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Sample records for biokinetic pbbk modeling

  1. A physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) model for estragole bioactivation and detoxification in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study defines a physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) model for the alkenylbenzene estragole in rat based on in vitro metabolic parameters determined using relevant tissue fractions, in silico derived partition coefficients, and physiological parameters derived from the literature. The model consists of eight compartments including liver, lung and kidney as metabolizing compartments, and additional compartments for fat, arterial blood, venous blood, rapidly perfused tissue and slowly perfused tissue. Evaluation of the model was performed by comparing the PBBK predicted dose-dependent formation of the estragole metabolites 4-allylphenol and 1'-hydroxyestragole glucuronide to literature reported levels of these metabolites, which were demonstrated to be in the same order of magnitude. With the model obtained the relative extent of bioactivation and detoxification of estragole at different oral doses was examined. At low doses formation of 4-allylphenol, leading to detoxification, is observed to be the major metabolic pathway, occurring mainly in the lung and kidney due to formation of this metabolite with high affinity in these organs. Saturation of this metabolic pathway in the lung and kidney leads to a relative increase in formation of the proximate carcinogenic metabolite 1'-hydroxyestragole, occurring mainly in the liver. This relative increase in formation of 1'-hydroxyestragole leads to a relative increase in formation of 1'-hydroxyestragole glucuronide and 1'-sulfooxyestragole the latter being the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole. These results indicate that the relative importance of different metabolic pathways of estragole may vary in a dose-dependent way, leading to a relative increase in bioactiviation of estragole at higher doses

  2. Physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) modeling and validation of dose-, species-, interindividual- and matrix dependent effects on the bioactivation and detoxification of safrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martati, E.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: safrole, PBBK model, DNA adduct, mace  Safrole has been demonstrated to be carcinogenic in rodent studies at high doses of the pure compound. The use of pure safrole in foodshas already been prohibited. As a result, the main exposu

  3. Biokinetic model for 137 Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work was to provide a realistic biokinetic model for 137 Cs metabolism. This model was based on the retention of cesium in 57 people contaminated in the Goiania accident, ages 1 to 73 y old, complemented by data obtained in an experiment with beagle dogs, and data taken from the open literature. Cesium is distributed among all tissues and organs of the body. Its main retention site is the skeletal muscle tissue. Mathematically, cesium retention in the body may be described by a sum of three terms exponential equation. The first term represents the fraction which is rapidly eliminated in urine. This fraction is weight dependent (negative correlation). The second term represents the retention of cesium in tissues and organs of the body. For children and adolescents, the second term biological half-life is a function of the weight. For adults, it is correlated with sex. Men present a higher retention of cesium than women. The third term correspond to a retention fraction of the order of 0,1% of the initial body burden. It is characterized by a very long half-life and represents a subcellular retention of cesium in the skeletal muscle tissue. During pregnancy the transfer factor from the mother to the fetus is correlated to the amount of cesium in the blood and it is equal to 1, if the intake of cesium occurs pregnancy. (author)

  4. Development, implementation and quality assurance of biokinetic models within CONRAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Task Group 5.2 'Research Studies on Biokinetic Models' of the CONRAD project is presented. New biokinetic models have been implemented by several European institutions. Quality assurance procedures included intercomparison of the results as well as quality assurance of model formulation. Additionally, the use of the models was examined leading to proposals of tuning parameters. Stable isotope studies were evaluated with respect to their implications to the new models, and new biokinetic models were proposed on the basis of their results. Furthermore, the development of a biokinetic model describing the effects of decorporation of actinides by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid treatment was initiated. (authors)

  5. Dosimetric and biokinetic model for transuranic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transuranic elements are members of the actinide series beyond uranium, all are artificially produced in nuclear reactors and several include alpha-emitting radioisotopes with very long half-lives. Among them neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium are the most abundant and the most important from the health physics view point. The International Commission on Radiological Protection developed a comprehensive dosimetric system with biokinetic models and parameters for the internal exposure to workers in its Publication 30. Since then the ICRP published a new recommendation in 1990 and published several reports related to the internal dosimetry as Publication 66 in 1994, Publication 67 and Publication 68 in 1995, Publication 69 and Publication 71 in 1996. The new dosimetric and biokinetic model for transuranic elements described in Publication 67 is a recycling compartment model composed of 19 compartments and 28 transfer rates, which are a product of many efforts devoted to the improvement of internal dosimetry. The new model is related to the human physiology and is based on the information obtained from studies on human tissue samples and animal experiments. Dose coefficients derived from these models should be used in the dose calculation for the radiation protection for members of the public. (author)

  6. The Biokinetic Model of Americium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To improve in vivo measurements for detecting internal exposure from transuranium radio nuclides, such as neptunium, plutonium, americium, the bioknetic model was studied. According to ICRP report (1993, 1995, 1997) and other research, the

  7. Assessment of internal dose from radionuclides - dosimetric and biokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the assessment of annual limits on intakes of radionuclides by workers, and of dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by members of the public and patients, the ICRP has developed biokinetic models for the uptake of radionuclides by the gastrointestinal and the respiratory tract as well as for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides and their elimination from the body. The dosimetric and biokinetic models and data used for the assessments are described in detail. Present results and future activities of the ICRP on secondary limits for internal exposure are briefly mentioned. (orig./HP)

  8. Strontium biokinetic model for mouse-like rodent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model describing the biokinetics of strontium for murine rodent is suggested. The model represents modification of the ICRP model for reference human with reduced number of compartments: Blood, Gastrointestinal tract, Soft tissues, Skeleton, Urinary bladder. To estimate transfer rates of the model the published experimental data on strontium retention in body of laboratory and wild mice were analyzed. A set of eleven transfer rates suggested for the strontium biokinetic model for murine rodent satisfactorily describes both the laboratory experiments (relative standard error of 9.5%) and data on radiostrontium content available for wild animals. Application of the model allows estimation of strontium distribution by organs and tissues both in the cases of acute and chronic exposure with assessment of strontium activity in organs with time since beginning of exposure. The developed strontium biokinetic model will be used for internal dose assessment for murine rodents inhabiting East-Ural Radioactive Trace, where 90Sr intake is a significant source of contemporary internal exposure. -- Highlights: ► We examined 20 published experiments on 90Sr retention in rodents. ► Strontium biokinetic model for mouse-like rodent is suggested. ► Model satisfactory describes retention both in laboratory and wild animals

  9. Simplified excretion functions for recent recycling biokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent trends in biokinetic model development have seen the replacement of a simple, schematic one-way transfer of materials between compartments with more realistic and complex linkages, including 'recycling'. In its Publications 67 and 69, ICRP proposes the use of such models for Am, Np, Pu, Ba, Ra, Sr, Pb, Fe, Th, U and 1. These models have been developed primarily with a view- to providing time-dependent organ retention data which may be used as the basis for calculations of effective dose. However, these new models may also be of value in predicting faecal and urinary excretion rates, particularly if models are adapted for non-standard subjects such as children. In this paper simplified functions for organ retention and instantaneous excretion rates are obtained from the above models, and the latter are compared with excretion functions given in ICRP Publication 54. The potential for using future biokinetic models to predict urinary and faecal excretion rates is discussed. (author)

  10. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, R; Giussani, A

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews biokinetic data for technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans. The development of parameter values focuses on data for pertechnetate TcO(-)(4) the most commonly encountered form of technetium and the form expected to be present in body fluids. The model is intended as a default model for occupational or environmental intake of technetium, i.e. applicable in the absence of form- or site-specific information. Tissues depicted explicitly in the model include thyroid, salivary glands, stomach wall, right colon wall, liver, kidneys, and bone. Compared with the ICRP's current biokinetic model for occupational or environmental intake of technetium (ICRP 1993, 1994), the proposed model provides a more detailed and biologically realistic description of the systemic behaviour of technetium and is based on a broader set of experimental and medical data. For acute input of (99m)Tc (T(1/2) = 6.02 h) to blood, the ratios of cumulative (time-integrated) activity predicted by the current ICRP model to that predicted by the proposed model range from 0.4-7 for systemic regions addressed explicitly in both models. For acute input of (99)Tc (T(1/2) = 2.1 × 10(5) year) to blood, the corresponding ratios range from 0.2-30. PMID:25859762

  11. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitations for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr–AGe model). The Sr–AGe model has a similar structure to the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly re-evaluated: gastrointestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr–AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0–80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr–AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general populations exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes. (paper)

  12. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitation for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has similar structure as the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly reevaluated: gastro-intestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0–80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general population exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes.

  13. A recycling systemic model for the biokinetics of molybdenum radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the available data on molybdenum biokinetics and metabolism in humans is presented, with special emphasis on the results of stable tracer studies conducted in recent years, after the publication of the systemic model for incorporated radionuclides of molybdenum recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). On the basis of the presented information, a new structure for a compartmental model of molybdenum biokinetics, including the return of material from the organs back to the systemic circulation, was developed. The structure chosen is a compromise between the attempt to provide a realistic description of the biokinetics and the need to have a simple tool for dose estimation. The model consists of two compartments associated to the extracellulare fluids (blood plasma and interstitial fluids), liver, kidneys, and one generic compartment to represent all other tissues. The possibility of a direct excretion pathway into the urine was introduced, in order to correctly describe the rapid excretion as observed in the human studies. Reference values of the model parameters have been estimated taking into consideration that the amounts of radioactive molybdenum accidentally incorporated are negligible in comparison to the daily dietary intake of stable molybdenum

  14. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood

  15. A biokinetic and dosimetric model for the metabolism of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments involving injection and inhalation of uranium compounds into several animal species as well as those associated with humans are described and analyzed. A revised biokinetic and dosimetric model for the metabolism of uranium suitable for bioassay procedures is proposed. The model consists of a systematic part coupled to a model of the respiratory tract. The model has been tested against human data which incorporates in vivo measurements over the chest and measurements of urine, feces, and autopsy and biopsy samples.In particular the lung model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, Publication 30 ( ICRP-30 ), has been modified in order to provide a model which more nearly predicts urinary excretion in accord with the experiences in humans and animals. We have also tested the data against the new ICRP (LUDEP) lung model. (author). 55 refs., 14 tabs., 33 figs

  16. A genetic algorithm as an aid to biokinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe health effects of inhaled toxicants in a meaningful way, one must have a measure of the dose of the toxicant that caused the effect. For toxicants such as inhaled Pu, the dose is different for different organs and at different times after exposure. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a biokinetic model to simulate the distribution of Pu activity in the tissues and excreta of a dog as a function of time after it is inhaled. Such a model needed to account for all of the substance through a materials balance. It also had to model the amount of material retained in each major organ separately, with each organ divided into multiple compartments to depict different forms of Pu in the organ. Transfer between organs was controlled using transfer coefficients that were either constants, functions of particle size, or functions of time after deposition. This model required a large number of parameters because of its complexity

  17. Identification of nevadensin as an important herb-based constituent inhibiting estragole bioactivation and physiology-based biokinetic modeling of its possible in vivo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estragole is a natural constituent of several herbs and spices including sweet basil. In rodent bioassays, estragole induces hepatomas, an effect ascribed to estragole bioactivation to 1'-sulfooxyestragole resulting in DNA adduct formation. The present paper identifies nevadensin as a basil constituent able to inhibit DNA adduct formation in rat hepatocytes exposed to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole and nevadensin. This inhibition occurs at the level of sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated bioactivation of 1'-hydroxyestragole. The Ki for SULT inhibition by nevadensin was 4 nM in male rat and human liver fractions. Furthermore, nevadensin up to 20 μM did not inhibit 1'-hydroxyestragole detoxification by glucuronidation and oxidation. The inhibition of SULT by nevadensin was incorporated into the recently developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) rat and human models for estragole bioactivation and detoxification. The results predict that co-administration of estragole at a level inducing hepatic tumors in vivo (50 mg/kg bw) with nevadensin at a molar ratio of 0.06, representing the ratio of their occurrence in basil, results in almost 100% inhibition of the ultimate carcinogen 1'-sulfooxyestragole when assuming 100% uptake of nevadensin. Assuming 1% uptake, inhibition would still amount to more than 83%. Altogether these data point at a nevadensin-mediated inhibition of the formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole, without reducing the capacity to detoxify 1'-hydroxyestragole via glucuronidation or oxidation. These data also point at a potential reduction of the cancer risk when estragole exposure occurs within a food matrix containing SULT inhibitors compared to what is observed upon exposure to pure estragole.

  18. A case of accidental intake of Molybdenum Radionuclides: analysis of data with a revised biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, a series of investigations on the biokinetics of molybdenum in humans, conducted using stable isotopes of Mo as tracers, has provided valuable experimental data about the dynamics of relevant processes such as the uptake from the gut walls, the clearance from the systemic circulation and the elimination pathways. The results of these studies are in good agreement with the findings of a group of nutritionist who also performed biokinetic studies with stable tracers. All measurements show several deviations from the predictions of the current ICRP model. On the basis of these data, a preliminary revision of the biokinetic model for Mo was presented. The modified model was thus used as a starting point for a new series of biokinetic investigations, aimed at a better definition of some of its features. In a total of 54 studies conducted in 15 volunteers, the influence of the mass and of the chemical form on intestinal absorption, internal kinetics and urinary excretion was investigated

  19. A generic biokinetic model for predicting the behaviour of the lanthanide elements in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the biokinetics of the 15 elements of the lanthanide series, 57La to 71Lu, is too sparse to permit individual development of meaningful biokinetic models to describe the behaviour of each of the elements in humans. The lanthanides show a regular gradation in chemical properties across the series, and animal studies indicate that this is reflected in regular differences in their deposition in tissues such as the liver and skeleton. These regular differences in chemical and biological behaviour have been utilised to construct a generic lanthanide biokinetic model and to define element-specific parameters for each element in the series. This report describes the use of the available biokinetic data for humans and animals to derive the parameters for each of the elements. (author)

  20. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data

  1. Physiology-based modelling in radiation research: The biokinetics of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the biokinetics of radioactive substances was calculated on the basis of mathematical criteria only. Biokinetic compartments in most cases did not correspond to anatomically defined distribution areas in an organism but were operational values. However, the quality of the resulting models depends on how accurately their assumptions reflect reality. Ideally, a biokinetic model develops which reproduces reality. In the past few years, this need has resulted increasingly in physiological operational sequences being modelled in realistic anatomical structures of the body along with physicochemical parameters. In this study, an estimate of the biokinetic operational sequence after an incorporation of plutonium is made similar to the pharmacokinetics of a substance showing comparable chemical and physiological behaviours in the body. These behaviours are found for metals, iron and aluminium. Thus, comparison of the biokinetics of plutonium with the pharmacokinetics of aluminium results in some commonalities and some differences. A new model with physiological compartments for plutonium is presented on the basis of the biokinetics of aluminium. (authors)

  2. Calculations of radionuclide organ retentions from ICRP biokinetic recycling models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1985, the International Commission on Radiological Protection has revised biokinetic models for dose calculations from intakes of radionuclides. For workers and reference persons of the public, these models include recycling exchanges of the activity between the mixed blood and soft tissue pool and the other organs. Current work is aimed at providing a calculation tool to solve such recycling systems based on matrix algebra. The software, named CYCLOMOD, is written in Visual Basic language using Excel5. Database files provide radionuclide compartment transfer parameters corresponding to adults and children. CYCLOMOD processes any combination of acute and/or chronic intake by inhalation, ingestion and injection, for a chosen monitoring period of time following intake. Output files provide radionuclide remaining quantities, disintegrated amounts and number of disintegrations in each compartment as a function of time after intake. For each compartment, tissue and organ data are also presented graphically and thus could be related to in vivo organ measurements. The daily faecal and urinary excretions can also be calculated by subtraction. (author)

  3. A physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model for estragole DNA binding in rat liver based on in vitro kinetic data and estragole DNA adduct formation in primary hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estragole has been shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodent species at high-dose levels. Translation of these results into the likelihood of formation of DNA adducts, mutation, and ultimately cancer upon more realistic low-dose exposures remains a challenge. Recently we have developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) models for rat and human predicting bioactivation of estragole. These PBBK models, however, predict only kinetic characteristics. The present study describes the extension of the PBBK model to a so-called physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model predicting in vivo DNA adduct formation of estragole in rat liver. This PBBD model was developed using in vitro data on DNA adduct formation in rat primary hepatocytes exposed to 1'-hydroxyestragole. The model was extended by linking the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole formation predicted by the PBBK model to the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole in the in vitro experiments. The outcome of the PBBD model revealed a linear increase in DNA adduct formation with increasing estragole doses up to 100 mg/kg bw. Although DNA adduct formation of genotoxic carcinogens is generally seen as a biomarker of exposure rather than a biomarker of response, the PBBD model now developed is one step closer to the ultimate toxic effect of estragole than the PBBK model described previously. Comparison of the PBBD model outcome to available data showed that the model adequately predicts the dose-dependent level of DNA adduct formation. The PBBD model predicts DNA adduct formation at low levels of exposure up to a dose level showing to cause cancer in rodent bioassays, providing a proof of principle for modeling a toxicodynamic in vivo endpoint on the basis of solely in vitro experimental data.

  4. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final report 'Biokinetics and Dosimetry of Incorporated Radionuclides' presented here is one part of the 5 individual reports. The work to be carried out within this project is structured into four Work Packages: Workpackage 1 concentrates on ingested radionuclides, considering doses to the GI tract and radionuclide absorption. A major objective is the development of a new dosimetric model of the GI tract, taking account of most recent data on gut transit and dose to sensitive cells. Workpackage 2 seeks to improve and extend biokinetic and dosimetric models for systemic radionuclides. Existing models for adults and children will be extended to other elements and new models will be developed for the embryo and fetus. Workpackage 3 is to improve assessment of localised distribution of dose within tissues at the cellular level for specific examples of Auger emitters and alpha emitting isotopes, in relation to observed effects. The work will include experimental studies of dose/effect relationship and the development of localisation methods. Workpackage 4 concerns the development of computer codes for the new dosimetric models, quality assurance of the models and the calculation of dose coefficients. Formal sensitivity analysis will be used to identify critical areas of model development and to investigate the effects of variability and incertainty in biokinetic parameters. (orig.)

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of biokinetic models for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical models for kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in humans were developed and are used to estimate the radiation absorbed dose for patients in nuclear medicine by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee. However, due to the fact that the residence times used were derived from different subjects, partially even with different ethnic backgrounds, a large variation in the model parameters propagates to a high uncertainty of the dose estimation. In this work, a method was developed for analysing the uncertainty and sensitivity of biokinetic models that are used to calculate the residence times. The biokinetic model of 18F-FDG (FDG) developed by the MIRD Committee was analysed by this developed method. The sources of uncertainty of all model parameters were evaluated based on the experiments. The Latin hypercube sampling technique was used to sample the parameters for model input. Kinetic modelling of FDG in humans was performed. Sensitivity of model parameters was indicated by combining the model input and output, using regression and partial correlation analysis. The transfer rate parameter of plasma to other tissue fast is the parameter with the greatest influence on the residence time of plasma. Optimisation of biokinetic data acquisition in the clinical practice by exploitation of the sensitivity of model parameters obtained in this study is discussed. (authors)

  6. Biokinetic models for radionuclides in experimental animals; Modelos biocineticos de radionucleidos en animales de experimentacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcillo, M. A. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The biokinetic models for many radionuclides are, to a large extent, based on data obtained in experimental animals. The methods used in the experimental development of a biokinetic model can be classified in two groups (i) those applied during the experimental work, which include the activity determination of a given radionuclide at different times and in different biological media such as blood, serum, organs/tissues, urine, bile and faeces and (ii) those methods used for the analysis and study of the experimental data, based in mathematical tools. Some of these methods are reviewed,with special emphasis in the whole body macro autoradiography. To conclude, the contribution that this type of studies can have in two fields of radiation protection is discussed, namely optimization of dosimetric evaluations and decorporation of radionuclides. (Author)

  7. Recent developments in biokinetic models and the calculation of internal dose coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most cases the measurement of radioactivity in an environmental or biological sample will be followed by some estimation of dose and possibly risk, either to a population or an individual. This will normally involve the use of a dose coefficient (dose per unit intake value) taken from a compendium. In recent years the calculation of dose coefficients has seen many developments in both biokinetic modelling and computational capabilities. ICRP has recommended new models for the respiratory tract and for the systemic behavior of many of the more important elements. As well as this, a general age-dependent calculation method has been developed which involves an effectively continuous variation of both biokinetic and dosimetric parameters, facilitating more realistic estimation of doses to young people. These new developments were used in work for recent ICRP, IAEA and CEC compendia of dose coefficients for both members of the public (including children) and workers. This paper presents a general overview of the method of calculation of internal doses with particular reference to the actinides. Some of the implications for dose coefficients of the new models are discussed. For example it is shown that compared with data in ICRP Publications 30 and 54: the new respiratory tract model generally predicts lower deposition in systemic tissues per unit intake; the new biokinetic models for actinides allow for burial of material deposited on bone surfaces; age-dependent models generally feature faster turnover of material in young people. All of these factors can lead to substantially different estimates of dose and examples of the new dose coefficients are given to illustrate these differences. During the development of the new models for actinides, human bioassay data were used to validate the model. Thus, one would expect the new models to give reasonable predictions of bioassay quantities. Some examples of the bioassay applications, e.g., excretion data for the

  8. Validation of biokinetic models for strontium. Analysis of the Techa River and Chernobyl data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRP models used in radiation protection to estimate doses resulting from internal irradiation are based on biokinetic models for different radionuclides. Strontium-90 was one of the main sources of environmental contamination due to accidents in the ''Mayak'' plutonium production complex (Southern Urals, 1949-1956) and the Chernobyl accident (1986). Over 800 measurements of bone-autopsy, and 31,000 Whole body Counter 90Sr measurements for Techa River population were made at URCRM (Chelyabinsk). Measurements of 90Sr contents in skeleton were performed for residents of the area contaminated due to Chernobyl accident (RPI, Kiev). These unique data allowed to validate the predictions of 90Sr biokinetic models at different times after ingestion, and in the case of complicated rate of intake. Model validation can be considered as best approach for quantifying the reliability of the model's predictions. Available data on 90Sr content in human skeleton were analyzed. 90Sr measurements cover the long period after start of intake: from 2 to 45 years after contamination (Techa River data). Model predictions for all age groups were compared with Techa River and Chernobyl data. For adult persons calculated and measured values of 90Sr body content were found to be very close, especially over the first 15 years after the major intake. After the majority of measured people had attained the age of 45 years and changes of calcium metabolism resulted in a significant increase of strontium elimination rate. The particularities of bone mineral turnover in old persons are not considered in the framework of the ICRP model. The latter feature resulted in a divergence between the model curve and the results of 90Sr measurements for old persons. For children and adolescents the differences between calculated values and measured 90Sr body contents are more significant. The comparison of different strontium biokinetic models is discussed in the paper. (author)

  9. Reliability of Current Biokinetic and Dosimetric Models for Radionuclides: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Meck, Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the results of a pilot study of the reliability of the biokinetic and dosimetric models currently used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as predictors of dose per unit internal or external exposure to radionuclides. The study examines the feasibility of critically evaluating the accuracy of these models for a comprehensive set of radionuclides of concern to the NRC. Each critical evaluation would include: identification of discrepancies between the models and current databases; characterization of uncertainties in model predictions of dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; characterization of variability in dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; and evaluation of prospects for development of more accurate models. Uncertainty refers here to the level of knowledge of a central value for a population, and variability refers to quantitative differences between different members of a population. This pilot study provides a critical assessment of models for selected radionuclides representing different levels of knowledge of dose per unit exposure. The main conclusions of this study are as follows: (1) To optimize the use of available NRC resources, the full study should focus on radionuclides most frequently encountered in the workplace or environment. A list of 50 radionuclides is proposed. (2) The reliability of a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide (i.e., an estimate of dose per unit intake) may depend strongly on the specific application. Multiple characterizations of the uncertainty in a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide may be needed for different forms of the radionuclide and different levels of information of that form available to the dose analyst. (3) A meaningful characterization of variability in dose per unit intake of a radionuclide requires detailed information on the biokinetics of the radionuclide and hence is not feasible for many infrequently

  10. Improvements in the biokinetic model for strontium with allowance for age and gender differences in bone mineral metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagina, N.B.; Tolstykh, E.I.; Degteva, M.O

    2003-07-01

    An age- and gender-dependent biokinetic model for strontium was developed based on the study of a population living along the Techa River exposed to effluents from the Mayak Production Association. To estimate parameters of a new model (Techa biokinetic model, TBM) many data sets have been assembled: our whole-body counter data on long-term retention of {sup 90}Sr in humans, data from studies during the period of global fallout, data resulting from deliberate injections of strontium radionuclides, and non-radiological data regarding bone formation and resorption, mineral content of the body, etc. The model was developed using the basic structure of the ICRP biokinetic model for strontium, but new age- and gender-specific parameters were derived. This paper discusses the approaches applied to develop the new model. (author)

  11. Improvements in the biokinetic model for strontium with allowance for age and gender differences in bone mineral metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An age- and gender-dependent biokinetic model for strontium was developed based on the study of a population living along the Techa River exposed to effluents from the Mayak Production Association. To estimate parameters of a new model (Techa biokinetic model, TBM) many data sets have been assembled: our whole-body counter data on long-term retention of 90Sr in humans, data from studies during the period of global fallout, data resulting from deliberate injections of strontium radionuclides, and non-radiological data regarding bone formation and resorption, mineral content of the body, etc. The model was developed using the basic structure of the ICRP biokinetic model for strontium, but new age- and gender-specific parameters were derived. This paper discusses the approaches applied to develop the new model. (author)

  12. Practical identifiability of biokinetic parameters of a model describing two-step nitrification in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, D; Rosenwinkel, K-H; Morgenroth, E

    2008-10-15

    Parameter estimation and model calibration are key problems in the application of biofilm models in engineering practice, where a large number of model parameters need to be determined usually based on experimental data with only limited information content. In this article, identifiability of biokinetic parameters of a biofilm model describing two-step nitrification was evaluated based solely on bulk phase measurements of ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate. In addition to evaluating the impact of experimental conditions and available measurements, the influence of mass transport limitation within the biofilm and the initial parameter values on identifiability of biokinetic parameters was evaluated. Selection of parameters for identifiability analysis was based on global mean sensitivities while parameter identifiability was analyzed using local sensitivity functions. At most, four of the six most sensitive biokinetic parameters were identifiable from results of batch experiments at bulk phase dissolved oxygen concentrations of 0.8 or 5 mg O(2)/L. High linear dependences between the parameters of the subsets (KO2,AOB,muAOB) and (KO2,NOB,muNOB) resulted in reduced identifiability. Mass transport limitation within the biofilm did not influence the number of identifiable parameters but, in fact, decreased collinearity between parameters, especially for parameters that are otherwise correlated (e.g., muAOB) and KO2,AOB, or muNOB and KO2,NOB). The choice of the initial parameter values had a significant impact on the identifiability of two parameter subsets, both including the parameters muAOB and KO2,AOB. Parameter subsets that did not include the subsets muAOB and KO2,AOB or muNOB and KO2,NOB were clearly identifiable independently of the choice of the initial parameter values. PMID:18512262

  13. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficient for members of the public. 1. Sources of uncertainty in the biokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the decade following the Chernobyl accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) developed dose coefficients (doses per unit intake) for ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by members of the public. The level of uncertainty in those coefficients varies considerably from one radionuclide to another, due largely to differences in the level of understanding of the biological behaviour of different elements in the human body. This paper is the first in a series that examines the sources and extent of uncertainties in the ICRP's biokinetic and dosimetric models for members of the public and the dose coefficients derived from those models. The present paper describes the different types of information generally used to develop biokinetic models for radionuclides, the main sources of uncertainty associated with each type of information, and the approach used in subsequent papers in this series to quantify the uncertainties in biokinetic and dosimetric estimates. (author)

  14. Automatic application of ICRP biokinetic models in voxel phantoms for in vivo counting and internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the improvement of calibration techniques of in vivo counting, the Laboratory of Internal Dose Assessment of the Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety has developed a computer tool, 'OEDIPE', to model internal contamination, to simulate in vivo counting and to calculate internal dose. The first version of this software could model sources located in a single organ. As the distribution of the contamination evolves from the time of intake according to the biokinetics of the radionuclide, a new facility has been added to the software first to allow complex heterogeneous source modelling and then to automatically integrate the distribution of the contamination in the different tissues estimated by biokinetic calculation at any time since the intake. These new developments give the opportunity to study the influence of the biokinetics on the in vivo counting, leading to a better assessment of the calibration factors and the corresponding uncertainties. (authors)

  15. Evaluating Alternate Biokinetic Models for Trace Pollutant Cometabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Binning, Philip John; Smets, Barth F.

    2015-01-01

    has not been systematically evaluated for a variety of operational/experimental conditions. Here five different models were considered: first-order; MichaelisMenten; reductant; competition; and combined models. The models were assessed on their ability to fit data from simulated batch experiments...... covering a realistic range of experimental conditions. The simulated observations were generated by using the most complex model structure and parameters based on the literature, with added experimental error. Three criteria were used to evaluate model fit: ability to fit the simulated experimental data......, identifiability of parameters using a colinearity analysis, and suitability of the model size and complexity using the Bayesian and Akaike Information criteria. Results show that no single model fits data well for a range of experimental conditions. The reductant model achieved best results, but required very...

  16. Relevance of the ICRP biokinetic model for dietary organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingested dietary tritium can participate in metabolic processes, and become synthesized into organically bound tritium in the tissues and organs. The distribution and retention of the organically bound tritium throughout the body are much different than tritium in the body water. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 56 (1989) has a biokinetic model to calculate dose from the ingestion of organically bound dietary tritium. The model predicts that the dose from the ingestion of organically bound dietary tritium is about 2.3 times higher than from the ingestion of the same activity of tritiated water. Under steady-state conditions, the calculated dose rate (using the first principle approach) from the ingestion of dietary organically bound tritium can be twice that from the ingestion of tritiated water. For an adult, the upper-bound dose estimate for the ingestion of dietary organically bound tritium is estimated to be close to 2.3 times higher than that of tritiated water. Therefore, given the uncertainty in the dose calculation with respect to the actual relevant dose, the ICRP biokinetic model for organically bound tritium is sufficient for dosimetry for adults. (author)

  17. Characterisation, implementation and quality assurance of biokinetic models. The experience of the CONRAD Task Group 5.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CONRAD (Coordinated Network on Radiation Dosimetry) was an action funded by the European Commission within the 6th Framework Programme in order to link groups undertaking research relating to radiation dosimetry at workplaces. Workpackage 5 of CONRAD was dedicated to internal dosimetry. Task Group 5.2 ''Research Studies on Biokinetic Models'' dealt with the development, implementation, characterization and quality assurance of biokinetic models. The new ICRP model of the human alimentary tract (HATM), the new NCRP model for contaminated wounds, new systemic recycling models of the biokinetics of radioisotopes of polonium and plutonium presented in the scientific literature were implemented into the computer codes of five different institutions. Also new systemic biokinetic models for zirconium and molybdenum, developed on the basis of own results from stable tracer studies, were implemented. The excellent agreement among the results obtained by the different groups indicate that all the present models can be easily implemented into available software codes and that the outputs are independent of the computational approach used. It was also possible to better characterize the systemic models of plutonium by use of a partition factor expressing the relative distribution of material between skeleton and liver, and the NCRP wound model, by derivation of the exact analytical solutions for the wound retention resulting from the model formulation. (author)

  18. A physiological biokinetic model for the [7(N)-3H]-cholesterol dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a major source of deaths worldwide according to WHO (World Health Organization). It is well-known that the change of the level of plasma lipoproteins, which are responsible for the cholesterol transport in the bloodstream, is a main cause of these diseases. For this reason, to know the biokinetic parameters of plasma lipoproteins and quantifies them is important to correct and deepen the understanding of associated diseases. The main objective of this work is to provide a biokinetic model in order to estimate the radiometric dose, due to the intake of [7(N)-3H] –Cholesterol in physiological issues, in metabolic studies. The internal dosimetry is important to know the biological effects of radiation. The model was based on Schwartz et al (2004), using parameters for the plasmatic lipoproteins and ICRP 30 (1979) gastrointestinal tract; the dose in the compartments were calculated using the MIRD methodology and the compartmental analysis by Matlab® software. The coefficients were estimated for an adult phantom with a body mass of 73.3 kg. (author)

  19. A physiological biokinetic model for the [7(N)-{sup 3}H]-cholesterol dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Adriano dos Santos; Martins, Joao Francisco Trencher; Velo, Alexandre Franca; Hamada, Margarida M.; Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de, E-mail: adriano_oliveira@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a major source of deaths worldwide according to WHO (World Health Organization). It is well-known that the change of the level of plasma lipoproteins, which are responsible for the cholesterol transport in the bloodstream, is a main cause of these diseases. For this reason, to know the biokinetic parameters of plasma lipoproteins and quantifies them is important to correct and deepen the understanding of associated diseases. The main objective of this work is to provide a biokinetic model in order to estimate the radiometric dose, due to the intake of [7(N){sup -3}H] –Cholesterol in physiological issues, in metabolic studies. The internal dosimetry is important to know the biological effects of radiation. The model was based on Schwartz et al (2004), using parameters for the plasmatic lipoproteins and ICRP 30 (1979) gastrointestinal tract; the dose in the compartments were calculated using the MIRD methodology and the compartmental analysis by Matlab® software. The coefficients were estimated for an adult phantom with a body mass of 73.3 kg. (author)

  20. Bayesian model selection validates a biokinetic model for zirconium processing in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidl Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In radiation protection, biokinetic models for zirconium processing are of crucial importance in dose estimation and further risk analysis for humans exposed to this radioactive substance. They provide limiting values of detrimental effects and build the basis for applications in internal dosimetry, the prediction for radioactive zirconium retention in various organs as well as retrospective dosimetry. Multi-compartmental models are the tool of choice for simulating the processing of zirconium. Although easily interpretable, determining the exact compartment structure and interaction mechanisms is generally daunting. In the context of observing the dynamics of multiple compartments, Bayesian methods provide efficient tools for model inference and selection. Results We are the first to apply a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach to compute Bayes factors for the evaluation of two competing models for zirconium processing in the human body after ingestion. Based on in vivo measurements of human plasma and urine levels we were able to show that a recently published model is superior to the standard model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The Bayes factors were estimated by means of the numerically stable thermodynamic integration in combination with a recently developed copula-based Metropolis-Hastings sampler. Conclusions In contrast to the standard model the novel model predicts lower accretion of zirconium in bones. This results in lower levels of noxious doses for exposed individuals. Moreover, the Bayesian approach allows for retrospective dose assessment, including credible intervals for the initially ingested zirconium, in a significantly more reliable fashion than previously possible. All methods presented here are readily applicable to many modeling tasks in systems biology.

  1. Some elements for a revision of the americium reference biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interpretation of individual activity measurement after a contamination by 241Am or its parent nuclide 241Pu is based on the reference americium (Am) biokinetic model published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 1993 [International Commission on Radiological Protection. Age-dependent doses to members of the public from intake of radionuclides: Part 2 Ingestion dose coefficients. ICRP Publication 67. Ann. ICRP 23(3/4) (1993)]. The authors analysed the new data about Am biokinetics reported afterwards to propose an update of the current model. The most interesting results, from the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries post-mortem measurement database [Filipy, R. E. and Russel, J. J. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries as sources for actinide dosimetry and bio-effects. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 105(1-4), 185-187 (2003)] and the long-term follow-up of cases of inhalation intake [Malatova, I., Foltanova, S., Beckova, V., Filgas, R., Pospisilova, H. and Hoelgye, Z. Assessment of occupational doses from internal contamination with 241Am. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 105(1-4), 325-328 (2003)], seemed to show that the current model underestimates the retention in the massive soft tissues and overestimates the retention in the skeleton and the late urinary excretion. However, a critical review of the data demonstrated that all were not equally reliable and suggested that only a slight revision of the model, possibly involving a change in the balance of activity between massive soft tissues, cortical and trabecular bone surfaces, may be required. (authors)

  2. Biokinetic Mechanisms Linked With Musculoskeletal Health Disparities: Stochastic Models Applying Tikhonov’s Theorem to Biomolecule Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Asit K.; Liang, Yu; Sean S. Kohles

    2011-01-01

    Multiscale technology and advanced mathematical models have been developed to control and characterize physicochemical interactions, respectively, enhancing cellular and molecular engineering progress. Ongoing tissue engineering development studies have provided experimental input for biokinetic models examining the influence of static or dynamic mechanical stimuli (Saha, A. K., and Kohles, S. S., 2010, “A Distinct Catabolic to Anabolic Threshold Due to Single-Cell Nanomechanical Stimulation ...

  3. Implications of postmortem human tissue analysis on biokinetic models for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes and refinements to original biokinetic models, based on postmortem radiochemical measurements of the concentration and distribution of actinides in tissues obtained from volunteer donors with known occupational experience with actinides, are discussed with emphasis on applications to operational health physics. Analysis of five whole body donations to the United States Transuranium Registry indicates that the 239Pu model put forth in ICRP Publication 30 is generally applicable, although there is a significant fraction missing from the model that is retained in the muscle. For 241Am, the more recent model put forth in ICRP Publication 48 fits the autopsy data better than the model in Publication 30, although the observed retention half-time in the liver is on the order of two to three years rather than 20 years proposed by the model. An estimated 20% of the initial systemic deposition for 241Am goes to the muscle, where it has a residence half-time estimated at ten years. For both Pu and Am, less than 5% of the skeletal actinide in the skeleton is found in the marrow. The highest concentrations appear to be associated with the periosteum and endosteum. A significantly greater fraction of inhaled Pu and Am is retained in the lungs than is predicted by current models. Differences in the actinide distribution between lung and the associated lymph nodes are observed in smokers as compared with non-smokers. (author) 30 refs.; 1 tab

  4. Intercomparison and biokinetic model validation of radionuclide intake assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This TECDOC presents the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment, including the conclusions of a Research Co-ordination Meeting held from 6 to 8 July 1998. The present CRP on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment is part of the activities of the IAEA's Occupational Protection programme. The objective of this programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach for optimizing occupational radiation protection through: the development of guides, within the IAEA's activities for establishing standards for radiation protection, for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques; and the promotion of application of these guidelines

  5. Human biokinetic data and a new compartmental model of zirconium - A tracer study with enriched stable isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiter, Matthias B., E-mail: matthias.greiter@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Giussani, Augusto, E-mail: AGiussani@BfS.de; Hoellriegl, Vera, E-mail: vera.hoellriegl@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Li Weibo, E-mail: wli@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Oeh, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.oeh@helmholtz-muenchen.de

    2011-09-01

    Biokinetic models describing the uptake, distribution and excretion of trace elements are an essential tool in nutrition, toxicology, or internal dosimetry of radionuclides. Zirconium, especially its radioisotope {sup 95}Zr, is relevant to radiation protection due to its production in uranium fission and neutron activation of nuclear fuel cladding material. We present a comprehensive set of human data from a tracer study with stable isotopes of zirconium. The data are used to refine a biokinetic model of zirconium. Six female and seven male healthy adult volunteers participated in the study. It includes 16 complete double tracer investigations with oral ingestion and intravenous injection, and seven supplemental investigations. Tracer concentrations were measured in blood plasma and urine collected up to 100 d after tracer administration. The four data sets (two chemical tracer forms in plasma and urine) each encompass 105-240 measured concentration values above detection limits. Total fractional absorption of ingested zirconium was found to be 0.001 for zirconium in citrate-buffered drinking solution and 0.007 for zirconium oxalate solution. Biokinetic models were developed based on the linear first-order kinetic compartmental model approach used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The main differences of the optimized systemic model of zirconium to the current ICRP model are (1) recycling into the transfer compartment made necessary by the observed tracer clearance from plasma, (2) different parameters related to fractional absorption for each form of the ingested tracer, and (3) a physiologically based excretion pathway to urine. The study considerably expands the knowledge on the biokinetics of zirconium, which was until now dominated by data from animal studies. The proposed systemic model improves the existing ICRP model, yet is based on the same principles and fits well into the ICRP radiation protection approach. - Research

  6. Modeling Aspects of Activated Sludge Processes Part l l: Mathematical Process Modeling and Biokinetics of Activated Sludge Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical process modeling and biokinetics of activated sludge process were reviewed considering different types of models. It has been evaluated the task group models of ASMI. and 2, and 3 versioned by Henze et al considering the conditions of each model and the different processes of which every model consists. It is revealed that ASMI contains some defects avoided in ASM3. Relied on homogeneity, Models can be classified into homogenous models characterized by taking the activated sludge process as one phase. In this type of models, the internal mass transfer inside the floes was neglected.. Hence, the kinetic parameter produces can be considered inaccurate. The other type of models is the heterogeneous model This type considers the mass transfer operations in addition to the biochemical reaction processes; hence, the resulted kinetic parameters can be considered more accurate than that of homogenous type

  7. Biokinetic and dosimetric modelling in the estimation of radiation risks from internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, John [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.harrison@hpa.org.uk

    2009-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed biokinetic and dosimetric models that enable the calculation of organ and tissue doses for a wide range of radionuclides. These are used to calculate equivalent and effective dose coefficients (dose in Sv Bq{sup -1} intake), considering occupational and environmental exposures. Dose coefficients have also been given for a range of radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic medicine. Using equivalent and effective dose, exposures from external sources and from different radionuclides can be summed for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to risks from whole-body radiation exposure. Risk estimates are derived largely from follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. New dose coefficients will be required following the publication in 2007 of new ICRP recommendations. ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models are subject to continuing review and improvement, although it is arguable that the degree of sophistication of some of the most recent models is greater than required for the calculation of effective dose to a reference person for the purposes of regulatory control. However, the models are also used in the calculation of best estimates of doses and risks to individuals, in epidemiological studies and to determine probability of cancer causation. Models are then adjusted to best fit the characteristics of the individuals and population under consideration. For example, doses resulting from massive discharges of strontium-90 and other radionuclides to the Techa River from the Russian Mayak plutonium plant in the early years of its operation are being estimated using models adapted to take account of measurements on local residents and other population-specific data. Best estimates of doses to haemopoietic bone marrow, in utero and postnatally, are being used in epidemiological studies of radiation

  8. Investigation on biokinetics of 134Cs and 241Am radionuclides in three different organisms and a new evaluation by using discrete time model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, 134Cs and 241Am biokinetic experiments have been observed originally for Black Sea condition with using the gastropod Patella coerulea and the macro algae Enteremorpha linza and the common mussel Mytilus galloprovlncialis as bio indicator organisms. The experiments that have at least three originality, have been carried out very carefully and biokinetic parameters have been calculated by using classical model. The results are compared with the proportionally similar experiments in the literature globally. In this thesis, a new model application has proposed for the biokinetic evaluation for loss experiments of organisms. That is discrete time model. Loss experiments can be evaluated proportionally in a quick and easy way by using this model. Then, it can be observed that the calculated decreasing factor (r) by discrete time model, shows the loss process quality. Moreover, the loss experiments can be stopped when the decreasing factor goes to 1. So, the loss experiment can be evaluated rapidly and quickly with the adequate reliability by using discrete time model. Furthermore, the loss process in the organisms becomes slower and biologic half-lives becomes longer, when the decreasing factor (r) goes to 1. On the other hand, the biological depuration rate (k) goes to nearly zero. So, the proposed discrete time model that is applied in this thesis originally for biokinetic, can be evident that it has an adequate reliability for the biokinetic evaluation

  9. Controlling intake of uranium in the workplace: Applications of biokinetic modeling and occupational monitoring data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; McGinn, Wilson [ORNL; Meck, Dr. Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2012-01-01

    This report provides methods for interpreting and applying occupational uranium monitoring data. The methods are based on current international radiation protection guidance, current information on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and best available biokinetic models for uranium. Emphasis is on air monitoring data and three types of bioassay data: the concentration of uranium in urine; the concentration of uranium in feces; and the externally measured content of uranium in the chest. Primary Reference guidance levels for prevention of chemical effects and limitation of radiation effects are selected based on a review of current scientific data and regulatory principles for setting standards. Generic investigation levels and immediate action levels are then defined in terms of these primary guidance levels. The generic investigation and immediate actions levels are stated in terms of radiation dose and concentration of uranium in the kidneys. These are not directly measurable quantities, but models can be used to relate the generic levels to the concentration of uranium in air, urine, or feces, or the total uranium activity in the chest. Default investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest are recommended for situations in which there is little information on the form of uranium taken into the body. Methods are prescribed also for deriving case-specific investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest when there is sufficient information on the form of uranium to narrow the range of predictions of accumulation of uranium in the main target organs for uranium: kidneys for chemical effects and lungs for radiological effects. In addition, methods for using the information herein for alternative guidance levels, different from the ones selected for this report, are described.

  10. Software for biokinetic modeling of the radiopharmaceuticals used in PET; Software para modelagem biocinetica de radiofarmacos utilizados em PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, Leanderson P., E-mail: leoxofisico@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-RE),Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A. de; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br, E-mail: igoradiologia@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this work will be presented the current state of software in development to estimate the dose from PET images. Will be given the main biokinetic models used in PET, as well as the general features of a tool in development, whose current features allow quantitative analysis of compartmental models. Further, the tool allows display images 2D PET (in DICOM format) and quantify the intensity map of regions of interest in counts per second coincidence events. The next step is to insert in the same tool to estimate the activity concentration for ROI and estimate dose from PET images static and / or dynamic.

  11. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Association Contract covers a range of research domains that are important to the Radiation Protection Research Action, especially in the areas 'Evaluation of Radiation Risks' and 'Understanding Radiation Mechanisms and Epidemiology'. Three research projects concentrate on radiation dosimetry research and two projects on the modelling of radiation carcinogenesis. The following list gives an overview on the topics and responsible scientific project leaders of the Association Contract: Study of radiation fields and dosimetry at aviation altitudes. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Dose reconstruction. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Experimental data for the induction of cancer by radiation of different qualities. (orig.)

  12. Inhalation dose assessment of indoor radon progeny using biokinetic and dosimetric modeling and its application to Jordanian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High indoor radon concentrations in Jordan result in internal exposures of the residents due to the inhalation of radon and its short-lived progeny. It is therefore important to quantify the annual effective dose and further the radiation risk to the radon exposure. This study describes the methodology and the biokinetic and dosimetric models used for calculation of the inhalation doses exposed to radon progeny. The regional depositions of aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract were firstly calculated. For the attached progeny, the activity median aerodynamic diameters of 50 nm, 230 nm and 2500 nm were chosen to represent the nucleation, accumulation and coarse modes of the aerosol particles, respectively. For the unattached progeny, the activity median thermodynamic diameter of 1 nm was chosen to represent the free progeny nuclide in the room air. The biokinetic models developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were used to calculate the nuclear transformations of radon progeny in the human body, and then the dosimetric model was applied to estimate the organ equivalent doses and the effective doses with the specific effective energies derived from the mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. The dose conversion coefficient estimated in this study was 15 mSv WLM-1 which was in the range of the values of 6-20 mSv WLM-1 reported by other investigators. Implementing the average indoor radon concentration in Jordan, the annual effective doses were calculated to be 4.1 mSv y-1 and 0.08 mSv y-1 due to the inhalation of radon progeny and radon gas, respectively. The total annual effective dose estimated for Jordanian population was 4.2 mSv y-1. This high annual effective dose calculated by the dosimetric approach using ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models resulted in an increase of a factor of two in comparison to the value by epidemiological study. This phenomenon was presented by the ICRP in its new published statement on radon

  13. Comparison of observed skeleton retention of strontium in average indian adult with the value predicted by the ICRP biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The daily dietary intake of strontium and its content in skeleton, for an Indian adult population group were estimated by experimentally measuring its concentration in total cooked diet and autopsy skeleton samples using radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The data on daily dietary intake of strontium were used to compute its contents in skeleton using ICRP Publication 67 biokinetic model for strontium. The theoretically computed value of strontium (213.8 mg) compared favourably with the measured values (GM 181.2 mg) in an urban population group living in Mumbai representing an average Indian adult (Reference Indian Man). (authors)

  14. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  15. Quantitative biokinetic analysis of radioactively labelled, inhaled Titanium dioxide Nanoparticles in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Wenk, Alexander; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Lungenbiologie und Erkrankungen, Netzwerk Nanopartikel und Gesundheit

    2010-09-15

    The aim of this project was the determination of the biokinetics of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NP) in the whole body of healthy adult rats after NP administration to the respiratory tract - either via inhalation or instillation. We developed an own methodology to freshly synthesize and aerosolize TiO{sub 2}-NP in our lab for the use of inhalation studies. These NP underwent a detailed physical and chemical characterization providing pure polycrystalline anatase TiO{sub 2}-NP of about 20 nm (geometric standard deviation 1.6) and a specific surface area of 270 m{sup 2}/g. In addition, we developed techniques for sufficiently stable radioactive {sup 48}V labelling of the TiO{sub 2} NP. The kinetics of solubility of {sup 48}V was thoroughly determined. The methodology of quantitative biokinetics allows for a quantitative balance of the retained and excreted NP in control of the administered NP dose and provides a much more precise determination of NP fractions and concentrations of NP in organs and tissues of interest as compared to spotting biokinetics studies. Small fractions of TiO{sub 2}-NP translocate across the air-blood-barrier and accumulate in secondary target organs, soft tissue and skeleton. The amount of translocated TiO{sub 2}-NP is approximately 2% of TiO{sub 2}-NP deposited in the lungs. A prominent fraction of these translocated TiO{sub 2}-NP was found in the remainder. Smaller amounts of TiO{sub 2}-NP accumulate in secondary organs following particular kinetics. TiO{sub 2}-NP translocation was grossly accomplished within the first 2-4 hours after inhalation followed by retention in all organs and tissues studied without any detectable clearance of these biopersistent TiO{sub 2}-NP within 28 days. Therefore, our data suggest crossing of the air-blood-barrier of the lungs and subsequent accumulation in secondary organs and tissues depends on the NP material and its physico-chemical properties. Furthermore, we extrapolate that during repeated or chronic

  16. Quantitative biokinetic analysis of radioactively labelled, inhaled Titanium dioxide Nanoparticles in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this project was the determination of the biokinetics of TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) in the whole body of healthy adult rats after NP administration to the respiratory tract - either via inhalation or instillation. We developed an own methodology to freshly synthesize and aerosolize TiO2-NP in our lab for the use of inhalation studies. These NP underwent a detailed physical and chemical characterization providing pure polycrystalline anatase TiO2-NP of about 20 nm (geometric standard deviation 1.6) and a specific surface area of 270 m2/g. In addition, we developed techniques for sufficiently stable radioactive 48V labelling of the TiO2 NP. The kinetics of solubility of 48V was thoroughly determined. The methodology of quantitative biokinetics allows for a quantitative balance of the retained and excreted NP in control of the administered NP dose and provides a much more precise determination of NP fractions and concentrations of NP in organs and tissues of interest as compared to spotting biokinetics studies. Small fractions of TiO2-NP translocate across the air-blood-barrier and accumulate in secondary target organs, soft tissue and skeleton. The amount of translocated TiO2-NP is approximately 2% of TiO2-NP deposited in the lungs. A prominent fraction of these translocated TiO2-NP was found in the remainder. Smaller amounts of TiO2-NP accumulate in secondary organs following particular kinetics. TiO2-NP translocation was grossly accomplished within the first 2-4 hours after inhalation followed by retention in all organs and tissues studied without any detectable clearance of these biopersistent TiO2-NP within 28 days. Therefore, our data suggest crossing of the air-blood-barrier of the lungs and subsequent accumulation in secondary organs and tissues depends on the NP material and its physico-chemical properties. Furthermore, we extrapolate that during repeated or chronic exposure to insoluble NP the translocated fraction of NP will accumulate in secondary

  17. Cadmium bioavailability to Hyalella azteca from a periphyton diet compared to an artificial diet and application of a biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences between the bioavailability of cadmium in a periphyton diet and an artificial laboratory diet (TetraMin®) have important consequences for predicting bioaccumulation and toxicity in the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. The assimilation efficiency (AE) of Cd was compared between periphyton and TetraMin® at low (1510 and 358 nmol/g ash-free dry mass respectively) and chronically lethal (31,200 and 2890 nmol/g ash-free dry mass respectively) Cd concentrations and in fresh and dry forms using a 109Cd radiotracer pulse-chase feeding technique. Assimilation efficiency of Cd from periphyton (AE = 3–14%) was lower than that for TetraMin® (AE = 44–86%) regardless of Cd concentration or food form. Ingestion rate (IR) was lower for dry than fresh forms of periphyton (0.042 and 0.16 g AFDM/g H. azteca/day respectively) and TetraMin® (0.19 and 0.87 AFDM/g H. azteca/day respectively) and depuration rate (ke) did not differ statistically with food type, form or Cd concentration (0.032–0.094 d−1). Biokinetic models with parameters of AE, IR and ke were used to estimate bioaccumulation from the separate food types. These estimates were compared to those from an independent chronic Cd saturation bioaccumulation model. While the model estimates did not concur, a sensitivity analysis indicated that AE and IR were the most influential biokinetic model parameters for Cd in periphyton and TetraMin® respectively. It was hypothesized that AE was underestimated for Cd in periphyton due to a non-adapted gut enzyme system and IR was overestimated for Cd in TetraMin® due to an initial rapid ingestion phase in H. azteca's feeding habits. This research demonstrated the importance of using ecologically relevant food types in laboratory experiments and verifying acute biokinetic model predictions of dietary metal contribution with those derived from a chronic exposure which is more representative of a field exposure scenario.

  18. Cadmium bioavailability to Hyalella azteca from a periphyton diet compared to an artificial diet and application of a biokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Lisa A., E-mail: lisa.golding@csiro.au [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Borgmann, Uwe [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, Ontario L7R 4A6 (Canada); George Dixon, D. [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Differences between the bioavailability of cadmium in a periphyton diet and an artificial laboratory diet (TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign }) have important consequences for predicting bioaccumulation and toxicity in the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. The assimilation efficiency (AE) of Cd was compared between periphyton and TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} at low (1510 and 358 nmol/g ash-free dry mass respectively) and chronically lethal (31,200 and 2890 nmol/g ash-free dry mass respectively) Cd concentrations and in fresh and dry forms using a {sup 109}Cd radiotracer pulse-chase feeding technique. Assimilation efficiency of Cd from periphyton (AE = 3-14%) was lower than that for TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} (AE = 44-86%) regardless of Cd concentration or food form. Ingestion rate (IR) was lower for dry than fresh forms of periphyton (0.042 and 0.16 g AFDM/g H. azteca/day respectively) and TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} (0.19 and 0.87 AFDM/g H. azteca/day respectively) and depuration rate (k{sub e}) did not differ statistically with food type, form or Cd concentration (0.032-0.094 d{sup -1}). Biokinetic models with parameters of AE, IR and k{sub e} were used to estimate bioaccumulation from the separate food types. These estimates were compared to those from an independent chronic Cd saturation bioaccumulation model. While the model estimates did not concur, a sensitivity analysis indicated that AE and IR were the most influential biokinetic model parameters for Cd in periphyton and TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} respectively. It was hypothesized that AE was underestimated for Cd in periphyton due to a non-adapted gut enzyme system and IR was overestimated for Cd in TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} due to an initial rapid ingestion phase in H. azteca's feeding habits. This research demonstrated the importance of using ecologically relevant food types in laboratory experiments and verifying acute biokinetic model predictions of dietary metal contribution with

  19. The Biokinetic Spectrum for Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A.; Bowman, John P.; David A Ratkowsky; Olley, June; Ross, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We identify and describe the distribution of temperature-dependent specific growth rates for life on Earth, which we term the biokinetic spectrum for temperature. The spectrum has the potential to provide for more robust modeling in thermal ecology since any conclusions derived from it will be based on observed data rather than using theoretical assumptions. It may also provide constraints for systems biology model predictions and provide insights in physiology. The spectrum has a Δ-shape wit...

  20. Biokinetics of radioactive compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biokinetics of radioactive compounds in the human organism represent the central notion in this work, consisting of a theoretical and an experimental part. The first chapter contains definitions and explanations on the importance of the biokinetics of radioactive compounds in clinical therapy and pharmaceuticals research as well as for assessing radiation exposure and radiation hazards. Chapter 2 describes the bases of the biokinetics of radioactive compounds in the medical and non-medical sector, and biokinetics. Chapter 3 deals with obtaining biokinetics data for radioactive compounds from investigations in animals and man, evaluation of measurements, transferring data obtained by animal experiments to man, and with the variability of biokinetics data. In Chapter 4 the results of comprehensive studies in literature on the biokinetics of radioactive compounds are summarized. They relate to three areas: professional and environmental incorporation of radioactive compounds, use of radioactive pharmaceuticals in therapy and research, and incorporation of radioactive compounds by embryo and fetus in consequence of the uptake of radioactive compounds by the mother. Chapter 5 gives an assessment of radiation hazards from radioactive compounds in connection with occupational radiation exposure and nuclear diagnostics in vivo, and a comparison with other risks. For that purpose the concept of effective dose equivalent is applied in connection with suitable risk coefficients to professional and nuclear-medical radiation exposure. Chapter 6 is dedicated to measurement of the biokinetics of radioactive compounds in man using conventional devices. The object of Chapter 7 is measurement of the biokinetics of radioactive pharmaceuticals in man by means of single photon emission computed tomography. (orig./MG)

  1. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium; Proposta de um novo modelo biocinetico para o niobio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Roges

    2006-07-01

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data.

  2. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2-36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors' code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10-11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1-1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses. PMID:26198990

  3. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2-36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors’ code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10-11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1-1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses.

  4. Biokinetic of plutonium in human beings. Analysis and modification of ICRP 67 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary research of the available data and empirical functions for the plutonium excretion after injection was carried out. The ICRP model presented in the Publication no. 67 was then analyzed comparing its predictions for the activity in urine and, at a lesser extent, in feces and blood, with the collected data and empirical curves. The model was modified and an optimized age-related compartmental model was developed. A new skeletal model recently developed was also introduced and age depending bone remodelling rates were assumed on the basis of the ICRP Publication 70. This model provides a better agreement with measured urinary excretion data than the current ICRP 67 model, avoiding unphysiological assumptions such as the transfer of activity from soft tissue to urinary bladder, that were part of the ICRP model. The new optimized model predictions of the activity in faeces and in blood after an injection are also closer to the available data than the ICRP 67 estimations. A good agreement with the partitioning factor of plutonium between skeleton and liver obtained from different autopsy studies was also observed

  5. Application of a canine 238Pu biokinetics/dosimetry model to human bioassay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, A W; Griffith, W C; Roessler, G S; Guilmette, R A

    1995-03-01

    Associated with the use of 238Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes is the potential for human exposure, primarily by inhalation and most likely as 238PuO2. Several models have been developed for assessing the level of intake and predicting the resulting radiation dose following human exposure to 239Pu. However, there are indications that existing models do not adequately describe the disposition and dosimetry of 238Pu following human exposure. In this study, a canine model that accounts for these differences has been adapted for use with human excretion data. The model is based on existing knowledge about organ retention of plutonium. An analysis of the sensitivity of the model to changes in aerosol-associated properties indicated that predictions of urinary excretion are most sensitive to changes in particle solubility and diameter and in the ratio of fragment:particle surface area. Application of the model to urinary excretion data from seven workers exposed to a 238Pu ceramic aerosol gave estimated intakes of 390-8,200 Bq and associated initial pulmonary burdens of 80-1,700 Bq. The resulting 50-y dose commitments to critical organs per Bq of 238Pu intake were estimated to be 0.5 mSv for the thoracic region, 0.2 mSv for the liver, and 1 mSv for the bone surfaces. PMID:7860307

  6. Output parameters of the 131I bi-phasic vs. monoexponential biokinetics model in thyroid gland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, F.; Jirsa, Ladislav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 4 (2006), s. 177-177. [Days of Medical Biophysics /29./. 16.05.2006-18.05.2006, Bratislava] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET100750404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : thyroid activity * model of activity * effective half-life * residence time * radiation dose Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  7. Comparative biokinetics of radiogallium and radioindium in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetics of radiogallium and radioindium in normal mice are compared using the compartmental modelling analysis. The rate constants obtained provide useful information in understanding the physiological and biochemical kinetics of radionuclides in the intact object. A comparison of the compartmental models for gallium and indium reveals the similarities and differences between the biokinetics of the two radionuclides. Furthermore, the results provide valuable information and guidance for human studies and clinical use

  8. Estimation of parameters biokinetics from the resolution of a model compartment for I-131. Application to a patient with thyroid carcinoma hemodialysis; Estimacion de parametros bioceniticos a partir de la resolucion de un modelo compartimental para I-131. Aplicacion a un paciente hemodializado con carcinoma de torioides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, R.; Jimenez Feltstrom, D.; Luis dimon, F. J.; Sanchez Carmona, G.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to define a biokinetic model for the I-131, and solve it for different conditions of the patient or person affected (normal, with cancer of the thyroid or hyperthyroid). Solve the model in the case of a patient treated with I-131 for ablation of thyroid remnants with undergoing renal insufficiency and hemodialysis . Get the parameters Biokinetic this model for different situations. (Author)

  9. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996 - 1999. Mid-term reports for the period 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of the first dosimetry project are the measurement of neutron and charged particle flux and energy spectra at altitudes in civil aviation, the determination of response characteristics for detectors, the investigation of calibration procedures, and the evaluation of exposures of aircrews. The overall objective of the second dosimetry project is to improve estimates of dose following the intake of radionuclides by adults and children. The work includes the development of biokinetic and dosimetric models, including models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides, and for the developing embryo and foetus. Further subjects are target cell dosimetry for short-range particles and the development of computational tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis models. The third dosimetry project encompasses the study of different methods for retrospective dose assessments for individuals or groups of individuals accidentally exposed to increased levels of radiation. The methods investigated include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel and chromosome painting (FISH) for lymphocytes in peripheral blood for individual retrospective dose assessments, luminescence techniques on materials in inhabited environment (ceramics, bricks) and model calculations using environmental data as input. (orig.)

  10. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996 - 1999. Mid-term reports for the period 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Roth, P. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Michael, B.D. [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). Gray Lab.; O`Sullivan, D. [Dublin Inst. for Advanced Studies (Ireland)

    1998-12-31

    The main objectives of the first dosimetry project are the measurement of neutron and charged particle flux and energy spectra at altitudes in civil aviation, the determination of response characteristics for detectors, the investigation of calibration procedures, and the evaluation of exposures of aircrews. The overall objective of the second dosimetry project is to improve estimates of dose following the intake of radionuclides by adults and children. The work includes the development of biokinetic and dosimetric models, including models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides, and for the developing embryo and foetus. Further subjects are target cell dosimetry for short-range particles and the development of computational tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis models. The third dosimetry project encompasses the study of different methods for retrospective dose assessments for individuals or groups of individuals accidentally exposed to increased levels of radiation. The methods investigated include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel and chromosome painting (FISH) for lymphocytes in peripheral blood for individual retrospective dose assessments, luminescence techniques on materials in inhabited environment (ceramics, bricks) and model calculations using environmental data as input. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of relationship between inhalation of 131I thyroid uptake and administration time of stable iodine tablets. Calculation for Japanese by using biokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid uptake of radioactive iodine incorporated into the body is inhibited by the administration of stable iodine tablets. In this paper, the thyroid retention functions in the case of the acute inhalation of 131I for Japanese were analyzed by using the biokinetic models of radioactive and stable iodine. The influence of the Wolff-Chaikoff effect that the composition of thyroid hormone is temporarily inhibited by the intake of superfluous stable iodine is newly taken into consideration in the analysis of stable iodine. By comparing the computed thyroid retention functions between with and without the administration of stable iodine tablets, the inhibitory effects of the 131I thyroid uptake are evaluated. As a result, the inhibitory effect reaches about 50% when administration was conducted 2 days before 131I intake and it increases more than 80% in case of from 1 day to just before the intake. On the other hand, the inhibitory effect falls rapidly when administration was conducted after the intake, resulting in 20% or less than 7% in case of 12 hours or 1 day after the intake. (author)

  12. Analytical methods of biokinetics models with a large compartmental neutral systems. Applications of ICRP 66 and 78 models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New computer programs that include symbolic capability, like Mathematics, can be used to solve analytically large compartmental systems. In this paper some techniques are developed in order to make feasible a computer program that gives not only faster and more accurate solutions, but also analytic solutions for this kind of models. the main idea is to make a partition of subsystem and solve them sequentially. The concept of pseudo-trap compartments in a subsystem is crucial at this point. Impulse (acute), constant, and continuous (such as exponential) intakes are considered. This technique has been applied to develop a computer code (Hum orap) in Mathematic a for solving the ICRP 66 and 78 models. (Author) 11 refs

  13. Estimating biokinetic coefficients in the PACT™ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiyao; Arbuckle, Wm Brian

    2016-02-01

    When powdered activated carbon (PAC) is continuously added to the aeration tank of an activated sludge reactor, the modification is called a PACT™ process (for powdered activated carbon treatment). The PAC provides many benefits, but complicates the determination of biological phenomena. Determination of bio-oxidation kinetics in a PACT system is a key to fully understanding enhanced biological mechanisms resulting from PAC addition. A model is developed to account for the main mechanisms involved in the PACT system -- adsorption, air stripping and bio-oxidation. The model enables the investigation of biokinetic information, including possible synergistic effects. Six parallel reactors were used to treat a synthetic waste; three activated sludge and three PACT. The PACT reactors provided significantly reduced effluent TOC (total organic carbon). Biokinetic coefficients were obtained from steady-state data using averaged reactor data and by using all data (22 points for each reactor). As expected, the PACT reactors resulted in a substantial reduction in the effluent concentration of non-biodegradable total organic carbon. The Monod equation's half-saturation coefficient (Ks) was reduced significantly in the PACT reactors, resulting in higher growth rates at lower concentrations. The maximum specific substrate utilization (qm) rate was also reduced about 25% using the averaged data and remained unchanged using all the data. The substrate utilization values are affected by errors in biomass determination and more research is needed to accurately determine biomass. PMID:26613352

  14. Biokinetics and dosimetry of inhaled tritiated aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A. [Radiation Biology and Health Physics Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Cheng, Y.S. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Inhalation of tritiated pump oils and metal tritides is a potential radiological protection problem in some situations in tritium facilities. At present, the biokinetic data and validated dose models do not generally exist for chemical forms of tritium other than tritiated water and tritium gas. This situation calls for improving our radiobiological and dosimetric understanding for inhalation of tritiated aerosols. When tritiated pump oils or metal tritides were instilled into the lung, tritium was biotransformed to organically bound tritium (OBT) and tritiated water (HTO) in the body. The biokinetics of tritium-in-urine exhibited a sum of two exponential functions for OBT and HTO: short and long-term clearance components. For tritiated pump oils, 68% of the instilled activity was excreted in feces and less than 10% in urine. More than 90% of the applied activity was retained in the lung up to 5 d post-exposure, this declined to 40% and 5% of the instilled activity 7 d and 28 d post-exposure, respectively. No major long-term storage of OBT was observed in the body. For metal tritides (i.e., titanium tritide), 37% of instilled activity was eliminated via urine, 29% via feces, and 16% through exhaled air. The results on distribution and dynamics of tritium in the body were remarkably similar with our earlier studies on percutaneous absorption of tritiated pump oils or skin-contact exposure to tritium-gas-contaminated metal surfaces. Urinary excretion bioassay data from workers exposed to metal tritides or pump oils were analyzed using the MS-Windows 95 PC version of GENMOD{sup TM} internal dosimetry code. (GENMOD implements the ICRP Publication 66 respiratory tract model and compartment models rather than retention functions of tritium compounds as describes by ICRP Publication 67). The simulated tritium urinary excretion data for exposed workers indicated that Type S solubility classification is more appropriate that Type M default as prescribed ICRP Publication 66

  15. Towards a consensus-based biokinetic model for green microalgae – The ASM-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Valverde Pérez, Borja; Sæbø, Mariann;

    2016-01-01

    the systematic approach of the activated sludge modelling (ASM) framework. The process model – identified based on a literature review and using new experimental data – accounts for factors influencing photoautotrophic and heterotrophic microalgal growth, nutrient uptake and storage (i.e. Droop model) and decay...... and substrate availability can introduce significant variability on parameter values for predicting the reaction rates for bulk nitrate and the intracellularly stored nitrogen state-variables, thereby requiring scenario specific model calibration. ASM-A was identified using standard cultivation medium...... and it can provide a platform for extensions accounting for factors influencing algal growth and nutrient storage using wastewater resources....

  16. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Dose reconstruction. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project Dose Reconstruction was conducted within the five work packages: - EPR with teeth, - Chromosome painting (FISH) in lymphocytes, - Luminescence methods, - Modelling, and - Evaluation. (orig.)

  17. The STATFLUX code: a statistical method for calculation of flow and set of parameters, based on the Multiple-Compartment Biokinetical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, F.; Mesa, J.; Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Helene, O.; Vanin, V.; Milian, F.; Deppman, A.; Rodrigues, T. E.; Rodriguez, O.

    2007-03-01

    radioactive substances, through environmental pathways, is very important for radiological protection of populations. One such pathway, associated with the food chain, is the grass-animal-man sequence. The distribution of trace elements in humans and laboratory animals has been intensively studied over the past 60 years [R.C. Pendlenton, C.W. Mays, R.D. Lloyd, A.L. Brooks, Differential accumulation of iodine-131 from local fallout in people and milk, Health Phys. 9 (1963) 1253-1262]. In addition, investigations on the incidence of cancer in humans, and a possible causal relationship to radioactive fallout, have been undertaken [E.S. Weiss, M.L. Rallison, W.T. London, W.T. Carlyle Thompson, Thyroid nodularity in southwestern Utah school children exposed to fallout radiation, Amer. J. Public Health 61 (1971) 241-249; M.L. Rallison, B.M. Dobyns, F.R. Keating, J.E. Rall, F.H. Tyler, Thyroid diseases in children, Amer. J. Med. 56 (1974) 457-463; J.L. Lyon, M.R. Klauber, J.W. Gardner, K.S. Udall, Childhood leukemia associated with fallout from nuclear testing, N. Engl. J. Med. 300 (1979) 397-402]. From the pathways of entry of radionuclides in the human (or animal) body, ingestion is the most important because it is closely related to life-long alimentary (or dietary) habits. Those radionuclides which are able to enter the living cells by either metabolic or other processes give rise to localized doses which can be very high. The evaluation of these internally localized doses is of paramount importance for the assessment of radiobiological risks and radiological protection. The time behavior of trace concentration in organs is the principal input for prediction of internal doses after acute or chronic exposure. The General Multiple-Compartment Model (GMCM) is the powerful and more accepted method for biokinetical studies, which allows the calculation of concentration of trace elements in organs as a function of time, when the flow parameters of the model are known. However, few

  18. Experimental study on biokinetics of radionuclides in age groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, it becomes evident that dose coefficients for members of the public are necessary. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) established a task group of Committee 2 charged with the assessment of dose coefficients as a function of an individual's age. However, little data is available on the biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile and is a need to develop age-dependent biokinetic models, such as for the gastrointestinal tract. The present paper reviewed an outline on characteristics of biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile animals focusing on the previous experimental data. The following radionuclides are discussed: 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 106Ru, 110mAg, 115Cd, 125Sb, 137Cs, 141Ce, 203Hg and 3H. Generally, intestinal absorption and whole-body retention of radionuclides in Juveniles were higher than that of adult. In the case of sucklings, it is very important to study how radionuclides are transferred through the placenta and milk. The transfer rate of radionuclides through the placenta and milk is dependent on the period of gestation at the time of dosing. The IDES (Internal Dose Estimation System) which is based on the ICRP model was used for dose calculation. We modified the IDES using the biokinetic data which was gained by animal experiment. The IDES is flexible because the absorbed dose can be calculated by substituting arbitrary physical and physiological parameters and also substituting ingested dose coefficients not only for the ICRP Reference Man, but also for Japanese of 1 year old, 5 years old, 10 years old, 15 years old and the adult, respectively. (author)

  19. Biokinetics and dose assessment of radionuclides in juveniles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, it becomes evident that dose coefficients for members of the public are necessary. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) established a task group of Committee 2 charged with the assessment of dose coefficients as a function of an individual's age. However, little data is available on the biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile and there is a need to develop age-dependent biokinetic models, such as for the gastrointestinal tract. The present paper reviewed an outline on characteristics of biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile animals focusing on the previous experimental data. The following radionuclides are discussed: 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 106Ru, 110mAg, 115mCd, 125Sb, 137Cs, 141Ce, 203Hg and 3H. Generally, intestinal absorption and whole-body retention of radionuclides in juveniles were higher than that of adult. In the case of sucklings, it is very important to study how radionuclides are transferred through the placenta and milk. The transfer rate of radionuclides through the placenta and milk is dependent on the period of gestation at the time of dosing. The IDES(Internal Dose Estimation System) which is based on the ICRP model was used for dose calculation. We modified the IDES using the biokinetic data which was gained animal experiment. The IDES is flexible because the absorbed dose can be calculated by substituting arbitrary physical and physiological parameters and also substituting ingested dose coefficients not only for the ICRP Reference Man, but also for Japanese of 1 year old, 5 years old, 10 years old, 15 years old and the adult, respectively. (author)

  20. The biokinetics of Rhuthenium and Zirconium radionuclides in humans studied with stable tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of the internal radiation dose delivered by radionuclides incorporated in the human body after accidental release into the environment requires the use of suitable biokinetic models. These models describe the absorption of radionuclides into the blood circulation, their distribution and retention in various organs and tissues, and the excretion routes. Biokinetic models are also employed for interpreting bioassay measurements in exposed subjects, like activity concentration measurements in body fluids (e.g. urine, blood), in order to estimate the incorporated amount of radioactive substances. The reliability of a biokinetic model is closely linked to the available experimental data used to develop the model itself. Biokinetic data for human subjects are available for most essential elements, as well as for some important non-essential elements such as caesium, lead, radium, uranium, americium and plutonium. For many other radionuclides, either very little or no information is available from human studies, and the respective models must be derived from other sources. These may include results from studies in animals, comparative data on the behaviour of similar radionuclides or chemical analogues in vitro. Biokinetic models developed from such a variety of data sources can be applied to humans only with a limited degree of confidence. The availability of data directly obtained on human subjects is therefore fundamental to set up more reliable and realistic models. Ruthenium and zirconium are among the elements characterised by a serious lack of reliable data in humans

  1. 4.3 Collection of Biokinetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the section '4.3 Collection of Biokinetic Data' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'

  2. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficients for members of the public: US Government III. Plutonium as a case study of uncertainties in the systemic biokinetics of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a case study of the validity of different data sources and modelling approaches commonly used to build biokinetic models for radionuclides. The paper examines the basis and apparent predictive accuracy of each of the biokinetic models for Pu used over the years by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), in view of recent improvements in the database. The results of this study and similar retrospective studies for other elements suggest the following five points. (1) Extrapolation of biokinetic data from laboratory animals to man is particularly uncertain for the liver due to qualitative differences among species in the handling of many elements by this organ. (2) As a 'default' approach to biokinetic modelling or model assessment, biokinetic data for unhealthy human subjects should be given higher weight than information extrapolated across animal species or chemical families, but there are counter examples. (3) Little confidence can be placed in biokinetic model predictions for long times after exposure based solely on curve fits to short-term biokinetic data. (4) Bioassay and dosimetry models for a radionuclide should not be developed separately. (5) Where feasible, the systemic biokinetic model for a radionuclide should be developed within a physiologically realistic model structure, because this allows biokinetic data from experimental studies to be supplemented with physiological information, provides a basis for extrapolation of data across animal species or chemical families, results in models that can be used for both bioassay interpretation and dosimetry, and provides a logical basis for extrapolation of data to subgroups of the population (e.g., various ages) or to times outside the period of observation. (author)

  3. A biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculation of dose coefficient in the general population, especially infants, poses a problem in that physical function and biokinetics in infants are different from those in adults. This paper gives an outline on characteristics of biokinetics of radionuclides in jevenile animals, focusing on the previous experimental data. The following radionuclides are discussed: cesium, strontium, cobalt, manganese, lead, ruthenium, cerium, silver and antimony. The retention rate of any kind of radionuclide in the body after the oral administration has been shown to be age-dependent in rats. Dose coefficient in adults has been shown to be unsuitable for that in infants, even if limited to the rate of digestive absorption. Although fetuses are also included in the general population, there is a paucity of such information. Actually, exposure assessment remains, as yet, an issue unsettled. (N.K.)

  4. The biokinetics of alpha-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past two decades have seen wide interest in the application of alpha-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted endoradiotherapy and a large number of compounds labeled with 211At (T1/2 7.21 h), 212Bi (T1/2 1 h) or 213Bi (T1/2 0.78 h) have been studied. Knowledge of the biokinetic behaviour of such agents is important both for their optimal clinical exploitation and for general radiological protection purposes. Animal studies of the distribution and retention of 211At compounds, including ionic astatide, substituted aromatic compounds and labelled monoclonal antibodies, have provided new information on the biochemistry of astatine. With respect the thyroid gland the uptake of the astatide ion has been shown to be very much lower than that of the iodide ion. Less information is available for 212Bi-labelled radiopharmaceuticals. The available data for both 211At and 212Bi radiopharmaceuticals are reviewed. Cautious generic biokinetic models for inorganic and simple organic compounds of 211At and 212Bi; for [211At]-, and [212Bi]-biphosphonates and for [211At]-, and [212Bi]-monoclonal antibodies, are proposed for use in general radiological protection when compound-specific data are not available. (orig.)

  5. The biokinetics of alpha-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D.M. [School of Chemistry, Cardiff Univ., Cardiff (United Kingdom); Duffield, J.R. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Univ. of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    The past two decades have seen wide interest in the application of alpha-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted endoradiotherapy and a large number of compounds labeled with {sup 211}At (T{sup 1}/{sub 2} 7.21 h), {sup 212}Bi (T{sup 1}/{sub 2} 1 h) or {sup 213}Bi (T{sup 1}/{sub 2} 0.78 h) have been studied. Knowledge of the biokinetic behaviour of such agents is important both for their optimal clinical exploitation and for general radiological protection purposes. Animal studies of the distribution and retention of {sup 211}At compounds, including ionic astatide, substituted aromatic compounds and labelled monoclonal antibodies, have provided new information on the biochemistry of astatine. With respect the thyroid gland the uptake of the astatide ion has been shown to be very much lower than that of the iodide ion. Less information is available for {sup 212}Bi-labelled radiopharmaceuticals. The available data for both {sup 211}At and {sup 212}Bi radiopharmaceuticals are reviewed. Cautious generic biokinetic models for inorganic and simple organic compounds of {sup 211}At and {sup 212}Bi; for [{sup 211}At]-, and [{sup 212}Bi]-biphosphonates and for [{sup 211}At]-, and [{sup 212}Bi]-monoclonal antibodies, are proposed for use in general radiological protection when compound-specific data are not available. (orig.)

  6. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall project is organised into seven work packages. WP1 concentrates on the development of mechanistic, quantitative models for radiation oncogenesis using selected data sets from radiation epidemiology and from experimental animal studies. WP2 concentrates on the development of mechanistic, mathematical models for the induction of chromosome aberrations. WP3 develops mechanistic models for radiation mutagenesis, particularly using the HPRT-mutation as a paradigm. WP4 will develop mechanistic models for damage and repair of DNA, and compare these with experimentally derived data. WP5 concentrates on the improvement of our knowledge on the chemical reaction pathways of initial radiation chemical species in particular those that migrate to react with the DNA and on their simulation in track structure codes. WP6 models by track structure simulation codes the production of initial physical and chemical species, within DNA, water and other components of mammalian cells, in the tracks of charged particles following the physical processes of energy transfer, migration, absorption, and decay of excited states. WP7 concentrates on the determination of the start spectra of those tracks considered in WP6 for different impinging radiation fields and different irradiated biological objects. (orig.)

  7. Biokinetics and dosimetry of radioactively labelled organic C-14 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report starts with summarising research work and the resulting scientific information in connection with the dosimetry of C-14 labelled organic compounds. Biokinetic models are developed for compounds such as benzene, phenol, aniline, nitrobenzene, and a selection of pharmaceuticals, in order to show the radioactivity distribution after administration of the C-14 labelled substances. Based on the those models, dose coefficients and excretion rates are derived. The following synoptic view of the available data library leads on to a discussion of various aspects, as eg. the question of whether and how monitoring for detection of incorporation of C-14 administered with labelled organic compounds is possible. None of the questions and aspects arising in connection with this subject can be adequately dealt with in the present document, but concepts and methods are presented which permit an interpretation of radioactivity excretion data measured after incorporation of C-14 labelled organic substances. (orig./CB)

  8. Investigation of radiocesium biokinetics in Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to better understand the biokinetics of radiocesium in clams living in sediment. The accumulation and depuration kinetics of 134Cs were investigated in the Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) under controlled laboratory conditions. The concentration factor was found to be 3.0 for 134Cs in the whole body; however, the concentration factor in the soft part of the clams (12) was significantly higher than those in the whole body and shell (0.80). The depuration kinetics of the radionuclide were described by a two-component exponential model for the whole body. The biological half-lives in the fast and slow components were found to be 0.63 and 22.1 days, respectively. The depuration kinetics for 134Cs in the soft parts were described by a single-component exponential model with a resultant the biological half-life of 18.0 days. (author)

  9. Biokinetics of radionuclides and treatment of accidental intakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the objectives and reviews the progress of EULEP Working Party 5, convened under the auspices of the European Union's Fifth Framework Programme, to 'cluster' two EU-supported contracts, Biokinetics and Dosimetry of Internal Contamination (BIODOS (EU Contract FIS5-1999-00214)) and Radionuclide Biokinetics Database (EULEP) ( RBDATA-EULEP (Concerted Action Contract FIS5-1999-00218), and two non-EU funded projects, Biokinetics of Radionuclides in Human Volunteers (RNHV (non-EU Funded Project) and Treatment of Accidental Intakes of Radionuclides (TAIR (part-funded by EULEP)). (author)

  10. A simplified computer method incorporating compartmental analysis with recycling for biokinetic studies of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In past few years ICRP has made major revisions in its recommendations regarding protection from ionizing radiations. It has developed a series of biokinetic and dosimetric models for calculating radiation doses from intake of radionuclides in the body. It has also developed a new Human Respiratory Tract (HRT) model for this purpose. The new models have been developed to enable dose estimates for radiation workers as well as the general public including the children of all age groups. The new HRT model has been incorporated for dose estimations only in a few standard codes like LUDEP and GENMOD where as the new biokinetic models have not been employed in any of the available codes, except the InDose. ICRP has presented retention and excretion data for some selected radionuclides using these new models in its Publication 78, and dose coefficients for most radionuclides for 1 and 5 μm AMAD size in ICRP Publications 72 and 68 respectively. These data have been provided to ICRP by some leading laboratories and the codes used for these data are generally not available to other laboratories. In this paper we describe a simplified computer method which incorporates compartmental analysis with recycling and can be used for biokinetic studies of various radionuclides for any plant specific/non standard input parameters, data for which can not be obtained from any of the ICRP publications. The method incorporates the compartmentalised form of the new HRT model, GI tract model and the new biokinetic model of 125Sb. It can calculate the amount of radioactivity at any future time t after the inhalation intake and the total number of disintegration (Us) over any time interval of interest in any organ. By operating SEE matrix it can calculate the equivalent dose and the effective dose along with the amount in excretion compartments for any given aerosol size. The method can be used for any radionuclide by incorporating its biokinetic model in compartmentalised form along with

  11. Distribution, biokinetics and dosimetry of tritiated organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the biodistribution and biokinetics of tritium-in-macromolecules of male hairless rats for a period of up to 42 d post-exposure after skin contact exposure to tritiated pump oil or tritiated formaldehyde. Most of the retained organically bound tritium (OBT) was found in the cellular lipid (76%) and protein (22%), when the source of tritium intake was pump oil. For tritiated formaldehyde, 36 % of the OBT was in lipid and 49 % in the protein of tissues. The biological half-lives for tritium-in-lipid were about 3 d for the fast component and 12 d for the slower component. The tritium-in-protein has half-lives of about 0.5 d and 7 d. Tritium in DNA and RNA was cleared with half-lives of about 0.5 d and 20 d. The time-integrated tritium activity in macromolecules showed that the percent contribution to the total OBT dose was exposure- and organ-specific. Most of the OBT dose was due to lipid (42-74% for tritiated pump oil) and acid-insoluble protein (52-69% for tritiated formaldehyde). Only 2-8% of time-integrated OBT activity was found in the nuclei acids. These in vivo biokinetics results of OBT have indicated that a majority of tritium in organic macromolecules of the tissue is incorporated and retained in lipid and protein. The low levels of tritium bound to genetic materials, taken up by the cells in organs, are unlikely to contribute significantly to the effective dose. (authors)

  12. An empirical multivariate log-normal distribution representing uncertainty of biokinetic parameters for 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified biokinetic model for 137Cs has six parameters representing transfer of material to and from various compartments. Using a Bayesian analysis, the joint probability distribution of these six parameters is determined empirically for two cases with quite a lot of bioassay data. The distribution is found to be a multivariate log-normal. Correlations between different parameters are obtained. The method utilises a fairly large number of pre-determined forward biokinetic calculations, whose results are stored in interpolation tables. Four different methods to sample the multidimensional parameter space with a limited number of samples are investigated: random, stratified, Latin Hypercube sampling with a uniform distribution of parameters and importance sampling using a lognormal distribution that approximates the posterior distribution. The importance sampling method gives much smaller sampling uncertainty. No sampling method-dependent differences are perceptible for the uniform distribution methods. (authors)

  13. Biokinetic and molecular studies of methanogens in phased anaerobic digestion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Mirzaman; Parker, Wayne J; Verastegui, Yris; Neufeld, Josh D

    2013-12-01

    The influence of differing operational conditions of two-stage digesters on biokinetic characteristics and communities of methanogenic archaea was evaluated. Operating temperature of each phase influenced the archaeal communities significantly. Also, a strong correlation was observed between community composition and temperature and pH. The maximum specific substrate utilization rates (k max) of acetoclastic methanogens in the mesophilic and thermophilic 1st phases were 11.4 and 22.0 mgCOD mgCOD(-1)d(-1), respectively, whereas significantly lower k max values were estimated for the mesophilic and thermophilic 2nd-phase digesters which were 7.6 and 16.6 mgCOD mgCOD(-1)d(-1), respectively. It appeared that the biokinetic characteristics of the acetoclastic methanogen communities were reliant on digester loading rates. Also, higher temperature dependency coefficients (θ) were observed for the long retention time digesters when compared to the values computed for the 1st-phase digesters. Accordingly, the implementation of two sets of biokinetic parameters for acetoclastic methanogen will improve modeling of phased anaerobic digesters. PMID:24125797

  14. Comparison of predicted with observed biokinetics of inhaled plutonium nitrate and gadolinium oxide in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption kinetics to blood of plutonium and gadolinium after inhalation as nitrate and oxide in humans and animals has been studied. For each material, values describing the time dependence of absorption were derived from the studies in animals and used with the ICRP human respiratory tract model to predict lung retention and cumulative amounts to blood for the volunteers inhaling the same materials. Comparison with the observed behaviour in the volunteers suggests that absorption of plutonium and gadolinium is reasonably species independent, and that data obtained from animal studies can be used to assess their biokinetic behaviour in humans. (author)

  15. 99mTc-UBI Biokinetics: A Specific Peptide for Infection Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, antimicrobial peptides have been proposed as new agents to distinguish between bacterial infections and sterile inflammatory processes. Based on these considerations, Ubiquicidin peptide 29-41 (UBI) has been labeled with 99mTc using a new direct method showing a radiochemical purity > 97 %, high stability in human serum, and low protein binding. In addition 99mTc-UBI showed a specific in vitro and in vivo binding to bacteria. However its biokinetic parameters have not been evaluated since it is one of the new generation radiopharmaceuticals based on peptide structures. Therefore the aim of this project was to establish the biokinetic model for 99mTc-UBI. An activity from 74 to 148 MBq was injected to patients with bone infection and 5 whole body scans were taken at 1, 30, 120, 240 min and 24 h after radiopharmaceutical administration, with a dual head scanner. Urine was collected for 24 h. An antropomorphic phantom was previously used to calculate the effect of attenuation and scattered radiation on the gamma camera acquisition images. ROIs of the selected organs in patients (kidney, liver, heart, bone, soft tissue and lesion) were drawn, and attenuation and scatter corrected. The % urine elimination at 24 h and time integrated ROIs (cpm/pixel/ROIs) were used to obtain the residence time (τ) in each tissue and to establish the biokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic data show that blood clearance is biexponential with a mean residence time in the central compartment of 0.52 h. The images showed non-accumulation in metabolic organs. More than 75 % of the injected activity was eliminated by renal clearance 4 h after 99mTc-UBI administration. The mean radiation dose calculated according to the MIRD formalism was 0.130 mGy/MBq for kidney and the effective dose was 4.29 x 10-3 mSv/MBq

  16. 99mTc-UBI Biokinetics: A Specific Peptide for Infection Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; Meléndez-Alafort, L.; Herrera-Rodríguez, R.; Ferro-Flores, G.; Mitsoura, E.; Martínez-Duncker, C.

    2003-09-01

    Recently, antimicrobial peptides have been proposed as new agents to distinguish between bacterial infections and sterile inflammatory processes. Based on these considerations, Ubiquicidin peptide 29-41 (UBI) has been labeled with 99mTc using a new direct method showing a radiochemical purity > 97 %, high stability in human serum, and low protein binding. In addition 99mTc-UBI showed a specific in vitro and in vivo binding to bacteria. However its biokinetic parameters have not been evaluated since it is one of the new generation radiopharmaceuticals based on peptide structures. Therefore the aim of this project was to establish the biokinetic model for 99mTc-UBI. An activity from 74 to 148 MBq was injected to patients with bone infection and 5 whole body scans were taken at 1, 30, 120, 240 min and 24 h after radiopharmaceutical administration, with a dual head scanner. Urine was collected for 24 h. An antropomorphic phantom was previously used to calculate the effect of attenuation and scattered radiation on the gamma camera acquisition images. ROIs of the selected organs in patients (kidney, liver, heart, bone, soft tissue and lesion) were drawn, and attenuation and scatter corrected. The % urine elimination at 24 h and time integrated ROIs (cpm/pixel/ROIs) were used to obtain the residence time (τ) in each tissue and to establish the biokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic data show that blood clearance is biexponential with a mean residence time in the central compartment of 0.52 h. The images showed non-accumulation in metabolic organs. More than 75 % of the injected activity was eliminated by renal clearance 4 h after 99mTc-UBI administration. The mean radiation dose calculated according to the MIRD formalism was 0.130 mGy/MBq for kidney and the effective dose was 4.29 × 10-3 mSv/MBq.

  17. Biokinetics aand dosimetry of inhaled 238PuO2 in the beagle dog: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temporal and spatial distributions of 238Pu have been measured during the course of a dose-response study of the biological effects of inhaled 238PuO2 in Beagle dogs. These measurements were done on the dose-response study animals, as well as a separate group of dogs exposed to similar aerosols and killed serially out to 4 y after exposure. The data from this latter group provided the basis for the development of a biokinetic/dosimetric model for 238PuO2 in dogs. Since the publication of this model, several important findings have been made that affected the dosimetric evaluations. The first involved the discovery of significant quantities of natural uranium (U) in the feces samples. The U was measured with the plutonium (Pu), which inflated the values for purported Pu in feces. The second finding involved the addition of Pu biokinetics data from the dose-response dogs, which increased the period of observation from 4 y to 15 y; these later data were not consistent with the earlier model predictions. The purpose of this investigation was (1) to remove the analytical bias in the 238Pu radiochemical data due to the U and (2) to modify the original model of Mewhinney and Diel, taking into account all data from both studies

  18. Different biokinetics of nanomedicines linking to their toxicity; an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In spite of the extreme rise to the knowledge of nanotechnology in pharmaceutical sciences, there are currently limited experimental works studying the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs and the biological system. Adjustment of size and surface area plays the main role in the reaction between NPs and cells leading to their increased entrance into cells through skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory system. Moreover, change in physicochemical reactivity of NPs causes them to interact with circulatory and cellular proteins differentially leading to the altered parameters of their biokinetics, including adsorption, distribution, translocation, transformation, and elimination. A direct relationship between the surface area, reactive oxygen species generating capability, and proinflammatory effects of NPs have been found in respiratory tract toxicity. Additionally, complement-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to liposomes and other lipid-based nanodrugs have been well defined. Inhalation studies of some NPs have confirmed the translocation of inhaled materials to extra pulmonary organs such as central nervous system (CNS via olfactory neurons and induction of inflammatory response. Injectable uncoated NPs have a tendency to remain on the injection site while the poly ethanol glycol (PEG-coated NPs can be notably drained from the injection site to get as far as the lymph nodes where they accumulate. This confirms the existence of channels within the extracellular matrix for NPs to move along. Furthermore, induction of DNA strand breaks and formation of micronuclei have been recorded for exposure to some NPs such as single-walled carbon nanotubes. In the recent years, most of the studies have simply outlined better efficacy of nanodrugs, but few discussed their possible toxic reactions specially if used chronically. Therefore, we emphasize that this part of the nanoscience must not be undermined and toxicologists must be sensitive to

  19. Different biokinetics of nanomedicines linking to their toxicity; an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Mohammadi, Hamidreza; Ramazani, Ali; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the extreme rise to the knowledge of nanotechnology in pharmaceutical sciences, there are currently limited experimental works studying the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the biological system. Adjustment of size and surface area plays the main role in the reaction between NPs and cells leading to their increased entrance into cells through skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory system. Moreover, change in physicochemical reactivity of NPs causes them to interact with circulatory and cellular proteins differentially leading to the altered parameters of their biokinetics, including adsorption, distribution, translocation, transformation, and elimination. A direct relationship between the surface area, reactive oxygen species generating capability, and proinflammatory effects of NPs have been found in respiratory tract toxicity. Additionally, complement-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to liposomes and other lipid-based nanodrugs have been well defined. Inhalation studies of some NPs have confirmed the translocation of inhaled materials to extra pulmonary organs such as central nervous system (CNS) via olfactory neurons and induction of inflammatory response. Injectable uncoated NPs have a tendency to remain on the injection site while the poly ethanol glycol (PEG)-coated NPs can be notably drained from the injection site to get as far as the lymph nodes where they accumulate. This confirms the existence of channels within the extracellular matrix for NPs to move along. Furthermore, induction of DNA strand breaks and formation of micronuclei have been recorded for exposure to some NPs such as single-walled carbon nanotubes.In the recent years, most of the studies have simply outlined better efficacy of nanodrugs, but few discussed their possible toxic reactions specially if used chronically. Therefore, we emphasize that this part of the nanoscience must not be undermined and toxicologists must be sensitive to set up suitable in vivo or in

  20. The biokinetics of corrosion products from a water cooled reactor after deposition in the rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of steels used in the fabrication of the primary cooling circuit of certain types of nuclear reactor results in the formation of oxide bearing debris which contains neutron activation products. These present a potential inhalation hazard during maintenance and decommissioning of the reactors. In this study, the biokinetics of a residue containing (by activity) 51Cr (6.8%), 54Mn (12.7%), 58Co (4.8%), 59Fe (4.6%), 60Co (60.2%) and 65Zn (10.9%) have been investigated in rats after intratracheal instillation. Transfer rates to blood for 54Mn, 59Fe, 60Co and 65Zn were obtained up to 282 days after exposure. Combination of these with the mechanical clearance rates from the alveolar region of the lung in the proposed ICRP lung model, provided estimates of biological half-times in the lung. Predicted biokinetics in man for 60Co, 65Zn and 59Fe were consistent with human data obtained after accidental intakes and experimental studies and hence would appear to validate the model used. (author)

  1. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity; Biocinetique et toxicite de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A

    2000-07-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation.

  2. Radiation exposure of the patient in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Experimental studies of the biokinetics of 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide, 99mTc-MIBI, 14C-triolein and 14C-urea, and development of dosimetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biokinetic and dosimetric models for a number of clinically used radiopharmaceuticals, for which information on the radiation dosimetry is scarce, have been produced. On patients undergoing investigations with 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide (for diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours) and 99mTc-MIBI (for myocardial perfusion imaging), whole body gamma camera scanning was performed several times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical. Total body and organ activity content was determined using the geometric mean of the number of counts in two 180 deg opposed planar images. A thorough investigation of sources influencing the accuracy of the quantification of activity was carried out, showing an overall uncertainty varying from 10% to 30% for organs with a significant uptake and 5% for the whole body. The activity in blood and urine was also measured. 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide was predominantly excreted via the kidney-bladder system and a typical investigation with 1200 MBq resulted in an effective dose of 8.4 mSv (0.076 mSv/MBq). 99mTc-MIBI was to a great extent excreted via the gastrointestinal tract and an investigation with 1200 MBq resulted in an effective dose of 13 mSv (0.011 mSv/MBq). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to investigate the possibility to measure ultra-low activity concentrations of 14CO2, in exhaled air from patients undergoing 14C-breath tests, with special application to 14C-triolein (for study of fat malabsorption). AMS was proven to be a useful technique for long-term retention studies of 14C, and was used together with liquid scintillation counting in an investigation of the biokinetics of 14C-urea in adult and paediatric patients (for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in the upper gastrointestinal tract). The effective dose for 14C-urea was 0.019 mSv/MBq for adults and from 0.041 to 0.019 mSv/MBq for seven- to fourteen -year-old children, resulting in an effective dose of approximately 0.002 mSv per investigation

  3. Radiation exposure of the patient in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Experimental studies of the biokinetics of {sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}-octreotide, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI, {sup 14}C-triolein and {sup 14}C-urea, and development of dosimetric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide Svegborn, S

    1999-03-01

    Biokinetic and dosimetric models for a number of clinically used radiopharmaceuticals, for which information on the radiation dosimetry is scarce, have been produced. On patients undergoing investigations with {sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}-octreotide (for diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours) and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI (for myocardial perfusion imaging), whole body gamma camera scanning was performed several times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical. Total body and organ activity content was determined using the geometric mean of the number of counts in two 180 deg opposed planar images. A thorough investigation of sources influencing the accuracy of the quantification of activity was carried out, showing an overall uncertainty varying from 10% to 30% for organs with a significant uptake and 5% for the whole body. The activity in blood and urine was also measured. {sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}-octreotide was predominantly excreted via the kidney-bladder system and a typical investigation with 1200 MBq resulted in an effective dose of 8.4 mSv (0.076 mSv/MBq). {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was to a great extent excreted via the gastrointestinal tract and an investigation with 1200 MBq resulted in an effective dose of 13 mSv (0.011 mSv/MBq). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to investigate the possibility to measure ultra-low activity concentrations of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, in exhaled air from patients undergoing {sup 14}C-breath tests, with special application to {sup 14}C-triolein (for study of fat malabsorption). AMS was proven to be a useful technique for long-term retention studies of {sup 14}C, and was used together with liquid scintillation counting in an investigation of the biokinetics of {sup 14}C-urea in adult and paediatric patients (for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in the upper gastrointestinal tract). The effective dose for {sup 14}C-urea was 0.019 mSv/MBq for adults and from 0.041 to 0.019 mSv/MBq for seven- to fourteen -year-old children

  4. Biokinetic behavior of Tc in the red abalone, Haliotis rufescens: a reassessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetic behavior of /sup 95m/Tc in the red abalone, Haliotis rufescens, is reviewed in light of recent experiments on other molluscs. Additional experimentation has confirmed that, when uptake is directly from labeled seawater, abalone exhibit concentration factors in excess of 100. Bivalve molluscs under the same experimental conditions have concentration factors that do not exceed 2. However, uptake and loss kinetics cannot be described by a single compartment model as had been previously advanced. Assimilation of /sup 95m/Tc by the abalone following a single feeding of labeled macroalga, Nereocystis pyrifera, is high (approx. 45%) and loss kinetics are similar to those observed following direct uptake from seawater

  5. Study of the influence of radionuclide biokinetics on in vivo counting using voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo measurement is an efficient method to estimate the retention of activity in case of internal contamination. However, it is currently limited by the use of physical phantoms for the calibration, not enabling to reproduce neither the morphology of the measured person nor the actual distribution of the contamination. The current method of calibration therefore leads to significant systematic uncertainties on the quantification of the contamination. To improve the in vivo measurement, the Laboratory of Internal Dose Assessment (LEDI, IRSN) has developed an original numerical calibration method with the OEDIPE software. It is based on voxel phantoms created from the medical images of persons, and associated with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code of particle transport. The first version of this software enabled to model simple homogeneous sources and to better estimate the systematic uncertainties in the lung counting of actinides due to the detector position and to the heterogeneous distribution of activity inside the lungs. However, it was not possible to take into account the dynamic feature, and often heterogeneous distribution between body organs and tissues of the activity. Still, the efficiency of the detection system depends on the distribution of the source of activity. The main purpose of the thesis work is to answer to the question: what is the influence of the biokinetics of the radionuclides on the in vivo counting? To answer it, it was necessary to deeply modify OEDIPE. This new development enabled to model the source of activity more realistically from the reference biokinetic models defined by the ICRP. The first part of the work consisted in developing the numerical tools needed to integrate the biokinetics in OEDIPE. Then, a methodology was developed to quantify its influence on the in vivo counting from the results of simulations. This method was carried out and validated on the model of the in vivo counting system of the LEDI. Finally, the

  6. Compared biokinetic and biological studies of chronic and acute inhalations of uranium compounds in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a natural, radioactive heavy metal, widely used in the nuclear industry in various chemical and isotopic forms. Its use in the fuel cycle involves the risk of radiological exposure for the workers, mainly via the inhalation of uranium particles. According to the workplace configuration, uranium contaminations can be acute or repeated, involve various chemical forms and different levels of enrichment, as well as involving one or several components. The dosimetric concepts and models available for workers' radiological protection, as well as most of the studies of the biological effects, correspond to acute exposure situations. Moreover the processes leading to pathological effects are little known in vivo. In this context, the main question is to know whether exposures due to repeated inhalation by rats induce the element kinetics and toxicity, which may be different from those observed after an acute exposure. In this study, comparison of the experimental and theoretical biokinetics of an insoluble uranium repeatedly inhaled over three weeks shows that a chronic contamination is correctly modelled, except for bone retention, by the sum of acute, successive and independent incorporations. Moreover, the kinetics of a soluble uranium inhaled irregularly can be modified by previous repeated exposure to an insoluble uranium. In certain cases therefore, exposure to uranium could modify its biokinetics during later exposures. At a toxicological level, the study demonstrates that the uranium particles inhaled repeatedly induce behavioural disruptions and genotoxic effects resulting in various sorts of DNA damage, in several cell types and certainly depending on the quantity inhaled. Exposures involving several uraniferous components produce a synergy effect. Moreover, repeated inhalations worsen the genotoxic effects in comparison to an acute exposure. This work demonstrates the importance of not ignoring the effects of the repetition of uranium exposure. It

  7. A biokinetic study of {sup 209}Po in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henricsson, C.F.; Ranebo, Y. [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Lund (Sweden); Hansson, M. [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmoe, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Malmoe (Sweden); Raeaef, C.L., E-mail: Christopher.Raaf@med.lu.se [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmoe, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Malmoe (Sweden); Holm, E. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Osteras (Norway)

    2012-10-15

    Five adult volunteers participated in a biokinetic study of radioactive polonium. Portions of about 10 Bq of {sup 209}Po were orally administrated to four of the volunteers in a single ingestion. The fifth volunteer ingested a daily amount of 53 mBq of 209Po for 243 d to study the time to achieve equilibrium between intake and excretion for protracted intakes. For the subjects ingesting single intakes of {sup 209}Po complete sampling of urine and feces was subsequently collected the first few days upon the ingestion. The samples were processed with radiochemical extraction and analyzed with alpha spectrometry. In the study, the maximum daily excretion rates in feces were 18-50% of the ingested activity, observed within 3 d after intake. Regarding the urine excretion, the daily excretion peaked, on average, at 0.15-1% of the ingested activity within two days upon intake. These results indicate an average gastro-intestinal uptake fraction of 0.46 {+-} 0.08, which agrees well with earlier biokinetic studies of polonium in man. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human metabolism of an oral intake of polonium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4 individuals were administrated about 10 Bq polonium-209. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gastro-intestinal uptake fraction, if orally administrated polonium-209 was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biological half-time of polonium in human body was studied.

  8. Biokinetic study for SRC-I wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    Biooxidation is an important part of the overall wastewater treatment system for the proposed SRC-I Demonstration Plant in Newman, Kentucky. After the completion of a Baseline Design for the plant in April 1982, various refinements were evaluated. One of these was the inclusion of a process for phenol recovery from four sour-water streams. As part of this evaluation, an extensive laboratory treatability study was conducted on wastewaters both with and without this phenol recovery step. The purpose of the study was to compare the results of different treatment schemes on different wastewaters and did not include the development of the kinetic coefficients that govern the biooxidation process. Additional treatability testing documented herein, has been performed to establish the kinetic coefficients for biooxidation of the SRC-I wastewaters. This will provide a rational basis for any subsequent changes in design. The wastewater feed used in this study was process recycle water from the Fort Lewis, Washington, pilot plant. Prior to biooxidation, it was pretreated by solvent extraction for removal of phenolics and by steam stripping for removal of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide. Two, 2-stage bench scale bioreactors were operated for approximately eight months, during which time they were stabilized at various steady-state conditions. Kinetic coefficients were evaluated according to the Lawrence and McCarty model, based on BOD, COD, and TOC. Nitrification, oxygen utilization, and solids settling velocities were also studied. The results showed that BOD is a poor basis for the model mainly because almost all BOD/sub 5/ was removed at all steady-state conditions. Also, the model was more accurate for steady-state conditions of lower solids retention times. The bulk of both organic and ammonia reductions occurred in the first stage reactors.

  9. Assessment of physico-chemical and biokinetic properties of uranium peroxide hydrate UO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive studies on the radiotoxicological risk of an intermediate compound UO4, which is not specified in ICRP Recommendations, were motivated by its increased use in the nuclear fuel cycle and the lack of information such as physico-chemical and biokinetic properties. The aim of this work was to give an experimental basis for assessing the appropriate limits on intake for workers exposed to UO4 and to provide guidance for the interpretation of personal monitoring data. Particle size measurement of the UO4 dust indicated a geometric diameter D of 0.5 microm, which corresponds to an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1.1 microm. In vitro experiments conducted in culture medium showed that UO4 is a soluble compound with 66.2% dissolved in 1.9 d and 33.8% in 78 d. Results of dissolution obtained with macrophages showed a significant decrease of 50% at 1 d in terms of solubility. Biokinetic data in the rat obtained from two in vivo studies involving intratracheal instillation in rats indicated half-times in the lung of 0.5 d and 27 d for an initial lung deposit (ILD) of 195 microg, and 1.2 d and 38 d for an ILD of 7.6 microg. Absorption parameters to blood as defined in the ICRP Publication 66 human respiratory tract model were calculated with the specific software GIGAFIT and led to the rapid fraction fr, the rapid rate sr, and the slow rate ss. Effective dose coefficients by inhalation for this UO4 compound using the in vivo experimental results were calculated to be between 0.52 and 0.70 x 10-6 Sv Bq-1. Comparison of these values with effective dose coefficients defined in ICRP Publication 68 for workers showed that UO4 could be considered as a fast soluble compound of Type F

  10. Human biokinetics of inhaled terbium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four healthy men inhaled a monodisperse aerosol of 160Tb-labelled terbium oxide particles. The behaviour of the tracer was studied through measurements of body radioactivity and of its urinary and faecal excretion. Estimated early faecal losses in the four subjects ranged from 3% to 31% of the initial respiratory-tract deposit; most of the residue had become systemic within a year, with the principal deposit apparently in bone. Interference from this systemic deposit prevented accurate determination of the long-term pulmonary clearance kinetics, but the pattern was broadly what would be expected for Type M materials in the ICRP's Human Respiratory Tract Model. Averaged trends in the whole-body residue after ∼ 1 year suggest a clearance half-life of about 5 y. (author)

  11. Multigenerational cadmium acclimation and biokinetics in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2006-05-01

    A Cd exposure (3 microg L(-1)) experiment was conducted for six successive generations to investigate the responses to chronic Cd stress in Daphnia magna. We observed a biphasic accumulation of Cd in the six generations and suggested a similar pattern with respect to daphnids' tolerance. Cd assimilation efficiencies, daphnid growth, and reproduction corresponded to the changes of tolerance, which was partially accounted for by metallothionein induction. When maternally exposed neonates grew in Cd-free water for one or two generations, their growth, MT concentration and biokinetic parameters partially or totally recovered. The rapid recovery suggests the high potential for ecological restoration from Cd pollution. Our results indicate that the tolerance of sensitive D. magna clones to Cd was dependent on long-term or multigenerational exposure. The tolerance developed within the first several generations might not be maintained, and the animals may become even more sensitive to Cd stress in subsequent generations. PMID:16202491

  12. Biokinetic study of free 177Lu in NIH mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 177Lu has been identified, by the scientific community, as a radionuclide with interesting advantages compared with 90Y and other beta emitters used in nuclear medicine. This paper analyses the free 177Lu biokinetic behavior in NIH male mice from activity measurements performed by the Radiopharmacy Division of CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica) in the frame of an IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) Coordinated Research Project. The study of experimental data is a previous condition that allows drawing the activity-time curves for organs and to know the biodistribution of 177Lu. The cumulated activity in organs of interest in NIH male mice are calculated and critical organs are identified. The organs selected for analysis in this paper are the liver, kidneys, spleen, stomach, intestine, lungs, skeleton and red marrow. The last one is estimated from the activity measured in blood based on a recognized method published by Sgouros (2000). The results has been extrapolated to human assuming the same biokinetic behaviour as mice being the applicability of the different extrapolation methods also discussed. The direct extrapolation from mice data was the method of election from a radiological protection point of view. The measurement procedures, the data processing, the extrapolation techniques and the analysis performed in this study will contribute as a basis for future research of this group in the area of antibodies and other radiopharmaceutical labeled with 177Lu. The cumulated activity calculated in each organ is relevant because it makes possible to perform the dose assessment through the application of appropriate dose coefficients. It is a necessary step in order to evaluate the toxicity risk that is required in a pre-clinical study. (author)

  13. Comparison between biokinetics of inhaled plutonium nitrate and gadolinium oxide in humans and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the paucity of human data after inhalation of different chemical forms of radionuclides, the implications for human exposure are often based on animal studies. Biokinetic studies of plutonium nitrate and gadolinium oxide in human volunteers and rats are described. The results, together with information from other studies with radionuclides, suggests that animal studies can be used with advantage for assessing the biokinetic behavior in humans, and for providing guidance on the assessment of intake and optimal monitoring regimens. (author)

  14. Biokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles: toxicokinetics, biological fates, and protein interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi SJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soo-Jin Choi,1 Jin-Ho Choy2 1Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's University, 2Center for Intelligent Nano Bio Materials (CINBM, Department of Bioinspired Science and Department of Chemistry and Nanoscience, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Biokinetic studies of zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles involve systematic and quantitative analyses of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in plasma and tissues of whole animals after exposure. A full understanding of the biokinetics provides basic information about nanoparticle entry into systemic circulation, target organs of accumulation and toxicity, and elimination time, which is important for predicting the long-term toxic potential of nanoparticles. Biokinetic behaviors can be dependent on physicochemical properties, dissolution property in biological fluids, and nanoparticle–protein interaction. Moreover, the determination of biological fates of ZnO nanoparticles in the systemic circulation and tissues is critical in interpreting biokinetic behaviors and predicting toxicity potential as well as mechanism. This review focuses on physicochemical factors affecting the biokinetics of ZnO nanoparticles, in concert with understanding bioavailable fates and their interaction with proteins. Keywords: ZnO nanoparticles, biokinetics, distribution, excretion, fate, interaction

  15. Biokinetics of 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide in nude mice transplanted with a human carcinoid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long time biokinetics of the radiolabeled somatostatin analogues 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide was studied in nude mice transplanted with the human carcinoid tumor, GOT1. The results were compared with those from the patient with the original tumor. This patient has been diagnosed and later treated with 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide. The animals received about 2 MBq 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide (0.1 μg) by injection into a tail vein. The animals were killed 0.5 h-14 d after injection of the radiopharmaceutical. Tumor tissue and normal tissues were collected and weighed and measured for 111In activity. The 111In uptake in the tumor was higher than in all normal tissues except the kidneys. The tumor-to-normal-tissue activity concentration, TNC, increased with time for all normal tissues studied. These data were similar to those observed for the original tumor in the patient. The similar biokinetics for 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide in the tumor-bearing mice and the patient makes this animal model suitable as a model for evaluation of therapy of somatostatin receptor (sstr) expressing tumors with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. Furthermore, the increase with time of TNC both in mice and the patient indicates that long-lived radionuclides are preferred for therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues

  16. Biokinetics and dosimetry with 177Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; de Murphy, C. Arteaga; Ferro-Flores, Ge; Pedraza-López, M.; Murphy-Stack, E.

    Malignant pancreatic tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to determine biokinetic parameters in mice, in order to estimate the induced pancreatic tumour absorbed doses and to evaluate an `in house' 177Lu-DOTA-TATE radiopharmaceutical as part of preclinical studies for targeted therapy in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (nD22) to obtain biokinetic and dosimetric data of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. The mean tumour uptake 2 h post injection was 14.76±1.9% I.A./g; kidney and pancreas uptake, at the same time, were 7.27±1.1% I.A./g (1.71±0.90%/organ) and 4.20±0.98% I.A./g (0.42±0.03%/organ), respectively. The mean absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 0.58±0.02 Gy/MBq; 0.23±0.01 Gy/MBq and 0.14±0.01 Gy/MBq, respectively. These studies justify further dosimetric estimations to ensure that 177Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in humans.

  17. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNlC-TOC has shown high in vitro and in vivo stability, rapid background clearance and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non Hodgkin's Iymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNlC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 prepared from Iyophilized kits, and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. Whole-body images were acquired at different times after 99mTc-HYNlC-TOC or 188Re-anti-CD20 administration obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities > 95 %. Regions of interest (ROls) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate time-activity curves in each organ, to adjust the biokinetic model using the SAAM software, and to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNlC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood (heart) ratio of 4.3 ± 0.7 in receptor-positive tumors at 1 h and the mean radiation absorbed dose calculated for a study using 740 MBq was 24, 21.5, 5.5 and 1.0 mSv for spleen, kidneys, liver and bone marrow respectively and the effective dose was 4.4 mSv. Results showed that after administration of 7 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to whole body would be 0.7 Gy (0.1 mGy/MBq) which is the indicated dose for non Hodgkin's Iymphome therapies. (Author)

  18. Multigenerational cadmium acclimation and biokinetics in Daphnia magna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan Rui [Atmospheric Marine Coastal Environment Program (AMCE), and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China); Wang Wenxiong [Atmospheric Marine Coastal Environment Program (AMCE), and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: wwang@ust.hk

    2006-05-15

    A Cd exposure (3 {mu}g L{sup -1}) experiment was conducted for six successive generations to investigate the responses to chronic Cd stress in Daphnia magna. We observed a biphasic accumulation of Cd in the six generations and suggested a similar pattern with respect to daphnids' tolerance. Cd assimilation efficiencies, daphnid growth, and reproduction corresponded to the changes of tolerance, which was partially accounted for by metallothionein induction. When maternally exposed neonates grew in Cd-free water for one or two generations, their growth, MT concentration and biokinetic parameters partially or totally recovered. The rapid recovery suggests the high potential for ecological restoration from Cd pollution. Our results indicate that the tolerance of sensitive D. magna clones to Cd was dependent on long-term or multigenerational exposure. The tolerance developed within the first several generations might not be maintained, and the animals may become even more sensitive to Cd stress in subsequent generations. - Tolerance of sensitive Daphnia magna clones to cadmium was dependent on long-term or multigenerational exposure.

  19. Biokinetics and tolerance development of toxic metals in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Martin Tsz-Ki; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2007-05-01

    Daphnia magna is widespread in many freshwater systems of temperate regions and frequently is used to test metal toxicity. Recently, studies have been performed to determine metal biokinetics and development of tolerance in this important zooplankton species. In the present paper, we review the recent progress in these areas and suggest possible directions for future studies. Substantial differences exist in aqueous uptake, dietary assimilation, and elimination of several metals (Cd, Se, Zn, Ag, Hg, and MeHg) by D. magna. The routes of uptake are metal-specific, with Se and MeHg being accumulated predominantly through diet. All metals except Ag can be biomagnified from algae to D. magna, providing that metal concentrations in algae and algal food density are relatively low. Methylmercury is biomagnified in all situations. As a route for metal elimination in D. magna, maternal transfer is especially important for Se, Zn, and MeHg. On the other hand, the effect of single-generation exposure to metals on D. magna is very different from multigeneration exposure, which often results in a significantly higher metal tolerance. Moreover, D. magna easily loses metal tolerance developed through long-term exposure. Recovery from metal stress can temporarily increase the sensitivity of D. magna to metal toxicity. Finally, metallothionein-like protein is responsible for minimizing metal toxicity in D. magna. The results inferred from these studies can be extrapolated to other aquatic invertebrates as well as to other pollutants in the aquatic environment. PMID:17521151

  20. Biokinetics and dosimetry of several radiolabelled peptides in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; Ferro-Flores, G.; de Murphy, C. Arteaga; Pedraza-López, M.; Ramírez-Iglesias, M. A. T.

    Radiolabelled peptides have been used as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The goal of this research was the in vitro assessment of the uptake, internalization, externalization, and efflux of five radiolabelled peptides in cancer cells to estimate radiation-absorbed doses from experimental biokinetic data. 177Lu-DOTA-octreotate, 188Re-lanreotide, and 99mTc-HYNIC-octreotide were studied in the AR42J cell line. The PC3 and NCIH69 cells were used for 99mTc-HYNIC-bombesin and 177Lu-DOTA-minigastrin, respectively. The cumulated activities in the membrane and cytoplasm were calculated by integration of the experimental time-activity curves and used for dosimetry calculations according to the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) cellular methodology. The mean absorbed dose to the cell nucleus were 0.69±0.09, 0.11±0.08, 0.55±0.09, 3.45±0.48, and 3.30±0.65 Gy/Bq for 99mTc-HYNIC-bombesin, 99mTc-HYNIC-octreotide, 177Lu-DOTA-minigastrin, 177Lu-DOTA-octreotate, and 188Re-lanreotide, respectively. If radiopharmaceutical cell kinetics were not used and only uptake data were considered, the calculated doses would be overestimated up to 25 times.

  1. Biokinetics and dosimetry of 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with clinical 131I-MIBG studies of patients with suspected sporadic pheochromocytoma or multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN II), quantitative biokinetic data have been collected in order to improve the present estimates of absorbed dose to various organs and tissues as well as of the effective dose equivalent and its variation from patient to patient. The authors find considerably higher liver uptake than earlier published, but their estimates of the uptake in the thyroid and in the normal adrenal medulla show lower values than earlier reported. This results in the following absorbed dose per activity unit administered (mGy/MGq) (mean and typical range): Liver: 0.83 (0.50 - 1.2); Spleen: 0.61 (0.17 - 1.3); Salivary glands: 0.22 (0.082 - 0.41); Thyroid (blocked): 0.1; Total body: 0.082 (0.055 -0.12). The effective dose equivalent was estimated to be 0.20 (0.1 -0.3) mSv/MBq when the thyroid is adequately blocked. 16 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  2. Biokinetic and dosimetric investigations of 14C-labeled substances in man using AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to now, radiation dose estimates from radiopharmaceuticals, labeled with pure β-emitting radionuclides, e.g., 14C or 3H have been very uncertain. Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) we have derived new and improved data for 14C-triolein and 14C-urea and are currently running a program related to the biokinetics and dosimetry of 14C-glycocholic acid and 14C-xylose. The results of our investigations have made it possible to widen the indications for the clinical use of the 14C-urea test for Helicobacter pylori infection in children. The use of ultra-low activities, which is possible with AMS (down to 1/1000 of that used for liquid scintillation counting), has opened the possibility for metabolic investigations on children as well as on other sensitive patient groups like new-borns, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. Using the full potential of AMS, new 14C-labeled drugs could be tested on humans at a much earlier stage than today, avoiding uncertain extrapolations from animal models

  3. Radiocesium biokinetics in olive flounder inhabiting the Fukushima accident-affected Pacific coastal waters of eastern Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocesium (134Cs and 137Cs) originating from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1FNPP) has contaminated coastal waters and been subsequently transferred to the marine biota along the Pacific coastal region of eastern Japan. To clarify the mechanism of radiocesium biokinetics in olive flounder, a commercially valuable and piscivorous predator, the biokinetics of 137Cs was simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model and then validated with the measured concentrations in available monitoring data. The 137Cs concentrations in seawater of the Pacific coastal sites of eastern Japan, from Kesen-numa (170 km north from the 1FNPP) to Choshi (190 km south from the 1FNPP), were reconstructed by fitting the simulated levels to the observed concentrations. Simulated values were verified by measured radiocesium levels in sedentary organism such as macro-algae and mussels inhabiting each study site which had accumulated radiocesium in their ambient environment from the beginning of the accident. Using reconstructed 137Cs concentrations in seawater, the 137Cs levels in olive flounder and its main planktivorous prey fish, e.g. anchovy, sand lance, whitebait, etc., were simulated and compared with observed concentrations to clarify the biokinetics of radiocesium in these organisms. This assessment showed that the determining factor for the maximum radiocesium concentrations in fish in the plankton food chain is likely to be the initial radiocesium concentration which they were exposed to during the contamination stage. Furthermore, the simulated 137Cs concentrations in gut contents of olive flounder were verified by measured 137Cs concentrations in the stomach contents of this fish collected within 30 km from the 1FNPP. These results indicated that the decrease of 137Cs levels in their prey organisms was the primary determining factor of radiocesium depuration, and the resultant ecological half-lives were 140–160 d in the olive flounder, by the simulation

  4. The Determination of Bio-kinetic Coefficients of Crude Oil Biodegradation Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Talaie Khozani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Oil pollution can be generated as a result of spillage, leakage, discharge, exploration, production, refining, transport and storage of crude oil and fuels in the environment. Consequently, many researchers have developed and studied the chemical, physical and biological methods to degrade crude oil. Among them, the biological treatments are the most interesting as they are simple and economical methods. The aim of this study was to determine biokinetic coefficients of crude oil degradation by pseudomonas aerogenusa. This microorganism was isolated in our previous work."nMaterials and Methods: In this study the bio-kinetic coefficients of crude oil biodegradation were evaluated. Pseudomonas aerogenusa bacteria which had been isolated from the soil sample taken from a gas station in our previous work were used in this study. This microorganism was cultured in the liquid medium containing crude oil as sole carbon source. Finally with determining the amount of microorganisms and crude oil concentration during biodegradation process, the bio-kinetic coefficients based on modified Monod equation were calculated."nResults: bio-kinetic coefficients obtained from laboratory studies are vital factors in industrial applications. As a result, the bio-kinetic study was performed to find bio-kinetic coefficients for biodegradation of crude oil using the isolated bacteria. The results showed that ,Y, k and were equal 0.107 , 0.882 , 9.39 and 169.3 respectively."nCoculusion:Our results showed that pseudomonas aerogenusa is usable for treatment of oily wastewaters in the full scale facility. Results of this study indicated bio kinetics confections.

  5. Distribution and biokinetic analysis of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in poultry due to ingestion of dicalcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casacuberta, N., E-mail: Nuria.Casacuberta@uab.es [Departament de Fisica and Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Traversa, F.L. [Departament d' Electronica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Masque, P.; Garcia-Orellana, J. [Departament de Fisica and Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Anguita, M.; Gasa, J. [Departament de Ciencia Animal i dels Aliments, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Dicalcium phosphate (DCP) is used as a calcium supplement for food producing animals (i.e., cattle, poultry and pig). When DCP is produced via wet acid digestion of the phosphate rock and depending on the acid used in the industrial process, the final product can result in enhanced {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po specific activities ({approx} 2000 Bq.kg{sup -1}). Both {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po are of great interest because their contribution to the dose received by ingestion is potentially large. The aims of this work are to examine the accumulation of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in chicken tissues during the first 42 days of life and to build a suitable single-compartment biokinetic model to understand the behavior of both radionuclides within the entire animal using the experimental results. Three commercial corn-soybean-based diets containing different amounts and sources of DCP were fed to broilers during a period of 42 days. The results show that diets containing enhanced concentrations of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po lead to larger specific accumulation in broiler tissues compared to the blank diet. Radionuclides do not accumulate homogeneously within the animal body: {sup 210}Pb follows the calcium pathways to some extent and accumulates largely in bones, while {sup 210}Po accumulates to a large extent in liver and kidneys. However, the total amount of radionuclide accumulation in tissues is small compared to the amounts excreted in feces. The single-compartment non-linear biokinetic model proposed here for {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in the whole animal takes into account the size evolution and is self-consistent in that no fitting parameterization of intake and excretions rates is required.

  6. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide prepared from lyophilized kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) has shown high in vitro and in vivo stability, rapid background clearance and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. The aim of this study was to establish a biokinetic model for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC prepared from lyophilized kits, and to evaluate its dosimetry as a tumor imaging agent in patients with histologically confirmed neuroendocrine tumors. Whole-body images from eight patients were acquired at 5, 60, 90, 180 min and 24 h after 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC administration obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities >95%. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all eight scans and the count per minute (cpm) of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC time-activity curves in each organ, to adjust a biokinetic model using the SAAM software, and to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Images showed an average tumor/blood (heart) ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors at 1 h. The mean radiation absorbed dose calculated for a study using 740 MBq was 24, 21.5, 5.5 and 1.0 mSv for spleen, kidneys, liver and bone marrow respectively and the effective dose was 4.4 mSv

  7. Gender-specific differences in the biokinetics of plutonium and other actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The published data on the biokinetics of actinide distribution and retention in humans and animals have been reviewed. It is concluded that in humans there are strong indications that urinary and faecal excretion of plutonium is greater in females than males. Animal data indicate that this may also be true for americium, neptunium and uranium. (author)

  8. Biokinetic and dosimetric studies of {sup 188}Re-hyaluronic acid: a new radiopharmaceutical for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez-Alafort, Laura [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padua (Italy)], E-mail: laura.melendez@unipd.it; Nadali, Anna; Zangoni, Elena [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padua (Italy); Banzato, Alessandra; Rondina, Maria [Dipartimento di Scienze Oncologiche e Chirurgiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, Padua (Italy); Rosato, Antonio [Dipartimento di Scienze Oncologiche e Chirurgiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, Padua (Italy); Istituto Oncologico Veneto, IOV, Padova, Padua (Italy); Mazzi, Ulderico [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padua (Italy)

    2009-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer and has very limited therapeutic options. Recently, it has been found that hyaluronic acid (HA) shows selective binding to CD44 receptors expressed in most cancer histotypes. Since the trend in cancer treatment is the use of targeted radionuclide therapy, the aim of this research was to label HA with rhenium-188 and to evaluate its potential use as a hepatocarcinoma therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. Methods: {sup 188}Re-HA was prepared by a direct labelling method to produce a ReO(O-COO){sub 2}-type coordination complex. {sup 188}Re-HA protein binding and its stability in saline, phosphate buffer, human serum and cysteine solutions were determined. Biokinetic and dosimetric data were estimated in healthy mice (n=60) using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose methodology and mouse model beta-absorbed fractions. To evaluate liver toxicity, alanine aminotranferase (AST) and aspartate aminotranferase (ALT) levels in mice were assessed and the liver maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of {sup 188}Re-HA was determined. Results: A stable complex of {sup 188}Re-HA was obtained with high radiochemical purity (>90%) and low serum protein binding (2%). Biokinetic studies showed a rapid blood clearance (T{sub 1/2}{alpha}=21 min). Four hours after administration, {sup 188}Re-HA was almost totally removed from the blood by the liver due to the selective uptake via HA-specific receptors (73.47{+-}5.11% of the injected dose). The liver MTD in mice was {approx}40 Gy after 7.4 MBq of {sup 188}Re-HA injection. Conclusions: {sup 188}Re-HA complex showed good stability, pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics that confirm its potential as a new agent for HCC radiation therapy.

  9. Biokinetic and dosimetric studies of 188Re-hyaluronic acid: a new radiopharmaceutical for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer and has very limited therapeutic options. Recently, it has been found that hyaluronic acid (HA) shows selective binding to CD44 receptors expressed in most cancer histotypes. Since the trend in cancer treatment is the use of targeted radionuclide therapy, the aim of this research was to label HA with rhenium-188 and to evaluate its potential use as a hepatocarcinoma therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. Methods: 188Re-HA was prepared by a direct labelling method to produce a ReO(O-COO)2-type coordination complex. 188Re-HA protein binding and its stability in saline, phosphate buffer, human serum and cysteine solutions were determined. Biokinetic and dosimetric data were estimated in healthy mice (n=60) using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose methodology and mouse model beta-absorbed fractions. To evaluate liver toxicity, alanine aminotranferase (AST) and aspartate aminotranferase (ALT) levels in mice were assessed and the liver maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 188Re-HA was determined. Results: A stable complex of 188Re-HA was obtained with high radiochemical purity (>90%) and low serum protein binding (2%). Biokinetic studies showed a rapid blood clearance (T1/2α=21 min). Four hours after administration, 188Re-HA was almost totally removed from the blood by the liver due to the selective uptake via HA-specific receptors (73.47±5.11% of the injected dose). The liver MTD in mice was ∼40 Gy after 7.4 MBq of 188Re-HA injection. Conclusions: 188Re-HA complex showed good stability, pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics that confirm its potential as a new agent for HCC radiation therapy.

  10. Radionuclide decorporation: matching the biokinetics of actinides by transdermal delivery of pro-chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Mumper, Russell J; Jay, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism by the deliberate detonation of a nuclear weapon or radiological dispersion device ("dirty bomb") has made emergency response planning a priority. The only FDA-approved treatments for contamination with isotopes of the transuranic elements Am, Pu, and Cm are the Ca and Zn salts of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). These injectable products are not well suited for use in a mass contamination scenario as they require skilled professionals for their administration and are rapidly cleared from the circulation. To overcome the mismatch in the pharmacokinetics of the DTPA and the biokinetics of these transuranic elements, which are slowly released from contamination sites, the penta-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E5) was prepared and formulated in a nonaqueous gel for transdermal administration. When gels comprised of 40% C2E5, 40-45% Miglyol® 840, and 15-20% ethyl cellulose were spiked with [(14)C]-C2E5 and applied to rat skin; over 60% of the applied dose was absorbed within a 24-h period. Radioactivity was observed in urinary and fecal excretions for over 3 days after removal of the gel. Using an (241)Am wound contamination model, transdermal C2E5 gels were able to enhance total body elimination and reduce the liver and skeletal burden of (241)Am in a dose-dependent manner. The efficacy achieved by a single 1,000 mg/kg dose to contaminated rats was statistically comparable to intravenous Ca-DTPA at 14 mg/kg. The effectiveness of this treatment, favorable sustained release profile of pro-chelators, and ease of administration support its use following radiological emergencies and for its inclusion in the Strategic National Stockpile. PMID:23990504

  11. Biokinetics of nuclear fuel compounds and biological effects of nonuniform radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental releases of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds may occur at nuclear power plants during normal operation, after nuclear power plant accidents, and as a consequence of nuclear weapons testing. For example, the Chernobyl fallout contained extensive amounts of pulverized nuclear fuel composed of uranium and its nonvolatile fission products. The effects of these highly radioactive particles, also called hot particles, on humans are not well known due to lack of reliable data on the extent of the exposure. However, the biokinetics and biological effects of nuclear fuel compounds have been investigated in a number of experimental studies using various cellular systems and laboratory animals. In this article, we review the biokinetic properties and effects of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds, with special reference to UO2, PuO2, and nonvolatile, long-lived β-emitters Zr, Nb, Ru, and Ce. First, the data on hot particles, including sources, dosimetry, and human exposure are discussed. Second, the biokinetics of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds in the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract are reviewed. Finally, short- and long-term biological effects of nonuniform α- and β-irradiation on the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and skin are discussed. 191 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  12. Performance analysis of numeric solutions applied to biokinetics of radionuclides; Analise de desempenho de solucoes numericas aplicadas a biocinetica de radionuclideos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingatos, Danielle dos Santos; Bevilacqua, Joyce da Silva, E-mail: dani@ime.usp.br, E-mail: joyce@ime.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IME/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Matematica e Estatistica; Todo, Alberto Saburo; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando, E-mail: astodo@ipen.br, E-mail: rodrijr@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Biokinetics models for radionuclides applied to dosimetry problems are constantly reviewed by ICRP. The radionuclide trajectory could be represented by compartmental models, assuming constant transfer rates between compartments. A better understanding of physiological or biochemical phenomena, improve the comprehension of radionuclide behavior in the human body and, in general, more complex compartmental models are proposed, increasing the difficulty of obtaining the analytical solution for the system of first order differential equations. Even with constant transfer rates numerical solutions must be carefully implemented because of almost singular characteristic of the matrix of coefficients. In this work we compare numerical methods with different strategies for ICRP-78 models for Thorium-228 and Uranium-234. The impact of uncertainty in the parameters of the equations is also estimated for local and global truncation errors. (author)

  13. Biokinetics and dosimetry of depleted uranium (DU) in rats implanted with DU fragments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmette, Ray A.; Hahn, Fletcher F.; Durbin, P. W.

    2004-01-01

    A number of U. S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War were wounded with depleted uranium (DU) metal fragments as a result of 'friendly fire' incidents, in which Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles were struck by DU anti-armor munitions. Some of the crew members who survived were left with multiple small fragments of DU in their muscles and soft tissues. The number, size and location of the fragments made them inoperable in general, and therefore subject to long-term retention. Because there was inadequate data to predict the potential carcinogenicity of DU fragments in soft tissues, Hahn et al. (2003) conducted a lifespan cancer study in rats. As part of that study, a number of rats were maintained to study the biokinetics and dosimetry of DU implanted intramuscularly in male Wistar rats. Typically, four metal fragments, either as cylindrical pellets or square wafers were implanted into the biceps femoris muscles of the rats. Urine samples were collected periodically during their lifespans, and DU was analyzed in kidneys and eviscerated carcass (minus the implant sites) at death. The daily DU urinary excretion rate increased steeply during the first 30 d after implantation peaking at about 90 d at 3-10 x 10{sup -3}%/d. During the first 150 d, the average excretion rate was 2.4 x 10{sup -3}%/d, decreasing thereafter to about 1 x 10{sup -3}%/d. Serial radiographs were made of the wound sites to monitor gross morphologic changes in the DU implant and the surrounding tissue. As early as 1 w after implantation, radiographs showed the presence of surface corrosion and small, dense bodies near the original implant, presumably DU. This corrosion from the surface of the implant continued with time, but did not result in an increasing amount of DU reaching the blood and urine after the first 3 mo. During this 3-mo period, connective tissue capsules formed around the implants, and are hypothesized to have reduced the access of DU to tissue fluids by limiting the

  14. Improvement in DTPA efficacy for plutonium decorporation: biokinetic and dosimetric approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DTPA for pulmonary administration. DTPA has already been formulated as a micronized dry powder for inhalation and delivered to humans with a Spinhaler TM inhalator device. Both the powder and the inhalator device were far from being optimized since only 3% of the powder actually deposits in the lungs [3]. We have formulated DTPA into porous particles with optimised physical properties for major deposition in the deep lung [4]. Aerodynamic evaluation of our powder show that up to 60% of the initial dose deposits in the lungs with about 30% in the alveolar region. The ability of the DTPA powder to de-corporate Pu was evaluated in rats after contamination by inhalation with industrial Pu oxide. Six days after the exposure, the treatment was performed by a single insufflation of the dry DTPA powder [5]. After 24 hours, results showed a significant decrease of the alpha activity in the liver and in the bone, associated with an increase of actinide urinary excretion as compared to untreated rats. These results suggested that the novel DTPA formulation, which may be rapidly administered at the workplace, allows a fast systemic delivery of DTPA. Studies are in progress to compare the Pu decorporation efficacy of such DTPA powder with free DTPA intravenous injection in rats after contamination with more soluble Pu forms. To complete the biokinetic approach, modeling of DTPA decorporation from biological data reported after accidental contamination of workers is in progress [6]. Our aim is to estimate the reduction of dose associated with chelate treatment. The first case analyzed corresponds to a Pu wound which has been treated by repeated perfusions of DTPA during several months. The hypothesis that a 90 Pu decorporation involves only blood and interstitial fluids (STO) was initially applied. The first results show that the systemic model of ICRP 67 was not suitable to fit a theoretic curve to the amount of Pu excreted in urines. This was mainly due to an underestimate of the

  15. Biokinetic and dosimetric study of a locally produced kit 177Lu-EDTMP for use as a pain palliative agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals like the ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) labeled with β--emitting radioisotopes have demonstrated their efficacy in the palliative treatment of skeletal metastasis. A biokinetic and dosimetric study of 177Lu-EDTMP in NIH mice was performed. The results obtained were extrapolated to human. We estimate the absorbed doses in organs for two models: an adult male and an adult female. 177Lu-EDTMP has a selective uptake in bone, a rapid elimination from blood and negligible uptake in non-skeletal tissues. The estimated dose in bone is between 14.7-15.3 cGy/mCi for men and between 19.6-20.4 cGy/mCi for women. Bone marrow toxicity represents the limiting factor in this kind of therapy, and to avoid exceed the maximum dose it can tolerate (200 cGy), it was found that the maximum safe activity of 177Lu-EDTMP to be injected to male (73.9 kg), corresponds to a value of 1.01 mCi/kg and a value of 1.25 mCi/kg for female (56.9 kg)

  16. The biokinetics of thorium nitrate after deposition in the rat lung: implications for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biokinetic studies in rats have indicated that: 1) thorium nitrate behaves more like a Class Y compound than a Class W compound as defined by ICRP; 2) any increased excretion of thorium in the presence of excessive amounts of Class D uranium compounds does little to arrest the substantial reduction in the ALI from that based on uranium alone; 3) the behaviour of thorium is sufficiently different from that of its gamma-ray emitting daughter radionuclides as to cast doubt on the reliability of external monitoring techniques for assessing intake; and 4) the chelating agent DTPA will be of little value for treating workers overexposed to thorium. (Author)

  17. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide prepared from lyophilized kits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Vazquez, Armando [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Militar (Mexico); Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ferro-Flores, Guillermina [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52045 (Mexico)]. E-mail: gff@nuclear.inin.mx; Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran (Mexico); Gutierrez-Garcia, Zohar [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Militar (Mexico)

    2006-07-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC) has shown high in vitro and in vivo stability, rapid background clearance and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. The aim of this study was to establish a biokinetic model for {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC prepared from lyophilized kits, and to evaluate its dosimetry as a tumor imaging agent in patients with histologically confirmed neuroendocrine tumors. Whole-body images from eight patients were acquired at 5, 60, 90, 180 min and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC administration obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities >95%. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all eight scans and the count per minute (cpm) of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC time-activity curves in each organ, to adjust a biokinetic model using the SAAM software, and to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Images showed an average tumor/blood (heart) ratio of 4.3{+-}0.7 in receptor-positive tumors at 1 h. The mean radiation absorbed dose calculated for a study using 740 MBq was 24, 21.5, 5.5 and 1.0 mSv for spleen, kidneys, liver and bone marrow respectively and the effective dose was 4.4 mSv.

  18. Biokinetics in repeated-dosing in vitro drug toxicity studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Nynke I; Di Consiglio, Emma; Blaauboer, Bas J; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the EU FP7 Predict-IV project was to improve the predictivity of in vitro assays for unwanted effects of drugs after repeated dosing. The project assessed the added benefit of integrating long-lived in vitro organotypic cell systems with 'omics' technologies and in silico modelling, inclu

  19. Acquisition of biokinetic data for internal dose calculations for some novel radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of radiation dose commitment, expresses as an effective dose equivalent, is a prior requisite to the application for a license to administer radiopharmaceuticals and, therefore, in the case of novel radiopharmaceuticals is leading to an increasing awareness of the need for dosimetry-orientated studies. In this laboratory potential new radiopharmaceuticals are investigated initially by animal studies to assess the possible distribution in man, and subsequently in controlled volunteer studies designed to obtain the maximum possible amount of biokinetic data to allow accurate estimation of radiation dose. A variety of techniques are used for this purpose, including profile counting, partial and whole-body scanning by LFOV gamma camera and whole-body counting, in addition to the analysis of radioactivity in blood and excreta. The use of these techniques is illustrated for the acquisition of biokinetic data and subsequent dosimetry of three novel radiopharmaceuticals: 77Br-p-bromospiperone (quantification of dopamine receptors in the brain). 99Tc/sup m/-porphyrins and 99Tc/sup m/ DEPE (a possible novel blood pool marker for MUGA studies). 14 references, 14 figures, 2 tables

  20. Comparison between two clones of Daphnia magna: effects of multigenerational cadmium exposure on toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2006-03-10

    We investigated the effects of genotype (two different clones) and multigenerational Cd-exposure history on Cd toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics in populations of a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna. The adults of the tolerant (T) clone had longer mean-survival-time than the sensitive (S) clone in both control groups (without Cd-exposure) and continuous Cd-exposure groups, but the two clones showed comparable resistances to acute Cd stress in the recovery groups. The body concentration of metallothionein (MT) played a critical role in handling Cd stress, which mainly accounted for the significant difference between the two clones in terms of survival distribution. High comparability of these two clones in individual fitness parameters and biokinetics suggested that these parameters are unlikely driven by genetic variation. For each specific clone, continuous Cd-exposure inhibited the animal growth, elevated the MT induction, and increased the Cd uptake rate (ingestion rate, assimilation efficiency from dietary phase, and uptake rate from dissolved phase), all of which enhanced the weight-specific Cd accumulation in daphnids' bodies. The strong dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors (e.g., food concentrations, pH, dissolved or dietary metal concentration, and metal exposure histories) rather than on genotypes implied the great potential of using biokinetics in inter-lab comparisons and environmental risk assessments. PMID:16289344

  1. Comparison between two clones of Daphnia magna: Effects of multigenerational cadmium exposure on toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan Rui [Atmospheric Marine Coastal Environment Program and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wang Wenxiong [Atmospheric Marine Coastal Environment Program and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: wwang@ust.hk

    2006-03-10

    We investigated the effects of genotype (two different clones) and multigenerational Cd-exposure history on Cd toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics in populations of a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna. The adults of the tolerant (T) clone had longer mean-survival-time than the sensitive (S) clone in both control groups (without Cd-exposure) and continuous Cd-exposure groups, but the two clones showed comparable resistances to acute Cd stress in the recovery groups. The body concentration of metallothionein (MT) played a critical role in handling Cd stress, which mainly accounted for the significant difference between the two clones in terms of survival distribution. High comparability of these two clones in individual fitness parameters and biokinetics suggested that these parameters are unlikely driven by genetic variation. For each specific clone, continuous Cd-exposure inhibited the animal growth, elevated the MT induction, and increased the Cd uptake rate (ingestion rate, assimilation efficiency from dietary phase, and uptake rate from dissolved phase), all of which enhanced the weight-specific Cd accumulation in daphnids' bodies. The strong dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors (e.g., food concentrations, pH, dissolved or dietary metal concentration, and metal exposure histories) rather than on genotypes implied the great potential of using biokinetics in inter-lab comparisons and environmental risk assessments.

  2. Comparison between two clones of Daphnia magna: Effects of multigenerational cadmium exposure on toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the effects of genotype (two different clones) and multigenerational Cd-exposure history on Cd toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics in populations of a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna. The adults of the tolerant (T) clone had longer mean-survival-time than the sensitive (S) clone in both control groups (without Cd-exposure) and continuous Cd-exposure groups, but the two clones showed comparable resistances to acute Cd stress in the recovery groups. The body concentration of metallothionein (MT) played a critical role in handling Cd stress, which mainly accounted for the significant difference between the two clones in terms of survival distribution. High comparability of these two clones in individual fitness parameters and biokinetics suggested that these parameters are unlikely driven by genetic variation. For each specific clone, continuous Cd-exposure inhibited the animal growth, elevated the MT induction, and increased the Cd uptake rate (ingestion rate, assimilation efficiency from dietary phase, and uptake rate from dissolved phase), all of which enhanced the weight-specific Cd accumulation in daphnids' bodies. The strong dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors (e.g., food concentrations, pH, dissolved or dietary metal concentration, and metal exposure histories) rather than on genotypes implied the great potential of using biokinetics in inter-lab comparisons and environmental risk assessments

  3. Biokinetics of 131I in the human organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time evolution of the cumulated activity in human body is one of the key characteristics determining medical impacts of ionizing radiation. In nuclear medicine, so called effective half-life is mostly used for describing the evolution. This quantity is usually estimated by fitting a straight line in semi-logarithmic coordinates. Its novel Bayesian estimate was also proposed and its advantageous properties were verified. During extensive tests, it was found that the effective half-life has limited use as the underlying deterministic relationship time-activity can hardly be taken as (mono)exponential. It stimulated the search for a better and still simple model. A quadratic dependence of ln (activity) on ln (time) was found as an adequate candidate. Preliminary experiments on a restricted set of real data were promising enough to justify its further elaboration. The paper reports on the progress made in verifying and exploiting this non-standard model. Its potential exploitation in dosimetric tasks is outlined. The core of the paper describes a positive verification of our result on an extensive set of real data. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab

  4. Investigations on the biokinetics of carbon 14 in algae cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of 14C by Scenedesmus quadricauda is quantitatively investigated by simulation models of radio ecological relevance. Due to the complexing of the procedures in the natural ecosystem, it was only possible to consider idealized conditions. The batch culture ressembles the conditons of still waters or relatively still waters without notable water exchange. The effect of the 14C enrichment, as well as the drastic carbon reduction in the substrate as a result of algae growth, was avoided in the modified batch culture under conditions of simultaneous substrate diffusion by means of a permeation system. The 14C and 12C uptake of the cells thus took place solely under the conditions of constant concentration in the culture medium. The consequences for flowing water resulting from a nuclear power plant accident are to be simulated for the extent of the 14C uptake by green algae using the continuous culture model with dynamic 14C exposure. The continuous infusion of 14C in the continuous culture corresponds to the possible cases where 14C escapes into a flowing water at a constant rate over a long period of time, whether this may be via chronical release from a nuclear power plant or by 'fallout' resulting from nuclear arms testing. The results shown lead to the conclusion that the emission of 14C to the environment, which according to prognoses will be considerably higher after the year 2000, presents a serious radioactivity potential which man and environment will have to live with should these developments continue and the prognoses come true. (orig./MG)

  5. Dosimetric contribution of organs of biokinetics of 99mTc and 123I to estimate radiation doses in thyroids of children of 1 and 5 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed doses by thyroids during uptake studies through biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing 123I (iodine) or 99mTc (pertechnetate) are estimated. Using the MIRD scheme and the representation of Cristy-Eckerman for thyroids in children of 1 and 5 years, the objective of the study was to determine whether the dosimetric biokinetic contributions of the organs of 123I (iodide) and 99mTc (pertechnetate) biokinetic are significant in the estimated of the absorbed dose for thyroid uptake studies

  6. Multigenerational acclimation of Daphnia magna to mercury: relationships between biokinetics and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Martin T K; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2005-11-01

    We examined the effects of multigenerational exposure of mercury (Hg) on Hg toxicity and biokinetics in a population of Daphnia magna. After chronic Hg exposure at 3.8 microg Hg/L, the first generation (F0) adults had an elevated 24-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of Hg (76 microg/L) when compared to the control adults (56 microg/L). The dissolved influx rate of Hg was depressed significantly in the Hg-treated adults, which was accompanied by a reduced ingestion rate and enhanced induction of metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP). The second-generation (F1) juveniles originating from the control and exposed lines had no major differences in these parameters (except the dietary assimilation efficiency). Recovery from Hg stress enhanced the vulnerability of F1 adults to Hg toxicity, with a reduced 48-h LC50 (44 microg/L) and a decreased concentration of MTLP (80% of control). Nevertheless, Hg-treated F1 adults had similar tolerance (in terms of LC50s) as the control line, indicating that D. magna acclimated to Hg stress after the first generation of exposure. No major difference occurred in the Hg biokinetics and toxicity among different groups of F2 daphnids. However, the F2 neonates produced by the Hg-treated F1 adults had much higher 48-h LC50 (149 microg/L) and MTLP concentration (148% of control) when there was continuous Hg exposure after birth. We concluded that acclimation to Hg stress occurred quickly in D. magna, though animals recovering from Hg stress were more vulnerable to Hg toxicity. Both ingestion rate and MTLP may not be good biomarkers of Hg stress in the field, because acclimation can be achieved through multigenerational exposure to elevated Hg concentrations. PMID:16398130

  7. A review of contributions of human tissue studies to biokinetics, bio-effects and dosimetry of plutonium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly reviews the contributions made by human tissue studies to improved understanding of the biokinetics, dosimetry and potential bio-effects of plutonium in man. It includes consideration of tissue donations from both environmental and occupational populations, along with a brief history of human experience with plutonium and consideration of the bio-ethical aspects of post-mortem human tissue sampling. (authors)

  8. Depth investigation of rapid sand filters for drinking water production reveals strong stratification in nitrification biokinetic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatari, K; Smets, B F; Albrechtsen, H-J

    2016-09-15

    The biokinetic behavior of NH4(+) removal was investigated at different depths of a rapid sand filter treating groundwater for drinking water preparation. Filter materials from the top, middle and bottom layers of a full-scale filter were exposed to various controlled NH4(+) loadings in a continuous-flow lab-scale assay. NH4(+) removal capacity, estimated from short term loading up-shifts, was at least 10 times higher in the top than in the middle and bottom filter layers, consistent with the stratification of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB). AOB density increased consistently with the NH4(+) removal rate, indicating their primarily role in nitrification under the imposed experimental conditions. The maximum AOB cell specific NH4(+) removal rate observed at the bottom was at least 3 times lower compared to the top and middle layers. Additionally, a significant up-shift capacity (4.6 and 3.5 times) was displayed from the top and middle layers, but not from the bottom layer at increased loading conditions. Hence, AOB with different physiological responses were active at the different depths. The biokinetic analysis predicted that despite the low NH4(+) removal capacity at the bottom layer, the entire filter is able to cope with a 4-fold instantaneous loading increase without compromising the effluent NH4(+). Ultimately, this filter up-shift capacity was limited by the density of AOB and their biokinetic behavior, both of which were strongly stratified. PMID:27295615

  9. Biokinetics and estimation of dose from 99mTc-labelled polyclonal human immunoglobulin (HIG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, polyclonal unspecific human immunoglobulin was suggested as a new agent for the localization of inflammatory lesions. Little information about the biodistibution of this radiopharmaceutical was reported so far. To obtain further information, 99mTc-labelled human immunoglobulin (HIG) was administered to a volunteer with presumend normal biokinetics. The absorbed doses to the organs were calculated according to the MIRD concept. The scintigraphic images at 1, 2, 4 and 24 h post injection demonstrated a prolonged activity retention in the blood and high activity in the kidneys, bladder and also in the liver. No significant uptake in the bowels and the marrow could be observed over the whole period of study. 27,4% of the administered activity was excreted in the urine within 24 h. The calculated organ absorbed doses, all in μGy/MBq, were estimated as follows; whole body 2.7, liver 7.3, spleen 12.0, kidneys 15.3, lungs 3.2, marrow 9.6 and gonads 17.0. From these results an effective dose equivalent of 7.9.10-3 mSv/MBq was calculated. The cancer risk estimate of 5.10-5, using 370 MBq 99mTc-HIG, may be considered quite low in comparison to other scintigraphic methods of diagnosing inflammation. (orig.)

  10. Biokinetics of 131I after endogenous and exogenous stimulation of TSH in patients with DTC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The effective radioiodine treatment of patients with DTC is possible only after raising the TSH value over 30 microUI/ml. This effect might be obtained by either endogenous or exogenous stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in 131I biokinetics of selected regions of interest (ROIs) in cases of endogenous and exogenous stimulation. Material And Methods: Two groups of 50 patients were enrolled in the study. All patients were treated with 3.7 GBq of 131I; the first group after thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW), the second group after rh TSH administration (rh TSH). On the basis of post-treatment images, the uptake ratios over selected ROIs (thyroid remnants, mediastinum, liver, stomach, abdomen, and whole-body) were compared between groups. Results: In the case of uptake over the whole-body and the liver, statistically significant higher values were received for the THW group. For the remaining regions, the differences between groups were statistically insignificant, but uptake ratios in the rh TSH group were generally numerically lower compared to the THW group. (authors)

  11. Investigation of biokinetics of cadmium in the mussel in various environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetics of cadmium were investigated under different environmental conditions in mussel (M. galloprovincialis) using sup(115m)Cd as tracer. The accumulation experiment was followed from water for 34 days and observed concentration factor 68 was obtained. On the other hand, it is observed that between the concentrations used in the experiment, the accumulation increased proportionally with the stable cadmium concentration in water. During depuration, more than one compartment has been observed on the loss curves carried out under different temperature and salinity. The results showed that mussels under 22-10C lost cadmium more rapidly at the beginning compared with the ones under 15-10C, which were kept in the same salinity, 0.21%. At the same time, the loss rates were found significantly different under different salinities. For example, the biological half-lives were 407.6 and 866.2 at the salinities 0.21% and 0.7% S respectively. The loss rate of cadmium was also followed under field condition. It is concluded that the results obtained in the field and the laboratory cannot be comparable; for example, the biological half-lives for the slow components in these two experiments were 350 and 612 days respectively. The relative distribution of cadmium in different organs and tissues are examined, it is observed that cadmium both after accumulation and loss periods, is localized in stomach hepatopancreas, gills and mantle. At the end of the accumulation experiment the highest relative percentage of cadmium was 30% in stomach, 22.7% in hepatopancreas. Likely at the end of loss periods the highest percentages of retained cadmium were 42% in stomach and 32% in hepatopancreas. (author)

  12. A novel bench-scale column assay to investigate site-specific nitrification biokinetics in biological rapid sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    A bench-scale assay was developed to obtain site-specific nitrification biokinetic information from biological rapid sand filters employed in groundwater treatment. The experimental set-up uses granular material subsampled from a full-scale filter, packed in a column, and operated with controlled....../m3 packed sand/h could easily be determined at 7.5 g NH4+–N/m3 packed sand/h. This assay, with conditions reflecting full-scale observations, and where the biological activity is subject to minimal physical disturbance, provides a simple and fast, yet powerful tool to gain insight in nitrification...

  13. Parametric study of a thorium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models for radionuclides distribution in the human body and dosimetry involve assumptions on the biokinetic behavior of the material among compartments representing organs and tissues in the body. One of the most important problem in biokinetic modeling is the assignment of transfer coefficients and biological half-lives to body compartments. In Brazil there are many areas of high natural radioactivity, where the population is chronically exposed to radionuclides of the thorium series. The uncertainties of the thorium biokinetic model are a major cause of uncertainty in the estimates of the committed dose equivalent of the population living in high background areas. The purpose of this study is to discuss the variability in the thorium activities accumulated in the body compartments in relation to the variations in the transfer coefficients and compartments biological half-lives of a thorium-recycling model for continuous exposure. Multiple regression analysis methods were applied to analyze the results. (author)

  14. Compared biokinetic and biological studies of chronic and acute inhalations of uranium compounds in the rat; Etudes biocinetique et biologique comparees d'inhalations chroniques et aigues de composes uraniferes chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monleau, M

    2005-12-15

    Uranium is a natural, radioactive heavy metal, widely used in the nuclear industry in various chemical and isotopic forms. Its use in the fuel cycle involves the risk of radiological exposure for the workers, mainly via the inhalation of uranium particles. According to the workplace configuration, uranium contaminations can be acute or repeated, involve various chemical forms and different levels of enrichment, as well as involving one or several components. The dosimetric concepts and models available for workers' radiological protection, as well as most of the studies of the biological effects, correspond to acute exposure situations. Moreover the processes leading to pathological effects are little known in vivo. In this context, the main question is to know whether exposures due to repeated inhalation by rats induce the element kinetics and toxicity, which may be different from those observed after an acute exposure. In this study, comparison of the experimental and theoretical biokinetics of an insoluble uranium repeatedly inhaled over three weeks shows that a chronic contamination is correctly modelled, except for bone retention, by the sum of acute, successive and independent incorporations. Moreover, the kinetics of a soluble uranium inhaled irregularly can be modified by previous repeated exposure to an insoluble uranium. In certain cases therefore, exposure to uranium could modify its biokinetics during later exposures. At a toxicological level, the study demonstrates that the uranium particles inhaled repeatedly induce behavioural disruptions and genotoxic effects resulting in various sorts of DNA damage, in several cell types and certainly depending on the quantity inhaled. Exposures involving several uraniferous components produce a synergy effect. Moreover, repeated inhalations worsen the genotoxic effects in comparison to an acute exposure. This work demonstrates the importance of not ignoring the effects of the repetition of uranium exposure

  15. A methodology for biokinetic studies using stable isotopes: results of repeated molybdenum investigations on a healthy volunteer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for biokinetic studies in humans using stable isotopes is presented. The technique is based on double tracer administration and on proton activation as the analytical method. As an application, the results of investigations on molybdenum metabolism in humans are reported. The contents of 95Mo and 96Mo in biological samples were determined by inducing (p,n) reactions and by analysing the γ-rays emitted by the radioactive products. The minimum detectable quantity was 2 ng/mL plasma for both Mo isotopes. Four investigations on molybdenum metabolism were performed on a healthy volunteer subject in the course of 3 yr. Two absorption studies with different amounts of tracers in aqueous solution were performed by giving 96Mo orally and 95Mo intravenously. Two investigations were performed with single oral administration of 96Mo in aqueous solution and of a 96Mo solution mixed with an infant formula respectively. The stability with time of the biokinetic parameters was tested. The fractional absorption values measured in this volunteer were 0.84, 0.98 and 0.95 for three studies with Mo in HCl and 0.51 for a single study with Mo administered in an infant formula, these data are discussed. (Author)

  16. Review of QSAR Models and Software Tools for predicting Biokinetic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    MOSTRAG-SZLICHTYNG A.; Worth, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the assessment of industrial chemicals, cosmetic ingredients, and active substances in pesticides and biocides, metabolites and degradates are rarely tested for their toxicologcal effects in mammals. In the interests of animal welfare and cost-effectiveness, alternatives to animal testing are needed in the evaluation of these types of chemicals. In this report we review the current status of various types of in silico estimation methods for Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretio...

  17. DOSIMETRIC AND BIOKINETIC MODELS OF THE ICRPF OR THE ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL DOSES FROM RADIO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    1IntroductionTheequivalentdosetoatargetorganfromtheactivityofaradionuclideinasourceorganisproportionaltothetotalnumberoftrans...

  18. Inconsistencies in the new ICRP model for thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetic model for thorium, currently recommended by the ICRP, shows severe inconsistencies. Since this model forms the basis for calculations of dose coefficients and consequently for secondary derived limits, it is highly desirable to validate the model parameters, particularly the f1 value. Recent advances in the analytical techniques allow to do this with acceptable effort. (A.K.)

  19. In vitro and in vivo interactions of selected nanoparticles with rodent serum proteins and their consequences in biokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang G. Kreyling

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available When particles incorporated within a mammalian organism come into contact with body fluids they will bind to soluble proteins or those within cellular membranes forming what is called a protein corona. This binding process is very complex and highly dynamic due to the plethora of proteins with different affinities and fractions in different body fluids and the large variation of compounds and structures of the particle surface. Interestingly, in the case of nanoparticles (NP this protein corona is well suited to provide a guiding vehicle of translocation within body fluids and across membranes. This NP translocation may subsequently lead to accumulation in various organs and tissues and their respective cell types that are not expected to accumulate such tiny foreign bodies. Because of this unprecedented NP accumulation, potentially adverse biological responses in tissues and cells cannot be neglected a priori but require thorough investigations. Therefore, we studied the interactions and protein binding kinetics of blood serum proteins with a number of engineered NP as a function of their physicochemical properties. Here we show by in vitro incubation tests that the binding capacity of different engineered NP (polystyrene, elemental carbon for selected serum proteins depends strongly on the NP size and the properties of engineered surface modifications. In the following attempt, we studied systematically the effect of the size (5, 15, 80 nm of gold spheres (AuNP, surface-modified with the same ionic ligand; as well as 5 nm AuNP with five different surface modifications on the binding to serum proteins by using proteomics analyses. We found that the binding of numerous serum proteins depended strongly on the physicochemical properties of the AuNP. These in vitro results helped us substantially in the interpretation of our numerous in vivo biokinetics studies performed in rodents using the same NP. These had shown that not only the

  20. Influence of zinc on the biokinetics of Zn-65 and hepatic trace elements of ethanol treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of zinc on the biokinetics of 65Zn and hepatic trace elements of ethanol treated rats. The effect of zinc on the biokinetics of 65Zn in liver and whole body and its relation to the hepatic levels of different elements was evaluated in male wistar rats under alcoholic conditions. The rats were segregated into four treatment groups viz., normal control, ethanol treated, zinc treated and combined zinc+ethanol treated. Animals were fed 3ml of 30% ethanol orally daily and zinc in the form of zinc sulfate (ZnSo4 7H2O) was administrated to rats at a dose level of 227mg/L mixed in their drinking water for a total duration of 2 months. Whole body counting studies indicated that the Tb1 i.e., the faster elimination of the radiotracer. On the contrary, Tb2 i.e., the slower component was increased significantly following ethanol treatment. Percent uptake values of 65Zn were found to be increased in liver, intestine, muscle and kidney and decreased in bone under alcoholic conditions. A significant elevation was noticed in in vitro uptake 65Zn in ethanol treated animals. In the above said conditions, the values were reverted back to within normal limits upon zinc supplementation to these ethanol intoxicated animals, except in the case of in vitro 65Zn uptake in liver where the uptake was further increased upon combined treatment. A significant decrease in zinc contents was noticed in ethanol treated rats, which however were raised to normal levels upon zinc supplementation. Copper levels, on the other hand, were found to be significantly enhanced in both ethanol fed and combined ethanol+zinc supplemented animals. Calcium levels were found to e significantly decreased in both ethanol and zinc treated rats, which however were further reduced upon zinc supplementation to ethanol fed rats. However, no significant change was observed in the concentrations of sodium and potassium in any of the treatment groups. Therefore, zinc appears to play a protective role by reverting

  1. Lead Bioaccumulation Factor of Cockle Shell (Anadara granosa) Base on Biokinetic Study that Used Radiotracer 210Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead is kind of hazardous heavy metal to human health and the concentration in the coastal environment should be monitored continuously because lead could be accumulated by marine biota. One of the monitoring techniques is bio indicator. Anadara granosa is a marine biota which spread in almost all Indonesian coastal, life in the bottom and mud sandy environment in the depth of until 4 meter and relatively still. Base on the book of environmental equilibrium balance DKI Jakarta, Anadara granosa is a macrozobenthos in Jakarta bay which have second highest density after Donax or with density of 14 individual per meter square. Base on the environmental equilibrium balance from 26 locations, 22 locations can be found Anadara granosa so this mollusk could be used for bio indicator. The objective of research for bioaccumulation that use 210Pb as a tracer is to find bio indicator base on biokinetic process which include concentration factor, uptake and depuration processes and biology half life. The result shows that Anadara granosa could be use as a lead bio indicator in Jakarta bay. (author)

  2. Biokinetics and dosimetry of 111In-DOTA-NOC-ATE compared with 111In-DTPA-octreotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetics and dosimetry of 111In-DOTA-NOC-ATE (NOCATE), a high-affinity ligand of SSTR-2 and SSTR-5, and 111In-DTPA-octreotide (Octreoscan trademark, OCTREO) were compared in the same patients. Seventeen patients (10 men, 7 women; mean age 60 years), referred for an OCTREO scan for imaging of a neuroendocrine tumour (15), thymoma (1) or medullary thyroid carcinoma (1), agreed to undergo a second study with NOCATE. Whole-body anterior-posterior scans were recorded 0.5 (100 % reference scan), 4, 24 and 48 h (17 patients) and 120 h (5 patients) after injection. In 16 patients the OCTREO scan (178 ± 15 MBq) was performed 16 ± 5 days before the NOCATE scan (108 ± 14 MBq) with identical timing; 1 patient had the NOCATE scan before the OCTREO scan. Blood samples were obtained from 14 patients 5 min to 48 h after injection. Activities expressed as percent of the initial (reference) activity in the whole body, lung, kidney, liver, spleen and blood were fitted to biexponential or single exponential functions. Dosimetry was performed using OLINDA/EXM. Initial whole-body, lung and kidney activities were similar, but retention of NOCATE was higher than that of OCTREO. Liver and spleen uptakes of NOCATE were higher from the start (p 1/2β for NOCATE was longer (19 vs. 6 h). As a result, the effective dose of NOCATE (105 μSv/MBq) exceeded that of OCTREO (52 μSv/MBq), and the latter result was similar to the ICRP 106 value of 54 μSv/MBq. Differential activity measurement in blood cells and plasma showed an average of <5 % of NOCATE and OCTREO attached to globular blood components. NOCATE showed a slower clearance from normal tissues and its effective dose was roughly double that of OCTREO. (orig.)

  3. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficients for members of the public: IV. Basis of the human alimentary tract model and uncertainties in model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetic and dosimetric model of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract applied in current documents of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) was developed in the mid-1960's. The model was based on features of a reference adult male and was first used by the ICRP in Publication 30, Limits for Intakes of Radionuclides by Workers (Part 1, 1979). In the late 1990's an ICRP task group was appointed to develop a biokinetic and dosimetric model of the alimentary tract that reflects updated information and addresses current needs in radiation protection. The new age-specific and gender-specific model, called the Human Alimentary Tract Model (HATM), has been completed and will replace the GI model of Publication 30 in upcoming ICRP documents. This paper discusses the basis for the structure and parameter values of the HATM, summarises the uncertainties associated with selected features and types of predictions of the HATM and examines the sensitivity of dose estimates to these uncertainties for selected radionuclides. Emphasis is on generic biokinetic features of the HATM, particularly transit times through the lumen of the alimentary tract, but key dosimetric features of the model are outlined, and the sensitivity of tissue dose estimates to uncertainties in dosimetric as well as biokinetic features of the HATM are examined for selected radionuclides. (authors)

  4. Biokinetics of radiocesium in shrimp (Palaemon adspersus): seawater and food exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioaccumulation of 134Cs was studied in the shrimp Palaemon adspersus (Rathke, 1837) using dissolved or food pathways. The uptake and loss kinetics (following seawater and food uptake) were followed for 27 and 38 days, respectively. The steady state concentration factor (CFss) value of 134Cs in the whole body of the shrimp was found to be 15 ± 0.08. The loss kinetics of radiocesium was described by a two-component exponential model, with a biological half-life of 85.5 days for the whole body. The depuration kinetics of 134Cs was best fitted to a single-component exponential model for both edible and inedible parts. The depuration kinetics of 134Cs following exposure via pulse-chase feeding was also described by a two-component exponential model, with a biological half-life of 84.2 days. Assimilation efficiency (AE) was found to be 38.5%. Most of the radioactivity was accumulated in muscular tissues (the edible part) of the shrimp compared to the remaining soft parts. The average of the total body burden of 134Cs eliminated with molting was %15.3 ± 8.1. - Highlights: • Bioaccumulation of 134Cs was studied in shrimp Palaemon adspersus. • Uptake and loss experiments were carried out under controlled laboratory conditions. • CFss value was found to be 15 ± 0.58 for whole body of shrimp. • Tb1/2 were found to be 85.5 ± 1.05 and 84.2 ± 2.93 days for long periods of dissolved and dietary pathways, respectively. • The average of the total body burden of 134Cs eliminated with molting was %15.3 ± 8.1

  5. Biokinetics and dosimetry of {sup 111}In-DOTA-NOC-ATE compared with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubaker, Ariane; Prior, John O.; Champendal, Melanie; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika [Lausanne University Hospital, CHUV, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Willi, Jean-Pierre [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Kosinski, Marek; Baechler, Sebastien [Lausanne University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Ginj, Mihaela [University Health Network, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Buchegger, Franz [Lausanne University Hospital, CHUV, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    The biokinetics and dosimetry of {sup 111}In-DOTA-NOC-ATE (NOCATE), a high-affinity ligand of SSTR-2 and SSTR-5, and {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide (Octreoscan trademark, OCTREO) were compared in the same patients. Seventeen patients (10 men, 7 women; mean age 60 years), referred for an OCTREO scan for imaging of a neuroendocrine tumour (15), thymoma (1) or medullary thyroid carcinoma (1), agreed to undergo a second study with NOCATE. Whole-body anterior-posterior scans were recorded 0.5 (100 % reference scan), 4, 24 and 48 h (17 patients) and 120 h (5 patients) after injection. In 16 patients the OCTREO scan (178 {+-} 15 MBq) was performed 16 {+-} 5 days before the NOCATE scan (108 {+-} 14 MBq) with identical timing; 1 patient had the NOCATE scan before the OCTREO scan. Blood samples were obtained from 14 patients 5 min to 48 h after injection. Activities expressed as percent of the initial (reference) activity in the whole body, lung, kidney, liver, spleen and blood were fitted to biexponential or single exponential functions. Dosimetry was performed using OLINDA/EXM. Initial whole-body, lung and kidney activities were similar, but retention of NOCATE was higher than that of OCTREO. Liver and spleen uptakes of NOCATE were higher from the start (p < 0.001) and remained so over time. Whole-body activity showed similar {alpha} and {beta} half-lives, but the {beta} fraction of NOCATE was double that of OCTREO. Blood T{sub 1/2}{beta} for NOCATE was longer (19 vs. 6 h). As a result, the effective dose of NOCATE (105 {mu}Sv/MBq) exceeded that of OCTREO (52 {mu}Sv/MBq), and the latter result was similar to the ICRP 106 value of 54 {mu}Sv/MBq. Differential activity measurement in blood cells and plasma showed an average of <5 % of NOCATE and OCTREO attached to globular blood components. NOCATE showed a slower clearance from normal tissues and its effective dose was roughly double that of OCTREO. (orig.)

  6. Biokinetics of copper in black-banded rainbowfish (Melanotaenia nigrans) tolerant to elevated copper concentrations, using the radioisotope 64Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For over 40 years black-banded rainbowfish (Melanotaenia nigrans) living in the East Branch of the Finniss River, Northern Territory have been exposed to elevated copper concentrations due to mine waste from the Rum Jungle uranium/copper mine. In the 1970s prior to remediation of the mine, fish kills were observed along the length of the East Branch. While copper concentrations remain comparatively high (up to 2000 μg/L) in the East Branch since remediation of the mine site, M. nigrans have been observed in the area. It was, therefore, hypothesised that due to selective pressure of lethal exposure, the population of black-banded rainbowfish in the East Branch have developed a tolerance to elevated copper concentrations. This project aimed to demonstrate copper tolerance and evaluate possible mechanism(s). In May 2000, fish were collected from the East Branch (exposed fish) and from a catchment previously unexposed to elevated metal concentrations (reference fish). The 96-hour EC50, fish imbalance (i.e. the concentration of copper that affects 50% of fish over 96 hours) for the exposed fish was over 8 times higher than the reference fish. Using the radioisotope, 64Cu, the biokinetics of newly accumulated copper was traced in exposed and reference fish at low and elevated copper concentrations. The uptake rate, and therefore body burden, were significantly (p=0.000) lower in exposed fish, at both low and elevated copper concentrations compared to reference fish. Possible mechanisms of reducing copper uptake will be discussed. Tolerance was not lost when fish were maintained in relatively low copper concentrations in the laboratory. Also, the two populations of fish were genetically dissimilar based on allozyme analysis, which suggests that the mechanism is genetically mediated. The outcome of this project will be important in assisting accurate risk assessment and the development of environmental management strategies for the conservation of biota. The

  7. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after nuclear medicine examinations. Biokinetic and dosimetric data and recommendations on breastfeeding interruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Ahlgren, Lars; Mattsson, Soeren [Lund University, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Skaane University Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Johansson, Lennart [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    To review early recommendations and propose guidelines for breastfeeding interruption after administration of radiopharmaceuticals, based on additional biokinetic and dosimetric data. Activity concentrations in breast milk from 53 breastfeeding patients were determined. The milk was collected at various times after administration of 16 different radiopharmaceuticals. The fraction of the activity administered to the mother excreted in the breast milk, the absorbed doses to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the infant were estimated. The fraction of the administered activity excreted per millilitre of milk varied widely from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -3} MBq/MBq administered. For {sup 99m}Tc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, the total fraction of the administered activity excreted in the milk varied from 0.0057 % for {sup 99m}Tc-labelled red blood cells (RBC) to 19 % for {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate. The effective dose to an infant per unit activity administered to the mother ranged from 6.7 x 10{sup -6} mSv/MBq for {sup 99m}Tc-labelled RBC to 3.6 x 10{sup -2} mSv/MBq for {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate. For the other radiopharmaceuticals, the total fraction of administered activity excreted in the milk varied from 0.018 % ({sup 51}Cr-EDTA) to 48 % ({sup 131}I-NaI). The effective dose ranged from 5.6 x 10{sup -5} mSv{sub infant}/MBq{sub mother} ({sup 51}Cr-EDTA) to 106 mSv{sub infant}/MBq{sub mother} ({sup 131}I-NaI). Based on an effective dose limit of 1 mSv to the infant and a typical administered activity, we recommend cessation of breastfeeding for {sup 131}I-NaI and interruption of feeding for 12 h for {sup 125}I-iodohippurate, {sup 131}I-iodohippurate, {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA. During this 12-h period all breast milk should be expressed at least three times and discarded. For the other radiopharmaceuticals included in this study, no interruption of breastfeeding is necessary. (orig.)

  8. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after nuclear medicine examinations. Biokinetic and dosimetric data and recommendations on breastfeeding interruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review early recommendations and propose guidelines for breastfeeding interruption after administration of radiopharmaceuticals, based on additional biokinetic and dosimetric data. Activity concentrations in breast milk from 53 breastfeeding patients were determined. The milk was collected at various times after administration of 16 different radiopharmaceuticals. The fraction of the activity administered to the mother excreted in the breast milk, the absorbed doses to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the infant were estimated. The fraction of the administered activity excreted per millilitre of milk varied widely from 10-10 to 10-3 MBq/MBq administered. For 99mTc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, the total fraction of the administered activity excreted in the milk varied from 0.0057 % for 99mTc-labelled red blood cells (RBC) to 19 % for 99mTc-pertechnetate. The effective dose to an infant per unit activity administered to the mother ranged from 6.7 x 10-6 mSv/MBq for 99mTc-labelled RBC to 3.6 x 10-2 mSv/MBq for 99mTc-pertechnetate. For the other radiopharmaceuticals, the total fraction of administered activity excreted in the milk varied from 0.018 % (51Cr-EDTA) to 48 % (131I-NaI). The effective dose ranged from 5.6 x 10-5 mSvinfant/MBqmother (51Cr-EDTA) to 106 mSvinfant/MBqmother (131I-NaI). Based on an effective dose limit of 1 mSv to the infant and a typical administered activity, we recommend cessation of breastfeeding for 131I-NaI and interruption of feeding for 12 h for 125I-iodohippurate, 131I-iodohippurate, 99mTc-pertechnetate and 99mTc-MAA. During this 12-h period all breast milk should be expressed at least three times and discarded. For the other radiopharmaceuticals included in this study, no interruption of breastfeeding is necessary. (orig.)

  9. Design, analysis and testing of a piezoelectric flex transducer for harvesting bio-kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, A.; Zhu, M.; Tiwari, A.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of low power consuming electronics brings greater potential to mobile energy harvesting devices as a possible power source. A new piezoelectric energy harvesting device, called the piezoelectric flex transducer (PFT), is presented and developed. A Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed to design and analyse the PFT. The PFT consists of a piezoelectric element sandwiched between substrate layers and metal endcaps that are able to amplify the axial force on the piezoelectric element. Based on the concept of the Cymbal transducer, the PFT can withstand higher forces, was retrofitted into a shoe and used to power a wireless sensor module whilst the subject with a body weight of 760N was wearing the shoe and ran at 3.1mph (1.4HZ on shoe), the PFT produced an average maximum power of 2.5mW (over 2MΩ load).

  10. Design, analysis and testing of a piezoelectric flex transducer for harvesting bio-kinetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing prevalence of low power consuming electronics brings greater potential to mobile energy harvesting devices as a possible power source. A new piezoelectric energy harvesting device, called the piezoelectric flex transducer (PFT), is presented and developed. A Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed to design and analyse the PFT. The PFT consists of a piezoelectric element sandwiched between substrate layers and metal endcaps that are able to amplify the axial force on the piezoelectric element. Based on the concept of the Cymbal transducer, the PFT can withstand higher forces, was retrofitted into a shoe and used to power a wireless sensor module whilst the subject with a body weight of 760N was wearing the shoe and ran at 3.1mph (1.4HZ on shoe), the PFT produced an average maximum power of 2.5mW (over 2MΩ load)

  11. Dosimetric contribution of organs of biokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I to estimate radiation doses in thyroids of children of 1 and 5 years; Contribucion dosimetrica de organos de la biocinetica del {sup 99m}Tc y {sup 123}I para estimar dosis en tiroides de ninos de 1 y 5 anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.V.; Castillo, C.E.; Abanto, D.M.; Rocha, D.; Garcia, W.H.; Marin, K., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo (UNT), Trujillo (Peru); Quispe, R. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The absorbed doses by thyroids during uptake studies through biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing {sup 123}I (iodine) or {sup 99m}Tc (pertechnetate) are estimated. Using the MIRD scheme and the representation of Cristy-Eckerman for thyroids in children of 1 and 5 years, the objective of the study was to determine whether the dosimetric biokinetic contributions of the organs of {sup 123}I (iodide) and {sup 99m}Tc (pertechnetate) biokinetic are significant in the estimated of the absorbed dose for thyroid uptake studies.

  12. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by acclimated and unacclimated activated sludge-Evaluation of biokinetic coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unacclimated and acclimated activated sludges were examined for their ability to degrade 4-CP (4-chlorophenol) in the presence and absence of a readily growing substrate using aerobic batch reactors. The effects of 4-CP on the μ (specific growth rate), COD removal efficiency, Y (yield coefficient), and q (specific substrate utilization rate) were investigated. It was observed that the toxicity of 4-CP on the culture decreased remarkably after acclimation. For example, the IC50 value on the basis of μ was found to increase from 130 to 218mg/L with the acclimation of the culture. Although an increase in 4-CP concentration up to 300mg/L has no adverse effect on the COD removal efficiency of the acclimated culture, a considerable decrease was observed in the case of an unacclimated culture. Although 4-CP removal was not observed with an unacclimated culture, almost complete removal was achieved with the acclimated culture, up to 300mg/L. The Haldane kinetic model adequately predicted the biodegradation of 4-CP and the kinetic constants obtained were qm=41.17mg/(gMLVSSh), Ks=1.104mg/L, and Ki=194.4mg/L. The degradation of 4-CP led to formation of 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which was further metabolized, indicating complete degradation of 4-CP via a meta-cleavage pathway

  13. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal Neto, Viriato, E-mail: viriatoleal@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: this article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. Materials and methods: a software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiacoes Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C ⧣ programming language. Results: with the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. Conclusion: the user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity. (author)

  14. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of 99mTc-HYNIC-Lys3-Bombesin: images of GRP receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bombesin (BN) receptor subtype 2 (GRP-r) is expressed in several normal human tissues and is over-expressed in various human tumors including breast, prostate, small cell lung and pancreatic cancer. Recently [99mTc]EDDA/HYNIC-Lys3-bombesin (99mTc-HYNIC-BN) was reported as a radiopharmaceutical with high stability in human serum, specific cell GRP-r binding and rapid cell internalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 99mTc-HYNIC-BN to image GRP-r and to assess the radiopharmaceutical biokinetics and dosimetry in 4 breast cancer patients and in 7 healthy women. Methods: Whole-body images were acquired at 20, 90, 180 min and 24 h after 99mTc-HYNIC-BN administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all 11 scans and the cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate 99mTc-HYNIC-BN time-activity curves in each organ in order to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions, according with MIRD methodology. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Results: Images showed a rapid radiopharmaceutical blood clearance with renal excretion as predominant route. 99mTc-HYNIC-BN exhibited high in vivo affinity for GRP-r over-expression successfully visualized in cancer mammary glands and well differentiated from the ubiquitous GRP-r expression in normal breast, lungs and airways. There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in the radiation absorbed doses between cancer patients and healthy women. The average equivalent doses (n=11) for a study using 740 MBq were 24.8 +- 8.8 mSv (kidneys), 7.3 +- 1.8 mSv (lungs), 6.5 +- 4.0 mSv (breast) 2.0 +- 0.3 mSv (pancreas), 1.6 +- 0.3 mSv (liver), 1.2 +- 0.2 mSv (ovaries) and 1.0 +- 0.2 mSv (red marrow). The mean effective dose was 3

  15. New mechanistic model to simulate microalgae growth

    OpenAIRE

    Solimeno, Alessandro; Samsó Campà, Roger; Uggetti, Enrica; Sialve, Bruno; Steyer, J. P.; Gabarró, Adrián; García Serrano, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of treating wastewater and at the same time producing microalgae biomass is receiving increasing attention. Mechanistic models for microalgae growth in wastewater are currently being developed for new systems design as well as to improve the understanding of the involved biokinetic processes. However, mathematical models able to describe the complexity of microalgal cultures are still not a common practice. The aim of the present study is to present and calibrate a new mechanisti...

  16. Investigation on the effect of incorporated radioactive and nonradioactive particles and their synergism by long-term animal studies - physicochemical and biokinetic properties of zirconium dioxide colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenic effect of thorotrast should presumably be attributed not only to ionizing radiation but also to nonradiation effects, i.e. foreign-body effects and/or chemical toxicity, possibly involving synergism. In order to identify and quantitatively assess the nonradiation effect of thorotrast, long-term animal studies have been performed in rats, using non-radioactive and radioactive colloids with identical physicochemical properties and with biophysical behavior comparable to that of thorotrast. In this study, nonradioactive colloidal ZrO2 (zirconotrast) and 230Th/228Th-enriched zirconium dioxide colloid (radiozirconotrast) are compared to thorotrast with regard to 5 criteria. The results of the biokinetic, histological and physical investigations justify the use of colloidal ZrO2 as a substitute colloid for studying the non-radiation effect of Thorotrast. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of radioiodine biokinetics following the administration of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone and after thyroid hormone withdrawal in thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, Markus; Lassmann, Michael; Haenscheid, Heribert; Reiners, Christoph [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sherman, Steven I. [Section of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Skarulis, Monica C. [Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Reynolds, James R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren Grant Magnusen Clinical Center, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Iodine kinetics were studied in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer while euthyroid under exogenous thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and while hypothyroid to detect differences in radioiodine uptake, distribution and elimination. Nine patients with total or near-total thyroidectomy on thyroid hormone suppressive therapy received two or three daily doses of 0.9 mg recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) followed by administration of a diagnostic activity of 2 mCi (74 MBq) iodine-131. After the biokinetics assessments had been performed, patients stopped taking thyroid hormones to become hypothyroid. A second 2 mCi (74 MBq) diagnostic activity of {sup 131}I was administered, followed by a second set of biokinetics assessments. One week later the patients underwent remnant ablation with a therapeutic activity of {sup 131}I. A comparison of the {sup 131}I kinetics in the patients while euthyroid and while hypothyroid showed major differences in the doses to the remnant as well as in residence times and radiation exposure to the blood. In the first diagnostic assessment the remnant dose was higher in eight of the nine patients and clearance of the activity from the blood was faster in all of them. The data from this study suggest that radioiodine administration is potent and safe when administered to euthyroid patients following rhTSH administration. Enhanced residence time in the remnant and decreased radiation exposure to the blood were noted when patients were euthyroid compared to when they were rendered hypothyroid. However, all patients received diagnostic activities in the same order: first while euthyroid, followed by hypothyroidism. It is quite possible that ''stunning'' from the radioiodine administered in the initial uptake study inhibited the subsequent uptake of radioiodine by the remnant lesions in the second uptake study. (orig.)

  18. Estimating 131I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in thyroid cancer patients: probe detection versus image quantification*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willegaignon, José; Pelissoni, Rogério Alexandre; Lima, Beatriz Christine de Godoy Diniz; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Queiroz, Marcelo Araújo; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the probe detection method with the image quantification method when estimating 131I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in the treatment of thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods Fourteen patients with metastatic thyroid cancer, without metastatic bone involvement, were submitted to therapy planning in order to tailor the therapeutic amount of 131I to each individual. Whole-body scans and probe measurements were performed at 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 131I administration in order to estimate the effective half-life (Teff) and residence time of 131I in the body. Results The mean values for Teff and residence time, respectively, were 19 ± 9 h and 28 ± 12 h for probe detection, compared with 20 ± 13 h and 29 ± 18 h for image quantification. The average dose to the red marrow and whole body, respectively, was 0.061 ± 0.041 mGy/MBq and 0.073 ± 0.040 mGy/MBq for probe detection, compared with 0.066 ± 0.055 mGy/MBq and 0.078 ± 0.056 mGy/MBq for image quantification. Statistical analysis proved that there were no significant differences between the two methods for estimating the Teff (p = 0.801), residence time (p = 0.801), dose to the red marrow (p = 0.708), and dose to the whole body (p = 0.811), even when we considered an optimized approach for calculating doses only at 4 h and 96 h after 131I administration (p > 0.914). Conclusion There is full agreement as to the feasibility of using probe detection and image quantification when estimating 131I biokinetics and red-marrow/whole-body doses. However, because the probe detection method is inefficacious in identifying tumor sites and critical organs during radionuclide therapy and therefore liable to skew adjustment of the amount of 131I to be administered to patients under such therapy, it should be used with caution.

  19. Influence on dose coefficients for workers of the new metabolic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently reviewed the biokinetic models used in the internal contamination dose assessment. ICRP has adopted a new model for the human respiratory tract and has updated, in ICRP Publications 56, 67 and 69, some of the biokinetic models of ICRP Publication 30. In this paper, the dose coefficients for some selected radionuclides issued in ICRP Publication 68 are compared with those obtained using the software LUPED (LUng Dose Evaluation Program). The former were calculated using the new systemic models, while the latter are based on the old metabolic models. The aim is to know to what extent the new models for systematic retention influence the dose coefficients for workers. (author)

  20. Study of the biodistribution and biokinetics of 165-dysprosium-ferric-hydroxide using the shadow-shield whole-body counter in the general hospital Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the whole-body counter at the Vienna General Hospital to the study of the biodistribution and biokinetics of 165Dy-DFH was investigated. Activity profiles of the four detectors allow the incorporated/injected radionuclide to be localized with an accuracy of ± 1 cm in the 3 coordinates. The main peak marks the position of the knee joint, the small peak on its right shows the position where a small amount of activity escaped . This small peak can be related to the anatomical structure. A rather high background is due to scattered rays. Based on data derived from phantom measurements, it is possible to determine the amount of activity applied and the exposure to non-target organs. The MIRDOSE II code was used to determine the energy dose in the organs. Radiation exposure of the patient whose urinary bladder has concentrated escaped activity can be reduced if the patients urinates immediately after the leakage was detected. The leakage of 165Dy-DFH out of the joint is negligible and radiation exposure due to the treatment is relatively low. The whole-body counter allows activity leakage to be detected with a considerably higher sensitivity than a gamma camera does. The biodistribution of 165Dy-DFH can be determined and leakage can be localized and related to the organs. (P.A.)

  1. Control of the biodistribution and biokinetics of 165-dysprosium-ferric-hydroxide after radiation synovectomy using the whole-body counter in the general hospital Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation synovectomy is suggested to be an alternative to surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of the whole-body counter in the General Hospital Vienna for the study of the biodistribution and biokinetics of 165-dysprosium-ferric-hydroxide (165Dy-DFH). During this study it was possible to measure 42 patients, who were treated with 165Dy-DFH. The applied activity ranged from 520 MBq to 12955 MBq. The emission of γ-radiation with an energy of 95 keV is used to monitor the kinetic distribution of 165Dy by performing activity profiles with the whole-body counter 2, 4 and 6 hours after injection. The doses to non-target organs were calculated using the software MIRDOSE II. In 32 patients no leakage could be monitored. In 3 patients a concentration of leakage was detected in the urinary bladder, in 2 patients a leakage was detected in the liver and in 6 patients a small leakage was detected in the inguinal lymphatic nodes of the treated legs. Using a whole-body counter activity leakage could be detected with much higher sensitivity than by using a gamma camera. Biodistribution of 165Dy-DFH could be determined, leakage could be localised and related to organs. (orig.)

  2. Dimer of the peptide cycle (Ar-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) radiolabeled with 99mTc for the integrin s over-expression image: formulation, biokinetics and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In breast cancer, α(v)β(3) and/or α(v)β(5) integrin s are over-expressed in both endothelial and tumour cells. Radiolabeled peptides based on the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence are radiopharmaceuticals with high affinity and selectivity for those integrin s. The RGD-dimer peptide (E-[c(RGDfK)]2) radiolabeled with 99mTc has been reported as a radiopharmaceutical with 10-fold higher affinity for the α(v)β(3) integrin as compared to the RGD-monomer. EDDA (Ethylenediamine-N,N-diacetic acid) is a hydrophilic molecule that may favours renal excretion when used as coligand in the 99mTc labelling of HYNIC-peptides and can easily be formulated in a lyophilized kit. Aim: Establish a biokinetic model for 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 prepared from lyophilized kits and evaluate the dosimetry as breast cancer imaging agent. Methods: 99mTc labelling was performed by addition of sodium pertechnetate solution and 0.2 M phosphate buffer ph 7.0 to a lyophilized formulation containing E-[c(RGDfK)]2, EDDA, tricine, mannitol and stannous chloride. Radiochemical purity was evaluated by reversed phase HPLC and ITLC-SG analyses. Stability studies in human serum were carried out by size-exclusion HPLC. In-vitro cell uptake was tested using breast cancer cells (MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231) with blocked and non-blocked receptors. Biodistribution and tumour uptake were determined in MCF7 tumour-bearing nude mice with blocked and non-blocked receptors, and images were obtained using a micro-SPECT/CT. Whole-body images from seven healthy women were acquired at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 administration obtained with radiochemical purities of >94 %. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. Each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 time-activity curves in each organ in order to adjust the biokinetic model and to calculate the

  3. DETERMINATION OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE MODEL ASDM PARAMETERS FOR WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATING IN THE SEQUENTIAL–FLOW TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Dariusz Zdebik

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calibration of activated sludge model with the use of computer program BioWin. Computer scheme has been developed on the basis of waste water treatment plant operating in the sequential – flow technology. For calibration of the activated sludge model data of influent and treated effluent from the existing object were used. As a result of conducted analysis was a change in biokinetic model and kinetic parameters parameters of wastewater treatment facilities. ...

  4. The dosimetric model and the dose conversion factor for members of the public from ingesting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The age-dependent dosimetric models were developed on the basis of the age-dependent physical and biokinetic models, and the ingestion dose conversion factors involved in age group newborns, 1, 5, 10, 15 years and adults for radioisotopes of hydrogen, carbon, strontium and cesium were calculated. The ingestion dose conversion factors estimated here are in accord with the results reported in the ICRP Publication 56 (1989)

  5. BK/TD models for analyzing in vitro impedance data on cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Sophie; Barcellini-Couget, Sylvie; Beaudoin, Rémy; Desousa, Georges; Rahmani, Roger; Pery, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The ban of animal testing has enhanced the development of new in vitro technologies for cosmetics safety assessment. Impedance metrics is one such technology which enables monitoring of cell viability in real time. However, analyzing real time data requires moving from static to dynamic toxicity assessment. In the present study, we built mechanistic biokinetic/toxicodynamic (BK/TD) models to analyze the time course of cell viability in cytotoxicity assay using impedance. These models accou...

  6. A physiological systems model for iodine for use in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for iodine in the human body and proposes a biokinetic model for use in dose assessments for radioiodine. The model unifies and extends existing physiological systems models describing three subsystems of the iodine cycle in the body: circulating (extrathyroidal) inorganic iodide; thyroidal iodine (trapping and organic binding of iodide, and synthesis, storage, and secretion of thyroid hormones); and extrathyroidal organic iodine. Thyroidal uptake of iodide is described as a function of daily stable iodine intake and requirements for thyroid hormones. Baseline parameter values are developed for adults with typical iodine intakes and hormone requirements. Estimated thyroid doses derived from the baseline parameter values and reference thyroid weights are higher than values predicted by the current model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for adults for intake of iodine isotopes with half-lives up to a few hours but consistent with ICRP predictions for longer-lived isotopes. For nearly all iodine isotopes, the proposed model yields order-of-magnitude differences from the ICRP's current iodine model for adults for stomach wall, salivary gland, and kidneys. Dose estimates for intravenously injected 131I-labeled thyroid hormones based on the present model differ substantially from current ICRP values for adult patients for some organs, including the thyroid. Subsequent studies will address age-specific biokinetics of iodine, reduction of doses from radioiodine due to thyroid blocking, and effects of dietary iodine levels and thyroid hormone requirements on thyroid doses from radioiodine.

  7. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of 14C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used 14C-breath tests: 14C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low 14C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform 14C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of 14C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: 14C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, 14C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, 14C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and 14C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the 14C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  8. Biokinetics of ultrafine gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) relating to redistribution and urinary excretion: a long-term in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Farhat; Koul, Veena; Srivastava, Amita; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of ultrafine size have drawn attention for their use in drug delivery systems. Tissue toxicity may be an issue when AuNPs are used for such applications. We investigated the long-term biokinetics (90 d), redistribution, and urinary excretion of three different-sized (2 ± 0.5 nm, 5 ± 1 nm, and 10 ± 2 nm) AuNPs after a single intravenous (i.v.) administration of 1250 µg/kg dose in mice. ICP-AES analysis of lungs, liver, spleen, heart, kidney, brain, blood, and urine revealed highest accumulation of gold in spleen around 15 d after injection. A low concentration was detected in brain after 1 d without any residual AuNPs after 30 d. Ultrastructural study of brain tissue also showed few AuNPs in lysosome with no changes in cellular architecture. Renal retention of AuNPs was limited indicating low nephrotoxic potential. AuNPs were detectable in urine till 30 d after single injection indicating slow excretion from the body. No evidence of significant toxicity was observed in hemogram, serum biochemistry, and tissue histology. No mortality, changes in behavior, hair color, weight, and food intake was observed as compared to control mice. Therefore, we conclude that the ultrafine AuNPs are predominantly excreted in urine without any systemic toxicity following i.v. administration and are hence safe for use in drug delivery systems. PMID:26837799

  9. Biokinetics of a transuranic (238PU) and a rare earth element (152Eu) in the lobster (Homarus gammarus): transfer mechanisms (accumulation and detoxification) in organs and at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented here is an experimental investigation of the biokinetics of transfer of a transuranic and a rare earth element (238Pu and 152Eu) in the lobster Homarus gammarus. The study of 238Pu biokinetics forms part of a wider framework of research concerning the transfer of transuranic elements in marine species, while the study of 152Eu is carried out with a view to supporting the analogy between the behaviour of transuranics and rare earths in living organisms. Exactly the same experimental protocol, based on techniques from various disciplines (biology, biochemistry and metrology), was used to Investigate the biokinetics of transfer of these two radionuclides. The Individual lobsters were radiolabelled by means of one-shot or chronic ingestion of spiked meals. As the first approach, the kinetics and transfer mechanisms were studied In whole animal samples and in different organs distinct series of pathways through the different organs were identified in the case of both radionuclides, being mainly linked to digestive processes induced by the meal as well as the transport function of hemo-lymph in this way, the Important role of the digestive gland was picked out, with two of four cellular types displaying a successive involvement In the fixation and then the retention of the studied radionuclides. As a corroborative approach, the digestive gland was subjected to a more detailed investigation with the aim of describing the mechanisms of Incorporation and elucidating transfer processes at the cellular and molecular levels. 238Pu is preferentially partitioned into the cytosol, where it is associated with various constituents such as ferritin (iron-storing protein). 152Eu is more diffusely distributed in the hepato-pancreatic cells, while the lysosomes appear to play a more important role during transfer. The results obtained in this study, both on the macroscopic scale (i.e. the whole animal and different organs) as well as the cellular and molecular levels

  10. DETERMINATION OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE MODEL ASDM PARAMETERS FOR WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATING IN THE SEQUENTIAL–FLOW TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Zdebik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for calibration of activated sludge model with the use of computer program BioWin. Computer scheme has been developed on the basis of waste water treatment plant operating in the sequential – flow technology. For calibration of the activated sludge model data of influent and treated effluent from the existing object were used. As a result of conducted analysis was a change in biokinetic model and kinetic parameters parameters of wastewater treatment facilities. The presented method of study of the selected parameters impact on the activated sludge biokinetic model (including autotrophs maximum growth rate, the share of organic slurry in suspension general operational, efficiency secondary settling tanks can be used for conducting simulation studies of other treatment plants.

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Hollow-Fiber Membrane System in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian PENG

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A set of mathematical models were derived based on the bio-kinetics and material balance principles to describe the performance of membrane system in this research. A synthetic wastewater and a meat packing wastewater were processed through a lab-scale membrane bioreactor system to generate experimental data for calibration and verification of the derived models. For the synthetic wastewater treatment, a high and stable Total Organic Carbon (TOC removal was achieved with volumetric organic loading from 0.2 to 24.2 kg TOC/m3ƒ(d. It was found that the derived system models fit the experimental data well. The bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd in the models were found to be 0.16 d-1, 1.0 mg/L, 1.75 mg Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids (MLVSS/mg TOC and 0.11 d-1, respectively. For the meat packing wastewater treatment, the bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd were found to be 0.48 d-1, 56.3 mg/L, 0.53 mg MLVSS/mg COD and 0.04 d-1, respectively. F/M ratio of 0.08 was found to be the proper operating condition for the system. Based on the proposed system models, the optimum MLSS concentration and F/M ratio can be computed to yield minimum cost of a membrane bioreactor system without excess biomass production.

  12. Experimental and mathematical modeling studies on Cr(VI) reduction by CRB, SRB and IRB, individually and in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, V; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2009-12-30

    Cr(VI) reduction studies were carried out with chromium reducing bacteria (CRB), sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and iron reducing bacteria (IRB), individually and in combination. Biokinetic parameters such as maximum specific growth rate (micro(max)), half saturation constant (K(s)), yield coefficient (Y(T)) and inhibition coefficient (K(i)) for individual cultures were evaluated. A mathematical model was proposed for simulating the chromium reduction, COD utilization and biomass growth, by individual cultures as well as by a combination of two or three different cultures, for different initial Cr(VI), SO(4)(2-) and Fe(III) concentrations. The biokinetic parameters evaluated from one set of experiments for individual cultures were utilized in all the validation studies. The performance of the mathematical model in terms of the dimensionless modified coefficient of efficiency (E) indicated that the proposed model simulates the system behavior very well. PMID:19692172

  13. Sentinel lymph node diagnostic in prostate carcinoma. Part II. Biokinetics and dosimetry of 99mTc-nanocolloid after intraprostatic injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To visualise the sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) of the prostate we injected the radiotracer into the parenchyma of the prostate. The activity was deposited in liver, spleen, bone marrow, urinary bladder and regional lymphatic system. The aim of this work is to determine biokinetical data and to estimate radiation doses to the patient. Methods: The patients with prostate cancer received a sonographically controlled, transrectal administration of 99mTc-Nanocoll trademark, injected directly into both prostate lobes. In 10 randomly selected patients radionuclide distribution and its time course was determined via regions of interest (ROIs) over prostate, urinary bladder, liver, spleen and the lymph nodes. The uptake in the SLNs was estimated from gamma probe measurements at the surgically removed nodes. To compare tumour positive with tumour free lymph nodes according to SLN-uptake and SLN-localisation we evaluated 108 lymph nodes out of 24 patients with tumour positive SLN. For calculating the effective dose according to ICRP 60 of the patients we used the MIRD-method and the Mirdose 3.1 software. Results: The average uptake of separate organs was: bladder content 24%, liver 25.5%, spleen 2%, sum of SLN 0.5%. An average of 9% of the applied activity remained in the prostate. The residual activity was mainly accumulated in bone marrow and blood. Occasionally a weak activity enrichment in intestinal tract and kidneys could be recognized. The effective dose to the patient was estimated to 7.6 μSv/MBq. The radioactivity uptake of the SLN varied in several orders of magnitude between 0.006% and 0.6%. The probability of SLN-metastasis was found to be independent from tracer uptake in the lymph node. The radioactivity uptake of the SLNs in distinct lymph node regions showed no significant differences. Conclusion: The radiotracer is transferred out of the prostate via blood flow, by direct transfer via the urethra into the bladder and by lymphatic transport. Injecting a

  14. Experimental studies on the biokinetics of Cs-134 and Cd-109 in the blood cockle (Anadara granosa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioaccumulation and depuration study under controlled laboratory conditions of Cs and Cd in Anadara granosa collected at coastal Kapar, Selangor was carried out using respective radiotracer, Cs-134 and Cd-109. The radioactivity of Cs-134 and Cd-109 were determined using high resolution hyper germanium detector. Our results demonstrate that Cd-109 was accumulated efficiently by this species, except Cs-134. The steady state concentration factor (CF) for accumulation of Cs-134 and Cd-109 from seawater was estimated to be about 5.86 and 51.31, respectively. For the depuration stage, loss kinetics of Cs-134 and Cd-109 was best described by 2-compartment exponential model. Results shown that A. granosa exposed to Cs-134 have a total loss of 69% in compared to 19 % of Cd-109. Results gained in this experiment are a baseline data to evaluate future released of radioactive material from nuclear power programme facilities within this region. (author)

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Multienzyme Biosensor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SP. Ganesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of hybrid inhibitor biosensor system is discussed. This model consists of five nonlinear partial differential equations for bisubstrate sensitive amperometric system. Simple and closed form of analytical expressions for concentration of glucose-6-phosphate (substrate, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (inhibitor, oxygen (co-substrate, glucose (product 1, and hydrogen peroxide (product 3 is obtained in terms of rate constant using modified Adomian decomposition method (MADM. In this study, behavior of biokinetic parameters is analyzed using this theoretical result. The obtained analytical results (concentrations are compared with the numerical results and are found to be in satisfactory agreement.

  16. Study of the biokinetic behavior of 99mTc-DMSA in renal scintigraphy of pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brazil, renal studies with 99mTcDTPA and 99mTc-DMSA constitute about 18% of pediatric diagnostic procedures. A retrospective non-randomized study was conducted in 2010, for absolute quantification of kidney activities. In 2010,51 patients underwent renal studies in the Hospital of the Rio de Janeiro State University - HUPE-UERJ/ RJ, Brazil. 19 of them with 9±4 years of age and body mass of 31.8±20.8 kg showed relative uptake of 99mTc-DMSA between 45% and 55%. Still images (AP, PA and posterior oblique abdomen incidences) were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 115.69±42.31 MBq of 99mTc-DMSA using gamma camera (Siemens E-Cam), LEHR collimator, matrix of 256x256 and 5min imaging. In 2012, 3 patients (9.3±2.1 years, 31.97±10.75 kg) in the previous study were followed in a prospective study. All urinary excretions samples were collected from administration of 99mTc-DMSA to 6 h after, while simultaneously images were acquired AP and PA abdominal region with Philips model Picker Prism 2000XP. Aliquots of each urine sample were measured in gamma counter shaft GenesysTM Gamma 1 with Nal (TI) detector. For whole body, the biological half-life estimate was 11.0±2.0 h, and the residence time was found to be 5.6±0.4 h while the literature suggests 4.l±0.5 h for age range studied. Residence time for kidney was found to be 0.7±0.4 h, while the literature shows, 3.07 h and 1.4 h for patients with normal and renal pathologies, respectively. This difference may be attributed to the methodology because while the images were taken during the first 6 h, SMITH et aI. (1996) performed images of the kidneys and whole body 30 h after administration of 99mTcDMSA, incorporating the slow term of biological half-life. For liver, it was found the average residence time of 3.0±0.4 min, whereas the literature indicates 20.8 min and 25.1 min, respectively according to SMITH et. ai (1996) and ICRP (1998). The fact that the administered activity was higher than the

  17. Biokinetic and dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-14F7-monoclonal antibody in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Joaquin; Calderon, Carlos; Pimentel, Gilmara; Oliva, Juan P., E-mail: jgg@infomed.sld.cu [Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto de Oncologia y Radiobiologia, Cidad Habana (Cuba); Casaco, Angel [Division de Ensayos Clinicos, Centro de Inmunologia Molecular, Reparto Siboney, Ciudad Habana (Cuba)

    2008-07-01

    ranged in 15h and 19h. The distribution volume was similar to physiological volume in normal subject. A low urinary excretion was observed. The biodistribution shows a high retention of radiotracer in whole-body. A high uptake and retention was observed in bone marrow, kidneys and liver. The highest absorbed dose per MBq was observed in liver and kidneys. The {sup 99m}Tc-14F7 shows a rapid tumor uptake (<2.5h) with a delayed biological elimination half time (>4.5 days). In most cases, the maximum activity uptake in tumor (<1%/100g of tumor) was observed at 24 hours after injection. The pharmacokinetic data observed for {sup 99m}Tc-14F7 MAb behaves as a monoexponential model showing a slow clearance from plasma and a low urinary excretion. (author)

  18. Age-specific models for evaluating dose and risk from internal exposures to radionuclides: Report of current work of the Metabolism and Dosimetry Research Group, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A projection of the health risk to a population internally exposed to a radionuclide requires explicit or implicit use of demographic, biokinetic, dosimetric, and dose-response models. Exposure guidelines have been based on models for a reference adult with a fixed life span. In this report, we describe recent efforts to develop a comprehensive methodology for estimation of radiogenic risk to individuals and to heterogeneous populations. Emphasis is on age-dependent biokinetics and dosimetry for internal emitters, but consideration also is given to conversion of age-specific doses to estimates of risk using realistic, site-specific demographic models and best available age-specific dose-response functions. We discuss how the methods described here may also improve estimates for the reference adult usually considered in radiation protection. 159 refs

  19. Modeling growth and bacteriocin production by Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 in response to temperature and pH values used for sourdough fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messens, Winy; Neysens, Patricia; Vansieleghem, Wim; Vanderhoeven, Johan; De Vuyst, Luc

    2002-03-01

    The biokinetics of cell growth of Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 and bacteriocin production by this strain were investigated as a function of the temperatures (28 to 44C) and pH values (pH 4.2 to 6.4) that are characteristic of a sourdough fermentation process. The influence of temperature and pH on microbial behavior is described by using a successfully validated predictive model. PMID:11872497

  20. Modeling Growth and Bacteriocin Production by Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 in Response to Temperature and pH Values Used for Sourdough Fermentations

    OpenAIRE

    Messens, Winy; Neysens, Patricia; Vansieleghem, Wim; Vanderhoeven, Johan; De Vuyst, Luc

    2002-01-01

    The biokinetics of cell growth of Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 and bacteriocin production by this strain were investigated as a function of the temperatures (28 to 44°C) and pH values (pH 4.2 to 6.4) that are characteristic of a sourdough fermentation process. The influence of temperature and pH on microbial behavior is described by using a successfully validated predictive model.

  1. Matrix modulation of the toxicity of alkenylbenzenes, studied by an integrated approach using in vitro, in vivo, and physiologically based biokinetic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Husainy, W.A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkenylbenzenes such as estragole and methyleugenol are common components of spices and herbs such as tarragon, basil, fennel, mace, allspice, star anise and anise and their essential oils (Smithet al., 20

  2. Matrix Modulation of the Bioactivation of Estragole by Constituents of Different Alkenylbenzene-containing Herbs and Spices and Physiologically Based Biokinetic Modeling of Possible In Vivo Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Husainy, W.A.A.M.; Berg, van den S.J.P.L.; Paini, A.; Campana, A.; Asselman, M.; Spenkelink, A.; Punt, A.; Scholz, G.; Schilter, B.; Adams, T.B.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.

    2012-01-01

    The alkenylbenzene estragole is a constituent of several herbs and spices. It induces hepatomas in rodents at high doses following bioactivation by cytochrome P450s and sulfotransferases (SULTs) giving rise to the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite 1'-sulfooxyestragole which forms DNA adducts. Methano

  3. Matrix modulation of the toxicity of alkenylbenzenes, studied by an integrated approach using in vitro, in vivo, and physiologically based biokinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Husainy, W.A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkenylbenzenes such as estragole and methyleugenol are common components of spices and herbs such as tarragon, basil, fennel, mace, allspice, star anise and anise and their essential oils (Smithet al., 2002). There is an interest in the safety evaluation of alkenylbenzenes because these compounds can induce hepatic tumours in rodents when dosed orally at high dose levels (Milleret al., 1983; NTP, 2000). Based on the rodent studies with estragole, methyleugenoland structurally related alkenyl...

  4. Dosimetric evaluation in organs of the Tc{sup 99m}, I{sup 123} bio-kinetics to estimate dose in thyroid children 1 and 5 years; Evaluacion dosimetrica en organos de la biocinetica del Tc{sup 99m}, I{sup 123} para estimar dosis en tiroides ninos 1 y 5 anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, A. M.; Quispe, R.; Vasquez, D. J.; Rocha, M. D.; Morales, N. R.; Marin, R. K. [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Trujillo (Peru); Zelada, A. L., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidad Cesar Vallejo, Grupo de Fisica Medica, Av. Larco s/n, Trujillo (Peru)

    2012-10-15

    Using the formalism MIRD and the representation of Cristy-Eckerman for the thyroid in children of 1 and 5 years, is demonstrated that the dosimetric contribution of the organs of I{sup 123} (iodure) bio-kinetics is not significant in the dose estimate. The total dose absorbed by the gland is its auto dose. The dosimetric contribution of the organs source of the Tc{sup 99m} (pertechnetate) bio-kinetics in the gland is significant in the dose estimate like to be ignored. The reported results for the iodure are not significantly different to the found for the Marinelli scheme (auto-dose) for thyroid represented by a sphere of 1,78 and 3,45 grams. (Author)

  5. The models of internal dose calculation in ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a lot discussions about internal dose calculation in ICRP. Many efforts are devoted to improvement in models and parameters. In this report, we discuss what kind of models and parameters are used in ICRP. Models are divided into two parts, the dosimetric model and biokinetic model. The former is a mathematical phantom model, and it is mainly developed in ORNL. The results are used in many researchers. The latter is a compartment model and it has a difficulty to decide the parameter values. They are not easy to estimate because of their age dependency. ICRP officially sets values at ages of 3 month, 1 year, 5 year, 10 year, 15 year and adult, and recommends to get values among ages by linear age interpolate. But it is very difficult to solve the basic equation with these values, so we calculate by use of computers. However, it has complex shame and needs long CPU time. We should make approximated equations. The parameter values include much uncertainty because of less experimental data, especially for a child. And these models and parameter values are for Caucasian. We should inquire whether they could correctly describe other than Caucasian. The body size affects the values of calculated SAF, and the differences of metabolism change the biokinetic pattern. (author)

  6. LUDEP 1.0, a personal computer program to implement the new ICRP respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has recently approved a new model of the human respiratory tract. This model has been designed to represent realistically the deposition and biokinetic behaviour of inhaled radionuclides, and to calculate doses to the respiratory tract. In order to examine the practical application and radiological implications of the new model, a Personal Computer program has been developed. LUDEP 1.0 is a user-friendly program for the IBM-compatible PC which enables the user to calculate doses to the respiratory tract and to other organs. (author)

  7. A generic model for 11C labelled radiopharmaceuticals for imaging receptors in the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with 11C (half-time 0.340 h) are being developed for positron emission tomographic studies of different types of receptor in the human brain. For most of these agents the available biokinetic data are insufficient to construct realistic compound-specific biokinetic models for calculating the internal radiation dose delivered to persons undergoing investigation. A generic model for brain receptor substances that predicts the internal dose with sufficient accuracy for general radiation protection purposes has, therefore, been developed. Biokinetic data for 13 11C radiopharmaceuticals used clinically for imaging different brain receptors indicate that, despite differences in chemical structure, their uptake and retention in the human brain and other tissues is broadly similar. The proposed model assumes instantaneous deposition of 5% of the injected radioactivity in the brain, with the remaining radioactivity being rapidly and uniformly distributed throughout all other tissues. Elimination from all tissues is assumed to occur with a half-time of 2 h. It is further assumed that 75% of the injected 11C is excreted in the urine, and 25% via the gall bladder, with a half-time of 2 h. This model yields an effective dose of 4.5 x 10-3mSv/MBq, with doses of 3.2 x 10-2, 1.7 x 10-2, 8.7 X 10-3, 5.2 x 10-3, and 3.8 x 10-3mGy MBq-1 to the urinary bladder, gall bladder, kidneys, brain and ovaries, respectively. These doses are well within the range of those reported using compound-specific models for the radiopharmaceuticals studied. (author)

  8. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  9. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-03-01

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  10. Dimer of the peptide cycle (Ar-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc for the integrin s over-expression image: formulation, biokinetics and dosimetry; Dimero del peptido ciclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) radiomarcado con {sup 99m}Tc para la imagen de sobre-expresion de integrinas: formulacion, biocinetica y dosimetria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz A, Z.

    2013-07-01

    In breast cancer, α(v)β(3) and/or α(v)β(5) integrin s are over-expressed in both endothelial and tumour cells. Radiolabeled peptides based on the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence are radiopharmaceuticals with high affinity and selectivity for those integrin s. The RGD-dimer peptide (E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}) radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc has been reported as a radiopharmaceutical with 10-fold higher affinity for the α(v)β(3) integrin as compared to the RGD-monomer. EDDA (Ethylenediamine-N,N-diacetic acid) is a hydrophilic molecule that may favours renal excretion when used as coligand in the {sup 99m}Tc labelling of HYNIC-peptides and can easily be formulated in a lyophilized kit. Aim: Establish a biokinetic model for {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} prepared from lyophilized kits and evaluate the dosimetry as breast cancer imaging agent. Methods: {sup 99m}Tc labelling was performed by addition of sodium pertechnetate solution and 0.2 M phosphate buffer ph 7.0 to a lyophilized formulation containing E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}, EDDA, tricine, mannitol and stannous chloride. Radiochemical purity was evaluated by reversed phase HPLC and ITLC-SG analyses. Stability studies in human serum were carried out by size-exclusion HPLC. In-vitro cell uptake was tested using breast cancer cells (MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231) with blocked and non-blocked receptors. Biodistribution and tumour uptake were determined in MCF7 tumour-bearing nude mice with blocked and non-blocked receptors, and images were obtained using a micro-SPECT/CT. Whole-body images from seven healthy women were acquired at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} administration obtained with radiochemical purities of >94 %. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. Each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} time-activity curves in each

  11. Modeling the effect of continuous infusion DTPA therapy on the retention and dosimetry of inhaled actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biokinetic model of the treatment of dogs that inhaled 241AmO2 aerosols with continuously infused DTPA has been adapted from a model previously published by Mewhinney and Griffith. This model simulated both the tissue retention and excretion of 241Am, and was used to estimate the cumulative radiation doses to tissues at risk from 241Am alpha radiation. The results showed that at 64 days after exposure, the liver dose of the DTPA-treated animals was 3% that of the corresponding controls, the skeletal dose was 2%, the kidney dose was 4%, and the lung dose was 67% of controls. This paper describes a biokinetic and dosimetric model that was adapted from a previously published model. It was developed to provide a means of estimating radiation doses for cases where continuously infused DTPA therapy is used to reduce radiation dose. The model was formulated for the case of 241Am02 inhalation, a physicochemical form of Am that is moderately soluble in vivo, and one to which people have been exposed. Because adequate human data, particularly tissue data, are not available from cases of accidental human exposure to 241Am, two published data sets from experiments in which Beagle dogs inhaled 241Am02 aerosols have been used to obtain parameter estimates for the model. The model simulations were then used to provide dose estimates with and without infused-DTPA therapy. (author)

  12. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of {sup 14}C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, Mikael

    2002-08-01

    {sup 14}C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used {sup 14}C-breath tests: {sup 14}C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low {sup 14}C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform {sup 14}C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of {sup 14}C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and {sup 14}C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the {sup 14}C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  13. Dosimetric contribution of the organs of the I{sup 123}, I{sup 124} and I{sup 131} bio-kinetics in the dose estimate for euthyroid adults; Contribucion dosimetrica de los organos de la biocinetica de I{sup 123}, I{sup 124} y I{sup 131} en el estimado de dosis para adultos eutiroideos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, A. M.; Rojas, A. R.; Castillo, D. C.; Idrogo, C. J.; Flores, U. H., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Trujillo (Peru)

    2011-10-15

    Using the formalism MIRD and the representation of Crysty-Eckerman for the thyroid adult, is demonstrated that the dosimetric contributions of source organs of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceuticals I{sup 123}, I{sup 124} and I{sup 131} (iodine) are not significant in the dose estimate. Therefore, the total absorbed dose by the gland is its auto-dose. Equally, the reported results do not present significant differences to the results found by the Marinelli scheme (auto-dose) for the thyroid represented by a sphere of 20 grams. (Author)

  14. BK/TD models for analyzing in vitro impedance data on cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, S; Barcellini-Couget, S; Beaudouin, R; Brochot, C; Desousa, G; Rahmani, R; Pery, A R R

    2015-06-01

    The ban of animal testing has enhanced the development of new in vitro technologies for cosmetics safety assessment. Impedance metrics is one such technology which enables monitoring of cell viability in real time. However, analyzing real time data requires moving from static to dynamic toxicity assessment. In the present study, we built mechanistic biokinetic/toxicodynamic (BK/TD) models to analyze the time course of cell viability in cytotoxicity assay using impedance. These models account for the fate of the tested compounds during the assay. BK/TD models were applied to analyze HepaRG cell viability, after single (48 h) and repeated (4 weeks) exposures to three hepatotoxic compounds (coumarin, isoeugenol and benzophenone-2). The BK/TD models properly fit the data used for their calibration that was obtained for single or repeated exposure. Only for one out of the three compounds, the models calibrated with a single exposure were able to predict repeated exposure data. We therefore recommend the use of long-term exposure in vitro data in order to adequately account for chronic hepatotoxic effects. The models we propose here are capable of being coupled with human biokinetic models in order to relate dose exposure and human hepatotoxicity. PMID:25827406

  15. A computational code for resolution of general compartment models applied to internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bio analysis and the knowledge of the incorporation time. The biokinetics models can be represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. There are available four different techniques for the resolution of system of differential equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods. The software was developed in C≠ programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved by SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system is in accordance with the values published by ICRP. (author)

  16. A computational code for resolution of general compartment models applied to internal dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, Thiago R.; Todo, Alberto S., E-mail: claro@usp.br, E-mail: astodo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bio analysis and the knowledge of the incorporation time. The biokinetics models can be represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. There are available four different techniques for the resolution of system of differential equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods. The software was developed in C{ne} programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved by SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system is in accordance with the values published by ICRP. (author)

  17. New framework for standardized notation in wastewater treatment modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corominas, L.; Rieger, L.; Takacs, I.;

    2010-01-01

    Many unit process models are available in the field of wastewater treatment. All of these models use their own notation, causing problems for documentation, implementation and connection of different models (using different sets of state variables). The main goal of this paper is to propose a new...... notational framework which allows unique and systematic naming of state variables and parameters of biokinetic models in the wastewater treatment field. The symbols are based on one main letter that gives a general description of the state variable or parameter and several subscript levels that provide...... is a framework that can be used in whole plant modelling, which consists of different fields such as activated sludge, anaerobic digestion, sidestream treatment, membrane bioreactors, metabolic approaches, fate of micropollutants and biofilm processes. The main objective of this consensus building...

  18. Providing a theoretical basis for nanotoxicity risk analysis departing from traditional physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Dirk P.

    The same novel properties of engineered nanoparticles that make them attractive may also present unique exposure risks. But, the traditional physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling assumption of instantaneous equilibration likely does not apply to nanoparticles. This simulation-based research begins with development of a model that includes diffusion, active transport, and carrier mediated transport. An eigenvalue analysis methodology was developed to examine model behavior to focus future research. Simulations using the physico-chemical properties of size, shape, surface coating, and surface charge were performed and an equation was determined which estimates area under the curve for arterial blood concentration, which is a surrogate of nanoparticle dose. Results show that the cellular transport processes modeled in this research greatly affect the biokinetics of nanoparticles. Evidence suggests that the equation used to estimate area under the curve for arterial blood concentration can be written in terms of nanoparticle size only. The new paradigm established by this research leverages traditional in vitro, in vivo, and PBPK modeling, but includes area under the curve to bridge animal testing results to humans. This new paradigm allows toxicologists and policymakers to then assess risk to a given exposure and assist in setting appropriate exposure limits for nanoparticles. This research provides critical understanding of nanoparticle biokinetics and allows estimation of total exposure at any toxicological endpoint in the body. This effort is a significant contribution as it highlights future research needs and demonstrates how modeling can be used as a tool to advance nanoparticle risk assessment.

  19. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with [sup 111]In-DOTA-Tyr[sup 3]-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, M.; Ferrari, M.; Maecke, H.R.; Tosi, G. (Department of Health Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)); Zoboli, S.; Chinol, M.; Fiorenza, M.; Paganelli, G. (Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti, 435, I-20141-Milan (Italy)); Stabin, M.G. (Nuclear Energy Department, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)); Orsi, F.O. (Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)); Jermann, E. (Nuclear Medicine Department, University of Basel (Switzerland)); Robertson, C. (Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy))

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe[sup 1]-Tyr[sup 3]-octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 [mu]g), labelled with 150-185 MBq of [sup 111]In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ [mu]mol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for [sup 111]In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9[+-]0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%[+-]11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2[+-]1.8 h in spleen, 1.7[+-]1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4[+-]1.9 h in liver, 1.5[+-]0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4[+-]5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6[+-]6.3 (spleen), 3.3[+-]2.2 (kidneys), 0.7[+-]0.6 (liver), 2.2[+-]0.3 (bladder), 0.03[+-]0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation

  20. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with {sup 111}In-DOTA-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, M.; Ferrari, M.; Maecke, H.R.; Tosi, G. [Department of Health Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Zoboli, S.; Chinol, M.; Fiorenza, M.; Paganelli, G. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti, 435, I-20141-Milan (Italy); Stabin, M.G. [Nuclear Energy Department, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Orsi, F.O. [Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Jermann, E. [Nuclear Medicine Department, University of Basel (Switzerland); Robertson, C. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 {mu}g), labelled with 150-185 MBq of {sup 111}In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ {mu}mol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for {sup 111}In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9{+-}0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%{+-}11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2{+-}1.8 h in spleen, 1.7{+-}1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4{+-}1.9 h in liver, 1.5{+-}0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4{+-}5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6{+-}6.3 (spleen), 3.3{+-}2.2 (kidneys), 0.7{+-}0.6 (liver), 2.2{+-}0.3 (bladder), 0.03{+-}0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation

  1. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with 111In-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with 90Y-DOTATOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with 90Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 μg), labelled with 150-185 MBq of 111In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ μmol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for 111In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9±0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%±11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2±1.8 h in spleen, 1.7±1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4±1.9 h in liver, 1.5±0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4±5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for 90Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6±6.3 (spleen), 3.3±2.2 (kidneys), 0.7±0.6 (liver), 2.2±0.3 (bladder), 0.03±0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of 90Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation doses to the spleen and kidneys. Tumour doses were high enough in most

  2. Significance of uncertainties derived from settling tank model structure and parameters on predicting WWTP performance - A global sensitivity analysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Sin, Gürkan; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen;

    2011-01-01

    Uncertainty derived from one of the process models – such as one-dimensional secondary settling tank (SST) models – can impact the output of the other process models, e.g., biokinetic (ASM1), as well as the integrated wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) models. The model structure and parameter...... from the last aerobic bioreactor upstream to the SST (Garrett/hydraulic method). For model structure uncertainty, two one-dimensional secondary settling tank (1-D SST) models are assessed, including a first-order model (the widely used Takács-model), in which the feasibility of using measured...... parameters for calibration is limited. The other SST model is a state-of-the-art, second-order, convection-dispersion tool (Plósz et al., 2007). The sensitivity results obtained from the four scenarios consistently indicate that the settler models and their parameters are among the most significant sources...

  3. Influence of selecting secondary settling tank sub-models on the calibration of WWTP models – A global sensitivity analysis using BSM2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Flores Alsina, Xavier; Sin, Gürkan;

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) model performance to the selection of one-dimensional secondary settling tanks (1-D SST) models with first-order and second-order mathematical structures. We performed a global sensitivity analysis (GSA) on the benchmark...... settling parameters were found to be as influential as the biokinetic parameters on the uncertainty of WWTP model predictions, particularly for biogas production and treated water quality. However, the sensitivity measures were found to be dependent on the 1-D SST models selected. Accordingly, we suggest a...... different optimum parameter selection for the calibration of WWTP models when either of the 1-D SST models is used. Using first-order models, the calibration should give equal importance to the adjustment of the hindered settling and slow settling parameter values. The adjusted hindered settling parameters...

  4. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-Bombesin: images of GRP receptors; Biocinetica y dosimetria en humanos de {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-Bombesina: imagenes de receptores GRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos C, C. L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The bombesin (BN) receptor subtype 2 (GRP-r) is expressed in several normal human tissues and is over-expressed in various human tumors including breast, prostate, small cell lung and pancreatic cancer. Recently [{sup 99m}Tc]EDDA/HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin ({sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN) was reported as a radiopharmaceutical with high stability in human serum, specific cell GRP-r binding and rapid cell internalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN to image GRP-r and to assess the radiopharmaceutical biokinetics and dosimetry in 4 breast cancer patients and in 7 healthy women. Methods: Whole-body images were acquired at 20, 90, 180 min and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all 11 scans and the cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN time-activity curves in each organ in order to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions, according with MIRD methodology. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Results: Images showed a rapid radiopharmaceutical blood clearance with renal excretion as predominant route. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN exhibited high in vivo affinity for GRP-r over-expression successfully visualized in cancer mammary glands and well differentiated from the ubiquitous GRP-r expression in normal breast, lungs and airways. There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in the radiation absorbed doses between cancer patients and healthy women. The average equivalent doses (n=11) for a study using 740 MBq were 24.8 +- 8.8 mSv (kidneys), 7.3 +- 1.8 mSv (lungs), 6.5 +- 4.0 mSv (breast) 2.0 +- 0.3 mSv (pancreas), 1.6 +- 0.3 mSv (liver), 1.2 +- 0.2 mSv (ovaries) and 1.0 +- 0.2 mSv (red

  5. A plant wide aqueous phase chemistry model describing pH variations and ion speciation/pairing in wastewater treatment process models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Alsina, X.; Mbamba, C. Kazadi; Solon, K.;

    There is a growing interest within the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) modelling community to correctly describe physico-chemical processes after many years of mainly focusing on biokinetics (Batstone et al., 2012). Indeed, future modelling needs, such as a plant-wide phosphorus (P) description...... presented and interfaced with industry standard models. The module involves extensive consideration of non-ideality by including ion activities instead of molar concentrations and complex ion pairing. The general equilibria are formulated as a set of Differential Algebraic Equations (DAEs) instead of...... cationic/anionic loads. In this way, the general applicability/flexibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by implementing the aqueous phase chemistry module in some of the most frequently used WWTP process simulation models. Finally, it is shown how traditional wastewater modelling studies can be...

  6. A compartmental model to describe hydraulics in a full-scale waste stabilization pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Andres; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Goethals, Peter; Nopens, Ingmar

    2012-02-01

    The advancement of experimental and computational resources has facilitated the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models as a predictive tool for mixing behaviour in full-scale waste stabilization pond systems. However, in view of combining hydraulic behaviour with a biokinetic process model, the computational load is still too high for practical use. This contribution presents a method that uses a validated CFD model with tracer experiments as a platform for the development of a simpler compartmental model (CM) to describe the hydraulics in a full-scale maturation pond (7 ha) of a waste stabilization ponds complex in Cuenca (Ecuador). 3D CFD models were validated with experimental data from pulse tracer experiments, showing a sufficient agreement. Based on the CFD model results, a number of compartments were selected considering the turbulence characteristics of the flow, the residence time distribution (RTD) curves and the dominant velocity component at different pond locations. The arrangement of compartments based on the introduction of recirculation flow rate between adjacent compartments, which in turn is dependent on the turbulence diffusion coefficient, is illustrated. Simulated RTD's from a systemic tanks-in-series (TIS) model and the developed CM were compared. The TIS was unable to capture the measured RTD, whereas the CM predicted convincingly the peaks and lags of the tracer experiment using only a minimal fraction of the computational demand of the CFD model. Finally, a biokinetic model was coupled to both approaches demonstrating the impact an insufficient hydraulic model can have on the outcome of a modelling exercise. TIS and CM showed drastic differences in the output loads implying that the CM approach is to be used when modelling the biological performance of the full-scale system. PMID:22137448

  7. Biokinetics of a transuranic ({sup 238}PU) and a rare earth element ({sup 152}Eu) in the lobster (Homarus gammarus): transfer mechanisms (accumulation and detoxification) in organs and at the cellular level; Biocinetiques d'un element transuranien, le {sup 238}PU, et d'une terre rare, le {sup 152}EU, chez le homard homarus gammarus (organes et niveau cellulaire) modalites des transferts (accumulation et detoxication)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocquet, N

    1995-07-01

    The work presented here is an experimental investigation of the biokinetics of transfer of a transuranic and a rare earth element ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 152}Eu) in the lobster Homarus gammarus. The study of {sup 238}Pu biokinetics forms part of a wider framework of research concerning the transfer of transuranic elements in marine species, while the study of {sup 152}Eu is carried out with a view to supporting the analogy between the behaviour of transuranics and rare earths in living organisms. Exactly the same experimental protocol, based on techniques from various disciplines (biology, biochemistry and metrology), was used to Investigate the biokinetics of transfer of these two radionuclides. The Individual lobsters were radiolabelled by means of one-shot or chronic ingestion of spiked meals. As the first approach, the kinetics and transfer mechanisms were studied In whole animal samples and in different organs distinct series of pathways through the different organs were identified in the case of both radionuclides, being mainly linked to digestive processes induced by the meal as well as the transport function of hemo-lymph in this way, the Important role of the digestive gland was picked out, with two of four cellular types displaying a successive involvement In the fixation and then the retention of the studied radionuclides. As a corroborative approach, the digestive gland was subjected to a more detailed investigation with the aim of describing the mechanisms of Incorporation and elucidating transfer processes at the cellular and molecular levels. {sup 238}Pu is preferentially partitioned into the cytosol, where it is associated with various constituents such as ferritin (iron-storing protein). {sup 152}Eu is more diffusely distributed in the hepato-pancreatic cells, while the lysosomes appear to play a more important role during transfer. The results obtained in this study, both on the macroscopic scale (i.e. the whole animal and different organs) as well

  8. Computer modelling of the chemical speciation of lanthanide and actinide elements in the human gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joint expert speciation system (JESS) computer modelling is used to produce biokinetic models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the radiation dose from internally deposited radionuclides to be calculated. Preliminary estimations of the interactions of Gd and Cm with all the metal binding species present in the small intestine, i.e. bile and pancreatic fluid, over a pH range of pH 5.0-9.0, have been made. The development of the models and these initial validation results for the use of Gd as a surrogate for Cm, will be presented and discussed. From these aqueous studies it appears that the use of Gd as a surrogate for Cm in bile or pancreatic fluid is doubtful. However, further speciation modelling, incorporating solids, is in process to confirm these findings. (orig.)

  9. A model for the transfer of calcium and strontium to the fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biokinetic model has been developed for the transfer of calcium and strontium to the human fetus. For the mother, ICRP models were adapted for pregnancy to include increases in gastrointestinal absorption, urinary excretion and bone turnover rates. The fetus was modelled with blood, soft tissue and bone compartments. Fetal requirements for CA were determined by skeletal calcification and recycling between fetal and maternal blood was included. Daily transfer of Sr to the fetus was taken to be 0.6 times that of Ca. For acute intakes of 45Ca and 90Sr in late pregnancy at 36 weeks after conception, when maximum transfer occurs, the model predicts CF:CM ratios of 19 and 9, respectively. Corresponding committed doses to the red bone marrow of offspring would be greater than in adults by factors of about nine for 45Ca and about two for 90Sr. (author)

  10. A Development of Domestic Food Chain Model Data for Chronic Effect Estimation of Off-site Consequence Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FCM includes complex transport phenomena of radiation materials on a biokinetic system of contaminated environments. An estimation of chronic health effects is a key part of the level 3 PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment), which depends on the FCM estimation from contaminated foods ingestion. A cultural ingestion habit of a local region and agricultural productions are different to the general features over worldwide scale or case by case. This is a reason to develop a domestic FCM data for the level 3 PSA. However, a generation of the specific FCM data is a complex process and under a large degree of uncertainty due to inherent biokinetic models. As a preliminary study, the present study focuses on an infrastructure development to generation of a specific FCM data. During this process, the features of FCM data to generate a domestic FCM data were investigated. Based on the insights obtained from this process, a specific domestic FCM data was developed. The present study was developed a domestic FCM data to estimate the chronic health effects of off-site consequence analysis. From this study, an insight was obtained, that a domestic FCM data is roughly 20 times higher than the MACCS2 defaults data. Based on this observation, it is clear that the specific chronic health effects of a domestic plant site should be considered in the off-site consequence analysis

  11. A Development of Domestic Food Chain Model Data for Chronic Effect Estimation of Off-site Consequence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seok-Jung; KEUM, Dong-Kwon; Jang, Seung-Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The FCM includes complex transport phenomena of radiation materials on a biokinetic system of contaminated environments. An estimation of chronic health effects is a key part of the level 3 PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment), which depends on the FCM estimation from contaminated foods ingestion. A cultural ingestion habit of a local region and agricultural productions are different to the general features over worldwide scale or case by case. This is a reason to develop a domestic FCM data for the level 3 PSA. However, a generation of the specific FCM data is a complex process and under a large degree of uncertainty due to inherent biokinetic models. As a preliminary study, the present study focuses on an infrastructure development to generation of a specific FCM data. During this process, the features of FCM data to generate a domestic FCM data were investigated. Based on the insights obtained from this process, a specific domestic FCM data was developed. The present study was developed a domestic FCM data to estimate the chronic health effects of off-site consequence analysis. From this study, an insight was obtained, that a domestic FCM data is roughly 20 times higher than the MACCS2 defaults data. Based on this observation, it is clear that the specific chronic health effects of a domestic plant site should be considered in the off-site consequence analysis.

  12. A model for the bioaccumulation of 99Tc in lobsters (Homarus gammarus) from the West Cumbrian coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biokinetic model is presented that simulates the uptake and release of 99Tc by the European lobster (Homarus gammarus). This organism is of significant radioecological interest since lobsters, in contrast to most other organisms, have a high affinity for 99Tc. The model is designed to represent annually averaged 99Tc concentrations in lobsters from the Cumbrian coast, where significant levels of 99Tc have been released under authorisation by the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at BNFL Sellafield. This paper describes the construction of the model, how it was calibrated using data from published literature, and preliminary results indicating that model output agrees well with the available monitoring data. Given that this model successfully combines laboratory and field data, this research could potentially make a significant contribution to the field, as, to date, it has been difficult to predict and explain concentrations of 99Tc in lobsters

  13. Biodegradation of phenol with chromium(VI) reduction in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process-Kinetic model and reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model system was derived to describe the simultaneous removal of phenol biodegradation with chromium(VI) reduction in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm reactor. The model system incorporates diffusive mass transport and double Monod kinetics. The model was solved using a combination of the orthogonal collocation method and Gear's method. A laboratory-scale column reactor was employed to validate the kinetic model system. Batch kinetic tests were conducted independently to evaluate the biokinetic parameters used in the model simulation. The removal efficiencies of phenol and chromium(VI) in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process were approximately 980 mg/g and 910 mg/g, respectively, under a steady-state condition. In the steady state, model-predicted biofilm thickness reached up to 350 μm and suspended cells in the effluent were 85 mg cell/l. The experimental results agree closely with the results of the model simulations.

  14. Role of bio-effect models in improving radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of linear quadratic model of cell survival in radiotherapy has enabled to successfully predict the response of both the normal tissues and tumours. Even the simplest form of BED (biological effective dose) equation for fractionated radiotherapy could precisely predict the late normal tissue complications resulting from large dose per fraction. These observations have led to the development MFD (multiple fractions daily) protocol, with the specific objective of reducing late normal tissue morbidity. Protraction of treatment and consequent loss of BED and tumour control; multiple fractions delivered without adequate intervals resulting in incomplete repair of sub-lethal damage and consequent normal tissue complications, have been explained successfully by the LQ model. In the recent past LDR (low dose rate) brachytherapy is mostly replaced by HDR (high dose rate) technique. A series of calculations based on tumour bio-kinetics parameters, as well as the geometric sparing provides a sound rationale for replacing LDR technique by HDR technique. Some of the calculations relevant to this will be presented during this talk. Bio-effect models can also provide insight in to the rationale of RIT (radio-immunotherapy). With an adequate knowledge of biological half-life of antibodies in the tumour/critical organs, and biological uptake half-time in the tumour, it is possible to evaluate the efficacy of a number of radio-nuclides in RIT. Calculations based on LQ models suggest that longer lived isotopes such as 32P, 86Rb, 144mIn may have an advantage over the shorter lived radio-nuclides. A clear knowledge of the various parameters like/values, potentially doubling time of tumour and other bio-kinetic parameters may hold the key for successful application of bio-effect models in predicting the response to radiotherapy. Feedback from the clinics will further help in refining and validating the existing models. (author)

  15. Computer modelling of the chemical speciation of lanthanide and actinide elements in the human gastrointestinal tract: mouth and stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesse 53 computer modelling was used to produce biokinetic models of the gastrointestinal tract in order for the radiation dose from internally deposited radionuclides to be calculated. Preliminary estimations of the interactions of Eu and Am with all the metal binding species present in the mouth and stomach, i.e. saliva over a pH range of 5.6-7.6, and gastric juice over a pH range of 1.5-5.5, and at a temperature of 37 deg. C, have been made. The development of the models, and initial validation results for the use of Eu as a surrogate for Am, are presented and discussed. From these aqueous studies it appears that the use of Eu as a surrogate for Am in saliva or gastric juice is doubtful. However, further speciation modelling, incorporating solids, is in process to confirm these findings. (author)

  16. Shall we upgrade one-dimensional secondary settler models used in WWTP simulators? - An assessment of model structure uncertainty and its propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plósz, Benedek Gy; De Clercq, Jeriffa; Nopens, Ingmar; Benedetti, Lorenzo; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    In WWTP models, the accurate assessment of solids inventory in bioreactors equipped with solid-liquid separators, mostly described using one-dimensional (1-D) secondary settling tank (SST) models, is the most fundamental requirement of any calibration procedure. Scientific knowledge on characterising particulate organics in wastewater and on bacteria growth is well-established, whereas 1-D SST models and their impact on biomass concentration predictions are still poorly understood. A rigorous assessment of two 1-DSST models is thus presented: one based on hyperbolic (the widely used Takács-model) and one based on parabolic (the more recently presented Plósz-model) partial differential equations. The former model, using numerical approximation to yield realistic behaviour, is currently the most widely used by wastewater treatment process modellers. The latter is a convection-dispersion model that is solved in a numerically sound way. First, the explicit dispersion in the convection-dispersion model and the numerical dispersion for both SST models are calculated. Second, simulation results of effluent suspended solids concentration (XTSS,Eff), sludge recirculation stream (XTSS,RAS) and sludge blanket height (SBH) are used to demonstrate the distinct behaviour of the models. A thorough scenario analysis is carried out using SST feed flow rate, solids concentration, and overflow rate as degrees of freedom, spanning a broad loading spectrum. A comparison between the measurements and the simulation results demonstrates a considerably improved 1-D model realism using the convection-dispersion model in terms of SBH, XTSS,RAS and XTSS,Eff. Third, to assess the propagation of uncertainty derived from settler model structure to the biokinetic model, the impact of the SST model as sub-model in a plant-wide model on the general model performance is evaluated. A long-term simulation of a bulking event is conducted that spans temperature evolution throughout a summer

  17. Uncertainty analysis in WWTP model applications: a critical discussion using an example from design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist; Neumann, Marc B.;

    2009-01-01

    design performance criteria differs significantly. The implication for the practical applications of uncertainty analysis in the wastewater industry is profound: (i) as the uncertainty analysis results are specific to the framing used, the results must be interpreted within the context of that framing......This study focuses on uncertainty analysis of WWTP models and analyzes the issue of framing and how it affects the interpretation of uncertainty analysis results. As a case study, the prediction of uncertainty involved in model-based design of a wastewater treatment plant is studied. The Monte...... stoichiometric, biokinetic and influent parameters; (2) uncertainty due to hydraulic behaviour of the plant and mass transfer parameters; (3) uncertainty due to the combination of (1) and (2). The results demonstrate that depending on the way the uncertainty analysis is framed, the estimated uncertainty of...

  18. Considerations on the ICRP model predictions of the transfer of (137)Cs from food to the milk and urine of lactating mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Augusto; Risica, Serena

    2014-06-01

    A recent work has shown that the current ICRP biokinetic model for the transfer of caesium radionuclides from food to human breast milk was able to describe with satisfactory accuracy (137)Cs activity concentrations in human breast samples collected a few weeks after the Chernobyl accident as well as in samples collected some years later. However, systematic discrepancies were observed for the predictions of the activity concentrations in urine samples. In the present work, modifications to the model were investigated with the aim of improving the agreement between model predictions and data. It turned out that the disagreement for the urine data was ascribable to the mathematical simplifications used by the ICRP to describe urinary excretion in the first few days after delivery. However, the predictive performances of the model remained unchanged even when differences in the bioavailability of caesium from the ingested food types were considered or metabolic interactions between caesium and potassium were introduced into the model formulation. PMID:24705367

  19. Considerations on the ICRP model predictions of the transfer of 137Cs from food to the milk and urine of lactating mothers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent work has shown that the current ICRP biokinetic model for the transfer of caesium radionuclides from food to human breast milk was able to describe with satisfactory accuracy 137Cs activity concentrations in human breast samples collected a few weeks after the Chernobyl accident as well as in samples collected some years later. However, systematic discrepancies were observed for the predictions of the activity concentrations in urine samples. In the present work, modifications to the model were investigated with the aim of improving the agreement between model predictions and data. It turned out that the disagreement for the urine data was ascribable to the mathematical simplifications used by the ICRP to describe urinary excretion in the first few days after delivery. However, the predictive performances of the model remained unchanged even when differences in the bioavailability of caesium from the ingested food types were considered or metabolic interactions between caesium and potassium were introduced into the model formulation. (note)

  20. A plant-wide aqueous phase chemistry module describing pH variations and ion speciation/pairing in wastewater treatment process models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores Alsina, Xavier; Kazadi Mbamba, Christian; Solon, Kimberly;

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest within the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) modelling community to correctly describe physico-chemical processes after many years of mainly focusing on biokinetics. Indeed, future modelling needs, such as a plant-wide phosphorus (P) description, require a major, but...... unavoidable, additional degree of complexity when representing cationic/anionic behaviour in Activated Sludge (AS)/Anaerobic Digestion (AD) systems. In this paper, a plant-wide aqueous phase chemistry module describing pH variations plus ion speciation/pairing is presented and interfaced with industry...... different cationic/anionic loads. In this way, the general applicability/flexibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated, by implementing the aqueous phase chemistry module in some of the most frequently used WWTP process simulation models. Finally, it is shown how traditional wastewater modelling...

  1. 131I-SPGP internal dosimetry: animal model and human extrapolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorpaena plumieri is commonly called moreia-ati or manganga and is the most venomous and one of the most abundant fish species of the Brazilian coast. Soprani 2006, demonstrated that SPGP - an isolated protein from S. plumieri fish- possess high antitumoral activity against malignant tumours and can be a source of template molecules for the development (design) of antitumoral drugs. In the present work, Soprani's 125ISPGP biokinetic data were treated by MIRD formalism to perform Internal Dosimetry studies. Absorbed doses due to the 131I-SPGP uptake were determinate in several organs of mice, as well as in the implanted tumor. Doses obtained for animal model were extrapolated to humans assuming a similar ratio for various mouse and human tissues. For the extrapolation, it was used human organ masses from Cristy/Eckerman phantom. Both penetrating and non-penetrating radiation from 131I were considered. (author)

  2. 131I-CRTX internal dosimetry: animal model and human extrapolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snake venoms molecules have been shown to play a role not only in the survival and proliferation of tumor cells but also in the processes of tumor cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. 125I-Crtx, a radiolabeled version of a peptide derived from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom, specifically binds to tumor and triggers apoptotic signalling. At the present work, 125I-Crtx biokinetic data (evaluated in mice bearing Erlich tumor) were treated by MIRD formalism to perform Internal Dosimetry studies. Doses in several organs of mice were determinate, as well as in implanted tumor, for 131I-Crtx. Doses results obtained for animal model were extrapolated to humans assuming a similar concentration ratio among various tissues between mouse and human. In the extrapolation, it was used human organ masses from Cristy/Eckerman phantom. Both penetrating and non-penetrating radiation from 131I in the tissue were considered in dose calculations. (author)

  3. {sup 131}I-SPGP internal dosimetry: animal model and human extrapolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Henrique Martins de; Ferreira, Andrea Vidal; Soprani, Juliana; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: hma@cdtn.br; Figueiredo, Suely Gomes de [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas. Lab. de Quimica de Proteinas

    2009-07-01

    Scorpaena plumieri is commonly called moreia-ati or manganga and is the most venomous and one of the most abundant fish species of the Brazilian coast. Soprani 2006, demonstrated that SPGP - an isolated protein from S. plumieri fish- possess high antitumoral activity against malignant tumours and can be a source of template molecules for the development (design) of antitumoral drugs. In the present work, Soprani's {sup 125}ISPGP biokinetic data were treated by MIRD formalism to perform Internal Dosimetry studies. Absorbed doses due to the {sup 131}I-SPGP uptake were determinate in several organs of mice, as well as in the implanted tumor. Doses obtained for animal model were extrapolated to humans assuming a similar ratio for various mouse and human tissues. For the extrapolation, it was used human organ masses from Cristy/Eckerman phantom. Both penetrating and non-penetrating radiation from {sup 131}I were considered. (author)

  4. The application of equilibrium models to incidence situations using the example of the exposure pathway human milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Martin; Karcher, Klaus; Nosske, Dietmar [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The radiation exposure after a short-term release of radioactive substances is often calculated assuming equilibrium conditions. An example is that of the German Incident Calculation Bases for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Here, the contamination of human milk is calculated using transfer factors. Applying this equilibrium model to incident situations raises the question whether baby's radiation exposure is adequately assessed. This contribution shows that compliance with the relevant dose limits of paragraph 49 of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance is ensured for design basis accidents on the assumption that the hypothetical breastfeeding period starts at the beginning of the activity release. Comparative analyses were performed against the biokinetic models applied by ICRP for radiation protection purposes, taking the reference nuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 131}I, {sup 241}Am and long-lived plutonium isotopes as examples. (orig.)

  5. The application of equilibrium models to incidence situations using the example of the exposure pathway human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation exposure after a short-term release of radioactive substances is often calculated assuming equilibrium conditions. An example is that of the German Incident Calculation Bases for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Here, the contamination of human milk is calculated using transfer factors. Applying this equilibrium model to incident situations raises the question whether baby's radiation exposure is adequately assessed. This contribution shows that compliance with the relevant dose limits of paragraph 49 of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance is ensured for design basis accidents on the assumption that the hypothetical breastfeeding period starts at the beginning of the activity release. Comparative analyses were performed against the biokinetic models applied by ICRP for radiation protection purposes, taking the reference nuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, 131I, 241Am and long-lived plutonium isotopes as examples. (orig.)

  6. Compartmental model of 18F-choline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, T.; Tavola, F.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M. C.; Uusijärvi, H.; Mattsson, S.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henß, N.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-03-01

    The MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations), aims to improve the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging by optimizing, among others, the knowledge of the temporal variation of the radiopharmaceuticals' uptake in and clearance from tumor and healthy tissues. With the help of compartmental modeling it is intended to optimize the time schedule for data collection and improve the evaluation of the organ doses to the patients. Administration of 18F-choline to screen for recurrence or the occurrence of metastases in prostate cancer patients is one of the diagnostic applications under consideration in the frame of the project. PET and CT images have been acquired up to four hours after injection of 18F-choline. Additionally blood and urine samples have been collected and measured in a gamma counter. The radioactivity concentration in different organs and data of plasma clearance and elimination into urine were used to set-up a compartmental model of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. It features a central compartment (blood) exchanging with organs. The structure describes explicitly liver, kidneys, spleen, plasma and bladder as separate units with a forcing function approach. The model is presented together with an evaluation of the individual and population kinetic parameters, and a revised time schedule for data collection is proposed. This optimized time schedule will be validated in a further set of patient studies.

  7. Fluxes of 238U Series Radionuclides in the Industrial Production of Dicalcium Phosphate and the Biokinetic Analysis of 210Pb and 210Po in Poultry Tissue Due to its Ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORM derived from the wet acid digestion of phosphate rock might represent a serious problem facing the phosphate industry. The aim of this work is to discuss both: (a) the fluxes of the 238U series radionuclides (U and Th isotopes, 226Ra, 210Pb and 210Po) during the DCP production process and, (b) the accumulation of 210Pb and 210Po in chicken tissues due to the ingestion of DCP. Industrial samples were collected from different production steps at a factory in Spain that uses phosphate rock from Morocco. The results showed that whereas uranium is equally distributed within products and by-products, thorium and 210Po are mainly eliminated through the sludges and 210Pb is mostly found in the final product (DCP). The 210Pb and 210Po results in chicken tissues and faeces after animals were bred with different amounts of DCP for 42 days have shown that about 95% of the ingested 210Pb and 210Po was immediately excreted. From the amount accumulated in tissues it was observed that whereas 210Pb is mostly found in bones, 210Po accumulates in the liver and kidneys. A one compartment non-linear kinetic model has been developed in order to determine the variation of the total activity of 210Pb and 210Po accumulated in the chicken body throughout its 6 weeks life. This model correctly reproduces experimental results and also allows calculating of transfer rates for 210Pb and 210Po, useful for first order models, that is, under stationary metabolic conditions. (author)

  8. A comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the absence of age-specific biokinetic models, current retention models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) frequently are used as a point of departure for evaluation of exposures to the general population. These models were designed and intended for estimation of long-term integrated doses to the adult worker. Their format and empirical basis preclude incorporation of much valuable physiological information and physiologically reasonable assumptions that could be used in characterizing the age-specific behavior of radioelements in humans. In this paper we discuss a comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling in which consideration is given not only to changes with age in masses and relative geometries of body organs and tissues but also to best available physiological and radiobiological information relating to the age-specific biobehavior of radionuclides. This approach is useful in obtaining more accurate estimates of long-term dose commitments as a function of age at intake, but it may be particularly valuable in establishing more accurate estimates of dose rate as a function of age. Age-specific dose rates are needed for a proper analysis of the potential effects on estimates or risk of elevated dose rates per unit intake in certain stages of life, elevated response per unit dose received during some stages of life, and age-specific non-radiogenic competing risks

  9. Development of an Age- and Gender-specific Model for Strontium Metabolism in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagina, N. B.; Degteva, M. O.; Tolstykh, E. I.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a development of a new biokinetic model for strontium, which accounts for age and gender differences of metabolism in humans. This model was developed based on the long-term follow-up of the residents living on the banks of the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) contaminated with 89,90Sr in 1950-1956. The new model uses the structure of ICRP model for strontium but model parameters have been estimated to account for age, gender and population differences in strontium retention and elimination. Estimates of age- and gender-specific model parameters were derived from (a) the results of long-term measurements of 90Sr-body burden for the Techa River population; (b) experimental studies of calcium and strontium metabolism in humans and (c) non-radiological data regarding bone metabolism (mineral content of the body, bone turnover, etc). As a result, the new model satisfactorily describes data on long-term retention of 90Sr in residents of the Techa River settlements of all ages and both genders and also data from studies during the period of global fallout in the UK and the USA and experimental data on strontium retention in humans. The new model can be used to calculate dose from 89,90Sr for the Techa River residents and also for other populations with similar parameters of skeletal maturation and also for other populations with similar parameters of skeletal maturation and involution. (Author) 27 refs.

  10. Study of the biokinetic behavior of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA in renal scintigraphy of pediatric patients; Estudo de comportamento biocinetico do {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA em cintilografia renal de pacientes pediatricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Felipe Simas dos

    2013-07-01

    In Brazil, renal studies with {sup 99m}Tc{sub D}TPA and {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA constitute about 18% of pediatric diagnostic procedures. A retrospective non-randomized study was conducted in 2010, for absolute quantification of kidney activities. In 2010,51 patients underwent renal studies in the Hospital of the Rio de Janeiro State University - HUPE-UERJ/ RJ, Brazil. 19 of them with 9±4 years of age and body mass of 31.8±20.8 kg showed relative uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA between 45% and 55%. Still images (AP, PA and posterior oblique abdomen incidences) were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 115.69±42.31 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA using gamma camera (Siemens E-Cam), LEHR collimator, matrix of 256x256 and 5min imaging. In 2012, 3 patients (9.3±2.1 years, 31.97±10.75 kg) in the previous study were followed in a prospective study. All urinary excretions samples were collected from administration of {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA to 6 h after, while simultaneously images were acquired AP and PA abdominal region with Philips model Picker Prism 2000XP. Aliquots of each urine sample were measured in gamma counter shaft GenesysTM Gamma 1 with Nal (TI) detector. For whole body, the biological half-life estimate was 11.0±2.0 h, and the residence time was found to be 5.6±0.4 h while the literature suggests 4.l±0.5 h for age range studied. Residence time for kidney was found to be 0.7±0.4 h, while the literature shows, 3.07 h and 1.4 h for patients with normal and renal pathologies, respectively. This difference may be attributed to the methodology because while the images were taken during the first 6 h, SMITH et aI. (1996) performed images of the kidneys and whole body 30 h after administration of 99mTc{sub D}MSA, incorporating the slow term of biological half-life. For liver, it was found the average residence time of 3.0±0.4 min, whereas the literature indicates 20.8 min and 25.1 min, respectively according to SMITH et. ai (1996) and ICRP (1998). The fact that the

  11. Retention of tritium in reference persons: a metabolic model. Derivation of parameters and application of the model to the general public and to workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium (3H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen that is ubiquitous in environmental and biological systems. Following debate on the human health risk from exposure to tritium, there have been claims that the current biokinetic model recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) may underestimate tritium doses. A new generic model for tritium in mammals, based on energy metabolism and body composition, together with all its input data, has been described in a recent paper and successfully tested for farm and laboratory mammals. That model considers only dietary intake of tritium and was extended to humans. This paper presents the latest development of the human model with explicit consideration of brain energy metabolism. Model testing with human experimental data on organically bound tritium (OBT) in urine after tritiated water (HTO) or OBT intakes is presented. Predicted absorbed doses show a moderate increase for OBT intakes compared with doses recommended by the ICRP. Infants have higher tritium retention-a factor of 2 longer than the ICRP estimate. The highest tritium concentration is in adipose tissue, which has a very low radiobiological sensitivity. The ranges of uncertainty in retention and doses are investigated. The advantage of the new model is its ability to be applied to the interpretation of bioassay data.

  12. Using animal dosimetry models to interpret human bioassay data for actinide exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay and dosimetry models are needed to estimate intakes of radionuclides, and to calculate radiation doses to target tissues following such intakes. Because of the diversity of exposure materials, individual biological variabilities, and the general lack of adequate bioassay information and knowledge of the metabolism of radionuclides, current models are based mostly on empiricism. This paper describes biokinetic/dosimetry models for U, Am and Cm. They are based on experimental data developed from studies in dogs that inhaled one of the above radionuclides in specific chemical forms and specific particle sizes. The models, which are based on similar biological principles, and, therefore, have similar structure, are applied to the very sparse human bioassay data available from cases of exposure to either U, Am, or Cm. The results thus far indicate that the lung retention for the different actinides are well described by the models, that urinary bioassay data can be described within limited time periods, and that the fecal excretion rate is not adequately described. Improvements in modeling are predicted on increased publication of human bioassay data, and better cooperative interaction between model developers and health protection professionals responsible for industrial bioassay programs. (author) 36 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Biodegradation and cometabolic modeling of selected beta blockers during ammonia oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyamoorthy, Sandeep; Chandran, Kartik; Ramsburg, C Andrew

    2013-11-19

    Accurate prediction of pharmaceutical concentrations in wastewater effluents requires that the specific biochemical processes responsible for pharmaceutical biodegradation be elucidated and integrated within any modeling framework. The fate of three selected beta blockers-atenolol, metoprolol, and sotalol-was examined during nitrification using batch experiments to develop and evaluate a new cometabolic process-based (CPB) model. CPB model parameters describe biotransformation during and after ammonia oxidation for specific biomass populations and are designed to be integrated within the Activated Sludge Models framework. Metoprolol and sotalol were not biodegraded by the nitrification enrichment culture employed herein. Biodegradation of atenolol was observed and linked to the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophs but not nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Results suggest that the role of AOB in atenolol degradation may be disproportionately more significant than is otherwise suggested by their lower relative abundance in typical biological treatment processes. Atenolol was observed to competitively inhibit AOB growth in our experiments, though model simulations suggest inhibition is most relevant at atenolol concentrations greater than approximately 200 ng·L(-1). CPB model parameters were found to be relatively insensitive to biokinetic parameter selection suggesting the model approach may hold utility for describing pharmaceutical biodegradation during biological wastewater treatment. PMID:24112027

  14. Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Artiklen fremhæver den visuelle rotation - billeder, tegninger, modeller, værker - som det privilligerede medium i kommunikationen af ideer imellem skabende arkitekter......Artiklen fremhæver den visuelle rotation - billeder, tegninger, modeller, værker - som det privilligerede medium i kommunikationen af ideer imellem skabende arkitekter...

  15. Biokinetic studies on 14C-chitosan in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption and the basic metabolism of chitosan in rats are investigated. The results indicated that 14C-chitosan from gastrointestinal tract was absorbed, metabolized and excreted quickly without re-bioavailability. The radioactive compounds perhaps with specifically chemical forms in serum, liver and the contents of small intestines were separated on GPC column and measured by radioactivity counting. A big pile of peaks with the retention volume almost same as that of standard 14C-chitosan and another sharp one with the retention volume in the range of higher molecular weight same as that of BSA were discovered in analysis respectively for contents of intestine and serum or liver. The sharp peak would disappear if the proteins contained in the serum or liver were removed. In addition, and interesting tail peak, followed with the pile ones and eluted with the retention volume of lower molecular weight range same as that of chitooligosaccharides was also found in each of the 3 samples, ignoring the protein removal or not. These results suggested that most of 14C-chitosan was not to be digested in intestine. On the other hand, a small amount of 14C-chitosan was likely to be absorbed directly or after degraded to small molecular compounds into blood, liver and other tissues, and then connected with the proteins. Perhaps it is these trace materials that were playing important roles in reduction of the bioavailability of radiostrontium in rats

  16. Upon biodistribution and biokinetics of radioiodine-labelled diethylstilbestroldiphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine-labelled (131I, 125I, 123I) diethylstilbestroldiphosphate (DES) was investigated with respect to measuring radio-labelled hormone derivatives in animals and men. DES was injected intravenously in Wistar rats and mammatumor-bearing mice (Carcinoma solidum simplex), and activities were measured in several organs between 10 minutes and 7 days, p.inj. The liver showed strong activity concentration and long-lasting retention, smaller concentrations were found in kidneys, adrenals, blood, abdominal wall and prostate. The tumor concentration between 10 minutes and 15 hours p.inj. was below the blood concentrations and later on up to 7 days in the order of the blood concentrations, however, always significantly exceeding muscle tissue concentrations. Respective measurements were done in men using tissue cylinders from the prostate gained by puncture-biopsy or other tissue specimens gained during surgery. Activity concentration in the liver is high, therefore the scintigraphic visualization of the liver is possible immediately after injection up to 13 days later. Potentially it is a receptor-sensitive scintigraphy of the liver. (orig.)

  17. Nitrification biokinetics in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina

    Danmarks drikkevandsforsyning er udelukkende baseret på grundvand – og mere end 2500 vandværker behandler hver dag vand til de danske forbrugere. Selv om denne vandbehandling betegnes som simpel, er den i virkeligheden baseret på komplicerede mikrobielle processer, som vi hidtil har vidst relativ...

  18. Different biokinetics of nanomedicines linking to their toxicity; an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Mohammad; Ramazani Ali; Mohammadi Hamidreza; Mostafalou Sara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In spite of the extreme rise to the knowledge of nanotechnology in pharmaceutical sciences, there are currently limited experimental works studying the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the biological system. Adjustment of size and surface area plays the main role in the reaction between NPs and cells leading to their increased entrance into cells through skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory system. Moreover, change in physicochemical reactivity of NPs causes them to int...

  19. Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Spädtke, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

  20. Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This last volume in the series of textbooks on environmental isotopes in the hydrological cycle provides an overview of the basic principles of existing conceptual formulations of modelling approaches. While some of the concepts provided in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 are of general validity for quantitative interpretation of isotope data; the modelling methodologies commonly employed for incorporating isotope data into evaluations specifically related to groundwater systems are given in this volume together with some illustrative examples. Development of conceptual models for quantitative interpretations of isotope data in hydrogeology and the assessment of their limitations and field verification has been given priority in the research and development efforts of the IAEA during the last decade. Several Co-ordinated Research Projects on this specific topic were implemented and results published by the IAEA. Based on these efforts and contributions made by a number of scientists involved in this specific field, the IAEA has published two Technical Documents entitled ''Mathematical models and their applications to isotope studies in groundwater studies -- IAEA TECDOC-777, 1994'' and ''Manual on Mathematical models in isotope hydrogeology -- IAEA TECDOC-910, 1996''. Results of a recently completed Co-ordinated Research Project by the IAEA entitled ''Use of isotopes for analysis of flow and transport dynamics in groundwater systems'' will also soon be published by the IAEA. This is the reason why the IAEA was involved in the co-ordination required for preparation of this volume; the material presented is a condensed overview prepared by some of the scientists that were involved in the above cited IAEA activities. This volume VI providing such an overview was included into the series to make this series self-sufficient in its coverage of the field of Isotope Hydrology. A special chapter on the methodologies and concepts related to geochemical modelling in groundwater

  1. Modeling arsenite oxidation by chemoautotrophic Thiomonas arsenivorans strain b6 in a packed-bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a major toxic pollutant of concern for the human health. Biological treatment of arsenic contaminated water is an alternative strategy to the prevalent conventional treatments. The biological treatment involves a pre-oxidation step transforming the most toxic form of arsenic, As (III), to the least toxic form, As (V), respectively. This intermediate process improves the overall efficiency of total arsenic removal from the contaminated water. As (III) oxidation by the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiomonas arsenivorans strain b6 was investigated in a fixed-film reactor under variable influent As (III) concentrations (500–4000 mg/L) and hydraulic residence times (HRTs) (0.2–1 day) for a duration of 137 days. During the entire operation, seven steady-state conditions were obtained with As (III) oxidation efficiency ranging from 48.2% to 99.3%. The strong resilience of the culture was exhibited by the recovery of the bioreactor from an As (III) overloading of 5300 ± 400 mg As (III)/L day operated at a HRT of 0.2 day. An arsenic mass balance revealed that As (III) was mainly oxidized to As (V) with unaccounted arsenic (≤ 4%) well within the analytical error of measurement. A modified Monod flux expression was used to determine the biokinetic parameters by fitting the model against the observed steady-state flux data obtained from operating the bioreactor under a range of HRTs (0.2–1 day) and a constant influent As (III) concentration of 500 mg/L. Model parameters, k = 0.71 ± 0.1 mg As (III)/mg cells h, and Ks = 13.2 ± 2.8 mg As (III)/L were obtained using a non-linear estimation routine and employing the Marquardt–Levenberg algorithm. Sensitivity analysis revealed k to be more sensitive to model simulations of As (III) oxidation under steady-state conditions than parameter Ks. -- Highlights: ► As (III) oxidation. ► Biokinetic parameters. ► Model validation and sensitivity analysis.

  2. A model for the transfer of alkaline earth elements to the fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biokinetic model has been developed for the transfer of calcium, strontium, barium and radium to the human fetus. For the mother, ICRP models were adapted for pregnancy to include increases in gastrointestinal absorption, urinary excretion and bone turnover rates. The fetus was modelled with blood, soft tissue and bone compartments. Fetal requirements for Ca were determined by skeletal calcification, and recycling between fetal and maternal blood was included. Daily transfer of Sr, Ba and Ra to the fetus was taken to be lower than for Ca by factors of 0.6 for Sr and 0.4 for Ba and Ra. For acute intakes in late pregnancy at 35 weeks after conception, when maximum transfer occurs, the model predicts whole-body fetus:mother concentration ratios (CF:CM) of 18 for Ca, 8 for Sr and 2 for Ba and Ra, respectively. Estimates of committed equivalent doses to the red bone marrow of offspring, including in utero and postnatal dose, after maternal ingestion in late pregnancy, were greater than corresponding doses in adults by factors of 20-30 for 45Ca, 2-3 for 90Sr and 3-4 for 226Ra but slightly lower (0.8-0.9) for 133Ba. (author)

  3. CFD-aided modelling of activated sludge systems - A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinska, Anna M; Bridgeman, John

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the major challenges in the wastewater sector is the successful design and reliable operation of treatment processes, which guarantee high treatment efficiencies to comply with effluent quality criteria, while keeping the investment and operating cost as low as possible. Although conceptual design and process control of activated sludge plants are key to ensuring these goals, they are still based on general empirical guidelines and operators' experience, dominated often by rule of thumb. This review paper discusses the rationale behind the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to model aeration, facilitating enhancement of treatment efficiency and reduction of energy input. Several single- and multiphase approaches commonly used in CFD studies of aeration tank operation, are comprehensively described, whilst the shortcomings of the modelling assumptions imposed to evaluate mixing and mass transfer in AS tanks are identified and discussed. Examples and methods of coupling of CFD data with biokinetics, accounting for the actual flow field and its impact on the oxygen mass transfer and yield of the biological processes occurring in the aeration tanks, are also critically discussed. Finally, modelling issues, which remain unaddressed, (e.g. coupling of the AS tank with secondary clarifier and the use of population balance models to simulate bubbly flow or flocculation of the activated sludge), are also identified and discussed. PMID:26615385

  4. The work of Committee 2 of ICRP on a new model for the human alimentary tract (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed doses received from ingested radionuclides are currently calculated using the method outlined in Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and are based on a number of assumptions including transit rates of ingested material in the gastrointestinal tract, fractional absorption of radionuclides, and absorbed fractions for electrons and alpha particles. It has been recognised by the ICRP that some of the assumptions used to calculate absorbed doses should be reviewed. Moreover, ICRP Publication 60 gave specific tissue weighting factors for the oesophagus, stomach and colon. Lastly, the current model is not age-dependent. The ICRP has set up a Task Group (TG) on the Human Alimentary Tract (HAT) to undertake a review and revision of the present dosimetric model for the gastrointestinal tract. Initial reviews of available data (morphological, anatomical, histological and biokinetic) have indicated there may need to be substantial changes to the existing model. A new model should include the mouth and oesophagus. Additional sites for absorption also need to be considered. Lastly, the absorbed doses of interest are most appropriately the doses to sensitive cells for stochastic effects. All these points will be discussed firstly through the definition of a purely physiological model, then, following a sensitivity analysis of each parameter, a dosimetric model will be recommended. (author)

  5. Modelling of microalgal growth and lipid production in Dunaliella tertiolecta using nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium fertilizer medium in sintered disk chromatographic glass bubble column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anup; Guria, Chandan; Chitres, G; Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Pathak, A K

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model involving NPK-10:26:26 fertilizer, NaCl, NaHCO3, light and temperature operating variables for Dunaliella tertiolecta cultivation is formulated to predict microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity. Proposed model includes Monod/Andrews kinetics for the absorption of essential nutrients into algae-biomass and Droop model involving internal nutrient cell quota for microalgae growth, assuming algae-biomass is composed of sugar, functional-pool and neutral-lipid. Biokinetic model parameters are determined by minimizing the residual-sum-of-square-errors between experimental and computed microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity using genetic algorithm. Developed model is validated with the experiments of Dunaliella tertiolecta cultivation using air-agitated sintered-disk chromatographic glass-bubble column and the effects of operating variables on microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity is investigated. Finally, parametric sensitivity analysis is carried out to know the sensitivity of model parameters on the obtained results in the input parameter space. Proposed model may be helpful in scale-up studies and implementation of model-based control strategy in large-scale algal cultivation. PMID:27450983

  6. Application of IEUBK model in lead risk assessment of children aged 61-84 months old in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Hu, Jia; Wu, Wei; Liu, Shuyun; Li, Mei; Yao, Na; Chen, Jianwei; Ye, Linxiang; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Yikai

    2016-01-15

    Few studies have focused on the accuracy of using the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model in Chinese children with site- and age-specific exposure data. This study aimed to validate the accuracy and sensitivity of the IEUBK model in lead risk assessment of Chinese children aged 61-84 months old. A total of 760 children were enrolled from two respective counties in Central China by using random cluster sampling method. Blood lead levels (BLLs) of all subjects were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, as well as that in the environmental media, such as air, drinking water, soil, dust and food. Age- and site-specific time-activity patterns and water consumption were evaluated by using questionnaires for children. Exposure parameters including outdoor and indoor activity time, ventilation rate and water consumption in this study were different from the default values of the IEUBK model. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the predicted and observed BLLs. Diet and soil/dust lead intake contributed approximately 83.39% (57.40%-93.84% range) and 15.18% (3.25%-41.60% range) of total lead intake, respectively. These findings showed that the IEUBK model is suitable for lead risk assessment of Chinese children aged 61-84 months old and diet acts as an important lead source. PMID:26433329

  7. A hybrid pore-scale and continuum-scale model for solute diffusion, reaction, and biofilm development in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youneng; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.

    2015-03-01

    It is a challenge to upscale solute transport in porous media for multispecies bio-kinetic reactions because of incomplete mixing within the elementary volume and because biofilm growth can change porosity and affect pore-scale flow and diffusion. To address this challenge, we present a hybrid model that couples pore-scale subdomains to continuum-scale subdomains. While the pore-scale subdomains involving significant biofilm growth and reaction are simulated using pore-scale equations, the other subdomains are simulated using continuum-scale equations to save computational time. The pore-scale and continuum-scale subdomains are coupled using a mortar method to ensure continuity of solute concentration and flux at the interfaces. We present results for a simplified two-dimensional system, neglect advection, and use dual Monod kinetics for solute utilization and biofilm growth. The results based on the hybrid model are consistent with the results based on a pore-scale model for three test cases that cover a wide range of Damköhler (Da = reaction rate/diffusion rate) numbers for both homogeneous (spatially periodic) and heterogeneous pore structures. We compare results from the hybrid method with an upscaled continuum model and show that the latter is valid only for cases of small Damköhler numbers, consistent with other results reported in the literature.

  8. Using biodynamic models to reconcile differences between laboratory toxicity tests and field biomonitoring with aquatic insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Cain, D.J.; Clements, W.H.; Luoma, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    Aquatic insects often dominate lotic ecosystems, yet these organisms are under-represented in trace metal toxicity databases. Furthermore, toxicity data for aquatic insects do not appear to reflect their actual sensitivities to metals in nature, because the concentrations required to elicit toxicity in the laboratory are considerably higher than those found to impact insect communities in the field. New approaches are therefore needed to better understand how and why insects are differentially susceptible to metal exposures. Biodynamic modeling is a powerful tool for understanding interspecific differences in trace metal bioaccumulation. Because bioaccumulation alone does not necessarily correlate with toxicity, we combined biokinetic parameters associated with dissolved cadmium exposures with studies of the subcellular compartmentalization of accumulated Cd. This combination of physiological traits allowed us to make predictions of susceptibility differences to dissolved Cd in three aquatic insect taxa: Ephemerella excrucians, Rhithrogena morrisoni, and Rhyacophila sp. We compared these predictions with long-term field monitoring data and toxicity tests with closely related taxa: Ephemerella infrequens, Rhithrogena hageni, and Rhyacophila brunea. Kinetic parameters allowed us to estimate steady-state concentrations, the time required to reach steady state, and the concentrations of Cd projected to be in potentially toxic compartments for different species. Species-specific physiological traits identified using biodynamic models provided a means for better understanding why toxicity assays with insects have failed to provide meaningful estimates for metal concentrations that would be expected to be protective in nature. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  9. USTUR case 0259 whole body donation: a comprehensive test of the current ICRP models for the behavior of inhaled 238PuO2 ceramic particles. U.S. Transuranium and Uranium Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A C; Filipy, R E; Russell, J J; McInroy, J F

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of 238Pu in the whole body donation to the U.S. Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) is presented. This donor accidentally inhaled an unusual physical form of plutonium, predominantly the 238Pu isotope in the form of a highly insoluble ceramic. Along with six other workers accidentally exposed at the same time, this donor excreted little or no 238Pu in his urine for several months. Subsequently, however, and, with no further intakes, the urinary excretion of 238Pu by all of these workers increased progressively. Such a pattern of increasing urinary excretion of plutonium resulting from a single acute inhalation was unknown at the time. The subject of this study provided a unique opportunity to analyze not only the pattern of urinary excretion for 17 y following this unusual intake but also the complete distribution of 238Pu in his donated body tissues and skeleton at death. Radiochemical analyses of tissues from this whole body donation were used to perform critical tests of the applicability and accuracy of the respiratory tract model and the systemic biokinetic models for plutonium currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The respiratory tract model was applied to analyze the donor's long-term urinary excretion pattern. The facility provided by this model to represent progressive transformation of insoluble particles in the lungs into a more soluble form, applied in conjunction with the systemic biokinetic model, predicted the total amount of 238Pu measured in the donor's body to within 17% accuracy. The measured division of 238Pu between the donor's lungs and systemic organs was predicted to within 10%. Small adjustments to several rate constants in these models provided precise predictions of the absolute amounts of 238Pu in the lungs, thoracic lymph nodes, liver, red bone marrow, skeleton (including the distribution of 238Pu between trabecular and cortical bone matrices derived from the radiochemical

  10. Application of a canine {sup 238}Pu dosimetry model to human bioassay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, A.W. Jr. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Associated with the use of 2{sup 238}Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes and power supplies for cardiac devices is the potential for human exposure to {sup 238}Pu, primarily by inhalation. In the event of human internal exposure, a means is needed for assessing the level of intake and calculating radiation doses. Several bioassay/dosimetry models have been developed for {sup 239}Pu. However, results from studies with laboratory animals have indicated that the biokinetics, and therefore the descriptive models, of {sup 238}Pu are significantly different from those for {sup 239}Pu. A canine model accounting for these differences has been applied in this work to urinary excretion data from seven humans occupationally exposed to low levels of an insoluble {sup 238}Pu compound. The modified model provides a good description of the urinary excretion kinetics observed in the exposed humans. The modified model was also used to provide estimates of the initial intakes of {sup 238}Pu for the seven individuals; these estimates ranged from 4.5 nCi (170 Bq) to 87 nCi (3200 Bq). Autopsy data on the amount and distribution of {sup 238}Pu retained in the organs may be used in the future to validate or refute both these estimates and the assumptions used to formulate the human model. Modification of the human model to simulate an injection exposure to {sup 239}Pu gave patterns of retention in the organs and urinary excretion comparable to those seen previously in humans; further modification of the model using fecal data (unavailable for the subjects of this study) is indicated.

  11. The 10th international congress of IRPA. The development of models for internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past ten years a series of Publications have been issued by Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) giving dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by inhalation and ingestion for both members of the public and workers. The biokinetic and dosimetric models used in the calculation of dose coefficients have been based largely on the model structure adopted in ICRP Publication 30 although new, physiologically-based models, involving recycling of radionuclides have been developed for both the alkaline earth and actinide elements. In addition, a new model for the human respiratory tract (HRTM) has been developed. A comprehensive series of dose coefficients have also been published by ICRP on CD-ROM. The series of reports giving dose coefficients for members of the public of various ages is to be completed with the issue of two further reports. The first will give dose coefficients for the embryo, fetus and newborn child following intakes of radionuclides by the mother either before or during pregnancy. Models for infants and children can generally be based on those for adults, with modifications to parameter values, but in the case of the embryo and fetus, fundamentally new models have had to be developed. Models are also being developed for calculating radiation doses to the offspring as a result of the intake of radionuclides in breast milk. The HRTM used for calculating inhalation dose coefficients was developed to allow the use of material specific data. To date, however, it has only been applied using default model parameters. A technical report is being developed that will give guidance on the practical application of the HRTM in circumstances which require the use of data on the deposition and solubility characteristics of specific inhaled materials. The present model used for assessing doses from ingestion of radionuclides was prepared in 1966. An improved model for the human alimentary tract is being developed

  12. Modeling Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Pierre-Alain; Fondement, Frédéric; Baudry, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Model-driven engineering and model-based approaches have permeated all branches of software engineering; to the point that it seems that we are using models, as Molière's Monsieur Jourdain was using prose, without knowing it. At the heart of modeling, there is a relation that we establish to represent something by something else. In this paper we review various definitions of models and relations between them. Then, we define a canonical set of relations that can be used to express various ki...

  13. Measurement and modelling in anthropo-radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this HDR (Accreditation to supervise researches) report, the author gives an overview of his research activities, gives a summary of his research thesis (feasibility study of an actinide measurement system in the case of lungs), and proposes a research report on the different aspects of anthropo-radiometric measurement: context (principles, significance, sampling phantoms), development of digital phantoms (software presentation and validation), interface development and validation, application to actinide measurement in lung, taking biokinetic data into account for anthropo-radiometric measurement

  14. Biodistribution dosimetric study of radiopharmaceutical 99mTc Ixolaris in mice for melanoma diagnosis by molecular image and translational model for human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labeling of Ixolaris with 99mTc was developed by Barboza et.al. (2013) aiming its use primarily in glioblastoma and after in melanoma diagnosis, a less common but very aggressive cancer and with high mortality rate. Preliminary tests on animals have proven its effectiveness of labeling but a dosimetric study to human clinical trials should be performed. This study aimed to: (1) determine the biokinetic model for the radiotracer 99mTc-Ixolaris in mice by imaging dosimetry method; and (2) estimate the absorbed and effective dose resulting from the use of a new radiopharmaceutical for melanoma and metastases diagnosis in human beings, since a dosimetric study of new radiopharmaceuticals in animals is necessary to test them subsequently in humans and apply for registration in ANVISA. According to SPECT images, was found a latency period of 15 to 21 days for the development of lung metastasis in mice. Three C57BL6 mice, one control animal, and two animals with induced cell line B16-F10 murine melanoma were tested. The 99mTc-Ixolaris radiopharmaceutical was administered intravenously in a caudal vein, and SPECT images were acquired 0.5 h, 1.5 h, 2.5 h, 3.5 h and 24 h post-administration for analysis and biodistribution quantification. The biokinetic model was determined and thus, obtained cumulative activity in order to estimate the absorbed dose in each organ. The mass and metabolic differences between mice and humans were considered and used to extrapolate the data acquired at different scales. Based on dose factors provided by the software MIRDOSE and Olinda (S factor), absorbed doses in irradiated target organs were calculated for the source organs, and finally the effective dose was estimated. The results indicate that for diagnostic exams conducted in human melanoma patients by administering approximately 25.7 MBq the estimated effective dose was 4.3 mSv. Comparing with effective doses obtained in other diagnostic techniques with 99mTc, a range of effective

  15. Dosimetric Significance of the ICRP's Updated Guidance and Models, 1989-2003, and Implications for U.S. Federal Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.

    2003-09-10

    Over the past two decades the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a series of Federal guidance documents for the purpose of providing the Federal and State agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs. Currently recommended dose conversion factors, annual limits on intake, and derived air concentrations for intake of radionuclides are tabulated in Federal Guidance Report No. 11 (FGR 11), published in 1988. The tabulations in FGR 11 were based on dosimetric quantities and biokinetic and dosimetric models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) developed for application to occupational exposures. Since the publication of FGR 11 the ICRP has revised some of its dosimetric quantities and its models for workers and has also developed age-specific models and dose conversion factors for intake of radionuclides by members of the public. This report examines the extent of the changes in the inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients of FGR 11 implied by the updated recommendations of the ICRP, both for workers and members of the public.

  16. Modeling Modeling Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Pierre-Alain; Fondement, Frédéric; Baudry, Benoit; Combemale, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Model-driven engineering and model-based approaches have permeated all branches of software engineering to the point that it seems that we are using models, as Molière's Monsieur Jourdain was using prose, without knowing it. At the heart of modeling, there is a relation that we establish to represent something by something else. In this paper we review various definitions of models and relations between them. Then, we define a canonical set of relations that can be used to express various kin...

  17. Analysis of real-time mixture cytotoxicity data following repeated exposure using BK/TD models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, S; Tebby, C; Barcellini-Couget, S; De Sousa, G; Brochot, C; Rahmani, R; Pery, A R R

    2016-08-15

    Cosmetic products generally consist of multiple ingredients. Thus, cosmetic risk assessment has to deal with mixture toxicity on a long-term scale which means it has to be assessed in the context of repeated exposure. Given that animal testing has been banned for cosmetics risk assessment, in vitro assays allowing long-term repeated exposure and adapted for in vitro - in vivo extrapolation need to be developed. However, most in vitro tests only assess short-term effects and consider static endpoints which hinder extrapolation to realistic human exposure scenarios where concentration in target organs is varies over time. Thanks to impedance metrics, real-time cell viability monitoring for repeated exposure has become possible. We recently constructed biokinetic/toxicodynamic models (BK/TD) to analyze such data (Teng et al., 2015) for three hepatotoxic cosmetic ingredients: coumarin, isoeugenol and benzophenone-2. In the present study, we aim to apply these models to analyze the dynamics of mixture impedance data using the concepts of concentration addition and independent action. Metabolic interactions between the mixture components were investigated, characterized and implemented in the models, as they impacted the actual cellular exposure. Indeed, cellular metabolism following mixture exposure induced a quick disappearance of the compounds from the exposure system. We showed that isoeugenol substantially decreased the metabolism of benzophenone-2, reducing the disappearance of this compound and enhancing its in vitro toxicity. Apart from this metabolic interaction, no mixtures showed any interaction, and all binary mixtures were successfully modeled by at least one model based on exposure to the individual compounds. PMID:27317371

  18. Mathematical model for carbon dioxide evolution from the thermophilic composting of synthetic food wastes made of dog food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impacts of the aeration and the agitation on the composting process of synthetic food wastes made of dog food were studied in a laboratory-scale reactor. Two major peaks of CO2 evolution rate were observed. Each peak represented an independent stage of composting associated with the activities of thermophilic bacteria. CO2 evolutions known to correlate well with microbial activities and reactor temperatures were fitted successfully to a modified Gompertz equation, which incorporated three biokinetic parameters, namely, CO2 evolution potential, specific CO2 evolution rate, and lag phase time. No parameters that describe the impact of operating variables are involved. The model is only valid for the specified experimental conditions and may look different with others. The effects of operating parameters such as aeration and agitation were studied statistically with multivariate regression technique. Contour plots were constructed using regression equations for the examination of the dependence of CO2 evolution potentials on aeration and agitation. In the first stage, a maximum CO2 evolution potential was found when the aeration rate and the agitation parameter were set at 1.75 l/kg solids-min and 0.35, respectively. In the second stage, a maximum existed when the aeration rate and the agitation parameter were set at 1.8 l/kg solids-min and 0.5, respectively. The methods presented here can also be applied for the optimization of large-scale composting facilities that are operated differently and take longer time

  19. The measurement of thoron (220Rn) concentration in indoor air continuously using pylon model WLx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of thoron (220Rn) in particular location can be higher than radon (220Rn), however, its presence is always neglected. This might be due to the difficulties in calibration and discrimination between radon and thoron. From biokinetic and dosimetric model, it has been known that the dominant contribution of thoron to the effective dose is in the lungs. UNSCEAR estimates the doses contribution of thoron and its progenies is between 5-10% of the annual dose received by the general public and the risk level is 4.4 times greater than radon and progenies. Therefore, it is necessary to study the thoron concentration in indoor air and workplaces. Radon-thoron concentration in indoor air can be determined by direct methods using Pylon Model WLx device and passive methods using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTDs). In this research the measurement of thoron was carried out continuously using Pylon Model WLx equipment that is sensitive to radon for 24, 65, 72, 116 and 154 hours in different rooms. The measurement result showed that the mean value of thoron working level (WL) concentration obtained in room-1 was 2.53 ± 0.67 Bq/m3 with maximum and minimum of thoron concentrations were 3.37 and 2.22 Bq/m3 respectively. From the measurement in different locations, it was obtained that the largest and smallest average concentrations of thoron progenies were 0.83 ± 0.23 Bq/m3 and 0.29 ± 0.64 Bq/m3, while the maximum and minimum concentration values were 7.80 Bq/m3 and 0.01 Bq/m3 respectively. Pylon Model WLx device is not enables to be used for longer and large scale survey area concurrently, so the SSNTDs which is sensitive to the emission of alpha particles and can measure cumulative thoron concentrations is required. (author)

  20. Characteristics of radiation dose accumulation and methods of dose calculation for internal inflow of 137Cs into experimental rats body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problem of formation doses are considered at the peroral entering of 137Cs in the organism of laboratory rats. First the functions of isotopes retention and values of biokinetic constants have been determined for different organs and tissues. Multicamerate model for description of biokinetics of radionuclides in the organism is proposed. Advantages of application of this model for estimation of absorbed doses are discussed in comparison to existent models

  1. Copper complex N(4)-ortho-toluyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone - (64Cu)(H2Ac4oT)Cl - internal dosimetry: animal model and human extrapolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiosemicarbazones have attracted great pharmacological interest because of their biological properties, such as cytotoxic activity against multiple strains of human tumors. Due to the excellent properties of 64Cu, the copper complex N(4)-ortho-toluyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone ( (64Cu)(H2Ac4oT)Cl) was developed for tumor detection by positron emission tomography. The radiopharmaceuticals were produced in the nuclear reactor TRIGA-IPR-R1 from CDTN. At the present work, (64Cu)(H2Ac4oT)Cl biokinetic data (evaluated in mice bearing Ehrlich tumor) were treated by MIRD formalism to perform Internal Dosimetry studies. Doses in several organs of mice were determinate, as well as in implanted tumor, for (64Cu)(H2Ac4oT)Cl. Doses results obtained for animal model were extrapolated to humans assuming a similar concentration ratio among various tissues between mouse and human. In the extrapolation, it was used human organ masses from Cristy/Eckerman phantom. Both penetrating and non-penetrating radiation from 64Cu in the tissue were considered in dose calculations. (author)

  2. Kinetic modelling of radionuclide transfer in northern European marine food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biokinetic modelling approach with allometric considerations has been used to estimate the trophic transfer of 137Cs and 239Pu in a marine foodchain consisting of 4 trophic levels including phytoplankton, zooplankton, polar cod, and with harp seal as a top predator. The time-dependent transfer of radionuclides within the foodchain is defined by uptake rates, assimilation efficiencies and egestion/excretion rates and can be described by a system of linear 1st order differential equations. The Matlab based software ECOLEGO was used to solve the equation system numerically, and the activity concentration for animals in each trophic level was found as a function of time. For the simulation concerning 137Cs, the preliminary results suggest that equilibrium is not attained for higher trophic levels, i.e. polar cod and harp seal, before time > 2000 days. Biomagnification appears to occur for the lower trophic levels but is not occurring at the highest trophic level, i.e. seal. For 239Pu, transfer to successively higher trophic levels is low - there is a fall of several orders of magnitude between primary producers, represented by phytoplankton, and polar cod representing trophic level 3-4. However, the model predicts that this decreasing trend in activity concentrations along the food-chain is reversed for the highest trophic level, represented by seal. The simulated results for seal display equilibrium activity concentrations about 2 orders of magnitude higher than those observed for polar cod (one of its prey species). However equilibrium (165 years) is not reached during the life span of a seal. The equilibrium 137Cs CFs are approximately 50, 130 and 70 ml/g for zooplankton, polar cod and seal respectively. The predicted equilibrium 239Pu CFs for zooplankton and polar cod are 2.5x103 and 25 ml/g. For seal, following a 1 year equilibration period, a CF of approximately 75 ml/g is predicted. (author)

  3. Root uptake of uranium by a higher plant model (Phaseolus vulgaris) bioavailability from soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, L.; Henner, P.; Camilleri, V.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Uranium behaviour in soils is controlled by actions and interactions between physicochemical and biological processes that also determine its bioavailability. In soil solution, uranium(+VI) aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes mainly depending on pH, carbonates, phosphates and organic matter. In a first approach to identify bioavailable species of U to plants, cultures were performed using hydroponics, to allow an easy control of the composition of the exposure media. The latter, here an artificial soil solution, was designed to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS using a database compiled from the OECD/NEA thermochemical database project and verified was used to perform the solution speciation calculations. On this theoretical basis, three domains were defined for short-duration well-defined laboratory experiments in simplified conditions: pH 4.9, 5.8 and 7 where predicted dominant species are uranyl ions, hydroxyl complexes and carbonates respectively. For these domains, biokinetics and characterization of transmembrane transport according to a classical Michaelis Menten approach were investigated. The Free Ion Model (or its derived Biotic Ligand Model) was tested to determine if U uptake is governed by the free uranyl species or if other metal complexes can be assimilated. The effect of different variables on root assimilation efficiency and phyto-toxicity was explored: presence of ligands such as phosphates or carbonates and competitive ions such as Ca{sup 2+} at the 3 pH. According to previous experiments, uranium was principally located in roots whatever the pH and no difference in uranium uptake was evidenced between the main growth stages of the plant. Within the 3 studied chemical domains, results from short-term kinetics evidenced a linear correlation between total uranium concentration in bean roots and that in exposure media, suggesting that total uranium in soil solution could be a good predictor

  4. Biodistribution dosimetric study of radiopharmaceutical {sup 99mT}c Ixolaris in mice for melanoma diagnosis by molecular image and translational model for human beings; Estudo dosimetrico da biodistribuicao do radiofarmaco Ixolaris-{sup 99m}Tc em camundongos para diagnostico de melanoma atraves de imagem molecular e modelo translacional para humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Sarah Canuto Silva

    2015-07-01

    The labeling of Ixolaris with {sup 99m}Tc was developed by Barboza et.al. (2013) aiming its use primarily in glioblastoma and after in melanoma diagnosis, a less common but very aggressive cancer and with high mortality rate. Preliminary tests on animals have proven its effectiveness of labeling but a dosimetric study to human clinical trials should be performed. This study aimed to: (1) determine the biokinetic model for the radiotracer {sup 99m}Tc-Ixolaris in mice by imaging dosimetry method; and (2) estimate the absorbed and effective dose resulting from the use of a new radiopharmaceutical for melanoma and metastases diagnosis in human beings, since a dosimetric study of new radiopharmaceuticals in animals is necessary to test them subsequently in humans and apply for registration in ANVISA. According to SPECT images, was found a latency period of 15 to 21 days for the development of lung metastasis in mice. Three C57BL6 mice, one control animal, and two animals with induced cell line B16-F10 murine melanoma were tested. The {sup 99m}Tc-Ixolaris radiopharmaceutical was administered intravenously in a caudal vein, and SPECT images were acquired 0.5 h, 1.5 h, 2.5 h, 3.5 h and 24 h post-administration for analysis and biodistribution quantification. The biokinetic model was determined and thus, obtained cumulative activity in order to estimate the absorbed dose in each organ. The mass and metabolic differences between mice and humans were considered and used to extrapolate the data acquired at different scales. Based on dose factors provided by the software MIRDOSE and Olinda (S factor), absorbed doses in irradiated target organs were calculated for the source organs, and finally the effective dose was estimated. The results indicate that for diagnostic exams conducted in human melanoma patients by administering approximately 25.7 MBq the estimated effective dose was 4.3 mSv. Comparing with effective doses obtained in other diagnostic techniques with {sup 99m

  5. Copper complex N(4)-ortho-toluyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone - ({sup 64}Cu)(H2Ac4oT)Cl - internal dosimetry: animal model and human extrapolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Josianne L.; Silva, Paulo R.O.; Santos, Raquel G.; Ferreira, Andrea V., E-mail: jlr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Thiosemicarbazones have attracted great pharmacological interest because of their biological properties, such as cytotoxic activity against multiple strains of human tumors. Due to the excellent properties of {sup 64}Cu, the copper complex N(4)-ortho-toluyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (({sup 64}Cu)(H2Ac4oT)Cl) was developed for tumor detection by positron emission tomography. The radiopharmaceuticals were produced in the nuclear reactor TRIGA-IPR-R1 from CDTN. At the present work, ({sup 64}Cu)(H2Ac4oT)Cl biokinetic data (evaluated in mice bearing Ehrlich tumor) were treated by MIRD formalism to perform Internal Dosimetry studies. Doses in several organs of mice were determinate, as well as in implanted tumor, for ({sup 64}Cu)(H2Ac4oT)Cl. Doses results obtained for animal model were extrapolated to humans assuming a similar concentration ratio among various tissues between mouse and human. In the extrapolation, it was used human organ masses from Cristy/Eckerman phantom. Both penetrating and non-penetrating radiation from {sup 64}Cu in the tissue were considered in dose calculations. (author)

  6. Cumulated blood activity measurements and modelling in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    according to the one of the parameters. Slow uptake in the blood cannot be properly estimated by a mono-exponential model. Therefore, it was found that the dose estimated with mono-exponential model was over-estimated. Conclusions: using the two compartment model allows discriminating the patients in two groups with different iodine biokinetics. It is noteworthy that the second model is essential for the patients with the slow kinetics of radioiodine. (authors)

  7. Biokinetics of nuclear fuel compounds and biological effects of nonuniform radiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, S.; Servomaa, K.; Kosma, V M; Rytömaa, T

    1995-01-01

    Environmental releases of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds may occur at nuclear power plants during normal operation, after nuclear power plant accidents, and as a consequence of nuclear weapons testing. For example, the Chernobyl fallout contained extensive amounts of pulverized nuclear fuel composed of uranium and its nonvolatile fission products. The effects of these highly radioactive particles, also called hot particles, on humans are not well known due to lack of reliable data on the ex...

  8. Biokinetics of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the freshwater gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noelle; Forbes, Valery E; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is recognized as a major environmental sink for contaminants, including engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Consequently, sediment-living organisms are likely to be exposed to NPs. There is evidence that both accumulation and toxicity of metal NPs to sediment-dwellers increase with decreasing...... particle size, although NP size does not always predict effects. In contrast, not much is known about the influence of particle shape on bioaccumulation and toxicity. Here, we examined the influence of copper oxide (CuO) NP shape (rods, spheres, and platelets) on their bioaccumulation kinetics and toxicity...... sediment for 14 days did not significantly affect snail mortality. However, growth decreased for snails exposed to sediment amended with CuO NP spheres and platelets. P. antipodarum accumulated Cu from all Cu forms/shapes in significant amounts compared to control snails. In addition, once accumulated, Cu...

  9. Biokinetics of indium-111 labeled platelets after cryotherapy of hepatic metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The present investigation was performed to evaluate mean platelet live-span and the proportion of platelet disposal in different organs in patients after hepatic cryotherapy. Seven patients with advanced colorectal cancer and liver metastases were included. Directly before the surgical procedure a blood specimen was drawn and an in vitro labeling of patients platelets with 18 MBq Indium-111 oxime was performed. Reinjection was done intraoperatively just before cryotherapy. Blood specimen were drawn at 1, 2, 3, 24 und 48 h p.i.. Whole-body scintigraphy was acquired on day two alter operation. The evaluation comprised the calculation of mean platelet live-span and of organ activities as percentage of whole-body activity. The local disposal of platelets at the site of cryotherapy ranged from 0 to 35.2 percent, the mean value was 16,2 ± 12,2 percent (mean ± SD). The mean half-time of time-activity curve gave 0.6 to 2.4 days (mean ± SD: 1.6 ± 0.6 d; normal value: 3.5-6 d), the mean platelet life-span was between 2.1 and 5.2 days corresponding to a mean value of 3.4 ± 1.0 days (normal value: 7-11 d). The evaluation of SPECT slices of large liver metastases demonstrated that platelet disposal takes place at the border zone of the metastases just around the necrotic center. We conclude that the enhanced local platelet trapping is a major cause for cryothermia-induced systemic thrombocytopenia. (author)

  10. Nanomaterial translocation - the biokinetics, tissue accumulation, toxicity and fate of materials in secondary organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Balharry, Dominique; Wallin, Håkan;

    2015-01-01

    dioxide and quantum dots) or fast (e.g. zinc oxide) solubility. The translocation of NMs following intratracheal, intranasal and pharyngeal aspiration is higher (up to 10% of administered dose), however the relevance of these routes for risk assessment is questionable. Uptake of the materials from the...

  11. Biokinetics of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the freshwater gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Forbes, Valery E.; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is recognized as a major environmental sink for contaminants, including engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Consequently, sediment-living organisms are likely to be exposed to NPs. There is evidence that both accumulation and toxicity of metal NPs to sediment-dwellers increase with decreasing particle size, although NP size does not always predict effects. In contrast, not much is known about the influence of particle shape on bioaccumulation and toxicity. Here, we examined the influence of copper oxide (CuO) NP shape (rods, spheres, and platelets) on their bioaccumulation kinetics and toxicity to the sediment-dwelling gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum. The influence of Cu added as CuCl2 (i.e., aqueous Cu treatment) was also examined. Exposure to sediment mixed with aqueous Cu or with different-shaped CuO NPs at an average measured exposure concentration of 207 μg Cu per g dry weight sediment for 14 days did not significantly affect snail mortality. However, growth decreased for snails exposed to sediment amended with CuO NP spheres and platelets. P. antipodarum accumulated Cu from all Cu forms/shapes in significant amounts compared to control snails. In addition, once accumulated, Cu was efficiently retained (i.e., elimination rate constants were generally not significantly different from zero). Consequently, snails are likely to concentrate Cu over time, from both aqueous and NP sources, resulting in a high potential for toxicity.

  12. Comparative studies on transuranium nuclide biokinetics in sediment-dwelling invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment-dwelling molluscs (bivalve and gastropod), echinoderms (ophiuroid and holothurian) and annelids (polychaete) were analyzed for accumulation tissue distribution and loss of 237Pu, 241Am and 242Cm. After a 3-week exposure to a given radionuclide organisms were transferred to clean sea water for the depuration phase. Some individuals were dissected following both the uptake and loss period. Concentration factors varied widely (1-103), strongly dependent on species and radionuclide. All species tested took up more 241Am than 237Pu with the exception of the brittle star Ophiura texturata which showed a preference for 237Pu over 241Am by a factor of 5. The highest uptake of 241Am was noted in the polychaete Hermione hystrix which reached concentration factors of 103 and showed no indication of approaching steady state after 20 days. The detritivorous gastropod Aporrhais pespelicani attained somewhat higher 241Am concentration factors (550) than did the suspension-feeding clam (330). The lowest 241Am concentration factors were found in the brittle star (60) and the sea cucumber Stichopus regalis (20). Transuranics accumulated in polyaetes > molluscs > echinoderms, with ophiuroids reaching higher levels than holothurians, most of the radionuclides (80-90%) associating with shell or body wall. Particularly high concentration factors (103-104) were noted in chitinous setae of the polychaete and digestive tissues and gonads of the ophiuroid. Tranfer probably takes place via the coelomic fluid. Tbsub(1/2) ranged from 2-13 months, a function of species rather than the transuranic element. Benthic species of the sediment-water interface can readily accumulate transuranic elements retaining them for relatively long periods of time

  13. Comparative investigations on the biokinetics of colloidal thorium, zirconium, and hafnium dioxides in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the investigations is to establish biophysical data as a basis for dose calculations of realized projected long-term animal experiments devoted to the problem radiation and nonradiation effect of Thorotrast. For this purpose a Thorotrast-equivalent thorium dioxide aquasol as well as dextrin-stabilized aquasols of zirconium and hafnium dioxides (Zirconotrast, Hafnorast) of our own production have been injected intravascularly into rats. The animals subdivided in four subgroups have been administered 60 to 600 μl of any colloid per rat. Four subgroups were sacrificed at different times between 1 and 100 days after injection. The whole-body kinetics of Thorotrast and Hafnotrast have been studied by single whole-body counting of altogether 10 animals during the total time of exposure. Both the distribution of the colloids and the activity ratios between 232Th and daughters have been determined. Supplementary to these investigations studies were performed on the Thorotrast kinetics in mice and in one dog

  14. Synthesis, labeling with 99mTc and biokinetics of brains scintigraphy diaminodithiol perfusion radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent tomography status using radiopharmaceuticals have been contributing greatly with the 'age of certainty' in the diagnosis examination of syndromes, pathologies and clinical signs, because they can evidence some phenomena occurring in a molecular manner. The purpose of this work have had the development of new diaminodithiol (DADT) perfusion radiopharmaceuticals to be used in brain diagnosis using S.P.E.T. (Single Photon Emission Tomography). Initially, the rational planning had been performed with the new DADT molecular structures as radiopharmaceutical candidates. Using of Q.S.A.R. (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) techniques, the molecular descriptors such as partition coefficient and effective polarizability, have been studied in order to increase the blood brain barrier transport and the brain uptake respectively. Applying the Q.S.P.R. (Quantitative Structure Property Relationship) concepts to perform drug latentiation, based on bio-labile functional groups, the congener DADT derivative has been transformed into a pro-drug that works as a DADT moiety carrier, allowing the increasing of brain radiopharmaceutical uptake. Later on, synthetic routes and chemical purifications have been developed allowing the creation of the proposed chemical structure. Each new DADT derivative has been synthesized and analyzed in terms of elemental analysis, infrared and NMR spectra, in order to confirm its proposed chemical structure. Then, the new derivative has been labeled with 99mTc, radiochemically purified, intravenously injected in Swiss mice, allowing its biodistribution to evidence its brain transport and uptake. The rational planning studies have been re-evaluated after each biodistribution had been performed, to see what kind of molecular descriptor was responsible for causing a stronger optimization in the brain perfusion characteristics and then, new DADT derivatives have been prepared. Three new DADT derivatives have been obtained by using QSAR: DADT-PR, DADT-DIPA, DADT-DIB. In terms of absolute values, expressed as % dose/organ, the DADT-DIPA showed the biggest brain uptake, because it has got the partition coefficient closest to the ideal and a high effective polarizability value. DADT - DIPA proved that the partition coefficient is the most important molecular descriptor in the optimization of the DADT derivatives because in the case of DADT-DIB, even possessing the most effective polarizability, but a non-ideal partition coefficient value , it was showed a significantly smaller brain uptake. The DADT -DIPA derivative is potentially a brain perfusion radiopharmaceutical to be explored in details. The DADT - BUT , developed by QSPR despite the fact of having a low brain uptake expressed in terms of % dose/organ, presented pro-drug behaviour, because even 30 minutes after its administration, the radiopharmaceutical strikingly still retained 62% of the 5 minutes brain uptake. This DADT derivative has proved to possess low cerebral clearance, creating the possibility of becoming a good brain perfusion agent, once its structure assumes the closest to ideal partition coefficient value by adequate molecular modification. (author)

  15. Biokinetic study of radionuclides in rats after feeding a chitosan diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan is derived from chitin, which is a cellulose-like biopolymer distributed widely in nature, especially in crustaceans, insects, fungi and yeast. Chitin and chitosan are known to be one of the naturals chelating agents. We already reported that the whole-body retention of orally administered 85Sr in rats decreased remarkably after feeding a chitosan diet when comparing them with controls. The present study was to investigate whether chitosan can be applied to the animal and human bodies in order to reduce the bioavailability of radionuclides in food. Wistar strain male rats were used in this experiment. These rats were fed with different diets in order to observe the removal of ingested radio-iron and zinc by chitosan. The whole-body retention of radio-iron was slightly lower in the 5%-chitosan diet group than non-chitosan diet group. In tissue distribution study, rats were sacrificed 14 days after administration. The relative concentration of iron in the blood and spleen was found to be lower in the 5%-chitosan diet group. The whole-body retention of 65Zn decreased sharply in the rats given 3% phytate water in advance of 65Zn administration when compared with the control rats. The rats given 5% chitosan and 1% phytate water also showed a significant reduction in radio-zinc. However, 5% chitosan diet on it's own did not have a significant effect on accelerating the removal of radio-zinc in the rats. Previous studies have shown that the administration of 1% phytate water is also not effective in reducing radio-zinc in rats. These results suggest that the effectiveness of phytate and chitosan in reducing the bioavailability of radio-zinc depend on their concentration. (author)

  16. Revised dose limits and new respiratory tract model and their implications for annual limits of intake of radioactive materials - A review of recent ICRP publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation may cause immediate and/or delayed biological damages to the body of the exposed person and/or his/her progeny. The exposure may be caused by an external source or may arise due to internal contamination by a radioactive material. In order to prevent such exposure, or to reduce the probability that it will occur, national authorities and international organizations that are engaged in radiation safety and protection have set limits for the exposure to ionizing radiation from either source. The sensitivity of the body to ionizing radiation usually decreases with age. For this reason and due to the limited possibilities to control the exposure of the general public, different limits have been set for for occupational exposure and for the exposure of members of the public of different age groups. The general principles of these limits and guidelines for their calculations are set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and published in the Annals of the ICRP. The basic philosophy of the Commission, which includes the principles of justification, optimization and dose limits, the basic radiobiological models, and the distinction between stochastic and non-stochastic effects has been presented in its publication no. 26 . Based on this philosophy, the Commission issued between 1979 and 1988 a series of publications followed by annexes and addenda known as publication no. 30 . This series presented models describing the metabolism of radioactive materials which enter the body by inhalation and ingestion, the transfer of such materials from the respiratory tract and the gastrointestinal tract to the blood, and from there to the body organs and the excretion of the material from the body. This series presented also values for biokinetic parameters of these systems and transfer paths, and methods for calculating limits on intake which ensure that the exposure from internal contamination will not exceed the dose limits set by the

  17. Modeling Model Slicers

    OpenAIRE

    Blouin A.; Combemale B.; Baudry B.; Beaudoux O.

    2011-01-01

    International audience Among model comprehension tools, model slicers are tools that extract a subset from a model, for a specific purpose. Model slicers are tools that let modelers rapidly gather relevant knowledge from large models. However, existing slicers are dedicated to one modeling language. This is an issue when we observe that new domain specific modeling languages (DSMLs), for which we want slicing abilities, are created almost on a daily basis. This paper proposes the Kompren l...

  18. Adaptation of the ICRP models for the Techa River populations to estimate in utero and postnatal haemopoietic tissue doses from ingested strontium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Reliable estimation of tissue doses for exposed individuals is very important in epidemiological studies. Long-term cohort studies of the Techa River populations exposed in the early 1950s due to releases of liquid radioactive wastes from the Mayak plutonium production facility (Southern Urals, Russia) are unique in allowing the quantification of risks from low-level chronic exposure of the general population and providing information on risks for persons exposed in utero. Strontium isotopes were the most important contributors to haemopoietic tissue doses for people living in the riverside settlements. Large-scale monitoring of the exposed population has provided a comprehensive database, including post mortem and in vivo measurements of 90Sr in bones and whole body, for use in the estimation of doses. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published biokinetic and dosimetric models for the calculation of doses to members of the public, including doses from in utero exposures and from intakes with breast milk. However, the ICRP models as applied to Sr required modification to provide best estimates of doses to Techa River residents. Adaptations were made to the ICRP model for Sr in children and adults to take account of population-specific features relating to bone mineral turnover and to model age and gender differences in strontium retention. Refinements in the ICRP model for Sr uptake and retention in the fetus were made to improve the treatment of discrimination against Sr, relative to Ca, in transfer from maternal to foetal blood and to take account of population-specific data on the calcium content of the maternal and fetal skeleton. Modification of the ICRP model for Sr transfer in breast-milk included adaptations relating to changes in maternal mineral metabolism during lactation and consideration of population-specific features of breast feeding in the rural population. The improved models were successfully validated

  19. Effect of iron retention in the alimentary tract on the committed effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICRP Publication 100 provides a new human alimentary tract model (HATM). This model allows for the possibility of radionuclide retention within any tract tissue. Iron isotopes are among relevant radionuclides in this respect. The present study was aimed at the development of a biokinetic alimentary tract model which combines the HATM with the model in ICRP Publication 69 and allows for retention in the small intestine based on available literature. The model modification was used to simulated conceivable biokinetics deviations such as anemia, dysfunction of iron absorption or different colon transit times. The calculated committed equivalent doses and committed effective doses were compared. (orig.)

  20. Modeling Model Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Onatski, Alexei; Williams, Noah

    2003-01-01

    Recently there has been much interest in studying monetary policy under model uncertainty. We develop methods to analyze different sources of uncertainty in one coherent structure useful for policy decisions. We show how to estimate the size of the uncertainty based on time series data, and incorporate this uncertainty in policy optimization. We propose two different approaches to modeling model uncertainty. The first is model error modeling, which imposes additional structure on the errors o...

  1. Study of the internal contamination of thorium through ingestion path way using the Human Alimentary Tract Model (HATM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Release of thorium to the atmosphere can occur both from natural and anthropogenic sources, and emissions from the latter sources can produce locally elevated atmospheric levels of thorium over the background. Data regarding the fate and transport of thorium in the air are limited. The rate of deposition will depend on the meteorological conditions, the particle size and density, and the chemical form of thorium particles. In water, thorium will be present in suspended matters and sediments and the concentration of soluble, thorium will be low. In view of the kinetics of thorium in plant/soil medium, there exists a possibility of internal contamination of the general public located in the vicinity of high background areas. Literature study on the concentration of 232Th in the soil in Kollam district shows that the range of concentration is 54 -11976 Bq/Kg. The biological half life of thorium from the bones is about 8000 days and it is a health hazard as it emits about six alphas per disintegration. A method to estimate the dose due to internal contamination is by assessing the systemic uptake. ICRP 100 has recently published improved generic Human Alimentary Tract Model (HATM), replacing the old Gastro Intestinal Tract Model (GITM) of ICRP 30 to compute distribution of ingested radionuclide in the body as information has become available on the location of sensitive cells and retention of radionuclides in different regions of the alimentary tract. In this study a computer programme has been written in FORTRAN to implement HATM in conjunction with the systemic biokinetic model. A series of coupled first order differential equations has been solved numerically. The programme has been validated by analyzing the sample problem of 90Sr published in ICRP100. This programme has been used to compute the daily faecal excretion rate for an intake of 1 Bq of 232Th and the values were compared with that obtained using the GITM. For example the ratio of the predicted daily

  2. Determination and reliability of dose coefficients for radiopharmaceuticals; Ermittlung der Zuverlaessigkeit von Dosiskoeffizienten fuer Radiopharmaka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, V.; Li, W.B.; Zankl, M.; Oeh, U.

    2015-11-15

    The dose coefficients used in nuclear medicine for dose calculations of radiopharmaceuticals are based on recommendations by ICRP (International Commission on radiological protection) and the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee) using mathematical models for the temporal activity distributions in organs and tissues (biokinetic models) and mathematical models of the human body. These models using an idealized human body do not include uncertainty estimations. The research project is aimed to determine the uncertainties and thus the reliability of the dose coefficients for radiopharmaceuticals and to identify the biokinetic and dosimetric parameters that contribute most of the uncertainties.

  3. Business Models as Models

    OpenAIRE

    Baden-Fuller, C.; Morgan, M S

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on research undertaken in the history and philosophy of science, with particular reference to the extensive literature which discusses the use of models in biology and economics, we explore the question ‘Are Business Models useful?’ We point out that they act as various forms of model: to provide means to describe and classify businesses; to operate as sites for scientific investigation; and to act as recipes for creative managers. We argue that studying business models as models is r...

  4. Model Validation and Model Error Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ljung, Lennart

    1999-01-01

    To validate an estimated model and to have a good understanding of its reliability is a central aspect of System Identification. This contribution discusses these aspects in the light of model error models that are explicit descriptions of the model error. A model error model is implicitly present in most model validation methods, so the concept is more of a representation form than a set of new techniques. Traditional model validation is essentially a test of whether the confidence region of...

  5. Kinetics of systemic ruthenium in human blood using a stable tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetics of ruthenium after oral and intravenous administration has been investigated in two human subjects using the stable isotope 101Ru as a tracer. Tracer concentrations in blood plasma have been determined using activation analysis with protons. The results presented here prove that the stable tracer technique is a valuable tool for obtaining relevant information about the biokinetics of ruthenium in humans. From these pilot studies, it may be argued that the clearance of systemic ruthenium from plasma is significantly slower than the predictions of the biokinetic model currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The experimental data for the orally administered tracer, which reflect the gastrointestinal absorption process, differ from the curve derived from the ICRP model, suggesting that the uptake into the systemic circulation may be lower than predicted. On the basis of these preliminary data, investigations on a larger number of subjects with improvements in the experimental design are scheduled. (author)

  6. Gills as a glutathione-dependent metabolic barrier in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas: Absorption, metabolism and excretion of a model electrophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle F; Delapedra, Gabriel; Silva, Danilo G H; Arl, Miriam; Danielli, Naissa M; Metian, Marc; Almeida, Eduardo A; Dafre, Alcir L

    2016-04-01

    The mercapturic acid pathway (MAP) is a major phase II detoxification route, comprising the conjugation of electrophilic substances to glutathione (GSH) in a reaction catalyzed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes. In mammals, GSH-conjugates are exported from cells, and the GSH-constituent amino acids (Glu/Gly) are subsequently removed by ectopeptidases. The resulting Cys-conjugates are reabsorbed and, finally, a mercapturic acid is generated through N-acetylation. This pathway, though very well characterized in mammals, is poorly studied in non-mammalian biological models, such as bivalve mollusks, which are key organisms in aquatic ecosystems, aquaculture activities and environmental studies. In the present work, the compound 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was used as a model electrophile to study the MAP in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. Animals were exposed to 10μM CDNB and MAP metabolites were followed over 24h in the seawater and in oyster tissues (gills, digestive gland and hemolymph). A rapid decay was detected for CDNB in the seawater (half-life 1.7h), and MAP metabolites peaked in oyster tissues as soon as 15min for the GSH-conjugate, 1h for the Cys-conjugate, and 4h for the final metabolite (mercapturic acid). Biokinetic modeling of the MAP supports the fast CDNB uptake and metabolism, and indicated that while gills are a key organ for absorption, initial biotransformation, and likely metabolite excretion, hemolymph is a possible milieu for metabolite transport along different tissues. CDNB-induced GSH depletion (4h) was followed by increased GST activity (24h) in the gills, but not in the digestive gland. Furthermore, the transcript levels of glutamate-cysteine ligase, coding for the rate limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, and two phase II biotransformation genes (GSTpi and GSTo), presented a fast (4h) and robust (∼6-70 fold) increase in the gills. Waterborne exposure to electrophilic compounds affected gills, but not digestive gland

  7. Dose absorbed in adults and children thyroid due to the I{sup 123} using the dosimetry MIRD and Marinelli; Dosis absorbida en tiroides de adultos y ninos debido al I{sup 123} utilizando las dosimetrias MIRD y Marinelli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.; Castillo, C.; Cabrera, C.; Sarachaga, R.; Castaneda, J. [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Trujillo (Peru); Diaz, E., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Paulo Gamma 110, Bairro Farropilhas, Porto Alegre, RS 90040-060 (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Using the dosimetry MIRD, and representation Cristy-Eckerman in the thyroid gland and organs of their bio-kinetics when I{sup 123} (Iodine) is used, the study demonstrates that the absorbed dose by the gland of an adult, children, and newly born, is their auto-dose, independent of the compartments number of their bio-kinetics. The dosimetric contributions of the organs of their bio-kinetics are insignificant. Their results are not significantly different to those obtained by the formalism MARINELLI (auto-dose) when it uses a sphere like glandular representation. In consequence, the kinetic model corresponding to the glandular representation decreases to a compartment, where the gland can also be represented like a sphere. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the lungs due to Xe{sup 133} and Tc{sup 99m} (MAA); Evaluacion de la dosis absorbida en los pulmones debido al Xe{sup 133} y Tc{sup 99m} (MAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez A, M.; Murillo C, F.; Castillo D, C.; Sifuentes D, Y.; Sanchez S, P. [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Trujillo (Peru); Rojas P, E. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima (Peru); Marquez P, F., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Av. Angamos 2520, Lima (Peru)

    2015-10-15

    The absorbed dose in lungs of an adult patient has been evaluated using the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing Xe{sup 133} or Tc{sup 99m} (MAA). The absorbed dose was calculated using the MIRD formalism, and the Cristy-and Eckerman lungs model. The absorbed dose in the lungs due to {sup 133}Xe is 0.00104 mGy/MBq. Here, the absorbed dose due to remaining tissue, included in the {sup 133}Xe biokinetics is not significant. The absorbed dose in the lungs, due Tc{sup 99m} (MAA), is 0.065 mGy/MBq. Approximately, 4.6% of the absorbed dose is due to organs like liver, kidneys, bladder, and the rest of tissues, included in the Tc{sup 99m} biokinetics. Here, the absorbed dose is very significant to be overlooked. The dose contribution is mainly due to photons emitted by the liver. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the lungs due to Xe133 and Tc99m (MAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose in lungs of an adult patient has been evaluated using the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing Xe133 or Tc99m (MAA). The absorbed dose was calculated using the MIRD formalism, and the Cristy-and Eckerman lungs model. The absorbed dose in the lungs due to 133Xe is 0.00104 mGy/MBq. Here, the absorbed dose due to remaining tissue, included in the 133Xe biokinetics is not significant. The absorbed dose in the lungs, due Tc99m (MAA), is 0.065 mGy/MBq. Approximately, 4.6% of the absorbed dose is due to organs like liver, kidneys, bladder, and the rest of tissues, included in the Tc99m biokinetics. Here, the absorbed dose is very significant to be overlooked. The dose contribution is mainly due to photons emitted by the liver. (Author)

  10. Dose absorbed in adults and children thyroid due to the I123 using the dosimetry MIRD and Marinelli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the dosimetry MIRD, and representation Cristy-Eckerman in the thyroid gland and organs of their bio-kinetics when I123 (Iodine) is used, the study demonstrates that the absorbed dose by the gland of an adult, children, and newly born, is their auto-dose, independent of the compartments number of their bio-kinetics. The dosimetric contributions of the organs of their bio-kinetics are insignificant. Their results are not significantly different to those obtained by the formalism MARINELLI (auto-dose) when it uses a sphere like glandular representation. In consequence, the kinetic model corresponding to the glandular representation decreases to a compartment, where the gland can also be represented like a sphere. (Author)

  11. Actant Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Helle

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a functional modelling method called Actant Modelling rooted in linguistics and semiotics. Actant modelling can be integrated with Multilevel Flow Modelling (MFM) in order to give an interpretation of actants.......This paper presents a functional modelling method called Actant Modelling rooted in linguistics and semiotics. Actant modelling can be integrated with Multilevel Flow Modelling (MFM) in order to give an interpretation of actants....

  12. Modelling the models

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    By analysing the production of mesons in the forward region of LHC proton-proton collisions, the LHCf collaboration has provided key information needed to calibrate extremely high-energy cosmic ray models.   Average transverse momentum (pT) as a function of rapidity loss ∆y. Black dots represent LHCf data and the red diamonds represent SPS experiment UA7 results. The predictions of hadronic interaction models are shown by open boxes (sibyll 2.1), open circles (qgsjet II-03) and open triangles (epos 1.99). Among these models, epos 1.99 shows the best overall agreement with the LHCf data. LHCf is dedicated to the measurement of neutral particles emitted at extremely small angles in the very forward region of LHC collisions. Two imaging calorimeters – Arm1 and Arm2 – take data 140 m either side of the ATLAS interaction point. “The physics goal of this type of analysis is to provide data for calibrating the hadron interaction models – the well-known &...

  13. Modelling Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the practicalities of building, testing, deploying and maintaining models. It gives specific advice for each phase of the modelling cycle. To do this, a modelling framework is introduced which covers: problem and model definition; model conceptualization; model data...... requirements; model construction; model solution; model verification; model validation and finally model deployment and maintenance. Within the adopted methodology, each step is discussedthrough the consideration of key issues and questions relevant to the modelling activity. Practical advice, based on many...... years of experience is providing in directing the reader in their activities.Traps and pitfalls are discussed and strategies also given to improve model development towards “fit-for-purpose” models. The emphasis in this chapter is the adoption and exercise of a modelling methodology that has proven very...

  14. Model misinterpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    2012-01-01

    Models of myriad forms are rapidly becoming central to biology. This ranges from statistical models that are fundamental to the interpretation of experimental results to ODE models that attempt to describe the results in a mechanistic format. Models will be more and more essential to biologists but this growing importance requires all model users to become more sophisticated about what is in a model and how that limits the usability of the model. This review attempts to relay the potential pi...

  15. Promoting Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  16. Models within models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anyone who worries that physicists are running out of interesting challenges to tackle and important problems to solve should read the two, very different feature articles in this issue. In 'Climate change: complexity in action', Klaus Hasselmann and colleagues write about the challenges of including economic and political dimensions in computer simulations of climate change. It is hard to imagine a physics-based topic that has a greater impact on the world at large. In 'Quarks, diquarks and pentaquarks', Robert Jaffe and Frank Wilczek describe our current understanding of quantum chromodynamics and the strong nuclear force. In this case it is hard to think of many more difficult problems in fundamental physics. Traditional climate modelling is difficult enough because a whole range of effects in the atmosphere and the oceans have to be taken into account. It typically takes weeks for a state-of-the-art supercomputer to simulate 100 years of climate change with a horizontal resolution of 100 km. But climate change is about much more than solving difficult differential equations - there are crucial social, political and economic influences as well. Some researchers, including a significant number of physicists, have started to look at this integrated-assessment approach. The first challenge is to develop climate models that take minutes to run on a laptop. The next challenge is to develop analogous models that work in the social, political and economic arenas - which is not a trivial task - and then integrate all these different models and explore all the possible global-warming scenarios. Physicists also hope to integrate quantum chromodynamics (QCD) into the larger framework of a so-called theory of everything. Like climate modellers, particle theorists working on QCD require enormous computational resources for their calculations, and even then there are limits to what can be achieved (e.g. the mass of the proton has yet to be calculated from first principles

  17. Biokinetics of selected heavy metals and radionuclides in two marine macrophytes: the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and the alga Caulerpa taxifolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnau, M. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Lab. de Biologie Marine; Fowler, S.W.; Teyssie, J.-L. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco (Monaco). Marine Environment Lab.

    1996-08-02

    Uptake and loss kinetics of Zn, Ag, Cd, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 241}Am by shoots of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and fronds of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia were determined in controlled laboratory radiotracer experiments using low contaminant concentrations. The two species accumulated most of the elements efficiently. The only exceptions were {sup 134}Cs in both P. oceanica and C. taxifolia and Cd in C. taxifolia (concentration factors {<=} 6.4). Steady state in uptake was reached in C.taxifolia for each element except Ag. In P. oceanica, steady state was noted for the uptake of Ag and {sup 134}Cs whereas Zn, Cd, and {sup 241}Am were linearly accumulated during the course of the experiment (15 d). With respect to relative metal bioavailability, the different compartments of P. oceanica shoots were generally ranked in the order: leaf epiphytes > adult leaves intermediate leaves > leaf sheaths. The long-lived component of the loss kinetics for each element in P. oceanica was characterized by a relatively short biological half-life (T{sub b1/2} 28 d). However, observations for the individual compartments indicated that adult leaves had a high retention capacity for Ag and {sup 134}Cs, with virtually 100% retained after 21 d in uncontaminated sea water. In C. taxifolia, the long-lived component of the loss kinetics for each element was characterized by a T{sub b1/2} value that was not significantly different from infinity, an observation which suggests that a substantial fraction of the metal or radionuclide incorporated during a contamination event would be irreversibly bound by this algal species. (author).

  18. Biokinetics of selected heavy metals and radionuclides in two marine macrophytes: the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and the alga Caulerpa taxifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake and loss kinetics of Zn, Ag, Cd, 134Cs, and 241Am by shoots of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and fronds of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia were determined in controlled laboratory radiotracer experiments using low contaminant concentrations. The two species accumulated most of the elements efficiently. The only exceptions were 134Cs in both P. oceanica and C. taxifolia and Cd in C. taxifolia (concentration factors ≤ 6.4). Steady state in uptake was reached in C.taxifolia for each element except Ag. In P. oceanica, steady state was noted for the uptake of Ag and 134Cs whereas Zn, Cd, and 241Am were linearly accumulated during the course of the experiment (15 d). With respect to relative metal bioavailability, the different compartments of P. oceanica shoots were generally ranked in the order: leaf epiphytes > adult leaves intermediate leaves > leaf sheaths. The long-lived component of the loss kinetics for each element in P. oceanica was characterized by a relatively short biological half-life (Tb1/2 28 d). However, observations for the individual compartments indicated that adult leaves had a high retention capacity for Ag and 134Cs, with virtually 100% retained after 21 d in uncontaminated sea water. In C. taxifolia, the long-lived component of the loss kinetics for each element was characterized by a Tb1/2 value that was not significantly different from infinity, an observation which suggests that a substantial fraction of the metal or radionuclide incorporated during a contamination event would be irreversibly bound by this algal species. (author)

  19. Comparative radioanalytical and biokinetic studies of 99mTc-Tin and 99mTc-sulphur colloid kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel chromatography scanning technique (GCS) was used to study the radioanalytical behaviour of 99mTc-tin colloid and 99mTc-sulphur colloid kits. Sepharose has been found to be more accurate and versatile than the other conventional analytical procedures for radioanalytical evaluation of 99mTc-labelled colloids. The obtained radioanalytical results showed that 99mTc-sulphur colloid is more susceptible than the 99mTc-tin colloids to change due to the analytical environment. This is related to the nature of oxidation state of technetium atom in both colloids. The formation of 99mTc-tin colloid is achieved within few minutes after pertechnetate addition, while labeling of sulphur colloid is accomplished through a rather slow process. The organ distribution in mice shows that more than 90% of the injected dose of both colloids are accumulated in the liver, which proved the colloid labeling and optimal size particle. The minor size difference in the blood residual activity is due to the presence of hydrophilic stabilizer in 99mTc-sulphur colloid. The blood clearance study in rabbits showed that the biological half-times of activity disappearance of fast phase are longer periods extend to 125 and 65 minutes to 99mTc-tin and 99mTc-sulphur colloids, respectively. The in vitro plasma protein binding studies revealed by the GSC method showed that about 85% of 99mTc-tin colloid and 16% of 99mTc-sulphur colloid were bound to plasma protein, which proved that it does not influence the in vivo kinetics of both colloids

  20. Labelling study of galacturonic acid with Tc-99m and investigation of the biokinetic behaviour in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main criterion in the selection of a proper ligand to be labelled with Technetium is to match the requirement of a radiopharmaceutical of good biological specificity, where the target organ-to-background ratio is considerably high. Perliminary study on experimental animals has shown, that galacturonic acid is among those ligands of high renal specificity after complexing with Tc-99. In this communication we describe for the first time the labelling of galacturonic acid with Tc-99, using stannous chloride as a reducing agent for pertechnetate. The radioanalytical results assessed by gelchromatography column scanning (GCS) method, reveal that, the labelling efficiency of (Tc)99-galacturonate complex is promoted by raising the pH of the reaction mixture to a value higher than 7 using tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane buffer. The optimal amounts of the reactants to obtain a high labelled and stable complex with high kidney uptake, were found to be not less than 50 mg galacturonic acid and not more than 200 Mg SnCl2.H2O in the preparation

  1. Depth investigation of rapid sand filters for drinking water production reveals strong stratification in nitrification biokinetic behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    rate, indicating their primarily role in nitrification under the imposed experimental conditions. The maximum AOB cell specific NH4 + removal rate observed at the bottom was at least 3 times lower compared to the top and middle layers. Additionally, a significant up-shift capacity (4.6 and 3.5 times...

  2. Biokinetics of Hg and Pb accumulation in the encapsulated egg of the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis: Radiotracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacoue-Labarthe, T., E-mail: tlacouel@gmail.com [Littoral, Environnement et Societes (LIENSs), UMR 6250, CNRS-Universite de La Rochelle, 2 rue Olympe de Gouges, F-17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01 (France); Warnau, M., E-mail: warnaumichel@yahoo.com [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine Ier, MC-98000 (Monaco); Metian, M. [Littoral, Environnement et Societes (LIENSs), UMR 6250, CNRS-Universite de La Rochelle, 2 rue Olympe de Gouges, F-17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01 (France); International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine Ier, MC-98000 (Monaco); Oberhaensli, F. [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine Ier, MC-98000 (Monaco); Rouleau, C. [Institut Maurice-Lamontagne, 850 Route de la Mer, C.P. 1000, Mont-Joli, Quebec (Canada); Bustamante, P., E-mail: pbustama@univ-lr.fr [Littoral, Environnement et Societes (LIENSs), UMR 6250, CNRS-Universite de La Rochelle, 2 rue Olympe de Gouges, F-17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01 (France)

    2009-12-01

    Uptake and depuration kinetics of dissolved {sup 203}Hg and {sup 210}Pb were determined during the entire embryonic development of the eggs of the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis (50 d at 17 {sup o}C). {sup 203}Hg and {sup 210}Pb were accumulated continuously by the eggs all along the development time reaching load/concentration ratio (LCR) of 467 {+-} 43 and 1301 {+-} 126 g, respectively. During the first month, most of the {sup 203}Hg and {sup 210}Pb remained associated with the eggshell indicating that the latter acted as an efficient shield against metal penetration. From this time onwards, {sup 203}Hg accumulated in the embryo, indicating that it passed through the eggshell, whereas {sup 210}Pb did not cross the chorion during the whole exposure time. It also demonstrated that translocation of Hg associated with the inner layers of the eggshell is a significant source of exposure for the embryo. This study highlighted that the maturing embryo could be subjected to the toxic effects of Hg in the coastal waters where the embryonic development is taking place.

  3. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after nuclear medicine examinations. Biokinetic and dosimetric data and recommendations on breastfeeding interruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liepe, K. [GH Hospital Frankfurt/Oder, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Frankfurt an der Oder (Germany); Becker, A. [GH Hospital Frankfurt/Oder, Department of Internal Medicine, Frankfurt an der Oder (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Since the 1990s the advantages of breastfeeding have been emphasized and the number of women who nurse their infant has increased significantly. Although women in this population are generally healthy and relatively rarely need radionuclide imaging or radionuclide therapies, the issue of radiation protection of breastfed children arises because of their higher radiosensitivity. Approximately 55 papers on excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after radionuclide imaging or therapy have been published. Unfortunately, most of them are case reports or include only a small number of cases. In 1955 the first report was published about a breastfeeding woman after radioiodine treatment of thyrotoxicosis. This early study showed a higher concentration of radioiodine in breast milk than in plasma and investigated the risk to the infant, especially to the thyroid gland.

  4. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after nuclear medicine examinations. Biokinetic and dosimetric data and recommendations on breastfeeding interruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the 1990s the advantages of breastfeeding have been emphasized and the number of women who nurse their infant has increased significantly. Although women in this population are generally healthy and relatively rarely need radionuclide imaging or radionuclide therapies, the issue of radiation protection of breastfed children arises because of their higher radiosensitivity. Approximately 55 papers on excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after radionuclide imaging or therapy have been published. Unfortunately, most of them are case reports or include only a small number of cases. In 1955 the first report was published about a breastfeeding woman after radioiodine treatment of thyrotoxicosis. This early study showed a higher concentration of radioiodine in breast milk than in plasma and investigated the risk to the infant, especially to the thyroid gland.

  5. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry for patients undergoing a glycerol tri[1-14C]oleate fat malabsorption breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glycerol tri[1-14C]olein test for fat malabsorption was carried out in two male volunteers and measurements of the loss of 14C in expired air, urine and faeces and the retention of 14C in biopsy samples of abdominal fat were made using accelerator mass spectrometry. Exhalation accounted for 73% and 55% of the administered activity and could be described by three-component exponential functions with halftimes of about 1 h, 2 days and 150 days, respectively. Urinary excretion accounted for 24% of the administered activity, almost all during the first 24 h after administration; about 2% was excreted in the faeces in 48 h. The halftime of retention of 14C in fat ranged from 137 to 620 days. Absorbed dose calculations indicate that for a normal adult the largest dose, 1.5-7.0 mGy/MBq is received by the adipose tissue, and that the effective dose is 0.3-0.5 mSv/MBq. It is concluded that no restrictions need to be placed on radiation safety grounds on the administration of 0.05-0.1 MBq 14C-triolein for the triolein breath test

  6. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 99mTc-ciprofloxalina obtained from a modified formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the biokinetics performance of 99mTc-ciprofloxacin obtained from a new formulation. Both in vitro assays and experimental infection models demonstrated its affinity for viable bacteria.Half life in blood was 5.89 ± 0.85 hours. The biodistribution showed high accumulation on infected muscles and low on healthy tissues

  7. Model Warehouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper puts forward a new conception:model warehouse,analyzes the reason why model warehouse appears and introduces the characteristics and architecture of model warehouse.Last,this paper points out that model warehouse is an important part of WebGIS.

  8. Constitutive Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Piccolo, Chiara; Heitzig, Martina;

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents various types of constitutive models and their applications. There are 3 aspects dealt with in this chapter, namely: creation and solution of property models, the application of parameter estimation and finally application examples of constitutive models. A systematic...... procedure is introduced for the analysis and solution of property models. Models that capture and represent the temperature dependent behaviour of physical properties are introduced, as well as equation of state models (EOS) such as the SRK EOS. Modelling of liquid phase activity coefficients are also...... covered, illustrating several models such as the Wilson equation and NRTL equation, along with their solution strategies. A section shows how to use experimental data to regress the property model parameters using a least squares approach. A full model analysis is applied in each example that discusses...

  9. Model error

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Simons

    1997-01-01

    Modern finance would not have been possible without models. Increasingly complex quantitative models drive financial innovation and the growth of derivatives markets. Models are necessary to value financial instruments and to measure the risks of individual positions and portfolios. Yet when used inappropriately, the models themselves can become an important source of risk. Recently, several well-publicized instances occurred of institutions suffering significant losses attributed to model er...

  10. Model cities

    OpenAIRE

    M Batty

    2007-01-01

    The term ?model? is now central to our thinking about how weunderstand and design cities. We suggest a variety of ways inwhich we use ?models?, linking these ideas to Abercrombie?sexposition of Town and Country Planning which represented thestate of the art fifty years ago. Here we focus on using models asphysical representations of the city, tracing the development ofsymbolic models where the focus is on simulating how functiongenerates form, to iconic models where the focus is on representi...

  11. Supermatrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yost, S.A.

    1991-05-01

    Radom matrix models based on an integral over supermatrices are proposed as a natural extension of bosonic matrix models. The subtle nature of superspace integration allows these models to have very different properties from the analogous bosonic models. Two choices of integration slice are investigated. One leads to a perturbative structure which is reminiscent of, and perhaps identical to, the usual Hermitian matrix models. Another leads to an eigenvalue reduction which can be described by a two component plasma in one dimension. A stationary point of the model is described.

  12. Modelling Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Vesterager, Johan

    This report provides an overview of the existing models of global manufacturing, describes the required modelling views and associated methods and identifies tools, which can provide support for this modelling activity.The model adopted for global manufacturing is that of an extended enterprise....... One or more units from beyond the network may complement the extended enterprise. The common reference model for this extended enterprise will utilise GERAM (Generalised Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology) to provide an architectural framework for the modelling carried out within the...

  13. Geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contributions to the workshop 'Geochemical modeling' from 19 to 20 September 1990 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. The report contains the programme and a selection of the lectures held at the workshop 'Geochemical modeling'. (BBR)

  14. ENTRAINMENT MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presented information on entrainment models. Entrainment models use entrainment hypotheses to express the continuity equation. The advantage is that plume boundaries are known. A major disadvantage is that the problems that can be solved are rather simple. The ...

  15. Enterprise Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Mark S.; Gruninger, Michael

    1998-01-01

    To remain competitive, enterprises must become increasingly agile and integrated across their functions. Enterprise models play a critical role in this integration, enabling better designs for enterprises, analysis of their performance, and management of their operations. This article motivates the need for enterprise models and introduces the concepts of generic and deductive enterprise models. It reviews research to date on enterprise modeling and considers in detail the Toronto virtual ent...

  16. Battery Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the capacity of the employed batteries. The battery lifetime determines how long one can use a device. Battery modeling can help to predict, and possibly extend this lifetime. Many different battery models have been developed over the years. However, with these models one can only compute lifetimes for specific discharge profiles, and not for workloads in general. In this paper, we give an overview of the different battery models that are availabl...

  17. Computable models

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Computational models can be found everywhere in present day science and engineering. In providing a logical framework and foundation for the specification and design of specification languages, Raymond Turner uses this framework to introduce and study computable models. In doing so he presents the first systematic attempt to provide computational models with a logical foundation. Computable models have wide-ranging applications from programming language semantics and specification languages, through to knowledge representation languages and formalism for natural language semantics. They are al

  18. Model Building

    OpenAIRE

    Frampton, Paul H.

    1997-01-01

    In this talk I begin with some general discussion of model building in particle theory, emphasizing the need for motivation and testability. Three illustrative examples are then described. The first is the Left-Right model which provides an explanation for the chirality of quarks and leptons. The second is the 331-model which offers a first step to understanding the three generations of quarks and leptons. Third and last is the SU(15) model which can accommodate the light leptoquarks possibly...

  19. Magnetosphere models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the most recent magnetospheric models are reviewed. After a short overview of the particle environment, a synthetic survey of the problem is given. For each feature of magnetospheric modelling (boundary, current sheet, ring-current) the approaches used by different authors are described. In the second part a description is given of the magnetospheric models, divided into four groups. In the last part, the different uses of magnetospheric models are illustrated by means of examples

  20. Phoenix model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix (formerly referred to as the Second Generation Model or SGM) is a global general equilibrium model designed to analyze energy-economy-climate related questions and policy implications in the medium- to long-term. This model disaggregates the global economy into 26 industr...

  1. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sclütter, Flemming; Frigaard, Peter; Liu, Zhou

    This report presents the model test results on wave run-up on the Zeebrugge breakwater under the simulated prototype storms. The model test was performed in January 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The detailed description of the model is given in...

  2. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  3. Hydrological models are mediating models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, L. V.; Karssenberg, D.

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing role of models in hydrological research and decision-making processes, only few accounts of the nature and function of models exist in hydrology. Earlier considerations have traditionally been conducted while making a clear distinction between physically-based and conceptual models. A new philosophical account, primarily based on the fields of physics and economics, transcends classes of models and scientific disciplines by considering models as "mediators" between theory and observations. The core of this approach lies in identifying models as (1) being only partially dependent on theory and observations, (2) integrating non-deductive elements in their construction, and (3) carrying the role of instruments of scientific enquiry about both theory and the world. The applicability of this approach to hydrology is evaluated in the present article. Three widely used hydrological models, each showing a different degree of apparent physicality, are confronted to the main characteristics of the "mediating models" concept. We argue that irrespective of their kind, hydrological models depend on both theory and observations, rather than merely on one of these two domains. Their construction is additionally involving a large number of miscellaneous, external ingredients, such as past experiences, model objectives, knowledge and preferences of the modeller, as well as hardware and software resources. We show that hydrological models convey the role of instruments in scientific practice by mediating between theory and the world. It results from these considerations that the traditional distinction between physically-based and conceptual models is necessarily too simplistic and refers at best to the stage at which theory and observations are steering model construction. The large variety of ingredients involved in model construction would deserve closer attention, for being rarely explicitly presented in peer-reviewed literature. We believe that devoting

  4. Model Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Selén, Yngve

    2004-01-01

    Before using a parametric model one has to be sure that it offers a reasonable description of the system to be modeled. If a bad model structure is employed, the obtained model will also be bad, no matter how good is the parameter estimation method. There exist many possible ways of validating candidate models. This thesis focuses on one of the most common ways, i.e., the use of information criteria. First, some common information criteria are presented, and in the later chapters, various ext...

  5. Cadastral Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Modeling is a term that refers to a variety of efforts, including data and process modeling. The domain to be modeled may be a department, an organization, or even an industrial sector. E-business presupposes the modeling of an industrial sector, a substantial task. Cadastral modeling compares...... to the modeling of an industrial sector, as it aims at rendering the basic concepts that relate to the domain of real estate and the pertinent human activities. The palpable objects are pieces of land and buildings, documents, data stores and archives, as well as persons in their diverse roles as owners, holders...... to land. The paper advances the position that cadastral modeling has to include not only the physical objects, agents, and information sets of the domain, but also the objectives or requirements of cadastral systems....

  6. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  7. ICRF modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture provides a survey of the methods used to model fast magnetosonic wave coupling, propagation, and absorption in tokamaks. The validity and limitations of three distinct types of modelling codes, which will be contrasted, include discrete models which utilize ray tracing techniques, approximate continuous field models based on a parabolic approximation of the wave equation, and full field models derived using finite difference techniques. Inclusion of mode conversion effects in these models and modification of the minority distribution function will also be discussed. The lecture will conclude with a presentation of time-dependent global transport simulations of ICRF-heated tokamak discharges obtained in conjunction with the ICRF modelling codes. 52 refs., 15 figs

  8. Model choice versus model criticism

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Christian P.; Mengersen, Kerrie; Chen, Carla

    2009-01-01

    The new perspectives on ABC and Bayesian model criticisms presented in Ratmann et al.(2009) are challenging standard approaches to Bayesian model choice. We discuss here some issues arising from the authors' approach, including prior influence, model assessment and criticism, and the meaning of error in ABC.

  9. Ventilation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Yang

    1999-11-04

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future.

  10. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics.We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...... temporarily from bookcases to borrowers. When we characterize events as change agents we focus on concepts like transactions, entity processes, and workflow processes....

  11. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics. We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...... temporarily from bookcases to borrowers. When we characterize events as change agents we focus on concepts like transactions, entity processes, and workflow processes....

  12. Turbulence modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-ε two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the 'standard' (Rij-ε) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called 'feasible'. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author)

  13. Phenomenological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braby, L.A.

    1990-09-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation exposure are the result of a complex sequence of physical, chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions. One way to begin a search for an understanding of health effects of radiation is through the development of phenomenological models of the response. Many models have been presented and tested in the slowly evolving process of characterizing cellular response. A range of models covering different endpoints and phenomena has developed in parallel. Many of these models employ similar assumptions about some underlying processes while differing about the nature of others. An attempt is made to organize many of the models into groups with similar features and to compare the consequences of those features with the actual experimental observations. It is assumed that by showing that some assumptions are inconsistent with experimental observations, the job of devising and testing mechanistic models can be simplified. 43 refs., 13 figs.

  14. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this report a new turbulence model is presented.In contrast to the bulk of modern work, the model is a classical continuum model with a relatively simple constitutive equation. The constitutive equation is, as usual in continuum mechanics, entirely empirical. It has the usual Newton or Stokes...... term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence....... The model is in a virgin state, but a number of numerical tests have been carried out with good results. It is published to encourage other researchers to study the model in order to find its merits and possible limitations....

  15. Mathematical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomhøj, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Developing competences for setting up, analysing and criticising mathematical models are normally seen as relevant only from and above upper secondary level. The general belief among teachers is that modelling activities presuppose conceptual understanding of the mathematics involved. Mathematical...... modelling, however, can be seen as a practice of teaching that place the relation between real life and mathematics into the centre of teaching and learning mathematics, and this is relevant at all levels. Modelling activities may motivate the learning process and help the learner to establish cognitive...... roots for the construction of important mathematical concepts. In addition competences for setting up, analysing and criticising modelling processes and the possible use of models is a formative aim in this own right for mathematics teaching in general education. The paper presents a theoretical...

  16. Mathematical modelling

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a thorough introduction to the challenge of applying mathematics in real-world scenarios. Modelling tasks rarely involve well-defined categories, and they often require multidisciplinary input from mathematics, physics, computer sciences, or engineering. In keeping with this spirit of modelling, the book includes a wealth of cross-references between the chapters and frequently points to the real-world context. The book combines classical approaches to modelling with novel areas such as soft computing methods, inverse problems, and model uncertainty. Attention is also paid to the interaction between models, data and the use of mathematical software. The reader will find a broad selection of theoretical tools for practicing industrial mathematics, including the analysis of continuum models, probabilistic and discrete phenomena, and asymptotic and sensitivity analysis.

  17. Logistic models

    OpenAIRE

    Sochůrková, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the compilation of an inventory management methods, describe their principles and assess the appropriateness of their use. In the introductory part of the work, "The nature and importance of inventory management" are briefly described the inventory management, the main objectives of inventory control models, the basic division of inventory species and costs of supply. The following chapter "Overview of inventory control models" includes a breakdown of models from dif...

  18. Why Model?

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Joshua M.

    2008-01-01

    This address treats some enduring misconceptions about modeling. One of these is that the goal is always prediction. The lecture distinguishes between explanation and prediction as modeling goals, and offers sixteen reasons other than prediction to build a model. It also challenges the common assumption that scientific theories arise from and 'summarize' data, when often, theories precede and guide data collection; without theory, in other words, it is not clear what data to collect. Among ot...

  19. Mental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Moreira

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The mental models subject is presented particularly in the light of Johnson-Laird’s theory. Views from different authors are also presented but the emphasis lies in Johson-Laird’s approach, proposing mental models as a third path in the images x propositions debate. In this perspective, the nature, content, and typology of mental models are discussed, as well as the issue of conciousness and computability. In addition, the methodology of research studies are provided. Essentially, the aim of the paper is to provide an introduction to the mental models topic, having science education research in mind.

  20. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Frigaard, Peter

    This report presents the model on wave run-up and run-down on the Zeebrugge breakwater under short-crested oblique wave attacks. The model test was performed in March-April 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University.......This report presents the model on wave run-up and run-down on the Zeebrugge breakwater under short-crested oblique wave attacks. The model test was performed in March-April 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University....

  1. Stream Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Kristian

    engineers, but as the scale and the complexity of the hydraulic works increased, the mathematical models became so complex that a mathematical solution could not be obtained. This created a demand for new methods and again the experimental investigation became popular, but this time as measurements on small......-scale models. But still the scale and complexity of hydraulic works were increasing, and soon even small-scale models reached a natural limit for some applications. In the mean time the modern computer was developed, and it became possible to solve complex mathematical models by use of computer-based numerical...

  2. Ventilation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post

  3. Modeling Documents with Event Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhui Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently deep learning has made great breakthroughs in visual and speech processing, mainly because it draws lessons from the hierarchical mode that brain deals with images and speech. In the field of NLP, a topic model is one of the important ways for modeling documents. Topic models are built on a generative model that clearly does not match the way humans write. In this paper, we propose Event Model, which is unsupervised and based on the language processing mechanism of neurolinguistics, to model documents. In Event Model, documents are descriptions of concrete or abstract events seen, heard, or sensed by people and words are objects in the events. Event Model has two stages: word learning and dimensionality reduction. Word learning is to learn semantics of words based on deep learning. Dimensionality reduction is the process that representing a document as a low dimensional vector by a linear mode that is completely different from topic models. Event Model achieves state-of-the-art results on document retrieval tasks.

  4. Education models

    OpenAIRE

    Poortman, Sybilla; Sloep, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Educational models describes a case study on a complex learning object. Possibilities are investigated for using this learning object, which is based on a particular educational model, outside of its original context. Furthermore, this study provides advice that might lead to an increase in teachers’ motivation for using and sharing learning objects. This document is aimed at teachers and educational designers.

  5. Didactical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Tomas; Hansen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce Didactical Modelling as a research methodology in mathematics education. We compare the methodology with other approaches and argue that Didactical Modelling has its own specificity. We discuss the methodological “why” and explain why we find it useful to...

  6. Neurofuzzy Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    A neural network can approximate a function, but it is impossible to interpret the result in terms of natural language. The fusion of neural networks and fuzzy logic in neurofuzzy models provide learning as well as readability. Control engineers find this useful, because the models can be...

  7. Martingale Model

    OpenAIRE

    Giandomenico, Rossano

    2006-01-01

    The model determines a stochastic continuous process as continuous limit of a stochastic discrete process so to show that the stochastic continuous process converges to the stochastic discrete process such that we can integrate it. Furthermore, the model determines the expected volatility and the expected mean so to show that the volatility and the mean are increasing function of the time.

  8. Scribe modeller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssing, Ulrik

    1986-01-01

    Ulrik Løssing har redigeret, illustreret og oversat: "Scribe Modeller System, Sheffield, november 1985" af forfatterne: Cedric Green, David Cooper og John Wells.......Ulrik Løssing har redigeret, illustreret og oversat: "Scribe Modeller System, Sheffield, november 1985" af forfatterne: Cedric Green, David Cooper og John Wells....

  9. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  10. Modelling Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2009-01-01

    There are many different notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and workflows. These notations and formalisms have been introduced with different purposes and objectives. Later, influenced by other notations, comparisons with other tools, or by standardization efforts, these...... notations have been extended in order to increase expressiveness and to be more competitive. This resulted in an increasing number of notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and in an increase of the different modelling constructs provided by modelling notations, which makes it difficult...... to compare modelling notations and to make transformations between them. One of the reasons is that, in each notation, the new concepts are introduced in a different way by extending the already existing constructs. In this chapter, we go the opposite direction: We show that it is possible to add...

  11. Building Models and Building Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj Asbjørn; Skauge, Jørn

    teoretiske basis for de kapitler, der har et mere teoretisk indhold. De følgende appendikser B-D indeholder nærmere karakteristika om de to modellerings CAD-programmer ArchiCAD og Architectural Desktop tillige med en sammenligning mellem de to værktøjer. I de resterende to appendikser beskrives de specielle...... problemstillinger vedrørende modellering af de to "Sorthøjparken"-modeller og de resul­terende modeller bliver præsenteret og evalueret. Den samlede rapport er udgivet på projektets hjemmeside: www.iprod.aau.dk/bygit/Web3B/ under Technical Reports....

  12. OSPREY Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2013-01-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to

  13. Efficiency correction factors of an Accuscan whole-body counter due to the biodistribution of 134Cs, 137Cs and 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency calibration of whole-body counters (WBCs) for monitoring of internal contaminations is usually performed with anthropomorphic physical phantoms assuming homogeneous activity distribution. Besides the inherent limitations of these phantoms in resembling the human anatomy, they do not represent a realistic activity distribution, since in real situations each incorporated radionuclide has its particular biodistribution after entering the systemic circulation. Moreover, the activity content in the different organs and tissues comprising the biokinetics is time dependent. This work aims at assessing the whole-body counting efficiency deviations arising from considering a detailed voxel phantom instead of a standard physical phantom (BOMAB) and at evaluating the effect of the anatomical differences between both phantoms. It also aims at studying the efficiency considering the biodistribution of a set of radionuclides of interest incorporated in the scope of environmental and occupational exposures (inhalation and ingestion) and at computing the time-dependent efficiency correction factors to account for the biodistribution variation over time. For the purpose, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to simulate the whole-body counting efficiencies and biokinetic models were used to estimate the radionuclides' biokinetic behaviour in the human body after intake. The comparison between the efficiencies obtained with BOMAB and the voxel phantom showed deviations between 1.8 and 11.7 %, proving the adequacy of the BOMAB for WBC calibration. The obtained correction factors show that the effect of the biodistribution in the whole-body counting efficiency is more pronounced in cases of acute activity uptake and long-term retention in certain organs than in cases of homogeneous distribution in body tissues, for which the biokinetics influence can be neglected. This work further proves the powerful combination of MC simulation methods using voxel phantoms and

  14. Graphical Rasch models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Svend; Christensen, Karl Bang

    Rasch models; Partial Credit models; Rating Scale models; Item bias; Differential item functioning; Local independence; Graphical models......Rasch models; Partial Credit models; Rating Scale models; Item bias; Differential item functioning; Local independence; Graphical models...

  15. Stereometric Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, P.

    2012-07-01

    These mandatory guidelines are provided for preparation of papers accepted for publication in the series of Volumes of The The stereometric modelling means modelling achieved with : - the use of a pair of virtual cameras, with parallel axes and positioned at a mutual distance average of 1/10 of the distance camera-object (in practice the realization and use of a stereometric camera in the modeling program); - the shot visualization in two distinct windows - the stereoscopic viewing of the shot while modelling. Since the definition of "3D vision" is inaccurately referred to as the simple perspective of an object, it is required to add the word stereo so that "3D stereo vision " shall stand for "three-dimensional view" and ,therefore, measure the width, height and depth of the surveyed image. Thanks to the development of a stereo metric model , either real or virtual, through the "materialization", either real or virtual, of the optical-stereo metric model made visible with a stereoscope. It is feasible a continuous on line updating of the cultural heritage with the help of photogrammetry and stereometric modelling. The catalogue of the Architectonic Photogrammetry Laboratory of Politecnico di Bari is available on line at: http://rappresentazione.stereofot.it:591/StereoFot/FMPro?-db=StereoFot.fp5&-lay=Scheda&-format=cerca.htm&-view

  16. Model theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, Wilfrid

    1993-01-01

    An up-to-date and integrated introduction to model theory, designed to be used for graduate courses (for students who are familiar with first-order logic), and as a reference for more experienced logicians and mathematicians.

  17. Modeling Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Veitzer, Seth; Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gra- dient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  18. Paleoclimate Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Computer simulations of past climate. Variables provided as model output are described by parameter keyword. In some cases the parameter keywords are a subset of...

  19. MHD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author's goal is to provide a physical understanding of the ideal MHD model which includes: (1) a basic description of the model, (2) a derivation starting from a more fundamental kinetic model, and (3) a discussion of its range of validity. The ideal MHD model is a single-fluid model that describes the effects of magnetic geometry on the macroscopic equilibrium and stability properties of fusion plasmas. The model is derived in a straight forward manner by forming the mass, momentum, and energy moments of the Boltzmann equation. The moment equations reduce to ideal MHD with the introduction of three critical assumptions: high collisionality, small ion gyro radius, and small resistivity. An analysis of the validity conditions shows that the collision-dominated assumption is never satisfied in plasmas of fusion interest. The remaining two conditions are satisfied by a wide margin. A careful examination of the collision-dominated assumption shows that those particular parts of ideal MHD treated inaccurately (i.e., the parallel momentum and energy equations), play little, if any practical role in MHD equilibrium and stability. These equations primarily describe compression and expansion of a plasma whereas most MHD instabilities involve incompressible motions. The model is incorrect only where it does not matter. This realization leads to the introduction of a modified MHD model known as collisionless MHD which makes predictions nearly identical to collision-dominated assumption. It is thus valid for plasmas of fusion interest. The derivation follows from an analysis of single-particle guiding center motion in a collisionless plasma and the subsequent closure of the system by the heuristic assumption that the motions of interest are incompressible

  20. Accelerated life models modeling and statistical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bagdonavicius, Vilijandas

    2001-01-01

    Failure Time DistributionsIntroductionParametric Classes of Failure Time DistributionsAccelerated Life ModelsIntroductionGeneralized Sedyakin's ModelAccelerated Failure Time ModelProportional Hazards ModelGeneralized Proportional Hazards ModelsGeneralized Additive and Additive-Multiplicative Hazards ModelsChanging Shape and Scale ModelsGeneralizationsModels Including Switch-Up and Cycling EffectsHeredity HypothesisSummaryAccelerated Degradation ModelsIntroductionDegradation ModelsModeling the Influence of Explanatory Varia

  1. Model fit and model selection

    OpenAIRE

    Kocherlakota, Narayana R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses an example to show that a model that fits the available data perfectly may provide worse answers to policy questions than an alternative, imperfectly fitting model. The author argues that, in the context of Bayesian estimation, this result can be interpreted as being due to the use of an inappropriate prior over the parameters of shock processes. He urges the use of priors that are obtained from explicit auxiliary information, not from the desire to obtain identification.

  2. Model composition in model checking

    OpenAIRE

    Felscher, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Model-checking allows one to formally check properties of systems: these properties are modeled as logic formulas and the systems as structures like transition systems. These transition systems are often composed, i.e., they arise in form of products or sums. The composition technique allows us to deduce the truth of a formula in the composed system from "interface information": the truth of formulas for the component systems and information in which components which of these formulas hold. W...

  3. Analog model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to devices for modelling the space-dependent kinetics of a nuclear reactor. It can be advantageously used in studying the dynamics of the neutron field in the core to determine the effect of the control rods on the power distribution in the core, for training purposes. The proposed analog model of a nuclear reactor comprises operational amplifiers and a grid of resistors simulating neutron diffusion. Connected to the grid nodes are supply resistors modelling absorption and multiplication of neutrons. This is achieved by that, in the proposed model, all resistors through which power is supplied to the grid nodes are interconnected by their other leads and coupled to the output of the amplifier unit common for all nodes. Therewith, the amlifier unit models the transfer function of a ''point'' reactor. Connected to the input of this unit which includes two to four amplifiers are resistors for addition of signals with a grid node. Coupled to the grid nodes via additional resistors are voltage sources simulating reactivity

  4. Lens Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory of probabil......Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory of...... probabilistic functionalism, and concerns the environment and the mind, and adaptation by the latter to the former. This entry is about the lens model, and probabilistic functionalism more broadly. Focus will mostly be on firms and their employees, but, to fully appreciate the scope, we have to keep in mind the...

  5. Persistent Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between representation and the represented is examined here through the notion of persistent modelling. This notion is not novel to the activity of architectural design if it is considered as describing a continued active and iterative engagement with design concerns – an evident...... characteristic of architectural practice. But the persistence in persistent modelling can also be understood to apply in other ways, reflecting and anticipating extended roles for representation. This book identifies three principle areas in which these extensions are becoming apparent within contemporary....... It also provides critical insight into the use of contemporary modelling tools and methods, together with an examination of the implications their use has within the territories of architectural design, realisation and experience....

  6. Modelling Defiguration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork Petersen, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    focus centres on how the catwalk scenography evokes a ‘defiguration’ of the walking models and to what effect. Vibskov’s mobile catwalk draws attention to the walk, which is a key element of models’ performance but which usually functions in fashion shows merely to present clothes in the most...... advantageous manner. Stepping on the catwalk’s sloping, moving surfaces decelerates the models’ walk and makes it cautious, hesitant and shaky: suddenly the models lack exactly the affirmative, staccato, striving quality of motion, and the condescending expression that they perform on most contemporary...... determines the models’ walk. Furthermore, letting the models set off sound through triggers with attached sound samples gives them an implied agency. This calls into question the designer’s unrestricted authorship....

  7. Inflatable Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Vasily Volkov

    2006-01-01

    A physically-based model is presented for the simulation of a new type of deformable objects-inflatable objects, such as shaped balloons, which consist of pressurized air enclosed by an elastic surface. These objects have properties inherent in both 3D and 2D elastic bodies, as they demonstrate the behaviour of 3D shapes using 2D formulations. As there is no internal structure in them, their behaviour is substantially different from the behaviour of deformable solid objects. We use one of the few available models for deformable surfaces, and enhance it to include the forces of internal and external pressure. These pressure forces may also incorporate buoyancy forces, to allow objects filled with a low density gas to float in denser media. The obtained models demonstrate rich dynamic behaviour, such as bouncing, floating, deflation and inflation.

  8. Supernova models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the 56Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed

  9. Molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported by the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  10. Cheating models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnoldi, Jakob

    The article discusses the use of algorithmic models for so-called High Frequency Trading (HFT) in finance. HFT is controversial yet widespread in modern financial markets. It is a form of automated trading technology which critics among other things claim can lead to market manipulation. Drawing on...... two cases, this article shows that manipulation more likely happens in the reverse way, meaning that human traders attempt to make algorithms ‘make mistakes’ or ‘mislead’ algos. Thus, it is algorithmic models, not humans, that are manipulated. Such manipulation poses challenges for security exchanges...

  11. Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When you submit the form on this page, which includes your email address

  12. Modelling language

    CERN Document Server

    Cardey, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    In response to the need for reliable results from natural language processing, this book presents an original way of decomposing a language(s) in a microscopic manner by means of intra/inter‑language norms and divergences, going progressively from languages as systems to the linguistic, mathematical and computational models, which being based on a constructive approach are inherently traceable. Languages are described with their elements aggregating or repelling each other to form viable interrelated micro‑systems. The abstract model, which contrary to the current state of the art works in int

  13. Smashnova Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaram, C.

    2007-01-01

    An alternate model for gamma ray bursts is suggested. For a white dwarf (WD) and neutron star (NS) very close binary system, the WD (close to Mch) can detonate due to tidal heating, leading to a SN. Material falling on to the NS at relativistic velocities can cause its collapse to a magnetar or quark star or black hole leading to a GRB. As the material smashes on to the NS, it is dubbed the Smashnova model. Here the SN is followed by a GRB. NS impacting a RG (or RSG) (like in Thorne-Zytkow ob...

  14. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  15. Modeling Minds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, John

    others' minds. Then (2), in order to bring to light some possible justifications, as well as hazards and criticisms of the methodology of looking time tests, I will take a closer look at the concept of folk psychology and will focus on the idea that folk psychology involves using oneself as a model of...

  16. Why Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eWolkenhauer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a renaissance of mining approaches. A comprehensive picture of the genetic landscape of an individual patient will be useful, for example, to identify groups of patients that do or do not respond to certain therapies. The high expectations may however not be satisfied if the number of patient groups with similar characteristics is going to be very large. I therefore doubt that mining sequence data will give us an understanding of why and when therapies work. For understanding the mechanisms underlying diseases, an alternative approach is to model small networks in quantitative mechanistic detail, to elucidate the role of gene and proteins in dynamically changing the functioning of cells. Here an obvious critique is that these models consider too few components, compared to what might be relevant for any particular cell function. I show here that mining approaches and dynamical systems theory are two ends of a spectrum of methodologies to choose from. Drawing upon personal experience in numerous interdisciplinary collaborations, I provide guidance on how to model by discussing the question Why model?

  17. Painting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  18. Logic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the NSPCC/University of Edinburgh Child Protection Research Centre. It highlights the Centre's work, approach, progress to date and direction of travel. The document includes the Centre's Logic Model which details types of research and outcomes.

  19. Transport modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ There has been remarkable progress during the past decade in understanding and modeling turbulent transport in tokamaks. With some exceptions the progress is derived from the huge increases in computational power and the ability to simulate tokamak turbulence with ever more fundamental and physically realistic dynamical equations, e.g.

  20. Model CAPM

    OpenAIRE

    Burianová, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Cílem první části této bakalářské práce je - pomocí analýzy výchozích textů - teoretické shrnutí ekonomických modelů a teorií, na kterých model CAPM stojí: Markowitzův model teorie portfolia (analýza maximalizace očekávaného užitku a na něm založený model výběru optimálního portfolia), Tobina (rozšíření Markowitzova modelu ? rozdělení výběru optimálního portfolia do dvou fází; nejprve určení optimální kombinace rizikových instrumentů a následná alokace dostupného kapitálu mezi tuto optimální ...

  1. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten S.; Frigaard, Peter

    In the following, results from model tests with Zeebrugge breakwater are presented. The objective with these tests is partly to investigate the influence on wave run-up due to a changing waterlevel during a storm. Finally, the influence on wave run-up due to an introduced longshore current is...

  2. Modelling Entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Bosma (Niels); G. de Wit (Gerrit); M.A. Carree (Martin)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTwo approaches can be distinguished with respect to modelling entrepreneurship: (i) the approach focusing on the net development of the number of entrepreneurs in an equilibrium framework and (ii) the approach focusing on the entries and exits of entrepreneurs. In this paper we unify the

  3. Criticality Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  4. Criticality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of

  5. Information Model for Product Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦国方; 刘慎权

    1992-01-01

    The Key problems in product modeling for integrated CAD ∥CAM systems are the information structures and representations of products.They are taking more and more important roles in engineering applications.With the investigation on engineering product information and from the viewpoint of industrial process,in this paper,the information models are proposed and the definitions of the framework of product information are given.And then,the integration and the consistence of product information are discussed by introucing the entity and its instance.As a summary,the information structures described in this paper have many advantage and natures helpful in engineering design.

  6. Molecular Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important
    tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and
    the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to tailored to
    decrease harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques
    employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modelling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported from
    the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  7. Leadership model

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Leandro S.; José Fernando A. Cruz; Ferreira, Helena Isabel dos Santos Ribeiro; Pinto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior studies the decision-making mechanisms of individuals. We propose the Nash Equilibria as one, of many, possible mechanisms of transforming human intentions in behavior. This process corresponds to the best strategic individual decision taking in account the collective response. We built a game theoretical model to understand the role of leaders in decision-making of individuals or groups. We study the characteristics of the leaders that can have a...

  8. Model Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde, Merlise; George, Edward I.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of Bayesian approaches for model uncertainty over the past decade has been remarkable. Catalyzed by advances in methods and technology for posterior computation, the scope of these methods has widened substantially. Major thrusts of these developments have included new methods for semiautomatic prior specification and posterior exploration. To illustrate key aspects of this evolution, the highlights of some of these developments are described.

  9. Supersymmetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture was given at the KEK Summer School on August 3-6, 1993 by Professor N. Sakai. All the available experimental data at low energy can be adequately described by the standard model with SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) gauge group. The three different gauge coupling constants originate from the three different interactions, namely, strong, weak and electromagnetic interactions. The three interactions described by the three different gauge groups can be truly unified into a single gauge group if a simple gauge group to describe all three interactions is chosen. Even if the grand unified theory is not accepted, the existence of gravitational interaction is sure. There are only two options to explain the gauge hierarchy, that is, technicolor model and supersymmetry. As the introduction to supersymmetry, Spinors and Grassmann number, Supertransformation, unitary representation, chiral scalar superfield and supersymmetric Lagrangian field theory are explained. Regarding the supersymmetric SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) model, Yukawa coupling and particle content are described. It should be noted that the Higgsino (chiral fermions associated with Higgs scalar) in general introduces anomaly in gauge currents. The simplest way out of such anomaly problem is to introduce Higgsino doublet in pair. (K.I.)

  10. Modeling biomembranes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plimpton, Steven James; Heffernan, Julieanne; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Frink, Laura J. Douglas

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the properties and behavior of biomembranes is fundamental to many biological processes and technologies. Microdomains in biomembranes or ''lipid rafts'' are now known to be an integral part of cell signaling, vesicle formation, fusion processes, protein trafficking, and viral and toxin infection processes. Understanding how microdomains form, how they depend on membrane constituents, and how they act not only has biological implications, but also will impact Sandia's effort in development of membranes that structurally adapt to their environment in a controlled manner. To provide such understanding, we created physically-based models of biomembranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT) calculations using these models were applied to phenomena such as microdomain formation, membrane fusion, pattern formation, and protein insertion. Because lipid dynamics and self-organization in membranes occur on length and time scales beyond atomistic MD, we used coarse-grained models of double tail lipid molecules that spontaneously self-assemble into bilayers. DFT provided equilibrium information on membrane structure. Experimental work was performed to further help elucidate the fundamental membrane organization principles.

  11. Ozone modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exhaust gases from power plants that burn fossil fuels contain concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitric oxide (NO), particulate matter, hydrocarbon compounds and trace metals. Estimated emissions from the operation of a hypothetical 500 MW coal-fired power plant are given. Ozone is considered a secondary pollutant, since it is not emitted directly into the atmosphere but is formed from other air pollutants, specifically, nitrogen oxides (NO), and non-methane organic compounds (NMOQ) in the presence of sunlight. (NMOC are sometimes referred to as hydrocarbons, HC, or volatile organic compounds, VOC, and they may or may not include methane). Additionally, ozone formation Alternative is a function of the ratio of NMOC concentrations to NOx concentrations. A typical ozone isopleth is shown, generated with the Empirical Kinetic Modeling Approach (EKMA) option of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Ozone Isopleth Plotting Mechanism (OZIPM-4) model. Ozone isopleth diagrams, originally generated with smog chamber data, are more commonly generated with photochemical reaction mechanisms and tested against smog chamber data. The shape of the isopleth curves is a function of the region (i.e. background conditions) where ozone concentrations are simulated. The location of an ozone concentration on the isopleth diagram is defined by the ratio of NMOC and NOx coordinates of the point, known as the NMOC/NOx ratio. Results obtained by the described model are presented

  12. Technological Forecasting---Model Selection, Model Stability, and Combining Models

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel Meade; Towhidul Islam

    1998-01-01

    The paper identifies 29 models that the literature suggests are appropriate for technological forecasting. These models are divided into three classes according to the timing of the point of inflexion in the innovation or substitution process. Faced with a given data set and such a choice, the issue of model selection needs to be addressed. Evidence used to aid model selection is drawn from measures of model fit and model stability. An analysis of the forecasting performance of these models u...

  13. Model Construct Based Enterprise Model Architecture and Its Modeling Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to support enterprise integration, a kind of model construct based enterprise model architecture and its modeling approach are studied in this paper. First, the structural makeup and internal relationships of enterprise model architecture are discussed. Then, the concept of reusable model construct (MC) which belongs to the control view and can help to derive other views is proposed. The modeling approach based on model construct consists of three steps, reference model architecture synthesis, enterprise model customization, system design and implementation. According to MC based modeling approach a case study with the background of one-kind-product machinery manufacturing enterprises is illustrated. It is shown that proposal model construct based enterprise model architecture and modeling approach are practical and efficient.

  14. Numerical models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Manoj, N.T.

    the wetted perimeter and A the area of cross section (excluding mud flats); C = (1.49/n)R1/6, where n is the Manning coefficient. The numerical scheme used by Harleman and Lee (1969) was used to solve the above equations. In this scheme, the continuity... equation is solved at odd grid points to compute eta at the next time step and the momentum equation is solved at even grid points to compute U . The original scheme of Harleman & Lee (1969) was developed for a single channel. For developing a model...

  15. A Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhiyang

    2011-01-01

    Similar to ISO Technical Committees,SAC Technical Committees undertake the management and coordination of standard's development and amendments in various sectors in industry,playing the role as a bridge among enterprises,research institutions and the governmental standardization administration.How to fully play the essential role is the vital issue SAC has been committing to resolve.Among hundreds of SAC TCs,one stands out in knitting together those isolated,scattered,but highly competitive enterprises in the same industry with the "Standards" thread,and achieving remarkable results in promoting industry development with standardization.It sets a role model for other TCs.

  16. The work of Committee 2 of ICRP in developing dose coefficients for the embryo and fetus following intakes of radionuclides by the mother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection has the responsibility for calculating radiation doses from intakes of radionuclides for all age groups in the population. This includes the development of models for calculating doses to the embryo and fetus following intakes of radionuclides by the mother. The development of both biokinetic and dosimetric models are reviewed and the results of preliminary dose calculations presented. (orig.)

  17. Energy Metabolism and Human Dosimetry of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of current revision of human dosimetry of 14C and tritium, undertaken by the International Commission of Radiological Protection, we propose a novel approach based on energy metabolism and a simple biokinetic model for the dynamics of dietary intake (organic 14C, tritiated water and Organically Bound Tritium-OBT). The model predicts increased doses for HTO and OBT comparing to ICRP recommendations, supporting recent findings

  18. 铅暴露对人体健康风险评价的模型综述∗%Review on models for lead exposure on human health risk assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张园; 耿春女; 蔡超

    2013-01-01

      铅是一种在暴露环境下,可以通过手口途径或者皮肤接触而进入人体,从而对人体许多组织器官都产生毒性作用的重金属,其对儿童的危害尤为突出。我国对暴露在铅环境下人体健康的风险评价研究起步较晚,基于血铅指标的铅污染土壤风险评估方法导则仍在探讨建立中。而国外已经存在一些较为成熟的用于成人及儿童的铅暴露吸收和生物动力学模型,其中被广泛接受和使用的是成人血铅模型(ALM)以及儿童在铅中的综合暴露吸收生物动力学模型(IEUBK)。前者描述了关于非居住区土壤中铅暴露物对成人风险的评估,且重点针对污染土壤的铅暴露物所导致的孕妇体内胎儿的血铅浓度进行评估;后者则重点预测6—84个月的儿童在铅的综合暴露下的健康风险。本文旨在通过对这些模型进行对比总结,从而提出可用于我国铅污染风险评估的理论依据及指导方法。%Lead is a heavy metal with toxic effect and widespread in the environment. It may enter the human blood through hand / mouth way or skin contact, thus produce toxic effect on many human organs. Lead exposures were demonstrated to be more harmful to children′s health. However, the research of lead exposure on human health risk assessment has just been carried out in China. Moreover, risk assessment method of lead pollution in soil based on the blood lead target was not established until now. Some bio-dynamic models have been developed to describe the lead exposure to adults and children in several foreign countries. The most widely accepted and used ones are the adult blood lead model (ALM), and the integrated exposure uptake biokinetic model (IEUBK). The former describes risk assessment of lead exposure in soil to the adults who are in the non-residential area, and it focuses on the fetal blood lead concentrations in the body. The latter model emphasizes the health risk

  19. From model checking to model measuring

    OpenAIRE

    Henzinger, Thomas A.; Otop, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We define the model-measuring problem: given a model $M$ and specification~$\\varphi$, what is the maximal distance $\\rho$ such that all models $M'$ within distance $\\rho$ from $M$ satisfy (or violate)~$\\varphi$. The model measuring problem presupposes a distance function on models. We concentrate on automatic distance functions, which are defined by weighted automata. The model-measuring problem subsumes several generalizations of the classical model-checking problem, in particular, qu...

  20. Internal dose coefficients for off-site radiological consequence analysis of nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OSCAAR computer code for use in probabilistic accident consequence assessment (Level 3PSA) developed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has calculated dose to the public with internal dose conversion factors based on dosimetric models and biokinetic data provided in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30. Since ICRP issued age-dependent biokinetic models for a limited set of radioisotopes are ICRP Publication 56, a new Human Respiratory Tract model, age-dependent biokinetic model for other radioisotopes and urinary and faecal excretion models were issued. ICRP has published age-dependent internal dose coefficients for a large set of radionuclides in its publications, but they provided only committed effective dose coefficients for inhalation and ingestion. Since OSCAAR estimated acute and late health effects for members of the public, it needs internal dose coefficients for specific tissues and organs in arbitrary integration times. This report describes a preprocessor code DSYS developed for use with OSCAAR for calculating inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients based on these new ICRP models. It also provides the internal dose coefficients for 54 radionuclides used in OSCAAR calculations. (author)

  1. Fermentation and growth kinetic study of Aeromonas caviae under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Jaai; Hwang, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2009-06-01

    Although Aeromonas caviae is pathogenic to a broad range of invertebrates including human, frequent in aquatic environments, and potentially vital for acidogenesis in anaerobic digestion, virtually no biokinetic information on its anaerobic growth is at hand. Therefore, this study focused on evaluating its anaerobic growth kinetics on glucose. To provide a set of relevant biokinetic coefficients for modeling, a combination of curve fitting and numerical modeling was used. Microcultivations were performed at eight different initial glucose concentrations of 0.1 to 2.5 g l(-1) to establish a function of specific growth rate versus substrate concentration. A batch anaerobic bioreactor was then operated to collect a data set for the numerical analysis. Kinetic coefficients were estimated from three different biomass growth profiles monitored by optical density, volatile suspended solids (VSS), or DNA measurement, and applied for simulating continuous operations at various hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Assuming the influent glucose concentration is 5,000 mg l(-1), the substrate utilization efficiency predicted to be 77.2% to 92.0% at 17 to 36 h HRTs. For the VSS-model-based simulation, the washout HRT was estimated to be 16.6 h, and similar for the other models. Overall, the anaerobic biokinetic coefficients of A. caviae grown on glucose were successfully estimated and found to follow a substrate inhibition model. PMID:19343339

  2. Internal dosimetry for intake of 18FDG using spot urine sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear medicine, workers handle unsealed radioactive materials. Among the materials, 18FDG is the most widely used in PET/CT technique. Because of the short half-life of 18F, it is very challenging to monitor internal exposure of nuclear medicine workers using in vitro bioassay. Thus, the authors developed the new in vitro bioassay methodology for short half-life nuclides. In the methodology, spot urine sample is directly used without normalisation to 1-d urine sample and the spot urinary excretion function was newly proposed. In order to estimate the intake and committed dose for workers dealing 18FDG, biokinetic models for FDG was also developed. Using the new methodology and biokinetic model, the in vitro bioassay for workers dealing 18FDG was successfully performed. The authors expect that this methodology will be very useful for internal monitoring of workers who deal short-lived radionuclides in the all field as well as the nuclear medicine field. (authors)

  3. Age-dependent dosimetry and metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of radionuclides into the environment following the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 created an urgent need for internationally acceptable dose coefficients for calculating the doses delivered to all members of the public, from conception to old age. Organ masses and the kinetics of distribution and retention of elements in humans generally vary with age and often not in simple linear relationship to body weight. Unless variations are considered calculated radiation doses to children may be seriously underestimated. The International Commission on Radiological Protection created in 1987 a Task Group on Age-dependent Doses to Members of the Public from Intake of Radionuclides (AGDOS). The work of AGDOS and the general problems encountered in deriving age-dependent dose coefficients will be discussed in this paper. The first two AGDOS reports, ICRP Publication 56 Parts 1 and 2, provide dose coefficients for the ages 3 months, 1, 5, 10, 15 years and for adults for the 21 elements considered to be of most immediate importance for radiation protection. To develop these dose coefficients, the ICRP Publication 30 dosimetric and biokinetic models were reevaluated and extended. The basic dosimetric model is retained but equivalent dose is now integrated from age at intake to 70 years and the new ICRP Publication 60 tissue weighting factors are incorporated. The development of age-dependent biokinetic models is complicated by the lack of age-related human, or even animal data for the majority of the elements. Thus in formulating the models it has been necessary to use all the available information, biokinetic, physiological chemical and biochemical, and to adopt a number of new approaches including the development of generic biokinetic models for chemically related families of elements such as the actinides and the alkaline earth elements. (author)

  4. ModelWizard: Toward Interactive Model Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchison, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Data scientists engage in model construction to discover machine learning models that well explain a dataset, in terms of predictiveness, understandability and generalization across domains. Questions such as "what if we model common cause Z" and "what if Y's dependence on X reverses" inspire many candidate models to consider and compare, yet current tools emphasize constructing a final model all at once. To more naturally reflect exploration when debating numerous models, we propose an inter...

  5. Towards a Multi Business Model Innovation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the evolution of business model (BM) innovations related to a multi business model framework. The paper tries to answer the research questions: • What are the requirements for a multi business model innovation model (BMIM)? • How should a multi business model innovation model...... look like? Different generations of BMIMs are initially studied in the context of laying the baseline for how next generation multi BM Innovation model (BMIM) should look like. All generations of models are analyzed with the purpose of comparing the characteristics and challenges of previous...

  6. Better Language Models with Model Merging

    CERN Document Server

    Brants, T

    1996-01-01

    This paper investigates model merging, a technique for deriving Markov models from text or speech corpora. Models are derived by starting with a large and specific model and by successively combining states to build smaller and more general models. We present methods to reduce the time complexity of the algorithm and report on experiments on deriving language models for a speech recognition task. The experiments show the advantage of model merging over the standard bigram approach. The merged model assigns a lower perplexity to the test set and uses considerably fewer states.

  7. Impedance model for nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Akhmedov

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of the impedance model for nanoelectronic quantum-mechanical structures modelling is described. Characteristics illustrating the efficiency of the model are presented.

  8. A multiple endpoint approach to predict the hepatotoxicity of pharmaceuticals in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Truisi, Germaine Loredana

    2014-01-01

    A new approach was evaluated to predict the hepatotoxic potential of pharmaceuticals. For this purpose, primary rat and human hepatocytes cultured in an optimised sandwich configuration were used; thus, allowing the long-term, repeat-dosing of drugs. The strategy based on the evaluation of multiple endpoints, including cytotoxicity, biokinetic profiling, transcriptomics and proteomics. Pharmaceuticals with known toxicities and pharmacokinetic properties were used as model compounds.

  9. Bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Mielke, H.; Bennett, J. [and others

    1996-05-02

    This project looks the following: what environmental conditions are necessary for enhancement of natural biodegradation processes and whether it is feasible to apply the technology developed to field conditions; development of a user friendly biokinetic model applicable to field conditions; effectiveness of new fungal isolate Maramius against heavy metals and chlorinated hydrocarbons; incorporation of inorganic and organic data into the GIS database; development of an integrated approach to remediation. 10 refs.

  10. Radiation doses from some [3H]-labelled organic compounds following ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published information, especially human data, on the biokinetics of 11 compounds labelled with 3H was used to develop simple, cautious compound-specific models and to calculate both tissue absorbed doses and effective doses using the OLINDA computer code. The compounds were [3H]-cortisol, 3α-Hydroxy-5β-pregnane-11, 20-dione-7-[3H], cyclic 20 trimethylene acetal, [3H]-ifetroban, [3H]-digoxin, 7-[2'-α- methylphenyl-ethylamino[3H

  11. Building Mental Models by Dissecting Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to…

  12. From Product Models to Product State Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Holm

    1999-01-01

    A well-known technology designed to handle product data is Product Models. Product Models are in their current form not able to handle all types of product state information. Hence, the concept of a Product State Model (PSM) is proposed. The PSM and in particular how to model a PSM is the Research...

  13. The IMACLIM model; Le modele IMACLIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document provides annexes to the IMACLIM model which propose an actualized description of IMACLIM, model allowing the design of an evaluation tool of the greenhouse gases reduction policies. The model is described in a version coupled with the POLES, technical and economical model of the energy industry. Notations, equations, sources, processing and specifications are proposed and detailed. (A.L.B.)

  14. Global Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten

    insight from the literature about business models, international product policy, international entry modes and globalization into a conceptual model of relevant design elements of global business models, enabling global business model innovation to deal with differences in a downstream perspective...

  15. Forward model nonlinearity versus inverse model nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, S.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of concern is the impact of forward model nonlinearity on the nonlinearity of the inverse model. The question posed is, "Does increased nonlinearity in the head solution (forward model) always result in increased nonlinearity in the inverse solution (estimation of hydraulic conductivity)?" It is shown that the two nonlinearities are separate, and it is not universally true that increased forward model nonlinearity increases inverse model nonlinearity. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  16. An experimental study of americium-241 biokinetics in the Lobster Homarus Gammarus. Analysis of the accumulation/storage and detoxification processes at the subcellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study of americium-241 kinetics has been conducted in the lobster Homarus gammmarus. The investigations were conducted at all the levels from the whole body to the subcellular and molecular levels. The animals were contaminated by a single or chronic ingestion of 241 Am labelled mussels. Assessments of accumulation, elimination and distribution of the radionuclide were established on organisms kept in the laboratory; they made it possible to demonstrate the importance of the digestive gland in the radionuclide transfer pathways. The preliminary results led to structural then ultrastructural investigations of the digestive gland in association with radioautographic studies and cellular extractions methods. Four cellular types were demonstrated, only two of them being implied in the radionuclide retention, the former being responsible for americium intake and the latter for its long-term retention. By means of biochemical techniques, subcellular accumulation was studied and the organelles implied in the nuclide retention were specified. Finally, a method of cellular nuclei dissociation was developed; it made it possible to analyse the molecular nature of americium ligands and to demonstrate the function of the protein nuclear matrix in the nuclide retention

  17. Biokinetics of cadmium, selenium, and zinc in freshwater alga Scenedesmus obliquus under different phosphorus and nitrogen conditions and metal transfer to Daphnia magna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of Cd, Se(IV) and Zn by the freshwater alga Scenedesmus obliquus and the subsequent transfer and release budget in Daphnia magna were investigated under different nutrient additions and cell incubation conditions. An increase in ambient phosphate concentrations from 0.5 μmol l-1 to 50 μmol l-1 significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of Cd (by 18x) and Zn (by 5x), but decreased the accumulation of Se (by 126x) in the alga. The percentage of these metals distributing in the intracellular pool of algae also increased substantially with increasing ambient P concentrations. Nitrate addition from 5.0 to 200 μmol l-1 did not influence the uptake of any of the three metals, although a significant decrease in the intracellular Se distribution was observed. Radiolabeled algae under different nutrient manipulations (semi-continuous culture, starvation, and P-pulse treatments) were used to measure trophic transfer assimilation efficiency (AE) in Daphnia. When the algal cells were grown in a semi-continuous culture, starved for N and P, or were treated with P-pulse, the AEs of Cd and Zn were generally independent of the nutritional conditions, but the Se AE was significantly affected by different P levels. The efflux rate constants, determined during 10 d depuration following 7 days of dietary uptake, decreased significantly for Cd and Zn, but were relatively constant for Se with increasing P concentration. N-addition caused no effect on the metal efflux rate constants. P- or N-additions did not influence the release budget (including molting, neonates, excretion and feces) for all three elements in Daphnia. Our study indicated that phosphate enrichment may substantially increase metal uptake in green alga S. obliquus. Responses of trophic transfer in Daphnia to nutrient enrichment were metal specific. P-enrichment can possibly lead to considerable decrease on Se transfer from algae to zooplankton. - Phosphorous enrichment influences metal uptake by algae, but not transfer to a zooplankton grazer

  18. The estimation of daily intake and organ content of Cs, I, Sr, Th and U in Indian population: Application to the study of their biokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical methods involving both instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation techniques (INAA and RNAA) are being standardised for the determination of the elements Cs, I, Sr, Th and U in various kinds of biological samples. The sampling method proposed to be adopted for the estimation of the daily dietary intake, of the above elements is described. Also reported in this paper are the preliminary results on the concentrations of these elements in the food ingredients which form important components of the diet of Indian population. (author)

  19. In vivo biokinetic and metabolic characterization of the {sup 68}Ga-labelled α5β1-selective peptidomimetic FR366

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Alessandria, Calogero; Pohle, Karolin; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Rechenmacher, Florian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Kessler, Horst [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) and Center of Integrated Protein Science (CIPSM), Department Chemie, Garching (Germany); Notni, Johannes; Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Pharmazeutische Radiochemie, Garching (Germany); Beer, Ambros J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Ulm University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors responsible for cell-cell adhesion and cell-extracellular matrix binding and play an important role in angiogenesis and tumour metastasis. For this reason, integrins are increasingly used as targets for molecular imaging. Up to now interest has mostly been focused on the integrin subtype αvβ3. However, targeting of other subtypes such as the integrin α5β1 is also of high interest due to its central role in colonization of metastatic cells, resistance of tumour cells to chemotherapy and ionizing radiation, and tumour aggressiveness. Recently, a highly active antagonist ligand (2,2'-(7-(1-carboxy-4-((6-((3-(4-(((S)-1-carboxy-2-(2- (3-guanidinobenzamido)acet amido)ethyl)carbamoyl)-3,5-dimethylphenoxy) propyl)amino)-6-oxohexyl)amino)-4-oxo butyl)-1,4,7-triazonane-1,4-diyl)diacetic acid, FR366) for the integrin subtype α5β1 with high selectivity versus αvβ3, has been developed and tested successfully in preliminary in vitro and in vivo experiments. Here, we present our results of an investigation of the use of {sup 68}Ga-labelled α5β1 ligand in PET imaging. The free α5β1 peptidomimetic ligand was functionalized with a spacer (6-aminohexanoic acid) and the bifunctional chelator 1-((1,3-dicarboxy)propyl) -4,7-(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (NODAGA) to yield FR366 and labelled with {sup 68}Ga. To confirm selective in vivo targeting of α5β1, female BALB/c nude mice xenografted with α5β1-expressing RKO cells in the right shoulder and α5β1/αvβ3-expressing M21 cells in the left shoulder were subjected to PET/CT scans and biodistribution experiments. Specificity of tracer uptake was proven by blocking studies. Metabolic stability of the injected tracer was measured in urine and in plasma. MicroPET/CT scans with radiolabelled FR366 showed a good tumour-to-normal tissue ratio with low uptake in the liver (0.32 ± 0.14 %ID/g) and good retention of {sup 68}Ga-NODAGA-FR366 in the tumour (0.71 ± 0.20 %ID/g and 0.40 ± 0.12 %ID/g for RKO and M21 tumours, respectively, at 90 min after injection). Biodistribution experiments showed uptake in the α5β1-expressing RKO tumour of 1.05 ± 0.23 %ID/g at 90 min after injection. Specificity of tracer uptake was demonstrated by injection of 5 mg/kg unlabelled ligand 10 min prior to tracer injection, resulting in a 67 % reduction in uptake in the RKO tumour. The tracer was found to be metabolically stable in urine and plasma 30 min after injection. Our results show that PET imaging of α5β1 expression with the {sup 68}Ga-labelled α5β1-specific ligand is feasible with good image quality. Thus, FR366 is a promising new tool for investigating the role of α5β1 in angiogenesis and the influence of this integrin subtype on cancer aggressiveness and metastatic potential. (orig.)

  20. Biokinetics and repeated exposure in in vitro assays : A detailed study into the behaviour of chlorpromazine and diazepam in different cell systems

    OpenAIRE

    Broeders, J.J.W.

    2013-01-01

    The potential risk of compounds is commonly assessed with animal experimentation and extrapolation of these data to assess human health effects. The use of Integrated Testing o Strategies combines different methods, including in vitro tests and in silico methods, to perform risk assessment with less costs and less animal experiments. Although alternatives to animal tests have been developed and validated, research into alternatives for certain toxicological endpoints is yet limited. One of th...

  1. Biokinetics and repeated exposure in in vitro assays : A detailed study into the behaviour of chlorpromazine and diazepam in different cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, J.J.W.

    2013-01-01

    The potential risk of compounds is commonly assessed with animal experimentation and extrapolation of these data to assess human health effects. The use of Integrated Testing o Strategies combines different methods, including in vitro tests and in silico methods, to perform risk assessment with less

  2. The biokinetics of four 239Pu/241Am dioxide bearing dusts in the rat after inhalation: the implications for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of the work described here were to provide an experimental basis for evaluating the committed effective dose equivalent per unit intake together with the ALI for four industrial oxide bearing dusts, and to assess the extent to which 241Am could be used for estimating the 239Pu content of the lung after an accidental intake of these materials. (author)

  3. Experimental study of Americium-241 biokinetics in Homarus Gammarus lobster. Analysis of the accumulation and detoxication mechanisms at the sub-cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Americium 241 radioelement accumulation and elimination rate and mechanisms in the lobster organism have been experimentally studied; incorporation and detoxification capacities of each organ are evaluated. The existence of various biological compartments is shown; the major role of the digestive gland in accumulation of the radioelement, its distribution towards the various organs, and its resorption is comprehensively described, with an analysis at the subcellular and molecular levels. 401 p., 65 fig., 43 tab., 428 ref

  4. Modeling for Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Combemale, Benoit; Cheng, Betty H.C.; Moreira, Ana; Bruel, Jean-Michel; Gray, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Various disciplines use models for different purposes. An engineering model, including a software engineering model, is often developed to guide the construction of a non-existent system. A scientific model is created to better understand a natural phenomenon (i.e., an already existing system). An engineering model may incorporate scientific models to build a system. Sustainability is an area that requires both types of models. Both engineering and scientific models have been used to support ...

  5. Rotating universe models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is made of some properties of the rotating Universe models. Godel's model is identified as a generalized filted model. Some properties of new solutions of the Einstein's equations, which are rotating non-stationary Universe models, are presented and analyzed. These models have the Godel's model as a particular case. Non-stationary cosmological models are found which are a generalization of the Godel's metrics in an analogous way in which Friedmann is to the Einstein's model. (L.C.)

  6. Radiation exposure by Tc-99m-methyldiphosphonate - development and use of a biophysical model for the determination of the local dose distribution in growth zones of a child's skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the determination of the data necessary for dose calculations of an intraveneous application of Tc-99m-MDP in children, ages 3 months to 7 years, test data for the biokinetics of MDP in the whole body as well as in body areas with and without radioactive concentrations was determined by the use of a whole body activity counter and a gamma camera. These investigations were supplemented by laboratory data on the radioactive decay of Tc-99m-MDP in blood serum and on the urinary excretion of MDP. For the determination of the target volume of epiphyseal growth areas with radioactive concentrations distortion corrected measurements of the patient from the bone scintographs were compared to the biological data taken from our X-ray images. The radiation exposure of these growth areas was calculated with consideration of results from animal investigations as well as under the assumption that larger target volumes could be present in the patients. In the animal investigations the organ distribution of the MDP at various times after application, along with the biokinetic data of MDP in the whole body was ascertained as well as the distribution along long hollow bones. The calcium distribution was activationally analytically ascertained along long hollow bones in a young and an adult dog. It was attempted in the animal investigations to autoradiographically present the microdistribution of MDP in border regions epiphyseal cartilage/epiphyseal center and epiphyseal cartilage/metaphyseal growth plate. (orig./MG)

  7. Ingestion dose for molybdenum: dependence on the administration form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum is an essential element for living organisms. Moreover its radionuclides may represent an incorporation risk for members of the public and/or radiation workers after a nuclear accident or a release of radioactive materials. However, only few reliable data on Mo biokinetics in humans were available. The results of recent tracer kinetic investigations with stable isotopes have shown several differences from the ICRP data with regard to the processes of intestinal absorption and of excretion. As a consequence, the dose coefficients calculated with a revised biokinetic model deviate from the ICRP estimates. By ingestion of 99Mo radionuclides with solid food, for example, the dose to the colon may be higher of a factor up to 1 order of magnitude, due to the fraction of non-absorbed material which traverses the gastro-intestinal tract. (orig.)

  8. The effect of isotope on the dosimetry of inhaled plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experimental studies in which animals inhaled 238PuO2 or 239PuO2 aerosols have shown that the biokinetics and associated radiation dose patterns for these two isotopes differ significantly due to differences in in-vivo solubility caused by the 260-fold difference in specific activity between 238PuO2 and 239PuO2. We have adapted a biokinetics and dosimetry model derived from results of the ITRI dog studies to humans and have calculated dose commitments and annual limits on intake (ALI) for both Pu isotopes. Our results show that the ALI calculated in this study is one-third that for class Y 238Pu from ICRP 30, and one-half or equal to that for class Y 239Pu, depending on how activity in the thoracic lymph nodes is treated dosimetrically

  9. Effect of the kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidation on nitritation success or failure for different biofilm reactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biokinetics on nitritation was investigated in two biofilm geometries, the Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) and a conventional biofilm system. A 1D biofilm model was used and evaluated by global sensitivity analysis using the variance based Sobol method. The main focus was on...... the influence of key biokinetic parameters (maximum specific growth rates, oxygen and nitrogen affinity constants of AOB (ammonium oxidizing bacteria) and NOB (nitrite oxidizing bacteria)) and their ratios on nitritation efficiency in these geometries. This exhaustive simulation study revealed that...... nitritation strongly depends on the chosen kinetic parameters of AOB and NOB. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax,AOB and μmax,NOB) had the strongest impact on nitritation efficiency (NE). In comparison, the counter-diffusion geometry yielded more parameter combinations (27.5%) that resulted in high NE...

  10. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries are unique parallel research programs devoted to the study of the actinide elements in man. The primary mission of the Registries is to verify and ensure the adequacy and applicability of radiation protection standards for the actinides. To accomplish this task, the Registries utilize tissues obtained postmortem from informed volunteer donors with confirmed or high likelihood of exposure to plutonium, americium, or other actinides. These are collected at autopsy and radiochemically analyzed for actinide content. The results, along with relevant details of occupational and exposure history, medical history and health physics data are used to determine the distribution, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinides in humans, and to correlate estimates of deposition and dose made during life with postmortem findings. Other important applications of the Registries' research is scaling of animal studies to man and validation or refinement of biokinetic models on which the safety standards are based

  11. Concept Modeling vs. Data modeling in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bodil Nistrup; Erdman Thomsen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    This chapter shows the usefulness of terminological concept modeling as a first step in data modeling. First, we introduce terminological concept modeling with terminological ontologies, i.e. concept systems enriched with characteristics modeled as feature specifications. This enables a formal...... account of the inheritance of characteristics and allows us to introduce a number of principles and constraints which render concept modeling more coherent than earlier approaches. Second, we explain how terminological ontologies can be used as the basis for developing conceptual and logical data models....... We also show how to map from the various elements in the terminological ontology to elements in the data models, and explain the differences between the models. Finally the usefulness of terminological ontologies as a prerequisite for IT development and data modeling is illustrated with examples from...

  12. Modelling of Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application of the l......This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application...

  13. Current activities in the ICRP concerning estimation of radiation doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Task Group within the ICRP Committees 2 and 3 is continuously working to improve absorbed dose estimates to patients investigated with radiopharmaceuticals. The work deals with reviews of the literature, initiation of new or complementary studies of the biokinetics of a compound and dose estimates. Absorbed dose calculations for organs and tissues have up to now been carried out using the MIRD formalism. There is still a lack of necessary biokinetic data from measurements in humans. More time series obtained by nuclear medicine imaging techniques such as whole-body planar gamma-camera imaging, SPECT or PET are highly desirable for this purpose. In 2008, a new addendum to ICRP Publication 53 was published under the name of ICRP Publication 106 containing biokinetic data and absorbed dose information to organs and tissues of patients of various ages for radiopharmaceuticals in common use. That report also covers a number of generic models and realistic maximum models covering other large groups of substances (e.g. 123I-brain receptor substances). Together with ICRP Publication 80, most radiopharmaceuticals in clinical use at the time of publication were covered except the radioiodine labeled compounds for which the ICRP dose estimates are still found in Publication 53. There is an increasing use of new radiopharmaceuticals, especially PET-tracers and the TG has recently finished its work with biokinetic and dosimetric data for 18F-FET, 18F-FLT and 18F-choline. The work continues now with new data for 11C-raclopride, 11C-PiB and 123I-ioflupan as well as re-evaluation of published data for 82Rb-chloride, 18F-fluoride and radioiodide. This paper summarises published ICRP-information on dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals and gives some preliminary data for substances under review.

  14. Optimal predictive model selection

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Maria Maddalena; Berger, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Often the goal of model selection is to choose a model for future prediction, and it is natural to measure the accuracy of a future prediction by squared error loss. Under the Bayesian approach, it is commonly perceived that the optimal predictive model is the model with highest posterior probability, but this is not necessarily the case. In this paper we show that, for selection among normal linear models, the optimal predictive model is often the median probability model, which is defined a...

  15. Business Model Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Dodgson, Mark; Gann, David; Phillips, Nelson; Massa, Lorenzo; Tucci, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The chapter offers a broad review of the literature at the nexus between Business Models and innovation studies, and examines the notion of Business Model Innovation in three different situations: Business Model Design in newly formed organizations, Business Model Reconfiguration in incumbent firms, and Business Model Innovation in the broad context of sustainability. Tools and perspectives to make sense of Business Models and support managers and entrepreneurs in dealing with Business Model ...

  16. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: 1968-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The historical development and scientific contributions of the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries are briefly traced. Further to encourage radiobiology studies and to provide unique materials for research in other areas such as biomarkers including oncogenes, the Registries have established the National Human Radiobiology Tissue Repository, which includes more than 20,000 tissue samples and solutions, histopathology slides, and related materials from persons with internal depositions, including radium dial painters, available to other investigators for collaborative or individual research purposes. Emphasis is given to recent findings of the Registries with respect to biokinetic models for the actinides and the post-mortem analysis of USTUR Case 0246, an individual who suffered a massive intake of 241Am eleven years prior to death from heart disease. Registries studies show that, in addition to skeleton and liver, muscle is an appreciable reservoir for both plutonium and americium. The systemic biokinetics of plutonium and americium are well represented by a three-compartment model that includes skeleton, liver, and muscle, although the biokinetic parameters of these two transuranium elements differ significantly. Initial uptake fractions for plutonium are 0.4, 0.4, and 0.2, with residence half-times of 50, 20 and 10 years, respectively, for skeleton, liver and muscle. For americium, the comparable uptake fractions are 0.45, 0.25, 0.3 with residence half-times of 50, 2.5 and 10 years for the three compartments. (author)

  17. Wake modelling combining mesoscale and microscale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Jake; Volker, Patrick; Prospathospoulos, J.; Sieros, G.; Ott, Søren; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the basis for introducing thrust information from microscale wake models into mesocale model wake parameterizations will be described. A classification system for the different types of mesoscale wake parameterizations is suggested and outlined. Four different mesoscale wake...

  18. Model Manipulation for End-User Modelers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acretoaie, Vlad

    , and transformations using their modeling notation and editor of choice. The VM* languages are implemented via a single execution engine, the VM* Runtime, built on top of the Henshin graph-based transformation engine. This approach combines the benefits of flexibility, maturity, and formality. To simplify model editor......End-user modelers are domain experts who create and use models as part of their work. They are typically not Software Engineers, and have little or no programming and meta-modeling experience. However, using model manipulation languages developed in the context of Model-Driven Engineering often...... requires such experience. These languages are therefore only used by a small subset of the modelers that could, in theory, benefit from them. The goals of this thesis are to substantiate this observation, introduce the concepts and tools required to overcome it, and provide empirical evidence in support...

  19. Model Checking of Boolean Process Models

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Christoph; Wehler, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    In the field of Business Process Management formal models for the control flow of business processes have been designed since more than 15 years. Which methods are best suited to verify the bulk of these models? The first step is to select a formal language which fixes the semantics of the models. We adopt the language of Boolean systems as reference language for Boolean process models. Boolean systems form a simple subclass of coloured Petri nets. Their characteristics are low tokens to mode...

  20. MODEL VALIDATION AND THE PHILIPPINE PROGRAMMING MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Gil R. Jr.; Kunkel, David E.

    1980-01-01

    This research demonstrates the need and the procedure for testing sector programming models It compares the model estimates of endogenous variables to carefully selected base period parameters It uses an operational, static, deterministic, and highly aggregate programming model of Philippine agriculture as the framework Alternative formulations of the Philippine model are also examined for possible errors In the consumption, production, and objective function data sets

  1. Molecular Models: Construction of Models with Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinovčić P.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular models are indispensable tools in teaching chemistry. Beside their high price, commercially available models are generally too small for classroom demonstration. This paper suggests how to make space-filling (callote) models from Styrofoam with magnetic balls as connectors and disc magnets for showing molecular polarity

  2. QSMSR QUALITATIVE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Abdullah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Software architecture design and requirement engineering are core and independent areas of engineering. A lot of research, education and practice are carried on Requirement elicitation and doing refine it, but it is a major issue of engineering. QSMSR model act as a bridge between requirement and design there is a huge gap between these two areas of software architecture and requirement engineering. The QSMSR model divide into two sub model qualitative model and Principal model in this research we focus on Qualitative model which further divide into two sub models fabricated model and classified model. Classified model make the sub groups of the role and match it with components. The Fabricated model link QSMSR Principal Model to an architecture design. At the end it provides the QSMSR Architecture model of the system as output.

  3. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  4. Model-Independent Diffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Könemann, Patrick

    just contain a list of strings, one for each line, whereas the structure of models is defined by their meta models. There are tools available which are able to compute the diff between two models, e.g. RSA or EMF Compare. However, their diff is not model-independent, i.e. it refers to the models it was...

  5. Automated data model evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeling process is essential phase within information systems development and implementation. This paper presents methods and techniques for analysis and evaluation of data model correctness. Recent methodologies and development results regarding automation of the process of model correctness analysis and relations with ontology tools has been presented. Key words: Database modeling, Data model correctness, Evaluation

  6. Modelling Foundations and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    selected from 81 submissions. Papers on all aspects of MDE were received, including topics such as architectural modelling and product lines, code generation, domain-specic modeling, metamodeling, model analysis and verication, model management, model transformation and simulation. The breadth of topics...

  7. Environmental Satellite Models for a Macroeconomic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To support national environmental policy, it is desirable to forecast and analyse environmental indicators consistently with economic variables. However, environmental indicators are physical measures linked to physical activities that are not specified in economic models. One way to deal with this is to develop environmental satellite models linked to economic models. The system of models presented gives a frame of reference where emissions of greenhouse gases, acid gases, and leaching of nutrients to the aquatic environment are analysed in line with - and consistently with - macroeconomic variables. This paper gives an overview of the data and the satellite models. Finally, the results of applying the model system to calculate the impacts on emissions and the economy are reviewed in a few illustrative examples. The models have been developed for Denmark; however, most of the environmental data used are from the CORINAIR system implemented in numerous countries

  8. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Clayton

    2000-12-19

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the

  9. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M and O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and

  10. Collaborative networks: Reference modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Camarinha-Matos; H. Afsarmanesh

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative Networks: Reference Modeling works to establish a theoretical foundation for Collaborative Networks. Particular emphasis is put on modeling multiple facets of collaborative networks and establishing a comprehensive modeling framework that captures and structures diverse perspectives of

  11. Wildfire Risk Main Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The model combines three modeled fire behavior parameters (rate of spread, flame length, crown fire potential) and one modeled ecological health measure (fire...

  12. LSTM based Conversation Models

    OpenAIRE

    Luan, Yi; Ji, Yangfeng; Ostendorf, Mari

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a conversational model that incorporates both context and participant role for two-party conversations. Different architectures are explored for integrating participant role and context information into a Long Short-term Memory (LSTM) language model. The conversational model can function as a language model or a language generation model. Experiments on the Ubuntu Dialog Corpus show that our model can capture multiple turn interaction between participants. The propos...

  13. Computational neurogenetic modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Benuskova, Lubica

    2010-01-01

    Computational Neurogenetic Modeling is a student text, introducing the scope and problems of a new scientific discipline - Computational Neurogenetic Modeling (CNGM). CNGM is concerned with the study and development of dynamic neuronal models for modeling brain functions with respect to genes and dynamic interactions between genes. These include neural network models and their integration with gene network models. This new area brings together knowledge from various scientific disciplines, such as computer and information science, neuroscience and cognitive science, genetics and molecular biol

  14. TRACKING CLIMATE MODELS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CLAIRE MONTELEONI*, GAVIN SCHMIDT, AND SHAILESH SAROHA* Climate models are complex mathematical models designed by meteorologists, geophysicists, and climate...

  15. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  16. Combustion modeling in a model combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Y.Jiang; I.Campbell; K.Su

    2007-01-01

    The flow-field of a propane-air diffusion flame combustor with interior and exterior conjugate heat transfers was numerically studied.Results obtained from four combustion models,combined with the re-normalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model,discrete ordinates radiation model and enhanced wall treatment are presented and discussed.The results are compared with a comprehensive database obtained from a series of experimental measurements.The flow patterns and the recirculation zone length in the combustion chamber are accurately predicted,and the mean axial velocities are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data,particularly at downstream sections for all four combustion models.The mean temperature profiles are captured fairly well by the eddy dissipation (EDS),probability density function (PDF),and laminar flamelet combustion models.However,the EDS-finite-rate combustion model fails to provide an acceptable temperature field.In general,the flamelet model illustrates little superiority over the PDF model,and to some extent the PDF model shows better performance than the EDS model.

  17. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS MandO 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS MandO 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4

  18. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3

  19. Business value modeling based on BPMN models

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumigoudarzi, Farahnaz

    2014-01-01

    In this study we will try to clarify the explanation of modeling and measuring 'Business Values', as it is defined in business context, in the business processes of a company and introduce different methods and select the one which is best for modeling the company's business values. These methods have been used by researchers in business analytics and senior managers of many companies. The focus in this project is business value detection and modeling. The basis of this research is on BPM...

  20. A future of the model organism model

    OpenAIRE

    Rine, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Changes in technology are fundamentally reframing our concept of what constitutes a model organism. Nevertheless, research advances in the more traditional model organisms have enabled fresh and exciting opportunities for young scientists to establish new careers and offer the hope of comprehensive understanding of fundamental processes in life. New advances in translational research can be expected to heighten the importance of basic research in model organisms and expand opportunities. Howe...

  1. Failure prediction model: Model napovedovanja odpovedi:

    OpenAIRE

    Čelan, Štefan; Težak, Oto; Žižek, Adolf

    2002-01-01

    Preventative maintenance is vital for delicate technical products. Electronic components or the whole system must be changed, and thus need a good model that will indicate failure accurately. In this paper a stochastic stress-strength quantitative model is presented, folowing the five original hypothesis. Proposed new model of failure prediction could be used by the system maintenance. Failure risk could be instantaneosly calculated. The given theory considers the influences of stress on the ...

  2. Better models are more effectively connected models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, João Pedro; Bielders, Charles; Darboux, Frederic; Fiener, Peter; Finger, David; Turnbull-Lloyd, Laura; Wainwright, John

    2016-04-01

    The concept of hydrologic and geomorphologic connectivity describes the processes and pathways which link sources (e.g. rainfall, snow and ice melt, springs, eroded areas and barren lands) to accumulation areas (e.g. foot slopes, streams, aquifers, reservoirs), and the spatial variations thereof. There are many examples of hydrological and sediment connectivity on a watershed scale; in consequence, a process-based understanding of connectivity is crucial to help managers understand their systems and adopt adequate measures for flood prevention, pollution mitigation and soil protection, among others. Modelling is often used as a tool to understand and predict fluxes within a catchment by complementing observations with model results. Catchment models should therefore be able to reproduce the linkages, and thus the connectivity of water and sediment fluxes within the systems under simulation. In modelling, a high level of spatial and temporal detail is desirable to ensure taking into account a maximum number of components, which then enables connectivity to emerge from the simulated structures and functions. However, computational constraints and, in many cases, lack of data prevent the representation of all relevant processes and spatial/temporal variability in most models. In most cases, therefore, the level of detail selected for modelling is too coarse to represent the system in a way in which connectivity can emerge; a problem which can be circumvented by representing fine-scale structures and processes within coarser scale models using a variety of approaches. This poster focuses on the results of ongoing discussions on modelling connectivity held during several workshops within COST Action Connecteur. It assesses the current state of the art of incorporating the concept of connectivity in hydrological and sediment models, as well as the attitudes of modellers towards this issue. The discussion will focus on the different approaches through which connectivity

  3. AIDS Epidemiological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Fouad Lazhar

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present mathematical modelling of the spread of infection in the context of the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These models are based in part on the models suggested in the field of th AIDS mathematical modelling as reported by ISHAM [6].

  4. Lanchester combat models

    OpenAIRE

    MacKay, N. J.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of Lanchester combat models, emphasising their pedagogical possibilities. After a description of the aimed-fire model and comments on the literature, we introduce briefly a range of further topics: a discrete equivalent, the unaimed-fire model, mixed forces, the meaning of a 'unit', support troops, Bracken's generalization and an asymmetric model.

  5. Lumped-parameter models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, M.

    2006-12-15

    A lumped-parameter model represents the frequency dependent soil-structure interaction of a massless foundation placed on or embedded into an unbounded soil domain. In this technical report the steps of establishing a lumped-parameter model are presented. Following sections are included in this report: Static and dynamic formulation, Simple lumped-parameter models and Advanced lumped-parameter models. (au)

  6. Animal Models for imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Croft, Barbara Y.

    2002-01-01

    Animal models can be used in the study of disease. This chapter discusses imaging animal models to elucidate the process of human disease. The mouse is used as the primary model. Though this choice simplifies many research choices, it necessitates compromises for in vivo imaging. In the future, we can expect improvements in both animal models and imaging techniques.

  7. Deeper model endgame analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Andrist, Rafael B.; Haworth, Guy McCrossan

    2005-01-01

    A reference model of Fallible Endgame Play has been implemented and exercised with the chess-engine WILHELM. Past experiments have demonstrated the value of the model and the robustness of decisions based on it: experiments agree well with a Markov Model theory. Here, the reference model is exercised on the well-known endgame KBBKN.

  8. Generative Models of Disfluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a generative model for representing disfluent phenomena in human speech. This model makes use of observed syntactic structure present in disfluent speech, and uses a right-corner transform on syntax trees to model this structure in a very natural way. Specifically, the phenomenon of speech repair is modeled by explicitly…

  9. Modelling Railway Interlocking Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Morten Peter; Viuf, P.; Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    In this report we present a model of interlocking systems, and describe how the model may be validated by simulation. Station topologies are modelled by graphs in which the nodes denote track segments, and the edges denote connectivity for train traÆc. Points and signals are modelled by annotatio...

  10. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, E; Elettreby, M. F.

    2004-01-01

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here we will introduce random version of BS model. Also we generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  11. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, E.; Elettreby, M. F.

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here, we will introduce random version of BS model. We also generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  12. Biomass Scenario Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a unique, carefully validated, state-of-the-art dynamic model of the domestic biofuels supply chain which explicitly focuses on policy issues, their feasibility, and potential side effects. It integrates resource availability, physical/technological/economic constraints, behavior, and policy. The model uses a system dynamics simulation (not optimization) to model dynamic interactions across the supply chain.

  13. Masonry behavior and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Angelillo, Maurizio; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Milani, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this Chapter we present the basic experimental facts on masonry materials and introduce simple and refined models for masonry. The simple models are essentially macroscopic and based on the assumption that the material is incapable of sustaining tensile loads (No-Tension assumption). The refined models account for the microscopic structure of masonry, modeling the interaction between the blocks and the interfaces.

  14. Numerical Modelling of Streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Kristian

    In recent years there has been a sharp increase in the use of numerical water quality models. Numeric water quality modeling can be divided into three steps: Hydrodynamic modeling for the determination of stream flow and water levels. Modelling of transport and dispersion of a conservative...

  15. Wastewater Treatment Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2008-01-01

    The state-of-the-art level reached in modeling wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is reported. For suspended growth systems, WWTP models have evolved from simple description of biological removal of organic carbon and nitrogen in aeration tanks (ASM1 in 1987) to more advanced levels including...... practice of WWTP modeling by linking the wastewater treatment line with the sludge handling line in one modeling platform. Application of WWTP models is currently rather time consuming and thus expensive due to the high model complexity, and requires a great deal of process knowledge and modeling expertise...

  16. Wastewater treatment models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Sin, Gürkan

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art level reached in modeling wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is reported. For suspended growth systems, WWTP models have evolved from simple description of biological removal of organic carbon and nitrogen in aeration tanks (ASM1 in 1987) to more advanced levels including...... WWTP modeling by linking the wastewater treatment line with the sludge handling line in one modeling platform. Application of WWTP models is currently rather time consuming and thus expensive due to the high model complexity, and requires a great deal of process knowledge and modeling expertise...

  17. Validation of HEDR models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computer models for estimating the possible radiation doses that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the validation of these models. In the HEDR Project, the model validation exercise consisted of comparing computational model estimates with limited historical field measurements and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the models. The results of any one test do not mean that a model is valid. Rather, the collection of tests together provide a level of confidence that the HEDR models are valid

  18. Meta-model Pruning

    OpenAIRE

    Sen S; Moha N.; Baudry B.; Jezequel J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    International audience Large and complex meta-models such as those of Uml and its profiles are growing due to modelling and inter-operability needs of numerous stakeholders. The complexity of such meta-models has led to coining of the term meta-muddle. Individual users often exercise only a small view of a meta-muddle for tasks ranging from model creation to construction of model transformations. What is the effective meta-model that represents this view? We present a flexible meta-model p...

  19. Validation of HEDR models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has developed a set of computer models for estimating the possible radiation doses that individuals may have received from past Hanford Site operations. This document describes the validation of these models. In the HEDR Project, the model validation exercise consisted of comparing computational model predictions with limited historical field measurements and experimental measurements that are independent of those used to develop the models. The results of any one test do not mean that a model is valid. Rather, the collection of tests together provide a level of confidence that the HEDR models are valid

  20. Conceptual Model for Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Fedaghi, Sabah Al; Fadel, Zahraa

    2009-01-01

    A variety of idealized models of communication systems exist, and all may have something in common. Starting with Shannons communication model and ending with the OSI model, this paper presents progressively more advanced forms of modeling of communication systems by tying communication models together based on the notion of flow. The basic communication process is divided into different spheres (sources, channels, and destinations), each with its own five interior stages, receiving, processing, creating, releasing, and transferring of information. The flow of information is ontologically distinguished from the flow of physical signals, accordingly, Shannons model, network based OSI models, and TCP IP are redesigned.