WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological agent detection

  1. Sensors for detecting biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim E. Sapsford

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological agents including viruses, bacteria, and other naturally occurring pathogenic organisms, along with the toxins they produce, are considered far harder to detect and defend against than chemical agents. Here we provide an overview of the predominant molecular sensing technologies for the detection of these agents. This includes biosensing strategies based upon use of antibodies, genomic analysis, biochemical testing, other recognition interactions, and cellular-based responses. We survey some popular sensing approaches, illustrate them with current examples showing how they have been applied, and discuss their intrinsic benefits and potential liabilities. Lastly, within the context of security applications, some approaches for integrating sensing technologies into field-portable devices are discussed.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes: Detection of Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Kumar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of carbon nanotubes has great impact on the development of newer methodologies and devicesuseful for the analysis of various types of chemicals. The functionalisation of CNTs with biomolecules relatedto chemical and biological warfare agents makes these useful for the detection of these agents. The detectionsensitivity can be increased manyfold. Various types of chemical and biological sensors were developed usingvarious type of carbon nanotubes as well as nano particles of different metals.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.617-625, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1684

  3. Chemiluminescence assay for the detection of biological warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langry, K; Horn, J

    1999-11-05

    A chemiluminescent homogeneous immunoassay and a hand-size multiassay reader are described that could be used for detecting biological materials. The special feature of the assay is that it employs two different antibodies that each bind to a unique epitope on the same antigen. Each group of epitope-specific antibodies has linked to it an enzyme of a proximal-enzyme pair. One enzyme of the pair utilizes a substrate in high concentration to produce a second substrate required by the second enzyme. This new substrate enables the second enzyme to function. The reaction of the second enzyme is configured to produce light. This chemiluminescence is detected with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The proximal pair enzymes must be in close proximity to one another to allow the second enzyme to react with the product of the first enzyme. This only occurs when the enzyme-linked antibodies are attached to the antigen, whether antigen is a single protein with multiple epitopes or the surface of a cell with a variety of different antigens. As a result of their juxtaposition, the enzymes produce light only in the presence of the biological material. A brief description is given as to how this assay could be utilized in a personal bio-agent detector system.

  4. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K.; Sharma, Ramesh C.

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ˜5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly.

  5. Multispectral analysis of biological agents to implement a quick tool for stand-off biological detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carestia, M.; Pizzoferrato, R.; Lungaroni, M.; Gabriele, J.; Ludovici, G. M.; Cenciarelli, O.; Gelfusa, M.; Murari, A.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.

    2015-10-01

    With the aim of identifying an approach to exploit the differences in the fluorescence signatures of biological agents BAs, we have investigated the response of some BAs simulants to a set of different excitation wavelengths in the UV spectral range (i.e. 266, 273, 280, 300, 340, 355 nm). Our preliminary results on bacterial spores and vegetative forms, dispersed in water, showed that the differences in the fluorescence spectra can be enhanced, and more easily revealed, by using different excitation wavelengths. Specifically, the photo luminescence (PL) spectra coming from different species of Bacillus, in the form of spores (used as simulants of Bacillus anthracis), show significant differences under excitation at all the wavelengths, with slightly larger differences at 300, 340, 355 nm. On the other hand, the vegetative forms of two Bacillus species, did not show any appreciable difference, i.e. the PL spectra are virtually identical, for the excitation wavelengths of 266, 273, 280 nm. Conversely, small yet appreciable difference appear at 300, 340, 355 nm. Finally, large difference appear between the spore and the vegetative form of each species at all the wavelengths, with slightly larger variations at 300, 340, 355 nm. Together, these preliminary results support the hypothesis that a multi-wavelength approach could be used to improve the sensitivity and specificity of UV-LIF based BAs detection systems. The second step of this work concerns the application of a Support Vector Regression (SVR) method, as evaluated in our previous work to define a methodology for the setup of a multispectral database for the stand-off detection of BAs.

  6. Portable Raman device for detection of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Martin, Matthew E.; Yan, Fei; Stokes, David L.; Mobley, Joel; Cullum, Brian M.; Wintenberg, Alan; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes a compact, self-contained, cost effective, and portable Raman Integrated Tunable Sensor (RAMiTs) for screening a wide variety of chemical and biological agents for homeland defense applications. The instrument is a fully-integrated, tunable, "point-and-shoot" Raman monitor based on solid-state acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) technology. It can provide direct identification and quantitative analysis of chemical and biological samples in a few seconds under field conditions. It also consists of a 830-nm diode laser for excitation, and an avalanche photodiode for detection. Evaluation of this instrument has been performed by analyzing several standard samples and comparing the results those obtained using a conventional Raman system. In addition to system evaluation, this paper will also discuss potential applications of the RAMiTs for detection of chemical and biological warfare agents.

  7. Novel fluorescence-based integrated sensor for chemical and biological agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; Wald, Lara; Paul, Kateri; Hancock, Lawrence F.; Fagan, Steve; Krouse, Justin; Hutchinson, Kira D.

    2004-12-01

    There is a renewed interest in the development of chemical and biological agent sensors due to the increased threat of weapons deployment by terrorist organizations and rogue states. Optically based sensors address the needs of military and homeland security forces in that they are reliable, rapidly deployed, and can provide continuous monitoring with little to no operator involvement. Nomadics has developed optically based chemical weapons sensors that utilize reactive fluorescent chromophores initially developed by Professor Tim Swager at MIT. The chromophores provide unprecedented sensitivity and selectivity toward toxic industrial chemicals and certain chemical weapon agents. The selectivity is based upon the reactivity of the G-class nerve agents (phosphorylation of acetylcholinesterase enzyme) that makes them toxic. Because the sensor recognizes the reactivity of strong electrophiles and not molecular weight, chemical affinity or ionizability, our system detects a specific class of reactive agents and will be able to detect newly developed or modified agents that are not currently known. We have recently extended this work to pursue a combined chemical/biological agent sensor system incorporating technologies based upon novel deep ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) developed out of the DARPA Semiconductor UV Optical Sources (SUVOS) program.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection for chemical and biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Stokes, David L.; Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Griffin, Guy D.; Vass, Arpad A.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2004-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of chemical agent simulants such as dimethyl methylphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP), diethyl phosphoramidate (DEPA), and 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (CEES), and biological agent simulants such as bacillus globigii (BG), erwinia herbicola (EH), and bacillus thuringiensis (BT) were obtained from silver oxide film-deposited substrates. Thin AgO films ranging in thickness from 50 nm to 250 nm were produced by chemical bath deposition onto glass slides. Further Raman intensity enhancements were noticed in UV irradiated surfaces due to photo-induced Ag nanocluster formation, which may provide a possible route to producing highly useful plasmonic sensors for the detection of chemical and biological agents upon visible light illumination.

  9. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Matatagui; José Luis Fontecha; María Jesús Fernández; Isabel Gràcia; Carles Cané; José Pedro Santos; María Carmen Horrillo

    2014-01-01

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentr...

  10. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved. PMID:25029282

  11. Love-Wave Sensors Combined with Microfluidics for Fast Detection of Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Matatagui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs. The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13, and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR. Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved.

  12. Love-wave sensors combined with microfluidics for fast detection of biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, Daniel; Fontecha, José Luis; Fernández, María Jesús; Gràcia, Isabel; Cané, Carles; Santos, José Pedro; Horrillo, María Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The following paper examines a time-efficient method for detecting biological warfare agents (BWAs). The method is based on a system of a Love-wave immunosensor combined with a microfluidic chip which detects BWA samples in a dynamic mode. In this way a continuous flow-through of the sample is created, promoting the reaction between antigen and antibody and allowing a fast detection of the BWAs. In order to prove this method, static and dynamic modes have been simulated and different concentrations of BWA simulants have been tested with two immunoreactions: phage M13 has been detected using the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-M13 (AM13), and the rabbit immunoglobulin (Rabbit IgG) has been detected using the polyclonal antibody goat anti-rabbit (GAR). Finally, different concentrations of each BWA simulants have been detected with a fast response time and a desirable level of discrimination among them has been achieved. PMID:25029282

  13. Autonomous Detection of Aerosolized Biological Agents by Multiplexed Immunoassay with PCR Confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindson, B J; McBride, M T; Makarewicz, A J; Henderer, B D; Setlur, U S; Smith, S M; Gutierrez, D M; Metz, T R; Nasarabadi, S L; Venkateswaran, K S; Farrow, S W; Colston, Jr., B W; Dzenitis, J M

    2004-05-27

    The autonomous pathogen detection system (APDS) is an automated, podium-sized instrument that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents (bacteria, viruses, and toxins). The system has been developed to warn of a biological attack in critical or high-traffic facilities and at special events. The APDS performs continuous aerosol collection, sample preparation, and detection using multiplexed immunoassay followed by confirmatory PCR using real-time TaqMan assays. We have integrated completely reusable flow-through devices that perform DNA extraction and PCR amplification. The fully integrated system was challenged with aerosolized Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus globigii and botulinum toxoid. By coupling highly selective antibody and DNA based assays, the probability of an APDS reporting a false positive is extremely low.

  14. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets[I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas[2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study[3] has been

  15. LANL organic analysis detection capabilities for chemical and biological warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansell, G.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.; Hollis, K.W.; Monagle, M.

    1996-12-31

    Organic analysis is the analytical arm for several Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) research programs and nuclear materials processes, including characterization and certification of nuclear and nonnuclear materials used in weapons, radioactive waste treatment and waste certification programs. Organic Analysis has an extensive repertoire of analytical technique within the group including headspace gas, PCBs/pesticides, volatile organics and semivolatile organic analysis. In addition organic analysis has mobile labs with analytic capabilities that include volatile organics, total petroleum hydrocarbon, PCBs, pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and high explosive screening. A natural extension of these capabilities can be applied to the detection of chemical and biological agents,

  16. Rapid Detection of Biological and Chemical Threat Agents Using Physical Chemistry, Active Detection, and Computational Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Myung; Dong, Li; Fu, Rong; Liotta, Lance; Narayanan, Aarthi; Petricoin, Emanuel; Ross, Mark; Russo, Paul; Zhou, Weidong; Luchini, Alessandra; Manes, Nathan; Chertow, Jessica; Han, Suhua; Kidd, Jessica; Senina, Svetlana; Groves, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Basic technologies have been successfully developed within this project: rapid collection of aerosols and a rapid ultra-sensitive immunoassay technique. Water-soluble, humidity-resistant polyacrylamide nano-filters were shown to (1) capture aerosol particles as small as 20 nm, (2) work in humid air and (3) completely liberate their captured particles in an aqueous solution compatible with the immunoassay technique. The immunoassay technology developed within this project combines electrophoretic capture with magnetic bead detection. It allows detection of as few as 150-600 analyte molecules or viruses in only three minutes, something no other known method can duplicate. The technology can be used in a variety of applications where speed of analysis and/or extremely low detection limits are of great importance: in rapid analysis of donor blood for hepatitis, HIV and other blood-borne infections in emergency blood transfusions, in trace analysis of pollutants, or in search of biomarkers in biological fluids. Combined in a single device, the water-soluble filter and ultra-sensitive immunoassay technique may solve the problem of early warning type detection of aerosolized pathogens. These two technologies are protected with five patent applications and are ready for commercialization.

  17. Detection of aerosolized biological agents by immunoassay followed by autonomous PCR confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenitis, J M; Hindson, B J; McBride, M T; Makarewicz, A J; Henderer, B D; Sathyam, U S; Smith, S M; Gutierrez, D M; Metz, T R; Venkateswaran, K S; Colston, B W; Farrow, S W

    2003-12-15

    An Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) unit is an automated, podium-sized system that monitors the air for all three biological threat agents (bacteria, viruses, and toxins). The system has been developed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy and Department of Homeland Security by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to protect people in critical or high-traffic facilities and at special events. The system performs continuous aerosol collection, sample preparation, and multiplexed biological tests using advanced immunoassays as the primary screen. Over ten agents are assayed at once, and results are reported hourly. R&D work this year focused on incorporating polymerase chain-reaction (PCR) techniques for detecting DNA as confirmation of immunoassay positives. The primary objective of the Dugway testing was to demonstrate the APDS with immunoassay identification and PCR confirmation of bacteria. A secondary objective was to demonstrate immunoassay identification of a protein toxoid (denatured toxin) aerosol release. A total of 12 agent trials were conducted over 14 days of testing, for a total of four work weeks at Dugway. Both testing objectives were achieved with multiple releases and clear identifications. The APDS was shown to be effective for identifying aerosolized Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus globigii, and botulinum toxoid. The two areas for improvement were operational as opposed to hardware-related. The first was slowing the PCR thermal cycling to achieve stronger signals, which was demonstrated during the later phases of testing. The second area is to improve the parameters for autonomous PCR triggering; this is one of the focuses of the upcoming year's work.

  18. Functionalized gold nanoparticle supported sensory mechanisms applied in detection of chemical and biological threat agents: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Smart sensors are needed for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. ► Smart sensors detect analytes with rapid speed, high sensitivity and selectivity. ► Functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can potentially smart sense threat agents. ► Functionalized GNPs support multiple analytical methods for sensing threat agents. ► Threat agents of all types can be detected using functionalized GNPs. - Abstract: There is a great necessity for development of novel sensory concepts supportive of smart sensing capabilities in defense and homeland security applications for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. A smart sensor is a detection device that can exhibit important features such as speed, sensitivity, selectivity, portability, and more importantly, simplicity in identifying a target analyte. Emerging nanomaterial based sensors, particularly those developed by utilizing functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a sensing component potentially offer many desirable features needed for threat agent detection. The sensitiveness of physical properties expressed by GNPs, e.g. color, surface plasmon resonance, electrical conductivity and binding affinity are significantly enhanced when they are subjected to functionalization with an appropriate metal, organic or biomolecular functional groups. This sensitive nature of functionalized GNPs can be potentially exploited in the design of threat agent detection devices with smart sensing capabilities. In the presence of a target analyte (i.e., a chemical or biological threat agent) a change proportional to concentration of the analyte is observed, which can be measured either by colorimetric, fluorimetric, electrochemical or spectroscopic means. This article provides a review of how functionally modified gold colloids are applied in the detection of a broad range of threat agents, including radioactive substances, explosive compounds, chemical warfare agents, biotoxins, and

  19. Functionalized gold nanoparticle supported sensory mechanisms applied in detection of chemical and biological threat agents: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K.K., E-mail: Upadhyayula.Venkata@epa.gov [Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE), MC-100-44, PO Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smart sensors are needed for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smart sensors detect analytes with rapid speed, high sensitivity and selectivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can potentially smart sense threat agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functionalized GNPs support multiple analytical methods for sensing threat agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Threat agents of all types can be detected using functionalized GNPs. - Abstract: There is a great necessity for development of novel sensory concepts supportive of smart sensing capabilities in defense and homeland security applications for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. A smart sensor is a detection device that can exhibit important features such as speed, sensitivity, selectivity, portability, and more importantly, simplicity in identifying a target analyte. Emerging nanomaterial based sensors, particularly those developed by utilizing functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a sensing component potentially offer many desirable features needed for threat agent detection. The sensitiveness of physical properties expressed by GNPs, e.g. color, surface plasmon resonance, electrical conductivity and binding affinity are significantly enhanced when they are subjected to functionalization with an appropriate metal, organic or biomolecular functional groups. This sensitive nature of functionalized GNPs can be potentially exploited in the design of threat agent detection devices with smart sensing capabilities. In the presence of a target analyte (i.e., a chemical or biological threat agent) a change proportional to concentration of the analyte is observed, which can be measured either by colorimetric, fluorimetric, electrochemical or spectroscopic means. This article provides a review of how functionally modified gold colloids are applied in the detection of a broad

  20. Detection of biological warfare agents with fiber-optic microsphere-based DNA arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Linan; Walt, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Biological warfare agents (BWAs) pose significant threats to both military forces and civilian populations. The increased concern about bioterrorism has promoted the development of rapid, sensitive, and reliable detection systems to provide an early warning for detecting the release of BWAs. We have developed a high-density DNA array to detect BWAs in real environmental samples with fast response times and high sensitivity. An optical fiber bundle containing approximately 50,000 individual 3.1 μm diameter fibers was chemically etched to yield an array of microwells and used as the substrate for the array. 50-mer single-stranded DNA probes designed to be specific for target BWAs were covalently attached to 3.1-μm microspheres, and the microspheres were distributed into the microwells to form a randomized high-density DNA array. We demonstrated the applicability of this DNA array for the identification of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, a BWA simulant, in real samples. PCR was used to amplify the sequences, introduce fluorescent labels into the target molecules, and provide a second level of specificity. After hybridization of test solutions to the array, analysis was performed by evaluating the specific responses of individual probes on the array.

  1. Capillary zone electrophoresis analysis and detection of mid-spectrum biological warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, C.A.; Townsley, C.

    1995-04-01

    DRE Suffield has initiated a research program to develop methods and equipment for field detection and laboratory identification of mid-spectrum agents, molecules of biological origin such as proteins, peptides and toxins. In this study, a highly efficient and reproducible capillary zone electrophoresis method was developed to separate and identify a series of nine peptides of defence interest: bradykinin, bradykinin fragment 1-5, substance P,ARG8-vasopressin, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, bombesin, leucine enkephalin, methionine enkephalin, and oxytocin. Using a 50 micrometer x 47 cm capillary column, 22.5 kV separation voltage and a 100 mM pH 2.5 phosphate buffer, all nine peptide could separated in under 10 minutes. Three strategies, which could be used in a fully automated field detection and identification system, were demonstrated for the identification of unknown peptides: comparison of migration times, comparison of electrophoretic mobilities, and co-injection of multiple reference standards. These experiments demonstrate that a separation based analytical method such as capillary electrophoresis could form the basis of a generic detection system for mid-spectrum protein and peptide toxins.

  2. Comparison of traditional and molecular analytical methods for detecting biological agents in raw and drinking water following ultrafiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, D.S.; Bushon, R.N.; Brady, A.M.G.; Bertke, E.E.; Kephart, C.M.; Likirdopulos, C.A.; Mailot, B.E.; Schaefer, F. W., III; Lindquist, H.D. Alan

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To compare the performance of traditional methods to quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for detecting five biological agents in large-volume drinking-water samples concentrated by ultrafiltration (UF). Methods and Results: Drinking-water samples (100 l) were seeded with Bacillus anthracis, Cryptospordium parvum, Francisella tularensis, Salmonella Typhi, and Vibrio cholerae and concentrated by UF. Recoveries by traditional methods were variable between samples and between some replicates; recoveries were not determined by qPCR. Francisella tularensis and V. cholerae were detected in all 14 samples after UF, B. anthracis was detected in 13, and C. parvum was detected in 9 out of 14 samples. Numbers found by qPCR after UF were significantly or nearly related to those found by traditional methods for all organisms except for C. parvum. A qPCR assay for S. Typhi was not available. Conclusions: qPCR can be used to rapidly detect biological agents after UF as well as traditional methods, but additional work is needed to improve qPCR assays for several biological agents, determine recoveries by qPCR, and expand the study to other areas. Significance and Impact of the Study: To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare the use of traditional and qPCR methods to detect biological agents in large-volume drinking-water samples. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Surface plasmon resonance detection of biological warfare agent Staphylococcal enterotoxin B using high affinity monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel sensitive method was developed for the detection as well as quantification of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). It is well known that the amount of SEB needed to cause the intoxication to human beings is very less and this concentration (0.02 μg/kg) is highly dangerous, hence, it is used as biological warfare agent. Thus, the need to develop a reliable and potential detection system against SEB is warranted. In the present work, SEB antibody was immobilized on carboxymethyldextran modified gold chip. The immobilization of SEB antibody and interaction of antigen with immobilized antibody were in-situ characterized by SPR and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A sample solution containing SEB antigen was injected in a working channel and the results revealed linearity in the concentration from 2.0 to 32.0 pM with a detection limit of 1.0 pM. By using kinetic evaluation software, KD (equilibrium constant) and Bmax (maximum binding capacity of analyte) values were calculated and found to be 13 pM and 424.23, respectively. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameter, change in Gibb's free energy was deduced and found to be -62.08 kJ/mol and this value shows the spontaneous interaction between SEB antigen and SEB antibody. In order to optimize the detection method, temperature and pH variation studies were also performed. Interference study was conducted to know the selectivity for the antigen-antibody interaction of SEB. The selectivity efficiency of SEB, SEC, SEA and SED were 100, 27.15, 20.01 and 12.05%, respectively towards SEB antibody.

  4. The potential of TaqMan Array Cards for detection of multiple biological agents by real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip A Rachwal

    Full Text Available The TaqMan Array Card architecture, normally used for gene expression studies, was evaluated for its potential to detect multiple bacterial agents by real-time PCR. Ten PCR assays targeting five biological agents (Bacillus anthracis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis were incorporated onto Array Cards. A comparison of PCR performance of each PCR in Array Card and singleplex format was conducted using DNA extracted from pure bacterial cultures. When 100 fg of agent DNA was added to Array Card channels the following levels of agent detection (where at least one agent PCR replicate returned a positive result were observed: Y. pestis 100%, B. mallei & F. tularensis 93%; B. anthracis 71%; B. pseudomallei 43%. For B. mallei & pseudomallei detection the BPM2 PCR, which detects both species, outperformed PCR assays specific to each organism indicating identification of the respective species would not be reproducible at the 100 fg level. Near 100% levels of detection were observed when 100 fg of DNA was added to each PCR in singleplex format with singleplex PCRs also returning sporadic positives at the 10 fg per PCR level. Before evaluating the use of Array Cards for the testing of environmental and clinical sample types, with potential levels of background DNA and PCR inhibitors, users would therefore have to accept a 10-fold reduction in sensitivity of PCR assays on the Array Card format, in order to benefit for the capacity to test multiple samples for multiple agents. A two PCR per agent strategy would allow the testing of 7 samples for the presence of 11 biological agents or 3 samples for 23 biological agents per card (with negative control channels.

  5. The R.A.P.I.D. System – Rapid Response in Detection of Biological Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Taleski, Vaso; Hafield, Ted

    2006-01-01

    Biological agents (BA) today present the greatest danger of all weapons of mass destruction. A belief that terrorist organizations, groups or individuals, or state sponsored armies, will use this type of weapon, has never been greater, especially after the intentional distribution of anthrax spores through the USA mail delivery system. Different problems during initial stages of biological attack arising from variety and number of clinical and environmental samples, costs, preparedness an...

  6. Functionalized gold nanoparticle supported sensory mechanisms applied in detection of chemical and biological threat agents: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K K

    2012-02-17

    There is a great necessity for development of novel sensory concepts supportive of smart sensing capabilities in defense and homeland security applications for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. A smart sensor is a detection device that can exhibit important features such as speed, sensitivity, selectivity, portability, and more importantly, simplicity in identifying a target analyte. Emerging nanomaterial based sensors, particularly those developed by utilizing functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a sensing component potentially offer many desirable features needed for threat agent detection. The sensitiveness of physical properties expressed by GNPs, e.g. color, surface plasmon resonance, electrical conductivity and binding affinity are significantly enhanced when they are subjected to functionalization with an appropriate metal, organic or biomolecular functional groups. This sensitive nature of functionalized GNPs can be potentially exploited in the design of threat agent detection devices with smart sensing capabilities. In the presence of a target analyte (i.e., a chemical or biological threat agent) a change proportional to concentration of the analyte is observed, which can be measured either by colorimetric, fluorimetric, electrochemical or spectroscopic means. This article provides a review of how functionally modified gold colloids are applied in the detection of a broad range of threat agents, including radioactive substances, explosive compounds, chemical warfare agents, biotoxins, and biothreat pathogens through any of the four sensory means mentioned previously. PMID:22244163

  7. PCR Based Systems in Rapid Detection and Identification of Biological Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Taleski, Vaso

    2012-01-01

    Of all weapons of mass destruction, biological weapons (BW) today present the greatest danger. A belief that state sponsored armies or terrorist organizations, groups or individuals will use this type of weapon has never been greater which demands a capability for rapid medical response and early intervention. The specter of potential BA is well known and includes: anti-human, anti-plant and anti-animal agents. Unusual outbreaks of illnesses might be essential suspicion in recognizing of deli...

  8. Multiple functional UV devices based on III-Nitride quantum wells for biological warfare agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Savage, Susan; Persson, Sirpa; Noharet, Bertrand; Junique, Stéphane; Andersson, Jan Y.; Liuolia, Vytautas; Marcinkevicius, Saulius

    2009-02-01

    We have demonstrated surface normal detecting/filtering/emitting multiple functional ultraviolet (UV) optoelectronic devices based on InGaN/GaN, InGaN/AlGaN and AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures with operation wavelengths ranging from 270 nm to 450 nm. Utilizing MQW structure as device active layer offers a flexibility to tune its long cut-off wavelength in a wide UV range from solar-blind to visible by adjusting the well width, well composition and barrier height. Similarly, its short cut-off wavelength can be adjusted by using a GaN or AlGaN block layer on a sapphire substrate when the device is illuminated from its backside, which further provides an optical filtering effect. When a current injects into the device under forward bias the device acts as an UV light emitter, whereas the device performs as a typical photodetector under reverse biases. With applying an alternating external bias the device might be used as electroabsorption modulator due to quantum confined Stark effect. In present work fabricated devices have been characterized by transmission/absorption spectra, photoresponsivity, electroluminescence, and photoluminescence measurements under various forward and reverse biases. The piezoelectric effect, alloy broadening and Stokes shift between the emission and absorption spectra in different InGaN- and AlGaN-based QW structures have been investigated and compared. Possibilities of monolithic or hybrid integration using such multiple functional devices for biological warfare agents sensing application have also be discussed.

  9. Differential detection of a surrogate biological threat agent (Bacillus globigii) with a portable surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adducci, Benjamin A; Gruszewski, Hope A; Khatibi, Piyum A; Schmale, David G

    2016-04-15

    New methods and technology are needed to quickly and accurately detect potential biological warfare agents, such as Bacillus anthracis, causal agent of anthrax in humans and animals. Here, we report the detection of a simulant of B. anthracis (B. globigii) alone and in a mixture with a different species of Bacillus to test non-specific interference using a portable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor (SPIRIT 4.0, Seattle Sensor Systems). Both direct capture and antibody amplification were used to determine the limit of detection for spores of B. globigii, and to detect spores of B. globigii in a mixed sample containing another Bacillus spp. Spores of B. globigii were detected by anti-B. globigii (anti-Bg) coated sensors by direct capture at a concentration of 10(7)spores/mL, and with a secondary antibody amplification at a concentration of 10(5)spores/mL. Spores of B. globigii were differentially detected in a 1:1 mixture with B. pumilus spores from equal concentrations (10(7)spores/mL) with a secondary antibody amplification. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the differential detection of B. globigii with SPR in a mixed sample containing at least one additional Bacillus spp., highlighting the potential for SPR to detect any target bacterium in a mixed sample of closely related species. With the availability of portable instrumentation to accurately detect biological warfare agents such as B. anthracis, emergency responders can implement protocols in a timely fashion, limiting the amount of exposed individuals. PMID:26606307

  10. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  11. Preliminary experiment of fluorescent X-ray computed tomography to detect dual agents for biological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Takeda, T; Yuasa, T; Hasegawa, Y; Wu, J; Thet-Thet-Lwin; Hyodo, K; Dilmanian, F A; Itai, Y; Akatsuka, T

    2001-05-01

    The simultaneous observation of various information, such as blood flow, tissue metabolism and distribution of receptors, is quite important in order to understand the functional state of biomedical objects. The simultaneous detectability of contrast agents by fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) with synchrotron radiation is examined in this study. The system consisted of a silicon (111) double-crystal monochromator, an X-ray slit system, a scanning table, a PIN diode, a highly purified germanium detector and an X-ray charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The monochromatic X-ray beam energy was adjusted to 37.0 keV and collimated into a pencil beam of 1 x 1 mm. The fluorescent spectra of the K alpha lines for iodine and xenon were detected simultaneously. FXCT could image the distribution of both iodine and xenon agents in a phantom clearly and the contrast ratio was significantly better than that of transmission X-ray computed tomography images. PMID:11486409

  12. Capillary zone electrophoresis analysis and detection of mid-spectrum biological warfare agents. Suffield memorandum No. 1463

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Mid-spectrum biological warfare agents such as proteins, peptides, and toxins are often difficult to analyze and often require individually developed assay methods for detection and identification. In this regard, capillary electrophoresis is an important, emerging technique for separation and quantitation of peptides and proteins, providing separation efficiencies up to two orders of magnitude greater than high performance liquid chromatography. The technique can also analyze a broad range of compounds, has a simple instrument design which can be automated, and has low sample volume requirements. In this study, a highly efficient and reproducible capillary zone electrophoresis method was developed to separate and identify a series of nine peptides of defense interest including bradykinin, leucine enkephalin, and oxytocin. The paper demonstrates three strategies which could be used in a fully automated field detection and identification system for unknown peptides.

  13. Development of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Surrogate Biological Warfare Agents in Building Debris and Leachate▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal E. Saikaly; Barlaz, Morton A.; de los Reyes, Francis L.

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of the fate and transport of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills requires the development of specific and sensitive detection assays. The objective of the current study was to develop and validate SYBR green quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) assays for the specific detection and quantification of surrogate BW agents in synthetic building debris (SBD) and leachate. Bacillus atrophaeus (vegetative cells and spores) and Serratia marcescens were used as surrogates for Bacillus...

  14. Biological effects of mutagenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing body of evidence that mutagenic agents (biological, chemical and physical) play an important role in the etiology of human diseases. Mutations may occur in the germinal as well as in the somatic cells. Mutations of the germ cells may result on infertility or fertilization of damaged cells, the later leading to abortion or birth of a malformed fetus. Somatic-cells mutations may have various biological effects, depending on the period of the human life at which the mutation occurs. If it occurs during the prenatal life, a teratogenic or carcinogenic effect will be observed. If the somatic cell is damaged during the postnatal life, this will lead to neoplastic transformation. Therefore it is extremely important to know the mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic effects of various biological, chemical and physical agents in order to eliminate them from our environment. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  15. Biological Threats Detection Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among many decisive factors, which can have the influence on the possibility of decreases the results of use biological agents should be mentioned obligatory: rapid detection and identification of biological factor used, the proper preventive treatment and the medical management. The aims of identification: to identify the factor used, to estimate the area of contamination, to evaluate the possible countermeasure efforts (antibiotics, disinfectants) and to assess the effectiveness of the decontamination efforts (decontamination of the persons, equipment, buildings, environment etc.). The objects of identification are: bacteria and bacteria's spores, viruses, toxins and genetically modified factors. The present technologies are divided into: based on PCR techniques (ABI PRISM, APSIS, BIOVERIS, RAPID), immuno (BADD, RAMP, SMART) PCR and immuno techniques (APDS, LUMINEX) and others (BDS2, LUNASCAN, MALDI). The selected technologies assigned to field conditions, mobile and stationary laboratories will be presented.(author)

  16. Biologic agents in juvenile spondyloarthropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsicas, María Martha; Russo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The juvenile spondyloarthropathies (JSpA) are a group of related rheumatic diseases characterized by involvement of peripheral large joints, axial joints, and entheses (enthesitis) that begin in the early years of life (prior to 16(th) birthday).The nomenclature and concept of spondyloarthropathies has changed during the last few decades. Although there is not any specific classification of JSpA, diseases under the spondyloarthropathy nomenclature umbrella in the younger patients include: the seronegative enthesitis and arthropathy (SEA) syndrome, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthritis. Moreover, the ILAR criteria for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis includes two categories closely related to spondyloarthritis: Enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis.We review the pathophysiology and the use of biological agents in JSpA. JSpA are idiopathic inflammatory diseases driven by an altered balance in the proinflammatory cytokines. There is ample evidence on the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-17 in the physiopathology of these entities. Several non-biologic and biologic agents have been used with conflicting results in the treatment of these complex diseases. The efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents, such as etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab, have been analysed in controlled and uncontrolled trials, usually showing satisfactory outcomes. Other biologic agents, such as abatacept, tocilizumab and rituximab, have been insufficiently studied and their role in the therapy of SpA is uncertain. Interleukin-17-blocking agents are promising alternatives for the treatment of JSpA patients in the near future. Recommendations for the treatment of patients with JSpA have recently been proposed and are discussed in the present review. PMID:26968522

  17. Colitis associated with biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, there has been considerable focus on a host of drugs and chemicals that may produce colonic toxicity. Now, a variety of new biological monoclonal antibody agents, usually administered by infusion, have appeared in the clinical realm over the last decade or so to treat different chronic inflammatory or malignant disorders.For some of these agents, adverse effects have been documented, including apparently new forms of immune-mediated inflammatory bowel disease. In some, only limited symptoms have been recorded, but in others, severe colitis with serious complications, such as bowel perforation has been recorded. In others, adverse effects may have a direct vascular or ischemic basis, while other intestinal effects may be related to a superimposed infection. Some new onset cases of ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease may also be attributed to the same agents used to treat these diseases, or be responsible for disease exacerbation. Dramatic and well documented side effects have been observed with ipilimumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody developed to reduce and overcome cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4, a key negative feedback regulator of the T-cell anti-tumor response. This agent has frequently been used in the treatment of different malignancies, notably, malignant melanoma. Side effects with this agent occur in up to 40% and these are believed to be largely immune-mediated. One of these is a form of enterocolitis that may be severe, and occasionally, fatal. Other agents include rituximab (an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab (a monoclonal antibody against the vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, including infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept.

  18. Performance verification of a LIF-LIDAR technique for stand-off detection and classification of biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtanowski, Jacek; Zygmunt, Marek; Muzal, Michał; Knysak, Piotr; Młodzianko, Andrzej; Gawlikowski, Andrzej; Drozd, Tadeusz; Kopczyński, Krzysztof; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Kaszczuk, Mirosława; Traczyk, Maciej; Gietka, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Wiesław; Jakubaszek, Marcin; Ostrowski, Roman

    2015-04-01

    LIF (laser-induced fluorescence) LIDAR (light detection and ranging) is one of the very few promising methods in terms of long-range stand-off detection of air-borne biological particles. A limited classification of the detected material also appears as a feasible asset. We present the design details and hardware setup of the developed range-resolved multichannel LIF-LIDAR system. The device is based on two pulsed UV laser sources operating at 355 nm and 266 nm wavelength (3rd and 4th harmonic of Nd:YAG, Q-switched solid-state laser, respectively). Range-resolved fluorescence signals are collected in 28 channels of compound PMT sensor coupled with Czerny-Turner spectrograph. The calculated theoretical sensitivities are confronted with the results obtained during measurement field campaign. Classification efforts based on 28-digit fluorescence spectral signatures linear processing are also presented.

  19. Detection of Electrophilic and Nucleophilic Chemical Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-11-11

    A "real time" method for detecting electrophilic and nucleophilic species generally by employing tunable, precursor sensor materials that mimic the physiological interaction of these agents to form highly florescent berberine-type alkaloids that can be easily and rapidly detected. These novel precursor sensor materials can be tuned for reaction with both electrophilic (chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (proteins and other biological molecules) species.

  20. Development of Laser Warning and Detection Technology for Chemical/Biological Agents%生化战剂激光侦检技术的发展概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴慧云; 孙振海; 黄志松; 生甡; 王华; 徐卸古

    2013-01-01

    Application of chemical/biological agents in terrorism and unmilitary fields induce serious impact to the public safety. Principles of laser warning and detection technology for chemical/biological agents based on Mie scattering signals, Rayleigh scattering signals, Raman scattering signals, absorption signals and laser induced fluorescence signals are described. The key technologies in the laser warning and detection system are analyzed, the laser warning and detection technology development profiles in the United States, Russia, German and France are introduced.%生化战剂在恐怖主义活动和非军事领域的非法使用对社会公共安全造成了严重的威胁.分析了基于米氏散射、瑞利散射、拉曼散射、吸收光谱和诱导荧光光谱信号的生化战剂激光侦察报警和快速检测技术的基本原理,说明了生化战剂激光侦检系统的关键技术,回顾了美、俄、德、法等国生化战剂激光侦检技术的发展情况.

  1. Method to detect biological particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A medical-diagnostic method to detect immunological as well as other specific reactions is described. According to the invention, first reactive particles (e.g. antibodies) are adsorbed on the surface of a solid, non-reactive substrate. The coated substrate is subjected to a solution which one assumes to contain the second biological particles (e.g. antigens) which are specific to the first and form complexes with these. A preferential radioactive labelling (e.g. with iodine 125) of the second biological particle is then directly or indirectly carried out. Clearage follows labelling in order to separate the second biological particles from the first ones. A specific splitting agent can selectively break the bond of both types of particle. The splitting agent solution is finally separated off and its content is investigated for the presence of labelling. (VJ)

  2. Detection and Quantification of Plectosphaerella cucumerina, a Potential Biological Control Agent of Potato Cyst Nematodes, by Using Conventional PCR, Real-Time PCR, Selective Media, and Baiting

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, S. D.; Clark, I M; Sosnowska, D.; Hirsch, P. R.; Kerry, B. R.

    2003-01-01

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCN) are serious pests in commercial potato production, causing yield losses valued at approximately $300 million in the European Community. The nematophagous fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina has demonstrated its potential as a biological control agent against PCN populations by reducing field populations by up to 60% in trials. The use of biological control agents in the field requires the development of specific techniques to monitor the release, population size, sp...

  3. Detection of electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2014-08-12

    A "real time" method for detecting chemical agents generally and particularly electrophilic and nucleophilic species by employing tunable, precursor sensor materials that mimic the physiological interaction of these agents to form highly florescent berberine-type alkaloids that can be easily and rapidly detected. These novel precursor sensor materials can be tuned for reaction with both electrophilic (chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (proteins and other biological molecules) species. By bonding or otherwise attaching these precursor molecules to a surface or substrate they can be used in numerous applications.

  4. Rapid - PCR ( LightCycler ) in diagnosis of biological agents

    OpenAIRE

    Taleski, Vaso; Hadfield, Ted

    2001-01-01

    Although the historic use of biological weapons has been infrequent, a belief that state sponsored armies or terrorist organizations will use this type of weapon has never been greater which demands a capability for rapid medical response and early intervention. Molecular diagnostic methods, based on DNA amplification known as PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) are promising tools in fast and specific detection and identification of biological agent(s). The R.A.P.I.D.TM - PCR ( Ruggedized Adv...

  5. Francisella tularensis - potential biological agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisella tularensis is a small, nonmotile, aerobic, gram-negative coccobacillus capable of surviving for weeks at low temperatures in water, moist soil, hay, straw, or decaying animal carcasses. F. tularensis is the causative of the zoonotic disease tularemia. This bacterium was first identified in ground squirrels in Tulare County, California (1912). The human disease was recognized and described by Edward Francis (1922) as tularemia, and the agent was renamed Francisella tularensis in his honor. F. tularensis is one of the most infectious bacterial pathogens known, as few as 10-50 organisms can cause disease. Humans can become incidentally infected through diverse environmental exposures: bites by infected arthropods; handling infectious animal tissues or fluids; direct contact with or ingestion of contaminated food, water, or soil and inhalation of infective aerosols. Humans can develop severe and sometimes fatal illness, but do not transmit the disease to others. F. tularensis have few subspecies: 1) F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A), highly virulent, found only in North America. The bacterium is transmitted among animals and from animals to humans by ticks, occasionally deerfly, or by aerosols; 2) F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B), moderately virulent, occurs in Euroasia and North America, mainly associated with streams, lakes, ponds, rivers and semi-aquatic animals such as muskrats and beavers (water-borne disease). Type B tularemia has been observed during war times (during Second World War 100 000 cases occurred each year, in Kosovo in 2000 and 2003 over 300 cases each year); 3) F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica, rarely reported, isolated only in Kazahstan and Turkmenistan; 4) F. tularensis subsp. novicida is of low virulence, isolated in USA, Canada, Spain and Australia; 5) F. tularensis subsp. philomiragia, is of low virulence, associated with salt water (Atlantic, Mediterranean). Tularemia is very rear in Macedonia, but in 1996 an

  6. Synthesis and biological distribution of 99mTc-norfloxacin complex, a novel agent for detecting sites of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization of the radiolabeling yield of ciprofloxacin analogous, norfloxacin, with technetium-99m (99mTc) was described. Dependence of the labeling yield of 99mTc-norfloxacin complex on the concentration of norfloxacin, SnCl2 · 2H2O content, pH of the reaction mixture and reaction time was studied. Norfloxacin was labeled with 99mTc at pH 3 with a labeling yield of 95.4% by using 5 mg norfloxacin, 50 μg SnCl2 · 2H2O and 30 min reaction time. The formed 99mTc-norfloxacin complex was stable for a time up to 3 h. Biological distribution of 99mTc-norfloxacin complex was investigated in experimentally induced inflammation rats using Staphylococcus aureus (bacterial infection model) and heat killed Staphylococcus aureus and turpentine oil (sterile inflammation model). In case of bacterial infection, the T/NT value for 99mTc-norfloxacin complex was found to be 6.9 ± 0.4 which was higher than that of the commercially available 99mTc-ciprofloxacin under the same experimental condition. (author)

  7. Optical micro resonance based sensor schemes for detection and identification of nano particles and biological agents in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    A novel emerging technique for the label-free analysis of nano particles including biomolecules using optical micro cavity resonance is being developed. Various schemes based on a mechanically fixed microspheres as well as microspheres melted by laser on the tip of a standard single mode fiber have been investigated to make further development for microbial application. Water solutions of ethanol, HCl, glucose, vitamin C and biotin have been used to test refractive index changes by monitoring the magnitude of the whispering gallery modes spectral shift. Particular efforts were made for effective fixing of the micro spheres in the water flow, an optimal geometry for micro resonance observation and material of microsphere the most appropriate for microbial application. Optical resonance in free micro spheres from PMMA fixed in micro channels produced by photolithography has been observed under the laser power of less then 1 microwatt. Resonance shifts of C reactive protein water solutions as well as albumin solutions in pure water and with HCl modelling blood have been investigated. Introducing controlled amount of glass gel nano particles into sensor microsphere surrounding were accompanied by both correlative resonance shift (400 nm in diameter) and total reconstruct of resonance spectra (57 nm in diameter). Developed schemes have been demonstrated to be a promising technology platform for sensitive, lab-on-chip type sensor of diagnostic tools for different biological molecules, e.g. proteins, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides, lipids, small molecules, viral particles, cells as well as in different experimental contexts e.g. proteomics, genomics, drug discovery, and membrane studies.

  8. Preparation and biological distribution of 99mTc-cefazolin complex, a novel agent for detecting sites of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization of the radiolabeling yield of cefazolin with 99mTc was described. Dependence of the labeling yield of 99mTc-cefazolin complex on the amounts of cefazolin and SnCl2·2H2O, pH and reaction time was studied. Cefazolin was labeled with 99mTc with a labeling yield of 89.5 % by using 1 mg cefazolin, 5 μg SnCl2·2H2O at pH 4 and 30 min reaction time. The radiochemical purity of 99mTc-cefazolin was evaluated with ITLC. The formed 99mTc-cefazolin complex was stable for a time up to 3 h, after that the labeling yield decreased 64.0 % at 8 h. Biological distribution of 99mTc-cefazolin complex was investigated in experimentally induced inflammation mice, in the left thigh, using Staphylococcus aureus (bacterial infection model) and turpentine oil (sterile inflammation model). Both thighs of the mice were dissected and counted and the ratio of bacterial infected thigh/contralateral thigh was then evaluated. In case of bacterial infection, T/NT for 99mTc-cefazolin complex was 8.57 ± 0.4 after 0.5 h, which was higher than that of the commercially available 99mTc-ciprofloxacin under the same experimental conditions. The ability of 99mTc-cefazolin to differentiate between septic and aseptic inflammation indicates that 99mTc-cefazolin could undergo further clinical trials to be used for imaging sites of infection. (author)

  9. History of chemical and biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinicz, L

    2005-10-30

    Chemical and biological warfare agents constitute a low-probability, but high-impact risk both to the military and to the civilian population. The use of hazardous materials of chemical or biological origin as weapons and for homicide has been documented since ancient times. The first use of chemicals in terms of weapons of mass destruction goes back to World War I, when on April 22, 1915 large amounts of chlorine were released by German military forces at Ypres, Belgium. Until around the 1970s of the 20th century, the awareness of the threat by chemical and biological agents had been mainly confined to the military sector. In the following time, the development of increasing range delivery systems by chemical and biological agents possessors sensitised public attention to the threat emanating from these agents. Their proliferation to the terrorists field during the 1990s with the expanding scale and globalisation of terrorist attacks suggested that these agents are becoming an increasing threat to the whole world community. The following article gives a condensed overview on the history of use and development of the more prominent chemical and biological warfare agents. PMID:16111798

  10. Psoriatic arthritis: treatment strategies using biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Palazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA includes NSAIDs, corticosteroids and DMARDs. Advancement in the knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of PsA has been associated with the development of biologic agents which have revolutionized the management of the disease. Among biologics drugs, there are the 4 currently availablee anti-TNFα blocking agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab and golimumab which are more effective than traditional DMARDs on symptoms/signs of inflammation, quality of life, function, and in inhibiting the progression of the structural joint damage. Despite of the high cost, TNF inhibitors are costeffective on both the musculoskeletal and skin manifestations of psoriatic disease.

  11. Biologic agents in the treatment of glomerulonephritides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, See Cheng; Liew, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    Current immunosuppression strategies in the treatment of glomerulonephritides remain unsatisfactory, especially in glomerular diseases that are frequently relapsing or are resistant to treatment. Toxicities associated with the use of drugs with non-specific targets for the immune response result in treatment non-compliance, and increase morbidity and mortality in these patients. Advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritis and the availability of biologics have led to their successful use in the treatment of immune-mediated glomerular diseases. Biologics are usually very large complex molecules, often produced using recombinant DNA technology and manufactured in a living system such as a microorganism, or plant or animal cells. They are novel agents that can target specific immune cell types, cytokines or immune pathways involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. It is attractive to consider that, given their specific mode of action, these agents can potentially offer a more directed and effective immunosuppression, with side-effect profiles that are much more desirable. However, there have been few randomized controlled trials comparing biologic agents to conventional immunosuppression, and in many of these studies the side-effect profiles have been disappointingly similar. In this review, we will examine the rationale, efficacy and safety of some commonly used biologics in the treatment of primary and secondary glomerulonephritides. We will also discuss some of the key challenges that may be encountered with the use of biologics in treating glomerulonephritis in the future. PMID:26040770

  12. Functional Agents to Biologically Control Deoxynivalenol Contamination in Cereal Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Tan, Yanglan; Liu, Na; Liao, Yucai; Sun, Changpo; Wang, Shuangxia; Wu, Aibo

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxins, as microbial secondary metabolites, frequently contaminate cereal grains and pose a serious threat to human and animal health around the globe. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a commonly detected Fusarium mycotoxin, has drawn utmost attention due to high exposure levels and contamination frequency in the food chain. Biological control is emerging as a promising technology for the management of DON contamination. Functional biological control agents (BCAs), which include antagonistic microbes, natural fungicides derived from plants and detoxification enzymes, can be used to control DON contamination at different stages of grain production. In this review, studies regarding different biological agents for DON control in recent years are summarized for the first time. Furthermore, this article highlights the significance of BCAs for controlling DON contamination, as well as the need for more practical and efficient BCAs concerning food safety. PMID:27064760

  13. Biological agents targeting beyond TNF-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rashmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological agents represent an important addition to the therapies for immuno-inflammatory conditions and have a great impact on the disease course and quality of life of these patients. However, recent reports of serious infections like tuberculosis, demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases, pancytopenia, cardiovascular diseases, etc. after anti-TNF therapy raised questions on their safety. Hence, focus is shifted towards drugs targeting cytokine checkpoints in the inflammatory cascades beyond TNF-a. Existing therapeutic targets include the biological agents acting as antagonists of various inflammatory cytokines (Anakinra, Tocilizumab, Atlizumab and modulators of CD80 or CD86-CD28 co-stimulatory signal (Abatacept, CD2 receptors on T-cells (Alefacept, CD11a, subunit of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (Efalizumab, vitronectin receptor and CD20 antigen on pre-B, immature and mature B cells (Rituximab. With the introduction of these novel molecules the future for immunomodulatory intervention in rheumatology, asthma, crohn′s disease, septic shock etc. looks very promising. These novel therapeutic agents could truly give a new hope to the clinician to modify the disease and achieve tangible improvements in the lives of the patients.

  14. Systems for Detection and Identification of Biological Aerosols (Review Paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Švabenska

    2012-01-01

    Easy and inexpensive manufacturing of biological weapons, their complicated detection, expensive protection, difficult treating of affected individuals, selective impact only for people, animals or plants, are all factors making an effective defense against biological warfare agents very difficult. The aim of this study is an introduction to the systems for the detection and identification of biological aerosols containing dangerous bioagents. The basic techniques used for detection and ident...

  15. Biological agents in management of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tella, Sri Harsha; Gallagher, J Christopher

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease associated with an imbalance between formation and resorption, leading to net loss of bone mass, loss of bone microarchitecture, and development of fractures. Bone resorption is primarily due to an activation of osteoclastogenesis and an increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression, a cytokine involved in the final pathway of the osteoclast cycle.Recent studies of genetic diseases led to the discovery of the wingless-type (Wnt) signaling pathway that plays a major role in bone formation. Further work showed that sclerostin produced by osteocytes and the Dickkopf (DKK1) protein secreted in bone were negative regulators of the Wnt signaling bone formation pathway that act directly by binding to the co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 of WnT and thereby inhibiting the anabolic Wnt pathway. This understanding of the bone remodeling led to the discovery of new biological drugs that target these pathways and have been evaluated in clinical trials.The current article discusses the role of these newer "biological" agents in management of osteoporosis. Denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody that specifically binds RANKL, blocks the binding of RANK to its ligand markedly reducing bone resorption, increases bone density, and reduces fractures and is approved for osteoporosis. Parathyroid hormone PTH 1-34 (teriparatide) stimulates bone formation through inhibition of sclerostin, DKK1, and frizzled protein; increases BMD; improves microarchitecture; and decreases fractures and is approved for osteoporosis. The anti-sclerostin antibodies (romosozumab, blosozumab) increase bone mass by neutralizing the negative effects of sclerostin on the Wnt signaling pathway. These biologics are being evaluated now in a clinical trial and early data looks promising. Cathepsin K is a proteolytic enzyme that degrades bone matrix and inhibitors such as odanacatib show increasing bone density and perhaps decreased fractures. The

  16. Method and apparatus for enhanced detection of toxic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Wu, Jie Jayne; Qi, Hairong

    2013-10-01

    A biosensor based detection of toxins includes enhancing a fluorescence signal by concentrating a plurality of photosynthetic organisms in a fluid into a concentrated region using biased AC electro-osmosis. A measured photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms is obtained in the concentrated region, where chemical, biological or radiological agents reduce a nominal photosynthetic activity of the photosynthetic organisms. A presence of the chemical, biological and/or radiological agents or precursors thereof, is determined in the fluid based on the measured photosynthetic activity of the concentrated plurality of photosynthetic organisms. A lab-on-a-chip system is used for the concentrating step. The presence of agents is determined from feature vectors, obtained from processing a time dependent signal using amplitude statistics and/or time-frequency analysis, relative to a control signal. A linear discriminant method including support vector machine classification (SVM) is used to identify the agents.

  17. Fluorescent sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnworth, Mark; Rowan, Stuart J; Weder, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Along with biological and nuclear threats, chemical warfare agents are some of the most feared weapons of mass destruction. Compared to nuclear weapons they are relatively easy to access and deploy, which makes them in some aspects a greater threat to national and global security. A particularly hazardous class of chemical warfare agents are the nerve agents. Their rapid and severe effects on human health originate in their ability to block the function of acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that is vital to the central nervous system. This article outlines recent activities regarding the development of molecular sensors that can visualize the presence of nerve agents (and related pesticides) through changes of their fluorescence properties. Three different sensing principles are discussed: enzyme-based sensors, chemically reactive sensors, and supramolecular sensors. Typical examples are presented for each class and different fluorescent sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents are summarized and compared. PMID:17705326

  18. Biomedicines—Moving Biologic Agents into Approved Treatment Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Cornetta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of biologic agents for therapeutic purposes, or biomedicines, has seen an active area of research both at the bench and in clinical trials. There is mounting evidence that biologic products can provide effective therapy for diseases that have been unresponsive to traditional pharmacologic approaches. Monoclonal antibody therapy for cancer and rheumatologic diseases has become a well accepted part of disease treatment plans. Gene therapy products have been approved in China and Europe. Bioengineering of new agents capitalizing on microRNA biology, nanoparticle technology, stem cell biology, and an increasing understanding of immunology predict a rich future for product development. [...

  19. Ecological Complexity and the Success of Fungal Biological Control Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Guy R.; Louise-Marie C. Dandurand

    2014-01-01

    Fungal biological control agents against plant pathogens, especially those in soil, operate within physically, biologically, and spatially complex systems by means of a variety of trophic and nontrophic interspecific interactions. However, the biocontrol agents themselves are also subject to the same types of interactions, which may reduce or in some cases enhance their efficacy against target plant pathogens. Characterization of these ecologically complex systems is challenging, but a number...

  20. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J; Sopko, V; Jakubek, J [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F, E-mail: jiri.dammer@utef.cvut.cz [Biological center of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Entomology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-15

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1{mu}m, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  1. Nonpathogenic Fusarium as a Biological Control Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kaur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum is an important fungal group among the soil bone microflora. These strains are well-known for inducing wilt or root rots in important agricultural crops worldwide and some occur only as a saprophytes in rhizosphere of plants. There are certain strains which are nonpathogenic and protect plants from pathogenic strains. Based on phenotypic and genetic studies F. oxysporum showed a great diversity among its populations. The nonpathogenic strains, which were first isolated from suppressive soils strains showed several modes of action against pathogenic strains and thus exploited as biocontrol agents. These nonpathogenic strains suppress pathogens by competing for nutrients in the soil, reduce their chlamydospore germination, compete for infection sites on the root and induce systemic resistance in plant when invade host plant species before the pathogen. The nonpathogenic strains are formulated in talc and charcoal based media and commercial formulations are also available. These strains of Fusarium has been successfully combined with other biocontrol agents to obtain a effective biocontrol of plant pathogens. For application of nonpathogenic Fusarium under field condition some additional research is needed in several areas including: field studies and integration into production systems; risk assessment; and genetic improvement of biocontrol agents.

  2. A decontamination study of simulated chemical and biological agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive decontamination scheme of the chemical and biological agents, including airborne agents and surface contaminating agents, is presented. When a chemical and biological attack occurs, it is critical to decontaminate facilities or equipments to an acceptable level in a very short time. The plasma flame presented here may provide a rapid and effective elimination of toxic substances in the interior air in isolated spaces. As an example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22 cm diameter and 30 cm length, purifies air with an airflow rate of 5000 l/min contaminated with toluene, the simulated chemical agent, and soot from a diesel engine, the simulated aerosol for biological agents. Although the airborne agents in an isolated space are eliminated to an acceptable level by the plasma flame, the decontamination of the chemical and biological agents cannot be completed without cleaning surfaces of the facilities. A simulated sterilization study of micro-organisms was carried out using the electrolyzed ozone water. The electrolyzed ozone water very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) within 3 min. The electrolyzed ozone water also kills the vegetative micro-organisms, fungi, and virus. The electrolyzed ozone water, after the decontamination process, disintegrates into ordinary water and oxygen without any trace of harmful materials to the environment

  3. Biologically hazardous agents at work and efforts to protect workers' health: a review of recent reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Kyung-Taek; Lim, Cheol-Hong

    2014-06-01

    Because information on biological agents in the workplace is lacking, biological hazard analyses at the workplace to securely recognize the harmful factors with biological basis are desperately needed. This review concentrates on literatures published after 2010 that attempted to detect biological hazards to humans, especially workers, and the efforts to protect them against these factors. It is important to improve the current understanding of the health hazards caused by biological factors at the workplace. In addition, this review briefly describes these factors and provides some examples of their adverse health effects. It also reviews risk assessments, protection with personal protective equipment, prevention with training of workers, regulations, as well as vaccinations. PMID:25180133

  4. Considerations in detecting CDC select agents under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Charles; Soelberg, Scott; Swanson, Nathaneal; Furlong, Clement; Baker, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) has become a widely accepted technique for real-time detection of interactions between receptor molecules and ligands. Antibody may serve as receptor and can be attached to the gold surface of the SPR device, while candidate analyte fluids contact the detecting antibody. Minute, but detectable, changes in refractive indices (RI) indicate that analyte has bound to the antibody. A decade ago, an inexpensive, robust, miniature and fully integrated SPR chip, called SPREETA, was developed. University of Washington (UW) researchers subsequently developed a portable, temperature-regulated instrument, called SPIRIT, to simultaneously use eight of these three-channel SPREETA chips. A SPIRIT prototype instrument was tested in the field, coupled to a remote reporting system on a surrogate unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Two target protein analytes were released sequentially as aerosols with low analyte concentration during each of three flights and were successfully detected and verified. Laboratory experimentation with a more advanced SPIRIT instrument demonstrated detection of very low levels of several select biological agents that might be employed by bioterrorists. Agent detection under field-like conditions is more challenging, especially as analyte concentrations are reduced and complex matricies are introduced. Two different sample preconditioning protocols have been developed for select agents in complex matrices. Use of these preconditioning techniques has allowed laboratory detection in spiked heavy mud of Francisella tularensis at 10 3 CFU/ml, Bacillus anthracis spores at 10 3 CFU/ml, Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) at 1 ng/ml, and Vaccinia virus (a smallpox simulant) at 10 5 PFU/ml. Ongoing experiments are aimed at simultaneous detection of multiple agents in spiked heavy mud, using a multiplex preconditioning protocol.

  5. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  6. AGENT BASED INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEM IN MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Mandal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a technique for intrusion detection in MANET has been proposed where agents are fired from a node which traverses each node randomly and detect the malicious node. Detection is based on triangular encryption technique (TE where AODV is taken as routing protocol. For simulation we have taken NS2 (2.33 where two type of parameters are considered out of which number of nodes and percentage of node mobility are the attributes. For analysis purpose 20, 30, 30, 40, 50 and 60 nodes are taken with a variable percentage of malicious node as 0 %( no malicious, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Analysis have been done taking generated packets, forwarded packets, delay, and average delay as parameters

  7. Decontamination of biological warfare agents by a microwave plasma torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portable arc-seeded microwave plasma torch running stably with airflow is described and applied for the decontamination of biological warfare agents. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma torch indicated that this torch produced an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen that could effectively oxidize biological agents. Bacillus cereus was chosen as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis spores for biological agent in the decontamination experiments. Decontamination was performed with the airflow rate of 0.393 l/s, corresponding to a maximum concentration of atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The experimental results showed that all spores were killed in less than 8 s at 3 cm distance, 12 s at 4 cm distance, and 16 s at 5 cm distance away from the nozzle of the torch

  8. Biological agents with potential for misuse: a historical perspective and defensive measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological and chemical agents capable of producing serious illness or mortality have been used in biowarfare from ancient times. Use of these agents has progressed from crude forms in early and middle ages, when snakes and infected cadavers were used as weapons in battles, to sophisticated preparations for use during and after the second World War. Cults and terrorist organizations have attempted the use of biological agents with an aim to immobilize populations or cause serious harm. The reasons for interest in these agents by individuals and organizations include relative ease of acquisition, potential for causing mass casualty or panic, modest financing requirement, availability of technology, and relative ease of delivery. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified Critical Biological Agents into three major categories. This classification was based on several criteria, which include severity of impact on human health, potential for delivery in a weapon, capacity to cause panic and special needs for development, and stockpiling of medication. Agents that could cause the greatest harm following deliberate use were placed in category A. Category B included agents capable of producing serious harm and significant mortality but of lower magnitude than category A agents. Category C included emerging pathogens that could be developed for mass dispersion in future and their potential as a major health threat. A brief description of the category A bioagents is included and the pathophysiology of two particularly prominent agents, namely anthrax and smallpox, is discussed in detail. The potential danger from biological agents and their ever increasing threat to human populations have created a need for developing technologies for their early detection, for developing treatment strategies, and for refinement of procedures to ensure survival of affected individuals so as to attain the ultimate goal of eliminating the threat from intentional use of

  9. Effect of biologic agents on radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel J Tobón

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel J Tobón1, Alain Saraux1,2, Valérie Devauchelle-Pensec1,21Immunology Laboratory, Morvan Hospital, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France; 2Rheumatology Unit, Hôpital de la Cavale Blanche, CHU Brest, FranceAbstract: The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA has benefited over the last few years from the introduction of biologic agents whose development was based on new insights into the immunological factors involved in the pathogenesis of RA and the development of joint damage. These biological agents have been proven effective in RA patients with inadequate responses to synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Preventing joint damage is now the primary goal of RA treatment, and guidelines exist for the follow-up of joint abnormalities. Most biologic agents produced high clinical and radiological response rates in patients with established or recent-onset RA. Thus, for the first time, obtaining a remission is a reasonable treatment goal in RA patients. Factors that are crucial to joint damage control are: early initiation of DMARDs, use of intensive treatments including biological agents, and close monitoring of clinical disease activity and radiographic progression. However, some patients remain unresponsive to all available treatments and continue to experience joint damage progression. A major objective now is to identify patients at high risk for severe joint damage, in order to tailor the treatment regimen to their specific needs.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, radiographic progression, biologics

  10. Biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis: 2008 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweiss, Nadera J; Hushaw, Linda L

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease with a complex underlying pathology and varied presentation in patients. Several novel biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have become available for the treatment of RA. Agents in late-stage clinical trials include golimumab and certolizumab, which are anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha agents; ocrelizumab, an anti-CD20 agent; and tocilizumab, an inhibitor of interleukin-6. As treatment options for RA expand, nursing care will play an increasingly important role in empowering patients through interventions such as patient education and adverse effect management. PMID:19142153

  11. Current laboratory methods for biological threat agent identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchal, E A; Teska, J D; Ludwig, G V; Shoemaker, D R; Ezzell, J W

    2001-09-01

    The authors present an integrated approach for the identification of biological threat agents. The methods used have been used extensively in field exercises and during response to incidents of biological terrorism. A diagnostic system, which integrates the clinical diagnosis or medical intelligence with immunodiagnostic tests, rapid gene amplification assays, and standard culture, provides results of the highest quality and confidence. In the future, selected reagents and technologies will be distributed through a network of civilian and military laboratories. PMID:11572145

  12. Pyrazine-Derived Disulfide-Reducing Agent for Chemical Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Lukesh, John C.; Wallin, Kelly K.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    For fifty years, dithiothreitol (DTT) has been the preferred reagent for the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins and other biomolecules. Herein we report on the synthesis and characterization of 2,3-bis(mercaptomethyl)pyrazine (BMMP), a readily accessible disulfide-reducing agent with reactivity under biological conditions that is markedly superior to DTT and other known reagents.

  13. Respiratory Protection Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.K. Prasad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and biological warfare (CBW agents pose unavoidable threat, both to soldiers and civilians.Exposure to such deadly agents amidst the CBW agents contaminated environment can be avoided bytaking proper protective measures. Respiratory protection is indispensable when the soldiers or civiliansare surrounded by such deadly environment as contamination-free air is needed for respiration purposes.In this context, an attempt has been made to review the literature for the past five decades on developmentof various protective devices for respiratory protection against aerosols, gases, and vapours of CBWagents. This review covers structural, textural, and adsorption properties of materials used in gas filtersand mechanical filters for the removal of CBW agents.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.686-697, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1692

  14. The Use of Biologic Agents in Athletes with Knee Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopka, Michaela; Bradley, James P

    2016-07-01

    Biologic agents are gaining popularity in the management of bony and soft tissue conditions about the knee. They are becoming the mainstay of nonoperative therapy in the high-demand athletic population. The most well-studied agents include platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cells-both of which have shown promise in the treatment of various conditions. Animal and clinical studies have demonstrated improved outcomes following PRP treatment in early osteoarthritis of the knee, as well as in chronic patellar tendinopathy. Early clinical evidence also lends support for PRP in the augmentation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Research investigating the role of biologic agents in collateral ligament and meniscal injuries is ongoing. Studies assessing the utility of stem cells have shown encouraging results in the setting of osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, strict regulations by the FDA continue to restrict their application in clinical practice. A major limitation in the interpretation of current data is the significant variability in the harvesting and preparation of both PRP and stem cells. As the volume and quality of evidence continue to grow, biologic agents are poised to become an integral component of comprehensive patient care throughout all orthopedic specialties. PMID:27206071

  15. Treatment of relapsing polychondritis in the era of biological agents.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Eoghan M

    2012-02-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare disorder, often requiring high doses of immunosuppressive therapy to control its potentially life-threatening consequences. The advent of biological agents has added to the armamentarium available to treat RP, but the lack of controlled trials, along with the small numbers of patients and disease heterogeneity means that new therapies are prescribed without the benefits of rigorous clinical research. Thus, information on individual cases is of value in expanding our knowledge of the use of biologic agents in rare conditions. We report on the use of rituximab in a patient who subsequently developed catastrophic aortic incompetence, and we review the literature in relation to the use of this drug in RP.

  16. Biologic Agents for Periodontal Regeneration and Implant Site Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Suárez-López del Amo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of molecular mediators or biologic agents has increased tremendously during the last decade in periodontology and dental implantology. Implant site development and reconstruction of the lost periodontium represent main fields in which these molecular mediators have been employed and investigated. Different growth factors trigger different reactions in the tissues of the periodontium at various cellular levels. Proliferation, migration, and differentiation constitute the main target areas of these molecular mediators. It was the purpose of this comprehensive review to describe the origin and rationale, evidence, and the most current understanding of the following biologic agents: Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB, Enamel Matrix Derivate (EMD, Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF, Recombinant Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (rhFGF-2, Bone Morphogenic Proteins (BMPs, BMP-2 and BMP-7, Teriparatide PTH, and Growth Differential Factor-5 (GDF-5.

  17. Biologic Agents for Periodontal Regeneration and Implant Site Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-López del Amo, Fernando; Monje, Alberto; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Tang, ZhiHui; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of molecular mediators or biologic agents has increased tremendously during the last decade in periodontology and dental implantology. Implant site development and reconstruction of the lost periodontium represent main fields in which these molecular mediators have been employed and investigated. Different growth factors trigger different reactions in the tissues of the periodontium at various cellular levels. Proliferation, migration, and differentiation constitute the main target areas of these molecular mediators. It was the purpose of this comprehensive review to describe the origin and rationale, evidence, and the most current understanding of the following biologic agents: Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB), Enamel Matrix Derivate (EMD), Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF), Recombinant Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (rhFGF-2), Bone Morphogenic Proteins (BMPs, BMP-2 and BMP-7), Teriparatide PTH, and Growth Differential Factor-5 (GDF-5). PMID:26509173

  18. Leaf microbiota of strawberries as affected by biological control agents

    OpenAIRE

    Sylla, Justine; Alsanius, Beatrix W; Krüger, Erika; Reineke, Annette; Strohmeier, Stephan; Wohanka, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of biological control agents (BCAs) against Botrytis cinerea in strawberry raises the question of whether there are any undesirable impacts of foliar applications of BCAs on nontarget microorganisms in the phyllosphere. Therefore, our objective was to investigate this issue within a field study. Strawberry plants were repeatedly sprayed with three BCAs—namely, RhizoVital 42 fl. (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42), Trianum-P (Trichoderma harzianum T22), and Naturalis (Beauver...

  19. Effect of biologic agents on radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Devauchelle, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Gabriel J Tobón1, Alain Saraux1,2, Valérie Devauchelle-Pensec1,21Immunology Laboratory, Morvan Hospital, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France; 2Rheumatology Unit, Hôpital de la Cavale Blanche, CHU Brest, FranceAbstract: The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has benefited over the last few years from the introduction of biologic agents whose development was based on new insights into the immunological factors involved in the pathogen...

  20. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Javaid, Muhammad Kashif; Ashiq, Mehrban; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontaminatio...

  1. Biological warfare agents as threats to potable water.

    OpenAIRE

    Burrows, W D; Renner, S E

    1999-01-01

    Nearly all known biological warfare agents are intended for aerosol application. Although less effective as potable water threats, many are potentially capable of inflicting heavy casualties when ingested. Significant loss of mission capability can be anticipated even when complete recovery is possible. Properly maintained field army water purification equipment can counter this threat, but personnel responsible for the operation and maintenance of the equipment may be most at risk of exposur...

  2. A Magnetic Sensor System for Biological Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect biological targets through sensing the stray field of magnetic beads which label the targets. Commonly, magnetic biosensors employ the “sandwich” method to immobilize biological targets, i.e., the targets are sandwiched between a bio-functionalized sensor surface and bio-functionalized magnetic beads. This method has been used very successfully in different application, but its execution requires a rather elaborate procedure including several washing and incubation steps. This dissertation investigates a new magnetic biosensor concept, which enables a simple and effective detection of biological targets. The biosensor takes advantage of the size difference between bare magnetic beads and compounds of magnetic beads and biological targets. First, the detection of super-paramagnetic beads via magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors is implemented. Frequency modulation is used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, enabling the detection of a single magnetic bead. Second, the concept of the magnetic biosensor is investigated theoretically. The biosensor consists of an MTJ sensor, which detects the stray field of magnetic beads inside of a trap on top of the MTJ. A microwire between the trap and the MTJ is used to attract magnetic beads to the trapping well by applying a current to it. The MTJ sensor’s output depends on the number of beads inside the trap. If biological targets are in the sample solution, the beads will form bead compounds consisting of beads linked to the biological targets. Since bead compounds are larger than bare beads, the number of beads inside the trapping well will depend on the presence of biological targets. Hence, the output of the MTJ sensor will depend on the biological targets. The dependences of sensor signals on the sizes of the MTJ sensor, magnetic beads and biological targets are studied to find the optimum constellations for the detection of specific biological targets. The optimization is demonstrated

  3. Automatic detection of biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present research work has dealt with the analysis of biological cell images in general, and more specially with the cervical cells. This work was carried out in order to develop an automaton leading to a better prevention of cancer through automated mass screening. The device has been implemented on Motorola 68.000 microprocessor system. The automaton carries out cell nucleus analysis in several steps. The main steps are: - First: the automaton focuses on an individual cell nucleus among the smear's cell (about 10.000), - Second: it process each nucleus image. The digital processing yields geometrical of the nucleus (area and perimeter) for each cell. These data are stored in a local memory for further discriminant analysis by a microcomputer. In this way smears are classed in two groups: hale smears and uncertain smears. The automaton uses a wired logic for image acquisition and its software algorithms provide image reconstruction. The reconstruction algorithms are general purpose. Tests have proved that they can reconstruct any two dimensional images independently of its geometrical form. Moreover they can make the reconstruction of any image among the several images present in observation field. The processing times registered during the tests (for different cases) were situated, all of them, below three minutes for 10,000 images (each of them formed by an average of 450 pixels). The interest of the method is generality and speed. The only restriction is the primary device sensor (CCD linear array) length. Thus the automaton application can be extended beyond the biological image field. (author)

  4. Detecting Biothreat Agents: the Portuguese National Reference Laboratory Response

    OpenAIRE

    Pelerito, Ana; Cordeiro, Rita; Núncio, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    At present, the threat of a biological terrorist event with a dangerous pathogen and its insidious impact are among the most, yet least understood, threats to civil society today. The use of manufactured weapon, such as bomb, will produce consequences limited in time hence the most of the damage occurs immediately. By contrast, the use of a biological weapon is an extended process whose scope and timing cannot be precisely controlled. Many biological agents could be used as biological w...

  5. Detection of Alkylating Agents using Electrical and Mechanical Means

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerchikov, Yulia; Borzin, Elena; Gannot, Yair; Shemesh, Ariel; Meltzman, Shai; Hertzog-Ronen, Carmit; Eichen, Yoav [Schulich Department of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, 32000, Haifa (Israel) (Israel); Tal, Shay [Present address: Systems Biology Department, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Stolyarova, Sara; Nemirovsky, Yael; Tessler, Nir, E-mail: chryoav@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, 32000, Haifa (Israel)

    2011-08-17

    Alkylating agents are reactive molecules having at least one polar bond between a carbon atom and a good leaving group. These often simple molecules are frequently used in organic synthesis, as sterilizing agents in agriculture and even as anticancer agents in medicine. Unfortunately, for over a century, some of the highly reactive alkylating agents are also being used as blister chemical warfare agents. Being relatively simple to make, the risk is that these will be applied by terrorists as poor people warfare agents. The detection and identification of such alkylating agents is not a simple task because of their high reactivity and simple structure of the reactive site. Here we report on new approaches to the detection and identification of such alkylating agents using electrical (organic field effect transistors) and mechanical (microcantilevers) means.

  6. Detection of Alkylating Agents using Electrical and Mechanical Means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkylating agents are reactive molecules having at least one polar bond between a carbon atom and a good leaving group. These often simple molecules are frequently used in organic synthesis, as sterilizing agents in agriculture and even as anticancer agents in medicine. Unfortunately, for over a century, some of the highly reactive alkylating agents are also being used as blister chemical warfare agents. Being relatively simple to make, the risk is that these will be applied by terrorists as poor people warfare agents. The detection and identification of such alkylating agents is not a simple task because of their high reactivity and simple structure of the reactive site. Here we report on new approaches to the detection and identification of such alkylating agents using electrical (organic field effect transistors) and mechanical (microcantilevers) means.

  7. Evanescent planar waveguide detection of biological warfare simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipe, David M.; Schoonmaker, Kenneth P.; Herron, James N.; Mostert, Michael J.

    2000-04-01

    An evanescent planar waveguide Mark 1.5 instrument was used to detect simulants of biological warfare agents; ovalbumin (OV), MS2 bacteriophage, BG, and Erwinia herbicola (EH). Polyclonal tracer antibodies were labeled with the fluorescent dye, Cy5. Discrete bands of polyclonal capture antibodies were immobilized to a polystyrene planar waveguide with molded integral lenses. An ST-6 CCD camera was used for detection. OV. MS2 and BG were detected in a simultaneous 3 by 3 array; with a total of nine measurements within 6 minutes. EH was analyzed in a separate array. Results were evaluate dat the US Army Joint Field Trials V, at the Dugway Proving Grounds. Over a 10 day period, 32 unknown samples were analyzed daily for each simulant. Detection limits: OV 10 ng/ml, MS2 107 pfu/ml, BG 105 cfu/ml. EH was detectable at 5 X 105 cfu/ml. Overall false positives were 3.0 percent. Therefore, the Mark 1.5 instrument, with a parallel array of detectors, evanescent flourescent excitation, and CCD imaging provides for rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of biological warfare agent simulants.

  8. Genetically engineered biological agents in therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Aleksandrovna Aseeva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease. Its prevalence is 20 to 70 cases per 100,000 women and varies by race and ethnicity. Despite considerable progress in traditional therapy, many problems associated with the management of these patients need to be immediately solved: thus, 50-80% are found to have activity signs and/or frequent exacerbations and about 30% of the patients have to stop work; Class IV lupus nephritis increases the risk of terminalrenal failure. In the past 20 years great progress has been made in studying the pathogenesis of SLE: biological targets to affect drugs have been sought and fundamentally new therapeutic goals defined. Belimumab is the first genetically biological agent specially designed to treat SLE, which is rightly regarded as one of the most important achievements of rheumatology in the past 50 years.

  9. Genetically engineered biological agents in therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Aleksandrovna Aseeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease. Its prevalence is 20 to 70 cases per 100,000 women and varies by race and ethnicity. Despite considerable progress in traditional therapy, many problems associated with the management of these patients need to be immediately solved: thus, 50-80% are found to have activity signs and/or frequent exacerbations and about 30% of the patients have to stop work; Class IV lupus nephritis increases the risk of terminalrenal failure. In the past 20 years great progress has been made in studying the pathogenesis of SLE: biological targets to affect drugs have been sought and fundamentally new therapeutic goals defined. Belimumab is the first genetically biological agent specially designed to treat SLE, which is rightly regarded as one of the most important achievements of rheumatology in the past 50 years.

  10. Mass spectrometry for the detection of bioterrorism agents: from environmental to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriez, Elodie; Armengaud, Jean; Fenaille, François; Ezan, Eric

    2016-03-01

    In the current context of international conflicts and localized terrorist actions, there is unfortunately a permanent threat of attacks with unconventional warfare agents. Among these, biological agents such as toxins, microorganisms, and viruses deserve particular attention owing to their ease of production and dissemination. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques for the detection and quantification of biological agents have a decisive role to play for countermeasures in a scenario of biological attacks. The application of MS to every field of both organic and macromolecular species has in recent years been revolutionized by the development of soft ionization techniques (MALDI and ESI), and by the continuous development of MS technologies (high resolution, accurate mass HR/AM instruments, novel analyzers, hybrid configurations). New possibilities have emerged for exquisite specific and sensitive detection of biological warfare agents. MS-based strategies for clinical application can now address a wide range of analytical questions mainly including issues related to the complexity of biological samples and their available volume. Multiplexed toxin detection, discovery of new markers through omics approaches, and identification of untargeted microbiological or of novel molecular targets are examples of applications. In this paper, we will present these technological advances along with the novel perspectives offered by omics approaches to clinical detection and follow-up. PMID:26956386

  11. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J., E-mail: jiri.dammer@lf1.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Salmovská 1, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Hospital Na Bulovce, Department of Radiological Physics, Budinova 2, 180 81 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F. [Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 31, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Benes, J. [Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Salmovská 1, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Sopko, V. [Hospital Na Bulovce, Department of Radiological Physics, Budinova 2, 180 81 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Gelbic, I. [Biology Centre, AS CR, Institute of Entomology, Department of Biochemistry and Physiology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-01

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system.

  12. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system

  13. Rapid detection of biothreat agents based on cellular machinery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd W.; Gantt, Richard W.

    2004-12-01

    This research addresses rapid and sensitive identification of biological agents in a complex background. We attempted to devise a method by which the specificity of the cellular transcriptional machinery could be used to detect and identify bacterial bio-terror agents in a background of other organisms. Bacterial cells contain RNA polymerases and transcription factors that transcribe genes into mRNA for translation into proteins. RNA polymerases in conjunction with transcription factors recognize regulatory elements (promoters) upstream of the gene. These promoters are, in many cases, recognized by the polymerase and transcription factor combinations of one species only. We have engineered a plasmid, for Escherichia coli, containing the virA promoter from the target species Shigella flexneri. This promoter was fused to a reporter gene Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). In theory the indicator strain (carrying the plasmid) is mixed with the target strain and the two are lysed. The cellular machinery from both cells mixes and the GFP is produced. This report details the results of testing this system.

  14. Comparison and Analysis of Biological Agent Category Lists Based On Biosafety and Biodefense

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Deqiao; Zheng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Biological agents pose a serious threat to human health, economic development, social stability and even national security. The classification of biological agents is a basic requirement for both biosafety and biodefense. We compared and analyzed the Biological Agent Laboratory Biosafety Category list and the defining criteria according to the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the European Union (EU) and China. We also compared and analyzed the Biologic...

  15. An Immunity-Based Anomaly Detection System with Sensor Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiteru Ishida

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an immunity-based anomaly detection system with sensor agents based on the specificity and diversity of the immune system. Each agent is specialized to react to the behavior of a specific user. Multiple diverse agents decide whether the behavior is normal or abnormal. Conventional systems have used only a single sensor to detect anomalies, while the immunity-based system makes use of multiple sensors, which leads to improvements in detection accuracy. In addition, we propose an evaluation framework for the anomaly detection system, which is capable of evaluating the differences in detection accuracy between internal and external anomalies. This paper focuses on anomaly detection in user’s command sequences on UNIX-like systems. In experiments, the immunity-based system outperformed some of the best conventional systems.

  16. Spectral and electrochemical detection of protonated triplex formation by a small-molecule anticancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lingyan; Li, Xi; Peng, Yinghua; Geng, Jie; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2009-10-01

    Triplex helical formation has been the focus of considerable interest because of possible applications in developing new molecular biology tools as well as therapeutic agents and the possible relevance of H-DNA structures in biology system. We report here that a small-molecule anticancer agent, coralyne, has binding preference to the less stable protonated triplex d(C +-T) 6:d(A-G) 6·d(C-T) 6 over duplex d(A-G) 6·d(C-T) 6 and shows different spectral and electrochemical characteristics when binding to triplex and duplex DNA, indicating that electrochemical technique can detect the less stable protonated triplex formation.

  17. Joint chemical agent detector (JCAD): the future of chemical agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laljer, Charles E.

    2003-08-01

    The Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD) has continued development through 2002. The JCAD has completed Contractor Validation Testing (CVT) that included chemical warfare agent testing, environmental testing, electromagnetic interferent testing, and platform integration validation. The JCAD provides state of the art chemical warfare agent detection capability to military and homeland security operators. Intelligence sources estimate that over twenty countries have active chemical weapons programs. The spread of weapons of mass destruction (and the industrial capability for manufacture of these weapons) to third world nations and terrorist organizations has greatly increased the chemical agent threat to U.S. interests. Coupled with the potential for U.S. involvement in localized conflicts in an operational or support capacity, increases the probability that the military Joint Services may encounter chemical agents anywhere in the world. The JCAD is a small (45 in3), lightweight (2 lb.) chemical agent detector for vehicle interiors, aircraft, individual personnel, shipboard, and fixed site locations. The system provides a common detection component across multi-service platforms. This common detector system will allow the Joint Services to use the same operational and support concept for more efficient utilization of resources. The JCAD detects, identifies, quantifies, and warns of the presence of chemical agents prior to onset of miosis. Upon detection of chemical agents, the detector provides local and remote audible and visual alarms to the operators. Advance warning will provide the vehicle crew and other personnel in the local area with the time necessary to protect themselves from the lethal effects of chemical agents. The JCAD is capable of being upgraded to protect against future chemical agent threats. The JCAD provides the operator with the warning necessary to survive and fight in a chemical warfare agent threat environment.

  18. Magnetic biosensor system to detect biological targets

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2012-09-01

    Magneto-resistive sensors in combination with magnetic beads provide sensing platforms, which are small in size and highly sensitive. These platforms can be fully integrated with microchannels and electronics to enable devices capable of performing complex tasks. Commonly, a sandwich method is used that requires a specific coating of the sensor\\'s surface to immobilize magnetic beads and biological targets on top of the sensor. This paper concerns a micro device to detect biological targets using magnetic concentration, magnetic as well as mechanical trapping and magnetic sensing. Target detection is based on the size difference between bare magnetic beads and magnetic beads with targets attached. This method remedies the need for a coating layer and reduces the number of steps required to run an experiment. © 2012 IEEE.

  19. High-throughput assay for optimising microbial biological control agent production and delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack of technologies to produce and deliver effective biological control agents (BCAs) is a major barrier to their commercialization. A myriad of variables associated with BCA cultivation, formulation, drying, storage, and reconstitution processes complicates agent quality maximization. An efficie...

  20. Determination of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents in biological and environmental samples: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telgmann, Lena [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany); Sperling, Michael [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany); European Virtual Institute for Speciation Analysis (EVISA), Münster (Germany); Karst, Uwe, E-mail: uk@uni-muenster.de [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany)

    2013-02-18

    Highlights: ► All major methods for the analysis of Gd-based MRI contrast agents are discussed. ► Biological and environmental samples are covered. ► Pharmacokinetics and species transformation can be investigated. ► The figures of merit as limit of detection and analysis time are described. -- Abstract: The development of analytical methods and strategies to determine gadolinium and its complexes in biological and environmental matrices is evaluated in this review. Gadolinium (Gd) chelates are employed as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the 1980s. In general they were considered as safe and well-tolerated, when in 2006, the disease nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was connected to the administration of MRI contrast agents based on Gd. Pathogenesis and etiology of NSF are yet unclear and called for the development of several analytical methods to obtain elucidation in this field. Determination of Gd complex stability in vitro and in vivo, as well as the quantification of Gd in body fluids like blood and urine was carried out. Separation of the Gd chelates was achieved with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). For detection, various methods were employed, including UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A second challenge for analysts was the discovery of high concentrations of anthropogenic Gd in surface waters draining populated areas. The source could soon be determined to be the increasing administration of Gd complexes during MRI examinations. Identification and quantification of the contrast agents was carried out in various surface and groundwater samples to determine the behavior and fate of the Gd chelates in the environment. The improvement of limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) was and still is the goal of past and ongoing

  1. A review of research on common biological agents and their impact on environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological agents are unique class of microorganisms which can be used to produce the disease in large populations of humans, animals and plants. If used for hostile purposes, any disease-causing microorganism could be considered a weapon. The use of biological agents is not a new concept and history is replete with examples of biological weapon use. Before the twenty century, biological warfare took on three main forms by deliberate poisoning of food and water with infectious material, use of microorganisms or toxins in some form of weapon system, and use of biologically inoculated fabrics. Four kinds of biological warfare agents are bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae, fungi. These are distinguished by being living organisms, that reproduce within their host victims, who then become contagious with a deadly multiplier effect, bacteria, viruses, or fungi or toxin found in nature can be used to kill or injure people. Biological agents may be used for an isolated assassination, as well as to cause incapacitation or death to thousands. These biological agents represent a dangerous military threat because they are alive, and are therefore unpredictable and uncontrollable once released. The act of bioterrorism can range from a simple hoax to the actual use of biological weapons. Biological agents have the potential to make an environment more dangerous over time. If the environment is contaminated, a long-term threat to the population could be created. This paper discusses common biological agents, their mode of action in living organisms and possible impact on the environment. (author)

  2. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Muhammad Kashif; Ashiq, Mehrban; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation. PMID:27293964

  3. Bioforensics: Characterization of biological weapons agents by NanoSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P K; Ghosal, S; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Hutcheon, I D

    2007-02-26

    The anthrax attacks of Fall 2001 highlight the need to develop forensic methods based on multiple identifiers to determine the origin of biological weapons agents. Genetic typing methods (i.e., DNA and RNA-based) provide one attribution technology, but genetic information alone is not usually sufficient to determine the provenance of the material. Non-genetic identifiers, including elemental and isotopic signatures, provide complementary information that can be used to identify the means, geographic location and date of production. Under LDRD funding, we have successfully developed the techniques necessary to perform bioforensic characterization with the NanoSIMS at the individual spore level. We have developed methods for elemental and isotopic characterization at the single spore scale. We have developed methods for analyzing spore sections to map elemental abundance within spores. We have developed rapid focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning techniques for spores to preserve elemental and structural integrity. And we have developed a high-resolution depth profiling method to characterize the elemental distribution in individual spores without sectioning. We used these newly developed methods to study the controls on elemental abundances in spores, characterize the elemental distribution of in spores, and to study elemental uptake by spores. Our work under this LDRD project attracted FBI and DHS funding for applied purposes.

  4. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Muhammad Kashif; Ashiq, Mehrban; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation. PMID:27293964

  5. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif Javaid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation.

  6. Advanced Algorithms for Rapidly Reconstructing Clandestine Releases of Biological Agents in Urban Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinn, J.H.; Hall, C.H.; Neher, L.A.; Wilder, F.J.; Gouveia, D.W.; Layton, D.W.; Daniels, J.I.

    2000-02-25

    As the United States plays a greater role in the 21st Century as global peacekeeper and international defender of human rights and democratic principles, there is an increasing likelihood that it will become the focus of acts of terrorism. Such acts of terrorism--sometimes described as ''asymmetric''--could involve the threat or use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), particularly those considered unconventional, which include ones designed to release chemical or biological agents. In fact, biological agents are of great concern because, as noted by D.A. Henderson of the Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, ''... with shortages of hospital space, vaccines, antibiotics, there would be chaos.'' (Williams, 2000). Unfortunately, potential aggressor nations, terrorist groups, and even individuals, can, for a modest cost and effort, develop covert capabilities for manufacturing, transporting, and offensively using biological weapons of mass destruction. Furthermore, there is evidence to indicate that terrorist increasingly are targeting civilian populations--in order to inflict indiscriminate casualties--as well as other more traditional targets such as symbolic buildings or organizations (see Tucker, 1999), which suggest that introducing rapid treatment after a biological event may be more practical than concentrating on prevention (see Siegrist, 1999), especially because sensors are unlikely to be placed in all major urban areas to detect even an atmospheric biological release. For these reasons, and because symptoms for the majority of those effected may not occur or be directly identified for several days, early identification of a covert undetected biological event (CUBE) will contribute to timely medical intervention, which can save many lives.

  7. Passive standoff detection of chemical warfare agents on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, Jean-Marc; Puckrin, Eldon; Hancock, Jim; Lecavalier, Pierre; Lepage, Carmela Jackson; Jensen, James O

    2004-11-01

    Results are presented on the passive standoff detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) liquid agents on surfaces by the Fourier-transform IR radiometry. This study was performed during surface contamination trials at Defence Research and Development Canada-Suffield in September 2002. The goal was to verify that passive long-wave IR spectrometric sensors can potentially remotely detect surfaces contaminated with CW agents. The passive sensor, the Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, was used in the trial to obtain laboratory and field measurements of CW liquid agents, HD and VX. The agents were applied to high-reflectivity surfaces of aluminum, low-reflectivity surfaces of Mylar, and several other materials including an armored personnel carrier. The field measurements were obtained at a standoff distance of 60 m from the target surfaces. Results indicate that liquid contaminant agents deposited on high-reflectivity surfaces can be detected, identified, and possibly quantified with passive sensors. For low-reflectivity surfaces the presence of the contaminants can usually be detected; however, their identification based on simple correlations with the absorption spectrum of the pure contaminant is not possible. PMID:15540446

  8. Passive Standoff Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, Jean-Marc; Puckrin, Eldon; Hancock, Jim; Lecavalier, Pierre; Lepage, Carmela Jackson; Jensen, James O.

    2004-11-01

    Results are presented on the passive standoff detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) liquid agents on surfaces by the Fourier-transform IR radiometry. This study was performed during surface contamination trials at Defence Research and Development Canada-Suffield in September 2002. The goal was to verify that passive long-wave IR spectrometric sensors can potentially remotely detect surfaces contaminated with CW agents. The passive sensor, the Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, was used in the trial to obtain laboratory and field measurements of CW liquid agents, HD and VX. The agents were applied to high-reflectivity surfaces of aluminum, low-reflectivity surfaces of Mylar, and several other materials including an armored personnel carrier. The field measurements were obtained at a standoff distance of 60 m from the target surfaces. Results indicate that liquid contaminant agents deposited on high-reflectivity surfaces can be detected, identified, and possibly quantified with passive sensors. For low-reflectivity surfaces the presence of the contaminants can usually be detected; however, their identification based on simple correlations with the absorption spectrum of the pure contaminant is not possible.

  9. 75 FR 69396 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Arundo donax

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Arundo donax AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service... the control of Arundo donax (giant reed, Carrizo cane). The environmental assessment considers the... a biological control agent to reduce the severity of Arundo donax infestations. We are making...

  10. 75 FR 64984 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Hawkweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Hawkweeds AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service... the control of hawkweeds (Hieracium spp.). The environmental assessment considers the effects of, and... States as a biological control agent to reduce the severity of infestations of hawkweeds. We are...

  11. Insect pathogens as biological control agents: Back to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, L A; Grzywacz, D; Shapiro-Ilan, D I; Frutos, R; Brownbridge, M; Goettel, M S

    2015-11-01

    The development and use of entomopathogens as classical, conservation and augmentative biological control agents have included a number of successes and some setbacks in the past 1years. In this forum paper we present current information on development, use and future directions of insect-specific viruses, bacteria, fungi and nematodes as components of integrated pest management strategies for control of arthropod pests of crops, forests, urban habitats, and insects of medical and veterinary importance. Insect pathogenic viruses are a fruitful source of microbial control agents (MCAs), particularly for the control of lepidopteran pests. Most research is focused on the baculoviruses, important pathogens of some globally important pests for which control has become difficult due to either pesticide resistance or pressure to reduce pesticide residues. Baculoviruses are accepted as safe, readily mass produced, highly pathogenic and easily formulated and applied control agents. New baculovirus products are appearing in many countries and gaining an increased market share. However, the absence of a practical in vitro mass production system, generally higher production costs, limited post application persistence, slow rate of kill and high host specificity currently contribute to restricted use in pest control. Overcoming these limitations are key research areas for which progress could open up use of insect viruses to much larger markets. A small number of entomopathogenic bacteria have been commercially developed for control of insect pests. These include several Bacillus thuringiensis sub-species, Lysinibacillus (Bacillus) sphaericus, Paenibacillus spp. and Serratia entomophila. B. thuringiensis sub-species kurstaki is the most widely used for control of pest insects of crops and forests, and B. thuringiensis sub-species israelensis and L. sphaericus are the primary pathogens used for control of medically important pests including dipteran vectors. These pathogens

  12. PLANT ISOFLAVONES: BIOSYNHTESIS, DETECTION AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Naumenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological properties, chemical structures and biosynthesis pathways of plant isoflavones, especially soybean isoflavones (daidzein, genistein and glycitein are reviewed. The structures of isoflavones, and their aglicone and glucosides (glycosides forms as well as isoflavone biosynthesis pathways are described. General information about the advanced methods for the detection of isoflavones and their conjugates are considered. The importance of the profiling of isoflavones, flavonoids and their conjugates by means of analytical tools and methods to dissolve some questions in biology and medicine is discussed. The review provides data on the major isoflavone content in some vegetable crops and in the tissues of different soybean varieties. Health benefits and treatment or preventive properties of isoflavones for cancer, cardiovascular, endocrine diseases and metabolic disorders are highlighted. The mechanisms that may explain their positive biological effects are considered. The information on the application of advanced technologies to create new plant forms producing isoflavonoids with a predicted level of isoflavones, which is the most favorable for the treatment is given. The possibilities to use the metabolic engineering for the increasing of accumulation and synthesis of isoflavones at the non-legume crops such as tobacco, Arabidopsis and maize are considered. The examples how the plant tissues, which are not naturally produced of the isoflavones, can obtain potential for the synthesis of biologically active compounds via inducing of the activity of the introduced enzyme isoflavon synthase, are given. Specific biochemical pathways for increasing the synthesis of isoflavone genistein in Arabidopsis thaliana tissues are discussed. It is concluded that plant genetic engineering which is focused on modification of the secondary metabolites contain in plant tissues, enables to create the new crop varieties with improved agronomic properties and

  13. Distributed Intrusion Detection for Computer Systems Using Communicating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Ingram, Dennis J.; Kremer, H. Steven; Neil C. Rowe

    2000-01-01

    This paper appeared in the Proceedings of the 2000 Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium (CCRTS), Monterey, CA, June 11-13, 2000, and won the award for “Best Paper”. Intrusion detection for computer systems is a key problem of the Internet, and the Windows NT operating system has a number of vulnerabilities. The work presented here demonstrates that independent detection agents under Windows NT can be run in a distributed fashion, each operating mostly independent ...

  14. Biological toxin warfare: threat, proliferation, and the effects of neutron energy on BTW agents

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Jeffrey R.

    1995-01-01

    The threat of biological weapons presents a special military challenge. Biological toxin warfare (BTW) agents are more potent than chemical warfare agents. Depending on the yield of the nuclear weapon, a biological weapon also can have a higher lethality than nuclear weapons. This thesis examines existing international restricions on the proliferation of BTW technology and identifies their shortcomings. These loopholes contribute to the eay availability of the technology necessary to examine ...

  15. Biological soil crusts: a fundamental organizing agent in global drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem function is profoundly affected by plant community composition, which is ultimately determined by factors that govern seed retention. Dryland ecosystems constitute ~35% of terrestrial surfaces, with most soils in these regions covered by biological soil crusts (biocrusts), a community whose autotrophs are dominated by cyanobacteria, lichens, and mosses. Studies at 550 sites revealed that plant community composition was controlled by the interaction among biocrust type, disturbance regime, and external morphology of seeds. In bare soils (due to disturbance), all seed types were present in the seedbank and plant community. As biocrusts became better developed (i.e., the cover of lichens and mosses increased), they more strongly filtered out seeds with appendages. Thus, soils under late successional biocrusts contained seedbanks dominated by smooth seeds and vascular plants growing in late successional biocrusts were dominated by those with smooth seeds. Therefore, the tension between the removal of biocrusts by soil surface disturbance and their recovery creates a shifting mosaic of plant patch types in both space and time. Because changes in vascular plant communities reverberate throughout both below ground and above ground food webs and thus affect multiple trophic levels, we propose that biocrusts are a fundamental organizing agent in drylands worldwide. Future increased demand for resources will intensify land use both temporally and spatially, resulting in an increased rate of biocrust loss across larger areas. As a result, we can expect shifts in the composition and distribution of plant communities, accompanied by concomitant changes in many aspects of dryland ecosystems. Conceptual model of shifting dryland plant mosaics through space and time. Within the large circles, soil surface type changes with time in the same space, going from bare uncrusted soil (B) to cyanobacterial biocrust (C) to lichen/moss (L/M) biocrust. Disturbance (D) drives the

  16. Electrochemiluminescence DNA sensor array for multiplex detection of biowarfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehar-Délèze, Anna-Maria; Gransee, Rainer; Martinez-Montequin, Sergio; Bejarano-Nosas, Diego; Dulay, Samuel; Julich, Sandra; Tomaso, Herbert; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2015-09-01

    Development of a fully automated electrochemiluminescence (ECL) DNA assay for multiplex detection of six biowarfare agents is described. Aminated-DNA capture probes were covalently immobilised on activated-carbon electrodes and subsequently hybridised to target strands. Detection was achieved via a sandwich-type assay after Ru(bpy)3(2+)-labelled reporter probes were hybridised to the formed probe-target complexes. The assay was performed in an automated microsystem in a custom designed ECL detection box with integrated fluidics, electronics,and movable photomultiplier detector. The obtained limits of detection were 0.6-1.2 nmol L(-1) for six targets ranging from 50 to 122 base pairs in size, with linear range 1-15 nmol L(-1). Non-specific adsorption and cross-reactivity were very low. Detection of six targets on a single chip was achieved with subnanomolar detection limits. PMID:26100549

  17. Treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents in Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Mercieca, Liam; Boffa, Michael J.; Clark, Eileen; Scerri, Lawrence; Aquilina, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Biologic therapy has revolutionalised the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis leading to improved clinical outcomes and quality of life scores. This study aims to determine current biologic use in psoriatic patients at our Dermatology department at Sir Paul Boffa hospital, Malta. Method: All patients who were administered biologic therapy for psoriasis in Malta until the end of 2014 were included. Data included demographic details, disease dur...

  18. Mass spectrometry for the detection of bioterrorism agents: from environmental to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriez, E; Armengaud, J; Fenaille, F; Ezan, E

    2016-03-01

    The threat posed by bioterrorism is a serious concern as the consequences of a large-scale biological attack would be devastating, causing significant social and economic disruption, while being potentially achievable at a relatively moderate cost and without the need for specific high-level technology. The biological agents potentially concerned include both microorganisms and protein toxins. In this Special Feature article, Eric Ezan and co-workers provide an up to date review and report on some of the technological developments that have recently enabled the detection of these bioagents to move forward. They also address today's challenges in translating MS-based approaches from the original environmental detection to clinical diagnosis. Dr. Ezan is a biochemist at the Centre d'Etude Atomique de Saclay (Gif sur Yvette, France). Amongst his research interests is the study of metabolic processing of biologics by numerous techniques including mass spectrometry. PMID:26956394

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A novel and efficient biological control agent for Colletotrichum acutatum during pre-harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marcos Roberto; Klein, Mariana Nadjara; Ferraz, Luriany Pompeo; da Silva, Aline Caroline; Kupper, Katia Cristina

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of six isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in controlling Colletotrichum acutatum, the causal agent of postbloom fruit drop that occur in pre-harvest citrus. We analyzed the mechanisms of action involved in biological control such as: production of antifungal compounds, nutrient competition, detection of killer activity, and production of hydrolytic enzymes of the isolates of S. cerevisiae on C. acutatum and their efficiency in controlling postbloom fruit drop on detached citrus flowers. Our results showed that all six S. cerevisiae isolates produced antifungal compounds, competed for nutrients, inhibited pathogen germination, and produced killer activity and hydrolytic enzymes when in contact with the fungus wall. The isolates were able to control the disease when detached flowers were artificially inoculated, both preventively and curatively. In this work we identified a novel potential biological control agent for C. acutatum during pre-harvest. This is the first report of yeast efficiency for the biocontrol of postbloom fruit drop, which represents an important contribution to the field of biocontrol of diseases affecting citrus populations worldwide. PMID:25960430

  20. The Effects of Biological Agents on Melanocytic Nevi: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurşah Doğan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the changes of the melanocytic nevi during the biological agent therapy. Methods: For this purpose, 40 index nevi of 25 adult patients who were treated with infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept or rituximab were included in this study. All of the patients underwent clinical and dermoscopic evaluation before the beginning of the treatment, 6 months and 1 year after the beginning of the treatment. Among dermoscopic examination methods, pattern analysis, ABCD score system and three-point checklist were performed. Results: In terms of the diameter of the index nevi, there was no statistically significant difference between the first examination and that of the sixth month, but differences was observed between the first examination and that of the twelfth month. There was also no statistically significant difference in total dermoscopy scores calculated by ABCD score system application on 31 nevi at the times of assessment. At the end of the study, we detected 24 new nevi formation in 7 patients, whom all of were over 35 years of age, however no eruptive nevi or melanoma formation were observed. Conclusion: An increase in the diameters of the present nevi and formation of new nevi may be seen with biological agent therapy in one-year-follow-up.

  1. Anabolic agents: recent strategies for their detection and protection from inadvertent doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-05-01

    According to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List, anabolic agents consist of exogenous anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), endogenous AAS and other anabolic agents such as clenbuterol and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Currently employed strategies for their improved detection include the prolongation of the detection windows for exogenous AAS, non-targeted and indirect analytical approaches for the detection of modified steroids (designer steroids), the athlete's biological passport and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the detection of the misuse of endogenous AAS, as well as preventive doping research for the detection of SARMs. The recent use of these strategies led to 4-80-fold increases of adverse analytical findings for exogenous AAS, to the detection of the misuse of new designer steroids, to adverse analytical findings of different endogenous AAS and to the first adverse analytical findings of SARMs. The strategies of the antidoping research are not only focused on the development of methods to catch the cheating athlete but also to protect the clean athlete from inadvertent doping. Within the past few years several sources of inadvertent doping with anabolic agents have been identified. Among these are nutritional supplements adulterated with AAS, meat products contaminated with clenbuterol, mycotoxin (zearalenone) contamination leading to zeranol findings, and natural products containing endogenous AAS. The protection strategy consists of further investigations in case of reasonable suspicion of inadvertent doping, publication of the results, education of athletes and development of methods to differentiate between intentional and unintentional doping. PMID:24632537

  2. Hand-Held Devices Detect Explosives and Chemical Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ion Applications Inc., of West Palm Beach, Florida, partnered with Ames Research Center through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements to develop a miniature version ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). While NASA was interested in the instrument for detecting chemicals during exploration of distant planets, moons, and comets, the company has incorporated the technology into a commercial hand-held IMS device for use by the military and other public safety organizations. Capable of detecting and identifying molecules with part-per-billion sensitivity, the technology now provides soldiers with portable explosives and chemical warfare agent detection. The device is also being adapted for detecting drugs and is employed in industrial processes such as semiconductor manufacturing.

  3. Assessment of tuberculosis infection during treatment with biologic agents in a BCG-vaccinated pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Cavusoglu, Cengiz; Dortkardesler, Merve; Sozeri, Betul

    2016-02-01

    Biologic therapies, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blockers, are commonly used to treat rheumatological diseases in childhood. Screening patients for tuberculosis (TB) is highly recommended before starting therapy with TNF-α blockers. Despite appropriate screening, TB still remains a problem in patients receiving anti-TNF therapy in countries where TB is not endemic. TB in anti-TNF-treated patients is often diagnosed late due to altered presentation, and this delay results in high morbidity and mortality with a high proportion of extrapulmonary and disseminated disease. The aim of this study is to show the course of TB disease in children who are on biologic therapy, in an era where many of the children are BCG-vaccinated and TB is intermediately endemic. We recruited 71 patients with several types of inflammatory diseases. Six of them had a positive test result during TB screening and began taking isoniazid (INH) prophylactically. During the 3 years of follow-up, none of these patients developed TB disease. Biologic agents can be safely used in a BCG-vaccinated pediatric population, as long as patients are closely monitored to ensure that any cases of TB will be detected early. PMID:25515621

  4. Development of a rapid method for the automatic classification of biological agents' fluorescence spectral signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carestia, Mariachiara; Pizzoferrato, Roberto; Gelfusa, Michela; Cenciarelli, Orlando; Ludovici, Gian Marco; Gabriele, Jessica; Malizia, Andrea; Murari, Andrea; Vega, Jesus; Gaudio, Pasquale

    2015-11-01

    Biosecurity and biosafety are key concerns of modern society. Although nanomaterials are improving the capacities of point detectors, standoff detection still appears to be an open issue. Laser-induced fluorescence of biological agents (BAs) has proved to be one of the most promising optical techniques to achieve early standoff detection, but its strengths and weaknesses are still to be fully investigated. In particular, different BAs tend to have similar fluorescence spectra due to the ubiquity of biological endogenous fluorophores producing a signal in the UV range, making data analysis extremely challenging. The Universal Multi Event Locator (UMEL), a general method based on support vector regression, is commonly used to identify characteristic structures in arrays of data. In the first part of this work, we investigate fluorescence emission spectra of different simulants of BAs and apply UMEL for their automatic classification. In the second part of this work, we elaborate a strategy for the application of UMEL to the discrimination of different BAs' simulants spectra. Through this strategy, it has been possible to discriminate between these BAs' simulants despite the high similarity of their fluorescence spectra. These preliminary results support the use of SVR methods to classify BAs' spectral signatures.

  5. Voltammetric detection of biological molecules using chopped carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Kazuharu; Yugami, Asako; Kojima, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Voltammetric detection of biological molecules was carried out using chopped carbon fibers produced from carbon fiber reinforced plastics that are biocompatible and inexpensive. Because chopped carbon fibers normally are covered with a sizing agent, they are difficult to use as an electrode. However, when the surface of a chopped carbon fiber was treated with ethanol and hydrochloric acid, it became conductive. To evaluate the functioning of chopped carbon fibers, voltammetric measurements of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-) were carried out. Redoxes of FAD, ascorbic acid and NADH as biomolecules were recorded using cyclic voltammetry. The sizing agents used to bundle the fibers were epoxy, polyamide and polyurethane resins. The peak currents were the greatest when using the chopped carbon fibers that were created with epoxy resins. When the electrode response of the chopped carbon fibers was compared with that of a glassy carbon electrode, the peak currents and the reversibility of the electrode reaction were sufficient. Therefore, the chopped carbon fibers will be useful as disposable electrodes for the sensing of biomolecules. PMID:20953048

  6. Paradoxical reactions under TNF-α blocking agents and other biological agents given for chronic immune-mediated diseases: an analytical and comprehensive overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussirot, Éric; Aubin, François

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical adverse events (PAEs) have been reported during biological treatment for chronic immune-mediated diseases. PAEs are defined as the occurrence during biological agent therapy of a pathological condition that usually responds to this class of drug. A wide range of PAEs have been reported including dermatological, intestinal and ophthalmic conditions, mainly with antitumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) agents. True PAEs include psoriasis, Crohn's disease and hidradenitis suppurativa. Other PAEs may be qualified as borderline and include uveitis, scleritis, sarcoidosis and other granulomatous diseases (granuloma annulare, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis), vasculitis, vitiligo and alopecia areata. Proposed hypotheses to explain these PAEs include an imbalance in cytokine production, the differential immunological properties between the monoclonal antibodies and TNF-α soluble receptor, an unopposed type I interferon production and a shift towards a Th1/Th2 profile. Data from registries suggest that the risk for paradoxical psoriasis is low and non-significant. We discuss management of these PAEs, which depends on the type and severity of the adverse events, pre-existing treated conditions and the possibility of alternative therapeutic options for the underlying disease. Paradoxical adverse events are not restricted to anti-TNF-α agents and close surveillance of new available biological drugs (anti-interleukin-17/23, anti-integrin) is warranted in order to detect the occurrence of new or as yet undescribed events. PMID:27493788

  7. 75 FR 39437 - Optimizing the Security of Biological Select Agents and Toxins in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... appropriate practices for physical security and cyber security for facilities that possess Tier 1 agents. The..., 2010. [FR Doc. 2010-16864 Filed 7-7-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Executive Order 13546--Optimizing the Security of Biological Select Agents and Toxins in the United...

  8. 75 FR 28232 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... Plant Health Inspection Service has prepared an environmental assessment relative to the control of... a biological control agent to reduce the severity of hemlock woolly adelgid infestations. We...

  9. 77 FR 46373 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... Control Agent for Hemlock Woolly Adelgid AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... prepared an environmental assessment relative to the release of Symnus coniferarum to control hemlock... of Symnus coniferarum into the eastern United States for use as a biological control agent to...

  10. Anti-tick biological control agents: assessment and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samish, M., H.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Glazer, I.

    2008-01-01

    Widespread and increasing resistance to most available acaracides threatens both global livestock industries and public health. This necessitates better understanding of ticks and the diseases they transmit in the development of new control strategies. Ticks: Biology, Disease and Control is written by an international collection of experts and covers in-depth information on aspects of the biology of the ticks themselves, various veterinary and medical tick-borne pathogens, and aspects of traditional and potential new control methods. A valuable resource for graduate students, academic researchers and professionals, the book covers the whole gamut of ticks and tick-borne diseases from microsatellites to satellite imagery and from exploiting tick saliva for therapeutic drugs to developing drugs to control tick populations. It encompasses the variety of interconnected fields impinging on the economically important and biologically fascinating phenomenon of ticks, the diseases they transmit and methods of their control.

  11. COOPERATIVE MULTI-AGENTS DETECTION WITH SPATIALLY DISTRIBUTED ARRAY SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkacem BENADDA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper deals with the design of a multi-agents system associated with array sensors dedicated to wireless telecommunications. We will present as first part, the spatially distributed array general modeled as well as the channel spatial propagation stimulus. Indeed, the integration and implementation of these systems is not simple and often goes through heuristics optimization design phases. This synthesis will be useful for selection of the different algorithms related to the beamforming and detection problem. As second part, we present the general multi-agents model proposed as solution. In this case multi-agents systems are presented as a new design paradigm that allows an efficient use of multicore- processor and distributed systems architectures currently widely available and preferred. In our case, multi-agents systems will bring the concepts of artificial intelligence, collaboration principles, autonomy, proactive behavior and communications possibility. The final solution will provide several issues: simultaneous several signals acquisition, effective spatial filttering, optimal performance under the imposed environment circumstances and prompt reaction and treatment.

  12. A multi-agent genetic algorithm for community detection in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhangtao; Liu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Complex networks are popularly used to represent a lot of practical systems in the domains of biology and sociology, and the structure of community is one of the most important network attributes which has received an enormous amount of attention. Community detection is the process of discovering the community structure hidden in complex networks, and modularity Q is one of the best known quality functions measuring the quality of communities of networks. In this paper, a multi-agent genetic algorithm, named as MAGA-Net, is proposed to optimize modularity value for the community detection. An agent, coded by a division of a network, represents a candidate solution. All agents live in a lattice-like environment, with each agent fixed on a lattice point. A series of operators are designed, namely split and merging based neighborhood competition operator, hybrid neighborhood crossover, adaptive mutation and self-learning operator, to increase modularity value. In the experiments, the performance of MAGA-Net is validated on both well-known real-world benchmark networks and large-scale synthetic LFR networks with 5000 nodes. The systematic comparisons with GA-Net and Meme-Net show that MAGA-Net outperforms these two algorithms, and can detect communities with high speed, accuracy and stability.

  13. Probiotic Bacteria as Biological Control Agents in Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Verschuere, L.; Rombaut, G.; Sorgeloos, P.; Verstraete, W.

    2000-01-01

    There is an urgent need in aquaculture to develop microbial control strategies, since disease outbreaks are recognized as important constraints to aquaculture production and trade and since the development of antibiotic resistance has become a matter of growing concern. One of the alternatives to antimicrobials in disease control could be the use of probiotic bacteria as microbial control agents. This review describes the state of the art of probiotic research in the culture of fish, crustace...

  14. Biological agents and biosimilars: Essential information for the internist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasina, Luca; Casadei, Gianluigi; Nobili, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Biologics embrace a wide range of substances synthesized by cells or living organisms by means of different biological processes, including recombinant DNA technology, controlled gene expression, or antibody technologies. A biosimilar establishes similarity to the reference medicinal product in terms of quality characteristics, biological activity, safety, and efficacy based on a comprehensive comparability exercise. Minimizing development costs and accelerating their market access create a convergence of interests between health services, worried about sustainability, and generic manufacturers. While the demonstration of bioequivalence is sufficient for small synthetic molecules, this approach is not scientifically applicable to a copy of biological drug constituted by large and complex molecules, which are similar but not identical to the originator and are also subject to different post-translational processes. Internists should be confident that the development process of biosimilars ensures a comparable risk-to-benefit balance with the originators. On the basis of available evidence and pharmacovigilance network, there are no grounds to believe that the use of a biosimilar carries more risks for the patient than the use of an originator. Since the first biosimilar was authorized in Europe in 2006, no clinical alerts have raised red flags about the established EMA biosimilar pathway. In this article, we discuss some of the most frequent concerns raised by clinicians about biosimilars and try to explains the scientific principles underlying the biosimilar concept established in the EU in order to license biosimilar drugs. PMID:27342030

  15. Agent-based Models in Synthetic Biology: Tools for Simulation and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V.Krishnamurthy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multiset of agents based modeling and simulation paradigm for synthetic biology. The multiset of agents –based programming paradigm, can be interpreted as the outcome arising out of deterministic, nondeterministic or stochastic interaction among elements in a multiset object space, that includes the environment. These interactions are like chemical reactions and the evolution of the multiset can emulate the system biological functions. Since the reaction rules are inherently parallel, any number of actions can be performed cooperatively or competitively among the subsets of elements, so that the elements evolve toward equilibrium or emergent state. Practical realization of this paradigm for system biological simulation is achieved through the concept of transactional style programming with agents, as well as soft computing (neural- network principles. Also we briefly describe currently available tools for agent-based-modeling, simulation and animation.

  16. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy - VII. Biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gatto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of biological agents has been a major turning-point in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, particularly in rheumatoid arthritis. This review describes the principle milestones that have led, through the knowledge of the structure and functions of nucleic acids, to the development of production techniques of the three major families of biological agents: proteins, monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. A brief history has also been traced of the cytokines most involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IL-1 and TNF and the steps which have led to the use of the main biological drugs in rheumatology: anakinra, infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept and rituximab.

  17. New sensitive agents for detecting singlet oxygen by electron spin resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, T; Sakurai, K; Oi, T; Obara, H; Ohya, H; Kamada, H

    1999-05-01

    Free radicals are well-established transient intermediates in chemical and biological processes. Singlet oxygen, though not a free radical, is also a fairly common reactive chemical species. It is rare that singlet oxygen is studied with the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique in biological systems, because there are few suitable detecting agents. We have recently researched some semiquinone radicals. Specifically, our focus has been on bipyrazole derivatives, which slowly convert to semiquinone radicals in DMSO solution in the presence of potassium tert-butoxide and oxygen. These bipyrazole derivatives are dimers of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one and have anti-ischemic activities and free radical scavenging properties. In this work, we synthesized a new bipyrazole derivative, 4,4'-bis(1p-carboxyphenyl-3-methyl-5-hydroxyl)-pyrazole, DRD156. The resulting semiquinone radical, formed by reaction with singlet oxygen, was characterized by ESR spectroscopy. DRD156 gave no ESR signals from hydroxyl radical, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide. DRD156, though, gives an ESR response with hypochlorite. This agent, nevertheless, has a much higher ability to detect singlet oxygen than traditional agents with the ESR technique. PMID:10381208

  18. Terahertz signatures of biological-warfare-agent simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana; Woolard, Dwight L.; Khromova, Tatyana; Partasarathy, Ramakrishnan; Majewski, Alexander; Abreu, Rene; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Pan, Shing-Kuo; Ediss, Geoff

    2004-09-01

    This work presents spectroscopic characterization results for biological simulant materials measured in the terahertz gap. Signature data have been collected between 3 cm-1 and 10 cm-1 for toxin Ovalbumin, bacteria Erwinia herbicola, Bacillus Subtilis lyophilized cells and RNA MS2 phage, BioGene. Measurements were conducted on a modified Bruker FTIR spectrometer equipped with the noise source developed in the NRAL. The noise source provides two orders of magnitude higher power in comparison with a conventional mercury lamp. Photometric characterization of the instrument performance demonstrates that the expected error for sample characterization inside the interval from 3 to 9.5 cm-1 is less then 1%.

  19. Integrative biological studies of anti-tumour agents

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    3, 11-difluoro-6, 8, 13-trimethyl-8H- quino [4, 3, 2-kl] acridinium methosulfate (RHPS4) is a member of a series of pentacyclic acridines developed at the University of Nottingham, which bind to, and stabilise the structure of G-quadruplex DNA and inhibit the action of telomerase at sub-micromolar concentrations in the cell free TRAP assay and limit cancer cell growth therefore leading to the conclusion that RHPS4 has potential anti-tumour activity. Previous biological studies, however, have...

  20. Naphthoflavones as Antiproliferative Agents: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Onkar; Nepali, Kunal; Bedi, Pms; Qayum, Arem; Singh, Shashank; Jain, Subheet K

    2016-01-01

    The present study involves the design and synthesis of naphthoflavones as antiproliferative agents. The strategy presents naphthoflavones as hybrids of naphthyl based chalcones and flavones. A panel of human cancer cell lines were employed for the cytotoxicity studies. DK-13 exhibited significant cytoxicity against MiaPaCa-2 cell lines with IC50 value of 1.93 μM and 5.63 μM against MCF-7 cell lines. The compound DK-13 was found to induce apoptosis evidenced through phase contrast microscopy, DAPI staining, and mitochondrial membrane potential loss. The cell phase distribution studies indicated an increase from 11.26 % (control sample) to 55.19 % (sample treated with 20 μM compound DK-13) in the apoptotic population. PMID:26845133

  1. A Bayesian Dose-finding Design for Oncology Clinical Trials of Combinational Biological Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunyan; Yuan, Ying; Ji, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Treating patients with novel biological agents is becoming a leading trend in oncology. Unlike cytotoxic agents, for which efficacy and toxicity monotonically increase with dose, biological agents may exhibit non-monotonic patterns in their dose-response relationships. Using a trial with two biological agents as an example, we propose a dose-finding design to identify the biologically optimal dose combination (BODC), which is defined as the dose combination of the two agents with the highest efficacy and tolerable toxicity. A change-point model is used to reflect the fact that the dose-toxicity surface of the combinational agents may plateau at higher dose levels, and a flexible logistic model is proposed to accommodate the possible non-monotonic pattern for the dose-efficacy relationship. During the trial, we continuously update the posterior estimates of toxicity and efficacy and assign patients to the most appropriate dose combination. We propose a novel dose-finding algorithm to encourage sufficient exploration of untried dose combinations in the two-dimensional space. Extensive simulation studies show that the proposed design has desirable operating characteristics in identifying the BODC under various patterns of dose-toxicity and dose-efficacy relationships. PMID:24511160

  2. The use contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, František; Sopko, V.; Jakůbek, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, C01096 (2011), s. 1-7. ISSN 1748-0221. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /12./. Cambridge, 11.07.2010-15.7.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06005 Grant ostatní: Research Program(CZ) 6840770029; Research Program(CZ) 6840770040; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600550614; GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06007; GA MŠk(CZ) 1PO4LA211; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : x-ray radiography and digital radiography (DR) * x-ray detectors * inspections with x-rays Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.869, year: 2011

  3. Probiotic bacteria as biological control agents in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuere, L; Rombaut, G; Sorgeloos, P; Verstraete, W

    2000-12-01

    There is an urgent need in aquaculture to develop microbial control strategies, since disease outbreaks are recognized as important constraints to aquaculture production and trade and since the development of antibiotic resistance has become a matter of growing concern. One of the alternatives to antimicrobials in disease control could be the use of probiotic bacteria as microbial control agents. This review describes the state of the art of probiotic research in the culture of fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and live food, with an evaluation of the results obtained so far. A new definition of probiotics, also applicable to aquatic environments, is proposed, and a detailed description is given of their possible modes of action, i.e., production of compounds that are inhibitory toward pathogens, competition with harmful microorganisms for nutrients and energy, competition with deleterious species for adhesion sites, enhancement of the immune response of the animal, improvement of water quality, and interaction with phytoplankton. A rationale is proposed for the multistep and multidisciplinary process required for the development of effective and safe probiotics for commercial application in aquaculture. Finally, directions for further research are discussed. PMID:11104813

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  5. Biological evaluation of 99mTc-Voriconazole as a potential agent for diagnosis of fungal infections by gamma scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spread of HIV has led to an increase of fungal infections such as candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Several types of antifungals are used to treat them and some of them can be radiolabeled with a gamma emitting agent to allow detection by scintigraphy of foci of infection. Voriconazole is a triazole agent, suitable for the synthesis of a complex linked with the precursor [99mTc(H2O)3(CO)3]+. The aim of his work was to label and determine the physicochemical and biological characteristics of voriconazole with 99mTc for the early detection of fungal infections. Radiochemical purity was determined by HPLC and the complex remained stable during at least 120 min. In vivo studies in rats bearing either sterile inflammation, infection with C. Albicans or A. Niger showed differentiation of the processes not only in biodistribution but also in scintigraphic images

  6. Communicative interactions improve visual detection of biological motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Manera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the context of interacting activities requiring close-body contact such as fighting or dancing, the actions of one agent can be used to predict the actions of the second agent. In the present study, we investigated whether interpersonal predictive coding extends to interactive activities--such as communicative interactions--in which no physical contingency is implied between the movements of the interacting individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants observed point-light displays of two agents (A and B performing separate actions. In the communicative condition, the action performed by agent B responded to a communicative gesture performed by agent A. In the individual condition, agent A's communicative action was substituted with a non-communicative action. Using a simultaneous masking detection task, we demonstrate that observing the communicative gesture performed by agent A enhanced visual discrimination of agent B. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding complements and extends previous evidence for interpersonal predictive coding, suggesting that the communicative gestures of one agent can serve as a predictor for the expected actions of the respondent, even if no physical contact between agents is implied.

  7. Control of Lymantria dispar L. by biological agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGGuo-cai; WANGYue-jie; YANGXiao-guang

    2005-01-01

    The experiment on control of Lymantria dispar L by using different kinds of biological measures, including nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) of Lymantria dispar L., BtMP-342, sex-attractant as well as botanical insecticide, was carried out in the forest regions of Inner Mongolia in 2003. Two concentrations (2.632×106 PIB·ml-1 and 2.632×107 PIB·ml-1) of Lymantria dispar L. NPV were sprayed on the 2rd-instar-larvae of L. dispar and 70% and 77.8% control effect were obtained respectively. BtMP0-342 was applied to the 3rd- and 4th-instar larvae and the control effect was around 80%. The sex-attractant provided by Canada Pacific Forestry Research Center also showed a good result in trapping L. dispar adults. The self-produced botanical insecticide, which was extracted from a kind of poisonous plant distributed in Daxing'an Mountains, China, exhibited a good control result in controlling the larvae of L. dispar, and 82% mortality was observed when spraying primary liquid of the botanical insecticide on the 3rd-5th-instar-larvae in lab.

  8. Agentes Biológicos en el tratamiento de la Artritis Reumatoide Biological Agents in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Díaz-Coto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available El mayor conocimiento inmuno-patológico de la artritis reumatoide permitió mediante una sofisticada tecnología molecular elaborar antagonistas contra blancos específicos en diversos pasos de la inmuno patogenia de la enfermedad. Existe una amplia evidencia sobre la eficacia, tolerabilidad y seguridad de estos agentes en diferentes escenarios clínicos de la artritis reumatoide. La introducción de estos agentes biológicos en el arsenal terapéutico de la artritis reumatoide ha marcado un hito en su evolución y pronóstico artritis reumatoide.A better understanding of the immuno-pathological rheumatoid arthritis enabled by sophisticated molecular technology to develop antagonists against specific targets in various steps of the immune pathogenesis of the disease. There is ample evidence on the efficacy, tolerability and safety of these agents in different clinical scenarios of rheumatoid arthritis. The introduction of biological agents in the armamentarium of rheumatoid arthritis has marked a milestone in its evolution and prognosis rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Optical detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Michael E.; Pushkarsky, Michael B.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2004-12-01

    We present an analytical model evaluating the suitability of optical absorption based spectroscopic techniques for detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) in ambient air. The sensor performance is modeled by simulating absorption spectra of a sample containing both the target and multitude of interfering species as well as an appropriate stochastic noise and determining the target concentrations from the simulated spectra via a least square fit (LSF) algorithm. The distribution of the LSF target concentrations determines the sensor sensitivity, probability of false positives (PFP) and probability of false negatives (PFN). The model was applied to CO2 laser based photoacosutic (L-PAS) CWA sensor and predicted single digit ppb sensitivity with very low PFP rates in the presence of significant amount of interferences. This approach will be useful for assessing sensor performance by developers and users alike; it also provides methodology for inter-comparison of different sensing technologies.

  10. Physicochemical and biological study of a renal scintigraphy agent: the DMSA - 99mTc complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis deals with the study of the dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) marked with 99mTc, a recently developed scintigraphy agent used for the kidney isotopic exploration. The author notably studied the relationships between the physicochemical properties of solutions of dimercaptosuccinic acid marked with 99mTc and the biological distribution of 99mTc in order to reach a better understanding of the biological mechanism which results in technetium fixation to the kidney

  11. Chemical and Biological Warfare: Should Rapid Detection Techniques Be Researched To Dissuade Usage? A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Hurst

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry, microbiology and genetic engineering have opened new doorways for the human race to propel itself to a better future. However, there is a darker side to Bioengineering. One element of this is the manufacture and proliferation of biological and chemical weapons. It is clearly in the interest of humankind to prevent the future use of such weapons of mass destruction. Though many agents have been proposed as potential biological and chemical weapons, the feasibility of these weapons is a matter of conjecture. The unpredictable and indiscriminate devastation caused by natural epidemics and hazardous chemicals during wartime without medical treatment should warn humans of the dangers of employing them as weapons. This study argues rapid detection techniques may dissuade future use. Many agents are far less toxic to treatment. A quick response time to most attacks will decrease the chances of serious health issues. The agent will be less effective and discourage the attacker from using the weapon. Fortunately, the Chemical and Biological Weapons Convention (CWCIBWC allows defensive work in the area of biological and chemical weapons. Consequently, the review will discuss history, delivery/dispersal systems and specific agents of the warfare. The study presents current developments in biosensors for toxic materials of defense interest. It concludes with future directions for biosensor development.

  12. Update on the use of systemic biologic agents in the treatment of noninfectious uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasadhika S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sirichai Pasadhika,1 James T Rosenbaum2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Southern Arizona Veterans Administration Health Care System, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Legacy Devers Eye Institute, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Uveitis is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Noninfectious uveitis may be associated with other systemic conditions, such as human leukocyte antigen B27-related spondyloarthropathies, inflammatory bowel disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, Behçet's disease, and sarcoidosis. Conventional therapy with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents (such as methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine may not be sufficient to control ocular inflammation or prevent non-ophthalmic complications in refractory patients. Off-label use of biologic response modifiers has been studied as primary and secondary therapeutic agents. They are very useful when conventional immunosuppressive therapy has failed or has been poorly tolerated, or to treat concomitant ophthalmic and systemic inflammation that might benefit from these medications. Biologic therapy, primarily infliximab, and adalimumab, have been shown to be rapidly effective for the treatment of various subtypes of refractory uveitis and retinal vasculitis, especially Behçet's disease-related eye conditions and the uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Other agents such as golimumab, abatacept, canakinumab, gevokizumab, tocilizumab, and alemtuzumab may have great future promise for the treatment of uveitis. It has been shown that with proper monitoring, biologic therapy can significantly improve quality of life in patients with uveitis, particularly those with concurrent systemic symptoms. However, given high cost as well as the limited long-term safety data, we do not routinely recommend biologics as first-line therapy for noninfectious uveitis in most patients. These agents should be used with caution by experienced clinicians. The present

  13. A Bioanalytical Platform for Simultaneous Detection and Quantification of Biological Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Hans Sigrist; Marc-André Avondet; Friedrich Heitger; Hui Gao; François Crevoisier; Weingart, Oliver G.

    2012-01-01

    Prevalent incidents support the notion that toxins, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants or animals are increasingly responsible for food poisoning or intoxication. Owing to their high toxicity some toxins are also regarded as potential biological warfare agents. Accordingly, control, detection and neutralization of toxic substances are a considerable economic burden to food safety, health care and military biodefense. The present contribution describes a new versatile instrument and related p...

  14. Evaluation of agents to detect inflammatory foci using an experimental animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have evaluated the propensities of four agents- two metal complexes and two protein species, viz. 67Ga-citrate, 99mTc-citrate, 99mTc-human immunoglobulin (99mTc-HIG); and 99mTc-human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA), for localization of (turpentine- induced) inflammatory lesions in a rat and rabbit animal model systems. All these radiopharmaceuticals showed fairly good uptake in inflammatory lesions. 99mTc-HIG, 99mTc-HSA and 67Ga-citrate showed slower blood clearance and higher liver uptakes. On the other hand 99mTc-citrate demonstrated faster blood clearance and negligible liver and gut accumulation. The respective inflamed/normal muscle (IM/NM) ratios obtained with these agents in this animal model were in the following order: 99mTc-HIG>99mTc-HSA> 67Ga-citrate>99mTc-citrate at 5 h post injection. Although the IM/NM was relatively low in the case of 99mTc-citrate as compared with other radiopharmaceuticals the inflammation could be detected within 1-3 h. post injection because of the higher activities that could be injected with this radiopharmaceutical. Since 99mTc-citrate is predominantly excreted via renal pathway it is rapidly cleared from blood and shows fairly good accumulation in infection/inflammatory lesions at early time periods along with low uptakes in liver and adjacent organs. This agent can therefore be beneficially used to detect the abdominal abscess(es)/inflammation(s) within 1-3 h post injection. Because of its favourable characteristics, physical, biological, clinical, and even cost-effectiveness, it is suggested that 99mTc-citrate could be tried out as an agent for detection of inflammation including abdominal and vertebral abscess(es). (author)

  15. Enhancement of biological control agents for use against forest insect pests and diseases through biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavicek, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Research and development efforts in our research group are focused on the generation of more efficacious biological control agents through the techniques of biotechnology for use against forest insect pests and diseases. Effective biological controls for the gypsy moth and for tree fungal wilt pathogens are under development. The successful use of Gypchek, a formulation of the Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdNPV), in gypsy moth control programs has generated considerable interest in that agent. As a consequence of its specificity, LdPNV has negligible adverse ecological impacts compared to most gypsy moth control agents. However, LdNPV is not competitive with other control agents in terms of cost and efficacy. We are investigating several parameters of LdNPV replication and polyhedra production in order to enhance viral potency and efficacy thus mitigating the current disadvantages of LdNPV for gypsy moth control, and have identified LdNPV variants that will facilitate these efforts. Tree endophytic bacteria that synthesize antifungal compounds were identified and an antibiotic compound from one of these bacteria was characterized. The feasibility of developing tree endophytes as biological control agents for tree vascular fungal pathogens is being investigated.

  16. Microcantilever technology for law enforcement and anti-terrorism applications: chemical, biological, and explosive material detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. D.; Rogers, B.; Whitten, R.

    2005-05-01

    The remarkable sensitivity, compactness, low cost, low power-consumption, scalability, and versatility of microcantilever sensors make this technology among the most promising solutions for detection of chemical and biological agents, as well as explosives. The University of Nevada, Reno, and Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc (NNTS) are currently developing a microcantilever-based detection system that will measure trace concentrations of explosives, toxic chemicals, and biological agents in air. A baseline sensor unit design that includes the sensor array, electronics, power supply and air handling has been created and preliminary demonstrations of the microcantilever platform have been conducted. The envisioned device would measure about two cubic inches, run on a small watch battery and cost a few hundred dollars. The device could be operated by untrained law enforcement personnel. Microcantilever-based devices could be used to "sniff out" illegal and/or hazardous chemical and biological agents in high traffic public areas, or be packaged as a compact, low-power system used to monitor cargo in shipping containers. Among the best detectors for such applications at present is the dog, an animal which is expensive, requires significant training and can only be made to work for limited time periods. The public is already accustomed to explosives and metal detection systems in airports and other public venues, making the integration of the proposed device into such security protocols straightforward.

  17. Risk assessment and stakeholder perceptions in novel biological control agent release: YST as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of risk assessment are to learn about whether a candidate agent would be safe to use in the environment where release is planned, and to present such information in a clear, understandable format to regulators, stakeholders, and the public. Plant pathogens evaluated for biological co...

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis therapy with genetically engineered biological agents in the Republic of Karelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers whether a current treatment option for rheumatoid arthritis with genetically engineered biological agents that selectively block the activity of individual proinflammatory mediators and cell surface antigens involved in autoimmune inflammation may be performed in Karelia, which can achieve control of the disease, retard its progression, and improve prognosis.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis therapy with genetically engineered biological agents in the Republic of Karelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers whether a current treatment option for rheumatoid arthritis with genetically engineered biological agents that selectively block the activity of individual proinflammatory mediators and cell surface antigens involved in autoimmune inflammation may be performed in Karelia, which can achieve control of the disease, retard its progression, and improve prognosis.

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis therapy with genetically engineered biological agents in the Republic of Karelia

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko

    2013-01-01

    The paper considers whether a current treatment option for rheumatoid arthritis with genetically engineered biological agents that selectively block the activity of individual proinflammatory mediators and cell surface antigens involved in autoimmune inflammation may be performed in Karelia, which can achieve control of the disease, retard its progression, and improve prognosis.

  1. Is 'class effect' relevant when assessing the benefit/risk profile of a biologic agent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterry, W.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, genetically predisposed skin disorder, characterised by thickened scaly plaques. Although no therapy is recognised as curative, therapies aimed at symptom control include biologic agents that are generally designed to block molecular activation of cellular pathways of a patho

  2. Trichogramma spp. as biological control agents in the Philippines: history and current practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichogramma parasitoids have long been recognized as important and viable biological control agents against lepidopteran pests of rice, corn and sugarcane in the Philippines. We describe the history of research and use of Trichogramma spp. in the Philippines in three main areas: 1) field surveys – ...

  3. Rapid Ultrasensitive Chemical-Fingerprint Detection of Chemical and Biochemical Warfare Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ASHBY, CAROL I.; SHEPODD, TIMOTHY J.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.; MURON, DAVID J.

    2002-12-01

    Vibrational spectra can serve as chemical fingerprints for positive identification of chemical and biological warfare molecules. The required speed and sensitivity might be achieved with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using nanotextured metal surfaces. Systematic and reproducible methods for preparing metallic surfaces that maximize sensitivity have not been previously developed. This work sought to develop methods for forming high-efficiency metallic nanostructures that can be integrated with either gas or liquid-phase chem-lab-on-a-chip separation columns to provide a highly sensitive, highly selective microanalytical system for detecting current and future chem/bio agents. In addition, improved protein microchromatographic systems have been made by the creation of acrylate-based porous polymer monoliths that can serve as protein preconcentrators to reduce the optical system sensitivity required to detect and identify a particular protein, such as a bacterial toxin.

  4. Aluminum nitride graphene for DMMP nerve agent adsorption and detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ab initio van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) calculations, we investigate the adsorption of DMMP nerve agent on graphene, BN and AlN graphenes, involving full geometry optimization. Several active sites for both the interacting systems were considered in the adsorption process. The detailed analysis of the structural and electronical properties of energetically favorable configurations is carried out. The results show that adsorption of DMMP molecule on the Al site of the AlN graphene is energetically preferable. The calculated binding energy and equilibrium distance are about −0.74 eV (−72.34 kJ mol−1) and 2.035 Å, respectively, accompanying with charge transfer of 0.23 e. In addition, the P–O bond is rather significantly elongated when DMMP is adsorbed on AlN graphene. Compared to carbon graphene or BN graphene, the AlN graphene has stronger interaction with the DMMP molecule and can provide more sensitive signal for a single DMMP molecule. In particular, the semiconducting AlN graphene would become metallic after adsorption DMMP. Consequently, the AlN graphene is a promising candidate for the DMMP sensing and detection. Our ab initio vdW-DF findings present evidence for a rational benchmark for the applicability of the AlN graphene for DMMP adsorption and detection. - Highlights: • Ab initio vdW-DF calculations were used for interaction of DMMP with various types of graphene. • Full structural optimization was performed for several possible active sites. • Electronic structure of the energetically favorable complexes was analyzed. • First-principles calculations showed that AlN graphene is a very promising candidate for DMMP sensing and detection

  5. Implications of Rheumatic Disease and Biological Response-Modifying Agents in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David M; Borah, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    The preoperative evaluation for any reconstructive or aesthetic procedure requires a detailed history of existing medical conditions and current home medications. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and psoriasis is high, but the impact of these chronic illnesses on surgical outcome and the side effects of the powerful medications used for treatment are often underappreciated. In this review, the authors highlight key perioperative considerations specific to rheumatologic diseases and their associated pharmacologic therapies. In particular, the authors discuss the perioperative management of biological response-modifying agents, which have largely become the new standard of therapy for many rheumatic diseases. The literature reveals three key perioperative concerns with biological therapy for rheumatic disease: infection, wound healing delays, and disease flare. However, data on specific perioperative complications are lacking, and it remains controversial whether withholding biological therapy before surgery is of benefit. The risk of these adverse events is influenced by several factors: age, sex, class of biological agent, duration of exposure, dosage, onset and severity of disease, and type of surgical procedure. Overall, it remains best to develop an individualized plan. In younger patients with recent onset of biological therapy, it is reasonable to withhold therapy based on 3 to 5 half-lives of the specific agent. In older patients with a substantial history of rheumatic disease, the decision to discontinue therapy must be weighed and decided carefully in conjunction with the rheumatologist. PMID:26595025

  6. Architecture for Intrusion Detection System with Fault Tolerance Using Mobile Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Chintan Bhatt; Asha Koshti; Hemant Agrawal; Zakiya Malek; Bhushan Trivedi

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a survey of the work, done for making an IDS fault tolerant.Architecture of IDS that usesmobile Agent provides higher scalability. Mobile Agent uses Platform for detecting Intrusions using filterAgent, co-relater agent, Interpreter agent and rule database. When server (IDS Monitor) goes down,other hosts based on priority takes Ownership. This architecture uses decentralized collection andanalysis for identifying Intrusion. Rule sets are fed based on user-behaviour or application...

  7. Biological Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LABOR UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety & Health Administration About OSHA A to Z Index Contact Us ... OF LABOR Career & Internships | Contact Us Occupational Safety & Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 800- ...

  8. Environmental distribution and population biology of Candidatus Accumulibacter, a primary agent of Biological Phosphorus Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, S. Brook; Warnecke, Falk; Madejska, Julita; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Members of the uncultured bacterial genus Candidatus Accumulibacter are capable of intracellular accumulation of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), but were also recently shown to inhabit freshwater and estuarine sediments. Additionally, metagenomic sequencing of two bioreactor cultures enriched in Candidatus Accumulibacter, but housed on separate continents, revealed the potential for glob...

  9. How psoriasis patients perceive, obtain, and use biologic agents: Survey from an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamangar, Faranak; Isip, Leah; Bhutani, Tina; Dennis, Madison; Heller, Misha M; Lee, Eric S; Nie, Hong; Liao, Wilson

    2013-02-01

    The availability of new biologic agents for the treatment of psoriasis provides hope for improved quality of life outcomes. However, the way patients come to use biologics, the potential barriers they encounter, and their attitudes towards using these medications are still not well studied. Here, we conducted a survey of 106 psoriasis patients at an academic medical center to discern patient attitudes towards biologics. We found that most patients learn of biologics through their physician and perform follow-up research using the Internet. Most patients did not find it difficult to make the decision to start a biologic. Difficulty in obtaining biologics was associated with age less than 55 (p = 0.01), lower income level (p = 0.007), and lack of insurance (p = 0.04). Patients were found to have high satisfaction and compliance rates on biologics. Of patients who missed a dose of their biologic, this was mainly due to logistical reasons such as not having the medication or forgetting to take it, rather than being depressed or overwhelmed. Patients with lower income levels had increased cut backs in personal expenses due to co-payments (p = 0.001). Among respondents, the mean annual out-of-pocket expense for a biologic was $557.12 per year, with a range of $0-7000. PMID:22007699

  10. Multi-level and Secured Agent-based Intrusion Detection System

    OpenAIRE

    Sodiya, Adesina Simon

    2006-01-01

    Since Intrusion Detection System (IDS) has become necessary security tool for detecting attacks on computer network and resources, it is therefore essential to improve on previous designs. In past, many mobile agent-based IDSs have been designed, but there still exists some drawbacks. Some of these drawbacks are low detection efficiency, high false alarm rate and agent security. A multi-level and secured IDS architecture that is based on mobile agent is presented on this work to correct these...

  11. nab-Paclitaxel in combination with biologically targeted agents for early and metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megerdichian, Christine; Olimpiadi, Yuliya; Hurvitz, Sara A

    2014-06-01

    Taxanes are highly active chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of early-stage and metastatic breast cancer. Novel formulations have been developed to improve efficacy and decrease toxicity associated with these cytotoxic agents. nab-Paclitaxel is a biologically interactive, solvent-free, 130-nm-sized albumin-bound paclitaxel, developed to avoid the Cremophor vehicle used in solvent-based paclitaxel. Based on a pivotal phase 3 study, nab-paclitaxel was shown to be safely infused at a significantly higher dose of paclitaxel than the doses used with standard paclitaxel therapy, and had a shorter infusion time, no premedication, and higher response rates. It is now approved in the United States for treatment of breast cancer after failure of combination chemotherapy for metastatic disease or relapse within 6 months of adjuvant therapy, and has demonstrated promising efficacy and favorable tolerability. Recently, several phase 2 and 3 studies have suggested a role for nab-paclitaxel in combination with biologically targeted agents for the treatment of early- and late-stage breast cancer. This review will discuss the findings of clinical trials evaluating nab-paclitaxel in combination with biologically targeted therapeutic agents for breast cancer in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic settings. PMID:24560997

  12. Population regulation of a classical biological control agent: larval density dependence in Neochetina eichhorniae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a biological control agent of water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J R U; Rees, M; Ajuonu, O

    2006-04-01

    The release of classical biological control agents has reduced the economic, environmental and social problems caused by water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes; however, additional control measures are needed in some locations. Water hyacinth plants were treated with different densities of eggs of the weevil Neochetina eichhorniae Warner, one of the main control agents, under different nutrient regimes in a controlled experiment. Plants were destructively sampled and the development of N. eichhorniae was assessed. The survival of first and second instars declined as larval density increased. Plant nutrient status did not directly affect the mortality rate of larvae, but at higher nutrient concentrations larvae developed faster and were larger at a given developmental stage. It is argued that the density dependence operating in N. eichhorniae occurs through an interaction between young larvae and leaf longevity. Consequently, events which disrupt water hyacinth leaf dynamics, e.g. frost or foliar herbicides, will have a disproportionately large effect on the control agents and may reduce the level of control of the host. PMID:16556335

  13. Genetically Engineered Protein Modules: Development and Applications in Anti-Viral Agent Screening and Cancer Marker Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Payal

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Genetically Engineered Protein Modules: Development and Applications in Anti-Viral Agent Screening and Cancer Marker Detection byPayal BiswasDoctor of Philosophy Cell Molecular and Developmental Biology Graduate ProgramUniversity of California, Riverside, August 2010Dr. Wilfred Chen, ChairpersonOne of the most critical aspects in drug discovery is the bioactivity screening assay, by which compounds that most effectively inhibit the target are identified. During t...

  14. Low-power ultraviolet lidar for standoff detection of BW agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Coorg R.; Huang, Wen; Bufton, Jack; Achey, Alexander; Dawson, Jeffrey; Serino, Robert M.; Shi, Wenhui

    2004-08-01

    A compact ultraviolet lidar stand-off sensor was recently developed and field-tested for detection of bio warfare (BW) agent stimulant aerosols and interferents. It employed a low-power (~5mW), continuous-wave, 375nm semiconductor ultraviolet optical source (SUVOS) laser diode that was modulated at high-speed with a pseudo-random (PR) code to provide range-resolved lidar detection of both aerosol elastic scattering and fluorescence. The sensor incorporated a 150mm diameter receiver telescope and 3 photon-counting detection channels centered at 375nm, 440nm, and 550nm. Aerosol elastic and fluorescence lidar profiles were obtained by correlating the signal photon-counts with the PR code. Tests of the lidar were performed first with simulants released in the Large Aerosol Chamber at Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center, MD at a lidar range of only 7.5m. The second phase of testing was done at Dugway Proving Ground, UT. Here the lidar was continuously scanned (+/- 13°) in a horizontal plane to detect downwind simulant and interferent aerosol disseminations at ranges of several hundred meters. Preliminary analyses of these tests show that the lidar detected fluorescence from the BW simulants at ranges up to 100m, and elastic scattering from aerosols up to 350m.

  15. Medical applications of nanoparticles in biological imaging, cell labeling, antimicrobial agents, and anticancer nanodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravina; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the applications of nanotechnology in the fields of medical and life sciences. Nanoparticles have shown promising applications from diagnosis to treatment of various types of diseases including cancer. In this review, we discuss the applications of nanostructured materials such as nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanorods, nanowires, and carbon nanotubes in diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labeling, contrast agents for biological imaging, antimicrobial agents, drug delivery systems, and anticancer nanodrugs for treatment of cancer and other infectious diseases. The adverse affects of nanoparticles on human skin from daily use in cosmetics and general toxicology of nanoscale materials are also reviewed. PMID:21870454

  16. Controlled biological and biomimetic systems for landmine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Maki K

    2007-08-30

    Humanitarian demining requires to accurately detect, locate and deactivate every single landmine and other buried mine-like objects as safely and as quickly as possible, and in the most non-invasive manner. The quality of landmine detection affects directly the efficiency and safety of this process. Most of the available methods to detect explosives and landmines are limited by their sensitivity and/or operational complexities. All landmines leak with time small amounts of their explosives that can be found on surrounding ground and plant life. Hence, explosive signatures represent the robust primary indicator of landmines. Accordingly, developing innovative technologies and efficient techniques to identify in real-time explosives residue in mined areas represents an attractive and promising approach. Biological and biologically inspired detection technology has the potential to compete with or be used in conjunction with other artificial technology to complement performance strengths. Biological systems are sensitive to many different scents concurrently, a property that has proven difficult to replicate artificially. Understanding biological systems presents unique opportunities for developing new capabilities through direct use of trained bio-systems, integration of living and non-living components, or inspiring new design by mimicking biological capabilities. It is expected that controlled bio-systems, biotechnology and microbial techniques will contribute to the advancement of mine detection and other application domains. This paper provides directions, evaluation and analysis on the progress of controlled biological and biomimetic systems for landmine detection. It introduces and discusses different approaches developed, underlining their relative advantages and limitations, and highlighting trends, safety and ecology concern, and possible future directions. PMID:17662594

  17. Biological effects of radiation in combination with other physical, chemical or biological agents. Annex L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annex considers the combined action of radiation with potentially important environmental conditions. Since there is a scarcity of systematic data on which an analysis of combined effects can be based, this Annex will be more hypothetical and will attempt to suggest definitions, to identify suitable methods of analysis, to select from a large amount of diffuse information the conditions and the data of importance for further consideration and to provide suggestions for future research. For humans in environmental circumstances the UNSCEAR Committee has been unable to document any clear case of synergistic interaction between radiation and other agents, which could lead to substantial modifications of the risk estimates for significant sections of the population

  18. Structural, spectroscopic and biological investigation of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder composed of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents has been synthesized and characterized with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), glycol propylene, glycerin and glycerin plus ammonia were used as capping agents. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that nanoparticles form agglomerates with the size from 80 to 120 nm while particles size determined from the XRD experiment was in the range from 7 to 21 nm. XPS and XRD experiments revealed that depending on capping and reducing agents used in the synthesis nanoparticles are composed of Cu2O, CuO or a mixture of them. The biological activity test performed for a selected sample where the capping agent was glycerin plus ammonia has shown promising killing/inhibiting behavior, very effective especially for Gram negatives bacteria. - Highlights: • We obtained copper oxide nanoparticles in a powder form. • Several capping agents were tested. • Structural and chemical tests showed that the main component were Cu2O and CuO. • The size of nanoparticles was in the range 7–21 nm. • Nanoparticles with glycerin and ammonia capping agent showed good antibacterial properties

  19. Structural, spectroscopic and biological investigation of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, A., E-mail: ana.maria.nowak@gmail.com [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Szade, J.; Talik, E.; Ratuszna, A. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Ostafin, M. [Agricultural University of Cracow, Department of Microbiology, Krakow (Poland); Peszke, J. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Powder composed of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents has been synthesized and characterized with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), glycol propylene, glycerin and glycerin plus ammonia were used as capping agents. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that nanoparticles form agglomerates with the size from 80 to 120 nm while particles size determined from the XRD experiment was in the range from 7 to 21 nm. XPS and XRD experiments revealed that depending on capping and reducing agents used in the synthesis nanoparticles are composed of Cu{sub 2}O, CuO or a mixture of them. The biological activity test performed for a selected sample where the capping agent was glycerin plus ammonia has shown promising killing/inhibiting behavior, very effective especially for Gram negatives bacteria. - Highlights: • We obtained copper oxide nanoparticles in a powder form. • Several capping agents were tested. • Structural and chemical tests showed that the main component were Cu{sub 2}O and CuO. • The size of nanoparticles was in the range 7–21 nm. • Nanoparticles with glycerin and ammonia capping agent showed good antibacterial properties.

  20. Agreements and Discrepancies between FDA Reports and Journal Papers on Biologic Agents Approved for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarilyo, Gil; Furst, Daniel E; Woo, Jennifer M P;

    2016-01-01

    reports on biologic agents developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: Available data on FDA-approved drugs were extracted from the website, and a systematic literature search was conducted to identify matching studies in peer-reviewed medical journals. Outcome measures were the American...... odds ratios. A ratio of odds ratios not equal to 1 was categorized as a discrepancy. RESULTS: FDA reports were available for 8 of 9 FDA-approved biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis; all identified trials (34) except one were published in peer-reviewed journals. Overall, discrepancies were noted......BACKGROUND: Sponsors that seek to commercialize new drugs apply to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which independently analyzes the raw data and reports the results on its website. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine if there are differences between the FDA assessments and journal...

  1. Variability of Botrytis cinerea sensitivity to pyrrolnitrin, an antibiotic produced by biological control agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Ajouz, Sakhr; Walker, Anne Sophie; Fabre, Frédéric; Leroux, Pierre; Nicot, Philippe; Bardin, Marc

    2011-01-01

    To establish a baseline sensitivity of Botrytis cinerea to pyrrolnitrin, an antibiotic produced by several biological control agents, 204 isolates were tested for sensitivity to pyrrolnitrin using a spore germination assay. The results showed that the isolates exhibited a wide range of sensitivity to pyrrolnitrin, with an 8.4-fold difference in EC50 (effective concentration to reduce spore germination by 50% comparing to the control) values between the least and the most sensitive isolates. T...

  2. Interaction of Ulocladium atrum, a Potential Biological Control Agent, with Botrytis cinerea and Grapevine Plantlets

    OpenAIRE

    Sébastien Ronseaux; Essaid Ait Barka; Christophe Clément

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of biological control agent, Ulocladium atrum (isolates U13 and U16) in protecting Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay against gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea, and simulation of the foliar defense responses was investigated. A degraded mycelium structure during cultural assay on potato dextrose agar revealed that U. atrum isolates U13 and U16 were both antagonistic to B. cinerea, mainly when isolates were inoculated two days before Botrytis. Under in vitro conditio...

  3. Canada thistle biological control agents on two South Dakota wildlife refuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, C.C.; Larson, D.L.; Larson, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    We monitored populations of Canada thistle biocontrol agents Cassida rubiginosa, Ceutorhynchus litura, Larinus (= Hadroplantus) planus, Urophora cardui, Orellia (= Terellia) ruficauda, and Rhinocyllus conicus on Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) at two national wildlife refuges in South Dakota from 1999 through 2003. C. litura, U. cardui, O. ruficauda, and R. conicus were present on both refuges. Agent populations were low except for C. litura, which was present in up to 90% of stems in some plots. C. litura infestation did not reduce thistle flowering, stem length, or over-winter survival. There was no change in thistle stem numbers over the study period and no difference in stem numbers in areas of high C. litura populations compared to areas of low C. litura populations. Our results suggest that insect biological control agents are inadequate for reduction of Canada thistle in southern South Dakota.

  4. Stand-off tissue-based biosensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents using photosynthetic fluorescence induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C A; Rodriguez, M; Greenbaum, E

    2001-09-01

    Tissue biosensors made from immobilized whole-cell photosynthetic microorganisms have been developed for the detection of airborne chemical warfare agents and simulants. The sensor read-out is based on well-known principles of fluorescence induction by living photosynthetic tissue. Like the cyanobacteria and algae from which they were constructed, the sensors are robust and mobile. The fluorescence signal from the sensors was stable after 40 days, storage and they can be launched or dropped into suspected danger zones. Commercially available hand-held fluorometric detector systems were used to measure Photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency of green algae and cyanobacteria entrapped on filter paper disks. Toxic agents flowing in the gas stream through the sensors can alter the characteristic fluorescence induction curves with resultant changes in photochemical yields. Tabun (GA), sarin (GB), mustard agent, tributylamine (TBA) (a sarin stabilizer), and dibutyl sulfide (DBS) (a mustard agent analog) were tested. Upper threshold limits of detectability for GA, TBA, and DBS are reported. With additional research and development, these biosensors may find application in stand-off detection of chemical and perhaps biological warfare agents under real-world conditions. PMID:11544038

  5. Using Informatics-, Bioinformatics- and Genomics-Based Approaches for the Molecular Surveillance and Detection of Biothreat Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Donald

    The convergence and wealth of informatics, bioinformatics and genomics methods and associated resources allow a comprehensive and rapid approach for the surveillance and detection of bacterial and viral organisms. Coupled with the continuing race for the fastest, most cost-efficient and highest-quality DNA sequencing technology, that is, "next generation sequencing", the detection of biological threat agents by `cheaper and faster' means is possible. With the application of improved bioinformatic tools for the understanding of these genomes and for parsing unique pathogen genome signatures, along with `state-of-the-art' informatics which include faster computational methods, equipment and databases, it is feasible to apply new algorithms to biothreat agent detection. Two such methods are high-throughput DNA sequencing-based and resequencing microarray-based identification. These are illustrated and validated by two examples involving human adenoviruses, both from real-world test beds.

  6. Viability and stability of biological control agents on cotton and snap bean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M L; Des Jardin, E A; Batson, W E; Caceres, J; Brannen, P M; Howell, C R; Benson, D M; Conway, K E; Rothrock, C S; Schneider, R W; Ownley, B H; Canaday, C H; Keinath, A P; Huber, D M; Sumner, D R; Motsenbocker, C E; Thaxton, P M; Cubeta, M A; Adams, P D; Backman, P A; Fajardo, J; Newman, M A; Pereira, R M

    2001-08-01

    Cotton and snap bean were selected for a multi-year, multi-state regional (south-eastern USA) research project to evaluate the efficacy of both commercial and experimental bacterial and fungal biological control agents for the management of damping-off diseases. The goal for this portion of the project was to determine the viability and stability of biological agents after application to seed. The biological seed treatments used included: (1) Bacillaceae bacteria, (2) non-Bacillaceae bacteria, (3) the fungus Trichoderma and (4) the fungus Beauveria bassiana. Seed assays were conducted to evaluate the following application factors: short-term (seed treatment; quality (i.e. isolate purity); compatibility with chemical pesticides and other biocontrol agents; application uniformity between years and plant species. For the bacterial treatments, the Bacillaceae genera (Bacillus and Paenibacillus) maintained the greatest population of bacteria per seed, the best viability over time and the best application uniformity across years and seed type. The non-Bacillaceae genera Burkholderia and Pseudomonas had the least viability and uniformity. Although Beauveria bassiana was only evaluated one year, the seed fungal populations were high and uniform. The seed fungal populations and uniformity for the Trichoderma isolates were more variable, except for the commercial product T-22. However, this product was contaminated with a Streptomyces isolate in both the years that it was evaluated. The study demonstrated that Bacillaceae can be mixed with Trichoderma isolates or with numerous pesticides to provide an integrated pest control/growth enhancement package. PMID:11517723

  7. Interaction of Ulocladium atrum, a Potential Biological Control Agent, with Botrytis cinerea and Grapevine Plantlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ronseaux

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of biological control agent, Ulocladium atrum (isolates U13 and U16 in protecting Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay against gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea, and simulation of the foliar defense responses was investigated. A degraded mycelium structure during cultural assay on potato dextrose agar revealed that U. atrum isolates U13 and U16 were both antagonistic to B. cinerea, mainly when isolates were inoculated two days before Botrytis. Under in vitro conditions, foliar application of U. atrum protected grapevine leaves against gray mold disease. An increase in chitinase activity was induced by the presence of U. atrum isolates indicating that the biological control agents triggered plant defense mechanisms. Moreover, U13 has the potential to colonize the grapevine plantlets and to improve their growth. The ability of U. atrum isolates to exhibit an antagonistic effect against B. cinerea in addition to their aptitude to induce plant resistance and to promote grapevine growth may explain a part of their biological activity. Hence, this study suggests that U. atrum provides a suitable biocontrol agent against gray mold in grapevines.

  8. Cardiocladius oliffi (Diptera: Chironomidae as a potential biological control agent against Simulium squamosum (Diptera: Simuliidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Michael D

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of onchocerciasis in the African region is currently based mainly on the mass drug administration of ivermectin. Whilst this has been found to limit morbidity, it does not stop transmission. In the absence of a macrofilaricide, there is a need for an integrated approach for disease management, which includes vector control. Vector control using chemical insecticides is expensive to apply, and therefore the use of other measures such as biological control agents is needed. Immature stages of Simulium squamosum, reared in the laboratory from egg masses collected from the field at Boti Falls and Huhunya (River Pawnpawn in Ghana, were observed to be attacked and fed upon by larvae of the chironomid Cardiocladius oliffi Freeman, 1956 (Diptera: Chironomidae. Methods Cardiocladius oliffi was successfully reared in the rearing system developed for S. damnosum s.l. and evaluated for its importance as a biological control agent in the laboratory. Results Even at a ratio of one C. oliffi to five S. squamosum, they caused a significant decrease in the number of adult S. squamosum emerging from the systems (treatments. Predation was confirmed by the amplification of Simulium DNA from C. oliffi observed to have fed on S. squamosum pupae. The study also established that the chironomid flies could successfully complete their development on a fish food diet only. Conclusion Cardiocladius oliffi has been demonstrated as potential biological control agent against S. squamosum.

  9. Detection of Sulfatase Enzyme Activity with a CatalyCEST MRI Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Fernández-Cuervo, Gabriela; Acfalle, Jasmine P; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI contrast agent has been developed that detects sulfatase enzyme activity. The agent produces a CEST signal at δ=5.0 ppm before enzyme activity, and a second CEST signal appears at δ=9.0 ppm after the enzyme cleaves a sulfate group from the agent. The comparison of the two signals improved detection of sulfatase activity. PMID:26956002

  10. Mobile-C Based Agent System for Detecting Improper Computer Usage at Computer Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Zhixin Tie

    2013-01-01

    Mobile agent based computing is one of the powerful technologies for the development of distributed complex systems. There is little research regarding the effectiveness of mobile agent based detecting of improper computer usage at computer laboratories. This paper presents a Mobile-C Based Agent System (MCBAS) for Detecting Improper Computer Usage at Computer Laboratories. Based on the Mobile-C library, the MABAS supports the dynamic sending and executing of control command, dynamic data exc...

  11. Biology, host specificity tests, and risk assessment of the sawfly Heteroperreyia hubrichi, a potential biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolius in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract. Heteroperreyia hubrichi Malaise (Hymenoptera: Pergidae), a foliage feeding sawfly of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), was studied to assess its suitability as a classical biological control agent of this invasive weed in Hawaii. Nochoice host-specificity tests we...

  12. A Newtonian framework for community detection in undirected biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Tejaswini; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-02-01

    Community detection is a key problem of interest in network analysis, with applications in a variety of domains such as biological networks, social network modeling, and communication pattern analysis. In this paper, we present a novel framework for community detection that is motivated by a physical system analogy. We model a network as a system of point masses, and drive the process of community detection, by leveraging the Newtonian interactions between the point masses. Our framework is designed to be generic and extensible relative to the model parameters that are most suited for the problem domain. We illustrate the applicability of our approach by applying the Newtonian Community Detection algorithm on protein-protein interaction networks of E. coli , C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae. We obtain results that are comparable in quality to those obtained from the Newman-Girvan algorithm, a widely employed divisive algorithm for community detection. We also present a detailed analysis of the structural properties of the communities produced by our proposed algorithm, together with a biological interpretation using E. coli protein network as a case study. A functional enrichment heat map is constructed with the Gene Ontology functional mapping, in addition to a pathway analysis for each community. The analysis illustrates that the proposed algorithm elicits communities that are not only meaningful from a topological standpoint, but also possess biological relevance. We believe that our algorithm has the potential to serve as a key computational tool for driving therapeutic applications involving targeted drug development for personalized care delivery. PMID:24681920

  13. Topography and biological noise determine acoustic detectability on coral reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Cagua, Edgar F.

    2013-08-19

    Acoustic telemetry is an increasingly common tool for studying the movement patterns, behavior and site fidelity of marine organisms, but to accurately interpret acoustic data, the variability, periodicity and range of detectability between acoustic tags and receivers must be understood. The relative and interactive effects of topography with biological and environmental noise have not been quantified on coral reefs. We conduct two long-term range tests (1- and 4-month duration) on two different reef types in the central Red Sea to determine the relative effect of distance, depth, topography, time of day, wind, lunar phase, sea surface temperature and thermocline on detection probability. Detectability, as expected, declines with increasing distance between tags and receivers, and we find average detection ranges of 530 and 120 m, using V16 and V13 tags, respectively, but the topography of the reef can significantly modify this relationship, reducing the range by ~70 %, even when tags and receivers are in line-of-sight. Analyses that assume a relationship between distance and detections must therefore be used with care. Nighttime detection range was consistently reduced in both locations, and detections varied by lunar phase in the 4-month test, suggesting a strong influence of biological noise (reducing detection probability up to 30 %), notably more influential than other environmental noises, including wind-driven noise, which is normally considered important in open-water environments. Analysis of detections should be corrected in consideration of the diel patterns we find, and range tests or sentinel tags should be used for more than 1 month to quantify potential changes due to lunar phase. Some studies assume that the most usual factor limiting detection range is weather-related noise; this cannot be extrapolated to coral reefs. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  14. Detection and quantification by PCR assay of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 on apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Muñoz, Lourdes; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Torres, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    The registration of biological control agents requires the development of monitoring systems to detect and quantify the agent in the environment. Pantoea agglomerans CPA-2 is an effective biocontrol agent for postharvest diseases of citrus and pome fruits. The monitoring of CPA-2 in postharvest semi-commercial trials was evaluated by Rodac impression plates and the colonies isolated were confirmed by conventional PCR using the SCAR primers PAGA1 and PAGB1. Samples were taken from different surfaces that had contact with CPA-2, the surrounding environment and working clothes worn by handlers. Moreover, population dynamics of the strain CPA-2 were determined on apple surfaces using both the classical plating technique and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A qPCR assay using a 3'-minor groove-binding (MGB) probe was developed for the specific detection and quantification of P. agglomerans strain CPA-2. Based on the nucleotide sequence of a SCAR fragment of CPA-2, one primer set and TaqMan MGB probe were designed. The primers SP2-F/SP2-R and the TaqMan MGB probe showed a specific detection of strain CPA-2 on apple surfaces, which was verified tested against purified DNA from 17 strains of P. agglomerans, 4 related Pantoea species, and 21 bacterial strains from other genera isolated from whole and also freshly-cut fruit and vegetables. The detection level was approximately 10(3) cells per reaction, and the standard curve was linear within a range of 5log units. Results from semi-commercial trials showed that CPA-2 had a low impact. The maximum persistence of P. agglomerans CPA-2 was not longer than 5days in plastic boxes stored at 0°C. Significant differences in CPA-2 population level dynamics were observed in results obtained by qPCR and dilution plating. These differences may indicate the presence of non-degraded DNA from non-viable cells. In conclusion, qPCR is a novel potential tool to quickly and specifically monitor recent surface colonisation by CPA-2

  15. Methods for detection of environmental agents that produce congenital defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, T.H.; Miller, J.R.; Marois, M. (eds.)

    1975-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: current methods for teratogenicity testing in animals and suggestion for improvement; use of zebra fish for screening of teratogens; chemical structure and teratogenic mechanism of action; somatic cell genetics and teratogenesis; studies on mammalian embryos during organogenesis; infectious agents as teratogens; and pharmacogenetics and teratogenesis. (HLW)

  16. Spacer/linker based synthesis and biological evaluation of mutual prodrugs as antiinflammatory agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velingkar V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutual prodrugs of some antiinflammatory agents were synthesized with the aim of improving the therapeutic index through prevention of gastrointestinal complications and to check the efficiency of release of the parent drug in presence of spacer. These mutual prodrugs were synthesized by direct condensation method using dicyclohexyl carbodiimide as a coupling agent and glycine as a spacer. The title compounds were characterized by spectral techniques and the release of the parent drug from mutual prodrug was studied in two different non-enzymatic buffer solutions at pH 1.2, pH 7.4 and in 80% human plasma. All mutual prodrugs exhibited encouraging hydrolysis profile in 80% human plasma. Biological activity of title compounds was studied by carrageenan-induced paw edema method. From the results obtained, it was concluded that these compounds retain the antiinflammatory action.

  17. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of anti-EV71 agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Yang, Bailing; Hao, Fei; Wang, Ping; He, Haiying; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Shengbin; Peng, Xuanjia; Yin, Ke; Hu, Jiao; Chen, Xinsheng; Gu, Zhengxian; Wang, Li; Shen, Liang; Hu, Guoping; Li, Ning; Li, Jian; Chen, Shuhui; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Zhenzhong; Guo, Qingming; Chang, Xiujuan; Zhang, Lanjun; Cai, Qixu; Lin, Tianwei

    2016-07-15

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which can spread its infections to the central nervous and other systems with severe consequences. In this article, design, chemical synthesis, and biological evaluation of various anti-EV71 agents which incorporate Michael acceptors are described. Further SAR study demonstrated that lactone type of Michael acceptor provided a new lead of anti-EV71 drug candidates with high anti-EV71 activity in cell-based assay and enhanced mouse plasma stability. One of the most potent compounds (2K, cell-based anti-EV71 EC50=0.028μM), showed acceptable stability profile towards mouse plasma, which resulted into promising pharmacokinetics in mouse via IP administration. PMID:27234148

  18. Opportunities for improving risk communication during the permitting process for entomophagous biological control agents: A review of current systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns about potentially irreversible non-target impacts from the importation and release of entomophagous biological control agents (BCAs) have resulted in increasingly stringent import requirements by National Plant Protection Organizations. Despite numerous scientific publications on the poten...

  19. Use of Biologic Agents in Combination with Other Therapies for the Treatment of Psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Cather, Jennifer C.; Crowley, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder, which is associated with a significant negative impact on a patient’s quality of life. Traditional therapies for psoriasis are often not able to meet desired treatment goals, and high-dose and/or long-term use is associated with toxicities that can result in end-organ damage. An improved understanding of the involvement of cytokines in the etiology of psoriasis has led to the development of biologic agents targeting tumor necrosis factor (TNF...

  20. Biological agents: investigation into leprosy and other infectious diseases before indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antônio, João Roberto; Soubhia, Rosa Maria Cordeiro; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco; Amarante, Carolina Forte; Travolo, Ana Regina Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Biological agents are widely used for various immune-mediated diseases, with remarkable effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease. However, attention needs to be drawn to the adverse effects of these therapies and the risk of reactivating underlying granulomatous infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy, syphilis, leishmaniasis, among others. The objective of this paper is to describe a case of leprosy in a patient with RA using anti-TNF alfa, demonstrating the need for systematic investigation of skin lesions suggestive of leprosy in patients who require rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic treatment, especially in endemic regions like Brazil. PMID:24346871

  1. Synthesis, analysis and biological evaluation of novel indolquinonecryptolepine analogues as potential anti-tumour agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gresley, A; Gudivaka, V; Carrington, S; Sinclair, A; Brown, J E

    2016-03-21

    A small library of cryptolepine analogues were synthesised incorporating halogens and/or nitrogen containing side chains to optimise their interaction with the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA to give improved binding, interfering with topoisomerase II hence enhancing cytotoxicity. Cell viability, DNA binding and Topoisomerase II inhibition is discussed for these compounds. Fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate the uptake of the synthesised cryptolepines into the nucleus. We report the synthesis and anti-cancer biological evaluation of nine novel cryptolepine analogues, which have greater cytotoxicity than the parent compound and are important lead compounds in the development of novel potent and selective indoloquinone anti-neoplastic agents. PMID:26893255

  2. COOPERATIVE MULTI-AGENTS DETECTION WITH SPATIALLY DISTRIBUTED ARRAY SENSORS

    OpenAIRE

    Belkacem BENADDA; Bendimerad, Fethi Tarik

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper deals with the design of a multi-agents system associated with array sensors dedicated to wireless telecommunications. We will present as first part, the spatially distributed array general modeled as well as the channel spatial propagation stimulus. Indeed, the integration and implementation of these systems is not simple and often goes through heuristics optimization design phases. This synthesis will be useful for selection of the different algorithms related to the b...

  3. Chemical agent detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Maksymiuk, Paul; Inscore, Frank E.; Smith, Wayne W.; Morrisey, Kevin; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-03-01

    In the past decade, the Unites States and its allies have been challenged by a different kind of warfare, exemplified by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Although suicide bombings are the most often used form of terror, military personnel must consider a wide range of attack scenarios. Among these is the intentional poisoning of water supplies to obstruct military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. To counter such attacks, the military is developing portable analyzers that can identify and quantify potential chemical agents in water supplies at microgram per liter concentrations within 10 minutes. To aid this effort we have been investigating the value of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based portable analyzer. In particular we have been developing silver-doped sol-gels to generate SER spectra of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products. Here we present SER spectra of several chemical agents measured in a generic tap water. Repeat measurements were performed to establish statistical error associated with SERS obtained using the sol-gel coated vials.

  4. NON-SPECIFIC METHODS FOR DETECTING RESIDUES OF CLEANING AGENTS DURING CLEANING VALIDATION

    OpenAIRE

    DRAGAN M. MILENOVIĆ; DRAGAN S. PEŠIĆ; SNEŽANA S. MITIĆ

    2011-01-01

    Cleaning validation procedures are carried out in order to assure that residues of cleaning agents are within acceptable limits after the cleaning process. Cleaning agents often consist of a mixture of various surfactants which are in a highly diluted state after the water rinsing procedure has been completed. This makes it difficult to find appropriate analytical methods that are sensitive enough to detect the cleaning agents. In addition, it is advantageous for the analytical methods to be ...

  5. Label-free detection and manipulation of single biological nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Michael C; Cheng, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In the past several years, there have been significant advances in the field of nanoparticle detection for various biological applications. Of considerable interest are synthetic nanoparticles being designed as potential drug delivery systems as well as naturally occurring or biological nanoparticles, including viruses and extracellular vesicles. Many infectious diseases and several human cancers are attributed to individual virions. Because these particles likely display different degrees of heterogeneity under normal physiological conditions, characterization of these natural nanoparticles with single-particle sensitivity is necessary for elucidating information on their basic structure and function as well as revealing novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Additionally, biodefense and point-of-care clinical testing demand ultrasensitive detection of viral pathogens particularly with high specificity. Consequently, the ability to perform label-free virus sensing has motivated the development of multiple electrical-, mechanical-, and optical-based detection techniques, some of which may even have the potential for nanoparticle sorting and multi-parametric analysis. For each technique, the challenges associated with label-free detection and measurement sensitivity are discussed as are their potential contributions for future real-world applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:717-729. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1392 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26846164

  6. Phenotypic charactheristics of fluorescent pseudomonss, biological control agent of lincat disease of temanggung tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NINING NURUL AZIZAH

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pseudomonass isolated from local plants-rishosphere in temanggung controlled lincat disease of tobacco. This report describe phenotypic charactheristics of the bacteria in order to be used as a base for the development of the bacteria as a biological control agent of lincat disease. Phenotypic charactheristics of six isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonass which controlled lincat disease in the field were determined in the laboratory of Plant Bacteriology, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University. Plant pathogenicity tests were conducted by hypersensitive reaction into tobacco leaf and inoculation to tobacco plants. Antagonism test between fluorescent Pseudomonass and other candidate of biological control agents were also conducted. The results indicated that the bacteria were rod shape, Gram negative, positive reaction in catalase and oxidase tests. Nitrate reduce to nitrite, arginine was hydrolysed, fluorescent pigment were produced on King’s B medium, levan formation positive and all bacteria denitrifiy. The bacteria used urea, tween 80 and amylum were not hydrolised, poly--hydroxybutyrate was not accumulated in the cells. Negative reactions were observed for lysine decarboxylation, indol production, VP/MR reaction, and gelatn liquefation. Some compounds could be used as solely carbon sources. All isolates grew on the medium containing 2% NaCl. The best pH for growth was 6-7 and all isolates grew at 20-41C. Negative result were obtained for hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity tests.

  7. The influence of flower morphology and nectar quality on the longevity of a parasitoid biological control agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vattala, H.D.; Wratten, S.D.; Phillips, C.B.; Wäckers, F.L.

    2006-01-01

    Conservation biological control aims to enhance the efficacy of arthropod biological control agents, such as parasitoids, partly by providing them with access to floral nectar. However, the suitability of a flower species for providing nectar to a parasitoid is dependent on the morphologies of the p

  8. Evaluation of biological control agents for mosquitoes control in artificial breeding places

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salim Abadi Yaser; Vatandoost Hassan; Rassi Yavar; Abai Mohammad Reza; Sanei Dehkordi Ali Reza; Paksa Azim

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the entomological impact of chlorpyrifos-methyl,Bacillus thuringiensis, andGambusia affinis on mosquitoes control in artificial breeding places.Methods:A Latin square design with 4 replicates was performed in order to evaluate the efficacy of chlorpyrifos-methyl,Bacillus thuringiensis, andGambusia affinis on larva. The larvicide was applied at the dosage of 100 mg a.h/ha,Bacillus thuringiensis at the recommended dosage and 10 fishes per m2 were applied at 1í1 m2 artificial breeding sites. The larval densities for both anopheline and culicine were counted according to larvae /10 dippers prior and 24 h after application.Results:All three control agents are effective for mosquito density reduction, and the difference between the three agents and the control is significant (P<0.05). There is also significant difference among chlorpyrifos-methyl,Bacillus thuringiensis andGambusia affinis.Bacillus thuringiensisexhibited more reduction on mosquito larval density than fish and larvicide (P<0.05).Conclusions:Bacillus thuringiensis in comparison with two other agents is the appropriate method for larviciding in the breeding places. Although long term assessing for biological activities as well as monitoring and mapping of resistance is required.

  9. Degradation of biological weapons agents in the environment: implications for terrorism response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Amy L; Wilkening, Dean A

    2005-04-15

    We investigate the impact on effective terrorism response of the viability degradation of biological weapons agents in the environment. We briefly review the scientific understanding and modeling of agent environmental viability degradation. In general, agent susceptibility to viability loss is greatest for vegetative bacteria, intermediate for viruses, and least for bacterial spores. Survival is greatest in soil and progressively decreases in the following environments: textiles, water, hard surfaces, and air. There is little detailed understanding of loss mechanisms. We analyze the time behavior and sensitivity of four mathematical models that are used to represent environmental viability degradation (the exponential, probability, and first- and second-order catastrophic decay models). The models behave similarly at short times (representation of the hazard. For longer time phenomena, including decontamination, the current model capabilities are likely insufficient. Finally, we implement each model in a simple numerical integration of anthrax dispersion, viability degradation, and dose response. Decay models spanning the current knowledge of airborne degradation result in vastly different predicted hazard areas. This confounds attempts to determine necessary medical and decontamination measures. Hence,the current level of understanding and representation of environmental viability degradation in response models is inadequate to inform appropriate emergency response measures. PMID:15884371

  10. The influence of the workplace-related biological agents on the immune systems of emergency medical personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewczyńska, Aleksandra; Depczyńska, Daria; Borecka, Anna; Winnicka, Izabela; Kubiak, Leszek; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Emergency medical services workers' (EMSWs) acute exposures to many biological agents are frequent and well recognised in their workplaces, as well as occupational diseases resulting from some of these exposures. At the same time, there is only scant information on the adverse effects of chronic exposure to biological hazard factors on the immune systems of EMSWs. In the Polish legislation system, the Ordinance of the Minister of Health about harmful biological agents in the workplace and ways of protecting workers from exposure to those agents is an implement of Directive 2000/54/EC, which deals thoroughly with those issues in European Union Countries. Emergency medical services workers play an essential role as primary providers of pre-hospital emergency medical care, and they are part of the integral components of disaster response. Traumatic experiences can affect emergency medical staff immune systems negatively, by functioning as a chronic stressor. Conscious use of biological agents in workplaces such as microbial laboratories can be easily controlled and monitored. However, risk assessment is more difficult for workers when they are exposed unintentionally to biological agents. Exposure to bio-aerosols is considered especially harmful. This review summarises available information about biological risk factors for emergency medical services workers, and some information about the influence of these factors on their immune systems. PMID:26557040

  11. Detection/classification/quantification of chemical agents using an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, G. Martin

    2005-05-01

    ChemSentry is a portable system used to detect, identify, and quantify chemical warfare (CW) agents. Electro chemical (EC) cell sensor technology is used for blood agents and an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors is used for nerve and blister agents. The combination of the EC cell and the SAW array provides sufficient sensor information to detect, classify and quantify all CW agents of concern using smaller, lighter, lower cost units. Initial development of the SAW array and processing was a key challenge for ChemSentry requiring several years of fundamental testing of polymers and coating methods to finalize the sensor array design in 2001. Following the finalization of the SAW array, nearly three (3) years of intensive testing in both laboratory and field environments were required in order to gather sufficient data to fully understand the response characteristics. Virtually unbounded permutations of agent characteristics and environmental characteristics must be considered in order to operate against all agents and all environments of interest to the U.S. military and other potential users of ChemSentry. The resulting signal processing design matched to this extensive body of measured data (over 8,000 agent challenges and 10,000 hours of ambient data) is considered to be a significant advance in state-of-the-art for CW agent detection.

  12. Detection of Biological Pathogens Using Multiple Wireless Magnetoelastic Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wen

    A number of recent, high-profile incidences of food-borne illness spreading through the food supply and the use of anthrax by terrorists after the September 11, 2001 attacks have demonstrated the need for new technologies that can rapidly detect the presence of biological pathogens. A bevy of biosensors show excellent detection sensitivity and specificity. However, false positive and false negative signals remain one of the primary reasons that many of these newly developed biosensors have not found application in the marketplace. The research described in this dissertation focuses on developing a free-standing magnetoelastic based bio-sensing system using a pulse method. This method allows fast detection, eliminates the bias magnetic field that is necessary in current methods, makes the system more simply and suitable for in-field detection. This system has two pairs of transformer coils, where a measurement sensor and a control sensor can be put in each pair of coils. The control sensor is used to compensate for environmental variables. The effect of pulse power on the performance of the magnetoelastic sensors in the pulse system is studied. The system is found to have excellent stability, good detection repeatability when used with multiple sensors. This research has investigated and demonstrated a multiple sensors approach. Because it will involve the simultaneous measurement of many sensors, it will significantly reduce problems encountered with false positive indications. The positioning and interference of sensors are investigated. By adding a multi-channel structure to the pulse detection system, the effect of sensor interference is minimized. The result of the repeatability test shows that the standard deviation when measuring three 1 mm magnetoelastic sensors is around 500 Hz, which is smaller than the minimum requirement for actual spores/bacteria detection. Magnetoelastic sensors immobilized with JRB7 phages and E2 phages have been used to specifically

  13. Transport behavior of surrogate biological warfare agents in a simulated landfill: Effect of leachate recirculation and water infiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Saikaly, Pascal

    2010-11-15

    An understanding of the transport behavior of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills is required to evaluate the suitability of landfills for the disposal of building decontamination residue (BDR) following a bioterrorist attack on a building. Surrogate BW agents, Bacillus atrophaeus spores and Serratia marcescens, were spiked into simulated landfill reactors that were filled with synthetic building debris (SBD) and operated for 4 months with leachate recirculation or water infiltration. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to monitor surrogate transport. In the leachate recirculation reactors, <10% of spiked surrogates were eluted in leachate over 4 months. In contrast, 45% and 31% of spiked S. marcescens and B. atrophaeus spores were eluted in leachate in the water infiltration reactors. At the termination of the experiment, the number of retained cells and spores in SBD was measured over the depth of the reactor. Less than 3% of the total spiked S. marcescens cells and no B. atrophaeus spores were detected in SBD. These results suggest that significant fractions of the spiked surrogates were strongly attached to SBD. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Animals as Mobile Biological Sensors for Forest Fire Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Guneri Sahin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a mobile biological sensor system that can assist in earlydetection of forest fires one of the most dreaded natural disasters on the earth. The main ideapresented in this paper is to utilize animals with sensors as Mobile Biological Sensors(MBS. The devices used in this system are animals which are native animals living inforests, sensors (thermo and radiation sensors with GPS features that measure thetemperature and transmit the location of the MBS, access points for wireless communicationand a central computer system which classifies of animal actions. The system offers twodifferent methods, firstly: access points continuously receive data about animals’ locationusing GPS at certain time intervals and the gathered data is then classified and checked tosee if there is a sudden movement (panic of the animal groups: this method is called animalbehavior classification (ABC. The second method can be defined as thermal detection(TD: the access points get the temperature values from the MBS devices and send the datato a central computer to check for instant changes in the temperatures. This system may beused for many purposes other than fire detection, namely animal tracking, poachingprevention and detecting instantaneous animal death.

  15. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wyatt I.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Gaskin, John F.; Norton, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others.

  16. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on the maintenance of the list of QPS biological agents intentionally added to food and feed (2011 update)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine

    EFSA is requested to assess the safety of a broad range of biological agents (including microorganisms and viruses) in the context of notifications for market authorisation as sources of food and feed additives, enzymes and plant protection products. The qualified presumption of safety (QPS......) assessment was developed by EFSA for its own use to provide a generic risk assessment approach applicable across EFSA’s scientific Panels, for biological agents notified for intentional use in the whole food chain. The safety of unambiguously defined biological agents at the highest taxonomic unit that is...... recommendations. The anamorph yeast form Phaffia rhodozyma of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was included on the QPS list and to the qualification for yeasts ‘absence of resistance to antimycotics used for medical treatment of yeast infections’, the sentence was added that ‘in the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  17. Handheld hyperspectral imager for standoff detection of chemical and biological aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Jensen, James O.; McAnally, Gerard

    2004-08-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a small hand held imaging spectrometer, Sherlock, for gas leak and aerosol detection and imaging. The system is based on a patented technique, (IMSS Image Multi-spectral Sensing), that uses diffractive optics and image processing algorithms to detect spectral information about objects in the scene of the camera. This cameras technology has been tested at Dugway Proving Ground and Dstl Porton Down facilities looking at Chemical and Biological agent simulants. In addition to Chemical and Biological detection, the camera has been used for environmental monitoring of green house gases and is currently undergoing extensive laboratory and field testing by the Gas Technology Institute, British Petroleum and Shell Oil for applications for gas leak detection and repair. In this paper we will present some of the results from the data collection at the TRE test at Dugway Proving Ground during the summer of 2002 and laboratory testing at the Dstl facility at Porton Down in the UK in the fall of 2002.

  18. A Rupture Detection Algorithm for the DNA Translocation Detection Though Biological Nanopore

    OpenAIRE

    Osaki, Toshihisa; Barbot, Jean-Pierre; Kawano, Ryuji; Sasaki, Hirotaka; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    International audience We propose in this paper a new methodology for the treatment of electrical signal of DNA translocation through !-hemolysin biological nanopore formed on an artificial lipidic membrane reconstituted on a microfluidic 96 wells microarray. The signal treatment algorithm is capable to detect translocation events through the pore, within very long and noisy recordings on multiple chambers of our microarray. The firing events are precisely detected, as well as the duration...

  19. Wavelet-based detection of transients in biological signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mzaik, Tahsin; Jagadeesh, Jogikal M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents two multiresolution algorithms for detection and separation of mixed signals using the wavelet transform. The first algorithm allows one to design a mother wavelet and its associated wavelet grid that guarantees the separation of signal components if information about the expected minimum signal time and frequency separation of the individual components is known. The second algorithm expands this idea to design two mother wavelets which are then combined to achieve the required separation otherwise impossible with a single wavelet. Potential applications include many biological signals such as ECG, EKG, and retinal signals.

  20. Detection of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble with constructed bubble wavelet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; WAN Mingxi

    2005-01-01

    To detect the echo irradiated by microbubble out from the signal reflected by surrounding tissues, a mother wavelet named bubble wavelet according to the modified Herring oscillation equation was constructed and then applied to the original ultrasound radio frequency signal to perform the wavelet transformation. The transformed wavelet coefficients were extracted by selected threshold values to differentiate the echo of microbubble from signal of surround tissues. The effect of bubble wavelet was compared with other three commonly used mother wavelets by computer simulation and phantom experiment. The results demonstrated that there existed a highly correlation between the bubble wavelet and the experimental echo irradiated by microbubble because bubble wavelet had represented the dynamics of microbubble in advance. Furthermore, the wavelet transform results showed a better signal-noise-ratio and a sharper contrast between the echo of microbubble and the signal of surrounding tissues. Finally,constructing an overall mother wavelet library can improve the applicability and robustness of this detection method.

  1. Malware Detection, Supportive Software Agents and Its Classification Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo, Olawale Surajudeen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Over time, the task of curbing the emergence of malware and its dastard activities has been identified interms of analysis, detection and containment of malware. Malware is a general term that is used todescribe the category of malicious software that is part of security threats to the computer and internetsystem. It is a malignant program designed to hamper the effectiveness of a computer and internetsystem. This paper aims at identifying the malware as one of the most dreaded threats to an emergingcomputer and communication technology. The paper identified the category of malware, malwareclassification algorithms, malwares activities and ways of preventing and removing malware if iteventually infects system.The research also describes tools that classify malware dataset using a rule-based classification schemeand machine learning algorithms to detect the malicious program from normal program through patternrecognition.

  2. Malware Detection, Supportive Software Agents and Its Classification Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Adebayo, Olawale Surajudeen; M.A. Mabayoje; Amit Mishra; Osho Oluwafemi

    2012-01-01

    Over time, the task of curbing the emergence of malware and its dastard activities has been identified interms of analysis, detection and containment of malware. Malware is a general term that is used todescribe the category of malicious software that is part of security threats to the computer and internetsystem. It is a malignant program designed to hamper the effectiveness of a computer and internetsystem. This paper aims at identifying the malware as one of the most dreaded threats to an ...

  3. Study on the uptake and distribution of gadolinium based contrast agents in biological samples using laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadolinium based contrast agents are used for magnetic resonance imaging. After their excretion by medicated patients they reach surface water passing waste water treatment plants where they are not removed sufficiently. The behavior of the contrast agents in the environment and the interaction with organisms was investigated in this work due to the toxicity of the free Gd3+ ion and the associated risks, such as accumulation in the human food chain. In this work, the two elemental analytical imaging methods laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis (SRXRF) have been used to investigate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of Gd-based contrast agents by various biological systems. Both methods were analytically characterized and compared for this application. The detection limits of gadolinium were determined under optimized conditions by LA-ICP-MS and SRXRF. With calibration by remains of dried elemental standard droplets detection limits of 0.78 pg absolute amount of gadolinium (LA-ICP-MS), respectively 89 pg (SRXRF) were reached. Based on filamentous algae as water plants the uptake and the excretion of Gd-based contrast agents were revealed. The dependence on concentration of the contrast agent in the exposition solution and the independence of temporal uptake within one to seven days were studied for duckweed. By LA-ICP-MS gadolinium was quantified in a leaf of cress plant. The verification of the results was performed by SRXRF and ICP-MS after digestion. Furthermore, the uptake and distribution of Gd-based contrast agents in higher organisms (water flea) were observed. The exact location of gadolinium was resolved by three-dimensional μ-computed tomography by the comparison of an exposed with a Gd-free water flea. In all studies, gadolinium was detected in the investigated exposed model organisms. It can be concluded that the contrast agents were taken from the environment.

  4. Transillumination imaging through biological tissue by single-pixel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Vicente; Soldevila, Fernando; Irles, Esther; Clemente, Pere; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Andrés, Pedro; Lancis, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    One challenge that has long held the attention of scientists is that of clearly seeing objects hidden by turbid media, as smoke, fog or biological tissue, which has major implications in fields such as remote sensing or early diagnosis of diseases. Here, we combine structured incoherent illumination and bucket detection for imaging an absorbing object completely embedded in a scattering medium. A sequence of low-intensity microstructured light patterns is launched onto the object, whose image is accurately reconstructed through the light fluctuations measured by a single-pixel detector. Our technique is noninvasive, does not require coherent sources, raster scanning nor time-gated detection and benefits from the compressive sensing strategy. As a proof of concept, we experimentally retrieve the image of a transilluminated target both sandwiched between two holographic diffusers and embedded in a 6mm-thick sample of chicken breast.

  5. Integrated MEMS/NEMS Resonant Cantilevers for Ultrasensitive Biological Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the recent researches implemented in Chinese Academy of Sciences, with achievements on integrated resonant microcantilever sensors. In the resonant cantilevers, the self-sensing elements and resonance exciting elements are both top-down integrated with silicon micromachining techniques. Quite a lot of effort is focused on optimization of the resonance mode and sensing structure for improvement of sensitivity. On the other hand, to enable the micro-cantilevers specifically sensitive to bio/chemical molecules, sensing materials are developed and modified on the cantilever surface with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM based bottom-up construction and surface functionalization. To improve the selectivity of the sensors and depress environmental noise, multiple and localized surface modifications are developed. The achieved volume production capability and satisfactory detecting resolution to trace-level biological antigen of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP give the micro-cantilever sensors a great promise for rapid and high-resoluble detection.

  6. Microarrays - new possibilities for detecting biological factors hazardous for humans and animals, and for use in environmental protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirski, Tomasz; Bartoszcze, Michał; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Gryko, Romuald; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz; Chomiczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    Both the known biological agents that cause infectious diseases, as well as modified (ABF-Advanced Biological Factors) or new, emerging agents pose a significant diagnostic problem using previously applied methods, both classical, as well as based on molecular biology methods. The latter, such as PCR and real-time PCR, have significant limitations, both quantitative (low capacity), and qualitative (limited number of targets). The article discusses the results of studies on using the microarray method for the identification of viruses (e.g. Orthopoxvirus group, noroviruses, influenza A and B viruses, rhino- and enteroviruses responsible for the FRI (Febrile Respiratory Illness), European bunyaviruses, and SARS-causing viruses), and bacteria (Mycobacterium spp., Yersinia spp., Campylobacter spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria meningitidis, Clostridium difficile , Helicobacter pylori), including multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. The method allows for the serotyping and genotyping of bacteria, and is useful in the diagnosis of genetically modified agents. It allows the testing of thousands of genes in one experiment. In addition to diagnosis, it is applicable for gene expression studies, analysis of the function of genes, microorganisms virulence, and allows the detection of even single mutations. The possibility of its operational application in epidemiological surveillance, and in the detection of disease outbreak agents is demonstrated. PMID:27007515

  7. MULTI-AGENT SYSTEM FOR WORM DETECTION AND CONTAINMENT IN METROPOLITAN AREA NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Active worms can cause widespread damages at so high a speed that effectively precludes human-directed reaction, and patches for the worms are always available after the damages have been caused, whichhas elevated them selfto a first-class security threat to Metropolitan Area Networks (MAN). Multi-agent sys-tem for Worm Detection and Containment in MAN (MWDCM) is presented to provide a first-class auto-matic reaction mechanism that automatically applies containment strategies to block the propagation of theworms and to protect MAN against worm scan that wastes a lot of network bandwidth and crashes therouters. Its user agent is used to detect the known worms. Worm detection agent and worm detection correla-tion agent use two-stage based decision method to detect unknown worms. They adaptively study the access-ing in the whole network and dynamically change the working parameters to detect the unknown worms.MWDCM confines worm infection within a macro-cell or a micro-cell of the metropolitan area networks, therest of the accesses and hosts continue functioning without disruption. MWDCM integrates Worm DetectionSystem (WDS) and network management system. Reaction measures can be taken by using Simple NetworkManagement Protocol (SNMP) interface to control broadband access server as soon as the WDS detect theactive worm. MWDCM is very effective in blocking random scanning worms. Simulation results indicatethat high worm infection rate of epidemics can be avoided to a degree by MWDCM blocking the propagationof the worms.

  8. Biometric Device Assistant Tool: Intelligent Agent for Intrusion Detection at Biometric Device using JESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maithili Arjunwadkar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While there are various advantages of biometric authentication process, it is vulnerable to attacks, which can decline its security. To enhance the security of biometric process, Intrusion detection techniques are significantly useful. In this paper, we have designed intelligent agent as knowledge based Biometric Device Intrusion Detection tool which is an innovative design. This intelligent agent can be located on the Biometric device. It performs intrusion detection using Operating Systems audit trail and device manager information. The system consists of a user interface module, an inference engine, a knowledgebase of illegal transactions and certified biometric devices. Inference engine is implemented using JESS which is a Java Expert System Shell.

  9. Ultrasensitive detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents by low-pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wanqi; Liang, Miao; Li, Zhen; Shu, Jinian; Yang, Bo; Xu, Ce; Zou, Yao

    2016-08-15

    On-spot monitoring of threat agents needs high sensitive instrument. In this study, a low-pressure photoionization mass spectrometer (LPPI-MS) was employed to detect trace amounts of vapor-phase explosives and chemical warfare agent mimetics under ambient conditions. Under 10-s detection time, the limits of detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene, nitrotoluene, nitrobenzene, and dimethyl methyl phosphonate were 30, 0.5, 4, and 1 parts per trillion by volume, respectively. As compared to those obtained previously with PI mass spectrometric techniques, an improvement of 3-4 orders of magnitude was achieved. This study indicates that LPPI-MS will open new opportunities for the sensitive detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents. PMID:27260452

  10. Endophytic colonization of tomato plants by the biological control agent Clonostachys rosea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Anna Kaja; Jørgensen, Hans Jørgen Lyngs; Amby, Daniel Buchvaldt;

    Fungal endophytes live naturally inside plants without causing symptoms. On the contrary, they can promote plant growth and increase tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress. These beneficial effects have increased the agricultural interest for exploitation of fungal isolates with an endophytic life......-style. Clonostachys rosea occurs naturally world-wide and is capable of colonizing many different habitats. The fungus is primarily known as a versatile biological control agent. However, it has also been reported as a plant endophyte in, e.g., soybean, red clover and cacao. The C. rosea isolate IK726 efficiently...... controls seed- and soil-borne diseases and can furthermore promote plant growth. However, it is not known whether IK726 can colonize plants internally and therefore, the objective of the present study was to examine the possibility of an endophytic life-style of IK726 in tomato. Tomato seeds were sown...

  11. Photodegradation-based detection of fluorescent whitening agents in a mountain river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Aziz; Pontvianne, Steve; Pons, Marie-Noëlle

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) are highly soluble and poorly biodegradable ingredients used in laundry detergents and in industries (paper, textile, plastic manufacturing). They are likely to pass through biological wastewater treatment systems. The presence of FWAs in a mountain river was detected by monitoring the decay of synchronous fluorescence intensity at λ(ex)=360 nm after exposing samples to ultraviolet (UV) light (365 nm), for mimicking sunlight, for 15 min. The method was first validated on four commercial FWAs (DAS-1, FB28, DMA-X and CBS-X) in different water matrices (deionized water and pristine river water in the presence of humic acid and dyes). A 40% decay was observed after 15 min for the least photosensitive FWA (CBS-X). A field application was then performed on samples collected along a mountain river in which impacts of FWAs from domestic sources (laundry greywater) and industrial sources (paper and textile mills) were suspected. Variations of fluorescence decay at λ(ex)=360 nm could be explained by these potential sources of pollution. It is suggested that the fluorescence decay at λ(ex)=280 nm also be considered as an indicator, as some FWAs can exhibit fluorescence at that excitation wavelength. PMID:24461430

  12. Environmental risk assessment for Neodryinus typhlocybae, biological control agent against Metcalfa pruinosa, for Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Strauss

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential environmental risks of Neodryinus typhlocybae, a parasitic wasp from North America, were evaluated with regard to its safe use as an exotic biocontrol agent for the planthopper Metcalfa pruinosa in Austria. Following an earlier host range study of N. typhlocybae conducted in the laboratory, the present study assessed the potential for establishment and spread as well as negative indirect effects on non-target organisms. The potential release sites in Austria were analysed for matching of the climatic requirements for establishment of N. typhlocybae. The two proposed release locations, Vienna and Graz, have a predominantly similar climate to the parasitoid’s region of origin, though the comparably cooler mean summer temperatures might result in a low emergence rate of the partial second generation. The natural spread potential of N. typhlocybae was reviewed and is considered to be sufficiently good for released individuals to reach nearby sites infested with M. pruinosa. However, a perceptible spreading of N. typhlocybae females only occurs a few years after release and seems to be strongly dependent on the host density. Gelis areator, a hyperparasitoid of N. typhlocybae known to occur in Austria, might have negative effects on the population of the beneficial organism. Advantages and disadvantages of chemical and biological control methods against M. pruinosa were evaluated. It is concluded that N. typhlocybae is very well suited as a biological control agent for M. pruinosa in Austria, as no adverse effects on non-target species are expected but its release offers advantages with regard to sustainable and environmentally friendly pest management.

  13. A systematic screen of FDA-approved drugs for inhibitors of biological threat agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B Madrid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rapid development of effective medical countermeasures against potential biological threat agents is vital. Repurposing existing drugs that may have unanticipated activities as potential countermeasures is one way to meet this important goal, since currently approved drugs already have well-established safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in patients, as well as manufacturing and distribution networks. Therefore, approved drugs could rapidly be made available for a new indication in an emergency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A large systematic effort to determine whether existing drugs can be used against high containment bacterial and viral pathogens is described. We assembled and screened 1012 FDA-approved drugs for off-label broad-spectrum efficacy against Bacillus anthracis; Francisella tularensis; Coxiella burnetii; and Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa fever viruses using in vitro cell culture assays. We found a variety of hits against two or more of these biological threat pathogens, which were validated in secondary assays. As expected, antibiotic compounds were highly active against bacterial agents, but we did not identify any non-antibiotic compounds with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Lomefloxacin and erythromycin were found to be the most potent compounds in vivo protecting mice against Bacillus anthracis challenge. While multiple virus-specific inhibitors were identified, the most noteworthy antiviral compound identified was chloroquine, which disrupted entry and replication of two or more viruses in vitro and protected mice against Ebola virus challenge in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The feasibility of repurposing existing drugs to face novel threats is demonstrated and this represents the first effort to apply this approach to high containment bacteria and viruses.

  14. Preparation and biological behavior of 99m Tc(V)-DMS as a tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 99m Tc - labelled radiopharmaceutical has been developed for tumor imaging under commercial name of DMS-PENTATEC. We used for the preparation 2,3 meso dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), as ligand, and SnCl2 x 2H2O, as reducing agent. The mass ratio DMSA: SnCl2 is 1:0.43 in the mixture of inositol, ascorbic acid and natrium chloride as the antioxidant system. The labelling with 99m Tc was performed at an alkaline pH (7.5 - 8.5) with the result of a new coordination complex DMS - 99m Tc(V) with higher uptake by the tumor cells. The biological studies were made on Wistar London rats with Walker tumors. After intravenous (i.v.) administration of 30 mCi DMS - 99m Tc(V), the biodistribution measurements were carried out at 5 min, 15 min, 30 min and 60 min for the tumors and following organs: blood, liver, spleen, kidneys. The DMS - 99m Tc(V) accumulates quantitatively in the tumor 30 min after i.v. injection. The present study provides a good basis for DMS-99'm Tc(V) clinical application as a tumor imaging agent, mainly for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, medullar thyroid cancers and soft-tissue tumors. (authors)

  15. Isolation, characterization, and identification of biological control agent for potato soft rot in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Ali, M E; Khan, A A; Akanda, A M; Uddin, Md Kamal; Hashim, U; Abd Hamid, S B

    2012-01-01

    A total of 91 isolates of probable antagonistic bacteria of potato soft rot bacterium Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) were extracted from rhizospheres and endophytes of various crop plants, different soil varieties, and atmospheres in the potato farming areas of Bangladesh. Antibacterial activity of the isolated probable antagonistic bacteria was tested in vitro against the previously identified most common and most virulent soft rot causing bacterial strain Ecc P-138. Only two isolates E-45 and E-65 significantly inhibited the in vitro growth of Ecc P-138. Physiological, biochemical, and carbon source utilization tests identified isolate E-65 as a member of the genus Bacillus and the isolate E-45 as Lactobacillus sp. The stronger antagonistic activity against Ecc P-138 was found in E-65 in vitro screening and storage potatoes. E-65 reduced the soft rot infection to 22-week storage potatoes of different varieties by 32.5-62.5% in model experiment, demonstrating its strong potential to be used as an effective biological control agent for the major pectolytic bacteria Ecc. The highest (62.5%) antagonistic effect of E-65 was observed in the Granola and the lowest (32.7%) of that was found in the Cardinal varieties of the Bangladeshi potatoes. The findings suggest that isolate E-65 could be exploited as a biocontrol agent for potato tubers. PMID:22645446

  16. BSim: an agent-based tool for modeling bacterial populations in systems and synthetic biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Gorochowski

    Full Text Available Large-scale collective behaviors such as synchronization and coordination spontaneously arise in many bacterial populations. With systems biology attempting to understand these phenomena, and synthetic biology opening up the possibility of engineering them for our own benefit, there is growing interest in how bacterial populations are best modeled. Here we introduce BSim, a highly flexible agent-based computational tool for analyzing the relationships between single-cell dynamics and population level features. BSim includes reference implementations of many bacterial traits to enable the quick development of new models partially built from existing ones. Unlike existing modeling tools, BSim fully considers spatial aspects of a model allowing for the description of intricate micro-scale structures, enabling the modeling of bacterial behavior in more realistic three-dimensional, complex environments. The new opportunities that BSim opens are illustrated through several diverse examples covering: spatial multicellular computing, modeling complex environments, population dynamics of the lac operon, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators. BSim is open source software that is freely available from http://bsim-bccs.sf.net and distributed under the Open Source Initiative (OSI recognized MIT license. Developer documentation and a wide range of example simulations are also available from the website. BSim requires Java version 1.6 or higher.

  17. BSim: an agent-based tool for modeling bacterial populations in systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorochowski, Thomas E; Matyjaszkiewicz, Antoni; Todd, Thomas; Oak, Neeraj; Kowalska, Kira; Reid, Stephen; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira T; Savery, Nigel J; Grierson, Claire S; di Bernardo, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale collective behaviors such as synchronization and coordination spontaneously arise in many bacterial populations. With systems biology attempting to understand these phenomena, and synthetic biology opening up the possibility of engineering them for our own benefit, there is growing interest in how bacterial populations are best modeled. Here we introduce BSim, a highly flexible agent-based computational tool for analyzing the relationships between single-cell dynamics and population level features. BSim includes reference implementations of many bacterial traits to enable the quick development of new models partially built from existing ones. Unlike existing modeling tools, BSim fully considers spatial aspects of a model allowing for the description of intricate micro-scale structures, enabling the modeling of bacterial behavior in more realistic three-dimensional, complex environments. The new opportunities that BSim opens are illustrated through several diverse examples covering: spatial multicellular computing, modeling complex environments, population dynamics of the lac operon, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators. BSim is open source software that is freely available from http://bsim-bccs.sf.net and distributed under the Open Source Initiative (OSI) recognized MIT license. Developer documentation and a wide range of example simulations are also available from the website. BSim requires Java version 1.6 or higher. PMID:22936991

  18. Comparing Effects of Biologic Agents in Treating Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Multiple Treatment Comparison Regression Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingunn Fride Tvete

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis patients have been treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs and the newer biologic drugs. We sought to compare and rank the biologics with respect to efficacy. We performed a literature search identifying 54 publications encompassing 9 biologics. We conducted a multiple treatment comparison regression analysis letting the number experiencing a 50% improvement on the ACR score be dependent upon dose level and disease duration for assessing the comparable relative effect between biologics and placebo or DMARD. The analysis embraced all treatment and comparator arms over all publications. Hence, all measured effects of any biologic agent contributed to the comparison of all biologic agents relative to each other either given alone or combined with DMARD. We found the drug effect to be dependent on dose level, but not on disease duration, and the impact of a high versus low dose level was the same for all drugs (higher doses indicated a higher frequency of ACR50 scores. The ranking of the drugs when given without DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest, etanercept, tocilizumab/ abatacept and adalimumab. The ranking of the drugs when given with DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest, tocilizumab, anakinra/rituximab, golimumab/ infliximab/ abatacept, adalimumab/ etanercept [corrected]. Still, all drugs were effective. All biologic agents were effective compared to placebo, with certolizumab the most effective and adalimumab (without DMARD treatment and adalimumab/ etanercept (combined with DMARD treatment the least effective. The drugs were in general more effective, except for etanercept, when given together with DMARDs.

  19. Status of miniature integrated UV resonance fluorescence and Raman sensors for detection and identification of biochemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F.; Bhartia, Rohit; Taspin, Alexandre; Lane, Arthur; Conrad, Pamela; Sijapati, Kripa; Reid, Ray D.

    2005-11-01

    Laser induced native fluorescence (LINF) is the most sensitive method of detection of biological material including microorganisms, virus', and cellular residues. LINF is also a sensitive method of detection for many non-biological materials as well. The specificity with which these materials can be classified depends on the excitation wavelength and the number and location of observation wavelengths. Higher levels of specificity can be obtained using Raman spectroscopy but a much lower levels of sensitivity. Raman spectroscopy has traditionally been employed in the IR to avoid fluorescence. Fluorescence rarely occurs at wavelength below about 270nm. Therefore, when excitation occurs at a wavelength below 250nm, no fluorescence background occurs within the Raman fingerprint region for biological materials. When excitation occurs within electronic resonance bands of the biological target materials, Raman signal enhancement over one million typically occurs. Raman sensitivity within several hundred times fluorescence are possible in the deep UV where most biological materials have strong absorption. Since the Raman and fluorescence emissions occur at different wavelength, both spectra can be observed simultaneously, thereby providing a sensor with unique sensitivity and specificity capability. We will present data on our integrated, deep ultraviolet, LINF/Raman instruments that are being developed for several applications including life detection on Mars as well as biochemical warfare agents on Earth. We will demonstrate the ability to discriminate organic materials based on LINF alone. Together with UV resonance Raman, higher levels of specificity will be demonstrated. In addition, these instruments are being developed as on-line chemical sensors for industrial and municipal waste streams and product quality applications.

  20. Pochonia chlamydosporia: Advances and Challenges to Improve Its Performance as a Biological Control Agent of Sedentary Endo-parasitic Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanilla-López, Rosa H.; Esteves, Ivania; Finetti-Sialer, Mariella M.; Hirsch, Penny R.; Ward, Elaine; Devonshire, Jean; Hidalgo-Díaz, Leopoldo

    2013-01-01

    The nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia var. chlamydosporia is one of the most studied biological control agents against plant (semi-) endo-parasitic nematodes of the genera Globodera, Heterodera, Meloidogyne, Nacobbus and, more recently, Rotylenchulus. In this paper we present highlights from more than three decades of worldwide research on this biological control agent. We cover different aspects and key components of the complex plant-fungus-nematode tri-trophic interaction, an interaction that needs to be addressed to ensure the efficient use of P. chlamydosporia as a biopesticide as part of an integrated pest management approach. PMID:23589653

  1. Design and implementation of self-protection agent for network-based intrusion detection system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱树人; 李伟琴

    2003-01-01

    Static secure techniques, such as firewall, hierarchy filtering, distributed disposing,layer management, autonomy agent, secure communication, were introduced in distributed intrusion detection. The self-protection agents were designed, which have the distributed architecture,cooperate with the agents in intrusion detection in a loose-coupled manner, protect the security of intrusion detection system, and respond to the intrusion actively. A prototype self-protection agent was implemented by using the packet filter in operation system kernel. The results show that all the hosts with the part of network-based intrusion detection system and the whole intrusion detection system are invisible from the outside and network scanning, and cannot apperceive the existence of network-based intrusion detection system. The communication between every part is secure. In the low layer, the packet streams are controlled to avoid the buffer leaks exist ing in some system service process and back-door programs, so as to prevent users from misusing and vicious attack like Trojan Horse effectively.

  2. A biolayer interferometry-based assay for rapid and highly sensitive detection of biowarfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechaly, Adva; Cohen, Hila; Cohen, Ofer; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-08-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is an optical technique that uses fiber-optic biosensors for label-free real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions. In this study, we coupled the advantages of the Octet Red BLI system (automation, fluidics-free, and on-line monitoring) with a signal enhancement step and developed a rapid and sensitive immunological-based method for detection of biowarfare agents. As a proof of concept, we chose to demonstrate the efficacy of this novel assay for the detection of agents representing two classes of biothreats, proteinaceous toxins, and bacterial pathogens: ricin, a lethal plant toxin, and the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia. The assay setup consisted of biotinylated antibodies immobilized to the biosensor coupled with alkaline phosphatase-labeled antibodies as the detection moiety to create nonsoluble substrate crystals that precipitate on the sensor surface, thereby inducing a significant wavelength interference. It was found that this BLI-based assay enables sensitive detection of these pathogens (detection limits of 10 pg/ml and 1 × 10(4) pfu/ml ricin and F. tularensis, respectively) within a very short time frame (17 min). Owing to its simplicity, this assay can be easily adapted to detect other analytes in general, and biowarfare agents in particular, in a rapid and sensitive manner. PMID:27156814

  3. Comparison of long-term drug survival and safety of biologic agents in patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, R; Bang, B; Bryld, L E;

    2015-01-01

    has a significantly longer drug survival than the anti-TNF-α agents. Switching from one biologic to another is associated with an impairment of drug survival. Preventing loss of efficacy is a major area of medical need in the biologic therapy of psoriasis and the strategies that improve drug survival......BACKGROUND: Drug survival (time to drug discontinuation) has recently emerged as an important parameter reflecting the long-term therapeutic performance in a real-life setting. Biologic drug survival in psoriasis is mainly limited by a gradual loss of efficacy over time. Previous studies have been...... and to analyse the factors that influence drug survival. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were extracted from the prospective registry DERMBIO covering all patients with psoriasis vulgaris treated with biologic agents in the academic centres in Denmark. Drug survival was analysed using the Kaplan...

  4. Establishing a new marketplace for biologic therapy with biosimilar agents: importance of extrapolation of data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressler B

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Brian Bressler,1 Theo Dingermann2 1St Paul’s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Institute of Pharmaceutical Biology, Frankfurt, Germany Abstract: Despite their enormous value for our health care system, biopharmaceuticals have become a serious threat to the system itself due to their high cost. Costs may be warranted if the medicine is new and innovative; however, it is no longer an innovation when its patent protection expires. As patents and exclusivities expire on biological drugs, biosimilar products defined as highly similar to reference biologics are being marketed. The goal of biosimilar development is to establish a high degree of biosimilarity, not to reestablish clinical efficacy and safety. Current sophisticated analytical methods allow the detection of even small changes in quality attributes and can therefore enable sensitive monitoring of the batch-to-batch consistency and variability of the manufacturing process. The European Medicines Agency (EMA, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, and Health Canada have determined that a reduced number of nonclinical and clinical comparative studies can be sufficient for approval with clinical data from the most sensitive indication extrapolated to other indications. Extrapolation of data is a scientifically based principle, guided by specific criteria, and if approved by the EMA, FDA, and/or Health Canada is appropriate. Enablement of extrapolation of data is a core principle of biosimilar development, based on principles of comparability and necessary to fully realize cost savings for these drugs. Keywords: biosimilars, Inflectra, infliximab, pharmacoeconomics, Canada, Europe 

  5. Innate positive chemotaxis to pollen from crops and banker plants in predaceous biological control agents: towards new field lures?

    OpenAIRE

    Shu Li; Xiaoling Tan; Nicolas Desneux; Giovanni Benelli; Jing Zhao; Xinhai Li; Fan Zhang; Xiwu Gao; Su Wang

    2015-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions form the core of biological control of arthropod pests. Which tools can be used to monitor and collect carnivorous arthropods in natural habitats and targeted crops? Eco-friendly and effective field lures are urgently needed. In this research, we carried out olfactometer experiments assess innate positive chemotaxis to pollen of seven crop and banker plant by two important predatory biological control agents: the coccinellid Propylea japonica (Thunberg) and the anth...

  6. Influence of dispersion agents on particle size and concentration determined by laser-induced breakdown detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) is a very promising analytical technique to determine the size and the concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous suspensions. The measurement principle is based on the formation of individual plasma events selectively produced when a pulsed, focused laser beam hits a NP. The breakdown probability (BDP) is defined as the ratio of the number of plasma events detected to the total number of laser pulses applied. Energy curves are established by recording the BDP as a function of the laser energy which is increased in a stepwise manner. The size and the concentration of NPs in aqueous suspensions can be extracted from recorded energy curves. Although several studies have already documented the potential of the LIBD technique to detect NPs at trace concentrations in aqueous suspensions, the effect of dissolved matrix constituents (e.g. dispersion agents, which are frequently used to stabilize NPs in suspension) on the LIBD signal has not been addressed, yet. We therefore recorded energy curves of ultrahigh purity (UHP) water and NP suspensions both spiked with different dispersion agents at different concentrations. An increasing shift of the energy curves towards lower energies was observed with increasing concentrations of dispersion agents. The LIBD-derived size of the NPs was less affected by the presence of dispersion agents than the LIBD-derived particle number concentrations, which deviated by up to 300% from the expected values. The effects on the calculated concentrations were most pronounced at low (2 · 107 particles mL−1) NP concentrations and at higher NP concentrations (3 · 108 particles mL−1), the effect of the dispersion agents on the energy curves became negligible. These results show that dissolved matrix constituents substantially affect LIBD measurements, especially at low NP concentrations. - Highlights: • Dissolved constituents e.g. dispersion agents affect the LIBD signal. • Dispersion agents

  7. Reactive chromophores for sensitive and selective detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; Wald, Lara; Paul, Kateri; Hancock, Lawrence F.

    2005-05-01

    A reactive chromophore developed at MIT exhibits sensitive and selective detection of surrogates for G-class nerve agents. This reporter acts by reacting with the agent to form an intermediate that goes through an internal cyclization reaction. The reaction locks the molecule into a form that provides a strong fluorescent signal. Using a fluorescent sensor platform, Nomadics has demonstrated rapid and sensitive detection of reactive simulants such as diethyl chloro-phosphate (simulant for sarin, soman, and related agents) and diethyl cyanophosphate (simulant for tabun). Since the unreacted chromophore does not fluoresce at the excitation wavelength used for the cyclized reporter, the onset of fluo-rescence can be easily detected. This fluorescence-based detection method provides very high sensitivity and could enable rapid detection at permissible exposure levels. Tests with potential interferents show that the reporter is very selective, with responses from only a few highly toxic, electrophilic chemicals such as phosgene, thionyl chloride, and strong acids such as HF, HCl, and nitric acid. Dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), a common and inactive simu-lant for other CW detectors, is not reactive enough to generate a signal. The unique selectivity to chemical reactivity means that a highly toxic and hazardous chemical is present when the reporter responds and illustrates that this sensor can provide very low false alarm rates. Current efforts focus on demonstrating the sensitivity and range of agents and toxic industrial chemicals detected with this reporter as well as developing additional fluorescent reporters for a range of chemical reactivity classes. The goal is to produce a hand-held sensor that can sensitively detect a broad range of chemical warfare agent and toxic industrial chemical threats.

  8. An Agent Based Intrusion Detection Model for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Reshmi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrusion detection has over the last few years, assumed paramount importance within the broad realm of network security, more so in case of wireless mobile ad hoc networks. The inherently vulnerable characteristics of wireless mobile ad hoc networks make them susceptible to attacks in-spite of some security measures, and it may be too late before any counter action can take effect. As such, there is a need to complement traditional security mechanisms with efficient intrusion detection and response systems. This paper proposes an agent-based model to address the aspect of intrusion detection in cluster based mobile wireless ad hoc network environment. The model comprises of a set of static and mobile agents, which are used to detect intrusions, respond to intrusions, and distribute selected and aggregated intrusion information to all other nodes in the network in an intelligent manner. The model is simulated to test its operation effectiveness by considering the performance parameters such as, detection rate, false positives, agent overheads, and intrusion information distribution time. Agent based approach facilitates flexible and adaptable security services. Also, it supports component based software engineering components such as maintainability, reachability, reusability, adaptability, flexibility, and customization.

  9. Microfluidic chip with optical sensor for rapid detection of nerve agent Sarin in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hsih Yin; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Loke, Weng Keong; Tan, Yong Teng

    2007-12-01

    The chemical warfare agent Sarin is an organophosphate that is highly toxic to humans as they can act as cholinesterase inhibitors, that disrupts neuromuscular transmission. As these nerve agents are colorless, odorless and highly toxic, they can be introduced into drinking water as a means of terrorist sabotage. Hence, numerous innovative devices and methods have been developed for rapid detection of these organophosphates. Microfluidic technology allows the implementation of fast and sensitive detection of Sarin. In this paper, a micro-total analysis systems (TAS), also known as Lab-on-a-chip, fitted with an optical detection system has been developed to analyze the presence of the nerve agent sarin in water samples. In the present set-up, inhibition of co-introduced cholinesterase and water samples containing trace amounts of nerve agent sarin into the microfluidic device was used as the basis for selective detection of sarin. The device was fabricated using polymeric micromachining with PMMA (poly (methymethacrylate)) as the substrate material. A chromophore was utilized to measure the activity of remnant cholinesterase activity, which is inversely related to the amount of sarin present in the water samples. Comparisons were made between two different optical detection techniques and the findings will be presented in this paper. The presented measurement method is simple, fast and as sensitive as Gas Chromatography.

  10. V-type nerve agents phosphonylate ubiquitin at biologically relevant lysine residues and induce intramolecular cyclization by an isopeptide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Breyer, Felicitas; Blum, Marc-Michael; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz; John, Harald

    2014-08-01

    Toxic organophosphorus compounds (e.g., pesticides and nerve agents) are known to react with nucleophilic side chains of different amino acids (phosphylation), thus forming adducts with endogenous proteins. Most often binding to serine, tyrosine, or threonine residues is described as being of relevance for toxicological effects (e.g., acetylcholinesterase and neuropathy target esterase) or as biomarkers for post-exposure analysis (verification, e.g., albumin and butyrylcholinesterase). Accordingly, identification of novel protein targets might be beneficial for a better understanding of the toxicology of these compounds, revealing new bioanalytical verification tools, and improving knowledge on chemical reactivity. In the present study, we investigated the reaction of ubiquitin (Ub) with the V-type nerve agents Chinese VX, Russian VX, and VX in vitro. Ub is a ubiquitous protein with a mass of 8564.8 Da present in the extra- and intracellular space that plays an important physiological role in several essential processes (e.g., proteasomal degradation, DNA repair, protein turnover, and endocytosis). Reaction products were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight- mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and μ-high-performance liquid chromatography online coupled to UV-detection and electrospray ionization MS (μHPLC-UV/ESI MS). Our results originally document that a complex mixture of at least mono-, di, and triphosphonylated Ub adducts was produced. Surprisingly, peptide mass fingerprint analysis in combination with MALDI and ESI MS/MS revealed that phosphonylation occurred with high selectivity in at least 6 of 7 surface-exposed lysine residues that are essential for the biological function of Ub. These reaction products were found not to age. In addition, we herein report for the first time that phosphonylation induced intramolecular cyclization by formation of an isopeptide bond between the ε-amino group of a formerly phosphonylated

  11. Purpureocillium lilacinum, potential agent for biological control of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex lundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffré, D; Folgarait, P J

    2015-09-01

    Many leaf-cutter ant species are well known pests in Latin America, including species of the genera Acromyrmex and Atta. An environmentally friendly strategy to reduce the number of leafcutter ants and avoid indiscriminate use of chemical pesticides is biological control. In this work we evaluated the effectiveness of a strain of the entomopathogen Purpureocillium lilacinum, against worker ants from six Acromyrmex lundii field colonies, after immersions in pure suspensions at a concentration of 1×10(6)conidiaml(-1). Survival of ants treated with P. lilacinum was significantly lower than that recorded in controls, and median lethal time (LT50) was 6-7days. P. lilacinum was responsible for 85.6% (80.6-89.7) of the mortality in inoculated ants, in which we found that the percentage of other entomopathogens that naturally infected ants decreased also, suggesting a good competitive capability of the fungus. Horizontal transmission to non-inoculated ants was also evidenced, given that 58.5% (41.9-64.2) of them died because of P. lilacinum. Moreover, we tested pathogenicity for three concentrations of this strain (1.0×10(4), 10(6) and 10(8)conidiaml(-1)) and found a significantly faster mortality of ants and greater median percentage of infection at 10(8)conidiaml(-1) of P. lilacinum. CL50 value was 2.8×10(5)conidiaml(-1). We thus propose the use of P. lilacinum as a biological control agent of leafcutter ants in crops and plantations. PMID:26205173

  12. Fungal biological control agents for integrated management of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae of livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Narladkar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana had wide host range against insects and hence these are being exploited as fungal bio-pesticide on a large scale. Both fungi are proved pesticides against many crop pests and farmers are well acquainted with their use on the field. Thus, research was aimed to explore the potency of these fungal spores against larval and adult Culicoides midges, a pest of livestock. Materials and Methods: In-vitro testing of both fungal biological control agents was undertaken in Petri dishes against field collected Culicoides larvae, while in plastic beakers against field collected blood-engorged female Culicoides midges. In-vivo testing was undertaken by spraying requisite concentration of fungal spores on the drainage channel against larvae and resting sites of adult Culicoides midges in the cattle shed. Lethal concentration 50 (LC50 values and regression equations were drawn by following probit analysis using SPSS statistical computerized program. Results: The results of this study revealed LC50 values of 2692 mg and 3837 mg (108 cfu/g for B. bassiana and M. anisopliae, respectively, against Culicoides spp. larvae. Death of Culicoides larvae due to B. bassiana showed greenish coloration in the middle of the body with head and tail showed intense blackish changes, while infection of M. anisopliae resulted in death of Culicoides larvae with greenish and blackish coloration of body along with total destruction, followed by desquamation of intestinal channel. The death of adult Culicoides midges were caused by both the fungi and after death growth of fungus were very well observed on the dead cadavers proving the efficacy of the fungus. Conclusion: Preliminary trials with both funguses (M. anisopliae, B. bassiana showed encouraging results against larvae and adults of Culicoides spp. Hence, it was ascertained that, these two fungal molecules can form a part of biological control and

  13. A Bioanalytical Platform for Simultaneous Detection and Quantification of Biological Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Sigrist

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Prevalent incidents support the notion that toxins, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants or animals are increasingly responsible for food poisoning or intoxication. Owing to their high toxicity some toxins are also regarded as potential biological warfare agents. Accordingly, control, detection and neutralization of toxic substances are a considerable economic burden to food safety, health care and military biodefense. The present contribution describes a new versatile instrument and related procedures for array-based simultaneous detection of bacterial and plant toxins using a bioanalytical platform which combines the specificity of covalently immobilized capture probes with a dedicated instrumentation and immuno-based microarray analytics. The bioanalytical platform consists of a microstructured polymer slide serving both as support of printed arrays and as incubation chamber. The platform further includes an easy-to-operate instrument for simultaneous slide processing at selectable assay temperature. Cy5 coupled streptavidin is used as unifying fluorescent tracer. Fluorescence image analysis and signal quantitation allow determination of the toxin’s identity and concentration. The system’s performance has been investigated by immunological detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A, Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB, and the plant toxin ricin. Toxins were detectable at levels as low as 0.5–1 ng·mL−1 in buffer or in raw milk.

  14. A bioanalytical platform for simultaneous detection and quantification of biological toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Oliver G; Gao, Hui; Crevoisier, François; Heitger, Friedrich; Avondet, Marc-André; Sigrist, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Prevalent incidents support the notion that toxins, produced by bacteria, fungi, plants or animals are increasingly responsible for food poisoning or intoxication. Owing to their high toxicity some toxins are also regarded as potential biological warfare agents. Accordingly, control, detection and neutralization of toxic substances are a considerable economic burden to food safety, health care and military biodefense. The present contribution describes a new versatile instrument and related procedures for array-based simultaneous detection of bacterial and plant toxins using a bioanalytical platform which combines the specificity of covalently immobilized capture probes with a dedicated instrumentation and immuno-based microarray analytics. The bioanalytical platform consists of a microstructured polymer slide serving both as support of printed arrays and as incubation chamber. The platform further includes an easy-to-operate instrument for simultaneous slide processing at selectable assay temperature. Cy5 coupled streptavidin is used as unifying fluorescent tracer. Fluorescence image analysis and signal quantitation allow determination of the toxin's identity and concentration. The system's performance has been investigated by immunological detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), and the plant toxin ricin. Toxins were detectable at levels as low as 0.5-1 ng · mL(-1) in buffer or in raw milk. PMID:22438766

  15. Terapia com agentes biológicos na criança e no adolescente Treatment with biologic agents in child and adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Maisse Suehiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar os mecanismos fisiopatológicos e novos alvos terapêuticos, os agentes biológicos disponíveis, principais indicações e a evidência científica atual para o uso de terapias biológicas na população pediátrica. FONTES DE DADOS: Pesquisa na base de dados Medline e SciELO, nas línguas inglesa e portuguesa, entre 2000 e 2009. As palavras-chave usadas foram "agentes biológicos", "crianças" e "adolescentes". SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Os agentes biológicos são uma importante opção terapêutica para tratar as doenças autoimunes refratárias às terapias convencionais na infância e na adolescência. Com exceção da artrite idiopática juvenil, a maioria dos estudos em outras doenças autoimunes não é controlada. CONCLUSÕES: Os agentes biológicos têm demonstrado eficácia no tratamento de doenças autoimunes pediátricas como artrite idiopática juvenil, miopatias idiopáticas inflamatórias, lúpus eritematoso juvenil, vasculites, uveítes crônicas, doenças inflamatórias intestinais e púrpura trombocitopênica imune crônica, assim como no linfoma não-Hodgkin. Considerando-se o custo elevado e os potenciais eventos adversos, o uso desses agentes deve ser individualizado e acompanhado por especialista.OBJECTIVE: To review the physiopathology and new therapeutical targets, the available biologic agents, the main indications and the current scientific evidence for the use of biological therapies in the pediatric population. DATA SOURCES: A bibliographical search was obtained from Medline and SciELO databases in English and Portuguese from 2000 to 2009. The key-words included were "biologic agent", "children" and "adolescent". DATA SYNTHESIS: Biologic agents are important therapeutic options to treat refractory autoimmune diseases to conventional therapies in childhood and adolescence. Excluding juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the majority of studies in other autoimmune diseases are uncontrolled trials. CONCLUSIONS

  16. 75 FR 28233 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Asian Citrus Psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Asian Citrus Psyllid AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... Plant Health Inspection Service has prepared an environmental assessment relative to the control...

  17. Life history of Parafreutreta regalis, (diptera:tephritidae), a candidate agent for biological control of delairea odorata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape-ivy, Delairea odorata Lamaire, is an ornamental vine, native to the eastern part of South Africa, which has escaped into natural areas in many countries and become a serious pest. Exploratory surveys in South Africa located several potential biological control agents. One of these is Parafreu...

  18. Life history and host range of Oxydia vesulia transpeneus, an unsuitable biological control agent of Brazilian peppertree

    Science.gov (United States)

    The suitability of Oxydia vesulia (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) was assessed as a potential biological control agent of the invasive weed Brazilian Peppertree Schinus terebinthifolia. Larvae were collected in Brazil feeding on the plant in its native range and colonized in quarantine where lif...

  19. Effect of host-plant genotypes on the performance of three candidate biological control agents of Schinus terebinthifolius in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazilian pepper is a weed in Florida, California and Hawaii that originates from South America. In Florida we have found two distinct types of Brazilian pepper plant and a hybrid between these two types. To control this weed, three biological control agents are being evaluated from Brazil. These ar...

  20. Efficiacy of bumble bee disseminated biological control agents for control of Botrytis Blossom blight of Rabbiteye Blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis blossom blight caused by Botrytis cinerea may cause severe crop loss in rabbiteye blueberry, necessitating applications of expensive fungicides. Commercial bumble bees, Bombus impatiens, were tested as vectors of the fungicidal biological control agents (BCAs), Prestop® Gliocladium catenula...

  1. HIGHLY SELECTIVE SENSORS FOR CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL WARFARE AGENTS, INSECTICIDES AND VOCS BASED ON A MOLECULAR SURFACE IMPRINTING TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract was given as an oral platform presentation at the Pittsburgh Conference, Orlando FL (March 5-9, 2006). Research described is the development of sensors based on molecular surface imprinting. Applications include the monitoring of chemical and biological agents and inse...

  2. Chromogenic and fluorogenic detection and discrimination of nerve agents Tabun and Vx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Rana, Hemlata

    2015-11-28

    Our approach uses squaraine (SQ) as the molecular-receptor as well as an indicator for the chromogenic and fluorogenic detection and discrimination of nerve agents Tabun and Vx. To mimic a real-life scenario, the protocols were implemented in spiked water and soil samples, on surfaces, and in the gas phase. The lower detection limit will be useful to protect human health and national security. PMID:26394304

  3. Zeolite fiber integrated microsensors for highly sensitive point detection of chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Hui, Juan; Dong, Junhang; Xiao, Hai

    2006-05-01

    A zeolite-fiber integrated chemical sensor was developed for in situ point detection of chemical warfare agents. The sensor was made by fine-polishing the MFI polycrystalline zeolite thin film synthesized on the endface of the single mode optical fiber. The sensor device operates by measuring the optical thickness changes of the zeolite thin film caused by the adsorption of analytes into the zeolite channels. The sensor was demonstrated for sensitive detection of toluene and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP).

  4. Metarhizium anisopliae as a Biological Control Agent Against Hyalomma anatolicum (Acari: Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Shigidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Sudan, ticks and Tick-borne Diseases (TBDs with subsequent costs of control and treatment are causing substantial economic loss. Control of ticks is mainly by chemical insecticides. The rising environmental hazards and problem of resistance has motivated research on biological agents as alternative methods of control. The present study aims at controlling livestock ticks using fungi for their unique mode of action besides their ability to adhere to the cuticle, to germinate and penetrate enzymatically. The study was conducted to evaluate the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae for tick control as an alternative mean to chemical acaricides. Pathogenicity of the fungus was tested on different developmental stages of the tick Hyalomma anatolicum. The fungus induced high mortality to flat immature stages. It, also, affected reproductive potential of the females. Egg laid, hatching percent, fertility and moulting percent of immature stages were significantly (p≤0.05 reduced. It was, also, shown that the fungus had ability to adhere to the cuticle and penetrate the integument of the tick. Conidia of the fungus were isolated from their internal tissues. This phenomenon is important in considering fungi as bioinsecticides. Infection of eggs laid by treated engorged female ticks, with the fungus might demonstrate suggesting transovarian transmission. The use of M. anisopliae to control ticks is discussed.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Lysobacter enzymogenes as a Biological Control Agent Against Some Fungal Pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Guo-liang; HU Bai-shi; JIANG Ying-hua; LIU Feng-quan

    2009-01-01

    Strain OH11, a Gram-negative, nonspore forming, rod-shaped bacterium with powerful antagonistic activity, was isolated from rhizosphere of green pepper in Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences of China and characterized to determine its taxonomic position. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain OH11 belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria and had the highest degree of sequence similarity to Lysobacter enzymogenes strain C3 (AY074793) (99%), Lysobacter enzyrnogenes strain N4-7 (U89965) (99%), Lysobacter antibioticus strain (AB019582) (97%), and Lysobacter gummosus strain (AB16136) (97%). Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain OH11 possesses a quinine system with Q-8 as the predominant compound and C15:0 iso,C17:1 iso w9c as the predominant iso-branched fatty acids,all of which corroborated the assignment of strain OH11 to the genus Lysobacter. Results of DNA-DNA hybridization and physiological and biochemical tests clearly showed that strain OH11 was classified as Lysobacter enzymogenes. Strain OH11 could produce protease, chitinase, and β-1,3-glucanase. It showed strong in vitro antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia scletotiorum, and several other phytopathogenic fungi. This is the first report of identification and characterization of Lysobacter enzymogenes as a biological control agent of plant diseases in China.

  6. Biological evaluation of Phellinus linteus-fermented broths as anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lien, Hsiu-Man; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Huang, Chao-Lu; Liu, Jau-Jin; Chang, Yun-Chieh; Chen, Chia-Chang; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2014-07-01

    Phellinus linteus and its constituent hispolon induce potent anti-inflammatory activity in macrophages. Efficient production of the effective constituent and the biological function of P. linteus in the regulation of innate sensing have rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to efficiently manufacture P. linteus-fermented broth containing the effective constituent, hispolon, and evaluate its immunoregulatory functions in macrophages. Four distinct fermented broths (PL1-4) and the medium dialyzate (MD) were prepared to screen suitable culture conditions for the mycelial growth of P. linteus. The P. linteus-fermented broth exhibited a dose-responsive inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production by murine macrophages. In addition, the P. linteus-fermented broths suppressed macrophage LPS-mediated nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Among the tested samples from P. linteus, PL4 contained vast amounts of hispolon and showed the greatest anti-inflammatory activity in both the RAW264.7 cells and murine primary peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). This study demonstrates that the purification of the effective constituent from P. linteus-fermented broth may enable the production of a potent therapeutic agent for anti-inflammation in macrophages. PMID:24503424

  7. 9 CFR 113.55 - Detection of extraneous agents in Master Seed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Master Seed Virus. 113.55 Section 113.55 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.55 Detection of extraneous agents in Master Seed Virus... Seed Virus (MSV) shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A MSV found unsatisfactory by...

  8. Fluorogenic and chromogenic probe for rapid detection of a nerve agent simulant DCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-hui; Dong, Jun-jun; Wang, Xin; Li, Jian; Sui, Shao-hui; Chen, Gao-yun; Liu, Ji-wei; Zhang, Ming

    2012-07-21

    A fluorogenic and visual probe was devised to detect diethyl chlorophosphate (DCP), a nerve agent simulant. The probe, N-(rhodamine B)-lactam-2-aminoethanol (RB-AE), undergoes oxazoline formation following phosphorylation in the presence of DCP, which gives rapid and clear fluorescence and color change in the assay solutions. PMID:22624148

  9. Proceedings First Workshop on Applications of Membrane computing, Concurrency and Agent-based modelling in POPulation biology

    CERN Document Server

    Milazzo, Paolo; 10.4204/EPTCS.33

    2010-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the first International Workshop on Applications of Membrane Computing, Concurrency and Agent-based Modelling in Population Biology (AMCA-POP 2010) held in Jena, Germany on August 25th, 2010 as a satellite event of the 11th Conference on Membrane Computing (CMC11). The aim of the workshop is to investigate whether formal modelling and analysis techniques could be applied with profit to systems of interest for population biology and ecology. The considered modelling notations include membrane systems, Petri nets, agent-based notations, process calculi, automata-based notations, rewriting systems and cellular automata. Such notations enable the application of analysis techniques such as simulation, model checking, abstract interpretation and type systems to study systems of interest in disciplines such as population biology, ecosystem science, epidemiology, genetics, sustainability science, evolution and other disciplines in which population dynamics and interactions...

  10. Microsystem strategies for sample preparation in biological detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Bennett, Dawn Jonita (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD); Manginell, Monica; Okandan, Murat; Acrivos, Andreas (The City College of New York, NY); Brozik, Susan Marie; Khusid, Boris (New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ)

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this LDRD was to develop microdevice strategies for dealing with samples to be examined in biological detection systems. This includes three sub-components: namely, microdevice fabrication, sample delivery to the microdevice, and sample processing within the microdevice. The first component of this work focused on utilizing Sandia's surface micromachining technology to fabricate small volume (nanoliter) fluidic systems for processing small quantities of biological samples. The next component was to develop interfaces for the surface-micromachined silicon devices. We partnered with Micronics, a commercial company, to produce fluidic manifolds for sample delivery to our silicon devices. Pressure testing was completed to examine the strength of the bond between the pressure-sensitive adhesive layer and the silicon chip. We are also pursuing several other methods, both in house and external, to develop polymer-based fluidic manifolds for packaging silicon-based microfluidic devices. The second component, sample processing, is divided into two sub-tasks: cell collection and cell lysis. Cell collection was achieved using dielectrophoresis, which employs AC fields to collect cells at energized microelectrodes, while rejecting non-cellular particles. Both live and dead Staph. aureus bacteria have been collected using RF frequency dielectrophoresis. Bacteria have been separated from polystyrene microspheres using frequency-shifting dielectrophoresis. Computational modeling was performed to optimize device separation performance, and to predict particle response to the dielectrophoretic traps. Cell lysis is continuing to be pursued using microactuators to mechanically disrupt cell membranes. Novel thermal actuators, which can generate larger forces than previously tested electrostatic actuators, have been incorporated with and tested with cell lysis devices. Significant cell membrane distortion has been observed, but more experiments need to be

  11. Integration of multi-array sensors and support vector machines for the detection and classification of organophosphate nerve agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; Sadik, Omowunmi A.; Embrechts, Mark J.; Leibensperger, Dale; Wong, Lut; Wanekaya, Adam; Uematsu, Michiko

    2003-08-01

    Due to the increased threats of chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by international terrorist organizations, a significant effort is underway to develop tools that can be used to detect and effectively combat biochemical warfare. Furthermore, recent events have highlighted awareness that chemical and biological agents (CBAs) may become the preferred, cheap alternative WMD, because these agents can effectively attack large populations while leaving infrastructures intact. Despite the availability of numerous sensing devices, intelligent hybrid sensors that can detect and degrade CBAs are virtually nonexistent. This paper reports the integration of multi-array sensors with Support Vector Machines (SVMs) for the detection of organophosphates nerve agents using parathion and dichlorvos as model stimulants compounds. SVMs were used for the design and evaluation of new and more accurate data extraction, preprocessing and classification. Experimental results for the paradigms developed using Structural Risk Minimization, show a significant increase in classification accuracy when compared to the existing AromaScan baseline system. Specifically, the results of this research has demonstrated that, for the Parathion versus Dichlorvos pair, when compared to the AromaScan baseline system: (1) a 23% improvement in the overall ROC Az index using the S2000 kernel, with similar improvements with the Gaussian and polynomial (of degree 2) kernels, (2) a significant 173% improvement in specificity with the S2000 kernel. This means that the number of false negative errors were reduced by 173%, while making no false positive errors, when compared to the AromaScan base line performance. (3) The Gaussian and polynomial kernels demonstrated similar specificity at 100% sensitivity. All SVM classifiers provided essentially perfect classification performance for the Dichlorvos versus Trichlorfon pair. For the most difficult classification task, the Parathion versus

  12. Chemically-functionalized microcantilevers for detection of chemical, biological and explosive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Hawk, John Eric [Olive Branch, MS; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    A chemically functionalized cantilever system has a cantilever coated on one side thereof with a reagent or biological species which binds to an analyte. The system is of particular value when the analyte is a toxic chemical biological warfare agent or an explosive.

  13. Intrusion detection system and technology of layered wireless sensor network based on Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genjian Yu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The intrusion detection system and technology of classified layered-wireless sensor network was able to meet the high safety requirements of wireless sensor network, it is urgent for us to improve the identification and generalization of detection system about characters of intrusion. In this paper, we design an intelligent intrusion detection system which realize intelligence, the effective and direct way was to add the methods,  and it was used for identification and generalization of intrusion characters to the Agent function of intrusion detection. It could obtain credible judgment by updating and examining the database for the actions which the general misuse detection or anomaly detection were not sure if the intrusion was formed.

  14. Reactive chromophores for sensitive and selective detection of chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; la Grone, Marcus; Wald, Lara; Aker, Craig; Dock, Matt; Hancock, Lawrence F.; Fagan, Steve; Paul, Kateri

    2004-08-01

    A new sensor for highly toxic species including chemical warfare (CW) agents has been developed. This sensor is based on a unique CW indicating chromophore (CWIC) developed by Professor Tim Swager at MIT. The CWIC was designed to be sensitive to the reactivity that makes these chemicals so toxic. Since it requires the reactivity of the agent to be detected, the CWIC technology has shown remarkable selectivity for nerve agent surrogates and some other highly toxic species, thereby demonstrating the potential to provide low false alarm rate detection. Since the chromophore has mini-mal fluorescence prior to reaction with an electrophilic and toxic chemical, the sensor acts in a dark field fluorescence mode. This provides the sensor with exceptional sensitivity and a potential to detect priority analytes well below levels detected by current hand held sensors. Finally, it is based on a simple optical detection scheme that enables small and rugged sensors to be developed and produced at a low enough cost so they can be widely utilized.

  15. Suppressive composts from organic wastes as agents of biological control of fusariosis in Tatartan Republic (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumerova, Raushaniya; Galitskaya, Polina; Beru, Franchesca; Selivanovskaya, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    pepton agar, the composts and their water extracts were checked towards their ability to inhibit growth of F. oxysporum. It was shown that three composts - CD, FPM and RD - possessed suppressiveness towards the model phytopathogen. From these three wastes, 28 bacterial and fungal strains were isolated and, in their turn, checked towards their ability to inhibit F. oxysporum. It was demonstrated that five of the isolated strains are highly suppressive to model test-object (the growth area of F. oxysporum did not exceed 30%), six of the stains were moderate suppressive (the growth area of F. oxysporum ranged from 35% to 60%), and other strains did not cause negative effects for the model phytopathogen. Further, we will check the composts and the isolated strains using the model system "soil - tomato plant - phytopathogen". As a result, effective composts and strains will be recommended as agents for biological control of fungal diseases in the region. Besides, the structure of bacterial and fungal community of the composts with suppressive properties will be assessed using 454-pyrosequencing.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of two native fishes from tropical North Queensland as biological control agents of subterranean Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, B M; Wang, J; Williams, Y; Hearnden, M N; Kay, B H

    2001-06-01

    The ability of 2 freshwater fishes, eastern rainbow fish Melanotaenia splendida splendida and fly-specked hardyhead Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum stercusmuscarum, native to North Queensland to prey on immature Aedes aegypti was evaluated under laboratory conditions. The predation efficiency of the 2 species was compared to the exotic guppy, Poecilia reticulata, which is commonly used as a biological control agent of mosquito larvae. Of the 3 fish species tested, M. s. splendida was shown to be the most promising agent for the biological control of Ae. aegypti that breed in wells. Melanotaenia s. splendida consumed significantly greater numbers of immature Ae. aegypti than P. reticulata, irrespective of developmental stage or light conditions. Unlike C s. stercusmuscarum, M. s. splendida could be handled, transported, and kept in captivity for extended periods with negligible mortality. However, M. s. splendida was also an efficient predator of Litoria caerulea tadpoles, a species of native frog found in wells during the dry season. This result may limit the usefulness of M. s. splendida as a biological control agent of well-breeding Ae. aegypti and suggests that predacious copepods, Mesocyclops spp., are more suitable. However, the use of M. s. splendida as a mosquito control agent in containers that are unlikely to support frog populations (e.g., aquaculture tanks and drinking troughs) should be given serious consideration. PMID:11480819

  17. Gadolinium-porphyrins: new potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two new porphyrin-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents, Gd-hematoporphyrin (Gd-H and Gd-tetra-carboranylmethoxyphenyl-porphyrin (Gd-TCP were synthesized and tested in nude mice with human melanoma (MM-138 xenografts as new melanoma contrast agents. METHODS: Subcutaneous xenografts of human melanoma cells (MM-138 were studied in 30 (five groups of six nude mice. The effect of different contrast agents (Gd-TCP, Gd-H, GdCl3 and Gd-DTPA on proton relaxation times was measured in tumors and other organs. T1 values, signal enhancement and the Gd concentration for different contrast agent solutions were also investigated. RESULTS: The porphyrin agents showed higher relaxivity compared to the clincal agent, Gd-DTPA. A significant 16% and 21% modification in T1 relaxation time of the water in human melanoma tumors grafted in the nude mice was revealed 24 hours after injection of Gd-TCP and Gd-H, respectively. The percentage of injected Gd localized to the tumor measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES was approximately 21% for Gd-TCP and 28% for Gd-H which were higher than that of Gd-DTPA (10%. CONCLUSIONS: The high concentration of Gd in the tumor is indicative of a selective retention of the compounds and indicates that Gd-TCP and Gd-H are promising MR imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection. Gd-porphyrins have considerable promise for further diagnostic applications in magnetic resonance imaging. KEY WORDS: MRI, porphyrin-based contrast agent, hematoporphyrin, melanoma.

  18. Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

    1999-09-01

    There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

  19. Predicting the host range of Nystalea ebalea: secondary plant chemistry and host selection by a surrogate biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The safety of weed biological control depends upon the selection and utilization of the target weed by the agent while causing minimal harm to non-target species. Selection of weed species by biological control agents is determined by the presence of behavioral cues, generally host secondary plant c...

  20. Preliminary assessment of the interaction of introduced biological agents with biofilms in water distribution systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Caldwell, Sara; Jones, Howland D. T.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Souza, Caroline Ann; McGrath, Lucas K.

    2005-12-01

    Basic research is needed to better understand the potential risk of dangerous biological agents that are unintentionally or intentionally introduced into a water distribution system. We report on our capabilities to conduct such studies and our preliminary investigations. In 2004, the Biofilms Laboratory was initiated for the purpose of conducting applied research related to biofilms with a focus on application, application testing and system-scale research. Capabilities within the laboratory are the ability to grow biofilms formed from known bacteria or biofilms from drinking water. Biofilms can be grown quickly in drip-flow reactors or under conditions more analogous to drinking-water distribution systems in annular reactors. Biofilms can be assessed through standard microbiological techniques (i .e, aerobic plate counts) or with various visualization techniques including epifluorescent and confocal laser scanning microscopy and confocal fluorescence hyperspectral imaging with multivariate analysis. We have demonstrated the ability to grow reproducible Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms in the annular reactor with plate counts on the order of 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/cm{sup 2}. Stationary phase growth is typically reached 5 to 10 days after inoculation. We have also conducted a series of pathogen-introduction experiments, where we have observed that both polystyrene microspheres and Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) stay incorporated in the biofilms for the duration of our experiments, which lasted as long as 36 days. These results indicated that biofilms may act as a safe harbor for bio-pathogens in drinking water systems, making it difficult to decontaminate the systems.

  1. Functionalized nanoparticles for biological imaging and detection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Bing C.

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained tremendous attention in the last decade as a result of their size-dependent spectroscopic properties. These nanoparticles have been a subject of intense study to bridge the gap between macroscopic and atomic behavior, as well as to generate new materials for novel applications in therapeutics, biological sensing, light emitting devices, microelectronics, lasers, and solar cells. One of the most promising areas for the use of these nanoparticles is in biotechnology, where their size-dependent optical properties are harnessed for imaging and sensing applications. However, these nanoparticles, as synthesized, are often not stable in aqueous media and lack simple and reliable means of covalently linking to biomolecules. The focus of this work is to advance the progress of these nanomaterials for biotechnology by synthesizing them, characterizing their optical properties and rendering them water-soluble and functional while maintaining their coveted optical properties. QDs were synthesized by an organometallic chemical procedure that utilizes coordinating solvents to provide brightly luminescent nanoparticles. The optical interactions of these QDs were studied as a function of concentration to identify particle size-dependent optimal concentrations, where scattering and indirection excitation are minimized and the amount light observed per particle is maximized. Both QDs and AuNPs were rendered water-soluble and stable in a broad range of biologically relevant conditions by using a series of ligands composed of dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) appended to poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether. By studying the stability of the surface modified AuNPs, we revealed some interesting information regarding the role of the surface ligand on the nanoparticle stability (i.e. solubility in high salt concentration, resistance to dithiothreitol competition and cyanide decomposition). Furthermore, the nanoparticles

  2. Detection of ionizing radiations with the SOS chromotest, a bacterial short-term test for genotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects if 3 type of ionizing radiation, γ-rays, neutrons and accelerated α-particles, were examined usingthe SOS Chromotest, a bacterial colorimetric assay for genotoxic agents besed on the measurement of the SOS response in Escherichia coli. The SOS Chromotest appeared to be a sensitive and simple assay to detect quantitatively these radiations as well as their biological effects. The range of adsorbed doses for which induction was observed was similar for the 3 types of radiation, the minimum inducing doses deing in the order of 2.5-5 Gy. We discuss the possible use of these observation to study the molecular action of radiations and to compare their genotoxic effects with those of chemicals. (Author). 43 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  3. The importance of molecular tools in classical biological control of weeds: Two case studies with yellow starthistle candidate biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular analyses may play a primary role in the process of host-specificity evaluation at species and population levels; here are reported two examples of their application with new candidate biocontrol agents for yellow starthistle (YST). Ceratapion basicorne is a root-crown boring weevil that sh...

  4. Microbial agent detection using near-IR electrophoretic and spectral signatures (MADNESS) for rapid identification in detect-to-warn applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Anthony Lee; Bambha, Ray P.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Fruetel, Julia A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2009-10-01

    Rapid identification of aerosolized biological agents following an alarm by particle triggering systems is needed to enable response actions that save lives and protect assets. Rapid identifiers must achieve species level specificity, as this is required to distinguish disease-causing organisms (e.g., Bacillus anthracis) from benign neighbors (e.g., Bacillus subtilis). We have developed a rapid (1-5 minute), novel identification methodology that sorts intact organisms from each other and particulates using capillary electrophoresis (CE), and detects using near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and scattering. We have successfully demonstrated CE resolution of Bacillus spores and vegetative bacteria at the species level. To achieve sufficient sensitivity for detection needs ({approx}10{sup 4} cfu/mL for bacteria), we have developed fiber-coupled cavity-enhanced absorbance techniques. Using this method, we have demonstrated {approx}two orders of magnitude greater sensitivity than published results for absorbing dyes, and single particle (spore) detection through primarily scattering effects. Results of the integrated CE-NIR system for spore detection are presented.

  5. Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

    2007-09-19

    This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

  6. Deep Reinforcement Learning Radio Control and Signal Detection with KeRLym, a Gym RL Agent

    OpenAIRE

    O'Shea, Timothy J; Clancy, T. Charles

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents research in progress investigating the viability and adaptation of reinforcement learning using deep neural network based function approximation for the task of radio control and signal detection in the wireless domain. We demonstrate a successful initial method for radio control which allows naive learning of search without the need for expert features, heuristics, or search strategies. We also introduce Kerlym, an open Keras based reinforcement learning agent collection ...

  7. The effect of biological and chemical control agents on the health status of the very early potato cultivar Rosara

    OpenAIRE

    Cwalina-Ambroziak Bożena; Damszel Marta Maria; Głosek-Sobieraj Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The external appearance and quality of table potatoes are determined, among other factors, by the health status of the plants during the growing season. Chemical control methods are often combined with biocontrol agents to effectively fight potato pathogens. Potatoes of the very early cultivar Rosara were grown in experimental plots. The plots were located in Tomaszkowo (NE Poland, 2007-2009). The experiment involved the following treatments: 1) biological control − mycorrhizal Glomus spp. in...

  8. RESEARCH ON SECURITY PROTOCOL FOR COLLABORATING MOBILE AGENTS IN NETWORK INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olumide Simeon Ogunnusi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the popularity of mobile agents in academic and commercial arena, the security issues associated with them have hindered their adoption on large scale distributed applications. However, researchers are making relentless effort to overcome the security impediments so that the interesting properties inherent in mobile agent application, especially in the field of intrusion detection, can be harnessed. Such properties include: adaptability, autonomous nature, low bandwidth utilization, latency eradication, mobility and intelligence. A number of protocols have been developed by researchers for different key distribution techniques to enhance their performance and to protect communicating entities against malicious attacks that can hinder their activities. However, they do not take into account the availability and fault tolerance of the protocols in case of any possible attack despite the authentication methods offered by encryption. This study therefore, proposes a fault-tolerant key distribution protocol for distributed mobile agents (communicating entities in network intrusion detection system to facilitate hitch-free collaboration geared towards intrusive packets detection in Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN.

  9. Surface-immobilization of molecules for detection of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Indrani; Neelam

    2014-09-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale molecular assemblies with advanced functionalities is an emerging field. These systems provide new perspectives for the detection and degradation of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The main concern in this context is the design and fabrication of "smart surfaces" able to immobilize functional molecules which can perform a certain function or under the input of external stimuli. This review addresses the above points dealing with immobilization of various molecules on different substrates and describes their adequacy as sensors for the detection of CWAs. PMID:24998209

  10. Radiochemical and biological evaluation of a new brain serotonin1A receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical and biological evaluations are made of a new bidentate radioligand as a potential brain serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor imaging agent. The bidentate part of the complex was a derivative of the well known serotonin1A receptor antagonist molecule, namely WAY 100635; the monodentate parts were thiocresol, thiosalicylic acid and thio-2-naphthol. The labelling procedure was performed through the 99mTc(V)-glucoheptonate precursor. The bidentate + monodentate complex formed during the reaction in the case of thiocresol was identified as 99TcO(o-CH3-C6H4-N(CH2-CH2)2N-CH2CH2S)( p-C6H4CH3)2 (99mTc-1). Its labelling efficiency and stability were determined by thin layer chromatography, the organic solvent extraction method and high performance liquid chromagraphy. The biodistribution of the labelled compound was found by using male Wistar rats. On the basis of these data, kinetic curves were constructed for different organs and the dosimetry for humans was calculated. The brain uptake and pharmacokinetics were followed by planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in rats. Average brain count density was calculated and different regional count densities (counts/gram tissue) were obtained for the hippocampus and other receptor-rich regions. A detailed SPECT study was carried out after administration of 99mTc-1 to a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca cynomolgus). The results found show that, of three investigated aromatic thiol compounds, the labelling efficiency was the highest in the case of thiocresol as the monodentate part. Therefore all further studies were carried out using thiocresol. The labelling efficiency of this bidentate complex was about 80%, and the molecule was stable for up to one hour. The biodistribution data show that more than 0.1% of the injected dose is present in the rat brains a few minutes after administration, and the metabolic pathway is through the hepatobiliary system. From the results obtained with the study of the

  11. Humans are Well Tuned to Detecting Agents Among Non-agents: Examining the Sensitivity of Human Perception to Behavioral Characteristics of Intentional Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wykowska, A.; Kajopoulos, J.; Obando-Leiton, M.; Chauhan, S S; Cabibihan, J.-J.; Cheng, G.

    2015-01-01

    For efficient social interactions, humans have developed means to predict and understand others' behavior often with reference to intentions and desires. To infer others' intentions, however, one must assume that the other is an agent with a mind and mental states. With two experiments, this study examined if the human perceptual system is sensitive to detecting human agents, based on only subtle behavioral cues. Participants observed robots, which performed pointing gestures interchangeably ...

  12. Preferences of patients and health professionals for route and frequency of administration of biologic agents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huynh, Tuan Khai; Ostergaard, Ann; Egsmose, Charlotte;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the preferences of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and health professionals (HPs) for the route and frequency of administration of biologic drugs. METHODS: One hundred and seven RA patients treated with biological agents for intravenous or subcutaneous use, 35 biologic...

  13. 基于轻负载代理的协同分布式入侵检测系统%Lightweight Agent for Collaborative Distribution Intrusion Detection System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琨; 刘凤玉

    2003-01-01

    The LAFCDIDS (Lightweight Agent for Collaborative Distnbution Intrusion Detection System) presented in this paper is a distributed intrusion detection system with the ability of collaborative detection in real time. The hierarchy architecture of agents and the ability of collaborative detection in real time are evident characteristics of the LAFCDIDS. Lightweight agent and agent sensitivity are LAFCDIDS's new concepts, which can reduce the overload of protected system, shorten the period of intrusion detection, and are suitable for monitoring the distributed collaborating attacks.

  14. Agents, assemblers, and ANTS: scheduling assembly with market and biological software mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth-Fejel, Tihamer T.

    2000-06-01

    Nanoscale assemblers will need robust, scalable, flexible, and well-understood mechanisms such as software agents to control them. This paper discusses assemblers and agents, and proposes a taxonomy of their possible interaction. Molecular assembly is seen as a special case of general assembly, subject to many of the same issues, such as the advantages of convergent assembly, and the problem of scheduling. This paper discusses the contract net architecture of ANTS, an agent-based scheduling application under development. It also describes an algorithm for least commitment scheduling, which uses probabilistic committed capacity profiles of resources over time, along with realistic costs, to provide an abstract search space over which the agents can wander to quickly find optimal solutions.

  15. Biologically inspired autonomous agent navigation using an integrated polarization analyzing CMOS image sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkaer, M.; San Segundo Bello, D.; Van Hoof, C.; Theuwissen, A.

    2010-01-01

    The navigational strategies of insects using skylight polarization are interesting for applications in autonomous agent navigation because they rely on very little information for navigation. A polarization navigation sensor using the Stokes parameters to determine the orientation is presented. The

  16. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Gigantol Derivatives as Potential Agents in Prevention of Diabetic Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jie; Lu, Chuanjun; Li, Xue; Fang, Hua; Wan, Wencheng; Yang, Qiaohong; Sun, Xiaosheng; Wang, Meiling; Hu, Xiaohong; Chen, C.-Y. Oliver; Wei, Xiaoyong

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of our efforts directed towards the development of natural anti-diabetic cataract agents, gigantol was isolated from Herba dendrobii and was found to inhibit both aldose reductase (AR) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, which play a significant role in the development and progression of diabetic cataracts. To improve its bioefficacy and facilitate use as a therapeutic agent, gigantol (compound 14f) and a series of novel analogs were designed and synthesized...

  17. Magnetophoretic bead trapping in a high-flowrate biological detection system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Rahimian, Kamayar; Martin, James Ellis; Anderson, G. Ronald; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea; Lemp, Thomas; Derzon, Mark Steven; James, Conrad D.

    2005-03-01

    This report contains the summary of the 'Magnetophoretic Bead Trapping in a High-Flowrate Biological Detection System' LDRD project 74795. The objective of this project is to develop a novel biodetection system for high-throughput sample analysis. The chief application of this system is in detection of very low concentrations of target molecules from a complex liquid solution containing many different constituents--some of which may interfere with identification of the target molecule. The system is also designed to handle air sampling by using an aerosol system (for instance a WESP - Wet Electro-Static Precipitator, or an impact spray system) to get air sample constituents into the liquid volume. The system described herein automatically takes the raw liquid sample, whether air converted or initially liquid matrix, and mixes in magnetic detector beads that capture the targets of interest and then performs the sample cleanup function, allowing increased sensitivity and eliminating most false positives and false negatives at a downstream detector. The surfaces of the beads can be functionalized in a variety of ways in order to maximize the number of targets to be captured and concentrated. Bacteria and viruses are captured using antibodies to surface proteins on bacterial cell walls or viral particle coats. In combination with a cell lysis or PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), the beads can be used as a DNA or RNA probe to capture nucleic acid patterns of interest. The sample cleanup capability of this system would allow different raw biological samples, such as blood or saliva to be analyzed for the presence of different infectious agents (e.g. smallpox or SARS). For future studies, we envision functionalizing bead surfaces to bind to chemical weapons agents, radio-isotopes, and explosives. The two main objectives of this project were to explore methods for enhancing the mixing of the capture microspheres in the sample, and to develop a novel high

  18. Development of electrochemical sensors for trace detection of explosives and for the detection of chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, T.; Ziegler, H.; Krausa, Michael

    2000-08-01

    A huge number of chemical sensors are based on electrochemical measurement methods. Particularly amperometric sensorsystems are employed for the fast detection of pollutants in industry and environment as well as for analytic systems in the medical diagnosis. The large number of different applications of electrochemical sensors is based on the high sensitivity of electrochemical methods and on the wide of possibilities to enhance the selectivity by variation of electrochemical and chemical parameters. Besides this, electrochemical sensorsystems are frequently simple to operate, transportable and cheap. Up to now the electrochemical method of cyclic voltammetry is used only seldom for sensors. Clearly the efficiency of cyclic voltammetry can be seen at the sensorsystem for the detection of nitro- and aminotoluenes in solids and waters as presented here. The potentiodynamic sensors system can be employed for the fast and easy risk estimation of contaminated areas. Because of the high sensitivity of electrochemical methods the detection of chemical substances with a low vapor pressure is possible also. The vapor pressure of TNT at room temperature is 7 ppb for instances. With a special electrochemical set-up we were able to measure TNT approximately 10 cm above a TNT-sample. In addition we were able to estimate TNT in the gaseous phase approximately 10 cm above a real plastic mine. Therefore it seems to be possible to develop an electrochemical mien detection. Moreover, we present that the electrochemical detection of RDX, HMX and chemical warfare agents is also possible.

  19. Efficacy of biological agents administered as monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a Bayesian mixed-treatment comparison analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migliore A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Migliore,1 Emanuele Bizzi,1 Colin Gerard Egan,2 Mauro Bernardi,3 Lea Petrella4 1Rheumatology Unit, San Pietro Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Rome, 2Primula Multimedia SRL, Pisa, 3Department of Statistical Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, 4MEMOTEF Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Background: Biological agents provide an important therapeutic alternative for rheumatoid arthritis patients refractory to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Few head-to-head comparative trials are available.Purpose: The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the relative efficacy of different biologic agents indicated for use as monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.Methods: A systemic literature search was performed on electronic databases to identify articles reporting double-blind randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of biologic agents indicated for monotherapy. Efficacy was assessed using American College of Rheumatology (ACR 20, 50, and 70 criteria at 16–24 weeks. Relative efficacy was estimated using Bayesian mixed-treatment comparison models. Outcome measures were expressed as odds ratio and 95% credible intervals.Results: Ten randomized controlled trials were selected for data extraction and analysis. Mixed-treatment comparison analysis revealed that tocilizumab offered 100% probability of being the best treatment for inducing an ACR20 response versus placebo, methotrexate, adalimumab, or etanercept. Likewise, for ACR50 and ACR70 outcome responses, tocilizumab had a 99.8% or 98.7% probability of being the best treatment, respectively, compared to other treatments or placebo. Tocilizumab increased the relative probability of being the best treatment (vs methotrexate by 3.2-fold (odds ratio: 2.1–3.89 for all ACR outcomes.Conclusion: Tocilizumab offered the greatest possibility of obtaining an ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70 outcome vs other monotherapies or placebo. Keywords: biologics, meta

  20. Chemical and Biological Warfare: Should Rapid Detection Techniques Be Researched To Dissuade Usage? A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mark R. Hurst; Ebtisam Wilkins

    2005-01-01

    Chemistry, microbiology and genetic engineering have opened new doorways for the human race to propel itself to a better future. However, there is a darker side to Bioengineering. One element of this is the manufacture and proliferation of biological and chemical weapons. It is clearly in the interest of humankind to prevent the future use of such weapons of mass destruction. Though many agents have been proposed as potential biological and chemical weapons, the feasibility of these weapons i...

  1. Optical detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals: Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Michael E.; Pushkarsky, Michael; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2005-06-01

    We present an analysis of optical techniques for the detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals in real-world conditions. We analyze the problem of detecting a target species in the presence of a multitude of interferences that are often stochastic and we provide a broadly applicable technique for evaluating the sensitivity, probability of false positives (PFP), and probability of false negatives (PFN) for a sensor through the illustrative example of a laser photoacoustic spectrometer (L-PAS). This methodology includes (1) a model of real-world air composition, (2) an analytical model of an actual field-deployed L-PAS, (3) stochasticity in instrument response and air composition, (4) repeated detection calculations to obtain statistics and receiver operating characteristic curves, and (5) analyzing these statistics to determine the sensor's sensitivity, PFP, and PFN. This methodology was used to analyze variations in sensor design and ambient conditions, and can be utilized as a framework for comparing different sensors.

  2. [Review of risks of biological agents and preventive measures to safeguard the health of compost production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubileo, L; Sarti, A M; Bianchi, L A; Calcaterra, E; Colombi, A

    1998-01-01

    A review of studies made in the compost production industry showed the biological agents posing a risk for workers were fungi and thermophile bacteria, gram-negative bacteria and endotoxins, with a prevalent inhalation exposure to airborne contaminated dusts. Medical examinations revealed cases of extrinsic allergic alveolitis due to A. fumigatus, and more frequently irritative and infectious disorders occurring especially in conditions of poor environmental hygiene and macroscopic dust pollution. For the evaluation of the air dispersion of microorganisms, which is high in compost transport and turning operations, at present no exposure limit values are available for biological agents; nevertheless, the concentrations measured were often higher than the limit values proposed for other manufacturing sectors by individual authors and by regulatory agencies in Europe, and were comparable to values observed in other industrial settings for which adverse health effects have been shown. Although the number of studies available are few in number, the results suggest that the hazards posed by microorganisms and the poor environmental hygiene conditions often encountered can undoubtedly be a source of risk for workers, which at present is difficult to establish but significant considering the high airborne concentrations of contaminated dust. Besides technical measures to avoid environmental macroscopic dispersion of dusts, measurement of airborne microbiological contaminants is also recommended. Health surveillance needs to be aimed at identifying subjects with hypersusceptibility to the infectious action of the pathogenetic and/or allergenic agents or with hypersensitivity to the same, and also to periodic control of respiratory organs. PMID:9847532

  3. Experimental study on detecting the explosives and chemical warfare agents by using neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some cases, some small security inspection systems for detecting explosives or chemical warfare agents are useful. By using the 252Cf neutron source, some thermal neutron captured γ rays of 10.83 and 6.6 MeV could be observed as the indicator of the existence of nitrogen and chlorine, respectively. As a result of the experiment, the detecting limit for TNT and the mustard gas is 200 g and 20 g, respectively. It is observed that by the use of LaBr3(Ce) scintillation crystal to detect the inelastic scattering γ rays of 5.1 MeV from nitrogen, of which the single escape and double escape peaks could be discriminated from the inelastic scattering peak of 4.43 MeV from carbon, since the energy resolution of LaBr3 is much better than that of other scintillators. In the case of nitrogen, it is better to detect the inelastic scattering γ rays induced by fast neutrons than to detect thermal neutron captured γ rays, since the counting rate is much higher. For the detection of mustard gas bomb, thermal neutron captured γ rays of 1.95 MeV is better than that of 6.6 MeV, since the interference of the background from the iron shell of the mustard gas bomb is smaller. These studies are useful for the establishment of the practical systems. (authors)

  4. Immunological detection and quantification of DNA components structurally modified by alkylating carcinogens, mutagens and chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection and quantification of defined reaction products of chemical mutagens and carcinogens (and of many cancer chemotherapeutic agents) with DNA require highly sensitive analytical techniques. The exceptional capability of immunoglobulins to recognize subtle alterations of molecular structure (especially when monoclonal antibodies are used to maximize specificity), outstanding sensitivity of immunoanalysis by high-affinity antibodies, and the fact that radioactively-labelled agents are not required suggest the utility of a radioimmunoassay to recognize and quantitate alkylated DNA products. We have recently developed a set of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (secreted by mouse x mouse as well as by rat x rat hybridomas; antibody affinity constants, 109 to > 1010 lmol) specifically directed against several DNA alkylation products with possible relevance in relation to both mutagenesis and malignant transformation of mammalian cells. These alkylation products include 06-N-butyldeoxyguanosine, and 04-ethyldeoxythymidine. When used in a radioimmunassay, an antibody specific for 06-ethyldeoxyguanosine, for example, will detect this product at an 06-ethyldeoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine molar ratio of approx. 3 x 10-7 in a hydrolysate of 100 ug of DNA. The limit of detection can be lowered further if the respective alkyldeoxynucleosides are separated by HPLC from the DNA hydrolysate prior to the RIA. The anti-alkyldeoxynucleoside monoclonal antibodies can also be used to visualize, by immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy combined with electronic image intensification, specific alkylation products in the nuclear DNA of individual cells, and to localize structurally modified bases in double-stranded DNA molecules by transmission electron microscopy

  5. Detection and classification of organophosphate nerve agent simulants using support vector machines with multiarray sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, Omowunmi; Land, Walker H; Wanekaya, Adam K; Uematsu, Michiko; Embrechts, Mark J; Wong, Lut; Leibensperger, Dale; Volykin, Alex

    2004-01-01

    The need for rapid and accurate detection systems is expanding and the utilization of cross-reactive sensor arrays to detect chemical warfare agents in conjunction with novel computational techniques may prove to be a potential solution to this challenge. We have investigated the detection, prediction, and classification of various organophosphate (OP) nerve agent simulants using sensor arrays with a novel learning scheme known as support vector machines (SVMs). The OPs tested include parathion, malathion, dichlorvos, trichlorfon, paraoxon, and diazinon. A new data reduction software program was written in MATLAB V. 6.1 to extract steady-state and kinetic data from the sensor arrays. The program also creates training sets by mixing and randomly sorting any combination of data categories into both positive and negative cases. The resulting signals were fed into SVM software for "pairwise" and "one" vs all classification. Experimental results for this new paradigm show a significant increase in classification accuracy when compared to artificial neural networks (ANNs). Three kernels, the S2000, the polynomial, and the Gaussian radial basis function (RBF), were tested and compared to the ANN. The following measures of performance were considered in the pairwise classification: receiver operating curve (ROC) Az indices, specificities, and positive predictive values (PPVs). The ROC Az) values, specifities, and PPVs increases ranged from 5% to 25%, 108% to 204%, and 13% to 54%, respectively, in all OP pairs studied when compared to the ANN baseline. Dichlorvos, trichlorfon, and paraoxon were perfectly predicted. Positive prediction for malathion was 95%. PMID:15032529

  6. Effects of pollutant accumulation by the invasive weed saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) on the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroponic greenhouse studies were used to investigate the effect of four anthropogenic pollutants (perchlorate (ClO4-), selenium (Se), manganese (Mn), and hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))) on the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata Brulle. Contaminant concentrations were quantified for experimental Tamarix ramosissima Ledab. plants and D. elongata beetles. Growth of larvae was significantly reduced by Se contamination, but was not affected by the presence of perchlorate, Mn, or Cr (VI). All of the contaminants were transferred from plants to D. elongata beetles. Only Cr (VI) was accumulated at greater levels in beetles than in their food. Because T. ramosissima grows in disturbed areas, acquires salts readily, and utilizes groundwater, this plant is likely to accumulate anthropogenic pollutants in contaminated areas. This study is one of the first to investigate the potential of an anthropogenic pollutant to influence a weed biological control system. - The presence of Se, but not perchlorate, Mn, or Cr (VI), in foliage of the invasive weed saltcedar was shown to reduce growth of the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata

  7. Effects of pollutant accumulation by the invasive weed saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) on the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, Mary A. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: mary.sorensen@ucr.edu; Parker, David R. [Department of Environmental Science, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Trumble, John T. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Hydroponic greenhouse studies were used to investigate the effect of four anthropogenic pollutants (perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}), selenium (Se), manganese (Mn), and hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))) on the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata Brulle. Contaminant concentrations were quantified for experimental Tamarix ramosissima Ledab. plants and D. elongata beetles. Growth of larvae was significantly reduced by Se contamination, but was not affected by the presence of perchlorate, Mn, or Cr (VI). All of the contaminants were transferred from plants to D. elongata beetles. Only Cr (VI) was accumulated at greater levels in beetles than in their food. Because T. ramosissima grows in disturbed areas, acquires salts readily, and utilizes groundwater, this plant is likely to accumulate anthropogenic pollutants in contaminated areas. This study is one of the first to investigate the potential of an anthropogenic pollutant to influence a weed biological control system. - The presence of Se, but not perchlorate, Mn, or Cr (VI), in foliage of the invasive weed saltcedar was shown to reduce growth of the biological control agent Diorhabda elongata.

  8. Correlation between biological agents and levels of heavy metals in municipal sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozek, Urszula; Kłapeć, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    During the period 2003-2004, 110 samples of sewage sludge were examined from 18 treatment plants located in the territory of the whole of Poland, the majority in the Lublin Province. Samples of fermented and dehydrated sewage sludge were taken from sludge drying beds. The bacteriological and parasitological determinations covered bacteria of the Salmonella genus and eggs of the helminths Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., and Toxocara spp. Chemical examinations for the presence of the heavy metals: chromium, zinc, cadmium, copper, nickel and lead were carried out by the method of atomic absorption flame spectrophotometry. The results were subjected to statistical analysis with the use of ANOVA and Student's t-tests. In the sewage sludge samples examined, Salmonella bacteria were isolated from 9 samples (8.2 % ), and the eggs of helminths from 31 samples (28.1 % ). The eggs of Ascaris spp. were most frequently detected--in 24 samples of sewage sludge (21.8 % ), followed by Trichuris spp. eggs--in 11 samples (10.0 % ), and Toxocara spp. eggs--in 6 samples (5.4 % ). Several samples of sewage sludge were infected by eggs of all the parasites examined (ATT). A very high variation was observed with respect to Salmonella bacteria and ATT eggs according to the origin, type of sanitation and duration of deposition of sludge. Levels of chromium, zinc, copper and lead in the sewage sludge samples, in the majority of samples examined, remained below allowable values. Very high values exceeding the allowable values for the levels of heavy metals were observed only in the samples of sewage sludge from one treatment plant. This concerned a cadmium level (201.1 mg/kg d.m.) which exceeded by 20 times the most rigorous allowable contents of this metal for sewage sludge designed for agricultural use, and nickel (288.7 mg/kg d.m.)--the standard being exceeded 3 times. A significant variation of the levels of heavy metals was observed depending on treatment type. A longer period of

  9. Substituted 3-Benzylcoumarins as Allosteric MEK1 Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation as Antiviral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to find novel antiviral agents, a series of allosteric MEK1 inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Based on docking results, multiple optimizations were made on the coumarin scaffold. Some of the derivatives showed excellent MEK1 binding affinity in the appropriate enzymatic assays and displayed obvious inhibitory effects on the ERK pathway in a cellular assay. These compounds also significantly inhibited virus (EV71 replication in HEK293 and RD cells. Several compounds showed potential as agents for the treatment of viral infective diseases, with the most potent compound 18 showing an IC50 value of 54.57 nM in the MEK1 binding assay.

  10. Contrast agent free detection of bowel perforation using chlorophyll derivatives from food plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Hyun; Jo, Young Goun; Kim, Jung Chul; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kang, Hoonsoo; Hwang, In-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophylls occur abundantly in food plants and show bright emission bands at long-wavelength regions (∼675 and ∼720 nm) compared to the autofluorescence of animal organs and peritoneal fluids. The use of these emissions as biomarkers for monitoring bowel perforation with a modality that does not involve synthetic contrast agents seems promising. To validate this, we measured the fluorescence spectra of rat organs, human peritoneal and intestinal fluids, and human intestinal fluids diluted with physiological saline. The developed technique showed a high detection sensitivity (∼50 ppm) under irrigation for abdominal surgery, highlighting the potential of this tool in the surgical setting.

  11. Fast, sensitive point of care electrochemical molecular system for point mutation and select agent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, J A; Nemeth, A C; Dicke, W C; Wang, D; Manalili Wheeler, S; Hannis, J C; Collier, G B; Drader, J J

    2016-07-01

    Point of care molecular diagnostics benefits from a portable battery-operated device capable of performing a fast turnaround using reliable inexpensive cartridges. We describe a prototype device for performing a molecular diagnostics test for clinical and biodefense samples in 16 minutes using a prototype capable of an 8 minute PCR reaction, followed by hybridization and detection on an electrochemical microarray based on the i-STAT® system. We used human buccal swabs for hemochromatosis testing including in-device DNA extraction. Additional clinical and biodefense samples included influenza A and bacterial select agents Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis. PMID:27280174

  12. Rapid identification of bio-molecules applied for detection of biosecurity agents using rolling circle amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Göransson

    Full Text Available Detection and identification of pathogens in environmental samples for biosecurity applications are challenging due to the strict requirements on specificity, sensitivity and time. We have developed a concept for quick, specific and sensitive pathogen identification in environmental samples. Target identification is realized by padlock- and proximity probing, and reacted probes are amplified by RCA (rolling-circle amplification. The individual RCA products are labeled by fluorescence and enumerated by an instrument, developed for sensitive and rapid digital analysis. The concept is demonstrated by identification of simili biowarfare agents for bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pantoea agglomerans and spores (Bacillus atrophaeus released in field.

  13. Scientific Opinion on the maintenance of the list of QPS biological agents intentionally added to food and feed (2012 update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available EFSA is requested to assess the safety of a broad range of biological agents in the context of notifications for market authorisation as sources of food and feed additives, enzymes and plant protection products. The qualified presumption of safety (QPS assessment was developed for safety risk assessments to provide a harmonised generic pre-assessment to support EFSA’s scientific Panels. The safety of unambiguously defined biological agents at the highest taxonomic unit appropriate for the purpose for which an application is intended and the completeness of the body of knowledge are assessed. Identified safety concerns for a taxonomic unit are where possible and reasonable in number reflected as ‘qualifications’ with a recommendation for the QPS list. The list of QPS recommended biological agents is reviewed and updated annually. Therefore, the only valid list is the one in the most recently published scientific opinion. The 2012 update reviews microorganisms previously assessed including bacteria, yeasts, filamentous fungi and viruses used for plant protection purposes. The BIOHAZ Panel confirmed all taxonomic units previously recommended for the QPS list. The notifications were reviewed. Bacillus firmus was re-evaluated and not recommended for the QPS list. A new recommendation was made for Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum was assessed for the first time and not recommended for the QPS list. Qualifications for the taxonomic units included in the QPS recommended list were reviewed and confirmed. Filamentous fungi and enterococci were not recommended for the QPS list following updating and reviewing of current scientific knowledge. For Enterococcus faecium recent data indicate a possible distinction between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. This is considered too recent knowledge for a QPS recommendation, considering the recent information on the evolution of the epidemiology of Enterococcus infections in

  14. 76 FR 3076 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for a Biological Control Agent for Air Potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Control Agent for Air Potato AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of... Inspection Service has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) relative to the control of air potato... severity of air potato infestations. We are making the EA available to the public for review and...

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of andrographolide derivatives as potent anti-HIV agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wang; Jing Li; Wen Long Huang; Hui Bin Zhang; Hai Qian; Yong Tang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    A series of Andro derivatives were described and evaluated for their anti-HIV activity in vitro. Compound 10 and 16b, of which TI were >10, had some anti-HTV-1 activity in vitro. Therein, compound 10 which was the best potent compound, could serve as a new lead for further development of anti-AIDS agents.

  16. Synthesis, biological evaluation and QSAR study of a series of substituted quinazolines as antimicrobial agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buha, V. M.; Rana, D. N.; Chhabria, M. T.; Chikhalia, K. H.; Mahajan, B. M.; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik; Shah, N. K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2013), s. 4096-4109. ISSN 1054-2523 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antimicrobial agents * quantitative structure-activity relationship * genetic function approximation * quinazoline Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.612, year: 2012

  17. A FRET-based ratiometric fluorescent and colorimetric probe for the facile detection of organophosphonate nerve agent mimic DCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weimin; Cao, Yanting; Zhou, Jiahong; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-18

    A FRET ratiometric fluorescent probe enabling a fast and highly sensitive response to OP nerve agent mimic DCP within 1 min and with as low as 0.17 ppm concentration detection limit has been developed. Moreover, the probe exhibits noticeable color changes under UV light and even with the naked eye. It is also demonstrated that it can detect both liquid and gas nerve agents. PMID:24080856

  18. Recent advances in the chemical biology of nitroxyl (HNO) detection and generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhengrui; King, S Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Nitroxyl or azanone (HNO) represents the redox-related (one electron reduced and protonated) relative of the well-known biological signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO). Despite the close structural similarity to NO, defined biological roles and endogenous formation of HNO remain unclear due to the high reactivity of HNO with itself, soft nucleophiles and transition metals. While significant work has been accomplished in terms of the physiology, biology and chemistry of HNO, important and clarifying work regarding HNO detection and formation has occurred within the last 10 years. This review summarizes advances in the areas of HNO detection and donation and their application to normal and pathological biology. Such chemical biological tools allow a deeper understanding of biological HNO formation and the role that HNO plays in a variety of physiological systems. PMID:27108951

  19. Dynamic Multi Layer Signature based Intrusion Detection system Using Mobile Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Uddin, Mueen

    2010-01-01

    Intrusion detection systems have become a key component in ensuring the safety of systems and networks. As networks grow in size and speed continues to increase, it is crucial that efficient scalable techniques should be developed for IDS systems. Signature based detection is the most extensively used threat detection technique for Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS). One of the foremost challenges for signaturebased IDS systems is how to keep up with large volume of incoming traffic when each packet needs to be compared with every signature in the database. When an IDS cannot keep up with the traffic flood, all it can do is to drop packets, therefore, may miss potential attacks. This paper proposes a new model called Dynamic Multi-Layer Signature based IDS using Mobile Agents, which can detect imminent threats with very high success rate by dynamically and automatically creating and using small and efficient multiple databases, and at the same time, provide mechanism to update these small signature databases a...

  20. Radiolabelled anti-human fibrin antibody: a new thrombus-detecting agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbit anti-human fibrin globulin (A.F.G.) was labelled with iodine (131I) and used as a thrombus-detecting agent. 131I-A.F.G. labelled thrombi were displayed by means of a gamma scintillation camera. Normal subjects and patients with thrombo-phlebitis of legs, acute fibrin depositions other than thrombi, and chronic varicosities were examined. The 131I-A.F.G. technique detected both formed thrombi and those that were forming and could discriminate between acute thrombosis and chronic varicosities. Thrombo-phlebitis and extravascular fibrin depositions were best demonstrated between 24 and 72 hours after 131I-A.F.G. injection. Radiolabelled A.F.G. in normal veins and chronic varicosities was best displayed within 6 hours of injection. (author)

  1. Deep Raman spectroscopy for the non-invasive standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izake, Emad L; Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Sundarajoo, Shankaran; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa

    2012-05-30

    Deep Raman spectroscopy has been utilized for the standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents from a distance of 15 m under real life background illumination conditions. By using combined time and space resolved measurements, various explosive precursors hidden in opaque plastic containers were identified non-invasively. Our results confirm that combined time and space resolved Raman spectroscopy leads to higher selectivity towards the sub-layer over the surface layer as well as enhanced rejection of fluorescence from the container surface when compared to standoff spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra that have minimal interference from the packaging material and good signal-to-noise ratio were acquired within 5 s of measurement time. A new combined time and space resolved Raman spectrometer has been designed with nanosecond laser excitation and gated detection, making it of lower cost and complexity than picosecond-based laboratory systems. PMID:22608458

  2. Design and evaluation of hyperspectral algorithms for chemical warfare agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakis, Dimitris; D'Amico, Francis M.

    2005-11-01

    Remote sensing of chemical warfare agents (CWA) with stand-off hyperspectral imaging sensors has a wide range of civilian and military applications. These sensors exploit the spectral changes in the ambient photon flux produced by either sunlight or the thermal emission of the earth after passage through a region containing the CWA cloud. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, to discuss a simple phenomenological model for the radiance measured by the sensor in the case of optically thin clouds. This model provides the mathematical framework for the development of optimum algorithms and their analytical evaluation. Second, we identify the fundamental aspects of the data exploitation problem and we develop detection algorithms that can be used by different sensors as long as they can provide the required measurements. Finally, we discuss performance metrics for detection, identification, and quantification and we investigate their dependance on CWA spectral signatures, sensor noise, and background spectral variability.

  3. Preparation and Evaluation of (125I) Daunorubicin as a Potential Agent for Tumor Detection and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the optimization of daunorubicin labeling with iodine-125 and its biological evaluation were described. Daunorubicin was labeled via direct electrophilic substitution using chloramine-T as oxidizing agent. The optimum amounts of reactants were: 40μg daunorubicin, 30μg Chloramine-T and ∼ 19 KBq carrier free Na125I. The labeled daunorubicin was stable for more than 24 hours. Results of the in-vivo evaluation revealed that the tracer, [125I] daunorubicin, tends to localize in tissues with high proliferation rate with preferential accumulation in cancerous tissues. Imaging should be carried at 3 hours post injection. The in-vitro cell growth inhibition assay showed that the effect of [125I] Daunorubicin was stronger than the effect of cold daunorubicin which strongly suggested that its cytotoxicity was mainly due to radiotoxicity rather than chemotherapeutic activity.

  4. Detection and impact on cancer causation of persons exhibiting abnormal susceptibility to carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The so-called 'late biological effects', like cancer and genetic consequences and cytotoxic effects (cell killing, at higher doses), were once thought to be an inevitable consequence of a given level of exposure, whether to background radiation, to chemicals in our biosphere, or form spontaneous damage, the 'wear and tear' of living. The measurement of exposure, which results in living organisms in the formation of a related amount of DNA damage, became a surrogate for the end-effects that constitute risk. This may not be entirely appropriate. The concept of 'equal exposure -- equal risk' assumes a homogeneous response of individuals. However, there are subgroups within the human population of persons whose cultured cells exhibit abnormal sensitivity to specific carcinogenic agents and who may be at increased risk of cancer induced by these of similar agents. Modern molecular biology has shown that the majority of the damage in DNA is repaired by enzymatic DNA repair processes that restitute or ameliorate the lesions and restore normal DNA structure and function. In this view, it is not the initial damage that is of consequence but rather the residual damage left after the repair processes have acted. Since the vast majority of the initial DNA damage undergoes repair normally, variation in the efficiency of these processes in different persons may affect the actual risk of exposure. The human side of the cancer causation formula, that is, considerable importance. To understand how human DNA repair processes function, our laboratories at Chalk River have studied 'mutant' human cell strains in tissue culture. Generally, these DNA repair-defective cell strains are derived from individual donors with heritable disorders that are associated with carcinogen-hypersensitivity and cancer-proneness. Such studies, together with related epidemiological research, have highlighted the importance of this new 'human' factor in carcinogenesis

  5. Hepatocyte-targeted MR contrast agents. Contrast enhanced detection of liver cancer in diffusely damaged liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of hepatocyte-targeted magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents in the detection of liver tumor was tested in rats with hepatitis. Hepatocyte-targeted MR contrast agents (paramagnetic hepatobiliary complex [manganese-DPDP] and superparamagnetic iron oxide coated with arabinogalactan [SPIO-AG]) were injected into normal rats and rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatitis. Before and after injection of either contrast agent, ex vivo relaxometry (0.94 T) or in vivo MR imaging (1.0 T) were performed. The obtained liver and tumor T1 and T2 relaxation times, liver and tumor signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), and tumor-liver contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of control rats and rats with hepatitis were compared. Both relaxometry and MR imaging showed that MnDPDP and SPIO-AG selectively enhanced liver tissue in controls and in rats with hepatitis to the same degree, and little tumor enhancement was seen in either group. As a result, no significant difference between control rats and rats with hepatitis was observed in the postcontrast tumor-liver CNR. For a MnDPDP-enhanced CNR with spin echo (SE) of 310/15, the results were -10.4±3.6 in control rats vs. -11.5±1.4 in rats with hepatitis; for a SPIO-AG-enhanced CNR with SE 2000/45 and 2000/90, respectively, the results were 30.7±9.2 and 18.7±4.7 in control rats vs. 31.9±7.1 and 17.7±2.4 in rats with hepatitis. These results indicate that hepatocyte-targeted contrast agents effectively enhance liver tissue and enhance liver-tumor image contrast despite hepatocellular dysfunction. (author)

  6. RNA aptamer probes as optical imaging agents for the detection of amyloid plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available Optical imaging using multiphoton microscopy and whole body near infrared imaging has become a routine part of biomedical research. However, optical imaging methods rely on the availability of either small molecule reporters or genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, which are challenging and time consuming to develop. While directly labeled antibodies can also be used as imaging agents, antibodies are species specific, can typically not be tagged with multiple fluorescent reporters without interfering with target binding, and are bioactive, almost always eliciting a biological response and thereby influencing the process that is being studied. We examined the possibility of developing highly specific and sensitive optical imaging agents using aptamer technology. We developed a fluorescently tagged anti-Aβ RNA aptamer, β55, which binds amyloid plaques in both ex vivo human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue and in vivo APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Diffuse β55 positive halos, attributed to oligomeric Aβ, were observed surrounding the methoxy-XO4 positive plaque cores. Dot blots of synthetic Aβ aggregates provide further evidence that β55 binds both fibrillar and non-fibrillar Aβ. The high binding affinity, the ease of probe development, and the ability to incorporate multiple and multimodal imaging reporters suggest that RNA aptamers may have complementary and perhaps advantageous properties compared to conventional optical imaging probes and reporters.

  7. Reproductive Requirements and Life Cycle of Iberorhyzobius rondensis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), Potential Biological Control Agent of Matsucoccus feytaudi (Hemiptera: Matsucoccidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, C; Jactel, H; van Halder, I; Branco, M

    2015-06-01

    Several pine bast scales (Hemiptera: Matsucoccidae) are important pests of pine trees in the Northern Hemisphere. Some species are invasive and cause significant economic and environmental impacts. Such is the case with Matsucoccus feytaudi Ducasse, an invasive pest of maritime pine forests in Southeastern France, Italy, and Corsica. The ladybird Iberorhyzobius rondensis (Eizaguirre) is a recently described species that is endemic to the Iberian Peninsula and is a potential candidate for the biological control of M. feytaudi. However, little is known of the biology of I. rondensis. As part of the risk assessment study for a classical biological control program, the phenology and reproductive mechanisms of the beetle were analyzed. I. rondensis is univoltine and is seasonally synchronized with the phenology of the prey M. feytaudi, which is also univoltine. An obligatory reproductive diapause of 5-6 mo and the need to feed on the eggs of the prey to begin oviposition emerged as the two primary mechanisms that assure life cycle synchronization of the ladybird with its prey. Female fecundity was also higher when the ladybirds were fed M. feytaudi eggs. Life cycle synchronization with M. feytaudi and reproduction triggered by consumption of prey eggs indicate that I. rondensis is a promising biological control agent of the pine bast scale. PMID:26313991

  8. In search of uracil derivatives as bioactive agents. Uracils and fused uracils: Synthesis, biological activity and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałasz, Aleksandra; Cież, Dariusz

    2015-06-01

    This review article is an effort to summarize recent developments in researches providing uracil derivatives with promising biological potential. This article also aims to discuss potential future directions on the development of more potent and specific uracil analogues for various biological targets. Uracils are considered as privileged structures in drug discovery with a wide array of biological activities and synthetic accessibility. Antiviral and anti-tumour are the two most widely reported activities of uracil analogues however they also possess herbicidal, insecticidal and bactericidal activities. Their antiviral potential is based on the inhibition of key step in viral replication pathway resulting in potent activities against HIV, hepatitis B and C, the herpes viruses etc. Uracil derivatives such as 5-fluorouracil or 5-chlorouracil were the first pharmacological active derivatives to be generated. Poor selectivity limits its therapeutic application, resulting in high incidences of gastrointestinal tract or central nervous toxicity. Numerous modifications of uracil structure have been performed to tackle these problems resulting in the development of derivatives exhibiting better pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties including increased bioactivity, selectivity, metabolic stability, absorption and lower toxicity. Researches of new uracils and fused uracil derivatives as bioactive agents are related with modifications of substituents at N(1), N(3), C(5) and C(6) positions of pyrimidine ring. This review is an endeavour to highlight the progress in the chemistry and biological activity of the uracils, predominately after the year 2000. In particular are presented synthetic methods and biological study for such analogues as: 5-fluorouracil or 5-chlorouracil derivatives, tegafur analogues, arabinopyranonucleosides of uracil, glucopyranonucleosides of uracil, liposidomycins, caprazamycins or tunicamycins, tritylated uridine analogues, nitro or cyano

  9. Association Between Changes in Coronary Artery Disease Progression and Treatment With Biologic Agents for Severe Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Kasper Fjellhaugen; Bøttcher, Morten; Vestergaard, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    , controlled, observer-blinded clinical study at a tertiary dermatology university hospital clinic enrolled patients with severe psoriasis initiating biological therapy and matched controls not receiving systemic therapy from April 11, 2011, through June 30, 2014. Interventions: Biological therapy approved for...... index remained unchanged from baseline to follow-up in the intervention group (mean [SD] baseline, 7.1 [1.5], follow-up, 7.1 [1.7]; P = .91), while controls demonstrated statistically nonsignificant progression (baseline, 8.3 [1.6], follow-up, 8.9 [2.2]; P = .06). Conclusions and Relevance: Clinically...

  10. Short cationic lipopeptides as effective antibacterial agents: Design, physicochemical properties and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Fazren; Elliott, Alysha G; Marasini, Nirmal; Ramu, Soumya; Ziora, Zyta; Kavanagh, Angela M; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Cooper, Matthew A; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2016-05-15

    The spread of drug-resistant bacteria has imparted a sense of urgency in the search for new antibiotics. In an effort to develop a new generation of antibacterial agents, we have designed de novo charged lipopeptides inspired by natural antimicrobial peptides. These short lipopeptides are composed of cationic lysine and hydrophobic lipoamino acids that replicate the amphiphilic properties of natural antimicrobial peptides. The resultant lipopeptides were found to self-assemble into nanoparticles. Some were effective against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains resistant to methicillin, daptomycin and/or vancomycin. The lipopeptides were not toxic to human kidney and liver cell lines and were highly resistant to tryptic degradation. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of bacteria cells treated with lipopeptide showed membrane-damage and lysis with extrusion of cytosolic contents. With such properties in mind, these lipopeptides have the potential to be developed as new antibacterial agents against drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27048775

  11. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel 1-Alkyltryptophan Analogs as Potential Antitumor Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chen Wang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available To seek novel antitumor agents, we designed and synthesized new 1-tryptophan analogs based on tryptophan catabolism. 1-Alkyltryptophan analogues including 1-ethyltryptophan (1-ET, 1-propyltryptophan (1-PT, 1-isopropyltryptophan (1-isoPT and 1-butyltryptophan (1-BT were synthesized from tryptophan. We examined whether those compounds had the antiproliferative effects on SGC7901 and HeLa cells line by using MTT assay in vitro, respectively. Compared to tryptophan, all targeted compounds efficiently inhibited proliferation of two cancer cell lines at 2 mmol/L for 48 hours. Among these tryptophan analogs, 1-BT showed the most powerful cytotoxicity against SGC7901 and HeLa cells at 1 mmol/L and 2 mmol/L concentration. These data suggest that some specific tryptophan analogs could be developed as potential anti-neoplastic agents.

  12. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biomarkers in biological fluids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yiping; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major infection not only in Cystic Fibrosis patients but also in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in critically ill patients in intensive care units. Successful antibiotic treatment of the infection relies on accurate and rapid identification of the infectious agents. Conventional microbiological detection methods usually take more than 3 days to obtain accurate results. We have developed a rapid diagnostic technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering to directly identify PA from biological fluids. P. aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, are cultured in lysogeny broth, and the SERS spectra of the broth show the signature Raman peaks from pyocyanin and pyoverdine, two major biomarkers that P. aeruginosa secretes during its growth, as well as lipopolysaccharides. This provides the evidence that the presence of these biomarkers can be used to indicate P. aeruginosa infection. A total of 22 clinical exhaled breath condensates (EBC) samples were obtained from subjects with CF disease and from non-CF healthy donors. SERS spectra of these EBC samples were obtained and further analyzed by both principle component analysis and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA can discriminate the samples with P. aeruginosa infection and the ones without P. aeruginosa infection at 99.3% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity. In addition, this technique can also discriminate samples from subject with CF disease and healthy donor with 97.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results demonstrate the potential of using SERS of EBC samples as a rapid diagnostic tool to detect PA infection.

  13. Evaluation of biological control agents for managing cucurbit powdery mildew on greenhouse-grown melon

    OpenAIRE

    Torés Montosa, Juan Antonio

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the ability of two mycoparasite-based products AQ10® (Ampelomyces quisqualis) and Mycotal® (Lecanicillium lecanii), as well as three strains of Bacillus subtilis, to manage powdery mildew disease, caused by Podosphaera fusca on melon seedlings maintained under different regimes of relative humidity and on plants grown under greenhouse conditions in Spain. In every case fungal and bacterial biocontrol agents (BCAs) performed better under conditions of high relative hu...

  14. A Biological Hierarchical Model Based Underwater Moving Object Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater moving object detection is the key for many underwater computer vision tasks, such as object recognizing, locating, and tracking. Considering the super ability in visual sensing of the underwater habitats, the visual mechanism of aquatic animals is generally regarded as the cue for establishing bionic models which are more adaptive to the underwater environments. However, the low accuracy rate and the absence of the prior knowledge learning limit their adaptation in underwater applications. Aiming to solve the problems originated from the inhomogeneous lumination and the unstable background, the mechanism of the visual information sensing and processing pattern from the eye of frogs are imitated to produce a hierarchical background model for detecting underwater objects. Firstly, the image is segmented into several subblocks. The intensity information is extracted for establishing background model which could roughly identify the object and the background regions. The texture feature of each pixel in the rough object region is further analyzed to generate the object contour precisely. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method gives a better performance. Compared to the traditional Gaussian background model, the completeness of the object detection is 97.92% with only 0.94% of the background region that is included in the detection results.

  15. A biological hierarchical model based underwater moving object detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Fan, Tanghuai; Tang, Min; Zhang, Qian; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Fengchen

    2014-01-01

    Underwater moving object detection is the key for many underwater computer vision tasks, such as object recognizing, locating, and tracking. Considering the super ability in visual sensing of the underwater habitats, the visual mechanism of aquatic animals is generally regarded as the cue for establishing bionic models which are more adaptive to the underwater environments. However, the low accuracy rate and the absence of the prior knowledge learning limit their adaptation in underwater applications. Aiming to solve the problems originated from the inhomogeneous lumination and the unstable background, the mechanism of the visual information sensing and processing pattern from the eye of frogs are imitated to produce a hierarchical background model for detecting underwater objects. Firstly, the image is segmented into several subblocks. The intensity information is extracted for establishing background model which could roughly identify the object and the background regions. The texture feature of each pixel in the rough object region is further analyzed to generate the object contour precisely. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method gives a better performance. Compared to the traditional Gaussian background model, the completeness of the object detection is 97.92% with only 0.94% of the background region that is included in the detection results. PMID:25140194

  16. Detecting Life and Biology-Related Parameters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Gilbet V.; Miller, Joseph D.; Straat, Patricia A.; Lodder, Robert; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    An integrated, miniaturized, low-power instrument capable of the detection and early characterization of microbial life in the soil of Mars is proposed. Based on the detection apd monitoring of on-going metabolism as being the surest evidence for extant life, the experiments will probe for chirality in metabolism, for circadian rhythm, and for photosynthesis. However, the instrument package will also be able to detect biosignatures and a variety of other physical and chemical parameters of the Martian surface that have significance for life. These include the presence and the physical state of water, the existence of an oxidant, the pH and the penetrability of the soil. Using the legacy of the 1976 Viking Labeled Release (LR) life detection experiment in conjunction with state-of-the-art laser diode spectral analysis, the instrument can be flown stand-alone, with or without a rover, or as part of an MSL-type mission. Sterility for experiment integrity and for planetary protection is provided.

  17. Ultrasensitive Force Detection and Applications to Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Thomas

    2001-03-01

    For many years, researchers have developed a variety of micromechanical devices for a range of applications. The majority of these devices are based on micromechanical force transducers to convert external physical signals into electrical signals. The force sensing capabilities of these devices are remarkable - it is possible to design devices with force resolution ranging from milli-N to atto-N within this technology. In addition to the conventional applications for MEMS devices, it is possible to tailor these designs to allow interesting scientific measurements on biological systems. For example, there are active research communities investigating cellular adhesion, protein folding, and animal locomotion. In all of these cases, the basic questions are mechanical in nature, and direct force measurements can provide new insight. This talk will review some ongoing biological research that makes use of MEMS devices, and discuss opportunities for new directions. Collaborators on this research include : Yiching Liang, Robert Rudnitsky, Michael Bartsch, Robert Full, Kellar Autumn, James Nelson, Jim Spudich, and Mark Cutkosky This work is funded by NSF (XYZ on a Chip) and ONR MURI (Biomimetic Robots).

  18. A simple electrochemical platform based on pectin stabilized gold nanoparticles for picomolar detection of biologically toxic amitrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Veerappan; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, V S; Ajmal Ali, M; Huang, Sheng-Tung; Al-Hemaid, Fahad M A

    2015-08-21

    Amitrole is a biologically toxic nonselective herbicide which contaminates surface and ground waters at unprecedented rates. All reported modified electrodes that detect amitrole within sub-micromolar to nanomolar levels were based on the electro-oxidation of amitrole. Herein, we developed a new conceptual idea to detect picomolar concentrations of amitrole based on calcium cross linked pectin stabilized gold nanoparticle (CCLP-GNP) film modified electrode which was prepared by electrodeposition. When the electrochemical behavior of amitrole was investigated at the CCLP-GNP film, the reduction peak current of the GNPs linearly decreased as the concentration of amitrole increases. We have designed a determination platform based on the amitrole dependent decrease of the GNP cathodic peak. The described concept and high sensitivity of square wave voltammetry together facilitate the great sensing ability; as a result the described approach is able to reach a low detection limit of 36 pM which surpassed the detection limits of existing protocols. The sensor presents a good ability to determine amitrole in two linear concentration ranges: (1) 100 pM-1500 pM with a detection limit of 36 pM; (2) 100 nM-1500 nM with a detection limit of 20 nM. The preparation of CCLP-GNPs is simple, rapid and does not require any reducing agents. PMID:26171468

  19. An analysis on the detection of biological contaminants aboard aircraft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace M Hwang

    Full Text Available The spread of infectious disease via commercial airliner travel is a significant and realistic threat. To shed some light on the feasibility of detecting airborne pathogens, a sensor integration study has been conducted and computational investigations of contaminant transport in an aircraft cabin have been performed. Our study took into consideration sensor sensitivity as well as the time-to-answer, size, weight and the power of best available commercial off-the-shelf (COTS devices. We conducted computational fluid dynamics simulations to investigate three types of scenarios: (1 nominal breathing (up to 20 breaths per minute and coughing (20 times per hour; (2 nominal breathing and sneezing (4 times per hour; and (3 nominal breathing only. Each scenario was implemented with one or seven infectious passengers expelling air and sneezes or coughs at the stated frequencies. Scenario 2 was implemented with two additional cases in which one infectious passenger expelled 20 and 50 sneezes per hour, respectively. All computations were based on 90 minutes of sampling using specifications from a COTS aerosol collector and biosensor. Only biosensors that could provide an answer in under 20 minutes without any manual preparation steps were included. The principal finding was that the steady-state bacteria concentrations in aircraft would be high enough to be detected in the case where seven infectious passengers are exhaling under scenarios 1 and 2 and where one infectious passenger is actively exhaling in scenario 2. Breathing alone failed to generate sufficient bacterial particles for detection, and none of the scenarios generated sufficient viral particles for detection to be feasible. These results suggest that more sensitive sensors than the COTS devices currently available and/or sampling of individual passengers would be needed for the detection of bacteria and viruses in aircraft.

  20. Life cycle of Puccinia crupinae, a candidate fungal biological control agent for Crupina vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupina vulgaris (Common crupina, Asteraceae) is an introduced weed pest in the western United States. An isolate of the rust fungus Puccinia crupinae from the Greece is currently under evaluation as a candidate for biological control of C. crupina in a Biosafety Level 3 (BL-3) containment greenhou...

  1. Adaptive evolution of a generalist parasitoid: implications for the effectiveness of biological control agents

    OpenAIRE

    Zepeda-Paulo, Francisca A; Ortiz-Martínez, Sebastián A; Figueroa, Christian C.; Lavandero, Blas

    2013-01-01

    The use of alternative hosts imposes divergent selection pressures on parasitoid populations. In response to selective pressures, these populations may follow different evolutionary trajectories. Divergent natural selection could promote local host adaptation in populations, translating into direct benefits for biological control, thereby increasing their effectiveness on the target host. Alternatively, adaptive phenotypic plasticity could be favored over local adaptation in temporal and spat...

  2. Evaluation of the biological and scanning distribution of hydroxyapatite-153Sm radiotherapeutic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fixation of 153Sm labeled hydroxyapatite (HA) in the synovial capsule and extra articular localization were evaluated by means of biological distribution tests and gamma scanning studies. These were carried out using HA-153Sm with particle size ranging between 5 and μm, and radiochemical purity above 99%. Animal models used were wistar rats and new zealand rabbits. Rabbits were injected with 7,4 MBq of HA-153Sm while rats received between 1,85 and 92,6 MBq of HA-153Sm. In both cases injection was given in the intra articular area. After injection, scanning images were obtained in rabbits on the 1st, 3rd and 7st day and in rats on the 2nd and 7th day. Biological distribution studies are conducted in the 2 hours to 9 days range in rats and one the 7th day in rabbits. No extra articular localization of HA-153Sm was found in scanning conducted on rabbits by the 1st, 3rd and 7st day after injection, neither on rats by the 2nd and 7th day. Biological distributions for rabbits and rats show localization above 99% in the intra articular area, during the evaluated periods of time. The evaluations of the biological distribution and the scintigraphic images show that fixation of HA-153Sm in the synovial capsule up to the 9th day is very high

  3. Does phylogeny explain the host choice behaviour of potential biological control agents for Brassicaceae weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four invasive Brassicaceae are currently being studied for biological control at the CABI Centre in Switzerland. A phylogenetic approach to host testing has so far been hampered by the fact that the evolutionary relationships of taxa within the Brassicaceae were unclear. Recently, a new phylogeny of...

  4. Metabolic behavior of bacterial biological control agents in soil and plant rhizospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control provides an attractive alternative to chemical pesticides for the control of plant diseases. To date, however, few biocontrol products have been developed successfully at the commercial level. This stems largely from variability in disease control performance that is often obser...

  5. An Agent-Based Intrusion Detection System for Local Area Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Jaydip

    2010-01-01

    Since it is impossible to predict and identify all the vulnerabilities of a network beforehand, and penetration into a system by malicious intruders cannot always be prevented, intrusion detection systems (IDSs) are essential entities to ensure the security of a networked system. To be effective in carrying out their functions, the IDSs need to be accurate, adaptive, and extensible. Given these stringent requirements and the high level of vulnerabilities of the current days’ networks, the design of an IDS has become a very challenging task. Although, an extensive research has been done on intrusion detection in a distributed environment, distributed IDSs suffer from a number of drawbacks e.g., high rates of false positives, low detection efficiency etc. In this paper, the design of a distributed IDS is proposed that consists of a group of autonomous and cooperating agents. In addition to its ability to detect attacks, the system is capable of identifying and isolating compromised nodes in the network the...

  6. Feasibility Study of Passive Aerosol Sampler for Bio-Agent Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, G

    2003-03-05

    We propose to establish the feasibility of a passive aerosol sampler for bio-agent collection through laboratory experiments and theoretical analysis. The passive sampler, unlike the typical active sampler, does not require pumps and complex fixtures, and thereby allows for large-scale field monitoring not possible with current active samplers. We plan to conduct experiments using model (both biological and non-biological) aerosols generated in an instrumented test chamber and compare the particles collected on various passive samplers to conventional filter samplers, commercial aerosol measuring instruments and to conventional surface swipes. Theoretical analysis will be used to design prototype passive samplers and to compare experimental results with theory. A successful feasibility study will be used to seek outside funding for applications that will greatly enhance current LLNL programs such as NARAC's atmospheric dispersal modeling, NAI's programs in bioagent monitoring in public locations and fixed sampling stations, and EPD's environmental monitoring and decontamination research. In addition, the feasibility study will position us favorably for responding to new calls for proposals by NIH and EPA for large scale environmental studies.

  7. Nanoparticle-based optical biosensors for the direct detection of organophosphate chemical warfare agents and pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurotoxic organophosphates (OP) have found widespread use in the environment for insect control. In addition, there is the increasing threat of use of OP based chemical warfare agents in both ground based warfare and terrorist attacks. Together, these trends necessitate the development of simple and specific methods for discriminative detection of ultra low quantities of OP neurotoxins. In our previous investigations a new biosensor for the direct detection of organophosphorus neurotoxins was pioneered. In this system, the enzymatic hydrolysis of OP neurotoxins by organophosphate hydrolase (OPH) generated two protons in each hydrolytic turnover through reactions in which P-X bonds are cleaved. The sensitivity of this biosensor was limited due to the potentiometric method of detection. Recently, it was reported that a change in fluorescence properties of a fluorophore in the vicinity of gold nanoparticles might be used for detection of nanomolar concentrations of DNA oligonucleotides. The detection strategy was based on the fact that an enhancement or quenching of fluorescence intensity is a function of the distances between the gold nanoparticle and fluorophore. While these reports have demonstrated the use of nanoparticle-based sensors for the detection of target DNA, we observed that the specificity of enzyme-substrate interactions could be exploited in similar systems. To test the feasibility of this approach, OPH-gold nanoparticle conjugates were prepared, then incubated with a fluorescent enzyme inhibitor or decoy. The fluorescence intensity of the decoy was sensitive to the proximity of the gold nanoparticle, and thus could be used to indicate that the decoy was bound to the OPH. Then different paraoxon concentrations were introduced to the OPH-nanoparticle-conjugate-decoy mixtures, and normalized ratio of fluorescence intensities were measured. The greatest sensitivity to paraoxon was obtained when decoys and OPH-gold nanoparticle conjugates were present at

  8. Spectroscopic detection of biological NO with a quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, L.; Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.; Urban, W.

    2001-01-01

    Two configurations of a continuous wave quantum cascade distributed feedback laser-based gas sensor for the detection of NO at a parts per billion (ppb) concentration level, typical of biomedical applications, have been investigated. The laser was operated at liquid nitrogen temperature near lambda = 5.2 microns. In the first configuration, a 100 m optical path length multi-pass cell was employed to enhance the NO absorption. In the second configuration, a technique based on cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (CES) was utilized, with an effective path length of 670 m. Both sensors enabled simultaneous analysis of NO and CO2 concentrations in exhaled air. The minimum detectable NO concentration was found to be 3 ppb with a multi-pass cell and 16 ppb when using CES. The two techniques are compared, and potential future developments are discussed.

  9. Biological detection and tagging using tailorable, reactive, highly fluorescent chemosensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Zifer, Thomas; McElhanon, James Ross; Rahn, Larry A.

    2006-11-01

    This program was focused on the development of a fluorogenic chemosensor family that could tuned for reaction with electrophilic (e.g. chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (e.g. proteins and other biological molecules) species. Our chemosensor approach utilized the fluorescent properties of well-known berberine-type alkaloids. In situ chemosensor reaction with a target species transformed two out-of-plane, weakly conjugated, short-wavelength chromophores into one rigid, planar, conjugated, chromophore with strong long wavelength fluorescence (530-560 nm,) and large Stokes shift (100-180 nm). The chemosensor was activated with an isourea group which allowed for reaction with carboxylic acid moieties found in amino acids.

  10. A Biological Hierarchical Model Based Underwater Moving Object Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Shen; Tanghuai Fan; Min Tang; Qian Zhang; Zhen Sun; Fengchen Huang

    2014-01-01

    Underwater moving object detection is the key for many underwater computer vision tasks, such as object recognizing, locating, and tracking. Considering the super ability in visual sensing of the underwater habitats, the visual mechanism of aquatic animals is generally regarded as the cue for establishing bionic models which are more adaptive to the underwater environments. However, the low accuracy rate and the absence of the prior knowledge learning limit their adaptation in underwater appl...

  11. In vivo detection of radicals in biological reactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Chance, B; G. Gao

    1994-01-01

    In vivo detection of free radicals on a quantitative basis is essential for an establishment of their role in membrane, protein, and cell and tissue damage. This article compares optical methods, including chemiluminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and NMR methods for the study of free radicals and free radical damage, especially reperfusion injury neutrophil accumulation 6 hr after the ischemia/reperfusion insult. The chemiluminescence method is applied to an evaluation of the ...

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  13. STUDY OF MICROBIAL DIVERSITY OF FUNGAL COMMUNITIES FROM RHIZOSPHERE AND PHYLOSPHERE OF STRAWBERRY TREATED WITH CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL AGENTS FOR THE CONTROL OF PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi-Mirela Matei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The negative impact of long term utilization of pesticides on yields quality, as well as on the human health made scientific community to seek new ways, less expensive and environmental friendly for protecting cultivated plants against pathogens. Biological control agents of microbial origin represented by living selected strains or their metabolites are more and more frequently utilized for protecting horticultural plants intensely consumed by European population, such as strawberry. A green house experiment was designed to compare the structure of rhizospheric and phylospheric microflora of strawberry cv. Senga Sengana, sensible to Botrytis cinerea (the agent of grey mould treated with systemic and contact fungicides, as well as with four biological control preparations of microbial origin administrated on plant leaves or in the soil. The structure of fungal communities in rhizosphere and phylosphere of strawberry cv. Senga Sengana varied as a function of the nature of control agent and the method of administration. Non significant influence on soil fungal community diversity index and species number was registered after the treatment with chemical and biological control agents, but significant increments were induced in time by control agents as compared with both non-treated control and chemical pesticides. Fungal community structure from strawberry leaves was not significantly influenced by chemical and biological control agents. The most favourable influence on fungal communities registered for bio-control agents E1 and E2 due to

  14. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Gigantol Derivatives as Potential Agents in Prevention of Diabetic Cataract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wu

    Full Text Available As a continuation of our efforts directed towards the development of natural anti-diabetic cataract agents, gigantol was isolated from Herba dendrobii and was found to inhibit both aldose reductase (AR and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS activity, which play a significant role in the development and progression of diabetic cataracts. To improve its bioefficacy and facilitate use as a therapeutic agent, gigantol (compound 14f and a series of novel analogs were designed and synthesized. Analogs were formulated to have different substituents on the phenyl ring (compounds 4, 5, 8, 14a-e, substitute the phenyl ring with a larger steric hindrance ring (compounds 10, 17c or modify the carbon chain (compounds 17a, 17b, 21, 23, 25. All of the analogs were tested for their effect on AR and iNOS activities and on D-galactose-induced apoptosis in cultured human lens epithelial cells. Compounds 5, 10, 14a, 14b, 14d, 14e, 14f, 17b, 17c, 23, and 25 inhibited AR activity, with IC50 values ranging from 5.02 to 288.8 μM. Compounds 5, 10, 14b, and 14f inhibited iNOS activity with IC50 ranging from 432.6 to 1188.7 μM. Compounds 5, 8, 10, 14b, 14f, and 17c protected the cells from D-galactose induced apoptosis with viability ranging from 55.2 to 76.26%. Of gigantol and its analogs, compound 10 showed the greatest bioefficacy and is warranted to be developed as a therapeutic agent for diabetic cataracts.

  15. Molecular Sleds and More: Novel Antiviral Agents via Single-Molecule Biology (441st Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangel, Wally (Ph.D., Biology Department)

    2008-10-15

    Vaccines are effective against viruses such as polio and measles, but vaccines against other important viruses, such as HIV and flu viruses, may be impossible to obtain. These viruses change their genetic makeup each time they replicate so that the immune system cannot recognize all their variations. Hence it is important to develop new antiviral agents that inhibit virus replication. During this lecture, Dr. Mangel will discuss his group's work with a model system, the human adenovirus, which causes, among other ailments, pink eye, blindness and obesity. Mangel's team has developed a promising drug candidate that works by inihibiting adenovirus proteinase, an enzyme necessary for viral replication.

  16. Characterization and mechanism of action of the biological control agent Pantoea agglomerans EPS125

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno González, M. del Carmen

    2006-01-01

    La soca EPS125 ha mostrat ser un efectiu agent de control biològic de diferents patògens fúngics de postcollita en diferents fruits. Degut a la seva elevada eficàcia, es va plantejar desenvolupar aquesta soca comercialment i per aquest motiu en el present treball es plantejà complementar la informació necessària pel seu registre. D'acord amb els resultats obtinguts mitjançant proves fenotípiques i genotípiques, la soca EPS125 queda inclosa dins l'espècie Pantoea agglomerans (Enterobacter aggl...

  17. Synthesis, biological evaluation and SAR studies of benzimidazole derivatives as H1-antihistamine agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Jian Wang; Mei Yang Xi; Ji Hua Fu; Fu Rong Zhang; Gui Fang Cheng; Da Li Yin; Qi Dong You

    2012-01-01

    A series of benzimidazole derivatives have been designed,synthesized and evaluated for H1 antihtistamine activity.Six compounds have showed potent antihistamine H1 activity.The primary SAR analysis indicated that benzyl or benzylidinyl substituted on the exo-nitrogen atom and C2 of the benzimidazole were significant.Further experiments indicated that compound 17d displayed excellent activity to reduce mast cell degranulation,moderate anti-PAF activity and decreased potency on hERG compared to astermizole.Hence compound 17d could serve as anti-altergic agent for further development.

  18. Synthesis, molecular modeling and biological evaluation of dithiocarbamates as novel antitubulin agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yong; Ma, Gao-Yuan; Yang, Ying; Cheng, Kui; Zheng, Qing-Zhong; Mao, Wen-Jun; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-06-15

    A series of novel dithiocarbamate compounds with the chalcone scaffold have been designed and synthesized, and their biological activities were also evaluated as potential antiproliferation and antitubulin polymerization inhibitors. Compound 2n showed the most potent biological activity in vitro, which inhibited the growth of MCF-7 cells with IC(50) of 0.04+/-0.01 microM and the polymerization of tubulin with IC(50) of 6.8+/-0.6 microM. To understand the tubulin-inhibitor interaction and the selectivity of the most active compound towards tubulin, molecular modeling studies were performed to dock compound 2n into the colchicine binding site, which suggested probable inhibition mechanism. PMID:20493717

  19. Climate warming increases biological control agent impact on a non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinmin; Siemann, Evan; He, Minyan; Wei, Hui; Shao, Xu; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Climate change may shift interactions of invasive plants, herbivorous insects and native plants, potentially affecting biological control efficacy and non-target effects on native species. Here, we show how climate warming affects impacts of a multivoltine introduced biocontrol beetle on the non-target native plant Alternanthera sessilis in China. In field surveys across a latitudinal gradient covering their full distributions, we found beetle damage on A. sessilis increased with rising temperature and plant life history changed from perennial to annual. Experiments showed that elevated temperature changed plant life history and increased insect overwintering, damage and impacts on seedling recruitment. These results suggest that warming can shift phenologies, increase non-target effect magnitude and increase non-target effect occurrence by beetle range expansion to additional areas where A. sessilis occurs. This study highlights the importance of understanding how climate change affects species interactions for future biological control of invasive species and conservation of native species. PMID:25376303

  20. Climate warming increases biological control agent impact on a non-target species

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xinmin; Siemann, Evan; He, Minyan; Wei, Hui; Shao, Xu; Ding, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Climate change may shift interactions of invasive plants, herbivorous insects and native plants, potentially affecting biological control efficacy and non-target effects on native species. Here, we show how climate warming affects impacts of a multivoltine introduced biocontrol beetle on the non-target native plant Alternanthera sessilis in China. In field surveys across a latitudinal gradient covering their full distributions, we found beetle damage on A. sessilis increased with rising tempe...

  1. The Use and Exchange of Biological Control Agents for Food and Agriculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.C.van; Lenteren; M.J.W.Cock; J.Brodeur; B.Barratt; F.Bigler; K.Bolckmans; F.Haas; P.G.Mason; J.R.P.Parra

    2010-01-01

    The report sets out to summarize the past and current situation regarding the practice of biologicalcontrol inrelationtothe use and exchange of genetic resources relevant for BCAs.It considers the twomain categories of biological control:classical and augmentative.Allowing access to BCAs for use inanother country imposes no risk of liability to the source country.Local scientific knowledge abouthabitats,fauna andflora,can be helpful

  2. Establishing a new marketplace for biologic therapy with biosimilar agents: importance of extrapolation of data

    OpenAIRE

    Bressler B; Dingermann T

    2015-01-01

    Brian Bressler,1 Theo Dingermann2 1St Paul’s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Institute of Pharmaceutical Biology, Frankfurt, Germany Abstract: Despite their enormous value for our health care system, biopharmaceuticals have become a serious threat to the system itself due to their high cost. Costs may be warranted if the medicine is new and innovative; however, it is no longer an innovation when its patent protection expires. As patents and exclusiviti...

  3. A medicoeconomic review of early intervention with biologic agents in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Odes S; Greenberg D

    2014-01-01

    Shmuel Odes,1 Dan Greenberg21Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel; 2Department of Health Systems Management, Faculty of Health Sciences and Guilford Glazer Faculty of Business and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, IsraelAbstract: The treatment of inflammatory bowel disease with standard therapy fails to control the disease in many patients. Biologic therapy has an increasing ...

  4. Computerized cyclic voltammetric detection after HPLC of the antineoplastic agents etoposide, teniposide, adriamycin and its metabolite adriamycinol in urine samples

    OpenAIRE

    Ploegmakers, H. H. J. L.; Moritz, P. A.; Toll, P. J. M. M.; Oort, W.J. van

    1989-01-01

    A computerized electrochemical detection system for application after HPLC, provided with a cyclic voltammetric oxidative and reductive module, is described for the on-line qualitative determination of electroactive antineoplastic agents and metabolites in urine samples, collected from cancer patients, following intravenous administration. The application of two cyclic voltammetric detection modes provides an insight into both oxidative and reductive electrode reactions of compounds, passing ...

  5. Magneto-mechanical trapping systems for biological target detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2014-03-29

    We demonstrate a magnetic microsystem capable of detecting nucleic acids via the size difference between bare magnetic beads and bead compounds. The bead compounds are formed through linking nonmagnetic beads and magnetic beads by the target nucleic acids. The system comprises a tunnel magneto-resistive (TMR) sensor, a trapping well, and a bead-concentrator. The TMR sensor detects the stray field of magnetic beads inside the trapping well, while the sensor output depends on the number of beads. The size of the bead compounds is larger than that of bare magnetic beads, and fewer magnetic beads are required to fill the trapping well. The bead-concentrator, in turn, is capable of filling the trap in a controlled fashion and so to shorten the assay time. The bead-concentrator includes conducting loops surrounding the trapping well and a conducting line underneath. The central conducting line serves to attract magnetic beads in the trapping well and provides a magnetic field to magnetize them so to make them detectable by the TMR sensor. This system excels by its simplicity in that the DNA is incubated with magnetic and nonmagnetic beads, and the solution is then applied to the chip and analyzed in a single step. In current experiments, a signal-to-noise ratio of 40.3 dB was obtained for a solution containing 20.8 nM of DNA. The sensitivity and applicability of this method can be controlled by the size or concentration of the nonmagnetic bead, or by the dimension of the trapping well.

  6. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel Selenium (Se-NSAID) Molecules as Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plano, Daniel; Karelia, Deepkamal N; Pandey, Manoj K; Spallholz, Julian E; Amin, Shantu; Sharma, Arun K

    2016-03-10

    The synthesis and anticancer evaluation of novel selenium-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (Se-NSAID) hybrid molecules are reported. The Se-aspirin analogue 8 was identified as the most effective agent in reducing the viability of different cancer cell lines, particularly colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, was more selective toward cancer cells than normal cells, and was >10 times more potent than 5-FU, the current therapy for CRC. Compound 8 inhibits CRC growth via the inhibition of the cell cycle in G1 and G2/M phases and reduces the cell cycle markers like cyclin E1 and B1 in a dose dependent manner; the inhibition of the cell cycle may be dependent on the ability of 8 to induce p21 expression. Furthermore, 8 induces apoptosis by activating caspase 3/7 and PARP cleavage, and its longer exposure causes increase in intracellular ROS levels in CRC cells. Taken together, 8 has the potential to be developed further as a chemotherapeutic agent for CRC. PMID:26750401

  7. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Resveratrol-NSAID Derivatives as Anti-inflammatory Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Ma, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Kun; Zhou, Ai-Yu; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Huaqian; Du, Zhiyun; Zhao, Deng-Gao

    2016-06-01

    Long-term use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may cause serious side effects such as gastric mucosal damage. Resveratrol, a naturally dietary polyphenol, exhibited anti-inflammatory activity and a protective effect against gastric mucosa damage induced by NSAIDs. In this regard, we synthesized a series of resveratrol-based NSAIDs derivatives and evaluated their anti-inflammatory activity against nitric oxide (NO) overproduction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. We identified mono-substituted resveratrol-ibuprofen combination 21 as the most potent anti-inflammatory agent, which is more active than a physical mixture of ibuprofen and resveratrol, individual ibuprofen, or individual resveratrol. In addition, compound 21 exerted potent inhibitory effects on the LPS-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Furthermore, compound 21 significantly increased the survival rate in an LPS-induced acute inflammatory model and produced markedly less gastric damage than ibuprofen. It was found that compound 21 may be a potent anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases. PMID:27009373

  8. TEAK: topology enrichment analysis framework for detecting activated biological subpathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judeh, Thair; Johnson, Cole; Kumar, Anuj; Zhu, Dongxiao

    2013-02-01

    To mine gene expression data sets effectively, analysis frameworks need to incorporate methods that identify intergenic relationships within enriched biologically relevant subpathways. For this purpose, we developed the Topology Enrichment Analysis frameworK (TEAK). TEAK employs a novel in-house algorithm and a tailor-made Clique Percolation Method to extract linear and nonlinear KEGG subpathways, respectively. TEAK scores subpathways using the Bayesian Information Criterion for context specific data and the Kullback-Leibler divergence for case-control data. In this article, we utilized TEAK with experimental studies to analyze microarray data sets profiling stress responses in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a public microarray data set, we identified via TEAK linear sphingolipid metabolic subpathways activated during the yeast response to nitrogen stress, and phenotypic analyses of the corresponding deletion strains indicated previously unreported fitness defects for the dpl1Δ and lag1Δ mutants under conditions of nitrogen limitation. In addition, we studied the yeast filamentous response to nitrogen stress by profiling changes in transcript levels upon deletion of two key filamentous growth transcription factors, FLO8 and MSS11. Via TEAK we identified a nonlinear glycerophospholipid metabolism subpathway involving the SLC1 gene, which we found via mutational analysis to be required for yeast filamentous growth. PMID:23268448

  9. Statistical models for LWIR hyperspectral backgrounds and their applications in chemical agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakis, D.; Jairam, L. G.; Zhang, D.; Rossacci, M.

    2007-04-01

    Remote detection of chemical vapors in the atmosphere has a wide range of civilian and military applications. In the past few years there has been significant interest in the detection of effluent plumes using hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy in the 8-13μm atmospheric window. A major obstacle in the full exploitation of this technology is the fact that everything in the infrared is a source of radiation. As a result, the emission from the gases of interest is always mixed with emission by the more abundant atmospheric constituents and by other objects in the sensor field of view. The radiance fluctuations in this background emission constitute an additional source of interference which is much stronger than the detector noise. In this paper we develop and evaluate parametric models for the statistical characterization of LWIR hyperspectral backgrounds. We consider models based on the theory of elliptically contoured distributions. Both models can handle heavy tails, which is a key stastical feature of hyperspectral imaging backgrounds. The paper provides a concise description of the underlying models, the algorithms used to estimate their parameters from the background spectral measurements, and the use of the developed models in the design and evaluation of chemical warfare agent detection algorithms.

  10. Demeclocycline as a contrast agent for detecting brain neoplasms using confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Dennis; Smith, Thomas W.; Moser, Richard; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2015-04-01

    Complete resection of brain tumors improves life expectancy and quality. Thus, there is a strong need for high-resolution detection and microscopically controlled removal of brain neoplasms. The goal of this study was to test demeclocycline as a contrast enhancer for the intraoperative detection of brain tumors. We have imaged benign and cancerous brain tumors using multimodal confocal microscopy. The tumors investigated included pituitary adenoma, meningiomas, glioblastomas, and metastatic brain cancers. Freshly excised brain tissues were stained in 0.75 mg ml-1 aqueous solution of demeclocyline. Reflectance images were acquired at 402 nm. Fluorescence signals were excited at 402 nm and registered between 500 and 540 nm. After imaging, histological sections were processed from the imaged specimens and compared to the optical images. Fluorescence images highlighted normal and cancerous brain cells, while reflectance images emphasized the morphology of connective tissue. The optical and histological images were in accordance with each other for all types of tumors investigated. Demeclocyline shows promise as a contrast agent for intraoperative detection of brain tumors.

  11. Innate positive chemotaxis to pollen from crops and banker plants in predaceous biological control agents: towards new field lures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Tan, Xiaoling; Desneux, Nicolas; Benelli, Giovanni; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xinhai; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Xiwu; Wang, Su

    2015-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions form the core of biological control of arthropod pests. Which tools can be used to monitor and collect carnivorous arthropods in natural habitats and targeted crops? Eco-friendly and effective field lures are urgently needed. In this research, we carried out olfactometer experiments assess innate positive chemotaxis to pollen of seven crop and banker plant by two important predatory biological control agents: the coccinellid Propylea japonica (Thunberg) and the anthocorid Orius sauteri (Poppius). We compared the attractiveness of pollens from crops and banker plants to that of common prey homogenates (aphids and thrips, respectively). Attractiveness of the tested odor sources was checked via field trapping experiments conducted in organic apple orchards and by release-recapture assays in organic greenhouse tomato crops. Maize and canola pollen were attractive to both P. japonica and O. sauteri, in laboratory and field assays. P. japonica was highly attracted by balm mint pollen, whereas O. sauteri was attracted by alfalfa pollen. Our results encourage the use of pollen from crops and banker plants as low-cost and eco-friendly attractors to enhance the monitoring and attraction of arthropod predators in biological control programs. PMID:26235136

  12. Molecular Detection of Monilinia fructigena as Causal Agent of Brown Rot on Quince

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Hrustić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Species of the genus Monilinia are important causal agents of fruit rot on pome and stone fruits in Serbia. The pathogen is very harmful, especially on small properties and cottage plantations where intensive control measures are not applied. Quince is importanthost for the pathogens of this genus. During spring 2010, intensive occurrence of mummified fruits overwintering on branches of the quince was observed. The pathogen was isolated using standard phytopathological methods. Pathogenicity of eight obtained isolates was tested by artificial inoculation of injured apple fruits. Identification was performed according to pathogenic, morphological and ecological properties, and was confirmed by Multiplex polimeraze chain reaction, PCR. All the isolates studied caused brown rot on inoculated apple fruits. The isolates form light yellow colonies with lobate margins,with single-celled, transparent, elliptical or oval conidia in chains, regardless temperature or light presence. Sclerotia are observed in 14 days old cultures. The highest growth rate of most of the isolates is at 27°C and in dark. Based on studied pathogenic, morphological and ecological characteristics, it was found that the Monilinia fructigena is causal agent of brown rot of quince. Using specific primers (MO368-5, MO368-8R, MO368-10R, Laxa-R2for detection of Monilinia species in Multiplex PCR reaction, the expected fragment 402 bp in size was amplified, which confirmed that the studied isolates belonged to the speciesM. fructigena.

  13. In-vivo detection of human bladder carcinoma without sensitizing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hallewin, Marie-Ange; Baert, Luc; Vanherzeele, Herman A.

    1994-05-01

    Transitional bladder cell carcinoma (TCC) is easily recognizable, but for the diagnosis of severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ (CIS) one can only rely on randomly taken biopsies. Fluorescence tagging of tumors by sensitizing agents such as hematoporphyrin derivatives (HpD) is possible but presents, even at low doses, a number of serious drawbacks for the patient. We demonstrate a cystoscopic fiber optic instrument, based on a small mercury arc lamp, for in vivo demarcation of human bladder carcinoma. The instrument detects the tissue autofluorescence upon UV excitation (365 nm), thus eliminating the need for sensitizing agents. The average demarcation contrast obtained for CIS and TCC is respectively 2.6 and 3.2, which is about 60% higher than what can be expected from photodynamic imaging with low-dose HpD. The main underlying biophysics are derived from a spectral analysis of the observed autofluorescence signals. The integration of the diagnostic method with a reliable therapeutic technique for tumor cell destruction, opens the way for cost-effective preventive care of high-risk patients.

  14. 9 CFR 113.46 - Detection of cytopathogenic and/or hemadsorbing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... hemadsorbing agents. 113.46 Section 113.46 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... abnormalities attributable to an extraneous agent. (b) Test for hemadsorbing agents. One or more monolayers that... specific cytopathology or hemadsorption attributable to an extraneous agent is found, the material...

  15. A Simple Agent Based Model for Detecting Abnormal Event Patterns in a Distributed Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muktikanta Sa, Manas Ranjan Nayak & Amiya Kumar Rath

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor networks (WSN is a promising technology for current as well asfuture. There is vast use of WSN in different fields like military surveillance andtarget tracking, traffic management, weather forecasting, habitat monitoring,designing smart home, structural and seismic monitoring, etc. For successapplication of ubiquitous WSN it is important to maintain the basic security, bothfrom external and internal attacks else entire network may collapse. Maintainingsecurity in WSN network is not a simple job just like securing wireless networksbecause sensor nodes are deployed in randomize manner. Hence majorchallenges in WSN are security. In this paper we have discussed differentattacks in WSN and how these attacks are efficiently detected by using our agentbased model. Our model identifies the abnormal event pattern sensor nodes in alargely deployed distributed sensor network under a common anomaly detectionframework which will be designed by agent based learning and distributed datamining technique.

  16. Secured UAV based on multi-agent systems and embedded Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Boukhdir

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, are a relatively recent area of research and in full effervescence with more and more amateur and academic projects. Initially associated to the military, these vehicles are way to be used in many other areas. In effect, demand is growing for various applications within of this type of technology. Inspection of buildings, search and rescue of missing or in distress people are some examples. This research paper highlights a lightweight intrusion detection system with the objective to secure UAVs. Our IDP(Intrusion and Prevention System uses real-time architecture, based on the multi-agent systems so it can be autonomous and distributed between the ground control station(GCS and the UAV is more suited to be embedded in low computation resources devices in general and especially UAVs

  17. Isolation and characterization of soil Streptomyces species as potential biological control agents against fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed

    2014-05-01

    The use of antagonist microorganisms against fungal plant pathogens is an attractive and ecologically alternative to the use of chemical pesticides. Streptomyces are beneficial soil bacteria and potential candidates for biocontrol agents. This study reports the isolation, characterization and antagonist activity of soil streptomycetes from the Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve, a Natural protected area in Campeche, Mexico. The results showed morphological, physiological and biochemical characterization of six actinomycetes and their inhibitory activity against Curvularia sp., Aspergillus niger, Helminthosporium sp. and Fusarium sp. One isolate, identified as Streptomyces sp. CACIS-1.16CA showed the potential to inhibit additional pathogens as Alternaria sp., Phytophthora capsici, Colletotrichum sp. and Rhizoctonia sp. with percentages ranging from 47 to 90 %. This study identified a streptomycete strain with a broad antagonist activity that could be used for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:24310522

  18. Efficacy of Bacillus subtilis V26 as a biological control agent against Rhizoctonia solani on potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Kilani-Feki, Olfa; Dammak, Mouna; Jabnoun-Khiareddine, Hayfa; Daami-Remadi, Mejda; Tounsi, Slim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the strain Bacillus subtilis V26, a local isolate from the Tunisian soil, to control potato black scurf caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The in vitro antifungal activity of V26 significantly inhibited R. solani growth compared to the untreated control. Microscopic observations revealed that V26 caused considerable morphological deformations of the fungal hyphae such as vacuolation, protoplast leakage and mycelia crack. The most effective control was achieved when strain V26 was applied 24h prior to inoculation (protective activity) in potato slices. The antagonistic bacterium V26 induced significant suppression of root canker and black scurf tuber colonization compared to untreated controls with a decrease in incidence disease of 63% and 81%, respectively, and promoted plant growth under greenhouse conditions on potato plants. Therefore, B. subtilis V26 has a great potential to be commercialized as a biocontrol agent against R. solani on potato crops. PMID:26563555

  19. Synthesis, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of novel chiral thiosemicarbazone derivatives as potent anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Demet; Karaküçük-İyidoğan, Ayşegül; Ulaşli, Mustafa; Taşkin-Tok, Tuğba; Oruç-Emre, Emİne Elçİn; Bayram, Hasan

    2015-02-01

    A series of new chiral thiosemicarbazones derived from homochiral amines in both enantiomeric forms were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro antiproliferative activity against A549 (human alveolar adenocarcinoma), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma), and HGC-27 (human stomach carcinoma) cell lines. Some of compounds showed inhibitory activities on the growth of cancer cell lines. Especially, compound exhibited the most potent activity (IC50 4.6 μM) against HGC-27 as compared with the reference compound, sindaxel (IC50 10.3 μM), and could be used as a lead compound to search new chiral thiosemicarbazone derivatives as antiproliferative agents. PMID:25399965

  20. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of 99mTc-carboxymethylthioethyl iminodiacetic acid as renal imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ligand carboxymethylthioethyl iminodiacetic acid (CMT-IDA), an analogue of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) has been radiolabeled with technetium-99m to study its renal clearance and determine its potential as a renal tubular imaging agent. (99mTc(CO)3CMT-IDA)2- could be obtained in >98% radiochemical purity as determined by HPLC. Stability, hydrophilicity and plasma protein binding studies were carried out and were found to be comparable to that of (99mTc(CO)3NTA)2-. Biodistribution studies were carried out in normal Swiss mice at 10 min. p.i. and 2 h.p.i. The complex has shown renal clearance of (71.0±5.9)% ID at 10 min. p.i., which increased to (84.1±10.6)% at 2 h.p.i., with no major uptake in vital organs. (author)

  1. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of new rhodacyanine analogues as potential antitumor agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xiong Li; Xin Zhai; Wei Ke Liao; Wu Fu Zhu; Ying He; Ping Gong

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to develop potent antitumor agents,new rhodacyanine analogues containing the pyridinium ring (5a-5h),the isoquinolinium ring (6a-6c) and the quinolinium ring (7a-7e) linked to the rhodanine ring via N-N covalent bond were designed,synthesized and evaluated for antitumor activity against human lung cancer cell line (H460) by MTT assay in vitro.Most of the tested compounds showed enhanced antitumor activity with IC50 values ranging from 0.006 to 9.2 μmol/L as compared to the lead compound MKT-077.Among them,the most promising compound 7d (IC50 =0.006 μmol/L) was 216.7 times more active than MKT-077 (IC50 =1.3 μmol/L).The preliminary structure-activity relationship of the target compounds was discussed.

  2. Biological effects of radiation and chemical agents with special regard to repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reasonably certain that the introduction or increase of pollutants in the environment can augment mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. These effects are operationally definable, but the genetic organization and the underlying mechanisms of DNA repair, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis are so complex as to make the extrapolation of results from mutagenicity test data to carcinogenicity somewhat uncertain. The subject is reviewed. Recent discoveries in gene organization and expression include overlapping genes in bacteriophages, split genes, processing of RNA and splicing, translocation of genes in eukaryotes, inactivation of the X-chromosome in mammals, etc. Apart from the genetic regulation, plasmids, insertion sequences and mutators can additionally affect mutation frequency. Cancers due to gene mutations, viruses, chemicals and physical agents are known. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved. The value of mutagenicity test data is beyond question, but in view of the extraordinary complexities encountered our extrapolations will be more sound if the data have the underpinning of basic information. (author)

  3. Enhanced Detection of Vibrio Cholerae in Oyster Homogenate Based on Centrifugal Removal of Inhibitory Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Donita; DePaola, Angelo; Young, Ronald B.

    1998-01-01

    The disease cholera, caused by Vibrio cholerae, has been associated with consumption of contaminated seafood, including raw oysters. Detection of V. cholerae in foods typically involves blending the oysters, diluting the homogenate in alkaline peptone water (APW), overnight enrichment, and isolation on selective agar. Unfortunately, the oyster homogenate must be diluted to large volumes because lower dilutions inhibit the growth of V. cholerae. The goals of this study were to develop an alternative to large dilutions and to evaluate the basis for the inhibition observed in lower dilutions of oyster homogenates. Centrifugation of oyster homogenates at 10,000 x g for 15 min, followed by enrichment of the resulting pellet in APW, was found to eliminate the inhibition of V. cholerae growth. Inhibition appears not to be due to competing microflora but to a component(s) released when V. cholerae grows in the presence of oyster homogenate. The inhibitory component(s) kills the V. cholerae after the cell concentration reaches > 10(exp 8) cells/mL, rather than initially preventing their growth. The pH also declines from 8.0 to 5.5 during this period; however, the pH decline by itself appears not to cause V. cholerae death. Seven strains of V. cholerae (01 and non-01) and two strains of V. vulnificus were susceptible to the inhibitory agent(s). However, other Vibrio and non-Vibrio species tested were not inhibited by the oyster homogenates. Based on digestion of oyster homogenates with pronase, trypsin and lipase, the inhibitory reaction involves a protein(s). In a preliminary trial with oyster homogenate seeded with 1 cfu/g of V. cholerae, the modified centrifugation technique detected a slightly higher percentage of samples at a 1:10 dilution than the standard FDA Bacteriological Analytical Method (BAM) detected in uncentrifuged oyster homogenate at a 1:100 dilution. V. cholerae in seeded samples could also be detected more frequently by the modified centrifugation method

  4. Effect of contrast agent administration on consequences of dosimetry and biology in radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ching-Jung [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Yang, Pei-Ying [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian, E-mail: chaot@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China); Tu, Shu-Ju, E-mail: sjtu@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333 Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    In the treatment planning of radiation therapy, patients may be administrated with contrast media in CT scanning to assist physicians for accurate delineation of the target or organs. However, contrast media are not used in patients during the treatment delivery. In particular, contrast media contain materials with high atomic numbers and dosimetric variations may occur between scenarios where contrast media are present in treatment planning and absent in treatment delivery. In this study we evaluate the effect of contrast media on the dosimetry and biological consequence. An analytical phantom based on AAPM TG 119 and five sets of CT images from clinical patients are included. Different techniques of treatment planning are considered, including 1-field AP, 2-field AP+PA, 4-field box, 7-field IMRT, and RapidArc. RapidArc is a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy and is used in our study of contrast media in clinical scenarios. The effect of RapidArc on dosimetry and biological consequence for administration of contrast media in radiotherapy is not discussed previously in literature. It is shown that dose difference is reduced as the number of external beams is increased, suggesting RapidArc may be favored to be used in the treatment planning enhanced by contrast media. Linear trend lines are fitted for assessment of percent dose differences in the planning target volume versus concentrations of contrast media between plans where contrast media are present and absent, respectively.

  5. Effect of contrast agent administration on consequences of dosimetry and biology in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the treatment planning of radiation therapy, patients may be administrated with contrast media in CT scanning to assist physicians for accurate delineation of the target or organs. However, contrast media are not used in patients during the treatment delivery. In particular, contrast media contain materials with high atomic numbers and dosimetric variations may occur between scenarios where contrast media are present in treatment planning and absent in treatment delivery. In this study we evaluate the effect of contrast media on the dosimetry and biological consequence. An analytical phantom based on AAPM TG 119 and five sets of CT images from clinical patients are included. Different techniques of treatment planning are considered, including 1-field AP, 2-field AP+PA, 4-field box, 7-field IMRT, and RapidArc. RapidArc is a recent technique of volumetric modulated arc therapy and is used in our study of contrast media in clinical scenarios. The effect of RapidArc on dosimetry and biological consequence for administration of contrast media in radiotherapy is not discussed previously in literature. It is shown that dose difference is reduced as the number of external beams is increased, suggesting RapidArc may be favored to be used in the treatment planning enhanced by contrast media. Linear trend lines are fitted for assessment of percent dose differences in the planning target volume versus concentrations of contrast media between plans where contrast media are present and absent, respectively

  6. Psyttalia ponerophaga (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) as a potential biological control agent of olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, K R; Daane, K M; Kirk, A; Andrews, J W; Johnson, M W; Messing, R H

    2007-06-01

    The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), is a newly invasive, significant threat to California's olive industry. As part of a classical biological control programme, Psyttalia ponerophaga (Silvestri) was imported to California from Pakistan and evaluated in quarantine. Biological parameters that would improve rearing and field-release protocols and permit comparisons to other olive fruit fly biological control agents were measured. Potential barriers to the successful establishment of P. ponerophaga, including the geographic origins of parasitoid and pest populations and constraints imposed by fruit size, were also evaluated as part of this investigation. Under insectary conditions, all larval stages except neonates were acceptable hosts. Provided a choice of host ages, the parasitoids' host-searching and oviposition preferences were a positive function of host age, with most offspring reared from hosts attacked as third instars. Immature developmental time was a negative function of tested temperatures, ranging from 25.5 to 12.4 days at 22 and 30 degrees C, respectively. Evaluation of adult longevity, at constant temperatures ranging from 15 to 34 degrees C, showed that P. ponerophaga had a broad tolerance of temperature, living from 3 to 34 days at 34 and 15 degrees C, respectively. Lifetime fecundity was 18.7 +/- 2.8 adult offspring per female, with most eggs deposited within 12 days after adult eclosion. Olive size affected parasitoid performance, with lower parasitism levels on hosts feeding in larger olives. The implications of these findings are discussed with respect to field manipulation and selection of parasitoid species for olive fruit fly biological control in California and worldwide. PMID:17524155

  7. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  8. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelas, Mark A.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Viswanath, Dabir; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 125I-erythropoietin as a potential radiopharmaceutical agent for tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein hormone responsible for regulating erythropoiesis. Expression of EPO and EPO receptors (EPOr) has recently been demonstrated in some neoplastic cell lines and tumours, suggesting a potential new target for therapy. In this work, EPO was labeled with iodine-125 using the lactoperoxidase method, known to prevent damage to protein during radioiodination, and labeling conditions were optimized. In vitro stability studies have shown that 125I-EPO is radiochemically stable for 20 days after radiolabeling. In vitro cell binding studies have demonstrated very low binding (125I-EPO. In mice with induced melanoma, only a residual fixation in the tumour was evident. Further studies are warranted on other tumoral cell lines to better understand the binding process and internalization into cells. Studies on EPO labeled with carbon-11 could be valuable, since there is a greater chance of preserving the biological activity of the protein using this method. (author)

  10. comparative efficiency of certain biological and chemical agents as radioprotectors against radiation. Vo. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of mice haemopoietic tissue after whole body gamma irradiation of (5 Gy), to alkoxy glycerol or colostrum treatment pre and post irradiation, was investigated. Blood cells, iron and Hb contents, bone marrow, and spleen cellularity, serum ferritin T3, T4 cortisol, and testosterone were estimated. Recovery of most blood cells, thyroid hormone and as cortisol levels, were observed in alkoxy glycerol post irradiated group. A protective effect of colostrum was more clearly detected than its therapeutic response. 3 tabs

  11. Open-target sparse sensing of biological agents using DNA microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaer Haley B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current biosensors are designed to target and react to specific nucleic acid sequences or structural epitopes. These 'target-specific' platforms require creation of new physical capture reagents when new organisms are targeted. An 'open-target' approach to DNA microarray biosensing is proposed and substantiated using laboratory generated data. The microarray consisted of 12,900 25 bp oligonucleotide capture probes derived from a statistical model trained on randomly selected genomic segments of pathogenic prokaryotic organisms. Open-target detection of organisms was accomplished using a reference library of hybridization patterns for three test organisms whose DNA sequences were not included in the design of the microarray probes. Results A multivariate mathematical model based on the partial least squares regression (PLSR was developed to detect the presence of three test organisms in mixed samples. When all 12,900 probes were used, the model correctly detected the signature of three test organisms in all mixed samples (mean(R2 = 0.76, CI = 0.95, with a 6% false positive rate. A sampling algorithm was then developed to sparsely sample the probe space for a minimal number of probes required to capture the hybridization imprints of the test organisms. The PLSR detection model was capable of correctly identifying the presence of the three test organisms in all mixed samples using only 47 probes (mean(R2 = 0.77, CI = 0.95 with nearly 100% specificity. Conclusions We conceived an 'open-target' approach to biosensing, and hypothesized that a relatively small, non-specifically designed, DNA microarray is capable of identifying the presence of multiple organisms in mixed samples. Coupled with a mathematical model applied to laboratory generated data, and sparse sampling of capture probes, the prototype microarray platform was able to capture the signature of each organism in all mixed samples with high sensitivity and specificity

  12. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Artemisinin-Indoloquinoline Hybrids as Potent Antiproliferative Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of artemisinin-indoloquinoline hybrids were designed and synthesized in an attempt to develop potent and selective anti-tumor agents. Compounds 7a–7f, 8 and 9 were prepared and characterized. Their antiproliferative activities against MV4-11, HCT-116, A549, and BALB/3T3 cell lines in vitro were tested. Nearly all of the tested compounds (7–9, except for compounds 7d and 7e against HCT-116 showed an increased antitumor activity against HCT-116 and A549 cell lines when compared to the dihydroartemisinin control. Especially for the artemisinin-indoloquinoline hybrid 8, with an 11-aminopropylamino-10H-indolo[3,2-b]quinoline substituent, the antiproliferative activity against the A549 cell line had improved more than ten times. The IC50 value of hybrid 8 against A549 cell lines was decreased to 1.328 ± 0.586 μM, while dihydroartemisin showed IC50 value of >20 µM in the same cell line. Thus, these results have proven that the strategy of introducing a planar basic fused aromatic moiety, such as the indoloquinoline skeleton, could improve the antiproliferative activity and selectivity towards cancer cell lines.

  13. Preparation and preliminary biological evaluation of 99Tcm-TADP as bone imaging agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xiaohong; LUO Shineng; NIU Guosai; YE Wanzhong; YANG Min; WANG Hongyong; XIA Yongmei

    2008-01-01

    TADP, 2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid, was synthesized by three step reactions from the raw material 1H-1,2,4-triazole. 99Tcm-TADP was prepared with 5 mg TADP at Ph 7.0 by joining 99TcmO4 with SnCl2·2H2O in aqueous solution for 10 min at room temperature. Both labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99Tcm-TADP were more than 95%. The biodistribution in rats and bone scan in rabbits were also studied. The uptake of organ was expressed as %ID/g. The results showed that the bone uptake is up to 17.17%ID/g which is the maximum of bone uptake at 30 min after injection of 99Tcm-TADP in rats, bone-to-muscle and bone-to-blood uptake ratios were 61.32 and 13.21, respectively. The clear bone image of rabbit was obtained at 120 min after injection of 99Tcm-TADP and clearance in soft tissue was visible. The preparation of 99Tcm-TADP was convenient and 99Tcm-TADP exhibited high uptake in bone, and it would be a potential new bone imaging agent.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new naphthalene substituted thiosemicarbazone derivatives as potent antifungal and anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altıntop, Mehlika Dilek; Atlı, Özlem; Ilgın, Sinem; Demirel, Rasime; Özdemir, Ahmet; Kaplancıklı, Zafer Asım

    2016-01-27

    New thiosemicarbazone derivatives (1-10) were obtained via the reaction of 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)thiosemicarbazide with fluoro-substituted aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal effects against pathogenic yeasts and molds using broth microdilution assay. Ames and umuC assays were carried out to determine the genotoxicity of the most effective antifungal derivatives. Furthermore, all compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic effects on A549 human lung adenocarcinoma and NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines using XTT test. Among these derivatives, 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1-(2,3-difluorobenzylidene)thiosemicarbazide (1) and 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1-(2,5-difluorobenzylidene)thiosemicarbazide (3) can be identified as the most promising antifungal derivatives due to their notable inhibitory effects on Candida species and no cytotoxicity against NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line. According to Ames and umuC assays, compounds 1 and 3 were classified as non-mutagenic compounds. On the other hand, 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1-(2,4-difluorobenzylidene)thiosemicarbazide (2) can be considered as the most promising anticancer agent against A549 cell line owing to its notable inhibitory effect on A549 cells with an IC50 value of 31.25 μg/mL when compared with cisplatin (IC50 = 16.28 μg/mL) and no cytotoxicity against NIH/3T3 cells. PMID:26706351

  15. Radioiodination and biological evaluation of Cladribine as potential agent for tumor imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayoumi, Noha Anwer; Amin, Abeer M.; El-Kolaly, Mohamed T. [Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Hot Lab Center; Ismail, Nasser S.M.; Abouzid, Khaled A.M. [Ain-Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Pharmaceutical Chemistry Dept.

    2015-07-01

    Cladribine, a purine analogue antimetabolite, was radioiodinated with {sup 125}I via direct electrophilic substitution reaction. The maximum radiochemical yield (92.5 ± 0.8%) was obtained when the reaction was done at ambient temperature for 30 min using 100 μg of Cladribine and 10 μg N-chlorosuccinamide (NCS) in 150 μL of 0.2 M phosphate buffer, pH 7. In vitro stability studies of HPLC purified {sup 125}I-Cladribine sample dissolved in 0.5 ml of 0.2 M phosphate buffer pH 7 at ambient temperature showed that {sup 125}I-Cladribine is stable up to 12 h post labeling. Biodistribution results revealed excretion of {sup 125}I-Cladribine mainly by kidneys. The uptake of {sup 125}I-Cladribine in the induced Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma was 2.8 ± 0.4%ID/g at 1 h post injection with maximum tumor/muscle ratio of 5.5. The good uptake of {sup 125}I-Cladribine confirms the molecular docking studies results which indicate that iodinated Cladribine binds with polymerase enzyme with a good-CDOCKER energy. As a result, radioiodinated Cladribine may be used as a valuable agent for tumor diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Use of the Crohn's disease activity index in clinical trials of biological agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) has been commonly used to assess the effects of treatment with different agents in Crohn's disease (CD). However, these studies may be compromised, if the results compared to a placebo or standard therapy group (in the absence of a placebo) substantially differ from the expected response. In addition, significant concerns have been raised regarding the reliability and validity of the CDAI. Reproducibility of the CDAI may be limited as significant inter-observer error has been recorded, even if measurements are done by experienced clinicians with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of CD. Finally, many CDAI endpoints are open to subjective interpretation and have the potential for manipulation. This is worrisome as there is the potential for significant financial gain, if the results of a clinical trial appear to provide a positive result. Physicians caring for patients should be concerned about the positive results in clinical trials that are sponsored by industry, even if the trials involve respected centers and the results appear in highly ranked medical journals.

  17. Removal of the antiviral agent oseltamivir and its biological activity by oxidative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestankova, Hana; Schirmer, Kristin; Escher, Beate I; von Gunten, Urs; Canonica, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    The antiviral agent oseltamivir acid (OA, the active metabolite of Tamiflu(®)) may occur at high concentrations in wastewater during pandemic influenza events. To eliminate OA and its antiviral activity from wastewater, ozonation and advanced oxidation processes were investigated. For circumneutral pH, kinetic measurements yielded second-order rate constants of 1.7 ± 0.1 × 10(5) and 4.7 ± 0.2 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of OA with ozone and hydroxyl radical, respectively. During the degradation of OA by both oxidants, the antiviral activity of the treated aqueous solutions was measured by inhibition of neuraminidase activity of two different viral strains. A transient, moderate (two-fold) increase in antiviral activity was observed in solutions treated up to a level of 50% OA transformation, while for higher degrees of transformation the activity corresponded to that caused exclusively by OA. OA was efficiently removed by ozonation in a wastewater treatment plant effluent, suggesting that ozonation can be applied to remove OA from wastewater. PMID:22230064

  18. Removal of the antiviral agent oseltamivir and its biological activity by oxidative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antiviral agent oseltamivir acid (OA, the active metabolite of Tamiflu®) may occur at high concentrations in wastewater during pandemic influenza events. To eliminate OA and its antiviral activity from wastewater, ozonation and advanced oxidation processes were investigated. For circumneutral pH, kinetic measurements yielded second-order rate constants of 1.7 ± 0.1 × 105 and 4.7 ± 0.2 × 109 M−1 s−1 for the reaction of OA with ozone and hydroxyl radical, respectively. During the degradation of OA by both oxidants, the antiviral activity of the treated aqueous solutions was measured by inhibition of neuraminidase activity of two different viral strains. A transient, moderate (two-fold) increase in antiviral activity was observed in solutions treated up to a level of 50% OA transformation, while for higher degrees of transformation the activity corresponded to that caused exclusively by OA. OA was efficiently removed by ozonation in a wastewater treatment plant effluent, suggesting that ozonation can be applied to remove OA from wastewater. - Highlights: ► Oseltamivir acid (OA) is oxidized by ozone and hydroxyl radical. ► Kinetics: We determined rate constants for the reaction with these oxidants. ► The specific activity of OA as neuraminidase inhibitor disappeared during oxidation. ► Ozonation and advanced oxidation can effectively remove OA from wastewaters. - Ozone and hydroxyl radical treatment processes can degrade aqueous oseltamivir acid and remove its antiviral activity.

  19. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) [A. Schuetze et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26, 1685 (1998)] is a nonthermal, high pressure, uniform glow plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O), which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz rf. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains neutral metastable species (e.g., O2*, He*) and radicals (e.g., O, OH). This reactive effluent has been shown to be an effective neutralizer of surrogates for anthrax spores and mustard blister agent. Unlike conventional wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion and it does not destroy wiring, electronics, or most plastics, making it highly suitable for decontamination of sensitive equipment and interior spaces. Furthermore, the reactive species in the effluent rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful by-products. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  20. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Liguzinediol Mono- and Dual Ester Prodrugs as Promising Inotropic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The potent positive inotropic effect, together with the relatively low safety risk of liguzinediol (LZDO, relative to currently available inotropic drugs, has prompted us to intensively research and develop LZDO as a potent positive inotropic agent. In this study, to obtain LZDO alternatives for oral chronic administration, a series of long-chain fatty carboxylic mono- and dual-esters of LZDO were synthesized, and preliminarily evaluated for physicochemical properties and bioconversion. Enhanced lipophilic properties and decreased solubility of the prodrugs were observed as the side chain length increased. All esters showed conspicuous chemical stability in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4. Moreover, the enzymatic hydrolysis of esters in human plasma and human liver microsomes confirmed that the majority of esters were converted to LZDO, with release profiles that varied due to the size and structure of the side chain. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies following oral administration of monopivaloyl (M5, monodecyl (M10 and monododecyl (M12 esters demonstrated the evidently extended half-lives relative to LZDO dosed alone. In particular the monopivaloyl ester M5 exhibited an optimal pharmacokinetic profile with appropriate physiochemical characteristics.

  1. Radioiodination and biological evaluation of Cladribine as potential agent for tumor imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cladribine, a purine analogue antimetabolite, was radioiodinated with 125I via direct electrophilic substitution reaction. The maximum radiochemical yield (92.5 ± 0.8%) was obtained when the reaction was done at ambient temperature for 30 min using 100 μg of Cladribine and 10 μg N-chlorosuccinamide (NCS) in 150 μL of 0.2 M phosphate buffer, pH 7. In vitro stability studies of HPLC purified 125I-Cladribine sample dissolved in 0.5 ml of 0.2 M phosphate buffer pH 7 at ambient temperature showed that 125I-Cladribine is stable up to 12 h post labeling. Biodistribution results revealed excretion of 125I-Cladribine mainly by kidneys. The uptake of 125I-Cladribine in the induced Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma was 2.8 ± 0.4%ID/g at 1 h post injection with maximum tumor/muscle ratio of 5.5. The good uptake of 125I-Cladribine confirms the molecular docking studies results which indicate that iodinated Cladribine binds with polymerase enzyme with a good-CDOCKER energy. As a result, radioiodinated Cladribine may be used as a valuable agent for tumor diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  3. Mobile Agent Based Hierarchical Intrusion Detection System in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surraya Khanum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Security mechanism is a fundamental requirement of wireless networks in general and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN in particular. Therefore, it is necessary that this security concern must be articulate right from the beginning of the network design and deployment. WSN needs strong security mechanism as it is usually deployed in a critical, hostile and sensitive environment where human labour is usually not involved. However, due to inbuilt resource and computing restriction, security in WSN needs a special consideration. Traditional security techniques such as encryption, VPN, authentication and firewalls cannot be directly applied to WSN as it provides defence only against external threats. The existing literature shows that there seems an inverse relationship between strong security mechanism and efficient network resource utilization. In this research article, we have proposed a Mobile Agent Based Hierarchical Intrusion Detection System (MABHIDS for WSN. The Proposed scheme performs two levels of intrusion detection by utilizing minimum possible network resources. Our proposed idea enhance network lifetime by reducing the work load on Cluster Head (CH and it also provide enhanced level of security in WSN.

  4. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC.

  5. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T C; Lee, Nancy Y; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  6. Preparation of 99mTc-cefoperazone complex, a novel agent for detecting sites of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompt localization of infection sites is essential for initiating appropriate therapeutic measures. There have been major advances in the management of patients suffering from infective and/or inflammatory disorders as a result of introduction of newer drugs with high sensitivity and specificity. Since the last decade, 99mTc-ciprofloxacin was used as a biologically active radiopharmaceutical to diagnose inflammation but it has some problems related to radiochemical purity and stability. The aim of this study is to develop simple and easy formulation of cefoperazone (other broad spectrum antimicrobial agent) with 99mTc a ready to use labeling kit for infection imaging. The optimum condition that gives high labeling yield of 99mTc-cefoperazone complex, 97.9%, was achieved by using 3 mg cefoperazone, 100 μg Sn(II), at pH 8 and 10-minute reaction time. For in vivo binding of 99mTc-cefoperazone pharmacokinetic studies were carried in experimentally induced infection, in the left thigh, using Staphylococcus aureus in rats. Both thighs of the rats were dissected and counted and the ratio of bacterial infected thigh/contralateral thigh was then evaluated. The time for maximum accumulation of 99mTc-cefoperazone at the site of infection (T/NT = 4.5) was 45-minute post intravenous injection, followed by gradual decline. So, 99mTc-cefoperazone complex is simple and stable preparation for infection imaging after 45-minute post injection. (author)

  7. Detection of heavy metals in biological samples through anodic stripping voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Buzea, Vlad; Florescu, Monica; Badea, Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    The toxicological aspects due to the presence of heavy metals in biological samples impose to have accurate and rapid methods for their detection. This paper is aimed to review approaches to anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) determination of several heavy metals (lead, cadmium, copper, mercury, zinc) in biological matrices (blood, urine, saliva, tissue sample). Analytical performances (LOD, data linearity range, sensitivity) of the reviewed methods were presented for several electrochemical ...

  8. ADVANCES OF BASIC MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES: POTENTIAL TO APPLY IN PLANT VIROID DETECTION IN SRI LANKA

    OpenAIRE

    Yapa M.A.M. Wijerathna

    2012-01-01

    Viroids are the smallest pathogens of plants. They are the cause of serious diseases on economic plants worldwide. Prevention and detection of the pathogens are the best method to reduce the economic loss from viroid infection. During last decade, genetics and molecular biology techniques have gained an increasing presence in plant pathology research. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most upgrade molecular biology techniques that have been used and studied recently. Most relevan...

  9. Detecting modules in biological networks by edge weight clustering and entropy significance

    OpenAIRE

    Lecca, Paola; Re, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the modular structure of biological networks is of interest to researchers adopting a systems perspective for the analysis of omics data. Computational systems biology has provided a rich array of methods for network clustering. To date, the majority of approaches address this task through a network node classification based on topological or external quantifiable properties of network nodes. Conversely, numerical properties of network edges are underused, even though the informa...

  10. A Software Framework For the Detection and Classification of Biological Targets in Bio-Nano Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Hafeez, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Detection and identification of important biological targets, such as DNA, proteins, and diseased human cells are crucial for early diagnosis and prognosis. The key to discriminate healthy cells from the diseased cells is the biophysical properties that differ radically. Micro and nanosystems, such as solid-state micropores and nanopores can measure and translate these properties of biological targets into electrical spikes to decode useful insights. Nonetheless, such approaches result in siz...

  11. Biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis treatment%类风湿关节炎的生物制剂治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈龙; 袁国华

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disabling diease, seriously affecting the patients' quality of life. Traditional drugs treatment for rheumatoid arthritis include nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and disease modifying antirheumatic drugs,however,these drugs are often not satisfied to control the condition of refractory rheumatoid arthritis,and resulting in severe joint damage. Recently , the emergence of multiple biological agents brought hope to the treatment of refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients These agents play an important role in the control of rheumatic conditions and the improvement of quality of life in PtA patients.%类风湿关节炎(rheumatoid arthritis,RA)是一种常见的致残性疾病,严重影响患者的生活质量.传统的RA药物治疗主要包括非甾体抗炎药、糖皮质激素以及慢作用药物,然而这些药物常常不能满意控制那些难治性RA患者的病情,最终导致关节进行性破坏.近年,由于多种生物制剂的出现,为治疗难治性RA带来了希望,这些生物制剂在控制风湿病情和改善生活质量方面发挥了重要作用.

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some polymethoxylated fused pyridine ring systems as antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostom, Sherif A F; Hassan, Ghada S; El-Subbagh, Hussein I

    2009-10-01

    A series of 3,5-bis(arylidene)-4-piperidones like chalcone analogues carrying variety of methoxylated aryl groups, pyrazolo[4,3-c]pyridines, pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidines, and pyrido[3,2-c]pyridines, carrying an arylidene moiety, and some pyrano[3,2-c]pyridines, like flavone and coumarin isosteres, were synthesized and screened for their in-vitro antitumor activity at the National Cancer Institute (NCI, USA). The tested compounds 7, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 17, and 19 exhibited a broad spectrum of antitumor activity. Compounds belonging to the pyrazolo[4,3-c]pyridine series proved to be more active than those of the pyrido[3,2-c]pyridine and pyrano[3,2-c]pyridine analogues, in which the monomethoxylated derivatives showed better antitumor activity when compared with their corresponding dimethoxylated congeners. Compound 7 is considered to be the most active member identified in this study with a broad spectrum of activity against 22 different tumor cell lines belonging to the nine subpanels employed, and a particular effectiveness against the breast cancer T-47D cell line (GI 54.7%). The pyrano[3,2-c]pyridine heterocyclic system 19 proved to be the most active antitumor agent among the six-membered fused pyridines, with variable activity against 18 different tumor cell lines, and special activity against the non-small cell lung cancer Hop-92 and ovarian cancer OVCAR-4 cell lines (GI values 63.9 and 48.5%, respectively). PMID:19714673

  13. A new bone imaging agent, 99Tcm-BIPrDP, its preparation and biological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of 99Tcm-1-hydroxy-3-(2-butyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl) propane-1, 1-diphosphonic acid (BIPrDP) as a new bone imaging agent. Methods: BIPrDP was synthesized by three steps from the raw material 2-butyl-1H-imidazole. 99Tcm-BIPrDP were prepared with mixed BIPrDP (50 mg/ml, 100 μl) and freshly eluted Na99TcmO4 (37.0 MBq) in the presence of the reducing agent SnCl2 (1 rng/ml, 100 μl) at boiling temperature for 30 min. The labeling yield and stability of 99Tcm-BIPrDP were measured with TLC. Partition coefficient in octanol-water and plasma protein binding ratio to human heparin anticoagulation plasma of 99Tcm-BIPrDP was checked. ICR mice were sacrificed at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min after tail vein injection of 0.2 ml (7.4 MBq) freshly prepared 99Tcm-BIPrDP.Samples of blood, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, bone, muscle, gonad, intestine, stomach and brain were taken, weighed and the gamma counts measured. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled compound in different organs was calculated and expressed as % ID/g. Bone-to-organ uptake ratios were calculated by the % ID/g values. The kinetics of blood clearance was calculated. Bone imaging was performed in New Zealand rabbit after intravenous injection of 99Tcm-BIPrDP. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze the % ID/g at different times points. Results: Radiolabeling yield of 99Tcm-BIPrDP was more than 95% and the labeled complex was stable at least up to 6 h in vitro. The octanol-water partition coefficients (log P) for 99Tcm-BIPrDP were-2.396 ± 0.035 and-2.242 ± 0.025 at pH values of 7.0 and 7.4, respectively. The plasma protein binding rate of 99Tcm-BIPrDP was (47.07 ± 0.05)%. The bone uptake of 99Tcm-BIPrDP in mice reached a maximum of 19.20 % ID/g at 30 min after injection, and this high level of uptake persisted 4 h later at 18.98 % ID/g. Kidney uptake was highest among all the non-target organs,but decreased from 24.50 % ID/g at 5 min to 5.22 % ID/g at 4 h

  14. The paper irradiation for the control of decay produced by biological agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of books and documents by insects and mould is a source of deterioration for the materials and a health risk for the library and archive staff and for the readers. The use of gamma radiation for decontamination is not widely used due to the damage it might cause to the paper and to some misconceptions concerning radiation technology that prevail among conservators. This paper reports the effects a dose of 15 KGy had on some properties of two kinds of paper in use in the library, one common paper for photocopies, printing and writing (Executive Ledesma) and the other a free of acid paper (Permalife) used in conservation and document restoration. The tenacity (MPa), tensile energy absorption (N/mm) and percent deformation were measured. No significant differences were found between irradiated and control samples of both kinds of paper. Light microscopy after the treatment with a reactive for the detection of lignin showed no differences after irradiation of the papers. No changes in the structure of the cellulosic fibres were detected by scanning electron microscopy after the irradiation treatment. Further studies have been undertaken regarding the ageing of the irradiated paper in relation to the non-irradiated controls. (author)

  15. Chemical composition and biological evaluation of Physalis peruviana root as hepato-renal protective agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gengaihi, Souad E; Hassan, Emad E; Hamed, Manal A; Zahran, Hanan G; Mohammed, Mona A

    2013-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential of Physalis peruviana root as a functional food with hepato-renal protective effects against fibrosis. The chemical composition of the plant root suggested the presence of alkaloids, withanolides and flavonoids. Five compounds were isolated and their structures elucidated by different spectral analysis techniques. One compound was isolated from the roots: cuscohygrine. The biological evaluation was conducted on different animal groups; control rats, control treated with ethanolic root extract, CCl(4) group, CCl(4) treated with root extract, and CCl(4) treated with silymarin as a standard herbal drug. The evaluation used the oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and nitric oxide (NO). The liver function indices; aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST & ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), bilirubin, and total hepatic protein were also estimated. Kidney disorder biomarkers; creatinine, urea, and serum protein were also evaluated. The results suggested safe administration, and improvement of all the investigated parameters. The liver and kidney histopathological analysis confirmed the results. In conclusion, P. peruviana succeeded in protecting the liver and kidney against fibrosis. Further studies are needed to discern their pharmacological applications and clinical uses. PMID:23419022

  16. Display technology on filamentous phage in the search for anti-infective biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Santiago Vispo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The causes of antibiotic resistance are complex. The phage display technology has been used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs and peptides directed against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Today, this technology is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits the phage display technology to discover new drugs against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies. Methods: Basic and recent literature review was made, mainly focused on general aspects of phage display technology and the application in the search of new peptides or antibodies of pharmaceutical use to combat the infectious diseases transmitted by bacteria and virus. Results: Updated information on the selected topics is shown, with a guiding and practical approach aimed at researchers in the field of molecular biology to continue deepening the technology with special emphasis in the applications that have been developed in Cuba. Conclusions: Advances in methods of screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies show that phage display technology can significantly contribute in the fight against clinically important pathogens.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel conjugates of camptothecin and 5-Flurouracil as cytotoxic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liu, E-mail: yqliu@lzu.edu.c [Lanzhou Jiaotong University (China). Environmental and Municipal Engineering School; Chun-Yan Zhaob; Ying-Qian Liu [Lanzhou University (China). School of Pharmacy

    2011-07-01

    A series of novel conjugates of camptothecin and 5-fluorouracil were first synthesized and their cytotoxic activities against two human tumor cell lines (SGC-7901 and A-549) as well as in vitro pharmacokinetic determination of lactone stability were studied. Among these compounds, most tested conjugates showed comparable or superior cytotoxic activities to 2, but less potent compared with 1. Particularly, conjugates 10b and 10d were highly active against A-549 with IC{sub 50} values of 0.45 and 0.38 {mu}mol L{sup -1}, respectively. Also, the in vitro pharmacokinetic determination of lactone levels of representative compound 10b showed that the biological life span of their lactone forms in human and mouse plasma significantly increased compared with their mother compound 1. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method was then applied for developing linear models to predict the cytotoxic activities of these derivatives that have not yet been synthesized or experimentally tested. In addition, molecular docking was used to clarify the binding mode of these derivatives to human DNA topoisomerase I. The important hydrogen-bonding interactions were observed between these derivatives and their receptor. The results from molecular modeling and QSAR study can guide the design of novel conjugates with higher antitumor activity. (author)

  18. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharmacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCT agents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron

  19. The effect of biological and chemical control agents on the health status of the very early potato cultivar Rosara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cwalina-Ambroziak Bożena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The external appearance and quality of table potatoes are determined, among other factors, by the health status of the plants during the growing season. Chemical control methods are often combined with biocontrol agents to effectively fight potato pathogens. Potatoes of the very early cultivar Rosara were grown in experimental plots. The plots were located in Tomaszkowo (NE Poland, 2007-2009. The experiment involved the following treatments: 1 biological control − mycorrhizal Glomus spp. inoculum was applied to the roots, − tubers were dressed and plants were sprayed with Polyversum three times during the growing season, 2 chemical control - at two-week intervals, plants were sprayed with the following fungicides: Infinito 687.5 SC and Tanos 50 WG, Valbon 72 WG and Tanos 50 WG. In the control treatment, potato plants were not protected against pathogens. During the growing season, the severity of late blight and early blight was evaluated on a nine-point scale. The composition of fungal communities colonising potato stems was analysed. The fungistatic properties of the fungicides used in the field experiment were evaluated in an in vitro test. The symptoms of infections caused by Phytophthora infestans and Alternaria spp. were significantly reduced in the treatment which used the integrated chemical and biological control. The least diverse fungal community was isolated from fungicide-treated plants. In the in vitro test, fungicides at all analysed concentrations inhibited the linear mycelial growth of selected pathogens.

  20. P-solubilizing Fungi as Biological Control Agents to Increase Growth and Prevent Moler Disease on Red Onion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiwiyono

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aim to obtain phosphate-solubilizing fungi have antagonistic ability to Fusarium oxysporum f. cepae, and increase soil available-P. The experiment was hold in April 2013 to February 2014. Antagonistic capability was observed in two stages i.e. in vitro test which was conducted in the Laboratory of Soil Biology and Biotechnology, while in vivo test in green house, Faculty of Agriculture, Sebelas Maret University Surakarta. The experimental design used was completely randomized design (CRD. The treatment factors of in vitro test were kinds of phosphate solubilizing fungi and incubation time with Pikovkaya liquid medium, while the treatment factor of in vivo test was isolates combination of phosphate solubilizing fungi. Each treatment combination was repilcate three times. The observated variable included soil available phosphate, shallot height, shoot dry weight, moler disease intensity, infection rate, and area under the disease progress curve. The research obtained 3 isolates of fungi with high potential as inoculums of P-solubilizing biofertilizer and biological control agents against moler desease of red onion. The resullt showed that mix of JK12 isolate (isolated from Entisol of Bantul District and isolate of JK14 (from Andisol of Tawangmangu sub district demonstrated the highest ability in solubilizing phosphate and suppressing moler disease of red onion.

  1. Studies on the use ofEchinostoma revolutum larvae as an agent for biological control of Fasciola gigantica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwitri Endah Estuningsih

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Echinostoma revolutum larvae as an agent for biological control of Fasciola gigantica has been studied in the laboratory of Parasitology, Balitvet. Infection of Lymnaea rubiginosa with Echinostoma revolutum increased the growth and mortality rates of the snails and completely suppressed their egg production . These effects were attributed to a destruction of gonads and other organs of the snails by echinostome rediae, production of which commenced during the second week after the infection. From laboratory studies with L. rubiginosa, there was an evidence of strong antagonism between larvae of E. revolutum and larvae of F. gigantica. Concurrent infection of L. rubiginosa with miracidia of F. gigantica and E. Revolutum resulted in that all snails were infected with E. revolutum only, when they were dissected 30 days later. In contrast, 94% of the snails which were exposed to miracidia of F. gigantica only, were infected with larvae of this species after 30 days . When L. rubiginosa were infected with F. gigantica 20 days previously were exposed to infection with E. revolutum and examined 30 days later, it was found that 77% of the snails had a single infection with E. revolutum, 16 % were infected with F. Gigantica only, and the remaining 7% had common infection. It was concluded that the dominant antagonism of E. revolutum over F. gigantica in L. rubiginosa and the reduction of fecundity and longevity ofsnails infected with E. revolutum could be useful for biological control of F. gigantica.

  2. ADVANCES OF BASIC MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES: POTENTIAL TO APPLY IN PLANT VIROID DETECTION IN SRI LANKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yapa M.A.M. Wijerathna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Viroids are the smallest pathogens of plants. They are the cause of serious diseases on economic plants worldwide. Prevention and detection of the pathogens are the best method to reduce the economic loss from viroid infection. During last decade, genetics and molecular biology techniques have gained an increasing presence in plant pathology research. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most upgrade molecular biology techniques that have been used and studied recently. Most relevant published reports and hand skilled techniques have presented here with emphasis on suitable Viroid detection technique should be used for Sri Lanka.

  3. Calcium phytate: A promising lung perfusion agent without risk of biological contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Lung ventilation and perfusion imaging has evolved over the years and its routine use has become widespread, where more than 70% of pulmonary thromboembolism can be diagnosed through the ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy. This non-invasive diagnostic tool offers information on the lung functional vascular bed. Historically the human Albumin macroaggregates and/or microspheres have been the selection radiopharmaceuticals to carry out the lung perfusion studies, where different formulations for diagnostic kits have been developed. However, due to the potential danger that represents the use of haemoderivates in the transmission of viral illnesses, specifically the Hepatitis C and the VIH, our country suspended at the beginning of the last decade the import of these kits. As a result of this decision we tried to obtain a reagent kit based on non-derived blood particles that were big enough to be caught by pulmonary capillaries and to allow its use in the lung perfusion imaging. For this purpose was used phytate, because of the Inositol hexaphosphoric acid (phytic acid) forms complex with numerous cations, many of which show a markedly lower solubility to that of the sodium phytate in biological systems, being the chosen cation Ca2+. The experiments were carried out starting from a complete factorial design of the type 22, where the employed variables were: Ca2+ concentration varied ranging from 5 to 15 mg of Ca2+ for a Ca2+:Phytate molar ratio of 4.6:1 and 13.8:1, respectively. Addition order of reagents, pre-supposing that this last influenced in the size of the particles: Variant 1: Ca-Tc/Phytate; Variant 2: Tc-Phytate/Ca. (author)

  4. Potential of Pest and Host Phenological Data in the Attribution of Regional Forest Disturbance Detection Maps According to Causal Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph; Hargrove, William; Norman Steve; Christie, William

    2014-01-01

    Near real time forest disturbance detection maps from MODIS NDVI phenology data have been produced since 2010 for the conterminous U.S., as part of the on-line ForWarn national forest threat early warning system. The latter has been used by the forest health community to identify and track many regional forest disturbances caused by multiple biotic and abiotic damage agents. Attribution of causal agents for detected disturbances has been a goal since project initiation in 2006. Combined with detailed cover type maps, geospatial pest phenology data offer a potential means for narrowing the candidate causal agents responsible for a given biotic disturbance. U.S. Aerial Detection Surveys (ADS) employ such phenology data. Historic ADS products provide general locational data on recent insect-induced forest type specific disturbances that may help in determining candidate causal agents for MODIS-based disturbance maps, especially when combined with other historic geospatial disturbance data (e.g., wildfire burn scars and drought maps). Historic ADS disturbance detection polygons can show severe and extensive regional forest disturbances, though they also can show polygons with sparsely scattered or infrequent disturbances. Examples will be discussed that use various historic disturbance data to help determine potential causes of MODIS-detected regional forest disturbance anomalies.

  5. New developments in the treatment of osteoarthritis – focus on biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrero JI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jose Ignacio Torrero,1 Carlos Martínez2 1BioTrauma Centre, Escaldes, Principality of Andorra; 2University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most common diseases around the world. Medical, social, and financial consequences oblige clinicians, surgeons, and researchers to focus on finding the best treatment option, to eradicate and stop this degenerative joint disease, in order to avoid surgical options which in many instances are over-indicated. Noninvasive treatments, such as anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, orthotic devices, dietary supplements, have demonstrated lack of effectiveness. The possibility to perform intra-articular injections with hyaluronic acid, corticosteroids, or the newest but criticized treatment based on platelet-rich plasma (PRP has changed the management of OA disease. The use of PRP has led to many differences in treatment since there is a lack of consensus about protocols, indications, number of doses, cost-effectiveness, and duration of the treatment. Many publications have suggested efficacy in tendon injuries, but when PRP has been indicated to treat cartilage injuries, things are more inconsistent. Some authors have reported their experience treating OA with PRP, and it seems that, if well indicated, it is an option as a supplementary therapy. Therefore, we need to understand that OA is a mechanical disease which not only produces changes in radiographs, but also affects the quality of life. Pathogenesis of OA has been well explained, providing us new knowledge and future possibilities to improve the clinical approach. From basic science to surgery, there is a great field we all need to contribute to, because the general population is aging and total joint replacements should not be the only solution for OA. So herein is an actual review of the developments for treating OA with biologics, intended to be useful for the population inside

  6. Gold nanoparticle wire and integrated wire array for electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. Diao; Qing Cao

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle wire and integrated nanoparticle wire array have been prepared through a green technique: discontinuous vertical evaporation-driven colloidal deposition. The conducting gold nanoparticle wire made by this technique shows ability for the sensitive electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules due to its high surface to volume ratio. Furthermore, we also demonstrate a potential usage of integrated gold nanoparticle wire array for the localized detection.

  7. Gold nanoparticle wire and integrated wire array for electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Diao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle wire and integrated nanoparticle wire array have been prepared through a green technique: discontinuous vertical evaporation-driven colloidal deposition. The conducting gold nanoparticle wire made by this technique shows ability for the sensitive electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules due to its high surface to volume ratio. Furthermore, we also demonstrate a potential usage of integrated gold nanoparticle wire array for the localized detection.

  8. Biological monitors of DNA damage by radiations and other environmental agents. Progress report, May 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monolayers of purified spores of repair-defective mutant strains of Bacillus subtilis were used in studies on lethal and mutagenic effects of radiation. Dose-survival and mutation frequency data were obtained with several wave-lengths of uv radiation. Mutation frequencies were higher for spores than for vegetative cells and the use of sporulation and colony morphology markers amplified the detection of mutations. Irradiation by several wavelengths of uv light of B. subtilis bacteriophages and transforming DNA was investigated with repair--defective mutants as hosts. The relative resistance of free DNA to the lethal effects of 300 nm irradiation suggests the formation of unique lesions, such as DNA-protein cross-links in the irradiated phages. Photodynamic inactivation of phages was studied with the result that lesions produced by proflavine and methylene blue were unrepaired in excision repair strains. By contrast, photodynamic inactivation by riboflavin was of the same order of magnitude in excision-repair and wild type strains. A radioimmunoassay was developed for identification of thymine dimers in uv-irradiated B. subtiles DNA. (U.S.)

  9. Remote Detection of Biological Particles and Chemical Plumes Using UV Fluorescence Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiee, J. J.; Hof, D. E.; Karl, R. R.; Martinez, R. J.; Quick, C. R.; Cooper, D. I.; Eichinger, W. E.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    A lidar system based on ultraviolet (UV) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was developed for the remote detection of atmospherically dispersed biological particles and chemical vapors. This UV fluorescence lidar has many potential applications for monitoring environmental pollution, industrial waste emission, agricultural insect control, illicit chemical processing, and military defense operations. The general goal of this work is to investigate the research issues associated with the long range detection and identification of chemicals, e.g. aromatic solvents and chemical precursors, and biological materials, e.g. bacillus thuringiensis (BT) and bacillus globiggi (BG). In the detection of biological particulates, we are particularly interested in extending the detection range of an existing solar-blind 248-nm lidar system. We are investigating the use of longer excitation laser wavelengths (i.e. lambda greater than 280-nm to have more favorable atmospheric light transmission characteristics) for improving detection range to better than 10 km. In the detection of chemical plumes, our main research objectives are to determine how accurately and sensitively a chemical plume can be located at range, and how well spectrally the chemical species can be measured to allow their identification.

  10. Evaluation of automated COBAS AMPLICOR PCR system for detection of several infectious agents and its impact on laboratory management.

    OpenAIRE

    Jungkind, D; Direnzo, S; Beavis, K G; Silverman, N S

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the COBAS AMPLICOR (CA) PCR system (Roche Diagnostic Systems) designed for automated PCR amplification and detection of nucleic acids from infectious agents in clinical samples. The Roche AMPLICOR microwell plate (MWP) PCR was the reference method. CA amplifies target nucleic acid, captures the biotinylated amplification products by using magnetic particles coated with specific oligonucleotide probes, and detects the bound products colorimetrically. For Mycobacterium tuberculosis...

  11. Ultra-rapid real-time PCR for the detection of Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Do-Bu; Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Eul-Hwan; Yoon, Byoung-Su

    2008-09-01

    A novel micro-PCR-based detection method, termed ultra-rapid real-time PCR, was applied to the development of a rapid detection for Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae) which is the causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB). This method was designed to detect the 16S rRNA gene of P. larvae with a micro-scale chip-based real-time PCR system, GenSpector TMC-1000, which has uncommonly fast heating and cooling rates (10 degrees C per second) and small reaction volume (6microl). In the application of ultra-rapid real-time PCR detection to an AFB-infected larva, the minimum detection time was 7 min and 54s total reaction time (30 cycles), including the melting temperature analysis. To the best of our knowledge, this novel detection method is one of the most rapid real-time PCR-based detection tools. PMID:18571197

  12. Software algorithms for false alarm reduction in LWIR hyperspectral chemical agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakis, D.; Model, J.; Rossacci, M.; Zhang, D.; Ontiveros, E.; Pieper, M.; Seeley, J.; Weitz, D.

    2008-04-01

    The long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperpectral sensing modality is one that is often used for the problem of detection and identification of chemical warfare agents (CWA) which apply to both military and civilian situations. The inherent nature and complexity of background clutter dictates a need for sophisticated and robust statistical models which are then used in the design of optimum signal processing algorithms that then provide the best exploitation of hyperspectral data to ultimately make decisions on the absence or presence of potentially harmful CWAs. This paper describes the basic elements of an automated signal processing pipeline developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. In addition to describing this signal processing architecture in detail, we briefly describe the key signal models that form the foundation of these algorithms as well as some spatial processing techniques used for false alarm mitigation. Finally, we apply this processing pipeline to real data measured by the Telops FIRST hyperspectral (FIRST) sensor to demonstrate its practical utility for the user community.

  13. 77 FR 22282 - Draft Guidelines on Biologics Quality Monitoring: Testing for the Detection of Mycoplasma...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Draft Guidelines on Biologics Quality Monitoring: Testing for the Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... master seed/cell testing in veterinary vaccines regulated by the Animal and Plant Health...

  14. Improved detection and biopsy of solid liver lesions using pulse-inversion ultrasound scanning and contrast agent infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldbye, B.; Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Struckmann, J.;

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of pulse-inversion ultrasound (US) scanning (PIUS), combined with an IV contrast agent, to detect malignant liver lesions and its impact on patient management (resectability). Additionally, to determine the feasibility of US-guided biopsy of new...

  15. New testosterone derivatives as semi-synthetic anticancer agents against prostate cancer: synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nathalie; Bruneau, Julie; Fortin, Sebastien; Brasseur, Kevin; Leblanc, Valerie; Asselin, Eric; Berube, Gervais

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a major health issue in the world. Treatments of localized PC are quite efficient and usually involve surgery, radiotherapy and/or hormonal therapy. Metastatic PC is however rarely curable to this day. Treatments of metastatic PC involve radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment such as orchiectomy, antiandrogens and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists. The suppression of tumor growth by hormonal treatment is efficient but overtime resistance still occurs and the disease progresses. Thus, more urgently than ever there is a need for discovery of new treatment options for castration-resistant PC (CRPC). Hence, we designed and tested a series of amide derivatives located at position 7α of testosterone as prospective "natural" or "semisynthetic" anticancer agents against CRPC with the goal of discovering therapeutic alternatives for the disease. This manuscript describes an efficient path towards the target molecules that are made in only 6 or 7 chemical steps from testosterone in good overall yields. This strategy can be used to make several compounds of interest that present higher biological activity than the classic antiandrogen; cyproterone acetate (3). The best testosterone-7α-amide was the N-2-pyridylethylamide (25) which was as active as the antiandrogen cyproterone acetate (3) on androgen-dependent LNCaP cells and 2.7 times more active on androgen-independent PC3 prostate cancer cells. The results obtained show the synthetic feasibility and the potential for future development of this unique class of semi-synthetic anticancer agents that offer the premise of new treatment modalities for patients afflicted with CRPC. PMID:25675439

  16. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel benzimidazole-2-substituted phenyl or pyridine propyl ketene derivatives as antitumour agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin-tao; Jiang, Zhi; Shen, Jia-jia; Yi, Hong; Zhan, Yue-chen; Sha, Ming-quan; Wang, Zhen; Xue, Si-tu; Li, Zhuo-rong

    2016-05-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole-2-subsituted phenyl or pyridine propyl ketene derivatives were designed and synthesized. The biological activities of these derivatives were then evaluated as potential antitumour agents. These compounds were assayed for growth-inhibitory activity against HCT116, MCF-7 and HepG2 cell lines in vitro. The IC50 values of compounds A1 and A7 against the cancer cells were 0.06-3.64 μM and 0.04-9.80 μM, respectively. Their antiproliferative activities were significantly better than that of 5-Fluorouracil (IC50: 56.96-174.50 μM) and were close to that of Paclitaxel (IC50: 0.026-1.53 μM). The activity of these derivatives was over 100 times more effective than other reported structures of chalcone analogues (licochalcone A). A preliminary mechanistic study suggested that these compounds inhibit p53-MDM2 binding. Compounds A1, A7 and A9 effectively inhibited tumour growth in BALB/c mice with colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. The group administered 200 mg/kg of compound A7 showed a 74.6% tumour growth inhibition with no signs of toxicity at high doses that was similar to the inhibition achieved with the 12.5 mg/kg irinotecan positive control (70.2%). Therefore, this class of benzimidazole-2-subsituted phenyl or pyridine propyl ketene derivatives represents a promising lead structure for the development of possible p53-MDM2 inhibitors as new antitumour agents. PMID:27017265

  17. Patients' and rheumatologists' preferences for the attributes of biological agents used in the treatment of rheumatic diseases in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolla JM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Joan M Nolla,1 Manuel Rodríguez,2 Emilio Martin-Mola,3 Enrique Raya,4 Isabel Ibero,5 Gonzalo Nocea,6 Belén Aragon,6 Luis Lizán,7 Miriam Prades7 1Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain; 2Department of Rheumatology, Complejo Hospitalario de Ourense, Ourense, Spain; 3Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain; 4Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, Spain; 5Hospital General de Elda, Alicante, Spain; 6Outcomes Research, MSD, Madrid, Spain; 7Outcomes’10, Castellón, Spain Purpose: To define importance values assigned to attributes of biological agents (BAs by Spanish patients with rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis and rheumatologists.Patients and methods: This was an observational, cross-sectional design based upon a rank-based full-profile conjoint analysis. A literature review and four focus groups were undertaken to identify attributes and levels. An orthogonal matrix, combining the selected levels of attributes, was used to define scenarios. Participants ranked eight scenarios from 1 (most preferred to 8 (least preferred. The relative importance (RI of attributes was calculated. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify the characteristics that influenced the values of RI. A total of 488 patients (male 50.9%, mean age 50.6 [standard deviation {SD} 12.06] years, rheumatoid arthritis 33.8%, ankylosing spondylitis 32.4%, psoriatic arthritis 33.8%; mean time since diagnosis 12.6 [SD 8.2] years and 136 rheumatologists (male 50.4%, mean age 46.4 [SD 9.1] years, mean time of practice 16.7 [SD 8.8] years participated.Results: The ideal BAs for patients and physicians, respectively, should allow pain relief and improvement of functional capacity (RI 39% and 44.7%, with low risk of adverse events (RI 24.9% and 30.5%, a long time prior to perceiving the need for a new dose

  18. A Wide-Field NV Diamond Magnetic Imager for Highly Parallel Detection of Rare Biological Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, David; Lee, Kyungheon; Lee, Hakho; Walsworth, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a wide-field magnetic imaging device based on Nitrogen Vacancy centers in diamond, optimized for the detection of rare, immunomagnetically labeled biological targets such as circulating tumor cells. The new imager allows simultaneous magnetic imaging over a ~ 1 mm2 field of view, approximately two orders of magnitude larger than previous implementations. We describe experiments to detect cancer cells tagged with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, including validation studies for a cell detection assay and technical considerations associated magnetic imaging over very wide fields of view.

  19. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 mi...

  20. Influence of Temperature, Humidity, and Plant Terpenoid Profiles on Life History Characteristics of Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), a Biological Control Agent of the Invasive Tree Melaleuca quinquenervia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the introduced weed biological control agent Boreioglycaspis melaleucae Moore is widely established among stands of its host Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) Blake (Myrtaceae) in south Florida, it’s population densities decline markedly during summer months. We investigated the hypothesis tha...

  1. Natural enemies of balloon vine, Cardiospermum grandiflorum Swartz (Sapindaceae), in Argentina and their potential use as biological control agents in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exploratory field surveys of the natural enemies associated with balloon vine, Cardiospermum grandiflorum (Sapindaceae), an environmental weed in South Africa, Australia and other countries, were conducted in northern Argentina from 2005 to 2009, to search for suitable biological control agents. The...

  2. Assessment of Proton Microbeam Analysis of 11B for Quantitative Microdistribution Analysis of Boronated Neutron Capture Agent Analogs in Biological Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose is to assess the 11B(p, α) 8Be* nuclear reaction for quantitatively mapping the in-vivo sub-cellular distribution of boron within gliosarcoma tumors treated with boronated neutron capture therapy agent (NCTA) analogs. Intracranial tumors were produced in Fisher 344 rats using a 9L gliosarcoma model. Fourteen days later, the majority of rats were treated with f-boronophenylalanine and sacrificed 30 or 180 minutes after intravenous injection. Freeze dried tumor cryosections were imaged using the 11B(p, α) 8Be* nuclear reaction and proton microbeams obtained from the nuclear microprobe at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. With 11B(p, α) 8Be* analysis, 11B distributions within cells can be quantitatively imaged with spatial resolutions down to 1.5 μm, minimum detection limits of 0.8 mg/kg and acquisition times of several hours. These capabilities offer advantages over alpha track autoradiography, electron energy loss spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for 11B quantitation in tissues. However, the spatial resolution, multi-isotope capability and analysis times achieved with SIMS are superior to those achieved with 11B(p, α) 8Be* analysis. When accuracy in quantitation is crucial, the 11B(p, α) 8Be* reaction is well suited for assessing the microdistribution of 11B. Otherwise, SIMS may well be better suited to image the microdistribution of boron associated with NCTAs in biological tissues.

  3. A cloud point extraction for spectrophotometric determination of ultra- trace antimony without chelating agent in environmental and biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a simple, sensitive and reliable method for the cloud point extraction of antimony (Sb) and its subsequent spectrophotometric detection. It is based on the color reaction of Sb (III) with iodide in acidic medium and subsequent micelle-mediated extraction of tetraiodoantimonate using a non-ionic surfactant in the absence of any chelating agent. The effects of reaction and extraction parameters were optimized. The calibration plot is linear in the range of 0.80-95 ng mL-1 of antimony in the sample solution, with a regression coefficient (r) of 0.9994 (for n=9). The detection limit (at SNR=3) is 0.23 ng mL-1, and the relative standard deviations at 10 and 70 ng mL-1 of antimony are 3.32 and 1.85 % (at n=8), respectively. The method compared favorably to other methods and was applied to determine antimony in seawater, anti-leishmania drug (glucantime), and human serum. (author)

  4. Caffeine-based gold(I) N-heterocyclic carbenes as possible anticancer agents: synthesis and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Benoît; Stefan, Loic; Pirrotta, Marc; Monchaud, David; Bodio, Ewen; Richard, Philippe; Le Gendre, Pierre; Warmerdam, Elena; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M; Picquet, Michel; Casini, Angela

    2014-02-17

    A new series of gold(I) N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes based on xanthine ligands have been synthesized and characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR, and X-ray diffraction. The compounds have been tested for their antiproliferative properties in human cancer cells and nontumorigenic cells in vitro, as well as for their toxicity in healthy tissues ex vivo. The bis-carbene complex [Au(caffein-2-ylidene)2][BF4] (complex 4) appeared to be selective for human ovarian cancer cell lines and poorly toxic in healthy organs. To gain preliminary insights into their actual mechanism of action, two biologically relevant in cellulo targets were studied, namely, DNA (more precisely a higher-order DNA structure termed G-quadruplex DNA that plays key roles in oncogenetic regulation) and a pivotal enzyme of the DNA damage response (DDR) machinery (poly-(adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), strongly involved in the cancer resistance mechanism). Our results indicate that complex 4 acts as an efficient and selective G-quadruplex ligand while being a modest PARP-1 inhibitor (i.e., poor DDR impairing agent) and thus provide preliminary insights into the molecular mechanism that underlies its antiproliferative behavior. PMID:24499428

  5. Duddingtonia flagrans, Monacrosporium thaumasium and Pochonia chlamydosporia as possible biological control agents of Oxyuris equi and Austroxyuris finlaysoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, F R; Araújo, J V; Silva, A R; Araujo, J M; Carvalho, R O; Campos, A K; Tavela, A O; Ferreira, S R; Frassy, L N; Alves, C D F

    2010-03-01

    The action of four fungal isolates of the species Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001), Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34a) and Pochonia chlamydosporia (VC1 and VC4) on eggs of Oxyuris equi and Austroxyuris finlaysoni was evaluated in two assays (A and B). Eggs of O. equi (Test A) and A. finlaysoni (Test B) were plated on Petri dishes with 2% water-agar with grown fungal isolates and control without fungus. After 5, 10 and 15 days, 100 eggs were collected and classified according to the following parameters: type 1 effect, physiological and biochemical effect without morphological damage to the eggshell; type 2 effect, lytic effect with morphological alteration of the eggshell and embryo; and type 3 effect, lytic effect with morphological alteration of the eggshell and embryo, hyphal penetration and internal egg colonization. Pochonia chlamydosporia isolates VC1 and VC4 showed ovicidal activity for type 1, 2 and 3 effects on eggs of O. equi and eggs of A. finlaysoni. In vitro assays A and B showed that P. chlamydosporia had a negative influence on eggs of O. equi and A. finlaysoni and can be considered as a potential biological control agent of nematodes. PMID:19570314

  6. Biology and host preferences of Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a possible biocontrol agent for Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Elisabeth; Johnson, M Tracy; Chacón, Eduardo; Anderson, Robert S; Wheeler, Terry A

    2010-12-01

    The introduced plant Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) poses a grave threat to Hawaii's native ecosystems and biodiversity. One potential candidate for classical biological control is Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae), a stem-boring weevil from Central and South America. This weevil feeds on M. calvescens in its native Costa Rica and has been successfully reared under greenhouse conditions. Comparison of its environmental conditions in Costa Rica with those in the Miconia infested areas of Hawaii indicates the latter is a suitable habitat for C. melastomae. C. melastomae has one or two generations per year. Adults feed on new stems, petioles, leaf buds, veins, and lamina, whereas larvae mine the stem until pupation. Adults appear to prefer saplings for oviposition and feeding. Under greenhouse conditions both adults and larvae can seriously damage and kill small M. calvescens. Preliminary host testing indicates that C. melastomae may be family specific on Melastomataceae. However, because Hawaii lacks native melastomes and has many other serious melastome weeds, a family specific insect may be suitable as a biocontrol agent in this case. PMID:22182550

  7. Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, and biological activities of new carnosine derivatives stable in human serum as potential neuroprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinaria, Massimo; Rolando, Barbara; Giorgis, Marta; Montanaro, Gabriele; Guglielmo, Stefano; Buonsanti, M Federica; Carabelli, Valentina; Gavello, Daniela; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2011-01-27

    The synthesis and the physicochemical and biological characterization of a series of carnosine amides bearing on the amido group alkyl substituents endowed with different lipophilicity are described. All synthesized products display carnosine-like properties differentiating from the lead for their high serum stability. They are able to complex Cu(2+) ions at physiological pH with the same stoichiometry as carnosine. The newly synthesized compounds display highly significant copper ion sequestering ability and are capable of protecting LDL from oxidation catalyzed by Cu(2+) ions, the most active compounds being the most hydrophilic ones. All the synthesized amides show quite potent carnosine-like HNE quenching activity; in particular, 7d, the member of the series selected for this kind of study, is able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to protect primary mouse hippocampal neurons against HNE-induced death. These products can be considered metabolically stable analogues of carnosine and are worthy of additional investigation as potential neuroprotective agents. PMID:21182325

  8. Efficacy of genetically engineered biological agents in the treatment of uveitis associated with rheumatic diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Neroyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of incorporating genetically engineered biological agents (GEBAs into a combination treatment regimen for rheumatic diseases (RD (juvenile idiopathic arthritis, Behcet's disease in relation to associated uveitis of varying severity was studied in 92 children aged 2 to 17 years. The follow-up lasted 1.5 to 49 months. Twenty-three patients took consecutively 2 to 5 GEBAs. When infliximab was used, remission of uveitis occurred in 21% of 38 children and the disease activity and/or recurrence rates reduced in an additional 21%. These were in 45 and 38.6% of 44 patients on adalimumab (ADA and in 27.8 and 27.8% of 18 patients on abatacept, respectively. There was an association of the efficiency of therapy with the severity of uveitis at the start of treatment. The use of ADA induced a steady remission of panuveitis resistant to therapy with glucocorticoids and cyclosporine in both patients with Behcet's disease. One of 4 rituximab-treated patients achieved a steady remission. Tocilizumab therapy caused an exacerbation of uveitis in 1 patient. The postoperative period showed no inflammatory complications in most cases (37 operations, 26 eyes, 20 patients. No local adverse reactions were seen; systemic reactions occurred in 14% of the patients, this caused GEBAs to be discontinued in 7%. There is evidence for a need for further investigations into the efficacy of GEBAs in RD-associated uveitis in children in order to define success criteria, differentiated indications, and therapy regimens.

  9. Biology and host range of Tecmessa elegans (Lepidoptera:Notodontidae) a leaf-feeding moth evaluated as a potential biological control agent for Schinus terebinthifolius (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    During surveys for natural enemies that could potentially be used as classical biological control agents of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Brazilian pepper) which is invasive in the USA, the caterpillar, Tecmessa elegans Schaus (Lepidoptera: Notodontidae), was recorded feeding on the leaves of the ...

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of silver nanoparticles in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huiyuan; Xing, Baoshan; Hamlet, Leigh C; Chica, Andrea; He, Lili

    2016-06-01

    Growing concerns over the potential release and threat of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to environmental and biological systems urge researchers to investigate their fate and behavior. However, current analytical techniques cannot meet the requirements for rapidly, sensitively and reliably probing AgNPs in complex matrices. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has shown great capability for rapid detection of AgNPs based on an indicator molecule that can bind on the AgNP surface. The objective of this study was to exploit SERS to detect AgNPs in environmental and biological samples through optimizing the Raman indicator for SERS. Seven indicator molecules were selected and determined to obtain their SERS signals at optimal concentrations. Among them, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE), crystal violet and ferric dimethyl-dithiocarbamate (ferbam) produced the highest SERS intensities. Further experiments on binding competition between each two of the three candidates showed that ferbam had the highest AgNPs-binding ability. The underlying mechanism lies in the strong binding affinity of ferbam with AgNPs via multiple sulfur atoms. We further validated ferbam to be an effective indicator for SERS detection of as low as 0.1mg/L AgNPs in genuine surface water and 0.57 mg/L in spinach juice. Moreover, limited interference on SERS detection of AgNPs was found from environmentally relevant inorganic ions, organic matter, inorganic particles, as well as biologically relevant components, demonstrating the ferbam-assisted SERS is an effective and sensitive method to detect AgNPs in complex environmental and biological samples. PMID:26956173

  11. Biological evaluation of an ornithine-modified 99mTc-labeled RGD peptide as an angiogenesis imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Radiolabeled RGD peptides that specifically target integrin ανβ3 have great potential in early tumor detection through noninvasive monitoring of tumor angiogenesis. Based on previous findings of our group on radiopeptides containing positively charged aminoacids, we developed a new cyclic cRGDfK derivative, c(RGDfK)-(Orn)3-CGG. This new peptide availing the polar linker (Orn)3 and the 99mTc-chelating moiety CGG (Cys-Gly-Gly) is appropriately designed for 99mTc-labeling, as well as consequent conjugation onto nanoparticles. Methods: A tumor imaging agent, c(RGDfK)-(Orn)3-[CGG-99mTc], is evaluated with regard to its radiochemical, radiobiological and imaging characteristics. Results: The complex c(RGDfK)-(Orn)3-[CGG-99mTc] was obtained in high radiochemical yield (> 98%) and was stable in vitro and ex vivo. It presented identical to the respective, fully analytically characterized 185/187Re complex retention time in RP-HPLC. In contrary to other RGD derivatives, we showed that the new radiopeptide exhibits kidney uptake and urine excretion due to the ornithine linker. High tumor uptake (3.87 ± 0.48% ID/g at 60 min p.i.) was observed and was maintained relatively high even at 24 h p.i. (1.83 ± 0.05 % ID/g), thus providing well-defined scintigraphic imaging. Accumulation in other organs was negligible. Blocking experiments indicated target specificity for integrin receptors in U87MG glioblastoma cells. Conclusion: Due to its relatively high tumor uptake, renal elimination and negligible abdominal localization, the new 99mTc-RGD peptide is considered promising in the field of imaging ανβ3-positive tumors. However, the preparation of multifunctional SPECT/MRI contrast agents (RGD-conjugated nanoparticles) for dual modality imaging of integrin expressing tumors should be further investigated

  12. Infection Agents Detected with Wound Culture in Patients with Diabetic Foot who will Undergo Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkan Mert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We aimed to obtain the knowledge of appropriate antibiotic therapy and to make a contribution to improving treatment efficacy by conducting a microbiological study of diabetic foot ulcers. METHOD: 30 patients (18 male and 12 female with diabetic foot ulcer applying to our center for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO treatment in 2010 were enrolled in this study. The wounds were graded according to Meggitt-Wagner classification system. Wound cultures were obtained before starting antibiotic therapy and HBO treatment. Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson, USA and Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion antibiotic sensitivity testing were used in order to detect the antimicrobial susceptibility of the infection agents. The number of HBO sessions, glycemic control and treatment results were assessed. RESULTS: Mean age of the patients was 61.3 years (range: 35-83. 24 patients had a good glycemic control and 6 patients had not. The patients were given 5 to 55 HBO sessions (mean: 20. Of the 30 patients 19 (63.33% recovered from the infection but 11 (36.67% have not responded to the treatment. 14 different infectious agents were detected in diabetic foot ulcers we examined. Gram-positive agents were isolated in 12 (40% out of 30 wound cultures and gram-negative agents were isolated in 18 (60% wound culture. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was predominantly isolated and the other agents isolated were enterococcus faecalis, klebsiella pneumoniae, staphylococcus aureus and escherichia coli. CONCLUSION: The outcomes can not represent the general population rates due to the restriction factors. They give only an idea about the probability of infectious agent spectrum in diabetic foot ulcers and their antibiotic susceptibility. We want to attract attention to the fact that although pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are mostly encountered in hospital, they can also be acquired from the community and it will be useful to develop appropriate antibiotic policies and treatment protocols. [TAF

  13. Detecting regime shifts in marine systems with limited biological data: An example from southeast Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzow, Michael A.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Frusher, Stewart D.; Dann, Peter; Tuck, Geoffrey N.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to detect ecological regime shifts in a data-limited setting was investigated, using southeast Australian ecosystems as a model. Community variability was summarized for 1968-2008 with the first two principal components (PCs) of recruitment estimates for six fish stocks and reproductive parameters for four seabird species; regional climate was summarized for 1953-2008 with the first two PCs for three parameters (sea surface temperature [SST], sea surface salinity, surface nitrate) measured at two stations; and basin-scale climate variability was summarized for 1950-2012 with mean South Pacific SST and the first two PCs of detrended South Pacific SST. The first two biology PCs explained 45% of total community variability. The first two PCs of basin-scale SST showed abrupt shifts similar to "regime" behavior observed in other ocean basins, and the first PC of basin-scale SST showed significant covariation with the first PC of regional climate. Together, these results are consistent with the strong community variability and decadal-scale red noise climatic variability associated with Northern Hemisphere regime shifts. However, statistical model selection showed that the first two PCs of regional climate and the first PC of biology time series all exhibited linear change, rather than abrupt shifts. This result is consistent with previous studies documenting rapid linear change in the climate and biology of southeast Australian shelf ecosystems, and we conclude that there is no evidence for regime shift behavior in the region's ecology. However, analysis of a large set of previously-published biological time series from the North Pacific (n = 64) suggests that studies using fewer than ∼30 biological time series, such as this one, may be unable to detect regime shifts. Thus we conclude that the nature of ecological variability in the region cannot be determined with available data. The development of additional long-term biological observations is needed

  14. Sensitive, Rapid, Quantitative and in Vitro Method for the Detection of Biologically Active Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Type E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula; Hernlem, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial cause of clinical infections and foodborne illnesses through its production of a group of enterotoxins (SEs) which cause gastroenteritis and also function as superantigens to massively activate T cells. In the present study, we tested Staphylococcal enterotoxin type E (SEE), which was detected in 17 of the 38 suspected staphylococcal food poisoning incidents in a British study and was the causative agent in outbreaks in France, UK and USA. The current method for detection of enterotoxin activity is an in vivo monkey or kitten bioassay; however, this expensive procedure has low sensitivity and poor reproducibility, requires many animals, is impractical to test on a large number of samples, and raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. The purpose of this study is to develop rapid sensitive and quantitative bioassays for detection of active SEE. We apply a genetically engineered T cell-line expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells response element (NFAT-RE), combined with a Raji B-cell line that presents the SEE-MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class II to the engineered T cell line. Exposure of the above mixed culture to SEE induces differential expression of the luciferase gene and bioluminescence is read out in a dose dependent manner over a 6-log range. The limit of detection of biologically active SEE is 1 fg/mL which is 10⁸ times more sensitive than the monkey and kitten bioassay. PMID:27187474

  15. Automated and miniaturized detection of biological threats with a centrifugal microfluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D.; van Oordt, T.; Strohmeier, O.; Roth, G.; Drexler, J.; Eberhard, M.; Niedrig, M.; Patel, P.; Zgaga-Griesz, A.; Bessler, W.; Weidmann, M.; Hufert, F.; Zengerle, R.; von Stetten, F.

    2012-06-01

    The world's growing mobility, mass tourism, and the threat of terrorism increase the risk of the fast spread of infectious microorganisms and toxins. Today's procedures for pathogen detection involve complex stationary devices, and are often too time consuming for a rapid and effective response. Therefore a robust and mobile diagnostic system is required. We present a microstructured LabDisk which performs complex biochemical analyses together with a mobile centrifugal microfluidic device which processes the LabDisk. This portable system will allow fully automated and rapid detection of biological threats at the point-of-need.

  16. Preparation of chitosan grafted graphite composite for sensitive detection of dopamine in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Thangavelu, Kokulnathan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Gnanaprakasam, P; Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2016-10-20

    The accurate detection of dopamine (DA) levels in biological samples such as human serum and urine are essential indicators in medical diagnostics. In this work, we describe the preparation of chitosan (CS) biopolymer grafted graphite (GR) composite for the sensitive and lower potential detection of DA in its sub micromolar levels. The composite modified electrode has been used for the detection of DA in biological samples such as human serum and urine. The GR-CS composite modified electrode shows an enhanced oxidation peak current response and low oxidation potential for the detection of DA than that of electrodes modified with bare, GR and CS discretely. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated GR-CS composite modified electrode shows the DPV response of DA in the linear response ranging from 0.03 to 20.06μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the sensor were estimated as 0.0045μM and 6.06μA μM(-1)cm(-2), respectively. PMID:27474582

  17. Detection methods predict differences in biology and survival in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to measure the biological characteristics involved in tumorigenesis and the progression of breast cancer in symptomatic and screen-detected carcinomas to identify possible differences. For this purpose, we evaluated clinical-pathological parameters and proliferative and apoptotic activities in a series of 130 symptomatic and 161 screen-detected tumors. After adjustment for the smaller size of the screen-detected carcinomas compared with symptomatic cancers, those detected in the screening program presented longer disease-free survival (RR = 0.43, CI = 0.19-0.96) and had high estrogen and progesterone receptor concentrations more often than did symptomatic cancers (OR = 3.38, CI = 1.72-6.63 and OR = 3.44, CI = 1.94-6.10, respectively). Furthermore, the expression of bcl-2, a marker of good prognosis in breast cancer, was higher and HER2/neu expression was lower in screen-detected cancers than in symptomatic cancers (OR = 1.77, CI = 1.01-3.23 and OR = 0.64, CI = 0.40-0.98, respectively). However, when comparing prevalent vs incident screen-detected carcinomas, prevalent tumors were larger (OR = 2.84, CI = 1.05-7.69), were less likely to be HER2/neu positive (OR = 0.22, CI = 0.08-0.61) and presented lower Ki67 expression (OR = 0.36, CI = 0.17-0.77). In addition, incident tumors presented a shorter survival time than did prevalent ones (RR = 4.88, CI = 1.12-21.19). Incident carcinomas include a variety of screen-detected carcinomas that exhibit differences in biology and prognosis relative to prevalent carcinomas. The detection method is important and should be taken into account when making therapy decisions

  18. Automated mitosis detection using texture, SIFT features and HMAX biologically inspired approach

    OpenAIRE

    Humayun Irshad; Sepehr Jalali; Ludovic Roux; Daniel Racoceanu; Lim Joo Hwee; Gilles Le Naour; Frédérique Capron

    2013-01-01

    Context: According to Nottingham grading system, mitosis count in breast cancer histopathology is one of three components required for cancer grading and prognosis. Manual counting of mitosis is tedious and subject to considerable inter- and intra-reader variations. Aims: The aim is to investigate the various texture features and Hierarchical Model and X (HMAX) biologically inspired approach for mitosis detection using machine-learning techniques. Materials and Methods: We propose an approach...

  19. Carbon Nanomaterials Based Electrochemical Sensors/Biosensors for the Sensitive Detection of Pharmaceutical and Biological Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Bal-Ram Adhikari; Maduraiveeran Govindhan; Aicheng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors and biosensors have attracted considerable attention for the sensitive detection of a variety of biological and pharmaceutical compounds. Since the discovery of carbon-based nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, C60 and graphene, they have garnered tremendous interest for their potential in the design of high-performance electrochemical sensor platforms due to their exceptional thermal, mechanical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Carbon nanomaterial-based el...

  20. Analytical detection and biological assay of antileukemic drug using gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    V. Selvaraj; Alagar, M.; Hamerton, I

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are reported and evaluated as probes for the detection of anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU). The nature of binding between 5FU and gold nanoparticles via complexation is investigated using ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry, cyclic voltammetry, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The bound antileukemic drug is fluorescent and the quenching property of gold nanoparticles could be exploited for biological in...

  1. Can a biologically-plausible hierarchy effectively replace face detection, alignment, and recognition pipelines?

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Qianli; Leibo, Joel Z.; Mroueh, Youssef; Poggio, Tomaso

    2013-01-01

    The standard approach to unconstrained face recognition in natural photographs is via a detection, alignment, recognition pipeline. While that approach has achieved impressive results, there are several reasons to be dissatisfied with it, among them is its lack of biological plausibility. A recent theory of invariant recognition by feedforward hierarchical networks, like HMAX, other convolutional networks, or possibly the ventral stream, implies an alternative approach to unconstrained face r...

  2. Detecting modules in biological networks by edge weight clustering and entropy significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecca, Paola; Re, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the modular structure of biological networks is of interest to researchers adopting a systems perspective for the analysis of omics data. Computational systems biology has provided a rich array of methods for network clustering. To date, the majority of approaches address this task through a network node classification based on topological or external quantifiable properties of network nodes. Conversely, numerical properties of network edges are underused, even though the information content which can be associated with network edges has augmented due to steady advances in molecular biology technology over the last decade. Properly accounting for network edges in the development of clustering approaches can become crucial to improve quantitative interpretation of omics data, finally resulting in more biologically plausible models. In this study, we present a novel technique for network module detection, named WG-Cluster (Weighted Graph CLUSTERing). WG-Cluster's notable features, compared to current approaches, lie in: (1) the simultaneous exploitation of network node and edge weights to improve the biological interpretability of the connected components detected, (2) the assessment of their statistical significance, and (3) the identification of emerging topological properties in the detected connected components. WG-Cluster utilizes three major steps: (i) an unsupervised version of k-means edge-based algorithm detects sub-graphs with similar edge weights, (ii) a fast-greedy algorithm detects connected components which are then scored and selected according to the statistical significance of their scores, and (iii) an analysis of the convolution between sub-graph mean edge weight and connected component score provides a summarizing view of the connected components. WG-Cluster can be applied to directed and undirected networks of different types of interacting entities and scales up to large omics data sets. Here, we show that WG-Cluster can be

  3. Similar effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and biologic agents on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: meta-analysis of 70 randomized placebo-controlled or drug-controlled studies, including 112 comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Jürgens, Gesche

    2010-01-01

    To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents.......To define the differences in effects on joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients between therapy with single and combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, and biologic agents....

  4. Biological evaluation of a technetium-99m-labeled integrated tropane-BAT and its piperidine congener as potential dopamine transporter imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, Davy M. [Laboratory of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Leuven, UZ Gasthuisberg, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Vanbilloen, Hubert P. [Radiopharmacy, UZ Gasthuisberg, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Cleynhens, Bernard J. [Radiopharmacy, UZ Gasthuisberg, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Terwinghe, Christelle Y. [Radiopharmacy, UZ Gasthuisberg, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Mortelmans, Luc [Nuclear Medicine, UZ Gasthuisberg, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Bormans, Guy M. [Laboratory of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Leuven, UZ Gasthuisberg, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Verbruggen, Alfons M. [Laboratory of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Leuven, UZ Gasthuisberg, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium)]. E-mail: alfons.verbruggen@uz.kuleuven.ac.be

    2006-01-15

    Introduction: Recently, we have reported modification of {sup 99m}Tc-TRODAT-1 by integrating the N2S2 metal chelating unit and the tropane skeleton. Results of a preliminary biodistribution study in rats were promising with respect to brain uptake. The present report deals with the further biological characterization of the {sup 99m}Tc-labelled integrated TRODAT derivatives ({sup 99m}Tc-TropaBAT and {sup 99m}Tc-norchloro-TropaBAT) and with the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel {sup 99m}Tc-labelled piperidine-based derivative ({sup 99m}Tc-PipBAT). Methods: Biodistribution of all radiolabelled complexes was studied in normal mice. A more detailed ex vivo intracerebral distribution study of the two {sup 99m}Tc-TropaBAT complexes was additionally performed in normal rats. Autoradiography of brain sections of normal mice (with or without pretreatment with FP-{beta}-CIT or haloperidol) and rats was performed. Affinity for the dopamine transporter (DAT) was also assessed in vitro in the presence or absence of cocaine. Results: Both {sup 99m}Tc-TropaBAT complexes show a slightly higher brain uptake than {sup 99m}Tc-TRODAT-1, but the striatum/cerebellum activity ratio is less favourable. Nevertheless, significant striatal uptake was detected after ex vivo autoradiography, but this uptake was also observed after pretreatment with FP-{beta}-CIT. Unexpectedly, no striatal uptake was detected after in vitro incubation of mouse brain sections with the tracer agents. For {sup 99m}Tc-PipBAT, neither brain uptake nor in vitro striatal uptake was found. Conclusion: Both {sup 99m}Tc-TropaBAT complexes exhibit similar diffusion into brain as {sup 99m}Tc-TRODAT-1, and ex vivo autoradiography shows significant striatal uptake. However, the inferior striatum/cerebellum activity ratio, the striatal uptake in mice pretreated with FP-{beta}-CIT or haloperidol, and the lack of striatal uptake during in vitro incubation prove that the DAT is not targeted. Brain uptake disappears

  5. Comparing the biological coherence of network clusters identified by different detection algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction networks serve to carry out basic molecular activity in the cell. Detecting the modular structures from the protein-protein interaction network is important for understanding the organization, function and dynamics of a biological system. In order to identify functional neighborhoods based on network topology, many network cluster identification algorithms have been developed. However, each algorithm might dissect a network from a different aspect and may provide different insight on the network partition. In order to objectively evaluate the performance of four commonly used cluster detection algorithms: molecular complex detection (MCODE), NetworkBlast, shortest-distance clustering (SDC) and Girvan-Newman (G-N) algorithm, we compared the biological coherence of the network clusters found by these algorithms through a uniform evaluation framework. Each algorithm was utilized to find network clusters in two different protein-protein interaction networks with various parameters. Comparison of the resulting network clusters indicates that clusters found by MCODE and SDC are of higher biological coherence than those by NetworkBlast and G-N algorithm.

  6. Possible reasons for the inefficacy of genetically engineered biological agents in rheumatoid arthritis and ways of its prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vladimirovna Chichasova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically engineered biological agents (GEBAs have held a firm place in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Patients are selected for this treatment in accordance with international and Russian guidelines. The question as to whether GEBAs should be added to therapy with disease-modifying anti-inflammatory drugs (DMAIDs is raised after there is an inadequate response to therapy with two DMAIDs, one of which should be methotrexate. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors as a first-line drug are indicated only in high RA activity. There are few predictors of the efficacy of GEBAs. It is noted that in accordance with the principles of the Treatment to Target program, RA is treated under control of monthly estimated scores in patients with high/moderate disease activity; if there is no remission (with low disease activity being an alternative aim after three months it is decided whether to correct therapy. In routine practice, when the effect of GEBAs, which is observed in many patients in the first week of treatment, appears, physicians often begin to discontinue symptomatic drugs and at times to decrease the dose or withdraw DMAIDs, which may result in the progression of symptoms of arthritis and which may be misinterpreted as the inadequate or none effect of GEBAs. There are objective reasons for the possible inefficacy of GEBAs. The valid predictor for a response to inhibitors of TNF-α is its baseline expression by synovial membrane cells. It is also important to take into account the nature of previous GEBA therapy. All GEBAs are noted to be highly effective when applying a weighed approach to selecting and managing patients; in so doing, rapid discontinuation of symptomatic therapy should be avoided.

  7. Demonstration Exercise of a Validated Sample Collection Method for Powders Suspected of Being Biological Agents in Georgia 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    August 7, 2006 the state of Georgia conducted a collaborative sampling exercise between the Georgia National Guard 4th Civil Support Team Weapons of Mass Destruction (CST-WMD) and the Georgia Department of Human Resources Division of Public Health demonstrating a recently validated bulk powder sampling method. The exercise was hosted at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) at Glynn County, Georgia and involved the participation of the Georgia Emergency Management Agency (GEMA), Georgia National Guard, Georgia Public Health Laboratories, the Federal Bureau of Investigation Atlanta Office, Georgia Coastal Health District, and the Glynn County Fire Department. The purpose of the exercise was to demonstrate a recently validated national sampling standard developed by the American Standards and Test Measures (ASTM) International; ASTM E2458 Standard Practice for Bulk Sample Collection and Swab Sample Collection of Visible Powders Suspected of Being Biological Agents from Nonporous Surfaces. The intent of the exercise was not to endorse the sampling method, but to develop a model for exercising new sampling methods in the context of existing standard operating procedures (SOPs) while strengthening operational relationships between response teams and analytical laboratories. The exercise required a sampling team to respond real-time to an incident cross state involving a clandestine bio-terrorism production lab found within a recreational vehicle (RV). Sample targets consisted of non-viable gamma irradiated B. anthracis Sterne spores prepared by Dugway Proving Ground. Various spore concentration levels were collected by the ASTM method, followed by on- and off-scene analysis utilizing the Center for Disease Control (CDC) Laboratory Response Network (LRN) and National Guard Bureau (NGB) CST mobile Analytical Laboratory Suite (ALS) protocols. Analytical results were compared and detailed surveys of participant evaluation comments were examined. I will present

  8. Patients’ and rheumatologists’ preferences for the attributes of biological agents used in the treatment of rheumatic diseases in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolla, Joan M; Rodríguez, Manuel; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Raya, Enrique; Ibero, Isabel; Nocea, Gonzalo; Aragon, Belén; Lizán, Luis; Prades, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To define importance values assigned to attributes of biological agents (BAs) by Spanish patients with rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis) and rheumatologists. Patients and methods This was an observational, cross-sectional design based upon a rank-based full-profile conjoint analysis. A literature review and four focus groups were undertaken to identify attributes and levels. An orthogonal matrix, combining the selected levels of attributes, was used to define scenarios. Participants ranked eight scenarios from 1 (most preferred) to 8 (least preferred). The relative importance (RI) of attributes was calculated. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify the characteristics that influenced the values of RI. A total of 488 patients (male 50.9%, mean age 50.6 [standard deviation {SD} 12.06] years, rheumatoid arthritis 33.8%, ankylosing spondylitis 32.4%, psoriatic arthritis 33.8%; mean time since diagnosis 12.6 [SD 8.2] years) and 136 rheumatologists (male 50.4%, mean age 46.4 [SD 9.1] years, mean time of practice 16.7 [SD 8.8] years) participated. Results The ideal BAs for patients and physicians, respectively, should allow pain relief and improvement of functional capacity (RI 39% and 44.7%), with low risk of adverse events (RI 24.9% and 30.5%), a long time prior to perceiving the need for a new dose (RI 16.4% and 12.4%), and self-administration at home (RI 19.7% and 12.5%), as identified through their preferences. Conclusion Although efficacy and safety are paramount for patients and rheumatologists to make a choice regarding BAs, the need for a low frequency of administration and the administration method also play a role as preference attributes for BAs. PMID:27382258

  9. The Use of Convalescent Sera in Immune-Electron Microscopy to Detect Non-Suspected/New Viral Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Lavazza; Cristiana Tittarelli; Monica Cerioli

    2015-01-01

    Negative staining electron microscopy methods can be employed for the diagnosis of viral particles in animal samples. In fact, negative staining electron microscopy methods are used to identify viruses, especially in minor species and wild animals, when no other methods are available and in cases of rare, emerging or re-emerging infections. In particular, immune-electron-microscopy with convalescent sera is employed to detect etiological agents when there are undiagnosed clinical outbreaks, w...

  10. Nanoparticle-Based Electrochemical Immunosensor for the Detection of Phosphorylated Acetylcholinesterase: An Exposure Biomarker of Organophosphate Pesticides and Nerve AgentsOrganophosphate Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Barry, Richard C.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Timchalk, Charles; Gassman, Paul L.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-11-01

    A nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunosensor has been developed for the detection of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) adducts, which is a potential exposure biomarker for organophosphate pesticides (OP) and chemical warfare nerve agent exposures. Zirconia nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were used as selective sorbents to capture the phosphorylated AChE adduct, and quantum dots (ZnS@CdS, QDs) were used as tags to label monoclonal anti-AChE antibody to track the immunorecognition events. The sandwich-like immunoreactions were performed among the ZrO2 NPs, which were pre-coated on a screen printed electrode (SPE) by electrodeposition, phosphorylated AChE and QD-anti-AChE. The captured QD tags were determined on the SPE by electrochemical stripping analysis of its metallic component (cadmium) after an acid-dissolution step. Paraoxon was used as a model OP insecticide to prepare the phosphorylated AChE adduct to demonstrate the proof of principle for this sensor technology. The paraoxon-AChE adduct was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum, and the binding affinity of anti-AChE to the paraoxon-AChE was validated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The parameters (e.g., amount of ZrO2 NP, QD-anti-AChE concentration,) that govern the electrochemical response of immunosensors were optimized. The voltammetric response of the immunosensor is highly linear over the range of 10 pM to 4 nM paraoxon-AChE, and the limit of detection is estimated to be 8 pM. This new nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunosensor thus provides a sensitive and quantitative tool for biomonitoring exposure to OP pesticides and nerve agents.

  11. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabalka, G. W.

    2005-06-28

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

  12. Carbon Nanomaterials Based Electrochemical Sensors/Biosensors for the Sensitive Detection of Pharmaceutical and Biological Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bal-Ram; Govindhan, Maduraiveeran; Chen, Aicheng

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors and biosensors have attracted considerable attention for the sensitive detection of a variety of biological and pharmaceutical compounds. Since the discovery of carbon-based nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, C60 and graphene, they have garnered tremendous interest for their potential in the design of high-performance electrochemical sensor platforms due to their exceptional thermal, mechanical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors have been employed for the detection of various analytes with rapid electron transfer kinetics. This feature article focuses on the recent design and use of carbon nanomaterials, primarily single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), SWCNTs-rGO, Au nanoparticle-rGO nanocomposites, and buckypaper as sensing materials for the electrochemical detection of some representative biological and pharmaceutical compounds such as methylglyoxal, acetaminophen, valacyclovir, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH), and glucose. Furthermore, the electrochemical performance of SWCNTs, rGO, and SWCNT-rGO for the detection of acetaminophen and valacyclovir was comparatively studied, revealing that SWCNT-rGO nanocomposites possess excellent electrocatalytic activity in comparison to individual SWCNT and rGO platforms. The sensitive, reliable and rapid analysis of critical disease biomarkers and globally emerging pharmaceutical compounds at carbon nanomaterials based electrochemical sensor platforms may enable an extensive range of applications in preemptive medical diagnostics. PMID:26404304

  13. Carbon Nanomaterials Based Electrochemical Sensors/Biosensors for the Sensitive Detection of Pharmaceutical and Biological Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal-Ram Adhikari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical sensors and biosensors have attracted considerable attention for the sensitive detection of a variety of biological and pharmaceutical compounds. Since the discovery of carbon-based nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, C60 and graphene, they have garnered tremendous interest for their potential in the design of high-performance electrochemical sensor platforms due to their exceptional thermal, mechanical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors have been employed for the detection of various analytes with rapid electron transfer kinetics. This feature article focuses on the recent design and use of carbon nanomaterials, primarily single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, reduced graphene oxide (rGO, SWCNTs-rGO, Au nanoparticle-rGO nanocomposites, and buckypaper as sensing materials for the electrochemical detection of some representative biological and pharmaceutical compounds such as methylglyoxal, acetaminophen, valacyclovir, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH, and glucose. Furthermore, the electrochemical performance of SWCNTs, rGO, and SWCNT-rGO for the detection of acetaminophen and valacyclovir was comparatively studied, revealing that SWCNT-rGO nanocomposites possess excellent electrocatalytic activity in comparison to individual SWCNT and rGO platforms. The sensitive, reliable and rapid analysis of critical disease biomarkers and globally emerging pharmaceutical compounds at carbon nanomaterials based electrochemical sensor platforms may enable an extensive range of applications in preemptive medical diagnostics.

  14. A cost-effective self-sensing biosensor for detection of biological species at ultralow concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faegh, Samira; Jalili, Nader; Yavuzcetin, Ozgur; Nagesha, Dattatri; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2013-06-01

    Detection of ultrasmall masses and identification of biological molecules have been made possible as a result of advances in nanotechnology. Development of biosensing tools has significantly contributed to high-throughput diagnosis and analytical sensing exploiting high affinity of biomolecules. MicroCantilever (MC)-based detection has emerged as a promising biosensing tool for offering label-free and cost-effective sensing capabilities. One of the main criteria determining the success of each biosensor is the capability of the sensing platform to operate in aqueous media. Although being characterized with high sensitivity and simplicity, MCs do not provide an effective tool for measurement of marker proteins in liquid media due to large hydrodynamic damping and losses in the surrounding liquid. In this study, we describe two approaches to high sensitivity biomolecular detection using piezoelectric microcantilevers. (i) Immobilized Mass Detection in Air using electro-mechanical resonance: a unique self-sensing measurement technique is reported utilizing a self-sensing circuit consisting of a piezoelectric MC to address the mentioned limitation. The capability of the self-sensing measurement technique was first verified by detecting ultrasmall biological masses immobilized over the surface of MC by monitoring the shift in fundamental mechanical resonance frequency of the system in air and comparing it with optical-based measurement. This was further utilized for calibration of mass detection in liquid media. (ii) Immobilized Mass Detection in Liquid using the electrical self-sensing circuit's resonance: Once the capability to detect adsorbed mass was verified, the self-sensing platform was implemented to detect different concentrations of target molecule (glucose in this study) in liquid media by adopting the highly sensitive resonance frequency of the whole circuit instead of the mechanical response of MC. Molecular binding occurring over the surface of MC changes

  15. Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Proximity Assay for Highly Selective Protein Detection in Biological Matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guangming; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-08-16

    This work proposes the first photoelectrochemical proximity assay (PECPA) method via the sensitization of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on photoelectrochemical response of ITO/TiO2/CdS electrode for highly selective and sensitive detection of proteins. This detection was performed on a sensing interface formed via the hybridization of capture DNA immobilized on ITO/TiO2/CdS electrode with labeled antibody-DNA (DNA-Ab1). Upon the recognition of Ab1 to target protein, the immunocomplex of DNA-Ab1, target, and the detection antibody-DNA (DNA-Ab2) was formed, which led to the proximity hybridization of the DNA in DNA-Ab2, capture DNA, and signal DNA-CdTe QDs, and brought CdTe QDs to the ITO/TiO2/CdS electrode to produce a sensitized photocurrent. The photocurrent intensity increased with the increasing concentration of the specific target protein. Using insulin as a target, this sensitized method showed a detectable range of 10 fM to 10 nM and a detection limit of 3.0 fM without the need of a washing step. It possessed high selectivity and good accuracy for detection of proteins in biological matrixes. This method is extremely flexible and can be extended to varieties of protein targets. PMID:27464227

  16. Distinct Regions of Right Temporal Cortex Are Associated with Biological and Human-Agent Motion: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neuropsychological Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Zaizhu; Bi, Yanchao; Chen, Jing; Chen, Quanjing; He, Yong; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    In human lateral temporal cortex, some regions show specific sensitivity to human motion. Here we examine whether such effects reflect a general biological-nonbiological organizational principle or a process specific to human-agent processing by comparing processing of human, animal, and tool motion in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with healthy participants and a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) study of patients with brain damage (77 stroke patients). The...

  17. Agreements and Discrepancies between FDA Reports and Journal Papers on Biologic Agents Approved for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-Research Project

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Amarilyo; Daniel E Furst; Woo, Jennifer M P; Wen Li; Henning Bliddal; Robin Christensen; Simon Tarp

    2016-01-01

    Background Sponsors that seek to commercialize new drugs apply to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which independently analyzes the raw data and reports the results on its website. Objectives This study sought to determine if there are differences between the FDA assessments and journal reports on biologic agents developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Available data on FDA-approved drugs were extracted from the website, and a systematic literature search was conduc...

  18. Greyhound meningoencephalitis: PCR-based detection methods highlight an absence of the most likely primary inducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, P; Drudy, D; Chalmers, W S K; Baxendale, W; Fanning, S; Callanan, J J

    2006-12-20

    Greyhound meningoencephalitis is currently classified as a breed-associated idiopathic central nervous system inflammatory disorder. The non-suppurative inflammatory response can be distinguished from the other breed-associated disorders based on histopathology and lesion topography, however the nature of the response primarily suggests a viral infection. In the present study PCR and RT-PCR technologies were employed on frozen cerebral tissue from confirmed cases of meningoencephalitis to target specific viruses and protozoa likely to be implicated and to exclude the presence of bacterial 16SrRNA. Secondly, degenerate primers were used to detect viruses of the herpesvirus and flavivirus families. In addition cerebral tissues were probed for West Nile Virus. Viral nucleic acid sequences to Borna disease virus, to louping ill, tick borne encephalitis, West Nile and other flaviviruses were not detected. Canine distemper virus was detected in one animal with 97% homology to strain A75/15. Degenerate PCR for herpesviruses detected viral amplification products in one animal with 90% homology to canine herpesvirus DNA polymerase gene. Protozoal amplification products were only detected in a single dog with pathological confirmation of a combination of lesions of greyhound meningoencephalitis and a protozoal encephalomyelitis. Neospora was confirmed with sequence homology to Austrian strain 1. Bacterial 16SrRNA was not detected. The present study supports previous observations that many of the known microbial causes of canine meningoencephalitis are not involved. Findings could reflect that the causal agent was not specifically targeted for detection, or that the agent is at undetectable levels or has been eliminated from brain tissue. The potential roles of genetics and of molecular mimicry also cannot be discounted. PMID:16962261

  19. Lab-on-a-chip for rapid electrochemical detection of nerve agent Sarin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin; Loke, Weng Keong; Nguyen, Nam-Trung;

    2014-01-01

    within minutes of inhalation. As purified Sarin is colourless, odourless, water soluble and a easily disseminated nerve agent, it has been used as a weapon in terrorist or military attacks. To ascertain whether potable water supplies have been adulterated with this extremely potent poison, an inexpensive...

  20. A multiplex PCR assay to detect and differentiate select agent strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralstonia solanacearum causes bacterial wilt in a variety of cash crops. R. solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains are considered select agents by the U.S. Government because they are not endemic to the U.S. and have the potential to cause brown rot disease in our potato production fields. Simple and...

  1. Ionization mechanism of the ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) and its applications to chemical nerve agent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2009-11-01

    We present studies of the ionization mechanism operative in the ambient pressure pyroelectric ionization source (APPIS), along with applications that include detection of simulants for chemical nerve agents. It is found that ionization by APPIS occurs in the gas-phase. As the crystal is thermally cycled over a narrow temperature range, electrical discharges near the surface of the crystal produce energetic species which, through reactions with atmospheric molecules, result in reactant ions such as protonated water clusters or clusters of hydroxide and water. Reactant ions can be observed directly in the mass spectrometer. These go on to react with trace neutrals via proton transfer reactions to produce the ions observed in mass spectra, which are usually singly protonated or deprotonated species. Further implicating gas-phase ionization, observed product distributions are highly dependent on the composition of ambient gases, especially the concentration of water vapor and oxygen surrounding the source. For example, basic species such as triethylamine are observed as singly protonated cations at a water partial pressure of 10 torr. At a water pressure of 4 torr, reactive oxygen species are formed and lead to observation of protonated amine oxides. The ability of the APPIS source to detect basic molecules with high proton affinities makes it highly suited for the detection of chemical nerve agents. We demonstrate this application using simulants corresponding to VX and GA (Tabun). With the present source configuration pyridine is detected readily at a concentration of 4 ppm, indicating ultimate sensitivity in the high ppb range. PMID:19682922

  2. Assessment of Proton Microbeam Analysis of 11B for Quantitative Microdistribution Analysis of Boronated Neutron Capture Agent Analogs in Biological Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bench, G; Grant, P G; Ueda, D L; Autry-Conwell, S A; Hou, Y; Boggan, J E

    2002-12-04

    Purpose: To assess the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* nuclear reaction for quantitatively mapping the in-vivo sub-cellular distribution of boron within gliosarcoma tumors treated with boronated neutron capture therapy agent (NCTA) analogs. Materials and Methods: Intracranial tumors were produced in Fisher 344 rats using a 9L gliosarcoma model. Fourteen days later, the majority of rats were treated with f-boronophenylalanine and sacrificed 30 or 180 minutes after intravenous injection. Freeze dried tumor cryosections were imaged using the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* nuclear reaction and proton microbeams obtained from the nuclear microprobe at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Results/Discussion: With{sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* analysis, {sup 11}B distributions within cells can be quantitatively imaged with spatial resolutions down to 1.5 {micro}m, minimum detection limits of 0.8 mg/kg and acquisition times of several hours. These capabilities offer advantages over alpha track autoradiography, electron energy loss spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for 'B quantitation in tissues. However, the spatial resolution, multi-isotope capability and analysis times achieved with SIMS are superior to those achieved with {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* analysis. Conclusions: When accuracy in quantitation is crucial, the assessing the microdistribution of {sup 11}B. {sup 11}B(p, {alpha}){sup 8}Be* reaction is well suited for Otherwise, SIMS may well be better suited to image the microdistribution of boron associated with NCTAs in biological tissues.

  3. Gadolinium-Hematoporphyrin: new potential MRI contrast agent for detection of breast cancer cell line (MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Shahbazi Gahrouei

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gadolinium-porphyrins have been synthesized and are currently being investigated as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents. This study aimed to synthesize Gd-hematoporphyrin and applicate it for in vitro detection of breast cancer cell line (MCF-7. Methods: The naturally occurring porphyrin (hematoporphyrin was inserted with gadolinium (III nitrate hexahydrate to yield Gd-H. T1 relaxation times and signal enhancement of the contrast agents were presented, and the results were compared. UV spectrophotometer measured the attachment of Gd to the cell membrane of MCF-7. Results: Most of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3 was found in the washing solution, indicate that it didn`t fixed to the breast cell membranes during incubation. Gd-DTPA showed some uptake into the MCF-7 cell membranes with incubation, however, its uptake was significantly lower than Gd-H. Conclusion: Good cell memberan uptake of Gd-porphyrin is comparable to controls, indicating selective delivery it to the breast cell line and considerable potency in diagnostic MR imaging for detection of breast cancer. Key Words: Porphyrin, Contrast agent, MRI, Hematoporphyrin, Breast cancer cell (MCF-7

  4. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  5. Biological Agents Influencing Physical Process in a Stream: A Case Study in Response to Human-Induced Alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondossi, H. A.; Bienz, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a case study of the Upper Williamson River, a major tributary to Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), to demonstrate illustrate the importance of biophysical interactions. The Klamath River is called 'the upside-down river' by some, due to its peculiar longitudinal profile--low-gradient at the headwaters east of the Cascade Range and steeper close to the mouth as it crosses the Cascades. The Upper Williamson River, as with other tributaries of UKL, flows through highly erodible volcanic ash (pumice) deposits of the Mazama eruption ~7,000 years ago, which created Crater Lake. There is little or no gravel in the broad, shallow alluvial valley of the River. We make the case that in this particular setting, the role of biological agents (e.g., riparian vegetation) is even more prominent than in settings with normal silica-derived sediment. Therefore, typical agricultural practices (removal of woody riparian vegetation, livestock grazing and trampling, etc.) cause rapid and severe channel response and therefore habitat degradation. However, when appropriately restored the recovery is also rapid and drastic. This spring-fed stream with few tributaries in the study area conveys relatively stable discharge, and has good water quality particularly in the upper reaches. It historically supported a population of native redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdnerii), and the candidate species (for listing under the Endangered Species Act) Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) and countless other avian species. In the late 20th Century, after decades of heavy grazing and active removal of willows from the floodplain, the River banks were nearly bare and unstable. The channel was wide, shallow, and smooth. Consequently, poor water quality, particularly high temperature rendered the stream extremely poor habitat. With controlled grazing, re-establishment of willow galleries, and addition of large woody debris (LWD) the channel has recovered to a narrower, deeper cross-section, with

  6. A model of electrostatically actuated MEMS and carbon nanotubes resonators for biological mass detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bouchaala, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of electrically actuated Micro and Nano (Carbon nanotube (CNT)) cantilever beams implemented as resonant sensors for mass detection of biological elements. The beams are modeled using an Euler-Bernoulli beam theory including the nonlinear electrostatic forces and the added biological elements, which are modeled as a discrete point mass. A multi-mode Galerkin procedure is utilized to derive a reduced-order model, which is used for the dynamic simulations. The frequency shifts due to added mass of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) are calculated for the primary and higher order modes of vibrations. Also, analytical expressions of the natural frequency shift under dc voltage and added mass have been developed. We found that using higher-order modes of vibration of MEMS beams or miniaturizing the size of the beam to Nano scale leads to significant improved sensitivity. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

  7. Removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluent by aerobic biological treatment with steroidal metabolite detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Soledad; Vergara, Juan P; Jarpa, Mayra; Hernandez, Victor; Becerra, Jose; Vidal, Gladys

    2016-10-14

    Stigmasterol is a phytosterol contained in Kraft mill effluent that is able to increase over 100% after aerobic biological treatment. This compound can act as an endocrine disrupter as its structure is similar to that of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluents treated by a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with steroidal metabolite detection. The MBBR was operated for 145 days, with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Stigmasterol and steroidal metabolites were detected by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector during MBBR operation. The results show that the MBBR removed 87.4% of biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 61.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 24.5% of phenol and 31.5% of lignin, expressed in average values. The MBBR system successfully removed 100% of the stigmasterol contained in the influent (33 µg L(-1)) after 5 weeks of operation. In that case, the organic load rate was 0.343 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Furthermore, different steroidal compounds (e.g., testosterone propionate, stigmast-4-en-3-one, 5α-pregnan-12-one-20α-hydroxy, 5α-pregnane-3,11,20-trione and 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstane-11,17-dione were detected in the Kraft mill effluent as potential products of phytosterol biotransformation. PMID:27399163

  8. Infrared differential-absorption Mueller matrix spectroscopy and neural network-based data fusion for biological aerosol standoff detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Copper, Jack; Owens, David J; Roese, Erik S; Bottiger, Jerold R; Everly, Robert D; Hung, Kevin C

    2010-01-20

    An active spectrophotopolarimeter sensor and support system were developed for a military/civilian defense feasibility study concerning the identification and standoff detection of biological aerosols. Plumes of warfare agent surrogates gamma-irradiated Bacillus subtilis and chicken egg white albumen (analytes), Arizona road dust (terrestrial interferent), water mist (atmospheric interferent), and talcum powders (experiment controls) were dispersed inside windowless chambers and interrogated by multiple CO(2) laser beams spanning 9.1-12.0 microm wavelengths (lambda). Molecular vibration and vibration-rotation activities by the subject analyte are fundamentally strong within this "fingerprint" middle infrared spectral region. Distinct polarization-modulations of incident irradiance and backscatter radiance of tuned beams generate the Mueller matrix (M) of subject aerosol. Strings of all 15 normalized elements {M(ij)(lambda)/M(11)(lambda)}, which completely describe physical and geometric attributes of the aerosol particles, are input fields for training hybrid Kohonen self-organizing map feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANNs). The properly trained and validated ANN model performs pattern recognition and type-classification tasks via internal mappings. A typical ANN that mathematically clusters analyte, interferent, and control aerosols with nil overlap of species is illustrated, including sensitivity analysis of performance. PMID:20090802

  9. Intrusion detection system and technology of layered wireless sensor network based on Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Genjian Yu; Kunpeng Weng

    2013-01-01

    The intrusion detection system and technology of classified layered-wireless sensor network was able to meet the high safety requirements of wireless sensor network, it is urgent for us to improve the identification and generalization of detection system about characters of intrusion. In this paper, we design an intelligent intrusion detection system which realize intelligence, the effective and direct way was to add the methods,  and it was used for identification and generalization of intru...

  10. Remote Detection of Xenon-based Molecular Sensors and the Development of Novel Paramagnetic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Monica A.

    2012-01-01

    Applications of laser-polarized xenon nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging have grown in number due to the exceptional sensitivity of xenon to its local environment. When paired with microfluidic technology, xenon-based molecular sensors (XBMS) have the potential to be used in a broad range of applications from medical devices to geochemistry. Detection of XBMS on a microfluidic chip requires remote detection NMR methodology, where the encoding and detection of aqueous...

  11. Molecular detection of Monilinia fructigena as causal agent of brown rot on quince

    OpenAIRE

    Jovana Hrustić; Mila Grahovac; Milica Mihajlović; Goran Delibašić; Mirko Ivanović; Mihailo Nikolić; Brankica Tanović

    2012-01-01

    Species of the genus Monilinia are important causal agents of fruit rot on pome and stone fruits in Serbia. The pathogen is very harmful, especially on small properties and cottage plantations where intensive control measures are not applied. Quince is important host for the pathogens of this genus. During spring 2010, intensive occurrence of mummified fruits overwintering on branches of the quince was observed. The pathogen was isolated using standard phyt...

  12. A Framework: Cluster Detection and Multidimensional Visualization of Automated Data Mining Using Intelligent Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jayabrabu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Data Mining techniques plays a vital role like extraction of required knowledge, finding unsuspected information to make strategic decision in a novel way which in term understandable by domain experts. A generalized frame work is proposed by considering non – domain experts during mining process for better understanding, making better decision and better finding new patters in case of selecting suitable data mining techniques based on the user profile by means of intelligent agents.

  13. The Steel Helmet Project: Canine Olfactory Detection of Low Concentrations of a Surrogate Chemical Warfare Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Hilliard, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    The Steel Helmet project was meant to assess the feasibility of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) detector dog concept. A relatively benign organophosphate pesticide called dichlorvos was used as a surrogate for CWAs. Using conventional training techniques, U.S. Department of Defense military working dogs were taught to discriminate scent boxes containing dichlorvos from “vehicle” scent boxes. Experiment 1 appeared to show that two out of three subjects were capable of criterion accuracy (0.95...

  14. Automaton based detection of affected cells in three dimensional biological system

    OpenAIRE

    Dundas, Jitesh

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research review is to propose the logic and search mechanism for the development of an artificially intelligent automaton (AIA) that can find affected cells in a 3-dimensional biological system. Research on the possible application of such automatons to detect and control cancer cells in the human body are greatly focused MRI and PET scans finds the affected regions at the tissue level even as we can find the affected regions at the cellular level using the framework. The AIA ...

  15. Identification problem for stochastic models with application to carcinogenesis, cancer detection and radiation biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Hanin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A general framework for solving identification problem for a broad class of deterministic and stochastic models is discussed. This methodology allows for a unified approach to studying identifiability of various stochastic models arising in biology and medicine including models of spontaneous and induced Carcinogenesis, tumor progression and detection, and randomized hit and target models of irradiated cell survival. A variety of known results on parameter identification for stochastic models is reviewed and several new results are presented with an emphasis on rigorous mathematical development.

  16. PRODUCTION OF FUNGAL BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS THROUGH SOLID STATE FERMENTATION: A CASE STUDY ON PAECILOMYCES LILACINUS AGAINST ROOT-KNOT NEMATODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brand

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes cause annual losses of about USD $100 billion worldwide. Development of natural resistance to nematicides by nematodes and the tendency to withdraw chemical pesticides/nematicides from the market led to the search for new methods of control. Biological control of root-knot nematodes with Paecilomyces lilacinus is being investigated thoroughly, but there is a lack of information on the production systems. Solid state fermentation is a suitable ecofriendly biological process for the mass production of biological control agents. Conidiospores produced are cost-effective and show good stability and viability for field applications on a commercial scale. Studies on bioreactor design are essential for scaling up solid-state fermentation processes, but they are scarce yet. We did an in-depth analysis on the production of fungal spores by solid state fermentation for commercial scale application against root-knot nematodes.

  17. Risks and benefits of combining immunosuppressives and biological agents in inflammatory bowel disease: is the synergy worth the risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of infliximab to treat Crohn's disease, combination therapy with immunosuppressants has reduced immunogenicity, without impacting efficacy. The availability of novel anti‐TNF agents and potential combined toxicities question the risk/benefit of combination therapies.

  18. Laser based in-situ and standoff detection of chemical warfare agents and explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2009-09-01

    Laser based detection of gaseous, liquid and solid residues and trace amounts has been developed ever since lasers were invented. However, the lack of availability of reasonably high power tunable lasers in the spectral regions where the relevant targets can be interrogated as well as appropriate techniques for high sensitivity, high selectivity detection has hampered the practical exploitation of techniques for the detection of targets important for homeland security and defense applications. Furthermore, emphasis has been on selectivity without particular attention being paid to the impact of interfering species on the quality of detection. Having high sensitivity is necessary but not a sufficient condition. High sensitivity assures a high probability of detection of the target species. However, it is only recently that the sensor community has come to recognize that any measure of probability of detection must be associated with a probability of false alarm, if it is to have any value as a measure of performance. This is especially true when one attempts to compare performance characteristics of different sensors based on different physical principles. In this paper, I will provide a methodology for characterizing the performance of sensors utilizing optical absorption measurement techniques. However, the underlying principles are equally application to all other sensors. While most of the current progress in high sensitivity, high selectivity detection of CWAs, TICs and explosives involve identifying and quantifying the target species in-situ, there is an urgent need for standoff detection of explosives from safe distances. I will describe our results on CO2 and quantum cascade laser (QCL) based photoacoustic sensors for the detection of CWAs, TICs and explosives as well the very new results on stand-off detection of explosives at distances up to 150 meters. The latter results are critically important for assuring safety of military personnel in battlefield

  19. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.; Shively, John E.; Li, Lin

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  20. System biology approach to detect and assign biological functions and regulator genes to feed efficiency traits in Nellore cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandre, Pâmela; Kogelman, Lisette; Santana, Miguel; Eler, Joanir; Kadarmideen, Haja; Fukumasu, Heidge

    The objective of this study was to use a system biology approach to identify biological mechanisms involved on feed efficiency in Nellore cattle and its possible regulator genes. Two modules of co-expressed and highly inter-connected genes correlated to feed efficiency were identified as well as ...