR) and multistate reactivity (MSR). TSR and MSR pose mechanistic challenges. How can one determine the structure of the reactive transition state (TS) and its spin state for these mechanisms? Calculations can do it for us, but the challenge is to find experimental probes. There are, however, no clear kinetic signatures for the reactive-spin-state in such reactions. This is the paucity that our group has been trying to fill for sometime. Hence, it is timely to demonstrate how theory joins experiment in realizing this quest. This Account uses a set of the H-abstraction reactions of 24 synthetic oxoiron(IV) complexes and 11 hydrocarbons, together undergoing H-abstraction reactions with TSR/MSR options, which provide experimentally determined kinetic isotope effect (KIE exp ) data. For this set, we demonstrate that comparing KIE exp results with calculated tunneling-augmented KIE (KIE TC ) data leads to a clear identification of the reactive spin-state during H-abstraction reactions. In addition, generating KIE exp data for a reaction of interest, and comparing these to KIE TC values, provides the mechanistic chemist with a powerful capability to

  8. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Laser analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, E. V.

    2002-11-01

    Tunable diode lasers (TDLs) are applied to the diagnostics of gastroenterological diseases using respiratory tests and preparations enriched with the stable 13C isotope. This method of the analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air is based on the selective measurement of the resonance absorption at the vibrational — rotational structure of 12CO2 and 13CO2. The CO2 transmission spectra in the region of 4.35 μm were measured with a PbEuSe double-heterostructure TDL. The accuracy of carbon isotope ratio measurements in CO2 of exhaled air performed with the TDL was ~0.5%. The data of clinical tests of the developed laser-based analyser are presented.

  9. Mathematical treatment of isotopologue and isotopomer speciation and fractionation in biochemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2010-03-01

    We present a mathematical treatment of the kinetic equations that describe isotopologue and isotopomer speciation and fractionation during enzyme-catalyzed biochemical reactions. These equations, presented here with the name GEBIK (general equations for biochemical isotope kinetics) and GEBIF (general equations for biochemical isotope fractionation), take into account microbial biomass and enzyme dynamics, reaction stoichiometry, isotope substitution number, and isotope location within each isotopologue and isotopomer. In addition to solving the complete GEBIK and GEBIF, we also present and discuss two approximations to the full solutions under the assumption of biomass-free and enzyme steady-state, and under the quasi-steady-state assumption as applied to the complexation rate. The complete and approximate approaches are applied to observations of biological denitrification in soils. Our analysis highlights that the full GEBIK and GEBIF provide a more accurate description of concentrations and isotopic compositions of substrates and products throughout the reaction than do the approximate forms. We demonstrate that the isotopic effects of a biochemical reaction depend, in the most general case, on substrate and complex concentrations and, therefore, the fractionation factor is a function of time. We also demonstrate that inverse isotopic effects can occur for values of the fractionation factor smaller than 1, and that reactions that do not discriminate isotopes do not necessarily imply a fractionation factor equal to 1.

  10. Stable isotope analysis of dynamic lipidomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Joost; Bailey, Andrew P; Koster, Grielof; Gould, Alex P; Postle, Anthony D

    2017-08-01

    Metabolic pathway flux is a fundamental element of biological activity, which can be quantified using a variety of mass spectrometric techniques to monitor incorporation of stable isotope-labelled substrates into metabolic products. This article contrasts developments in electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the measurement of lipid metabolism with more established gas chromatography mass spectrometry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodologies. ESI-MS combined with diagnostic tandem MS/MS scans permits the sensitive and specific analysis of stable isotope-labelled substrates into intact lipid molecular species without the requirement for lipid hydrolysis and derivatisation. Such dynamic lipidomic methodologies using non-toxic stable isotopes can be readily applied to quantify lipid metabolic fluxes in clinical and metabolic studies in vivo. However, a significant current limitation is the absence of appropriate software to generate kinetic models of substrate incorporation into multiple products in the time domain. Finally, we discuss the future potential of stable isotope-mass spectrometry imaging to quantify the location as well as the extent of lipid synthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: BBALIP_Lipidomics Opinion Articles edited by Sepp Kohlwein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative amino acid profiling and stable isotopically labeled amino acid tracer enrichment used for in vivo human systemic and tissue kinetics measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, Andreas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    An important area within clinical functional metabolomics is in vivo amino acid metabolism and protein turnover measurements for which accurate amino acid concentrations and stable isotopically labeled amino acid enrichments are mandatory not the least when tissue metabolomics is determined....../ion exchange, derivatized using a phenylisothiocyanate reagent and each amino acid was quantitated with its own stable isotopically labeled internal standard (uniformly labeled-(13)C/(15)N). The method was validated according to general recommendations for chromatographic analytical methods. The calibration...

  12. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  13. Isotopic separation by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1994-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction and the isotopic separation factor are first recalled; the principles of ion chromatography applied to lithium isotope separation are then reviewed (displacement chromatography) and the process is modelled in the view of dimensioning and optimizing the industrial process; the various dimensioning parameters are the isotopic separation factor, the isotopic exchange kinetics and the material flow rate. Effects of the resin type and structure are presented. Dimensioning is also affected by physico-chemical and hydraulic parameters. Industrial implementation features are also discussed. 1 fig., 1 tab., 5 refs

  14. Field-controlled electron transfer and reaction kinetics of the biological catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongki Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled reaction kinetics of the bio-catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide has been achieved using an electrostatic technique. The technique allowed independent control of 1 the thermodynamics of the system using electrochemical setup and 2 the quantum mechanical tunneling at the interface between microperoxidase-11 and the working electrode by applying a gating voltage to the electrode. The cathodic currents of electrodes immobilized with microperoxidase-11 showed a dependence on the gating voltage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, indicating a controllable reduction reaction. The measured kinetic parameters of the bio-catalytic reduction showed nonlinear dependences on the gating voltage as the result of modified interfacial electron tunnel due to the field induced at the microperoxidase-11-electrode interface. Our results indicate that the kinetics of the reduction of hydrogen peroxide can be controlled by a gating voltage and illustrate the operation of a field-effect bio-catalytic transistor, whose current-generating mechanism is the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water with the current being controlled by the gating voltage.

  15. Biochemical ripening of dredged sediments. Part 1. Kinetics of biological organic matter mineralization and chemical sulfur oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.; Gool, M.P.M. van; Dorleijn, A.S.; Joziasse, J.; Bruning, H.; Rulkens, W.H.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    2007-01-01

    After dredged sediments have settled in a temporary upland disposal site, ripening starts, which turns waterlogged sediment into aerated soil. Aerobic biological mineralization of organic matter (OM) and chemical oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds are the major biochemical ripening processes.

  16. Biochemical ripening of dredged sediments. part 1. Kinetics of biological organic matter mineralization and chemical sulfur oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.; Gool, van M.P.M.; Dorleijn, A.S.; Joziasse, J.; Bruning, H.; Rulkens, W.H.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    2007-01-01

    After dredged sediments have settled in a temporary upland disposal site, ripening starts, which turns waterlogged sediment into aerated soil. Aerobic biological mineralization of organic matter (OM) and chemical oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds are the major biochemical ripening processes.

  17. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  18. Combined bio-logging and stable isotopes reveal individual specialisations in a benthic coastal seabird, the Kerguelen shag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie C M Camprasse

    Full Text Available Individual specialisations, which involve the repetition of specific behaviours or dietary choices over time, have been suggested to benefit animals by avoiding competition with conspecifics and increasing individual foraging efficiency. Among seabirds, resident and benthic species are thought to be good models to study inter-individual variation as they repetitively exploit the same environment. We investigated foraging behaviour, isotopic niche and diet in the Kerguelen shag Phalacrocorax verrucosus during both the incubation and chick-rearing periods for the same individuals to determine the effect of sex, breeding stage, body mass and morphometrics on mean foraging metrics and their consistency. There were large differences between individuals in foraging behaviour and consistency, with strong individual specialisations in dive depths and heading from the colony. Stable isotopes revealed specialisations in feeding strategies, across multiple temporal scales. Specifically, individuals showed medium term specialisations in feeding strategies during the breeding season, as well as long-term consistency. A clustering analysis revealed 4 different foraging strategies displaying significantly different δ15N values and body masses. There were no sex or stage biases to clusters and individuals in different clusters did not differ in their morphology. Importantly, the results suggest that the different strategies emphasized were related to individual prey preferences rather than intrinsic characteristics.

  19. Simultaneous multi-species determination of trimethyllead, monomethylmercury and three butyltin compounds by species-specific isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poperechna, Nataliya; Heumann, Klaus G

    2005-09-01

    An accurate and sensitive multi-species species-specific isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS method was developed for the simultaneous determination of trimethyllead (Me3Pb+), monomethylmercury (MeHg+) and the three butyltin species Bu3Sn+, Bu2Sn2+, and BuSn3+ in biological samples. The method was validated by three biological reference materials (CRM 477, mussel tissue certified for butyltins; CRM 463, tuna fish certified for MeHg+; DORM 2, dogfish muscle certified for MeHg+). Under certain conditions, and with minor modifications of the sample pretreatment procedure, this method could also be transferred to environmental samples such as sediments, as demonstrated by analyzing sediment reference material BCR 646 (freshwater sediment, certified for butyltins). The detection limits of the multi-species GC-ICP-IDMS method for biological samples were 1.4 ng g(-1) for MeHg+, 0.06 ng g(-1) for Me3Pb+, 0.3 ng g(-1) for BuSn3+ and Bu3Sn+, and 1.2 ng g(-1) for Bu2Sn2+. Because of the high relevance of these heavy metal alkyl species to the quality assurance of seafood, the method was also applied to corresponding samples purchased from a supermarket. The methylated lead fraction in these samples, correlated to total lead, varied over a broad range (from 0.01% to 7.6%). On the other hand, the MeHg+ fraction was much higher, normally in the range of 80-100%. Considering that we may expect tighter legislative limitations on MeHg+ levels in seafood in the future, we found the highest methylmercury contents (up to 10.6 microg g(-1)) in two shark samples, an animal which is at the end of the marine food chain, whereas MeHg+ contents of less than 0.2 microg g(-1) were found in most other seafood samples; these results correlate with the idea that MeHg+ is usually of biological origin in the marine environment. The concentration of butyltins and the fraction of the total tin content that is from butyltins strongly depend on possible contamination, due to the exclusively anthropogenic

  20. Solution of kinetic equation by means of the moments method for phonon thermoconductivity and effect of isotopic disorder on it in the case of germanium and silicon crystals at T = 300 K

    CERN Document Server

    Zhernov, A P

    2001-01-01

    The problem on solving the kinetic equation through the moments method for the dielectric and semiconductor thermal conductivity is discussed. The evaluations of the isotopic disorder effect on the germanium crystals heat resistance in the multimoment approximation are obtained on the basis of the microscopic models. The contributions of the acoustic and optical phonons to the thermal conductivity are accounted for. The DELTA W surplus heat resistance in comparison with highly-enriched samples was determined for the natural composition samples. Good agreement between the theory and experiment for DELTA W is observed in the case of germanium. The theoretical value in the case of silicon is essentially lower as compared to the DELTA W experimental value

  1. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-07-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. 14C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. 14C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve 14C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts.

  2. Process Analytical Technology for Advanced Process Control in Biologics Manufacturing with the Aid of Macroscopic Kinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornecki, Martin; Strube, Jochen

    2018-03-16

    Productivity improvements of mammalian cell culture in the production of recombinant proteins have been made by optimizing cell lines, media, and process operation. This led to enhanced titers and process robustness without increasing the cost of the upstream processing (USP); however, a downstream bottleneck remains. In terms of process control improvement, the process analytical technology (PAT) initiative, initiated by the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA), aims to measure, analyze, monitor, and ultimately control all important attributes of a bioprocess. Especially, spectroscopic methods such as Raman or near-infrared spectroscopy enable one to meet these analytical requirements, preferably in-situ. In combination with chemometric techniques like partial least square (PLS) or principal component analysis (PCA), it is possible to generate soft sensors, which estimate process variables based on process and measurement models for the enhanced control of bioprocesses. Macroscopic kinetic models can be used to simulate cell metabolism. These models are able to enhance the process understanding by predicting the dynamic of cells during cultivation. In this article, in-situ turbidity (transmission, 880 nm) and ex-situ Raman spectroscopy (785 nm) measurements are combined with an offline macroscopic Monod kinetic model in order to predict substrate concentrations. Experimental data of Chinese hamster ovary cultivations in bioreactors show a sufficiently linear correlation (R² ≥ 0.97) between turbidity and total cell concentration. PLS regression of Raman spectra generates a prediction model, which was validated via offline viable cell concentration measurement (RMSE ≤ 13.82, R² ≥ 0.92). Based on these measurements, the macroscopic Monod model can be used to determine different process attributes, e.g., glucose concentration. In consequence, it is possible to approximately calculate (R² ≥ 0.96) glucose concentration based on online cell

  3. The effect of carbonic anhydrase on the kinetics and equilibrium of the oxygen isotope exchange in the CO2-H2O system: Implications for δ18O vital effects in biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    Interpretations of the primary paleoceanographic information recorded in stable oxygen isotope values (δ18O) of biogenic CaCO3 can be obscured by disequilibrium effects. CaCO3 is often depleted in 18O relative to the δ18O values expected for precipitation in thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater as a result of vital effects. Vital effects in δ18O have been explained in terms of the influence of fluid pH on the overall δ18O of the sum of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species (often referred to as "pH model") and in terms of 18O depletion as a result of the kinetic effects associated with CO2 hydration (CO2 + H2O ↔ H2CO3 ↔ HCO3- + H+) and CO2 hydroxylation (CO2 + OH- ↔ HCO3-) in the calcification sites (so-called "kinetic model"). This study addresses the potential role of an enzyme, carbonic anhydrase (CA), that catalyzes inter-conversion of CO2 and HCO3- in relation to the underlying mechanism of vital effects. We performed quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments in order to examine the changes in 18O equilibration rate as a function of CA concentration. Experiments were performed at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are comparable to the average surface ocean pH and elevated pH levels observed in the calcification sites of some coral and foraminiferal species, respectively. The rate of uncatalyzed 18O exchange in the CO2-H2O system is governed by the pH-dependent DIC speciation and the kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydration and hydroxylation, which can be summarized by a simple mathematical expression. The results from control experiments (no CA addition) are in agreement with this expression. The results from control experiments also suggest that the most recently published kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydroxylation has been overestimated. When CA is present, the 18O equilibration process is greatly enhanced at both pH levels due to the catalysis of CO2 hydration by the enzyme. For example, the time required for 18O

  4. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  5. Activation of molecular hydrogen by solid and molten hydroxides. III. Kinetics and mechanism of isotope exchange between hydrogen and solutions of water in alkali melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikov, Yu.M.; Ryskin, G.Ya.

    1982-01-01

    A kinetic study has been made of deuterium-protium exchange between hydrogen and water/caustic mixtures containing up to 50% (mole) water. It has been shown that the reaction proceeds homogeneously in the bulk liquid phase with the participation of dissolved hydrogen molecules. It is suggested that the associate OH - x H 2 O participates in the limiting stage of the exchange

  6. Corrigendum to "New constraints on kinetic isotope effects during CO2(aq) hydration and hydroxylation: Revisiting theoretical and experimental data" [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 214 (2017) 246-265

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Ziv; Halevy, Itay

    2018-03-01

    The authors regret an error in the derivation of the link between KFFs and isotopic rate constants of CO2 hydration (Section 2.2). Considering the subset of isotopologues, C16O16O, C18O16O, H216O and H218O, there are four possible forward reactions: C16O16O + H216O → H2C16O16O16O,

  7. Preconcentration of trace amounts of formaldehyde from water, biological and food samples using an efficient nanosized solid phase, and its determination by a novel kinetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afkhami, A.; Bagheri, H.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a sensitive method for the determination of formaldehyde. It is based on the use of modified alumina nanoparticles for its preconcentration, this followed by a new and simple catalytic kinetic method for its determination. Alumina nanoparticles were chemically modified by immobilization of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine via sodium dodecyl sulfate as a surfactant. The formaldehyde retained on the modified adsorbent was then desorbed and determined via its catalytic effect on the oxidation of thionine by bromate ion. Factors affecting the preconcentration and determination of formaldehyde have been investigated. Formaldehyde can be detected in the range from 0. 05 to 38. 75 μg L -1 , and no serious interferences have been observed. The method has been successfully applied to the quantitation of formaldehyde in water, food, and certain biological samples. (author)

  8. Study of oxalic acid effect on equilibrium and kinetics of isotopic exchange between penta- and hexavalent neptunium in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Ionnikova, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry at 25 deg C and ionic force μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 +HNO 3 ) was used to show that at HNO 3 concentration 0.1-1.0 mol/l H 2 C 2 O 4 introduction to nitric acid solutions of Np 5+ in the presence of nitrite-ion resulted in the shift of equilibrium between Np 5+ and Np 6+ to the side of Np 6+ accumulation. The presence of H 2 C 2 O 4 at HNO 3 concentration > 1.0 mol/l doesn't affect the equilibrium position. The values of nominal equilibrium constant at different HNO 3 and H 2 C 2 O 4 concentrations were calculated. It was found that isotope exchange ( 239 Np/ 237 Np) between Np 5+ and Np 6+ in oxalate solutions proceeded more slowly than in oxalate absence. Rate constants of isotope exchange calculated at 9 deg C, μ=1.0 mol/l (KNO 3 ), H 2 C 2 O 4 concentration 0.01 mol/l and pH=2.2 and 3.5 are equal to 0.49x10 3 and 0.67x10 2 l/mol·min respectively. Mechanism of isotope exchange including electron transport between Np 5+ and Np 6+ oxalate complexes is suggested

  9. Medical applications of Cu, Zn, and S isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarede, Francis; Télouk, Philippe; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Albalat, Emmanuelle; Oger, Philippe; Bonaventura, Paola; Miossec, Pierre; Fujii, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    This review examines recent applications of stable copper, zinc and sulfur isotopes to medical cases and notably cancer. The distribution of the natural stable isotopes of a particular element among coexisting molecular species varies as a function of the bond strength, the ionic charge, and the coordination, and it also changes with kinetics. Ab initio calculations show that compounds in which a metal binds to oxygen- (sulfate, phosphate, lactate) and nitrogen-bearing moieties (histidine) favor heavy isotopes, whereas bonds with sulfur (cysteine, methionine) favor light isotopes. Oxidized cations (e.g., Cu(ii)) and low coordination numbers are expected to favor heavy isotopes relative to their reduced counterparts (Cu(i)) and high coordination numbers. Here we discuss the first observations of Cu, Zn, and S isotopic variations, three elements closely related along multiple biological pathways, with emphasis on serum samples of healthy volunteers and of cancer patients. It was found that heavy isotopes of Zn and to an even greater extent Cu are enriched in erythrocytes relative to serum, while the difference is small for sulfur. Isotopic variations related to age and sex are relatively small. The 65 Cu/ 63 Cu ratio in the serum of patients with colon, breast, and liver cancer is conspicuously low relative to healthy subjects. The characteristic time over which Cu isotopes may change with disease progression (a few weeks) is consistent with both the turnover time of the element and albumin half-life. A parallel effect on sulfur isotopes is detected in a few un-medicated patients. Copper in liver tumor tissue is isotopically heavy. In contrast, Zn in breast cancer tumors is isotopically lighter than in healthy breast tissue. 66 Zn/ 64 Zn is very similar in the serum of cancer patients and in controls. Possible reasons for Cu isotope variations may be related to the cytosolic storage of Cu lactate (Warburg effect), release of intracellular copper from cysteine

  10. EFFECT OF MIXING CONDITIONS ON FLOCCULATION KINETICS OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING PROTEINS AND OTHER BIOLOGICAL COMPOUNDS USING FIBROUS MATERIALS AND POLYELECTROLYTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. CHEN

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of a combined system of a polyelectrolyte, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC, and highly fibrillated fibrous materials, cellulose triacetate fibrets (CTF, for the recovery of proteins and other biological compounds from model and actual biological systems has been demonstrated . In the present work, reaction batches were scaled-up to a one-liter agitated vessel, with a standard configuration. The effect of mixing conditions on the adsorption and flocculation process was studied. It was observed that flocculation time was very fast, occurring within the period of polymer addition. Long term shearing did not result in floc breakage and the values of percentage light transmission and protein concentration of the final filtrate remained the same during the incubation period. Increasing the shear rate resulted in improved process efficiency, up to an optimum value, above which performance was poorer. Perikinetic and orthokinetic rate parameters were calculated and results analyzed in view of these parameters.

  11. Molecular biological and isotopic biogeochemical prognoses of the nitrification-driven dynamic microbial nitrogen cycle in hadopelagic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunoura, Takuro; Nishizawa, Manabu; Kikuchi, Tohru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Hirai, Miho; Koide, Osamu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2013-11-01

    There has been much progress in understanding the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters including the recent identification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, and in the comprehensive estimation in abundance and activity of these microbial populations. However, compared with the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters, there are fewer studies concerning the oceanic benthic nitrogen cycle. To further elucidate the dynamic nitrogen cycle in deep-sea sediments, a sediment core obtained from the Ogasawara Trench at a water depth of 9760 m was analysed in this study. The profiles obtained for the pore-water chemistry, and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of pore-water nitrate in the hadopelagic sediments could not be explained by the depth segregation of nitrifiers and nitrate reducers, suggesting the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction in the shallowest nitrate reduction zone. The abundance of SSU rRNA and functional genes related to nitrification and denitrification are consistent with the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction observed in the geochemical analyses. This study presents the first example of cooperation between aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen metabolism in the deep-sea sedimentary environments. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Biological nitrogen fixation in common beans(kidney); under fungicidal effects(vitavox), using N-15 isotopic methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Marco; Arahana, Venancio; Bernal, Gustavo

    1991-01-01

    This research was conducted in the EXPERIMENTAL EDUCATIONAL FIELD L a Tola , located in Tumbaco, Pichincha. The purpose was to evaluate the fixative efficiency of five strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum Bv. phaseoli under the effect of fungicidy, using the N-15 isotopic methodology. The experimental utilized desing was that of split plot with four replications. The area of the experimental plot in the assay was 2.4 Sq. m. (1.2 m x 2 m) and had three 0.60 m. appart furrows. The analized variables were: combined dry weight of stem and leaves and pods; total nitrogen of steam and leaves and pod; percentage and amount of fixed nitrogen (NFx per cent, QNFx); and the yield. The strains of greater nitrogen fixation were 1073 and 1020, with 40 NFx per cent and 31.0 kg NFx per ha. vitavax fungicidy had influence on all analized variables and did not affect the fixation of nitrogen of the strains for the yield of the Cargabello variety of bean

  13. Integration of biological kinetics and computational fluid dynamics to model the growth of Nannochloropsis salina in an open channel raceway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Stephen; Li, Yebo

    2015-05-01

    Microalgal growth and systemic productivity is not only affected by environmental conditions such as temperature, irradiance, and nutrient concentrations, but also by physical processes such as fluid flow and particulate sedimentation. Modeling and simulating the system is a cost-effective way to predict the growth behavior under various environmental and physical conditions while determining effective engineering approaches to maximize productivity. Many mathematical models have been proposed to describe microalgal growth, while computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to model the behavior of many fluid systems. Integrating the growth kinetics into a CFD model can help researchers understand the impact of a variety of parameters and determine what measures can be taken to overcome some obstacles in the aquaculture industry--self-shading, biomass sedimentation, and contamination--which prevent the production of high biomass yields. The aim of this study was to integrate physical and environmental effects to predict space- and time-dependent algal growth in industrial scale raceways. A commercial CFD software, ANSYS-Fluent 14.5, was used to solve the proposed models in regards to fluid flow, heat transfer, and nutrient balance. User-defined functions written in C language were used to incorporate the kinetic equations into a three-dimensional standard k-ε turbulence model of an open channel raceway system driven by a single paddlewheel. Simulated results were compared with light intensity, temperature, nutrient concentration, and algal biomass data acquired for 56 day from an industrial scale raceway pond constructed for the growth of Nannochloropsis salina and were observed to be in good agreement with one another. There was up to a 17.6% increase in simulated productivity when the incoming CO2 concentration was increased from 0.0006 to 0.150 g L(-1), while the effect of paddlewheel velocity was not significant. Sensitivity analysis showed that the model

  14. Photochemically induced hydrogen isotope exchange between anthracene and aliphatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicki, J.; Reimschuessel, W.; Nowicki, T.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of photochemically induced deuterium and tritium isotope exchange between anthracene and diethylamine labelled in NH group or triethylamine-labelled water mixture was studied in acetonitrile and n-heptane. The rate constants of isotope exchange were calculated and ksub(D)/ksub(T) isotope effect was found. A mechanism for isotope exchange involving exciplex formation was proposed. (Auth.)

  15. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  16. Spectroscopic investigation on kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanism for electron transfer reaction of iron(III) complex with sulphur centered radical in stimulated biological system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepalakshmi, S; Sivalingam, A; Kannadasan, T; Subramaniam, P; Sivakumar, P; Brahadeesh, S T

    2014-04-24

    Electron transfer reactions of biological organic sulphides with several metal ions to generate sulphide radical cations are a great concern in biochemical process. To understand the mechanism, a stimulated biological system having model compounds, iron(III)-bipyridyl complex with thio-diglycolic acid (TDGA) was investigated. Spectroscopic study reveals the kinetics and thermodynamics of the reaction in aqueous perchloric acid medium. The reaction follows first and fractional order of 0.412 with respect to [Fe(bpy)3](3+) and TDGA, respectively. The oxidation is insensitive to variation in [H(+)] but slightly decreases with increase in ionic strength ([I]). Addition of acrylamide, a radical scavenger has no effect on the rate of the reaction. The high negative value of ΔS(#) (-74.3±1.09 J K(-1) mol(-1)) indicates the complex formed has a definite orientation higher than the reactants. Based on the above results, a suitable reaction mechanism for this reaction is proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. On Grounds of the Memory Effect in Amorphous and Crystalline Apatite: Kinetics of Crystallization and Biological Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskoković, Vuk; Tang, Sean; Wu, Victoria M

    2018-04-17

    Memory effects, despite being intrinsic to biological systems, are rarely potentiated in biomaterials. By exploring the transition between amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) from different empirical angles, here, we attempt to set the basis for elicitation of structural memory effects in CPs. Two CPs precipitated under different degrees of saturation (DS), yielding HAp at a low DS and ACP at a high DS, were shown to evolve into structures with a high level of crystallographic similarity after their prolonged aging in the solution and served as the basis for this study. Amorphous-to-crystalline transition was abrupt in both precipitates, indicating an autocatalytic process preceded by considerable nucleation lag times, but it was more dynamic and proceeded in multiple stages in the precipitate formed at a higher DS, involving a greater degree of lattice rearrangements. ACP was found to exist in one of the two stoichiometrically and crystallographically different forms, one of which, amounting to ≥60 wt %, resembled tricalcium phosphate and transformed to HAp through the surface dissolution/reprecipitation mechanism and the other one, amounting to ≤20 wt %, was apatitic, enabling the transformation of ACP to HAp via martensitic, bulk lattice reordering phenomena. Large density of stacking faults was responsible for the comparatively high lattice strain, the property to which biogenic apatite owes its ability to accommodate foreign ions and act as a mineral reservoir for the body. Being the precursor for biogenic apatite during biomineralization and a thermodynamically logical intermediate in the ripening of HAp per the Ostwald law of stages, ACP proved to be more prone to structural transformation than the final and the most stable of the CP phases in this sequence of events: HAp. Amorphized upon gelation, two CPs transformed into HAp, albeit at different rates, which were higher for the material that had been crystalline prior to

  18. Kinetics of reaction of peroxynitrite with selenium- and sulfur-containing compounds: Absolute rate constants and assessment of biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkey, Corin; Pattison, David I; Ignasiak, Marta T; Schiesser, Carl H; Davies, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Peroxynitrite (the physiological mixture of ONOOH and its anion, ONOO(-)) is a powerful biologically-relevant oxidant capable of oxidizing and damaging a range of important targets including sulfides, thiols, lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. Excessive production of peroxynitrite is associated with several human pathologies including cardiovascular disease, ischemic-reperfusion injury, circulatory shock, inflammation and neurodegeneration. This study demonstrates that low-molecular-mass selenols (RSeH), selenides (RSeR') and to a lesser extent diselenides (RSeSeR') react with peroxynitrite with high rate constants. Low molecular mass selenols react particularly rapidly with peroxynitrite, with second order rate constants k2 in the range 5.1 × 10(5)-1.9 × 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), and 250-830 fold faster than the corresponding thiols (RSH) and many other endogenous biological targets. Reactions of peroxynitrite with selenides, including selenosugars are approximately 15-fold faster than their sulfur homologs with k2 approximately 2.5 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1). The rate constants for diselenides and sulfides were slower with k2 0.72-1.3 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1) and approximately 2.1 × 10(2)M(-1)s(-1) respectively. These studies demonstrate that both endogenous and exogenous selenium-containing compounds may modulate peroxynitrite-mediated damage at sites of acute and chronic inflammation, with this being of particular relevance at extracellular sites where the thiol pool is limited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous multi-species determination of trimethyllead, monomethylmercury and three butyltin compounds by species-specific isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poperechna, Nataliya; Heumann, Klaus G. [Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (Germany). Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry

    2005-09-01

    An accurate and sensitive multi-species species-specific isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS method was developed for the simultaneous determination of trimethyllead (Me{sub 3}Pb{sup +}), monomethylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) and the three butyltin species Bu{sub 3}Sn{sup +}, Bu{sub 2}Sn{sup 2+}, and BuSn{sup 3+} in biological samples. The method was validated by three biological reference materials (CRM 477, mussel tissue certified for butyltins; CRM 463, tuna fish certified for MeHg{sup +}; DORM 2, dogfish muscle certified for MeHg{sup +}). Under certain conditions, and with minor modifications of the sample pretreatment procedure, this method could also be transferred to environmental samples such as sediments, as demonstrated by analyzing sediment reference material BCR 646 (freshwater sediment, certified for butyltins). The detection limits of the multi-species GC-ICP-IDMS method for biological samples were 1.4 ng g{sup -1} for MeHg{sup +}, 0.06 ng g{sup -1} for Me{sub 3}Pb{sup +}, 0.3 ng g{sup -1} for BuSn{sup 3+} and Bu{sub 3}Sn{sup +}, and 1.2 ng g{sup -1} for Bu{sub 2}Sn{sup 2+}. Because of the high relevance of these heavy metal alkyl species to the quality assurance of seafood, the method was also applied to corresponding samples purchased from a supermarket. The methylated lead fraction in these samples, correlated to total lead, varied over a broad range (from 0.01% to 7.6%). On the other hand, the MeHg{sup +} fraction was much higher, normally in the range of 80-100%. Considering that we may expect tighter legislative limitations on MeHg{sup +} levels in seafood in the future, we found the highest methylmercury contents (up to 10.6 {mu}g g{sup -1}) in two shark samples, an animal which is at the end of the marine food chain, whereas MeHg{sup +} contents of less than 0.2 {mu}g g{sup -1} were found in most other seafood samples; these results correlate with the idea that MeHg{sup +} is usually of biological origin in the marine environment. The concentration of

  20. Enantio-specific C(sp3)-H activation catalyzed by ruthenium nanoparticles: application to isotopic labeling of molecules of biological interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taglang, Celine

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic labeling with deuterium and tritium is extensively used in chemistry, biology and pharmaceutical research. Numerous methods of labeling by isotopic exchange allow high isotopic enrichments but generally require harsh conditions (high temperatures, acidity). As a consequence, a general, regioselective and smooth labeling method that might be applicable to a wide diversity of substrates remains to develop. In the first part of this thesis, we demonstrated that the use of ruthenium nanoparticles, synthesized by Pr. Bruno Chaudret's team (INSA Toulouse), allowed the mild (2 bar of deuterium gas at 55 C), effective and selective H/D exchange reaction of a large variety of nitrogen-containing compounds, such as pyridines, indoles and primary, secondary and tertiary alkyl amines. The usefulness and the efficiency of this novel methodology was demonstrated by the deuteration of eight nitrogen-containing molecules of biological interest without altering their chemical and stereochemical properties. However, the conservation of the original stereochemistry of an activated chiral C-H center remains a major issue. We studied the reactivity of RuNP(at)PVP on different categories of nitrogen-containing substrates (amines, aminoacids and peptides) in water or in organic solvents. Our results showed that C-H activation of chiral carbons C(sp3) took place efficiently, selectively and, in all cases, with total retention of configuration. The wide range of applications of this procedure was demonstrated by the labeling of three chiral amines, fourteen aminoacids, three aromatic amino esters and four peptides. Moreover, our collaboration with Pr. Romuald Poteau's team (INSA Toulouse) led to the identification of two mechanisms by ab initio simulation in agreement with our experimental results: the σ-bond metathesis mechanism and the oxidative addition mechanism. These two mechanisms imply two vicinal ruthenium atoms leading to the formation an original

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 protease. 1. Initial velocity studies and kinetic characterization of reaction intermediates by sup 18 O isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, L.J.; Tomaszek, T.A. Jr.; Roberts, G.D.; Carr, S.A.; Magaard, V.W.; Bryan, H.L.; Fakhoury, S.A.; Moore, M.L.; Minnich, M.D.; Culp, J.S.; DesJarlais, R.L.; Meek, T.D. (Smline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (United States))

    1991-08-27

    The peptidolytic reaction HIV-1 protease has been investigated by using four oligopeptide substrates, Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Pro-Val-Val-NH{sub 2}, Ac-Arg-Ala-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH{sub 2}, Ac-Ser-Gln-Ser-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH{sub 2}, and Ac-Arg-Lys-Ile-Leu-Phe-Leu-Asp-Gly-NH{sub 2} that resemble two cleavage sites found within the naturally occurring polyprotein substrates Pr55{sup gag} and Pr160{sup gag-pol}. By use of a variety of inorganic salts, it was concluded that the peptidolytic reaction is nonspecifically activated by increasing ionic strength. V/K increased in an apparently parabolic fashion with increasing ionic strength, while V was either increased or decreased slightly. From product inhibition studies, the kinetic mechanism of the protease is either random or ordered uni-bi, depending on the substrate studied. The protease-catalyzed exchange of an atom of {sup 18}O from H{sub 2}{sup 18}O into the re-formed substrates occurred at a rate which was 0.01-0.12 times that the forward peptidolytic reaction. The results of these studies are in accord with the formation of a kinetically competent enzyme-bound amide hydrate intermediate, the collapse of which is the rate-limiting chemical step in the reaction pathway.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of superoxide radical reactions with some biologically important compounds in aqueous solutions. Pulse radiolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revina, A. A.; Amiragova, M. I.; Volod'ko, V. V.; Vannikov, A. V.

    Microsecond pulse radiolysis of oxygenated aqueous solutions containing 0.02 mol dm -3 sodium formate and 2 mmol dm -3 phosphate buffer at pH 7 was used to generate superoxide anion radicals. The influence of some biologically important compounds upon the rate of O ⨪2 decay was monitored spectrophotometrically in the range of 245-300 nm. Hematoporphyrin (HP), hemin C (HC), catalase (Cat), cobalt sulfophthalocyanine (CoTSPc) were studied. Among the investigated compounds only Cat was found to show a high catalytic efficiency towards the self-decay of O ⨪2. A red shift of O ⨪2 absorption band and slowing down of its decay were observed to take place by adding HP or CoTSPc to the solutions containing formate ions in excess. This effect is associated with the formation of a transient superoxo-complex. An appearance of an intermediate species with absorption maxima at 350 nm and half-life of about 2s was observed to accompany the superoxo-complex of CoTSPc decay. In the aerated solution of HP the intensity of absorbance at 260 nm was found to be independent of the presence of formate ions.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of superoxide radical reactions with some biologically important compounds in aqueous solutions. Pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revina, A.A.; Volod'ko, V.V.; Vannikov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    Microsecond pulse radiolysis of oxygenated aqueous solutions containing 0.02 mol dm -3 sodium formate and 2 mmol dm -3 phosphate buffer at pH 7 was used to generate superoxide anion radicals. The influence of some biologically important compounds upon the rate of O 2 .-bar decay as monitored spectrophotometrically in the range of 245-300 nm. Hematoporphyrin (HP), hemin C (HC), catalase (Cat), cobalt sulfophthalocyanine (CoTSPc) were studied. Among the investigated compounds only Cat was found to show a high catalytic efficiency towards the self-decay of O 2 .-bar . A red shift of 0 2 .-bar absorption band and slowing down of its decay were observed to take place by adding HP or CoTSPc to the solutions containing formate ions in excess. This effect is associated with the formation of a transient superoxo-complex. An appearance of an intermediate species with absorption maxima at 350 nm and half-life of about 2 s was observed to accompany the superoxo-complex of CoTSPc decay. In the aerated solution of HP the intensity of absorbance at 260 nm was found to be independent of the presence of formate ions. (author)

  4. The use of the 15N isotope dilution technique to estimate the contribution of associated biological nitrogen fixation to the nitrogen nutrition of Paspalum notatum cv. batatais

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddey, R.M.; Doebereiner, Johanna

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a field experiment to investigate the use of the 15 N-dilution technique to measure the contribution of biological N 2 fixation to the N nutrition of the batatais cultivar of Paspalum notatum. The pensacola cultivar of this grass supports little associated N 2 fixation as evidenced by the low associated C 2 H 2 reduction activity and was thus used as a nonfixing control plant. The grasses were grown in 60-cm diameter concrete cylinders sunk into the soil, and the effects of four different addition rates of labelled nitrogen (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , were investigated. The data from seven harvests clearly demonstrated that there was a significant input of plant associated N 2 fixation to the nutrition of the batatais cultivar amounting to approximately 20 kg N ha -1 year -1 . Problems associated with the conduct of such isotope dilution experiments are discussed including the importance of using nonfixing control plants of similar growth habit, the advantages and disadvantages of growing the plants in cylinders as opposed to field plots, and the various methods of application of labelled N fertilizer

  5. Differential Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Double Spike Isotope Dilution Study of Release of β-Methylaminoalanine and Proteinogenic Amino Acids during Biological Sample Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Daniel G; Kerrin, Elliott S; Giddings, Sabrina D; Quilliam, Michael A; McCarron, Pearse

    2018-01-08

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been linked to neurodegenerative disease and reported throughout the environment. Proposed mechanisms of bioaccumulation, trophic transfer and chronic toxicity of BMAA rely on the hypothesis of protein misincorporation. Poorly selective methods for BMAA analysis have led to controversy. Here, a recently reported highly selective method for BMAA quantitation using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-DMS-MS/MS) is expanded to include proteinogenic amino acids from hydrolyzed biological samples. For BMAA quantitation, we present a double spiking isotope dilution approach using D 3 -BMAA and 13 C 15 N 2 -BMAA. These methods were applied to study release of BMAA during acid hydrolysis under a variety of conditions, revealing that the majority of BMAA can be extracted along with only a small proportion of protein. A time course hydrolysis of BMAA from mussel tissue was carried out to assess the recovery of BMAA during sample preparation. The majority of BMAA measured by typical methods was released before a significant proportion of protein was hydrolyzed. Little change was observed in protein hydrolysis beyond typical hydrolysis times but the concentration of BMAA increased linearly. These findings demonstrate protein misincorporation is not the predominant form of BMAA in cycad and shellfish.

  6. Ligand binding affinity at the insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A and subsequent IR-A tyrosine phosphorylation kinetics are important determinants of mitogenic biological outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinda eRajapaksha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The insulin receptor (IR is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signalling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration by activating some unique signalling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signalling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signalling (MAPK and Akt and receptor internalisation rates (related to mitogenic signalling. We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic ([His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51] IGF-I, qIGF-I or metabolic (S597 peptide biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signalling through the IR-A. The 3-fold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316 and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphorylation rather than potency that was associated with a low mitogenic potential. We conclude that both decreased affinity of IR-A binding and the kinetics of IR-A phosphorylation can independently lead to a lower mitogenic activity. None of the studied parameters could account for the lower metabolic activity of qIGF-I.

  7. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for separating isotopes in an isotopic mixture of atoms or molecules by increasing the mass differential among isotopic species. The mixture containing a particular isotope is selectively irradiated so as to selectively excite the isotope. This preferentially excited species is then reacted rapidly with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product containing the specific isotope, but having a mass different than the original species initially containing the particular isotope. The product and the remaining balance of the mixture is then caused to flow through a device which separates the product from the mixture based upon the increased mass differential

  9. Biodegradation and kinetics of organic compounds and heavy metals in an artificial wetland system (AWS) by using water hyacinths as a biological filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Espinosa, P F; Mendoza-Pérez, J A; Tabla-Hernandez, J; Martínez-Tavera, E; Monroy-Mendieta, M M

    2018-01-02

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the ability of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) to absorb organic compounds (potassium hydrogen phthalate, sodium tartrate, malathion, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), and piroxicam). For the aforementioned purpose, an artificial wetland system (AWS) was constructed and filled with water hyacinth collected from the Valsequillo Reservoir, Puebla, Mexico. Potassium hydrogen phthalate and sodium tartrate were measured in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). The present study indicated that the water hyacinths absorbed nearly 1.8-16.6 g of COD kg -1 dm (dry mass of water hyacinth), while the absorbance efficiency of BOD was observed to be 45.8%. The results also indicated that the maximum absorbance efficiency of malathion, 2,4-D, and piroxicam was observed to be 67.6%, 58.3%, and 99.1%, respectively. The kinetics of organic compounds fitted different orders as malathion followed a zeroth-order reaction, while 2,4-D and piroxicam followed the first-order reactions. Preliminary assessment of absorption of heavy metals by the water hyacinth in the AWS was observed to be (all values in mg g -1 ) 7 (Ni), 13.4 (Cd), 16.3 (Pb), and 17.5 (Zn) of dry biomass, thus proving its feasibility to depurate wastewater.

  10. Aqueous Mesocosm Techniques Enabling the Real-Time Measurement of the Chemical and Isotopic Kinetics of Dissolved Methane and Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eric W; Kessler, John D; Shiller, Alan M; Joung, DongJoo; Colombo, Frank

    2016-03-15

    Previous studies of microbially mediated methane oxidation in oceanic environments have examined the many different factors that control the rates of oxidation. However, there is debate on what factor(s) are limiting in these types of environments. These factors include the availability of methane, O2, trace metals, nutrients, the density of cell population, and the influence that CO2 production may have on pH. To look at this process in its entirety, we developed an automated mesocosm incubation system with a Dissolved Gas Analysis System (DGAS) coupled to a myriad of analytical tools to monitor chemical changes during methane oxidation. Here, we present new high temporal resolution techniques for investigating dissolved methane and carbon dioxide concentrations and stable isotopic dynamics during aqueous mesocosm and pure culture incubations. These techniques enable us to analyze the gases dissolved in solution and are nondestructive to both the liquid media and the analyzed gases enabling the investigation of a mesocosm or pure culture experiment in a completely closed system, if so desired.

  11. Kinetics of Ar isotopes during neutron irradiation: 39Ar loss from minerals as a source of error in 40Ar/39Ar dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, J.C.; Lippolt, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    The loss of 39 Ar from minerals in the course of neutron activation for 40 Ar/ 39 Ar dating is studied by directly measuring the loss rates in vacuum-sealed ampoules. Biotite shows 39 Ar losses between 0.1% and 16%. These losses are predominantly due to diffusion processes from K-poor alteration-phase intergrowths in the biotites at the elevated temperatures during the irradiation. Estimates for the irradiation temperatures range from 150 0 to 180 0 C. Direct 39 Ar recoil loss from biotite seems to be minor compared to difussion loss of recoil-implanted 39 Ar. Precise 40 Ar/ 39 Ar dating of biotites therefore requires the measurement of the 39 Ar losses during irradiation. Glauconite loses not only neutron-induced Ar isotopes ( 39 Ar: 20-22%, 37 Ar: 17-19%) but also radiogenic 40 Ar(∼9%). Slight 39 Ar losses are also observed for light micas (0.2% and 0.35%), hornblendes (0.1%) and sanidines (200 and 700 ppm). 25 refs.; 4 figs.; 6 tabs

  12. Isotopes in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, G.; Rozanski, K.; Vose, P.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive and stable isotopes have long been considered a very efficient tool for studying physical and biological aspects of how the global ecosystem functions. Their applications in environmental research are numerous, embracing research at all levels. This article looks at only a few of the approaches to environmental problems that involve the use of isotopes. Special attention is given to studies of the Amazon Basin. Environmental isotopes are very efficient tools in water cycle studies. Tritium, a radioactive tracer, is especially useful in studying dynamics of water movement in different compartments of the hydrosphere, both on the local and global scales. Heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen (deuterium and oxygen-18) provide information about steady-state characteristics of the water cycle. Isotope methods, some relatively new, have a major role in site-specific studies. Some indicative examples include: Studying turnover of organic matter. Changes in the carbon-13/carbon-12 isotopic ratio of organic matter were used to determine the respective contributions of organic carbon derived from forest and pasture. Studying biological nitrogen fixation. One of the ways nitrogen levels in soil can be maintained for productivity is by biological nitrogen fixation. Studying nitrogen availability and losses. The experimental use of nitrogen-15 is invaluable for defining losses of soil nitrogen to the atmosphere and to groundwater. Studies can similarly be done with stable and radioactive sulphur isotopes. This article indicates some potential uses of isotopes in environmental research. While the major problem of global climate change has not been specifically addressed here, the clearing of the Amazon forest, one focus of the IAEA's environmental programme, may have serious consequences for the global climate. These include substantial reduction of the amount of latent heat transported to the regions outside the tropics and acceleration of the greenhouse

  13. Isotope effects in photochemical rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, F.

    1983-01-01

    Taking anthracene resp. 9-deuteroanthracene as the initial substance, different substitution products have been prepared. The products originating by direct photolysis have been characterized and their structure has been determined. By comparing the measured kinetic isotope effect and the quantum yield of the nondeuterated and the monodeuterated fluorenes formed it could been demonstrated that the isotope effect mainly is due to the reaction rates and the influence of the deuterium substitution upon the radiationless desactivation against that is small. (HBR) [de

  14. Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and bupivacaine following subarachnoid administration in surgical patients: simultaneous investigation of absorption and disposition kinetics using stable isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burm, A.G.; Van Kleef, J.W.; Vermeulen, N.P.; Olthof, G.; Breimer, D.D.; Spierdijk, J.

    1988-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and bupivacaine following subarachnoid administration were studied in 12 surgical patients using a stable isotope method. After subarachnoid administration of the agent to be evaluated, a deuterium-labelled analogue was administered intravenously. Blood samples were collected for 24 h. Plasma concentrations of the unlabelled and the deuterium-labelled local anesthetics were determined using a combination of capillary gas chromatography and mass fragmentography. Bi-exponential functions were fitted to the plasma concentration-time data of the deuterium-labelled local anesthetics. The progression of the absorption was evaluated using deconvolution. Mono- and bi-exponential functions were then fitted to the fraction absorbed versus time data. The distribution and elimination half-lives of the deuterium-labelled analogues were 25 +/- 13 min (mean +/- SD) and 121 +/- 31 min for lidocaine and 19 +/- 10 min and 131 +/- 33 min for bupivacaine. The volumes of the central compartment and steady-state volumes of distribution were: lidocaine 57 +/- 10 l and 105 +/- 25 l, bupivacaine 25 +/- 6 l and 63 +/- 22 l. Total plasma clearance values averaged 0.97 +/- 0.21 l/min for lidocaine and 0.56 +/- 0.14 l/min for bupivacaine. The absorption of lidocaine could be described by a single first order absorption process, characterized by a half-life of 71 +/- 17 min in five out of six patients. The absorption of bupivacaine could be described adequately assuming two parallel first order absorption processes in all six patients. The half-lives, characterizing the fast and slow absorption processes of bupivacaine, were 50 +/- 27 min and 408 +/- 275 min, respectively. The fractions of the dose, absorbed in the fast and slow processes, were 0.35 +/- 0.17 and 0.61 +/- 0.16, respectively.

  15. Thermal bridgehead double inversion of the 6-methylene-and 6-ethylidene-2-methylbicyclo[3.1.0] hexanes and related materials. Rotational kinetic deuterium isotope effects and the mechanism of the thermal interconversion of cis- and trans-2,3-dimethylmethylenecyclopropanes via orthogonal and planar trimethylenemethane singlet biradicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, J.J.; Chou, S.K.

    1977-01-01

    Endo- and exo-2-methyl-6-methylenebicyclo[3.1.0]hexane (N and X) interconverted at 164 0 C at a rate comparable to that for cis to trans isomerization of the 2,3-dimethylmethylenecyclopropanes (C and T) allowing the possibility that the planar trimethylenemethane singlet is responsible for the racemization observed with optically active T. Pyrolysis of the four 2-methyl-6-ethylidenebicyclo[3.1.0]hexanes revealed an average of 8 percent preservation of the exo ethylidene stereochemistry in the bridgehead double inversion reaction. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect on the interconversion of endo- and exo-6,2-methyl-6-dideuteriomethylenebicyclo[3.1.0]hexanes, k/sub H 2 //k/sub D 2 / = 1.08 +- 0.02, suggests that exo methylene rotation occurs after rate-determining formation of a planar trimethylenemethane biradical since exo methylene rotation in the formation of anti- and syn-2-methylethylidenecyclopropane from trans-2,3-dimethyldideuteriomethylenecyclopropane has an isotope effect of 1.31 +- 0.04. Detailed mechanisms for the stereochemical and kinetic data from pyrolysis of T and C which involve mainly orthogonal and, to a lesser extent, planar or bisorthogonal trimethylenemethane biradicals are presented. The origin and magnitude of rotational kinetic isotope effects in these interconversions is discussed

  16. Methane clumped isotopes: Progress and potential for a new isotopic tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, Peter M. J.; Stolper, Daniel A.; Eiler, John M.; Sessions, Alex L.; Lawson, Michael; Shuai, Yanhua; Bishop, Andrew; Podlaha, Olaf G.; Ferreira, Alexandre A.; Santos Neto, Eugenio V.; Niemann, Martin; Steen, Arne S.; Huang, Ling; Chimiak, Laura; Valentine, David L.; Fiebig, Jens; Luhmann, Andrew J.; Seyfried, William E.; Etiope, Giuseppe; Schoell, Martin; Inskeep, William P.; Moran, James J.; Kitchen, Nami

    2017-11-01

    The isotopic composition of methane is of longstanding geochemical interest, with important implications for understanding hydrocarbon systems, atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, the global carbon cycle, and life in extreme environments. Recent analytical developments focusing on multiply substituted isotopologues (‘clumped isotopes’) are opening a potentially valuable new window into methane geochemistry. When methane forms in internal isotopic equilibrium, clumped isotopes can provide a direct record of formation temperature, making this property particularly valuable for identifying different methane origins. However, it has also become clear that in certain settings methane clumped isotope measurements record kinetic rather than equilibrium isotope effects. Here we present a substantially expanded dataset of methane clumped isotope analyses, and provide a synthesis of the current interpretive framework for this parameter. We review different processes affecting methane clumped isotope compositions, describe the relationships between conventional isotope and clumped isotope data, and summarize the types of information that this measurement can provide in different Earth and planetary environments.

  17. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous articles of this series, we discussed the use of isotopes to trace the nature of reactive intermediates and also to obtain information about minima and transition states through quantitative measurements of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. In this part, we describe an ingenious way of studying dynamic ...

  18. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous articles of this series, we discussed the use of isotopes to trace the nature of reactive intermediates and also to obtain information about minima and transition states through quan- titative measurements of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. In this part, we describe an ingenious way of studying dynamic ...

  19. Biological artificial fluid-induced non-lamellar phases in glyceryl monooleate: the kinetics pathway and its digestive process by bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanyan; Wang, Qifang; Wang, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yuan, Bo; Li, Sanming; Liu, Hongzhuo

    2014-02-01

    The cubic (Q(II)) phase is a promising sustained-release system. However, its rigid gel-like propensity is highly viscous, which makes it difficult to handle in pharmaceutical applications. To circumvent this problem, a less viscous lamellar (L(α)) phase that could spontaneously transform to Q(II) phase by the introduction of water or biological artificial fluid can be used. However, the kinetics pathway of phase transition, susceptibility to digestive processes and impact of the transition on drug release are not yet well understood. We investigated various biological artificial fluid-induced L(α) to inverse Q(II) phase transition over time in glyceryl monooleate (GMO) by water penetration scan and light polarizing microscopy. To reveal the structure stability, fluorescence spectroscopy studies were conducted using pyrene as a probe. Furthermore, the release mechanism of pyrene as a lipophilic drug model in the spontaneously formed Q(II) was investigated. Although hexagonal (H(II)) mesophases occurred when phosphate buffered saline (PBS) 7.4, 0.1 M HCl or sodium taurocholate (NaTC) solutions were introduced to GMO at room temperature, they disappear with the exception of 0.1 M HCl at 37 °C. Compared with 25 °C, L(α) to Q(II) phase transition was in a faster rate as almost completely transforms were observed after 2 h post-immersion. The spontaneously formed mesophases were stable over 24 h immersions in PBS or pancreatic lipase solutions as proven by the extremely low fluorescence signal, however they were digestible by bile salts. This result indicated that digestion by bile salts was the major pathway instead of digestion by lipases. Moreover, pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that the digestion by bile salts induced the formation of GMO-bile salt mixed micelles whose performance depended on the bile salt concentrations. This dependence influenced the drug release from the spontaneously formed Q(II) phase. All the results concluded that

  20. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  1. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  2. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoire, Jean

    1978-11-01

    Separation of isotopes is treated in a general way, with special reference to the production of enriched uranium. Uses of separated isotopes are presented quickly. Then basic definitions and theoretical concepts are explained: isotopic effects, non statistical and statistical processes, reversible and irreversible processes, separation factor, enrichment, cascades, isotopic separative work, thermodynamics. Afterwards the main processes and productions are reviewed. Finally the economical and industrial aspects of uranium enrichment are resumed [fr

  3. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  4. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  5. Lead isotope exchange between dissolved and fluvial particulate matter: a laboratory study from the Johor River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengli; Boyle, Edward A.; Lee, Jong-Mi; Nurhati, Intan; Zurbrick, Cheryl; Switzer, Adam D.; Carrasco, Gonzalo

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are the dominant source of Pb to the modern marine environment, and as a result, in most regions of the ocean the Pb isotopic composition of dissolved Pb in the surface ocean (and in corals) matches that of the regional aerosols. In the Singapore Strait, however, there is a large offset between seawater dissolved and coral Pb isotopes and that of the regional aerosols. We propose that this difference results from isotope exchange between dissolved Pb supplied by anthropogenic aerosol deposition and adsorbed natural crustal Pb on weathered particles delivered to the ocean by coastal rivers. To investigate this issue, Pb isotope exchange was assessed through a closed-system exchange experiment using estuarine waters collected at the Johor River mouth (which discharges to the Singapore Strait). During the experiment, a known amount of dissolved Pb with the isotopic composition of NBS-981 (206Pb/207Pb = 1.093) was spiked into the unfiltered Johor water (dissolved and particulate 206Pb/207Pb = 1.199) and the changing isotopic composition of the dissolved Pb was monitored. The mixing ratio of the estuarine and spike Pb should have produced a dissolved 206Pb/207Pb isotopic composition of 1.161, but within a week, the 206Pb/207Pb in the water increased to 1.190 and continued to increase to 1.197 during the next two months without significant changes of the dissolved Pb concentration. The kinetics of isotope exchange was assessed using a simple Kd model, which assumes multiple sub-reservoirs within the particulate matter with different exchange rate constants. The Kd model reproduced 56% of the observed Pb isotope variance. Both the closed-system experiment and field measurements imply that isotope exchange can be an important mechanism for controlling Pb and Pb isotopes in coastal waters. A similar process may occur for other trace elements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  6. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  7. Strategies for Extending Metabolomics Studies with Stable Isotope Labelling and Fluxomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Srivastava

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a perspective from the peer session on stable isotope labelling and fluxomics at the Australian & New Zealand Metabolomics Conference (ANZMET held from 30 March to 1 April 2016 at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. This report summarizes the key points raised in the peer session which focused on the advantages of using stable isotopes in modern metabolomics and the challenges in conducting flux analyses. The session highlighted the utility of stable isotope labelling in generating reference standards for metabolite identification, absolute quantification, and in the measurement of the dynamic activity of metabolic pathways. The advantages and disadvantages of different approaches of fluxomics analyses including flux balance analysis, metabolic flux analysis and kinetic flux profiling were also discussed along with the use of stable isotope labelling in in vivo dynamic metabolomics. A number of crucial technical considerations for designing experiments and analyzing data with stable isotope labelling were discussed which included replication, instrumentation, methods of labelling, tracer dilution and data analysis. This report reflects the current viewpoint on the use of stable isotope labelling in metabolomics experiments, identifying it as a great tool with the potential to improve biological interpretation of metabolomics data in a number of ways.

  8. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  9. Isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuny, M.

    1979-01-01

    The invention discloses a method for deriving, from a starting material including an element having a plurality of isotopes, derived material enriched in one isotope of the element. The starting material is deposited on a substrate at less than a critical submonatomic surface density, typically less than 10 16 atoms per square centimeter. The deposit is then selectively irradiated by a laser (maser or electronic oscillator) beam with monochromatic coherent radiation resonant with the one isotope causing the material including the one istope to escape from the substrate. The escaping enriched material is then collected. Where the element has two isotopes, one of which is to be collected, the deposit may be irradiated with radiation resonant with the other isotope and the residual material enriched in the one isotope may be evaporated from the substrate and collected

  10. Multiple stable isotope fronts during non-isothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Stable isotope signatures of oxygen, hydrogen and other elements in minerals from hydrothermal veins and metasomatized host rocks are widely used to investigate fluid sources and paths. Previous theoretical studies mostly focused on analyzing stable isotope fronts developing during single-phase, isothermal fluid flow. In this study, numerical simulations were performed to assess how temperature changes, transport phenomena, kinetic vs. equilibrium isotope exchange, and isotopic source signals determine mineral oxygen isotopic compositions during fluid-rock interaction. The simulations focus on one-dimensional scenarios, with non-isothermal single- and two-phase fluid flow, and include the effects of quartz precipitation and dissolution. If isotope exchange between fluid and mineral is fast, a previously unrecognized, significant enrichment in heavy oxygen isotopes of fluids and minerals occurs at the thermal front. The maximum enrichment depends on the initial isotopic composition of fluid and mineral, the fluid-rock ratio and the maximum change in temperature, but is independent of the isotopic composition of the incoming fluid. This thermally induced isotope front propagates faster than the signal related to the initial isotopic composition of the incoming fluid, which forms a trailing front behind the zone of transient heavy oxygen isotope enrichment. Temperature-dependent kinetic rates of isotope exchange between fluid and rock strongly influence the degree of enrichment at the thermal front. In systems where initial isotope values of fluids and rocks are far from equilibrium and isotope fractionation is controlled by kinetics, the temperature increase accelerates the approach of the fluid to equilibrium conditions with the host rock. Consequently, the increase at the thermal front can be less dominant and can even generate fluid values below the initial isotopic composition of the input fluid. As kinetics limit the degree of isotope exchange, a third front may

  11. Multiple-turnover isotopic labeling of Fmoc- and Boc-protected amino acids with oxygen isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Martin S; Lauber, Birgit S; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2010-01-01

    An efficient method for the selective isotopic labeling of carboxylic acids is reported. By reacting an amino acid with excess carbodiimide and (18)OH(2), a kinetically enhanced multiple turnover reaction provides the (18)O-labeled product in high yield and excellent isotopic enrichment. This reaction is fully compatible with standard Fmoc, Boc, Trt, and OtBu protecting groups and provides a means to selectively label the alpha-carboxylic acids of functionalized amino acids with stable oxygen isotopes.

  12. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, R.J.; Morrey, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated

  13. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry as the primary method of measurement for the amount of matter. Application to cadmium determination in biological materials and comparison with instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Luis; Gras, Nuri; Quejido, Alberto; Ferrada, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    A primary method of measurement as defined by the Consultative Committee on the Quantity of Matter (Comite Consultatif pour la Quantite de Matiere, CCQM) of the International Bureau of Weights and Measurements (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, BIPM), is one whose measurement process is perfectly known, has valid theoretical foundations and is fully described and answers to an equation that relates what is measured with what is intended to be measured without any significant empirical correction factors. It is also a method that has insignificant systematic errors, where only magnitudes from the International System of Units (SI) are used and where, preferably, the uncertainties are small ones. They are, therefore, procedures that do not need instrumental calibration. The absolute methods of measurement allow a chain of traceability to be formed between the result obtained and the magnitude of the SI assigned to what is measured. So the results are said to be traceable to the SI. One of the methods that meets these requirements and is recognized as the primary method by the CCQM is Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS). Through a project of Technical Cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency in the area of Chemical Metrology, the CCHEN obtained training in CIEMAT, Spain, in IDMS and its applications to the analysis of biological samples. This work describes the first experience carried out entirely in Chilean laboratories, applying IDMS to the determination of cadmium in the biological reference materials Oyster Tissue 15566-A from the NIST, United States, Dogfish Liver, DOLT-2 from the NRC-CNRC, Canada and Poplar Leaves GBW07604 from the NRCC, China. The samples were traced with an isotope enriched spike 111 Cd and then shaken to obtain the isotopic exchange. Once dissolved, the isotopic relationship 111 Cd/ 114 Cd was determined in the samples using mass spectrometry with plasma source. These results were compared with those obtained

  14. Exploring the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of four-electron electrochemical reactions: electrocatalysis of oxygen evolution by metal oxides and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Vincent C-C

    2016-08-10

    Finding fundamental and general mechanisms for electrochemical reactions, such as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) from water and reduction of CO2, plays vital roles in developing the desired electrocatalysts for facilitating solar fuel production. Recently, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have shown that there is a universal scaling relation of adsorption energy between key intermediate species, HO(ad) and HOO(ad), on the surface of metal oxides as OER electrocatalysts. In this paper, a kinetic and thermodynamic model for the four-electron electrochemical reaction based on previous OER mechanisms proposed by DFT calculations is developed to further investigate the electrocatalytic properties over a wide range of metal oxides and photosystem II. The OER activity of metal oxides (i.e. electrocatalytic current) calculated from the DFT-calculated equilibrium potentials with kinetic properties, such as the rate constants for interfacial electron transfer and catalytic turnover, can lead to a volcano-shaped trend that agrees with the results observed in experiments. In addition, the kinetic aspects of the impact on the electrocatalysts are evaluated. Finally, comparing the results of metal oxides and photosystem II, and fitting experimental voltammograms give further insights into kinetic and thermodynamic roles. Here, the general guidelines for designing OER electrocatalysts with unified kinetic and thermodynamic properties are presented.

  15. Determination of the carbon isotopic composition of whole/intact biological specimens using at-line direct thermal desorption to effect thermally assisted hydrolysis/methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, L.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Irth, H.; Floris, V.; Hoogveld, H.L.; Pel, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the use of a direct thermal desorption (DTD) interface as an alternative to Curie-point flash pyrolysis system as an inlet technique in gas chromatography–combustion isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C-IRMS) analysis of whole/intact phytoplankton and zooplankton

  16. Data mining for isotope discrimination in atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Scott R; Bryden, Aaron; Suram, Santosh K; Rajan, Krishna

    2013-09-01

    Ions with similar time-of-flights (TOF) can be discriminated by mapping their kinetic energy. While current generation position-sensitive detectors have been considered insufficient for capturing the isotope kinetic energy, we demonstrate in this paper that statistical learning methodologies can be used to capture the kinetic energy from all of the parameters currently measured by mathematically transforming the signal. This approach works because the kinetic energy is sufficiently described by the descriptors on the potential, the material, and the evaporation process within atom probe tomography (APT). We discriminate the isotopes for Mg and Al by capturing the kinetic energy, and then decompose the TOF spectrum into its isotope components and identify the isotope for each individual atom measured. This work demonstrates the value of advanced data mining methods to help enhance the information resolution of the atom probe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic species in an isotopic mixture including a first species having a first isotope and a second species having a second isotope are separated by selectively exciting the first species in preference to the second species and then reacting the selectively excited first species with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product having a mass different from the original species and separating the product from the balance of the mixture in a centrifugal separating device such as centrifuge or aerodynamic nozzle. In the centrifuge the isotopic mixture is passed into a rotor where it is irradiated through a window. Heavier and lighter components can be withdrawn. The irradiated mixture experiences a large centrifugal force and is separated in a deflection area into lighter and heavier components. (UK)

  18. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to molecular and atomic isotope separation and is particularly applicable to the separation of 235 U from other uranium isotopes including 238 U. In the method described a desired isotope is separated mechanically from an atomic or molecular beam formed from an isotope mixture utilising the isotropic recoil momenta resulting from selective excitation of the desired isotope species by radiation, followed by ionization or dissociation by radiation or electron attachment. By forming a matrix of UF 6 molecules in HBr molecules so as to collapse the V 3 vibrational mode of the UF 6 molecule the 235 UF 6 molecules are selectively excited to promote reduction of UF 6 molecules containing 235 U and facilitate separation. (UK)

  19. A Tale of Two Gases: Isotope Effects Associated with the Enzymatic Production of H2 and N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Gandhi, H.; Kreuzer, H. W.; Moran, J.; Hill, E. A.; McQuarters, A.; Lehnert, N.; Ostrom, N. E.; Hegg, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotopes can provide considerable insight into enzymatic mechanisms and fluxes in various biological processes. In our studies, we used stable isotopes to characterize both enzyme-catalyzed H2 and N2O production. H2 is a potential alternative clean energy source and also a key metabolite in many microbial communities. Biological H2 production is generally catalyzed by hydrogenases, enzymes that combine protons and electrons to produce H2 under anaerobic conditions. In our study, H isotopes and fractionation factors (α) were used to characterize two types of hydrogenases: [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Due to differences in the active site, the α associated with H2 production for [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases separated into two distinct clusters (αFeFe > αNiFe). The calculated kinetic isotope effects indicate that hydrogenase-catalyzed H2 production has a preference for light isotopes, consistent with the relative bond strengths of O-H and H-H bonds. Interestingly, the isotope effects associated with H2 consumption and H2-H2O exchange reactions were also characterized, but in this case no specific difference was observed between the different enzymes. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 300 times that of CO2, and the concentration of N2O is currently increasing at a rate of ~0.25% per year. Thus far, bacterial and fungal denitrification processes have been identified as two of the major sources of biologically generated N2O. In this study, we measured the δ15N, δ18O, δ15Nα (central N atom in N2O), and δ15Nβ (terminal N atom in N2O) of N2O generated by purified fungal P450 nitric oxide reductase (P450nor) from Histoplasma capsulatum. We observed normal isotope effects for δ18O and δ15Nα, and inverse isotope effects for bulk δ15N (the average of Nα and Nβ) and δ15Nβ. The observed isotope effects have been used in conjunction with DFT calculations to provide important insight into the mechanism of P450nor. Similar

  20. Kinetic sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Joneta Witabora; Jonata Witabora

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic Sculpture was born from a long process of searching new approach in sculpture. The artists tried to escape from 'static' paradigm and tried to implement movement into their works: a sculpture that is mobile. Movement is always a fascinating phenomenon to eyes. Kinetic sculpture strength lies in its unique character in combining science and art. Kinetic Sculptures are really interesting pieces of art. It succeeds to fascinate human everytime. 

  1. Elements in biological AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. 14 C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth's biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed

  2. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.H.; Marks, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    A process for separating uranium isotopes is described which includes: preparing a volatile compound U-T, in which U is a mixture of uranium isotopes and T is a chemical moiety containing at least one organic or deuterated borohydride group, and which exhibits for at least one isotopic species thereof a fundamental, overtone or combination vibrational absorption excitation energy level at a frequency between 900 and 1100 cm -1 ; and irradiating the compound in the vapour phase with energy emitted by a radiation source at a frequency between 900 and 1100 cm -1 (e.g. a CO 2 laser). (author)

  3. Kinetic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Collapse of a Bose gas: Kinetic approach ... Thermodynamical, statistical and static properties of condensates; Ultracold and trapped gases; matter waves. ... of a harmonically trapped attractively interacting Bose gas below the condensation point by introducing a kinetic approach within the Hartee-Fock approximation.

  4. Kinetic analysis of decreased sperm fertilizing ability by fluorides and fluoroaluminates: a tool for analyzing the effect of environmental substances on biological events

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bosáková, Z.; Tockstein, A.; Adamusová, H.; Coufal, P.; Šebková, Nataša; Dvořáková-Hortová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2016), s. 71-79 ISSN 0175-7571 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05547S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : kinetics * fluoride complexes * capacitation * tyrosine phosphorylation * acrosome reaction * sperm fertilizing ability Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2016

  5. Oxygen isotopic fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, N.; Turchyn, A. V.; Lyons, T.; Bruchert, V.; Schrag, D. P.; Wall, J.

    2006-12-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) is understood to depend on a variety of environmental parameters, such as sulfate concentration, temperature, cell specific sulfate reduction rates, and the carbon substrate. What controls oxygen isotope fractionation during BSR is less well understood. Some studies have suggested that carbon substrate is important, whereas others concluded that there is a stoichiometric relationship between the fractionations of sulfur and oxygen during BSR. Studies of oxygen fractionation are complicated by isotopic equilibration between sulfur intermediates, particularly sulfite, and water. This process can modify the isotopic composition of the extracellular sulfate pool (δ18OSO4 ). Given this, the challenge is to distinguish between this isotopic equilibration and fractionations linked to the kinetic effects of the intercellular enzymes and the incorporation of sulfate into the bacterial cell. The δ18OSO4 , in concert with the sulfur isotope composition of sulfate (δ34SSO4), could be a powerful tool for understanding the pathways and environmental controls of BSR in natural systems. We will present δ18OSO4 data measured from batch culture growth of 14 different species of sulfate reducing bacteria for which sulfur isotope data were previously published. A general observation is that δ18OSO4 shows little isotopic change (kinetic effect during BSR and/or equilibration between sulfur intermediates and the isotopically light water (~-5‰) of the growth medium. Our present batch culture data do not allow us to convincingly isolate the magnitude and the controlling parameters of the kinetic isotope effect for oxygen. However, ongoing growth of mutant bacteria missing enzymes critical in the different steps of BSR may assist in this mission.

  6. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  7. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  8. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  9. Isotope laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report from the Dutch Ministry of Health is an advisory document concerned with isotope laboratories in hospitals, in connection with the Dutch laws for hospitals. It discusses which hospitals should have isotope laboratories and concludes that as many hospitals as possible should have small laboratories so that emergency cases can be dealt with. It divides the Netherlands into regions and suggests which hospitals should have these facilities. The questions of how big each lab. is to be, what equipment each has, how each lab. is organised, what therapeutic and diagnostic work should be carried out by each, etc. are discussed. The answers are provided by reports from working groups for in vivo diagnostics, in vitro diagnostics, therapy, and safety and their results form the criteria for the licences of isotope labs. The results of a questionnaire for isotope labs. already in the Netherlands are presented, and their activities outlined. (C.F.)

  10. Isotope Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  11. Silicon isotope fractionation by marine siliceous sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, K. R.; Maldonado, M.

    2016-02-01

    The stable isotope composition of benthic sponge spicule silica is a potential source of palaeoceanographic information about past deep seawater chemistry. The silicon isotope composition of spicules has been shown to relate to the silicic acid concentration of ambient water. However, existing calibrations do exhibit a degree of scatter in the relationship, and there are many open questions surrounding the mechanism behind isotopic fractionation during biosilicification. Here, we present a new study of silicon isotopes in siliceous sponges, covering a range of ancestral lineages, marine environments and geographical locations, and the impact of cleaning methods of silicon isotope compositions. We show that the cleaning method has minimal impact on silicon isotope composition of sponge spicules. Our results highlight the importance of environmental and biological factors on silicon isotope fractionation, and we discuss the implications of these results on the use of palaeoceanographic applications of sponge spicules.

  12. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH...... was produced from the reaction of O(1D) (from O3 photolysis) with H2O, and Cl was from photolysis of Cl2. Samples were taken from the reaction cell and analyzed for methane (12CH4, 12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D) isotopologue ratios using tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy. Measured kinetic isotope...... effects for singly substituted species were consistent with previous experimental studies. For doubly substituted methane, 13CH3D, the observed kinetic isotope effects closely follow the product of the kinetic isotope effects for the 13C and deuterium substituted species (i.e., 13,2KIE = 13KIE × 2KIE...

  13. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  14. Solvent isotope effects in the complex formation of beryllium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boojj, M.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of complex formation and dissociation of BeSO 4 in D 2 O has been studied. The association constant and the inner sphere/outer sphere equilibrium constant were obtained. By comparing with the corresponding results in H 2 O(1) the solvent isotope effect could be evaluated for some of the involved thermodynamic and kinetic constants. The isotope effects can be understood in terms of Swain and Bader's statistical thermodynamical calculations (2). (orig.) [de

  15. Isotopic hydrogen exchange - a general method for the preparation of labelled organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatsepina, N.N.; Tupitsyn, I.F.

    1977-01-01

    Presented are results of the development of an efficient method for tritium (deuterium) labelling of various organic compounds, based on isotopic hydrogen exchange reaction. The factors which determine the exchange reaction rate were studied in selected aliphatic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds and in methyl derivatives of organic compounds containing nonmetallic elements. Solutions of sodium (potassium) hydroxide in water, sodium (potassium) alcoholate in alcohol and sodium (potassium) amide in liquid ammonia were used as solvents-donors of the heavy hydrogen isotope. The results of the kinetic studies were used for the choice of conditions for the preparation of a number of labelled, biologically important substances, solvents, polymer materials and compounds for general chemical use

  16. Stereochemistry and kinetic deuterium isotope effects in the thermal 1,3-sigmatropic rearrangement of (-)-(R,R)-trans-2-methyl-1-(1-tert-butylvinyl)cyclopropane: evidence for a biradical intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, J.J.; Warner, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of the thermally induced, first order 1,3-chemical shift in cyclopropanes has not been clearly defined. In an effort to resolve the mechanism of the 1,3-shift, (-)-(R,R)-trans-2-methyl-1-(1-tert-butylvinyl) cyclopropane and its 1-(2,2-dideuterio-1-tert-butylvinyl) derivative (80% deuterated) were prepared and heated in the gas phase in a static well-conditioned reactor at 280 0 C. The observed normal isotope effect on the 1,3-shift is in the opposite direction from that usually associated with secondary α deuterium isotope effects resulting from changes in bonding, and this inverse isotope effect is thought to arise by induction from the rotational effect on the 1,3-shift. However, the explanation is not consistent with the relatively large rate constant for enantiomerization unless the enantiomerization is a separate process

  17. Isotopically labelled pyrimidines and purines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban, A.T.; Bally, I.

    1987-01-01

    Among the three diazines, pyrimidine is by far the most important one because its derivatives uracil, thymine and cytosine are constituents of the ubiquitous deoxynucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Other derivatives of pyrimidine without condensed rings include barbiturates, alloxan, orotic acid and thiamine or vitamin B 1 . From the polycyclic derivatives of pyrimidine such as pteridine, alloxazine, and purine, the latter, through its derivatives adenine and guanine complete the list of bases which occur in DNA and RNA: in addition, other purine derivatives such as hypoxanthine, xanthine, theobromine, theophylline, caffeine and uric acid are important natural products with biological activity. The paper presents methods for preparing isotopically labeled pyrimidines as well as purine derivatives. For convenience, the authors describe separately carbon-labeled with radioisotopes 11 C (T 1/2 = 20.3 min) and 14 C (T 1/2 = 5736 years) or the stable isotope 13 C (natural abundance 1.1%) and then hydrogen-labeled systems with the radioisotope 3 H ≡ T (T 1/2 = 12.346 years) or with the stable isotope 2 H ≡ D (natural abundance 0.015%). We do not separate stable from radioactive isotopes because the synthetic methods are identical for the same element; however, the introduction of hydrogen isotopes into organic molecules is often performed by reactions such as isotope exchange which cannot take place in the case of carbon isotopes

  18. Isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Dewi M.

    1995-01-01

    Some 2 0% of patients using radiopharmaceuticals receive injections of materials produced by cyclotrons. There are over 200 cyclotrons worldwide; around 35 are operated by commercial companies solely for the production of radio-pharmaceuticals with another 25 accelerators producing medically useful isotopes. These neutron-deficient isotopes are usually produced by proton bombardment. All commonly used medical isotopes can be generated by 'compact' cyclotrons with energies up to 40 MeV and beam intensities in the range 50 to 400 microamps. Specially designed target systems contain gram-quantities of highly enriched stable isotopes as starting materials. The targets can accommodate the high power densities of the proton beams and are designed for automated remote handling. The complete manufacturing cycle includes large-scale target production, isotope generation by cyclotron beam bombardment, radio-chemical extraction, pharmaceutical dispensing, raw material recovery, and labelling/packaging prior to the rapid delivery of these short-lived products. All these manufacturing steps adhere to the pharmaceutical industry standards of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Unlike research accelerators, commercial cyclotrons are customized 'compact' machines usually supplied by specialist companies such as IBA (Belgium), EBCO (Canada) or Scanditronix (Sweden). The design criteria for these commercial cyclotrons are - small magnet dimensions, power-efficient operation of magnet and radiofrequency systems, high intensity extracted proton beams, well defined beam size and automated computer control. Performance requirements include rapid startup and shutdown, high reliability to support the daily production of short-lived isotopes and low maintenance to minimize the radiation dose to personnel. In 1987 a major step forward in meeting these exacting industrial requirements came when IBA, together with the University of Louvain-La-Neuve in Belgium, developed the

  19. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-04-23

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1

  20. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope study on benthic foraminifera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Bhaumik

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... Stable isotopes of benthic foraminifera have widely been applied in micropalaeontological research to understand vital effects in foraminifera. Isotopic fractionations are mainly controlled by ontogeny, bottom/pore water chemistry, habitat preference, kinetic effect and respiration. Discontinuous abundance.

  1. Radionuclide kinetics and biological effects from strontium-89 and cerium-144 at combined inocculation with the phosphorganic pesticide ''Agria-1060'' (Fazolon) in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyankov, I.Ya.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetics of 89 strontium and 144 cerium in the rat were studied for the case of single intake of either radionuclide combined with an organophosphorus pesticide, Agria-1060, and for chronic intake of 89 strontium with the same pesticide. After treatments involving minimal effective activities and concentrations, some hematological parameters were monitored, as well as biochemical (SGOT, SGPT, serum cholinesterase) and phagocytic activity of neutrophils. Unfavorable changes in RBC counts were attributable to the chemical factor, while those in WBC counts resulted from radiation exposure. Serum cholinesterase activity underwent shifts distinctly showing a phasic pattern and related in the main to the chemical agent. SGOT and SGPT activities were more markedly affected by 144 cerium combined with pesticide than by sole agent treatments. Phagocytic index response was observed to change according to radionuclide organotropism. As for chronic treatments, neutrophil phagocytic activity proved most susceptible, suggesting occurrence of changes in the immune system under such exposure conditions

  2. Kinetics and Isotope Patterns of Ethanol and Acetaldehyde Emissions from Yeast Fermentations of Glucose and Glucose-6,6-d2 Using Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Wang, T.; Španěl, Patrik

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2002), s. 69-76 ISSN 0951-4198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry * stable isotope * yeast fermentation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2002

  3. New estimates of Southern Ocean biological production rates from O 2/Ar ratios and the triple isotope composition of O 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuer, Matthew K.; Barnett, Bruce A.; Bender, Michael L.; Falkowski, Paul G.; Hendricks, Melissa B.

    2007-06-01

    We report O 2/Ar ratios (a constraint on net community production) and the triple isotopic composition of dissolved O 2 (a constraint on gross primary production) in samples collected from the surface mixed layer on 23 Southern Ocean transits. Samples were collected at 1-2° meridional resolution during the austral summer. Methodological limitations notwithstanding, the results constrain the net/gross production ratio, net O 2 production, and gross O 2 production at unprecedented resolution throughout the Southern Ocean mixed layer. Gross O 2 production rates inferred from the oxygen triple isotopes are greater than production rates calculated from a model based on remotely sensed chlorophyll. This result agrees with previous 18O and 14C incubations along 170°W. O 2/Ar ratios exceeding saturation are consistently observed within the Subantarctic and Polar Frontal Zones south of New Zealand and Australia, showing that a net autotrophic community predominates during austral summer. Lower O 2/Ar values are observed within the Drake Passage and Antarctic Zone, suggesting unresolved influences of low net community production, net heterotrophy, and upwelling of O 2-undersaturated waters. In autotrophic waters of the austral summer mixed layer, ratios of net community production/gross O 2 production scatter about 0.13, corresponding to f ratios of ˜0.25. Net community/gross O 2 production ratios show no meridional gradient across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, suggesting that an approximately constant fraction of gross primary productivity is regenerated or exported. Our calculated net O 2 production rates are in satisfactory agreement with comparable published estimates. Net and gross O 2 production rates are highest in the Subantarctic and decline to the south, paralleling the well-known trend of chlorophyll a concentrations. In an analysis of variance of net O 2 production and gross O 2 production with other environmental variables, the strongest correlations are

  4. Isotope generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The patent describes an isotope generator incorporating the possibility of stopping elution before the elution vessel is completely full. Sterile ventilation of the whole system can then occur, including of both generator reservoir and elution vessel. A sterile, and therefore pharmaceutically acceptable, elution fluid is thus obtained and the interior of the generator is not polluted with non-sterile air. (T.P.)

  5. Ca isotopes in refractory inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederer, F.R.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute isotope abundance of Ca in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites. Improved high precision measurements are reported also for 46 Ca. We find that nonlinear isotope effects in Ca are extremely rare in these inclusions. The absence of nonlinear effects in Ca, except for the effects in FUN inclusions, is in sharp contrast to the endemic effects in Ti. One fine-grained inclusion shows an excess of 46 Ca of (7 +- 1) per mille, which is consistent with addition of only 46 Ca or of an exotic (*) component with 46 Ca* approx. 48 Ca*. FUN inclusion EK-1-4-1 shows a small 46 Ca excess of (3.3 +- 1.0) per mille; this confirms that the exotic Ca components in EK-1-4-1 were even more deficient in 46 Ca relative to 48 Ca than is the case for normal Ca. The Ca in the Ca-Al-rich inclusions shows mass dependent isotope fractionation effects which have a range from -3.8 to +6.7 per mille per mass unit difference. This range is a factor of 20 wider than the range previously established for bulk meteorites and for terrestrial and lunar samples. Ca and Mg isotope fractionation effects in the Ca-Al-rich inclusions are common and attributed to kinetic isotope effects. (author)

  6. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  7. Quantification of stable isotope label in metabolites via mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huege, Jan; Goetze, Jan; Dethloff, Frederik; Junker, Bjoern; Kopka, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Isotope labelling experiments with stable or radioactive isotopes have long been an integral part of biological and medical research. Labelling experiments led to the discovery of new metabolic pathways and made it possible to calculate the fluxes responsible for a metabolic phenotype, i.e., the qualitative and quantitative composition of metabolites in a biological system. Prerequisite for efficient isotope labelling experiments is a reliable and precise method to analyze the redistribution of isotope label in a metabolic network. Here we describe the use of the CORRECTOR program, which utilizes matrix calculations to correct mass spectral data from stable isotope labelling experiments for the distorting effect of naturally occurring stable isotopes (NOIs). CORRECTOR facilitates and speeds up the routine quantification of experimentally introduced isotope label from multiple mass spectral readouts, which are generated by routine metabolite profiling when combined with stable isotope labelling experiments.

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some diols by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michaelis–Menten type kinetics is observed with respect to diol. Addition of benzyltrimethylammonium chloride does not affect the rate. Tribromide ion is postulated to be the reactive oxidizing species. Oxidation of [1,1,2,2-2H4] ethanediol shows the absence of a kinetic isotope effect. The reaction exhibits substantial solvent.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 116; Issue 6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine ... The oxidation of -deuteriomandelic acid exhibits the presence of a substantial kinetic isotope effect (/ = 5.91 at 298 K). The rates of ...

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some diols by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 1 ... The kinetics of oxidation of five vicinal and four non-vicinal diols, and two of their monoethers by benzyltrimethylammonium tribromide (BTMAB) have been studied in ... Oxidation of [1,1,2,2-2H4] ethanediol shows the absence of a kinetic isotope effect.

  11. Kinetics of biological decolorisation of anthraquinone based Reactive Blue 19 using an isolated strain of Enterobacter sp.F NCIM 5545.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkar, Chandrakant R; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Pinjari, Dipak V

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to evaluate the bacterial decolorisation of Reactive Blue 19 by an Enterobacter sp.F which was isolated from a mixed culture from anaerobic digester for biogas production. Phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis based on DNA sequencing comparisons indicate that Enterobacter sp.F was 99.7% similar to Enterobacter cloacae ATCC13047. The kinetics of Reactive Blue 19 dye decolorisation by bacterium had been estimated. Effects of substrate concentration, oxygen, temperature, pH, glucose and glucose to microbe weight ratio on the rate of decolorisation were investigated to understand key factor that determines the performance of dye decolorisation. The maximum decolorisation efficiency of Reactive Blue 19 was 90% over period of 24 h for optimized parameter. To the best of our knowledge, this research study is the report where Enterobacter sp.F has been reported with about 90% decolorizing ability against anthraquinone based Reactive Blue 19 dye. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isotopic mass-dependence of noble gas diffusion coefficients inwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-06-25

    Noble gas isotopes are used extensively as tracers inhydrologic and paleoclimatic studies. These applications requireknowledge of the isotopic mass (m) dependence of noble gas diffusioncoefficients in water (D), which has not been measured but is estimatedusing experimental D-values for the major isotopes along with an untestedrelationship from kinetic theory, D prop m-0.5. We applied moleculardynamics methods to determine the mass dependence of D for four noblegases at 298 K, finding that D prop m-beta with beta<0.2, whichrefutes the kinetic theory model underlying all currentapplications.

  13. Isotopes for medicine and the life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Manning, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    Both radioisotopes and enriched stable isotopes are essential to a wide variety of applications in medicine, where they are used in the diagnosis and treatment of illnesses. This report focuses primarily on those medical uses and those in allied life sciences. In addition, other applications of isotopes are discussed; isotopes also find wide parallel uses in research in chemistry, physics, biology, and geosciences, with additional needs existing in the commercial sector. Topic areas include the following: enriched stable isotopes; reactor-produced radionuclides; accelerator-produced radionuclides and a national biomedical tracer facility; public-private partnership models for NBTF; a national isotope policy: proposal for a new way to manage the nation's isotope resources

  14. Subtropical forest catchments in South China provide an efficient biological N sink alleviating regional N pollution: evidence from dual nitrate isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L.; Mulder, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, X. S.; Dörsch, P.

    2016-12-01

    In warm-humid subtropics of South China, enhanced N deposition has led to extreme N saturation in a wide range of forests, with significant nitrate (NO3-) leaching from well-drained soils. Yet, the imbalanced N budget, with limited N export by stream runoff, reveals strong N retention in these forest catchments. Here, to strengthen our understanding of catchment-scale N turnover, we combine a dual NO3- isotope study with weekly inorganic N flux monitoring for two years, across five southern forest catchments in China. In each catchment, data were collected along a hydrological continuum consisting of a hill slope (HS), a groundwater discharge zone (GDZ) and a stream outlet. Combined for all catchments, the data show that the atmogenic ammonium (NH4+) is efficiently removed in the soil pore water of HS, while NO3- is produced. Depleted δ15N and δ18O signals in NO3- on the HS suggested the occurrence of efficient nitrification. In the GDZ, the strong decline in NO3- concentration associated with significant increase in δ15N and δ18O of NO3- indicated denitrification as the dominant N sink. Such uniform N turnover pattern may be attributed to similar climatic and topographic conditions, which facilitate efficient N transformation and transport along the hydrological continuum. In-out N budgets across these sites revealed that elevated N deposition stimulated catchment N retention, which was matched by increasing difference in 15N enrichment of NO3- between HS and GDZ. Thus, N attenuation by denitrification in South Chinese forest catchments appears to be driven by N deposition load in a range of 10 to 50 kg ha-1 yr-1. Our study demonstrates widely overlooked N sink function of subtropical forest catchments, which may be of great importance for alleviating regional N pollution.

  15. Kinetic bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This report on kinetic bridges is essentially a state-of-the-art study on two types of bridges whose location or physical characteristics are designed to be time dependent. The first type, called a "relocatable bridge", is essentially for use as a te...

  16. Evidence of isotopic fractionation of natural uranium in cultured human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Avazeri, Emilie; Malard, Véronique; Vidaud, Claude; Reiller, Pascal E.; Ortega, Richard; Nonell, Anthony; Isnard, Hélène; Chartier, Frédéric; Bresson, Carole

    2016-12-01

    The study of the isotopic fractionation of endogen elements and toxic heavy metals in living organisms for biomedical applications, and for metabolic and toxicological studies, is a cutting-edge research topic. This paper shows that human neuroblastoma cells incorporated small amounts of uranium (U) after exposure to 10 µM natural U, with preferential uptake of the 235U isotope with regard to 238U. Efforts were made to develop and then validate a procedure for highly accurate n(238U)/n(235U) determinations in microsamples of cells. We found that intracellular U is enriched in 235U by 0.38 ± 0.13‰ (2σ, n = 7) relative to the exposure solutions. These in vitro experiments provide clues for the identification of biological processes responsible for uranium isotopic fractionation and link them to potential U incorporation pathways into neuronal cells. Suggested incorporation processes are a kinetically controlled process, such as facilitated transmembrane diffusion, and the uptake through a high-affinity uranium transport protein involving the modification of the uranyl (UO22+) coordination sphere. These findings open perspectives on the use of isotopic fractionation of metals in cellular models, offering a probe to track uptake/transport pathways and to help decipher associated cellular metabolic processes.

  17. Novel kinetic spectrophotometric method for estimation of certain biologically active phenolic sympathomimetic drugs in their bulk powders and different pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Mahmoud A; Badr El-Din, Khalid M; Salem, Hesham; Abdelmageed, Osama H

    2018-03-15

    A simple, selective and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method was described for estimation of four phenolic sympathomimetic drugs namely; terbutaline sulfate, fenoterol hydrobromide, isoxsuprine hydrochloride and etilefrine hydrochloride. This method is depended on the oxidation of the phenolic drugs with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent in presence of sodium carbonate. The rate of color development at 747-760nm was measured spectrophotometrically. The experimental parameters controlling the color development were fully studied and optimized. The reaction mechanism for color development was proposed. The calibration graphs for both the initial rate and fixed time methods were constructed, where linear correlations were found in the general concentration ranges of 3.65×10 -6 -2.19×10 -5 molL -1 and 2-24.0μgmL -1 with correlation coefficients in the following range 0.9992-0.9999, 0.9991-0.9998 respectively. The limits of detection and quantitation for the initial rate and fixed time methods were found to be in general concentration range 0.109-0.273, 0.363-0.910 and 0.210-0.483, 0.700-1.611μgmL -1 respectively. The developed method was validated according to ICH and USP 30 -NF 25 guidelines. The suggested method was successfully implemented to the estimation of these drugs in their commercial pharmaceutical formulations and the recovery percentages obtained were ranged from 97.63%±1.37 to 100.17%±0.95 and 97.29%±0.74 to 100.14±0.81 for initial rate and fixed time methods respectively. The data obtained from the analysis of dosage forms were compared with those obtained by reported methods. Statistical analysis of these results indicated no significant variation in the accuracy and precision of both the proposed and reported methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel kinetic spectrophotometric method for estimation of certain biologically active phenolic sympathomimetic drugs in their bulk powders and different pharmaceutical formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Mahmoud A.; Badr El-Din, Khalid M.; Salem, Hesham; Abdelmageed, Osama H.

    2018-03-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method was described for estimation of four phenolic sympathomimetic drugs namely; terbutaline sulfate, fenoterol hydrobromide, isoxsuprine hydrochloride and etilefrine hydrochloride. This method is depended on the oxidation of the phenolic drugs with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent in presence of sodium carbonate. The rate of color development at 747-760 nm was measured spectrophotometrically. The experimental parameters controlling the color development were fully studied and optimized. The reaction mechanism for color development was proposed. The calibration graphs for both the initial rate and fixed time methods were constructed, where linear correlations were found in the general concentration ranges of 3.65 × 10- 6-2.19 × 10- 5 mol L- 1 and 2-24.0 μg mL- 1 with correlation coefficients in the following range 0.9992-0.9999, 0.9991-0.9998 respectively. The limits of detection and quantitation for the initial rate and fixed time methods were found to be in general concentration range 0.109-0.273, 0.363-0.910 and 0.210-0.483, 0.700-1.611 μg mL- 1 respectively. The developed method was validated according to ICH and USP 30 -NF 25 guidelines. The suggested method was successfully implemented to the estimation of these drugs in their commercial pharmaceutical formulations and the recovery percentages obtained were ranged from 97.63% ± 1.37 to 100.17% ± 0.95 and 97.29% ± 0.74 to 100.14 ± 0.81 for initial rate and fixed time methods respectively. The data obtained from the analysis of dosage forms were compared with those obtained by reported methods. Statistical analysis of these results indicated no significant variation in the accuracy and precision of both the proposed and reported methods.

  19. Fingerprinting Bacterial and Fungal Manganese Oxidation via Stable Oxygen Isotopes of Manganese Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, K. M.; Wankel, S. D.; Hansel, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are a ubiquitous mineralogical component of surface Earth and Mars. Mn(III/IV) oxides are potent environmental sorbents and oxidants that play a crucial role in the fate of organic matter. The processes by which Mn(II) oxidation occurs in natural systems are poorly understood, but a number of studies have implicated microogranisms as the primary agents of Mn(II) oxidation in terrestrial and marine environments. The ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides transcends the boundaries of biological domain, with an abundance of well-characterized prokaryotes as well as eukaryotic fungi with the ability to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides. Biological Mn(II) oxidation proceeds directly through enzymatic activity or indirectly through the production of reactive oxygen species. Building upon earlier research suggesting that stable oxygen isotope fractionation could be used to fingerprint unique Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms or distinct oxidation pathways, here we use culture-based studies of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and fungi to determine the kinetic oxygen isotope effects associated with Mn(II) oxidation. Since the oxygen molecules in Mn(III/IV) oxides are comprised of oxygen from both precursor water and molecular oxygen, we used a two-fold approach to constrain isotope fractionation with respect to each oxygen source. We used open system oxidation experiments using oxygen-18 labeled water in parallel with closed system Rayleigh distillation oxidation experiments to fully constrain isotope fractionation associated with oxygen atom incorporation during Mn(II) oxidation. Our results suggest commonalities among fractionation factors from groups of Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms that have similar oxidation mechanisms. These results suggest that stable oxygen isotopes of Mn(III/IV) oxides have the potential to distinguish between Mn(II) oxidation pathways in nature, providing a way to determine which groups of Mn(II) oxidizers may be

  20. Isotope hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drost, W.

    1978-01-01

    The International Symposium on Isotope Hydrology was jointly organized by the IAEA and UNESCO, in co-operation with the National Committee of the Federal Republic of Germany for the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) and the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH (GSF). Upon the invitation of the Federal Republic of Germany the Symposium was held from 19-23 June 1978 in Neuherberg on the GSF campus. The Symposium was officially opened by Mr. S. Eklund, Director General of the IAEA. The symposium - the fifth meeting held on isotope hydrology - was attended by over 160 participants from 44 countries and four international organizations and by about 30 observers from the Federal Republic of Germany. Due to the absence of scientists from the USSR five papers were cancelled and therefore only 46 papers of the original programme were presented in ten sessions

  1. Dual nitrate isotopes clarify the role of biological processing and hydrologic flow paths on nitrogen cycling in subtropical low-gradient watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Natalie A.; Jackson, C. Rhett; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Klaus, Julian; Du, Enhao; Bitew, Menberu M.

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an important nutrient as it often limits productivity but in excess can impair water quality. Most studies on watershed N cycling have occurred in upland forested catchments where snowmelt dominates N export; fewer studies have focused on low-relief watersheds that lack snow. We examined watershed N cycling in three adjacent, low-relief watersheds in the Upper Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States to better understand the role of hydrological flow paths and biological transformations of N at the watershed scale. Groundwater was the dominant source of nitrified N to stream water in two of the three watersheds, while atmospheric deposition comprised 28% of stream water nitrate in one watershed. The greater atmospheric contribution may have been due to the larger stream channel area relative to total watershed area or the dominance of shallow subsurface flow paths contributing to stream flow in this watershed. There was a positive relationship between temperature and stream water ammonium concentrations and a negative relationship between temperature and stream water nitrate concentrations in each watershed suggesting that N cycling processes (i.e., nitrification and denitrification) varied seasonally. However, there were no clear patterns in the importance of denitrification in different water pools possibly because a variety of factors (i.e., assimilatory uptake, dissimilatory uptake, and mixing) affected nitrate concentrations. Together, these results highlight the hydrological and biological controls on N cycling in low-gradient watersheds and variability in N delivery flow paths among adjacent watersheds with similar physical characteristics.

  2. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, G.H.; Bett, R.; Cuninghame, J.G.; Sims, H.

    1982-01-01

    In the separation of short-lived isotopes for medical usage, a solution containing sup(195m)Hg is contacted with vicinal dithiol cellulose which adsorbs and retains the sup(195m)Hg. sup(195m)Au is eluted from the vicinal dithiol cellulose by using a suitable elutant. The sup(195m)Au arises from the radioactive decay of the sup(195m)Hg. The preferred elutant is a solution containing CN - ion. (author)

  3. Influence of Hydrophilic Polymers on the β Factor in Weibull Equation Applied to the Release Kinetics of a Biologically Active Complex of Aesculus hippocastanum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Kobryń

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenoid saponins complex of biological origin, escin, exhibits significant clinical activity in chronic venous insufficiency, skin inflammation, epidermal abrasions, allergic dermatitis, and acute impact injuries, especially in topical application. The aim of the study is the comparison of various hydrogel formulations, as carriers for a horse chestnut seed extract (EH. Methylcellulose (MC, two polyacrylic acid derivatives (PA1 and PA2, and polyacrylate crosspolymer 11 (PC-11 were employed. The release rates of EH were examined and a comparison with the Weibull model equation was performed. Application of MC as the carrier in the hydrogel preparation resulted in fast release rate of EH, whereas in the case of the hydrogel composed with PC-11 the release was rather prolonged. Applied Weibull function adhered best to the experimental data. Due to the evaluated shape parameter β, in the Weibull equation, the systems under study released the active compound according to the Fickian diffusion.

  4. Complete Biological Evaluation of Therapeutical Radiopharmaceuticals in Rodents, Laboratory Beagles and Veterinary Patients - Preclinical Distribution-, Kinetic-, Excretion-, Internal Dosimetry-, Radiotoxicological-, Radiation Safety- and Efficacy Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, L.; Domokos, M.; Polyak, A.; Thuroczy, J.; Janoki, G.

    2009-01-01

    The research and development of various novel therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals is a huge demand in many laboratories world-wide. Beside of multiple bone metastases pain-palliation and radiosynovectomy agents a number of specific radiopharmaceutical applicants mainly for oncological applications are in the pipeline. Numerous in vitro methods are available in the first line to test the radiolabelling efficiency, the possible radioactive and non-labelled impurities, the stability of the label at different conditions and mediums, and some specific characteristics of radiopharmaceutical applicants eg.: receptor binding assays, antigen-antibody assays. But, still before human clinical trials there are several questions to be solved in regards of toxicology, radiotoxicology, radiation safety and maybe most importantly the efficacy tasks. All these issues cannot be answered without animal tests. Several decades back animal tests in radiopharmacy meant only standard bioassays in a large number of healthy rodents. Later on pathological models eg.: human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient animals came-out and through them radiopharmaceutical tumor-uptake by the targets were available to evaluate in vivo as well. Xenografts are still popular and widely used models in the field but instead of wide-scaled bioassays nowadays repeated scintiscans or hybrid images (SPECT/CT, PET/CT) are more and more often used to answer kinetic-, excretion-, tumor uptake, internal dosimetry (Minimum Effective Dose, Maximum Tolerable Dose, critical organ doses, tumor doses) questions. Greater animals like laboratory Beagles are more closely in size, clinical and metabolic parameters to the human objects so playing a more perfect role of human medical doctor and especially veterinary patients. Easy to understand that many of the spontaneously occurring companion animal diseases are a good model of human pathological diseases. The need of a better diagnosis and treatment of that animals meets with

  5. Scientific study of 13C/12C carbon and 18O/16O oxygen stable isotopes biological fractionation in grapes in the Black Sea, Don Basin and the Western Caspian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The report presents the results of a study of carbon and oxygen stable isotopes in carbohydrates and intracellular water of red and white grapes of 2016 wine-growing season in the Crimean peninsula areas, South-west coast of the Greater Caucasus, the Don basin and the Western Caspian region. The mass concentration of reducing sugars in the studied grape samples has been from 17.5 to 25.0 g/100 ml, titrated acids concentration (based on tartaric acid – from 6.0 to 9.1 g/l, the buffer capacity 34.1–63.2 mg-Eq/l. Red and white wine made from respective grapes contained from 0.5 to 3.6 g/l of residual sugar; from 11.1 to 14.5% ethanol by volume; buffer capacity was 35.2–52.6 mg-Eq/l. It has been found that the δ13CVPDB values for carbohydrates of red and white grape varieties as a result of biological fractionation of carbon isotopes in the agro-climatic conditions of plant growth for the studied geographical areas are ranging from − 26.74 to − 20.74‰ (the Crimean peninsula; from − 27.31 to − 21.58‰ (South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus, from − 27.33 to − 24.73‰ (Don Basin and from − 26.64 to − 23.17‰ (West Caspian. The δ13CVPDB values for ethanol of the red and white dry wines range from − 28.52 to − 24.26‰ (the Crimean peninsula; from − 29.23 to − 24.52‰ (South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus; from − 28.97 to − 26.22‰ (Don Basin; from − 29.14 to − 25.22‰ (Western Caspian. Compared with the surface water and groundwater (averages from δ18OVSMOW− 13.90 to − 6.38‰ and with precipitation (averages from δ18OVSMOW − 10.30 to − 9.04‰ the δ18OVSMOW values in intracellular water of grapes are the following: for the Crimean peninsula grapes, from 0.40 to 4.97‰; the South West Coast of the Greater Caucasus, from -2.11 to 6.29‰; the Don Basin, from − 2.21 to 6.26‰; the Western Caspian, from − 0.24 to 1.44‰. It has been noted that in conditions of

  6. Kinetic, structural, and EPR studies reveal that aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas does not need a sulfido ligand for catalysis and give evidence for a direct Mo-C interaction in a biological system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Silva, Teresa; Ferroni, Felix; Thapper, Anders; Marangon, Jacopo; González, Pablo J; Rizzi, Alberto C; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Romão, Maria J; Brondino, Carlos D

    2009-06-17

    Aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (DgAOR) is a member of the xanthine oxidase (XO) family of mononuclear Mo-enzymes that catalyzes the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. The molybdenum site in the enzymes of the XO family shows a distorted square pyramidal geometry in which two ligands, a hydroxyl/water molecule (the catalytic labile site) and a sulfido ligand, have been shown to be essential for catalysis. We report here steady-state kinetic studies of DgAOR with the inhibitors cyanide, ethylene glycol, glycerol, and arsenite, together with crystallographic and EPR studies of the enzyme after reaction with the two alcohols. In contrast to what has been observed in other members of the XO family, cyanide, ethylene glycol, and glycerol are reversible inhibitors of DgAOR. Kinetic data with both cyanide and samples prepared from single crystals confirm that DgAOR does not need a sulfido ligand for catalysis and confirm the absence of this ligand in the coordination sphere of the molybdenum atom in the active enzyme. Addition of ethylene glycol and glycerol to dithionite-reduced DgAOR yields rhombic Mo(V) EPR signals, suggesting that the nearly square pyramidal coordination of the active enzyme is distorted upon alcohol inhibition. This is in agreement with the X-ray structure of the ethylene glycol and glycerol-inhibited enzyme, where the catalytically labile OH/OH(2) ligand is lost and both alcohols coordinate the Mo site in a eta(2) fashion. The two adducts present a direct interaction between the molybdenum and one of the carbon atoms of the alcohol moiety, which constitutes the first structural evidence for such a bond in a biological system.

  7. Theoretical evaluation of isotopic fractionation factors in oxidation reactions of benzene, phenol and chlorophenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Paweł; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-09-01

    We have studied theoretically the rate determining steps of reactions of benzene with permanganate, perchlorate, ozone and dioxygen in the gas phase and aqueous solution as well as phenol and dichlorophenol in protonated and unprotonated forms in aqueous solution. Kinetic isotope effects were then calculated for all carbon atoms and based on their values isotopic fractionation factors corresponding to compound specific isotopic analysis have been evaluated. The influence of the oxidant, substituents, environment and protonation on the isotopic fractionation factors has been analyzed.

  8. Physisorption kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  9. Oxygen isotopic fractionation in the condensation of refractory smokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.; Thiemens, M.; Nuth, J.; Donn, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary measurements of the oxygen isotopic fractionation that occurs during the condensation of refractory metal oxide smokes. Fractionation occurred at temperatures in excess of 500 K during and/or subsequent to reaction of SiH4, Fe(CO)5, Al(CH3)3, and O2 in a H2 carrier gas. Observed isotopic fractionation was as high as -15 per mil/amu. The magnitude of the isotopic fractionation suggests that the process is kinetically controlled since the effect is greatly in excess of that expected for equilibrium isotopic exchange.

  10. Relationship between morphological features and kinetic patterns of enhancement of the dynamic breast magnetic resonance imaging and clinico-pathological and biological factors in invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Guinea, Oscar; Andicoechea, Alejandro; González, Luis O; González-Reyes, Salomé; Merino, Antonio M; Hernández, Luis C; López-Muñiz, Alfonso; García-Pravia, Paz; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of breast cancer and its clinicopathological and biological factors. Dynamic MRI parameters of 68 invasive breast carcinomas were investigated. We also analyzed microvessel density (MVD), estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and expression of p53, HER2, ki67, VEGFR-1 and 2. Homogeneous enhancement was significantly associated with smaller tumor size (T1: < 2 cm) (p = 0.015). Tumors with irregular or spiculated margins had a significantly higher MVD than tumors with smooth margins (p = 0.038). Tumors showing a maximum enhancement peak at two minutes, or longer, after injecting the contrast, had a significantly higher MVD count than those which reached this point sooner (p = 0.012). The percentage of tumors with vascular invasion or high mitotic index was significantly higher among those showing a low percentage (≤ 150%) of maximum enhancement before two minutes than among those ones showing a high percentage (>150%) of enhancement rate (p = 0.016 and p = 0.03, respectively). However, there was a significant and positive association between the mitotic index and the peak of maximum intensity (p = 0.036). Peritumor inflammation was significantly associated with washout curve type III (p = 0.042). Variations in the early phase of dynamic MRI seem to be associated with parameters indicatives of tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer

  11. Elements in biological AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  12. KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF SOME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    proposed method was applied to the determination of the studied drugs in pharmaceutical formulations. KEY WORDS: Kinetic ... of fluoroquinolones either in pure forms, in dosage forms, or in biological fluids like ... chromatography [3-9], capillary zone electrophoresis [10, 11], electrochemistry [12-15], atomic absorption ...

  13. Kinetic studies of calcium in human by 41Ca tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boaretto, E.; Paul, M.; Gelbart, Z.; Johnson, R.R.; Meirav, O.; Sossi, V.; Venczel, E.; Hollos, G.; Prior, J.

    1992-01-01

    41 Ca (T 1/2 = 1 x 10 5 years) is an ideal tracer for long-term studies of calcium kinetics in biological systems for several reasons: (a) it behaves as a stable nuclide for all practical purpose due to its very long radioactive half-life; (b) its natural abundance is extremely low; (c) 41 Ca isotopic concentrations can now be measured to very high sensitivity by accelerator mass spectrometry, requiring therefore injection doses with no collateral radiation effects. Such an experiment has been initiated in a human subject by intravenous injection of a 126 ng dose of 41 Ca on July 18, 1990. The 41 Ca concentration and the 41 Ca/Ca isotopic ratios in serum and urine have been measured at five times over a 270 days period, showing a decrease in agreement with known time constants of the different calcium pools. It is planned to follow up the steady-state 41 Ca level ( 41 Ca/Ca ∼9 x 10 -12 ) over time (e.g. menstrual cycle, age)

  14. Isotope Exchange: a Potential Mechanism Regulating the Natural and Anthropogenic Pb Isotope Budget in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Boyle, E. A.; Zurbrick, C.; Carrasco, G. G.; Switzer, A.; Zhao, N.

    2016-02-01

    Two independent studies on anthropogenic Pb and Pb isotopes in coastal corals from the northern Arabian Gulf and the Singapore Straits have shown an isotopic excursion where the main Pb sources discharging to the water move to more crustal-like values, indicating that the Pb in coastal waters might exchange isotopically with crustal particulates without propotional change in concentration. To investigate this issue, Pb isotope exchange is assessed through a closed-system exchange experiment using estuarine waters collected at the Johor River mouth (discharging to the Singapore Straits). During the experiment, a known amount of NBS-981 (206Pb/207Pb=1.093) was spiked into the unfiltered Johor water (dissolved 206Pb/207Pb = 1.199) and the changing isotopic composition of the dissolved Pb was monitored. Shortly after the spike addition, dissolved Pb exhibited 206Pb/207Pb=1.178, reflecting the influence of the spike. Within the following few days, the 206Pb/207Pb in the water increased to >1.190 with limited changes of the dissolved Pb concentration. The observations in closed-system experiment agree with the isotope difference between Singapore aerosol and seawater in our 2-year-long field observations. The kinetics of isotope exchange were assessed using a simple model, which reproduced >70% of the observed Pb isotope variance. Both the close-system experiment and field measurements imply that isotope exchange can be an important mechanism for regulating the Pb and Pb isotopes in coastal waters. Investigations on the distribution of Pb and Pb isotope in estuaries and coastal waters should further assess the role of isotope exchange in ocean Pb chemistry.

  15. Metabolic studies in man using stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, H.; Jung, K.; Krumbiegel, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this project, stable isotope compounds and stable isotope pharmaceuticals were used (with emphasis on the application of 15 N) to study several aspects of nitrogen metabolism in man. Of the many methods available, the 15 N stable isotope tracer technique holds a special position because the methodology for application and nitrogen isotope analysis is proven and reliable. Valid routine methods using 15 N analysis by emission spectrometry have been demonstrated. Several methods for the preparation of biological material were developed during our participation in the Coordinated Research Programme. In these studies, direct procedures (i.e. use of diluted urine as a samples without chemical preparation) or rapid isolation methods were favoured. Within the scope of the Analytical Quality Control Service (AQCS) enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies were prepared and are now available through the International Atomic Energy Agency. The materials are of special importance as the increasing application of stable isotopes as tracers in medical, biological and agricultural studies has focused interest on reliable measurements of biological material of different origin. 24 refs

  16. Copper isotope fractionation by desert shrubs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete, Jesica U.; Viveros, Marian; Ellzey, Joanne T.; Borrok, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Copper has two naturally occurring stable isotopes of masses 63 and 65 which can undergo mass dependent fractionation during various biotic and abiotic chemical reactions. These interactions and their resulting Cu isotope fractionations can be used to determine the mechanisms involved in the cycling of Cu in natural systems. In this study, Cu isotope changes were investigated at the organismal level in the metal-accumulating desert plant, Prosopis pubescens. Initial results suggest that the lighter Cu isotope was preferentially incorporated into the leaves of the plant, which may suggest that Cu was actively transported via intracellular proteins. The roots and stems show a smaller degree of Cu isotope fractionation and the direction and magnitude of the fractionations was dependent upon the levels of Cu exposure. Based on this and previous work with bacteria and yeast, a trend is emerging that suggests the lighter Cu isotope is preferentially incorporated into biological components, while the heavier Cu isotope tends to become enriched in aqueous solutions. In bacteria, plants and animals, intracellular Cu concentrations are strictly regulated via dozens of enzymes that can bind, transport, and store Cu. Many of these enzymes reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I). These initial results seem to fit into a broader picture of Cu isotope cycling in natural systems where oxidation/reduction reactions are fundamental in controlling the distributions of Cu isotopes.

  17. Stable Isotope Group 1984 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    The work of the group in 1984 is described and includes studies in isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and mass spectrometer instrumentation. Geothermal studies have decreased compared to other years, but major data summaries were made for Wairakei and Ngawha. The hydrology of Whakarewarewa and Rotorua is being elucidated using water isotopes. Models of the subsurface flows at Kawerau and Ngawha are being made to relate fluid to mineral isotope compositions. A study of the δ 13 C and δ 34 S compositions of New Zealand oils has been started. Groups of oils of related origin are being defined, and compositions will be compared with those of potential source rocks. A method was developed for isotope analysis of sulphur in rocks. The isotopic composition of water is being used to identify and characterise groundwater aquifers in the Wairarapa and at Poverty Bay. Stable carbon isotopes have been used to identify food sources for invertebrates, and to show biochemical pathways in lactation by cows. The geochronology group is involved in major studies in Antarctica, using U-Pb, Rb-Sr and K-Ar methods. Rocks from North Victoria Land, Marie Byrd Land and the USARP mountains are being compared with possible correlatives in New Zealand and Argentina. Strontium isotope data is being applied to the origin of magmas in several regions of New Zealand. The K-Ar data is being stored on computer files. Fission track measurements are being applied to unravel uplift histories in Westland and Taranaki

  18. Stochastic kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  19. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2005-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. (author). 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Chromium stable isotope fractionation in modern biogeochemical cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    . In the present study, the isotopic composition of Cr is traced along this pathway to fill gaps in the understanding of the Cr-isotope system in natural environments. The thesis can be divided into three parts: The first part focuses on Cr release during oxidative weathering. Isotopically light Cr in modern...... processes (biological productivity). In the third part the potential use of the Cr-isotope system in the marine environment is discussed. Incorporation into biogenic carbonates (bivalves, gastropods, corals) is accompanied by Cr-isotope fractionation, causing negative seawater-shell offsets. None...

  1. Study of the mass, isotopic and kinetic energy distributions of the 233U(nth, f) and 241Pu(nth, f) fission products measured at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer (ILL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.

    2013-01-01

    Fission product yields are significant nuclear data for neutronic simulations. The purpose of this work is to improve fission yield knowledge for two fissile nuclei: 241 Pu and 233 U. Those are respectively involved in the uranium and thorium nuclear fuel cycle. The measurements are performed at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) located in Grenoble. The spectrometer is combined with an ionization chamber to measure mass yields of 241 Pu and 233 U and with a gamma spectrometry set-up to determine isotopic yields of 233 U. A new analysis method of experimental data has been developed in order to control systematics and to reduce experimental biases. For the first time, the experimental variance-covariance matrix of our measured fission yields could be deduced. (author) [fr

  2. Deciphering the iron isotope message of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczyk, Thomas; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2005-04-01

    Mass-dependent variations in isotopic composition are known since decades for the light elements such as hydrogen, carbon or oxygen. Multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and double-spike thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) permit us now to resolve small variations in isotopic composition even for the heavier elements such as iron. Recent studies on the iron isotopic composition of human blood and dietary iron sources have shown that lighter iron isotopes are enriched along the food chain and that each individual bears a certain iron isotopic signature in blood. To make use of this finding in biomedical research, underlying mechanisms of isotope fractionation by the human body need to be understood. In this paper available iron isotope data for biological samples are discussed within the context of isotope fractionation concepts and fundamental aspects of human iron metabolism. This includes evaluation of new data for body tissues which show that blood and muscle tissue have a similar iron isotopic composition while heavier iron isotopes are concentrated in the liver. This new observation is in agreement with our earlier hypothesis of a preferential absorption of lighter iron isotopes by the human body. Possible mechanisms for inducing an iron isotope effect at the cellular and molecular level during iron uptake are presented and the potential of iron isotope effects in human blood as a long-term measure of dietary iron absorption is discussed.

  3. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bett, R.; Sims, H.E.; Cuninghame, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    sup(195m)Au is separated from sup(195m)Hg in a solution containing ions of sup(195m)Hg, wherein sup(195m)Au is generated by radioactive decay of the sup(195m)Hg, by contacting the solution with an adsorbing agent to adsorb the sup(195m)Hg as Hg ++ ions followed by elution of sup(195m)Au arising from said radioactive decay. The adsorbing agent is 3-thio-2-hydroxypropyl-ether-Sepharose (R.T.M.); sup(195m)Au may be prepared in this way in a medical isotope generator and is suitable for use in gamma-scan studies of heart action. (author)

  4. Natural isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    14 C dates between 600 and 900 AD were obtained for early Iron Age sites in Natal, and from 1300 to 1450 AD for rock engraving sites in Bushmanland. Palaeoenvironmental data derived from the dating of samples related to sedimentary and geomorphic features in the central and northern Namib Desert enabled the production of a tentative graph for the changes in humidity in the region over the past 40000 years. These results suggest that relatively humid conditions came to an end in the Namib at ±25000 BP (before present). The increased precision of the SIRA mass spectrometer enabled the remeasurement of 13 C and 18 O in the Cango stalagmite. This data confirmed that the environmental temperatures in the Southern Cape remained constant to within ±1 o C during the past 5500 years. Techniques and applications for environmental isotopes in hydrology were developed to determine the origin and movement of ground water. Isotopic fractionation effects in light elements in nature were investigated. The 15 N/ 14 N ratio in bones of animals and humans increases in proportion to the aridity of the environment. This suggests that 15 N in bone from dated archaeological sites could be used to detect changes in past climatic conditions as naturally formed nitrate minerals are higly soluble and are only preserved in special, very dry environments. The sources and sinks of CO 2 on the South African subcontinent were also determined. The 13 C/ 12 C ratios of air CO 2 obtained suggest that the vegetation provides the major proportion of respired CO 2 . 9 refs., 1 fig

  5. Kinetic buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  7. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  8. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase.

  9. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase

  10. The isotopic contamination in electromagnetic isotope separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassignol, Ch.

    1959-01-01

    In the early years of isotope separation, and in particular electromagnetic isotope separation, needs for rapid results have conducted to empiric research. This paper describes fundamental research on the electromagnetic isotope separation to a better understanding of isotope separators as well as improving the performances. Focus has been made on the study of the principle of isotope contamination and the remedial action on the separator to improve the isotope separation ratio. In a first part, the author come back to the functioning of an electromagnetic separator and generalities on isotope contamination. Secondly, it describes the two stages separation method with two dispersive apparatus, an electromagnetic separation stage followed by an electrostatic separation stage, both separated by a diaphragm. The specifications of the electrostatic stage are given and its different settings and their consequences on isotope separation are investigated. In a third part, mechanisms and contamination factors in the isotope separation are discussed: natural isotope contamination, contamination by rebounding on the collector, contamination because of a low resolution, contamination by chromatism and diffusion effect, breakdown of condenser voltage. Analysis of experimental results shows the diffusion as the most important contamination factor in electromagnetic isotope separation. As contamination factors are dependent on geometric parameters, sector angle, radius of curvature in the magnetic field and clearance height are discussed in a fourth part. The better understanding of the mechanism of the different contamination factors and the study of influential parameters as pressure and geometric parameters lead to define a global scheme of isotope contamination and determinate optima separator design and experimental parameters. Finally, the global scheme of isotope contamination and hypothesis on optima specifications and experimental parameters has been checked during a

  11. Isotope and chemical tracers in groundwater hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, C.; Stewart, M.K.; Morgenstern, U.; Trompetter, V.

    1999-01-01

    The course sessions cover: session 1, Fundamentals of stable and radioactive isotopes; session 2, Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in hydrology: background, examples, sampling strategy; session 3, Catchment studies using oxygen and hydrogen isotopes: background - the hydrologic water balance, evapotranspiration - the lion's share, runoff generation - new water/old water fractions, groundwater recharge - the crumbs; session 4, Isotopes in catchment hydrology: survey of applications, future developments; session 5, Applications of tritium in hydrology: background and measurement, interpretation, examples; session 6, Case studies using mixing models: Hutt Valley groundwater system, an extended mixing model for simulating tracer transport in the unsaturated zone; session 7, Groundwater dating using CFC concentrations: background, sampling and measurement, use and applications; session 8, Groundwater dating with carbon-14: background, sampling and measurement, use and applications; session 9, NZ case studies: Tauranga warm springs, North Canterbury Plains groundwater; session 10, Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes: background and examples, biological applications of C-N-S isotopes; session 11, New developments in isotope hydrology: gas isotopes, compound specific applications, age dating of sediments etc; session 12, NZ case studies: North Canterbury Plains groundwater (continued), Waimea Plains groundwater. (author). refs., figs

  12. Effect of ecological conditions on migration of thorium isotopes isotopes in the soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuktomova, I.I.; Titaeva, N.A.; Kochan, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    Two territories (zones of central taiga and mountainous tundra) with a high natural content of thorium in soil forming rock and soil were examined in comparative analysis of fixed state and behavior of thorium isotopes ( 232 Th, 230 Th, 228 Th, 227 Th) in the soil layer and rock including evaluation and nature of distribution and forms of presence of isotopes in soil profiles; the extent of participance of isotopes in soil-forming processes is discussed and several conclusions are made regarding the role of genesis of isotopes and parameters of the migration medium for the direction and rate of migration processes. It was found that both climatic zones are characterized by the inclusion of all thorium isotopes in the biological cycle in the soil--plant systems. Characterizing as a whole the build up up thorium isotopes in all examined vegetation of the tundra, it may be noted that it is characterized by a slightly different dependence of mobility of these isotopes in comparison with the vegetation of the taiga zone. In addition, the intensity of inclusion of these thorium isotopes in the biological cycles of migration in the taiga zones is higher than in the tundra zone. 3 refs., 4 tabs

  13. Role of stable isotopes in life--testing isotopic resonance hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarev, Roman A

    2011-04-01

    Stable isotopes of most important biological elements, such as C, H, N and O, affect living organisms. In rapidly growing species, deuterium and to a lesser extent other heavy isotopes reduce the growth rate. At least for deuterium it is known that its depletion also negatively impacts the speed of biological processes. As a rule, living organisms "resist" changes in their isotopic environment, preferring natural isotopic abundances. This preference could be due to evolutionary optimization; an additional effect could be due to the presence of the "isotopic resonance". The isotopic resonance phenomenon has been linked to the choice of earliest amino acids, and thus affected the evolution of genetic code. To test the isotopic resonance hypothesis, literature data were analyzed against quantitative and qualitative predictions of the hypothesis. Four studies provided five independent datasets, each in very good quantitative agreement with the predictions. Thus, the isotopic resonance hypothesis is no longer simply plausible; it can now be deemed likely. Additional testing is needed, however, before full acceptance of this hypothesis. Copyright © 2011 Beijing Genomics Institute. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography. Application to the lithium isotopes separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this work is described the used study step to demonstrate the industrial feasibility of a lithium isotopes separation process by ion exchange chromatography. After having recalled how is carried out the exchange reaction between the lithium isotopes bound on the cations exchanger resin and those which are in solution and gave the ion exchange chromatography principle, the authors establish a model which takes into account the cascade theory already used for enriched uranium production. The size parameters of this model are: the isotopic separation factor (which depends for lithium of the ligands nature and of the coordination factor), the isotopic exchange kinetics and the mass flow (which depends of the temperature, the lithium concentration, the resins diameter and the front advance). The way they have to be optimized and the implementation of the industrial process are given. (O.M.)

  15. The biological behaviour of inhaled transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.

    1979-01-01

    The biological behaviour of inhaled transuranic elements has been reviewed by focus on different points of present interest. Lung clearance and translocation are largely affected by the chemistry of transuranic elements. However, especially for plutonium, some examples show that the kinetics of some chemical reactions are function of the element concentration: extrapolation to the biological concentrations must therefore be cautious. The importance of the specific activity is stressed by different behaviours of plutonium 238 and 239 oxides. In the case of 238 Pu, it is responsible of the fast dissolution of the oxide by formation of nanometric particles. Whatever the isotopes, these particules have a particularly important function since their biological fate seems to disturb the established models. Their origin is still to be determined since they have been identified both in the combustion of Pu-Na or Pu-Mg simultaneously, and plutonium only. The bronchial clearance of micronic particles does not seem to be fast for the whole of the fraction cleared. A residual compartment, indeed low, will remain at the level of the bronchial epithelium for a rather long time. This must be taken into account by dosimetric evaluations at the cellular levels. In spite of the few restrictions stated, the body of knowledge makes a fair estimation of risks possible [fr

  16. Integrated biological, chemical and physical processes kinetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A difficulty in calibrating this model is selection of the kLA value for the aeration system, which affects the pH in the anoxic and aerobic reactors through CO2 gas exchange. Aerobic reactor outflows from two full-scale wastewater treatment plants with fine bubble aeration systems were found to be around 20% supersaturated ...

  17. Epinephrine kinetics in humans: Radiotracer methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, S.G.; Linares, O.A.; Sanfield, J.A.; Zech, L.A.; Lizzio, V.P.; Halter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The use of the plasma epinephrine (EPI) level as an index of adrenomedullary activity in humans is complicated by the rapid removal of EPI from plasma by many tissues. To determine whether the kinetics of distribution and metabolism of EPI could be best quantified using the isotope dilution method or a mathematical modeling technique, eight human subjects received a [ 3 H]EPI infusion for 50-60 min. Analysis of the steady state arterialized plasma levels of EPI and [ 3 H]EPI using the isotope dilution technique showed that the basal plasma EPI appearance rate is 0.87 ± 0.11 nmol/m2.min, and the basal plasma EPI clearance rate is 1.63 ± 0.14 L/min.m2. Mathematical modeling of the [ 3 H]EPI levels revealed that a biexponential curve fit was superior to monoexponential and triexponential curve fits. A two-compartment model was the minimal compartment model that accurately described EPI kinetics. The basal plasma EPI appearance (0.82 ± 0.16 nmol/m2.min) and EPI clearance (1.67 ± 0.15 L/min.m2) rates that were estimated from this two-compartment model are similar to the results derived from the isotope dilution method. Mathematical modeling revealed a large extravascular mass of EPI. We conclude that the isotope dilution and mathematical modeling techniques similarly describe plasma EPI kinetics in humans. Kinetic analysis using mathematical modeling provides new insights into adrenomedullary function in humans

  18. Separation of hydrogen isotopes via single column pressure swing adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.W.; Hill, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Separation of hydrogen isotopes based on kinetic isotope effects was studied. The mixture separated was hydrogen containing a trace of tritium as HT and the hydride was vanadium monohydride. The separation was achieved using the single-column pressure swing process. Stage separation factors are larger and product cuts smaller than for a two-column pressure swing process operated in the same monohydride phase

  19. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between (/sup 14/C)NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols.

  20. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  1. Molybdenum isotope fractionation by cyanobacterial assimilation during nitrate utilization and N₂ fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, A L; Scheiderich, K; Maresca, J A; Liermann, L J; Brantley, S L

    2011-01-01

    We measured the δ⁹⁸Mo of cells and media from molybdenum (Mo) assimilation experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, grown with nitrate as a nitrogen (N) source or fixing atmospheric N₂. This organism uses a Mo-based nitrate reductase during nitrate utilization and a Mo-based dinitrogenase during N₂ fixation under culture conditions here. We also demonstrate that it has a high-affinity Mo uptake system (ModABC) similar to other cyanobacteria, including marine N₂-fixing strains. Anabaena variabilis preferentially assimilated light isotopes of Mo in all experiments, resulting in fractionations of -0.2‰ to -1.0‰ ± 0.2‰ between cells and media (ε(cells-media)), extending the range of biological Mo fractionations previously reported. The fractionations were internally consistent within experiments, but varied with the N source utilized and for different growth phases sampled. During growth on nitrate, A. variabilis consistently produced fractionations of -0.3 ± 0.1‰ (mean ± standard deviation between experiments). When fixing N₂, A. variabilis produced fractionations of -0.9 ± 0.1‰ during exponential growth, and -0.5 ± 0.1‰ during stationary phase. This pattern is inconsistent with a simple kinetic isotope effect associated with Mo transport, because Mo is likely transported through the ModABC uptake system under all conditions studied. We present a reaction network model for Mo isotope fractionation that demonstrates how Mo transport and storage, coordination changes during enzymatic incorporation, and the distribution of Mo inside the cell could all contribute to the total biological fractionations. Additionally, we discuss the potential importance of biologically incorporated Mo to organic matter-bound Mo in marine sediments. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Molybdenum isotope fractionation by cyanobacterial assimilation during nitrate utilization and N2fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, A L; Scheiderich, K; Maresca, J A; Liermann, L J; Brantley, S L

    2011-01-01

    We measured the δ98Mo of cells and media from molybdenum (Mo) assimilation experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, grown with nitrate as a nitrogen (N) source or fixing atmospheric N2. This organism uses a Mo-based nitrate reductase during nitrate utilization and a Mo-based dinitrogenase during N2 fixation under culture conditions here. We also demonstrate that it has a high-affinity Mo uptake system (ModABC) similar to other cyanobacteria, including marine N2-fixing strains. Anabaena variabilis preferentially assimilated light isotopes of Mo in all experiments, resulting in fractionations of −0.2‰ to −1.0‰ ± 0.2‰ between cells and media (εcells–media), extending the range of biological Mo fractionations previously reported. The fractionations were internally consistent within experiments, but varied with the N source utilized and for different growth phases sampled. During growth on nitrate, A. variabilis consistently produced fractionations of −0.3 ± 0.1‰ (mean ± standard deviation between experiments). When fixing N2, A. variabilis produced fractionations of −0.9 ± 0.1‰ during exponential growth, and −0.5 ± 0.1‰ during stationary phase. This pattern is inconsistent with a simple kinetic isotope effect associated with Mo transport, because Mo is likely transported through the ModABC uptake system under all conditions studied. We present a reaction network model for Mo isotope fractionation that demonstrates how Mo transport and storage, coordination changes during enzymatic incorporation, and the distribution of Mo inside the cell could all contribute to the total biological fractionations. Additionally, we discuss the potential importance of biologically incorporated Mo to organic matter-bound Mo in marine sediments. PMID:21092069

  3. Simultaneous analysis of (13)C-glutathione as its dimeric form GSSG and its precursor [1-(13)C]glycine using liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schierbeek, Henk; Rook, Denise; te Braake, Frans W. J.; Dorst, Kristien Y.; Voortman, Gardi; Godin, Jean-Philippe; Fay, Laurent-Bernard; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2009-01-01

    Determination of glutathione kinetics using stable isotopes requires accurate measurement of the tracers and tracees. Previously, the precursor and synthesized product were measured with two separate techniques, liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) and gas

  4. Global Cr-isotope distributions in surface seawater and incorporation of Cr isotopes into carbonate shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie; Frei, Robert; Vögelin, Andrea Regula

    In this study we present the Cr-isotope composition of surface seawater from several locations worldwide. In addition to the samples from the oceans (Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Southern Ocean and Artic Ocean) we analysed water samples from areas with a more limited water exchange (Mediterranean...... Sea, Baltic Sea, Øresund and Kattegat). The long residence time of Cr (7,000 to 40,000 years) [1,2,3] relative to the ocean mixing time (1,000 to 2,000 years) [4] could lead to the expectation that the Cr concentration and Cr-isotope distribution are homogeneous in the oceans. However, our seawater...... observed a negative correlation between the Cr-isotope composition and the Cr concentration. Exceptions are samples from the Baltic Sea/Øresund, which are isotopically light despite low Cr concentrations (~0.1-0.2 ppb). In addition to the seawater data, we measured Cr isotopes in modern biologically...

  5. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...... interaction is responsible for the effect. Our calculations provide support for the proposed mechanism....

  6. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Uses of isotope effects in the study of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, D B

    2001-06-01

    There have been few recent additions to the technical methods employed in the study of isotope effects, notable exceptions being the use of high pressure as an experimental variable and the measurement of heavy-atom isotope effects on maximal velocities using continuous-flow techniques. Most of the innovations are in the realm of new experimental designs that allow the asking of new questions. These designs include the use of isotope effects to: determine kinetic mechanisms, distinguish between changes in enzymatic activity and loss of active enzyme, distinguish between reactant-state origins and transition-state origins and quantify hydrogen tunneling, separate and quantify multiple origins of solvent isotope effects, distinguish between concerted and stepwise chemical mechanisms, characterize bond order changes in ligand binding, distinguish different pathways of inhibitor binding, and estimate intrinsic isotope effects. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. SHELL ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE LAND SNAIL LIMICOLARIA KAMBEUL CHUDEAUI GERMAIN. IN THE ETHIOPIAN RIFT VALLEY: HABITAT, ECOLOGY AND. SHELL ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY. Melanie J. Lengl, Henry F. Lamb',. Mohammed Umer Mohammed''* and Elias Dadebo4. 'NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Keyworth, Nottingham, ...

  9. Endogenous surfactant metabolism in critically ill infants measured with stable isotope labeled fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cogo, PE; Carnielli, VP; Bunt, JEH; Badon, T; Giordano, G; Zacchello, F; Sauer, PJJ; Zimmermann, LJI

    Little is known about endogenous surfactant metabolism in infants, because radioactive isotopes used for this purpose in animals cannot be used in humans. We developed a novel and safe method to measure the endogenous surfactant kinetics in vivo in humans by using stable isotope labeled fatty acids.

  10. Intramolecular distribution of carbon isotopes in fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Unruh, G.E.; Hayes, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    It is well known that biochemical reactions fractionate the stable isotopes of carbon, distributing them unevenly among their products. For amino acids and biosynthesized acetate, it has been shown that the isotopes are fractionated on an intramolecular basis, with some carbon positions being enriched in 13 C relative to others. With the goal of eventually determining the extent to which the isotopic distribution pattern in acetate is carried over into alkyl chains, we are working to develop methods for determining isotopic distributions within fatty acids. Because there are no purely instrumental approaches with sufficient precision to allow isotopic measurements on the intact fatty acid, chemical degradation must be applied in order to prepare CO 2 from each position of interest. Kinetic isotope effects during the chemical reactions and vapor pressure isotope effects during sample preparation and handling can significantly affect the results, and must be very carefully controlled and investigated. Thus far, suitable methods have been developed for determination of the isotopic composition of the carboxyl carbon in fatty acids. The isotopic composition of the aliphatic portion of the molecule can then be determined by the difference after the overall 13 C content has been determined by combustion

  11. Thermodynamically Feasible Kinetic Models of Reaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ederer, Michael; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of biological reaction networks are strongly constrained by thermodynamics. An holistic understanding of their behavior and regulation requires mathematical models that observe these constraints. However, kinetic models may easily violate the constraints imposed by the principle of detailed balance, if no special care is taken. Detailed balance demands that in thermodynamic equilibrium all fluxes vanish. We introduce a thermodynamic-kinetic modeling (TKM) formalism that adapts th...

  12. Disorders of cell kinetics and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Yalçin; Dolar, Neslihan; Keskin, Sadiye; Wolf, Ronni

    2007-10-01

    The kinetics of cells, keratin, and lipids in the skin could provide useful information about skin biology in health and disease. The kinetics of skin cell turnover are of interest for a variety of physiologic and pathologic conditions. There are also uncertainties regarding the extent of keratinocyte turnover in various skin diseases. Hyperproliferation may represent a risk factor for skin cancer and occurs in physiologic conditions such as wound healing.

  13. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Walker, P.M.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Evans, D.E.; Grant, I.S.; England, J.G.; Fawcett, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144 Sm and 154 Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  14. A Teaching Exercise to Introduce Stable Isotope Fractionation of Metals into Geochemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dominik J.; Harris, Caroline; Maher, Kate; Bullen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the isotopic composition of elements have been widely used to study earth's climate, biosphere, and interior, and more recently to track the fate of contaminants. Within the broad range of elements that exhibit measureable isotopic variations, metal stable isotopes are increasingly applied across the biological, geological,…

  15. Systems Biology of Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2017-06-20

    Metabolism is highly complex and involves thousands of different connected reactions; it is therefore necessary to use mathematical models for holistic studies. The use of mathematical models in biology is referred to as systems biology. In this review, the principles of systems biology are described, and two different types of mathematical models used for studying metabolism are discussed: kinetic models and genome-scale metabolic models. The use of different omics technologies, including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and fluxomics, for studying metabolism is presented. Finally, the application of systems biology for analyzing global regulatory structures, engineering the metabolism of cell factories, and analyzing human diseases is discussed.

  16. Carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotope effects in the decarboxylation of nicotinic acid of natural isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Zielinska, A.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; McKenzie, J.A.; Bernasconi, S.; Paul, H.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotope effects in the decarboxylation of nicotinic acid of natural isotopic composition above and below its melting temperature have been studied and compared with the primary (PKIE) and secondary kinetic isotope effects (SKIE) of 13 C and 18 O, respectively, in the decarboxylation of other heterocyclic acids. The temperature dependence of the secondary oxygen-18 isotope effects is negative in the total 221-255 deg C temperature interval investigated initially. The 13 C KIE measured above melting point of N.A. (temperature interval 235-270 deg C) are located in the range 1.007-1.009. Below melting point of nicotinic acid the 13 C KIE are larger and reveal the negative temperature dependence ( 13 C KIE decreases with decreasing the reaction temperature from 1.013/at 230 deg C to 1.0114/at 221 deg C). A discussion of the above isotopic results is presented. (author)

  17. Isotopic studies in soil and plant nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasricha, N.S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important peaceful applications of isotopes is in research for the enhancement of our understanding for increased crop production and better management of resources with higher economic efficiency and environmental safety. Nuclear techniques helped in generating useful information on such aspects as use-efficiency of fertilizer nutrients, quantifying their losses from soil and their biological transformations. Such information was, hitherto, obtained indirectly by conventional methods. Radio and stable isotopes have also been successfully employed for getting information in such diverse fields as soil erosion, turnover of soil organic matter, pesticide retention in soil ground water recharge etc. The property of 137 Cs adhering tightly to certain exchange surface in soil and its chemically inert nature has made it a useful tool for soil erosion studies. In this paper, applications of isotopes in the research and other such studies as degradation, movement and retention of pesticides, movement of nitrate in soil, biological and ammoniacal nitrogen fixation in soil is discussed

  18. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M.E.; Krol, M.C.; Hofmann, M.E.G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of

  19. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  20. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...

  1. Position-specific carbon isotope analysis of trichloroacetic acid by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breider, Florian; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2011-12-30

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is an important environmental contaminant present in soils, water and plants. A method for determining the carbon isotope signature of the trichloromethyl position in TCAA using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) was developed and tested with TCAA from different origins. Position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA) can provide direct information on the kinetic isotope effect for isotope substitution at a specific position in the molecule and/or help to distinguish different sources of a compound. The method is based on the degradation of TCAA into chloroform (CF) and CO₂ by thermal decarboxylation. Since thermal decarboxylation is associated with strong carbon isotope fractionation (ε = -34.6 ± 0.2‰) the reaction conditions were optimized to ensure full conversion. The combined isotope ratio of CF and CO₂ at the end of the reaction corresponded well to the isotope ratio of TCAA, confirming the reliability of the method. A method quantification limit (MQL) for TCAA of 18.6 µg/L was determined. Samples of TCAA produced by enzymatic and non-enzymatic chlorination of natural organic matter (NOM) and some industrially produced TCAA were used as exemplary sources. Significant different PSIA isotope ratios were observed between industrial TCAA and TCAA samples produced by chlorination of NOM. This highlights the potential of the method to study the origin and the fate of TCAA in the environment.

  2. Transient processes in cell proliferation kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, Andrej Yu

    1989-01-01

    A mathematician who has taken the romantic decision to devote himself to biology will doubtlessly look upon cell kinetics as the most simple and natural field of application for his knowledge and skills. Indeed, the thesaurus he is to master is not so complicated as, say, in molecular biology, the structural elements of the system, i. e. ceils, have been segregated by Nature itself, simple considerations of balance may be used for deducing basic equations, and numerous analogies in other areas of science also superficial add to one"s confidence. Generally speaking, this number of impression is correct, as evidenced by the very great theoretical studies on population kinetics, unmatched in other branches of mathematical biology. This, however, does not mean that mathematical theory of cell systems has traversed in its development a pathway free of difficulties or errors. The seeming ease of formalizing the phenomena of cell kinetics not infrequently led to the appearance of mathematical models lacking in adequ...

  3. Biological radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Ioan; Titescu, Gheorghe; Tamaian, Radu; Haulica, Ion; Bild, Walther

    2002-01-01

    According to the patent description, the biological radioprotector is deuterium depleted water, DDW, produced by vacuum distillation with an isotopic content lower than natural value. It appears as such or in a mixture with natural water and carbon dioxide. It can be used for preventing and reducing the ionizing radiation effects upon humans or animal organisms, exposed therapeutically, professionally or accidentally to radiation. The most significant advantage of using DDW as biological radioprotector results from its way of administration. Indeed no one of the radioprotectors currently used today can be orally administrated, what reduces the patients' compliance to prophylactic administrations. The biological radioprotector is an unnoxious product obtained from natural water, which can be administrated as food additive instead of drinking water. Dose modification factor is according to initial estimates around 1.9, what is a remarkable feature when one takes into account that the product is toxicity-free and side effect-free and can be administrated prophylactically as a food additive. A net radioprotective action of the deuterium depletion was evidenced experimentally in laboratory animals (rats) hydrated with DDW of 30 ppm D/(D+H) concentration as compared with normally hydrated control animals. Knowing the effects of irradiation and mechanisms of the acute radiation disease as well as the effects of administration of radiomimetic chemicals upon cellular lines of fast cell division, it appears that the effects of administrating DDW result from stimulation of the immunity system. In conclusion, the biological radioprotector DDW presents the following advantages: - it is obtained from natural products without toxicity; - it is easy to be administrated as a food additive, replacing the drinking water; - besides radioprotective effects, the product has also immunostimulative and antitumoral effects

  4. Steady-state analysis of enzymes with non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics: The transport mechanism of Na+/K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, José L E; Montes, Mónica R; Rossi, Rolando C

    2018-01-26

    Procedures to define kinetic mechanisms from catalytic activity measurements that obey the Michaelis-Menten equation are well established. In contrast, analytical tools for enzymes displaying non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics are underdeveloped, and transient-state measurements, when feasible, are therefore preferred in kinetic studies. Of note, transient-state determinations evaluate only partial reactions, and these might not participate in the reaction cycle. Here, we provide a general procedure to characterize kinetic mechanisms from steady-state determinations. We described non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics with equations containing parameters equivalent to k cat and K m and modeled the underlying mechanism by an approach similar to that used under Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The procedure enabled us to evaluate whether Na + /K + -ATPase uses the same sites to alternatively transport Na + and K + This ping-pong mechanism is supported by transient-state studies but contradicted to date by steady-state analyses claiming that the release of one cationic species as product requires the binding of the other ( ternary-complex mechanism). To derive robust conclusions about the Na + /K + -ATPase transport mechanism, we did not rely on ATPase activity measurements alone. During the catalytic cycle, the transported cations become transitorily occluded ( i.e. trapped within the enzyme). We employed radioactive isotopes to quantify occluded cations under steady-state conditions. We replaced K + with Rb + because 42 K + has a short half-life, and previous studies showed that K + - and Rb + -occluded reaction intermediates are similar. We derived conclusions regarding the rate of Rb + deocclusion that were verified by direct measurements. Our results validated the ping-pong mechanism and proved that Rb + deocclusion is accelerated when Na + binds to an allosteric, nonspecific site, leading to a 2-fold increase in ATPase activity. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and

  5. Oxygen isotope fractionation in double carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Böttcher, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in double carbonates of different crystal structures were calculated by the increment method. Synthesis experiments were performed at 60 °C and 100 °C to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionations involving PbMg[CO3]2. The calculations suggest that the double carbonates of calcite structure are systematically enriched in (18)O relative to those of aragonite and mixture structures. Internally consistent oxygen isotope fractionation factors are obtained for these minerals with respect to quartz, calcite and water at a temperature range of 0-1200 °C. The calculated fractionation factors for double carbonate-water systems are generally consistent with the data available from laboratory experiments. The experimentally determined fractionation factors for PbMg[CO3]2, BaMg[CO3]2 and CaMg[CO3]2 against H2O not only fall between fractionation factors involving pure carbonate end-members but are also close to the calculated fractionation factors. In contrast, experimentally determined carbon isotope fractionation factors between PbMg[CO3]2 and CO2 are much closer to theoretical predictions for the cerussite-CO2 system than for the magnesite-CO2 system, similar to the fractionation behavior for BaMg[CO3]2. Therefore, the combined theoretical and experimental results provide insights into the effects of crystal structure and exchange kinetics on oxygen isotope partitioning in double carbonates.

  6. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wankel, Scott David [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Buchwald, Carolyn [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Hansel, Colleen [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States)

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  7. Chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and the interpretation of in vivo processes - Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, R.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review of thermodynamic and kinetic concepts, the relationships between thermodynamic and kinetic information and the limitations of these concepts when confronted with the problems of biochemical processes and biological evaluation at the molecular level are presented [pt

  8. A KINETIC STUDY OF THE PHOTOCHEMICAL ADDITION OF PHENANTHRENEQUINONE TO OLEFINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed kinetic study of the photochemical addition of phenanthrenequinone to olefins has been made using an apparatus which permits the...Additional kinetic results include the absence of quenching by oxygen at high olefin- phenanthrenequinone ratios, a small secondary deuterium isotope

  9. Lake Louise Water (USGS47): A new isotopic reference water for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haiping; Lorenz, Jennifer M.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Tarbox, Lauren V.; Mayer, Bernhard; Taylor, Steve

    2014-01-01

    "RATIONALE: Because of the paucity of isotopic reference waters for daily use, a new secondary isotopic reference material has been prepared from Lake Louise water from Alberta, Canada for international distribution. MOTHODS: This water was filtered, homogenized, loaded into glass ampoules, sealed with a torch, autoclaved to eliminate biological activity, and measured by dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. This isotopic reference water is available by the case of 144 glass ampoules containing 5 mL of water in each ampoule.

  10. Secondary hydrogen isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melander, L.; Sonders, U.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary isotope effects can be produced by isotopes of elements heavier than hydrogen, but secondary isotope effects of hydrogen are of greater interest, because they are larger and can be measured easier. Such aspects of the problem as solvolytic reactions (in the case of α-position and β-position in organic compounds), reactions of compounds with deuterium remoted from reaction centre, with deuterium in nonsaturated compounds, participation of neighbouring groups in the reaction, are considered. Besides, steric isotope effects and inductive isotope effects are considered

  11. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of aliphatic primary alcohols by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The reaction is catalysed by hydrogen ions. The hydrogen-ion dependence has the form: obs = + [H+]. The oxidation of [1,1-2H2]ethanol (MeCD2OH) exhibits a substantial primary kinetic isotope effect. The reaction has been studied in nineteen different organic solvents. The solvent effect was analysed using Taft's ...

  13. Oxygen surface exchange kinetics of erbia-stabilized bismuth oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, C.-Y.; Boukamp, Bernard A.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The surface oxygen exchange kinetics of bismuth oxide stabilized with 25 mol% erbia (BE25) has been studied in the temperature and pO2 ranges 773–1,023 K and 0.1– 0.95 atm, respectively, using pulse-response 18O–16O isotope exchange measurements. The results indicate that BE25 exhibits a

  14. Methodology for the Validation of Isotopic Analyses by Mass Spectrometry in Stable-Isotope Labeling Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Cahoreau, Edern; Letisse, Fabien; Millard, Pierre; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2018-02-06

    Stable-isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) are widely used to investigate the topology and operation of metabolic networks. The quality of isotopic data collected in ILEs is of utmost importance to ensure reliable biological interpretations, but current evaluation approaches are limited due to a lack of suitable reference material and relevant evaluation criteria. In this work, we present a complete methodology to evaluate mass spectrometry (MS) methods used for quantitative isotopic studies of metabolic systems. This methodology, based on a biological sample containing metabolites with controlled labeling patterns, exploits different quality metrics specific to isotopic analyses (accuracy and precision of isotopologue masses, abundances, and mass shifts and isotopic working range). We applied this methodology to evaluate a novel LC-MS method for the analysis of amino acids, which was tested on high resolution (Orbitrap operating in full scan mode) and low resolution (triple quadrupole operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode) mass spectrometers. Results show excellent accuracy and precision over a large working range and revealed matrix-specific as well as mode-specific characteristics. The proposed methodology can identify reliable (and unreliable) isotopic data in an easy and straightforward way and efficiently supports the identification of sources of systematic biases as well as of the main factors that influence the overall accuracy and precision of measurements. This approach is generic and can be used to validate isotopic analyses on different matrices, analytical platforms, labeled elements, or classes of metabolites. It is expected to strengthen the reliability of isotopic measurements and thereby the biological value of ILEs.

  15. Hydrogen and chlorine isotope exchange in hydrogen dichloride ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szydlowski, J.; Ratajska, W.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of deuterium and chlorine-36 isotope exchange between hydrogen dichloride ions in tetramethyl- and tetraethyl-ammonium salts and hydrogen chloride was studied in the temperature range of 275-304 K. On the basis of the results obtained the exchange mechanism was proposed emphasizing the role of hydrogen bonding in the exchange process. (author)

  16. Kinetic Consequences of Chemisorbed Oxygen Atoms during Methane Oxidation on Group VIII Metal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Ya Huei

    2011-01-01

    Molecular insights and the kinetic relevance of reaction elementary steps for methane activation on Group VIII metal and oxide clusters are established based on kinetic, isotopic, and theoretical assessments. These fundamental understandings enable accurate prediction of complex rate dependencies and cluster size effects during methane conversion reactions in catalytic partial oxidation, reforming, and combustion processes.Kinetics of methane reactions with oxygen are described by several reg...

  17. Investigation of the kinetics and mechanism of the dehydrogenation of isobutane on platinum-tin catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lok, L.K.; Gaidai, N.A.; Gudkov, B.S.; Kiperman, S.L.; Kogan, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the kinetics and mechanism for the dehydrogenation of isobutane on platinum-tin catalysts having different tin concentrations. It has been shown that the maximum activity is possessed by a catalyst containing 2% tin. On this catalyst the kinetic isotopic effect has been measured, in which the hydrogen was replaced by deuterium and the isotopic distribution has been measured for the exchange products between isobutane, isobutylene and deuterium. A stagewise system for the mechanism of the process and kinetic equations, proposed previously for the reaction on platinum and platinum-indium catalysts are fully applicable also to reactions on catalysts containing tin

  18. Investigation of the kinetics and mechanism of the dehydrogenation of isobutane on platinum and platinum-indium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loc, L.K.; Gaidai, N.A.; Gudkov, B.S.; Kostyukovskii, M.M.; Kiperman, S.L.; Podkletnova, N.M.; Kogan, S.B.; Bursian, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of isobutane dehydrogenation on platinum and platinum-indium catalysts have been investigated. The kinetic isotopic effects have been measured during exchange of hydrogen by deuterium in reactions for isobutane dehydrogenation and isobutylene hydrogenation, and the isotopic distribution has been studied for exchange of isobutane and isobutylene with deuterium. A kinetic equation has been proposed for isobutane dehydrogenation, describing the experimental data over wide ranges of reagent concentration and degree of conversion. A stagewise scheme for the reaction mechanism has been substantiated, from which a kinetic equation results which is in accordance with experimental data

  19. NOx cycle and tropospheric ozone isotope anomaly: an experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, G.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Girsch, G.

    2013-04-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the atmosphere may be a useful tool for understanding the oxidation of NOx into nitric acid/nitrate in the atmosphere. A set of experiments were conducted to examine changes in isotopic composition of NOx due to O3-NOx photochemical cycling. At low NO2/O2 mixing ratios, NO2 becomes progressively and nearly equally enriched in 17O and 18O over time until it reaches a steady state with Δ17O values of 40.6 ± 1.9‰ and δ18O values of 84.2 ± 4‰, relative to the isotopic composition of the O2 gas. As the mixing ratio increases, isotopic exchange between O atoms and O2 and NOx suppresses the isotopic enrichments. A kinetic model simulating the observed data shows that the isotope effects during ozone formation play a more dominant role compared to kinetic isotope effects during NO oxidation or exchange of NO2. The model results are consistent with the data when the NO + O3 reaction occurs mainly via the transfer of the terminal atom of O3. The model predicts that under tropospheric concentrations of the three reactants, the timescale of NOx isotopic equilibrium ranges from hours (ppbv mixing ratios) to days/weeks (pptv) and yields steady state Δ17O and δ18O values of 46‰ and 115‰ respectively with respect to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water. Interpretation of tropospheric nitrate isotope data can now be done with the derived rate coefficients of the major isotopologue reactions at various pressures.

  20. Biologically mediated dissolution of volcanic glass in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudigel, H.; Chastain, R.A.; Yayanos, A.; Davies, G.R.; Verdurmen, E.; Schiffman, P.; Bourcier, R.; de Baar, H.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effects of biological mediation on the dissolution of basaltic glass in seawater. Experiments with typical seawater microbial populations were contrasted with a sterile control, and reactions were monitored chemically and isotopically. Biologically mediated experiments produce twice

  1. Methods of nonlinear kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Gorban, A. N.; Karlin, I. V.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear kinetic equations are reviewed for a wide audience of specialists and postgraduate students in physics, mathematical physics, material science, chemical engineering and interdisciplinary research. Contents: The Boltzmann equation, Phenomenology and Quasi-chemical representation of the Boltzmann equation, Kinetic models, Discrete velocity models, Direct simulation, Lattice Gas and Lattice Boltzmann models, Minimal Boltzmann models for flows at low Knudsen number, Other kinetic equati...

  2. Kinetic mechanism of DNA polymerase I (Klenow)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchta, R.D.; Mizrahi, V.; Benkovic, P.A.; Johnson, K.A.; Benkovic, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The minimal kinetic scheme for DNA polymerization catalyzed by the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (KF) from Escherichia coli has been determined with short DNA oligomers of defined sequence, labeled with [ 32 P]-nucleotides. A key feature of this scheme is a minimal two-step sequence that interconverts the ternary KF-DNA/sub n/-dNTP and KF-DNA/sub n+1/-PP/sub i/ complexes. The rate is not limited by the actual polymerization but by a separate step, possibly important in ensuring fidelity. Evidence for this sequence is supplied by the observation of biphasic kinetics in single-turnover pyrophosphorolysis experiments (the microscopic reverse of polymerization). Data analysis then provides an estimate of the internal equilibrium constant. The dissociations of DNA, dNTP, and PP/sub i/ from the various binary and ternary complexes were measured by partitioning (isotope-trapping) experiments. The rate constant for DNA dissociation from KF is sequence dependent and is rate limiting during nonprocessive DNA synthesis. The combination of single-turnover (both directions) and isotope-trapping experiments provides sufficient information to permit a quantitative evaluation of the kinetic scheme for specific DNA sequences

  3. Validation of systems biology models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasdemir, D.

    2015-01-01

    The paradigm shift from qualitative to quantitative analysis of biological systems brought a substantial number of modeling approaches to the stage of molecular biology research. These include but certainly are not limited to nonlinear kinetic models, static network models and models obtained by the

  4. Predictions and Verification of an Isotope Marine Boundary Layer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Posmentier, E. S.; Sonder, L. J.; Fan, N.

    2017-12-01

    A one-dimensional (1D), steady state isotope marine boundary layer (IMBL) model is constructed. The model includes meteorologically important features absent in Craig and Gordon type models, namely height-dependent diffusion/mixing and convergence of subsiding external air. Kinetic isotopic fractionation results from this height-dependent diffusion which starts as pure molecular diffusion at the air-water interface and increases linearly with height due to turbulent mixing. The convergence permits dry, isotopically depleted air subsiding adjacent to the model column to mix into ambient air. In δD-δ18O space, the model results fill a quadrilateral, of which three sides represent 1) vapor in equilibrium with various sea surface temperatures (SSTs) (high d18O boundary of quadrilateral); 2) mixture of vapor in equilibrium with seawater and vapor in the subsiding air (lower boundary depleted in both D and 18O); and 3) vapor that has experienced the maximum possible kinetic fractionation (high δD upper boundary). The results can be plotted in d-excess vs. δ18O space, indicating that these processes all cause variations in d-excess of MBL vapor. In particular, due to relatively high d-excess in the descending air, mixing of this air into the MBL causes an increase in d-excess, even without kinetic isotope fractionation. The model is tested by comparison with seven datasets of marine vapor isotopic ratios, with excellent correspondence; >95% of observational data fall within the quadrilateral area predicted by the model. The distribution of observations also highlights the significant influence of vapor from the nearby converging descending air on isotopic variations in the MBL. At least three factors may explain the affect the isotopic composition of precipitation. The model can be applied to modern as well as paleo- climate conditions.

  5. Isotope enrichment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spevak, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides a system in which both phases of the countercurrent contact isotope exchange concentration process are recycled continuously and an isotope depleted liquid phase substance thereof has its prior content of the desired isotope of hydrogen and/or oxygen replenished in an isotope regenerator by direct contact isotope exchange with a flow of steam from a source external to the concentrating process, whereby such replenished liquid serves as the feed liquid for the concentration process. As the supply of steam is gaseous, all problems incident to mineral solids in solution in liquid water are eliminated. As the elevated temperature corresponds to that of the steam, the isotope replenishment of the process feed liquid may be conducted without materially altering the characteristics of the steam for use as an energy source in any system

  6. Process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emile, B.F.M.

    1983-11-01

    A process is claimed for isotopic separation applied to isotopes of elements that can be placed in at least a physicochemical form in which the isotopic atoms or the molecules containing these atoms can be easily displaced and for which there are selective radiations preferentially absorbed by the isotopes of a certain type or by the molecules containing them, said absorption substantially increasing the probability of ionization of said atoms or molecules relative to the atoms or molecules that did not absorb the radiation. The process consists of placing the isotopic mixture in such a form, subjecting it in a separation zone to selective radiations and to an electrical field that produces migration of positive ions toward the negative electrodes and negative ions toward the positive electrodes, and withdrawing from certain such zones the fractions thus enriched in certain isotopes

  7. Sulfur isotope separation by dissociative electron attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.E. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is proposed for isotope separation in polyatomic molecules. In this method a laser is tuned to selectively excite a vibration mode of the molecules which contain the isotope to be removed. Before deactivation can occur, an electron is attached, resulting in an excited negative ion. Under the proper conditions this ion may dissociate, producing fragments which can be removed chemically. This technique is particularly suited to isotope separation in SF 6 . Potential energy curves are developed for this molecule to aid in explaining the mechanism of dissociative electron attachment. These curves incorporate much of the information known about attachment of electrons to SF 6 and represent an improvement over previously published curves. A rough estimate of the effectiveness of this method is made, based upon the temperature-dependent branching ratio for SF 5 - and SF 6 - . The calculations indicate that the fractional 34 S content in a sample of processed SF 6 may increase 4760 times the content in a natural sample. A kinetics model is presented to describe the attachment of electrons to SF 6 . Numerical solutions of the appropriate rate equations indicate that application of the proposed technique to SF 6 will require a low pressure environment and a large number of zero energy electrons. A simple theory is developed to determine threshold intensities for laser-induced dissociation on the basis of experimentally measurable quantities, the total laser power and the reaction volume. Using the focused beam method, a series of experiments performed to separate isotopes in SF 6 establishes a value of 6.0 MW/cm 2 for the threshold intensity. This eliminates dissociative electron attachment as an explanation of isotope separation by the focused beam method, but does not exclude it as a viable technique for separating isotopes

  8. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The instant invention relates to a process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in said material. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by selective dissociation of said excited molecules by the absorption of a single photon of visible or ultraviolet light. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium. 11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures

  9. The behavior of molybdenum and its isotopes across the chemocline and in the sediments of sulfidic Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Tais Wittchen; Anbar, Ariel; Gordon, Gwyneth

    2010-01-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) isotope studies in black shales can provide information about the redox evolution of the Earth’s oceans, provided the isotopic consequences of Mo burial into its major sinks are well understood. Previous applications of the Mo isotope paleo-ocean redox proxy assumed quantitative...... in the water column, despite the high sulfide concentrations, because the rate of Mo removal is fast compared to the slow reaction kinetics of thiomolybdate formation. However, elemental and isotopic mass balances show that Mo is indeed quantitatively removed to the lake sediments and thus the isotopic...

  10. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  11. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  12. Biomolecular tracing using long-lived isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Frantz, C.E.; Keating, G.; Felton, J.S.; Southon, J.R.; Roberts, M.R.; Gledhill, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was developed over the past 15 years as an essential tool for detecting long-lived, cosmogenic radio-isotopes in the earth and space sciences. We apply this technology to the measurement of chemical kinetics, primarily in biomedical systems, which had heretofore employed short-lived isotopes and/or long counting times to quantify radio-isotopic labels. AMS provides detection efficiencies of ∼ 1%, 10 3 to 10 6 better than decay-counting. Long-lived isotopes are used and detected with AMS at concentrations which reduce sample size, chemical dose, radiation safety hazards and radiolysis. We measure 3 H, 7,1O Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 CI, 41 Ca and 129 I, but most of our current program uses 14 C. Initial experiments involved research on the genotoxicity of mutagens in cooked foods and reversible binding of compounds to antibodies. Through collaborations, we apply AMS detection to research in carcinogenesis, pharmacokinetics of toxins, elemental metabolism, distribution of topical medications and nutrition

  13. Sulfur isotope in nature. Determination of sulfur isotope ratios in coal and petroleum by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derda, M.

    1999-01-01

    Elementary sulfur or in chemical compounds is one of the elements widespread in the earth's crust and biosphere. Its participation in earth's crust amounts to 0.26 % by weight. Measurement of isotope composition of natural samples can deliver many information about origin, creation and transformation ranges of rocks and minerals. Sulfur isotope ratio contained in minerals is variable and for this reason investigation of isotope sulfur composition can deliver useful information about the geochemistry of each component. Therefore in the investigated sample it is necessary to determine not only the content of sulfur but also the isotope composition of each component. Differentiation of contents of sulfur-34 in natural sulfur compounds can reach up to 110 per mile. So large divergences can be explained by a kinetic effect or by bacterial reduction of sulphates. In this report a wide review of the results of investigations of isotope sulfur compositions in coal and petroleum are presented as well as the methods for the preparation of samples for mass spectrometry analysis are proposed. (author)

  14. Discovery of the cadmium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Mechanism for underestimation of isotopically determined glucose disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.C.; Consoli, A.; Nurjhan, N.; Young, A.A.; Gerich, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Use of [3H]glucose and a one-compartment model to determine glucose kinetics frequently underestimates the rate of glucose production (Ra). To assess to what extent an isotope effect, a tracer contaminant, or inadequacy of the model was responsible, we measured glucose Ra and forearm clearance of tracer and unlabeled glucose at various concentrations of plasma insulin (approximately 50, approximately 160, and approximately 1800 microU/ml) and plasma glucose (approximately 90, approximately 160, approximately 250, and approximately 400 mg/dl) under steady-state and non-steady-state conditions. Under isotopic steady-state conditions, the clearances of tracer and unlabeled glucose across the forearm were identical, and exogenous glucose infusion rates did not differ significantly from the isotopically determined glucose Ra (10.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 10.5 +/- 1.0 mg.kg-1 fat-free mass.min-1, respectively). However, under isotopic non-steady-state conditions, the isotopically determined Ra was significantly lower than the glucose infusion rate (11.5 +/- 1.3 vs. 13.7 +/- 1.5 mg.kg-1 fat-free mass.min-1, respectively, P less than .001), and the underestimation was related to the deviation from the isotopic steady state. When [3H]glucose specific activity of plasma samples from experiments with the greatest underestimation of Ra was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, less than 7% of the underestimation could be accounted for by a contaminant. These results indicate that inadequacy of the one-compartment model is responsible for underestimation of glucose Ra under non-steady-state conditions and that there is no detectable isotopic effect or appreciable contaminant of [3-3H]glucose. We conclude that under isotopic steady-state conditions, [3-3H]glucose is a reliable tracer for glucose kinetic studies in humans

  16. Variations in lead isotopic abundances in Sprague-Dawley rat tissues: possible reason of formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duojian Liu

    Full Text Available It has been reported in previous research that the lead isotopic composition of blood, urine and feces samples statistically differed from the given lead sources in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. However, the reason for this phenomenon is still unclear. An animal experiment was performed to investigate the lead isotope fractionation in diverse biological samples (i.e., lungs, liver, kidneys, bone and to explore the possible reasons. SD rats were intratracheally instilled with lead acetate at the concentrations of 0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2 mg/kg body weight. Biological samples were collected for lead isotope analysis using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Significant differences are observed in lead isotope abundances among the diverse biological samples. The lead isotope abundances ((206Pb, (207Pb and (208Pb in diverse biological samples show different degrees and directions of departure from the given lead source. The results suggest that differences in enrichment or depletion capacity for each lead isotope in the various tissues might lead to the variation in lead isotopic abundances in tissues. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead level and the lead isotope abundances in liver and bone is observed. When the whole-blood level is higher than 50 ng/mL, the lead isotopic compositions of biological samples tend to be the same. Thus, the data support the speculation of a fractionation functional threshold.

  17. Variations in Lead Isotopic Abundances in Sprague-Dawley Rat Tissues: Possible Reason of Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Duojian; Wu, Jing; Ouyang, Li; Wang, Jingyu

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported in previous research that the lead isotopic composition of blood, urine and feces samples statistically differed from the given lead sources in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. However, the reason for this phenomenon is still unclear. An animal experiment was performed to investigate the lead isotope fractionation in diverse biological samples (i.e., lungs, liver, kidneys, bone) and to explore the possible reasons. SD rats were intratracheally instilled with lead acetate at the concentrations of 0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2 mg/kg body weight. Biological samples were collected for lead isotope analysis using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Significant differences are observed in lead isotope abundances among the diverse biological samples. The lead isotope abundances (206Pb, 207Pb and 208Pb) in diverse biological samples show different degrees and directions of departure from the given lead source. The results suggest that differences in enrichment or depletion capacity for each lead isotope in the various tissues might lead to the variation in lead isotopic abundances in tissues. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead level and the lead isotope abundances in liver and bone is observed. When the whole-blood level is higher than 50 ng/mL, the lead isotopic compositions of biological samples tend to be the same. Thus, the data support the speculation of a fractionation functional threshold. PMID:24587048

  18. Laser assisted aerodynamic isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H. van den

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the efficiency of conventional aerodynamic isotope seperation can be improved by two orders of magnitude with the aid of a relatively weak cw infrared laser which is used to induce isotopically selective condensation. Overall isotope enrichment factors in excess of 2 are obtained as compared to about 1.02 in the conventional seperation. Sulphur isotopes in SF 6 as well as Silicon isotopes in SiF 4 and Bromine isotopes in CF 3 Br are seperated on a laboratory scale. Infrared vibrational predissociation by itself and in combination with isotopically selective condensation are also shown to be effective new ways of isotope separation. (orig.) [de

  19. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption after which more of the excited molecules than nonexcited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium

  20. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  1. Isotopic research in Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetze, H.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1978 scientists of the Central Institute of Isotope- and Radiation Research of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR have participated in antarctic research. Substantial results have been achieved in research on isotope ratios, on the dynamics of water resources, on concentration of deuterium in lichens, and on age determination of a mummified seal and a penguin colony

  2. Isotope research materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Preparation of research isotope materials is described. Topics covered include: separation of tritium from aqueous effluents by bipolar electrolysis; stable isotope targets and research materials; radioisotope targets and research materials; preparation of an 241 Am metallurgical specimen; reactor dosimeters; ceramic and cermet development; fission-fragment-generating targets of 235 UO 2 ; and wire dosimeters for Westinghouse--Bettis

  3. Magnesium isotopic evidence for chemical disequilibrium among cumulus minerals in layered mafic intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lie-Meng; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Song, Xie-Yan; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Yu, Song-Yue; Zhu, Dan; Kang, Jian

    2018-04-01

    Magnesium isotopic compositions of olivine, clinopyroxene, and ilmenite from the Baima intrusion, SW China, for the first time, are investigated to constrain the magnitude and mechanisms of Mg isotope fractionation among cumulus minerals in layered mafic intrusions and to evaluate their geological implications. Olivine and clinopyroxene have limited Mg isotope variations, with δ26Mg ranging from -0.33 to +0.05‰ and from -0.29 to -0.13‰, respectively, similar to those of mantle xenolithic peridotites. By contrast, ilmenites display extremely large Mg isotopic variation, with δ26Mg ranging from -0.50 to +1.90‰. The large inter-mineral fractionations of Mg isotopes between ilmenite and silicates may reflect both equilibrium and kinetic processes. A few ilmenites have lighter Mg isotopic compositions than coexisting silicates and contain high MgO contents without compositional zoning, indicating equilibrium fractionation. The implication is that the light Mg isotopic compositions of lunar high-Ti basalts may result from an isotopically light source enriched in cumulate ilmenites. On the other hand, most ilmenites have heavy Mg isotopic compositions, coupled with high MgO concentration and chemical zoning, which can be quantitatively modeled by kinetic Mg isotope fractionations induced by subsolidus Mg-Fe exchange between ilmenite and ferromagnesian silicates during the cooling of the Baima intrusion. The extensive occurrence of kinetic Mg isotope fractionation in ilmenites implies the possibility of widespread compositional disequilibrium among igneous minerals in magma chambers. Consequently, disequilibrium effects need to be considered in studies of basaltic magma evolution, magma chamber processes, and magmatic Fe-Ti oxide ore genesis.

  4. Evolution of E. coli on [U-13C] Glucose Reveals a Negligible Isotopic Influence on Metabolism and Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Troy E.; Long, Christopher P.; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E.

    2016-01-01

    13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) traditionally assumes that kinetic isotope effects from isotopically labeled compounds do not appreciably alter cellular growth or metabolism, despite indications that some biochemical reactions can be non-negligibly impacted. Here, populations of Escherichia...

  5. On the Effect of Planetary Stable Isotope Compositions on Growth and Survival of Terrestrial Organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueshu Xie

    Full Text Available Isotopic compositions of reactants affect the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. Usually it is assumed that heavy stable isotope enrichment leads to progressively slower reactions. Yet the effect of stable isotopes may be nonlinear, as exemplified by the "isotopic resonance" phenomenon. Since the isotopic compositions of other planets of Solar system, including Mars and Venus, are markedly different from terrestrial (e.g., deuterium content is ≈5 and ≈100 times higher, respectively, it is far from certain that terrestrial life will thrive in these isotopic conditions. Here we found that Martian deuterium content negatively affected survival of shrimp in semi-closed biosphere on a year-long time scale. Moreover, the bacterium Escherichia coli grows slower at Martian isotopic compositions and even slower at Venus's compositions. Thus, the biological impact of varying stable isotope compositions needs to be taken into account when planning interplanetary missions.

  6. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  7. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

    2009-06-18

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose

  8. Application of stable isotope to breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yasuto

    1988-01-01

    Needles to say, radioisotopes have good characteristics as a tracer for examining biological functions. In fact, scyntigraphy is widely used over Japan. It is true, however, that there are some difficulties in applying radioisotopes to humans. Thus, greater attention began to be attracted to stable isotopes in the late 1960s, because these substances can be used for infants and pregnant women. They can be stored for a long period of time since they do not suffer damping as in the case of radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a tracer, stable isotopes can provide structural-chemical information including the position of isotope labels, and the mass and atomic composition of fragment ions. Such techniques as NMR spectroscopy is employed for this purpose. The method is currently used to perform examinations of congenital metabolic disorders. The carbon isotopes of 13 C and 14 C are used for breath test. Compounds labeled with these isotopes are administered and their ratio to the total CO 2 in breath is measured to diagnose diseases. In the early 1970s, 13 C has come into use for breath test. Similar breath test is applied to diagnosis of the bacterial overgrowth syndrome and ileal dysfunction syndrome. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Progress in stable isotope analysis and new possibilities of clinical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1989-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes in medicine rests on three possibilities offered by labelling: identification of an element, a molecule, or a fragment of a molecule along its biological pathway; quantification of biological pools by isotopic dilution; measurement of metabolization rates, and more generally of clearances. Whenever a corporal function experiences a disregulation reflected either by changes in metabolic activity or modifications of the importance of pools of certain molecules, the possibility exists of making use of isotopes in diagnosis. Examples of practical applications of stable isotopes are given and analytical problems that had to be solved are underlined

  10. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. This orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.

  11. Principles of chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  12. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  13. A review of biological processes within oceanic water columns relevant to the assessment of the safety of disposal of waste, notably radioactive isotopes on or within the sea bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Pelagic biological processes and their connotations in the assessment of possible dispersal mechanisms of contaminants released on the deep oceanic seabed are reviewed. Biological gradients tend to be from the surface down so the search is for processes which run counter to these general gradients. Observed profiles of standing crop of both plankton and micronekton show that below 2000 m biological activity would have to be exceptionally dynamic to have an influence that will even approach within an order of magnitude of the dispersive effect of physical mixing. Examination of all forms of known migration mechanisms fails to reveal such dynamic activity. Nor have any critical pathways been identified within the present or foreseeable pattern of exploitation of the oceans. However, a major gap in knowledge is whether the pattern of these biological processes changes substantially in the region of continental slopes. (author)

  14. FY 2005 annual report. 21st century COE program isotope science and engineering from basics to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    The 05' activity on 21st century COE program, Nagoya University, Isotopes open the future' is reported. The contents are: Research and educational execution planning; Operational reports (research activities, educational activities, international conferences, etc.); Research activities (1. the basic research field...isotope separation, isotope production, isotope measurement, and isotope materials, 2. the composite and development field...isotopes in biology, cultural science, and environment, 3. research contributions); Educational activities (1. programs for assist of young research students, 2. lectures on English, 3. lectures for postgraduate students). (M.H.)

  15. Stable isotope utilization for research on human nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjeux, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of nutritional molecule metabolism research, this paper presents the various stable isotopes used as labels for biological molecules, the reasons for their application in human nutritional study (mainly because of their non toxicity) and the various analysis methods (isotope ratio mass spectrometry, coupled gaseous chromatography and mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance). Several application examples in nutrition research are then discussed: metabolic conversion measurement for a molecule into its different metabolites, energetic losses. 23 refs

  16. Use of stable isotopes in human nutrition in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, the Laboratory of Nutrition of the Department of Animal Biology of the Faculty of Science and Technology of UCAD has been using stable isotopic techniques for nearly twenty years. Stable isotopes were applied to different target populations to measure milk production, exclusive breastfeeding, body composition, micronutrient bioavailability and total energy expenditure.The application of stable isotopic techniques in nutrition has contributed to advocacy for exclusive breastfeeding for up to 6 months in Senegal. It enabled government decision-makers to obtain essential information on the quality of foods needed for optimal effect during pregnancy and for infant growth and the results were reflected in the national policy on micronutrient supplementation.

  17. Kinetic equation solution by inverse kinetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, G.

    1983-01-01

    We propose a computer program (CAMU) which permits to solve the inverse kinetic equation. The CAMU code is written in HPL language for a HP 982 A microcomputer with a peripheral interface HP 9876 A ''thermal graphic printer''. The CAMU code solves the inverse kinetic equation by taking as data entry the output of the ionization chambers and integrating the equation with the help of the Simpson method. With this program we calculate the evolution of the reactivity in time for a given disturbance

  18. Isotope dilution analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.; Lesny, J.; Korenova, Z.; Klas, J.; Klehr, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope dilution analysis has been used for the determination of several trace elements - especially metals - in a variety of environmental samples, including aerosols, water, soils, biological materials and geological materials. Variations of the basic concept include classical IDA, substoichiometric IDA, and more recently, sub-superequivalence IDA. Each variation has its advantages and limitations. A periodic chart has been used to identify those elements which have been measured in environmental samples using one or more of these methods. (author)

  19. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in body water and hair: modeling isotope dynamics in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Shannon P; Valenzuela, Luciano O; Remien, Christopher H; Enright, Lindsey E; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Kaplan, Jay R; Wagner, Janice D; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2012-07-01

    The stable isotopic composition of drinking water, diet, and atmospheric oxygen influence the isotopic composition of body water ((2)H/(1)H, (18)O/(16)O expressed as δ(2) H and δ(18)O). In turn, body water influences the isotopic composition of organic matter in tissues, such as hair and teeth, which are often used to reconstruct historical dietary and movement patterns of animals and humans. Here, we used a nonhuman primate system (Macaca fascicularis) to test the robustness of two different mechanistic stable isotope models: a model to predict the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water and a second model to predict the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of hair. In contrast to previous human-based studies, use of nonhuman primates fed controlled diets allowed us to further constrain model parameter values and evaluate model predictions. Both models reliably predicted the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water and of hair. Moreover, the isotope data allowed us to better quantify values for two critical variables in the models: the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of gut water and the (18)O isotope fractionation associated with a carbonyl oxygen-water interaction in the gut (α(ow)). Our modeling efforts indicated that better predictions for body water and hair isotope values were achieved by making the isotopic composition of gut water approached that of body water. Additionally, the value of α(ow) was 1.0164, in close agreement with the only other previously measured observation (microbial spore cell walls), suggesting robustness of this fractionation factor across different biological systems. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Modeling in applied sciences a kinetic theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pulvirenti, Mario

    2000-01-01

    Modeling complex biological, chemical, and physical systems, in the context of spatially heterogeneous mediums, is a challenging task for scientists and engineers using traditional methods of analysis Modeling in Applied Sciences is a comprehensive survey of modeling large systems using kinetic equations, and in particular the Boltzmann equation and its generalizations An interdisciplinary group of leading authorities carefully develop the foundations of kinetic models and discuss the connections and interactions between model theories, qualitative and computational analysis and real-world applications This book provides a thoroughly accessible and lucid overview of the different aspects, models, computations, and methodology for the kinetic-theory modeling process Topics and Features * Integrated modeling perspective utilized in all chapters * Fluid dynamics of reacting gases * Self-contained introduction to kinetic models * Becker–Doring equations * Nonlinear kinetic models with chemical reactions * Kinet...