WorldWideScience

Sample records for biogeochemical cycles resulting

  1. Global biogeochemical cycle of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, William H; Klein, Emily M; Vengosh, Avner

    2017-12-26

    Synthesizing published data, we provide a quantitative summary of the global biogeochemical cycle of vanadium (V), including both human-derived and natural fluxes. Through mining of V ores (130 × 10 9 g V/y) and extraction and combustion of fossil fuels (600 × 10 9 g V/y), humans are the predominant force in the geochemical cycle of V at Earth's surface. Human emissions of V to the atmosphere are now likely to exceed background emissions by as much as a factor of 1.7, and, presumably, we have altered the deposition of V from the atmosphere by a similar amount. Excessive V in air and water has potential, but poorly documented, consequences for human health. Much of the atmospheric flux probably derives from emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels, but the magnitude of this flux depends on the type of fuel, with relatively low emissions from coal and higher contributions from heavy crude oils, tar sands bitumen, and petroleum coke. Increasing interest in petroleum derived from unconventional deposits is likely to lead to greater emissions of V to the atmosphere in the near future. Our analysis further suggests that the flux of V in rivers has been incremented by about 15% from human activities. Overall, the budget of dissolved V in the oceans is remarkably well balanced-with about 40 × 10 9 g V/y to 50 × 10 9 g V/y inputs and outputs, and a mean residence time for dissolved V in seawater of about 130,000 y with respect to inputs from rivers.

  2. Biogeochemical cycling in the Taiwan Strait

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, H.; Chen, C-T.A.

    Based on repeat observations made during 2001-2003 along two transects in the Taiwan Strait this study aims at understanding factors controlling primary productivity with an emphasis on biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen, the major bio...

  3. Biogeochemical cycling of radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livens, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of radionuclides with other components such as nutrients around ecosystems is discussed. In particular the behaviour of cesium in freshwater ecosystems since the Chernobyl accident and the behaviour of technetium in the form of pertechnetate anions, TcO 4 , in marine ecosystems is considered. (UK)

  4. Biogeochemical cycling in Rice Agroecosystems Resulting From Water and Si management: Implications for As abatement and Sustainable Rice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, A.; Limmer, M. A.; Amaral, D.; Teasley, W.

    2017-12-01

    Flooded rice agroecosystems favor geochemical conditions that mobilize soil-bound arsenic (As) and produce methane (CH4). These negative outcomes of flooded rice may lead to As exposure upon As-laden rice grain consumption and enhanced greenhouse gas emissions. Periodic draining of fields (e.g., alternate wetting and drying) is effective at minimizing these negative outcomes, but may reduce rice yield, increase toxic Cd in grain, and increase nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Because 3 of the 4 dominant chemical form of As in flooded paddy soil share the efficient Si uptake pathway, increasing plant-available Si can decrease toxic As in grain and boost yield, particularly when plants are stressed with As. We used combined pot and field studies to examine the biogeochemical cycling of As, Fe, Si, and C when plants are grown with water and/or Si management, the latter of which under both low and high As conditions. We show that increasing plant-available Si can be used alone or in conjunction with water management to improve rice yields depending on the edaphic conditions. These processes and findings will be discussed in the larger context of global food security.

  5. Disturbance decouples biogeochemical cycles across forests of the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley D. Keiser; Jennifer D. Knoepp; Mark A. Bradford

    2016-01-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are inherently linked through the stoichiometric demands of the organisms that cycle the elements. Landscape disturbance can alter element availability and thus the rates of biogeochemical cycling. Nitrification is a fundamental biogeochemical process positively related to plant productivity and nitrogen loss from soils to aquatic systems, and the...

  6. Searching for Biogeochemical Cycles on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The search for life on Mars clearly benefits from a rigorous, yet broad, definition of life that compels us to consider all possible lines of evidence for a martian biosphere. Recent studies in microbial ecology illustrate that the classic definition of life should be expanded beyond the traditional definition of a living cell. The traditional defining characteristics of life are threefold. First, life is capable of metabolism, that is, it performs chemical reactions that utilize energy and also synthesize its cellular constituents. Second, life is capable of self-replication. Third, life can evolve in order to adapt to environmental changes. An expanded, ecological definition of life also recognizes that life is a community of organisms that must interact with their nonliving environment through processes called biogeochemical cycles. This regenerative processing maintains, in an aqueous conditions, a dependable supply of nutrients and energy for growth. In turn, life can significantly affect those processes that control the exchange of materials between the atmosphere, ocean, and upper crust. Because metabolic processes interact directly with the environment, they can alter their surroundings and thus leave behind evidence of life. For example, organic matter is produced from single-carbon-atom precursors for the biosynthesis of cellular constituents. This leads to a reservoir of reduced carbon in sediments that, in turn, can affect the oxidation state of the atmosphere. The harvesting of chemical energy for metabolism often employs oxidation-reduction reactions that can alter the chemistry and oxidation state of the redox-sensitive elements carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, iron, and manganese. Have there ever been biogeochemical cycles on Mars? Certain key planetary processes can offer clues. Active volcanism provides reduced chemical species that biota can use for organic synthesis. Volcanic carbon dioxide and methane can serve as greenhouse gases. Thus the

  7. The biogeochemical iron cycle and astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christian; Köhler, Inga; Muller, Francois L. L.; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Kupenko, Ilya; Rüffer, Rudolf; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemistry investigates chemical cycles which influence or are influenced by biological activity. Astrobiology studies the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe. The biogeochemical Fe cycle has controlled major nutrient cycles such as the C cycle throughout geological time. Iron sulfide minerals may have provided energy and surfaces for the first pioneer organisms on Earth. Banded iron formations document the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. To assess the potential habitability of planets other than Earth one looks for water, an energy source and a C source. On Mars, for example, Fe minerals have provided evidence for the past presence of liquid water on its surface and would provide a viable energy source. Here we present Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations of Fe and C cycle interactions in both ancient and modern environments. Experiments to simulate the diagenesis of banded iron formations indicate that the formation of ferrous minerals depends on the amount of biomass buried with ferric precursors rather than on the atmospheric composition at the time of deposition. Mössbauer spectra further reveal the mutual stabilisation of Fe-organic matter complexes against mineral transformation and decay of organic matter into CO2. This corresponds to observations of a `rusty carbon sink' in modern sediments. The stabilisation of Fe-organic matter complexes may also aid transport of particulate Fe in the water column while having an adverse effect on the bioavailability of Fe. In the modern oxic ocean, Fe is insoluble and particulate Fe represents an important source. Collecting that particulate Fe yields small sample sizes that would pose a challenge for conventional Mössbauer experiments. We demonstrate that the unique properties of the beam used in synchrotron-based Mössbauer applications can be utilized for studying such samples effectively. Reactive Fe species often occur in amorphous or nanoparticulate form in the environment and

  8. The biogeochemical iron cycle and astrobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schröder, Christian; Köhler, Inga; Muller, Francois L. L.; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Kupenko, Ilya; Rüffer, Rudolf; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Biogeochemistry investigates chemical cycles which influence or are influenced by biological activity. Astrobiology studies the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe. The biogeochemical Fe cycle has controlled major nutrient cycles such as the C cycle throughout geological time. Iron sulfide minerals may have provided energy and surfaces for the first pioneer organisms on Earth. Banded iron formations document the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. To assess the potential habitability of planets other than Earth one looks for water, an energy source and a C source. On Mars, for example, Fe minerals have provided evidence for the past presence of liquid water on its surface and would provide a viable energy source. Here we present Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations of Fe and C cycle interactions in both ancient and modern environments. Experiments to simulate the diagenesis of banded iron formations indicate that the formation of ferrous minerals depends on the amount of biomass buried with ferric precursors rather than on the atmospheric composition at the time of deposition. Mössbauer spectra further reveal the mutual stabilisation of Fe-organic matter complexes against mineral transformation and decay of organic matter into CO 2 . This corresponds to observations of a ‘rusty carbon sink’ in modern sediments. The stabilisation of Fe-organic matter complexes may also aid transport of particulate Fe in the water column while having an adverse effect on the bioavailability of Fe. In the modern oxic ocean, Fe is insoluble and particulate Fe represents an important source. Collecting that particulate Fe yields small sample sizes that would pose a challenge for conventional Mössbauer experiments. We demonstrate that the unique properties of the beam used in synchrotron-based Mössbauer applications can be utilized for studying such samples effectively. Reactive Fe species often occur in amorphous or nanoparticulate form in the

  9. The biogeochemical iron cycle and astrobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröder, Christian, E-mail: christian.schroeder@stir.ac.uk [University of Stirling, Biological and Environmental Sciences, School of Natural Sciences (United Kingdom); Köhler, Inga [Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Geomicrobiology, Centre for Applied Geoscience (Germany); Muller, Francois L. L. [Qatar University, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences (Qatar); Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Kupenko, Ilya; Rüffer, Rudolf [ESRF-The European Synchrotron (France); Kappler, Andreas [Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Geomicrobiology, Centre for Applied Geoscience (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Biogeochemistry investigates chemical cycles which influence or are influenced by biological activity. Astrobiology studies the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe. The biogeochemical Fe cycle has controlled major nutrient cycles such as the C cycle throughout geological time. Iron sulfide minerals may have provided energy and surfaces for the first pioneer organisms on Earth. Banded iron formations document the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. To assess the potential habitability of planets other than Earth one looks for water, an energy source and a C source. On Mars, for example, Fe minerals have provided evidence for the past presence of liquid water on its surface and would provide a viable energy source. Here we present Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations of Fe and C cycle interactions in both ancient and modern environments. Experiments to simulate the diagenesis of banded iron formations indicate that the formation of ferrous minerals depends on the amount of biomass buried with ferric precursors rather than on the atmospheric composition at the time of deposition. Mössbauer spectra further reveal the mutual stabilisation of Fe-organic matter complexes against mineral transformation and decay of organic matter into CO{sub 2}. This corresponds to observations of a ‘rusty carbon sink’ in modern sediments. The stabilisation of Fe-organic matter complexes may also aid transport of particulate Fe in the water column while having an adverse effect on the bioavailability of Fe. In the modern oxic ocean, Fe is insoluble and particulate Fe represents an important source. Collecting that particulate Fe yields small sample sizes that would pose a challenge for conventional Mössbauer experiments. We demonstrate that the unique properties of the beam used in synchrotron-based Mössbauer applications can be utilized for studying such samples effectively. Reactive Fe species often occur in amorphous or nanoparticulate form in the

  10. Natural environment and the biogeochemical cycle s. Pt. A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutzinger, O [ed.

    1980-01-01

    At the moment three volumes of the handbook are planned. Volume 1 deals with the natural environment and the biogeochemical cycles therein, including some background information such as energetics and ecology. The individual chapters are dealing with the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, chemical oceanography, chemical aspects of soil, the cycle of oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus, metal cycles and biological methylation, and natural organohalogen compounds. Separate abstracts are prepared for 5 chapters of this book.

  11. Ecohydrological Interfaces as Dynamic Hotspots of Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg; Hannah, David; McDonald, Karlie; Folegot, Silvia; Baranov, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Ecohydrological interfaces, represent the boundaries between water-dependent ecosystems that can alter substantially the fluxes of energy and matter. There is still a critical gap of understanding the organisational principles of the drivers and controls of spatially and temporally variable ecohydrological interface functions. This knowledge gap limits our capacity to efficiently quantify, predict and manage the services provided by complex ecosystems. Many ecohydrological interfaces are characterized by step changes in microbial metabolic activity, steep redox gradients and often even thermodynamic phase shifts, for instance at the interfaces between atmosphere and water or soil matrix and macro-pores interfaces. This paper integrates investigations from point scale laboratory microcosm experiments with reach and subcatchment scale tracer experiments and numerical modeling studies to elaborate similarities in the drivers and controls that constitute the enhanced biogeochemical activity of different types of ecohydrologica interfaces across a range of spatial and temporal scales. We therefore combine smart metabolic activity tracers to quantify the impact of bioturbating benthic fauna onto ecosystem respiration and oxygen consumption and investigate at larger scale, how microbial metabolic activity and carbon turnover at the water-sediment interface are controlled by sediment physical and chemical properties as well as water temperatures. Numerical modeling confirmed that experimentally identified hotspots of streambed biogeochemical cycling were controlled by patterns of physical properties such as hydraulic conductivities or bioavailability of organic matter, impacting on residence time distributions and hence reaction times. In contrast to previous research, our investigations thus confirmed that small-scale variability of physical and chemical interface properties had a major impact on biogeochemical processing at the investigated ecohydrological interfaces

  12. Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion, Solar UV Radiation, and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change modulates the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, particularly for carbon cycling, resulting in UV-mediated positive or negative feedbacks on climate. Possible positive feedbacks discussed in this assessment...

  13. Effects of increased solar ultraviolet radiation on biogeochemical cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zepp, R.G.; Callaghan, T.V.; Erickson, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Increases in solar UV radiation could affect terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical cycles thus altering both sources and sinks of greenhouse and chemically important trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), carbonyl sulfide (COS). In terrestrial ecosystems, increased UV-B could modify both the production and decomposition of plant matter with concomitant changes in the uptake and release of atmospherically important trace gases. Decomposition processes can be accelerated when UV-B photodegrades surface litter, or retarded when the dominant effect involves changes in the chemical composition of living tissues that reduce the biodegradability of buried litter. These changes in decomposition can affect microbial production of CO2 and other trace gases and also may affect the availability of nutrients essential for plant growth. Primary production can be reduced by enhanced UV-B, but the effect is variable between species and even cultivars of some crops. Likewise, the effects of enhanced UV-B on photoproduction of CO from plant matter is species-dependent and occurs more efficiently from dead than from living matter. Aquatic ecosystems studies in several different locations have shown that reductions in current levels of solar UV-B result in enhanced primary production, and Antarctic experiments under the ozone hole demonstrated that primary production is inhibited by enhanced UV-B. In addition to its effects on primary production, solar UV radiation can reduce bacterioplankton growth in the upper ocean with potentially important effects on marine biogeochemical cycles. Decomposition processes can be retarded when bacterial activity is suppressed by enhanced UV-B radiation or stimulated when solar UV radiation photodegrades aquatic dissolved organic matter. Photodegradation of DOM results in loss of UV absorption and formation of dissolved inorganic carbon, CO, and organic substrates that are readily mineralized or taken up by aquatic

  14. The Microbial Engines That Drive Earth’s Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Fenchel, Tom; Delong, Edward F.

    2008-05-01

    Virtually all nonequilibrium electron transfers on Earth are driven by a set of nanobiological machines composed largely of multimeric protein complexes associated with a small number of prosthetic groups. These machines evolved exclusively in microbes early in our planet’s history yet, despite their antiquity, are highly conserved. Hence, although there is enormous genetic diversity in nature, there remains a relatively stable set of core genes coding for the major redox reactions essential for life and biogeochemical cycles. These genes created and coevolved with biogeochemical cycles and were passed from microbe to microbe primarily by horizontal gene transfer. A major challenge in the coming decades is to understand how these machines evolved, how they work, and the processes that control their activity on both molecular and planetary scales.

  15. Studying Microbial Mat Functioning Amidst "Unexpected Diversity": Methodological Approaches and Initial Results from Metatranscriptomes of Mats Over Diel cycles, iTags from Long Term Manipulations, and Biogeochemical Cycling in Simplified Microbial Mats Constructed from Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Lee, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial mats are famously amongst the most diverse microbial ecosystems on Earth, inhabiting some of the most inclement environments known, including hypersaline, dry, hot, cold, nutrient poor, and high UV environments. The high microbial diversity of microbial mats makes studies of microbial ecology notably difficult. To address this challenge, we have been using a combination of metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, iTags and culture-based simplified microbial mats to study biogeochemical cycling (H2 production, N2 fixation, and fermentation) in microbial mats collected from Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, California. Metatranscriptomes of microbial mats incubated over a diel cycle have revealed that a number of gene systems activate only during the day in Cyanobacteria, while the remaining appear to be constitutive. The dominant cyanobacterium in the mat (Microcoleus chthonoplastes) expresses several pathways for nitrogen scavenging undocumented in cultured strains, as well as the expression of two starch storage and utilization cycles. Community composition shifts in response to long term manipulations of mats were assessed using iTags. Changes in community diversity were observed as hydrogen fluxes increased in response to a lowering of sulfate concentrations. To produce simplified microbial mats, we have isolated members of 13 of the 15 top taxa from our iTag libraries into culture. Simplified microbial mats and simple co-cultures and consortia constructed from these isolates reproduce many of the natural patterns of biogeochemical cycling in the parent natural microbial mats, but against a background of far lower overall diversity, simplifying studies of changes in gene expression (over the short term), interactions between community members, and community composition changes (over the longer term), in response to environmental forcing.

  16. Past and present of sediment and carbon biogeochemical cycling models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Mackenzie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The global carbon cycle is part of the much more extensive sedimentary cycle that involves large masses of carbon in the Earth's inner and outer spheres. Studies of the carbon cycle generally followed a progression in knowledge of the natural biological, then chemical, and finally geological processes involved, culminating in a more or less integrated picture of the biogeochemical carbon cycle by the 1920s. However, knowledge of the ocean's carbon cycle behavior has only within the last few decades progressed to a stage where meaningful discussion of carbon processes on an annual to millennial time scale can take place. In geologically older and pre-industrial time, the ocean was generally a net source of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere owing to the mineralization of land-derived organic matter in addition to that produced in situ and to the process of CaCO3 precipitation. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations because of fossil fuel combustion and land use changes, the direction of the air-sea CO2 flux has reversed, leading to the ocean as a whole being a net sink of anthropogenic CO2. The present thickness of the surface ocean layer, where part of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions are stored, is estimated as of the order of a few hundred meters. The oceanic coastal zone net air-sea CO2 exchange flux has also probably changed during industrial time. Model projections indicate that in pre-industrial times, the coastal zone may have been net heterotrophic, releasing CO2 to the atmosphere from the imbalance between gross photosynthesis and total respiration. This, coupled with extensive CaCO3 precipitation in coastal zone environments, led to a net flux of CO2 out of the system. During industrial time the coastal zone ocean has tended to reverse its trophic status toward a non-steady state situation of net autotrophy, resulting in net uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and storage of carbon in the coastal ocean, despite the significant calcification

  17. Mangrove forests: a potent nexus of coastal biogeochemical cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, J. G.; Fuentes, J. D.; Shoemaker, B.; O'Halloran, T. L.; Lin, G., Sr.; Engel, V. C.

    2014-12-01

    Mangrove forests cover just 0.1% of the Earth's terrestrial surface, yet they provide a disproportionate source (~10 % globally) of terrestrially derived, refractory dissolved organic carbon to the oceans. Mangrove forests are biogeochemical reactors that convert biomass into dissolved organic and inorganic carbon at unusually high rates, and many studies recognize the value of mangrove ecosystems for the substantial amounts of soil carbon storage they produce. However, questions remain as to how mangrove forest ecosystem services should be valuated and quantified. Therefore, this study addresses several objectives. First, we demonstrate that seasonal and annual net ecosystem carbon exchange in three selected mangrove forests, derived from long-term eddy covariance measurements, represent key quantities in defining the magnitude of biogeochemical cycling and together with other information on carbon cycle parameters serves as a proxy to estimate ecosystem services. Second, we model ecosystem productivity across the mangrove forests of Everglades National Park and southern China by relating net ecosystem exchange values to remote sensing data. Finally, we develop a carbon budget for the mangrove forests in the Everglades National Park for the purposes of demonstrating that these forests and adjacent estuaries are sites of intense biogeochemical cycling. One conclusion from this study is that much of the carbon entering from the atmosphere as net ecosystem exchange (~1000 g C m-2 yr-1) is not retained in the net ecosystem carbon balance. Instead, a substantial fraction of the carbon entering the system as net ecosystem exchange is ultimately exported to the oceans or outgassed as reaction products within the adjacent estuary.

  18. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Moriarty, Róisín

    2016-01-01

    zooplankton community, despite iron limitation of phytoplankton community growth rates. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean....

  19. Accounting for the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in input-output life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2013-08-20

    Nitrogen is indispensable for sustaining human activities through its role in the production of food, animal feed, and synthetic chemicals. This has encouraged significant anthropogenic mobilization of reactive nitrogen and its emissions into the environment resulting in severe disruption of the nitrogen cycle. This paper incorporates the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen into the 2002 input-output model of the U.S. economy. Due to the complexity of this cycle, this work proposes a unique classification of nitrogen flows to facilitate understanding of the interaction between economic activities and various flows in the nitrogen cycle. The classification scheme distinguishes between the mobilization of inert nitrogen into its reactive form, use of nitrogen in various products, and nitrogen losses to the environment. The resulting inventory and model of the US economy can help quantify the direct and indirect impacts or dependence of economic sectors on the nitrogen cycle. This paper emphasizes the need for methods to manage the N cycle that focus not just on N losses, which has been the norm until now, but also include other N flows for a more comprehensive view and balanced decisions. Insight into the N profile of various sectors of the 2002 U.S. economy is presented, and the inventory can also be used for LCA or Hybrid LCA of various products. The resulting model is incorporated in the approach of Ecologically-Based LCA and available online.

  20. Andreae is New Editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2004-10-01

    As the incoming editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles, I would like to introduce myself and my ideas for the journal to Eos readers and to current and potential GBC authors. I've had a somewhat ``roaming'' scientific evolution, coming from ``straight'' chemistry through hard-rock geochemistry to chemical oceanography, the field in which I did my Ph.D. I taught marine chemistry at Florida State University for a number of years, and developed an interest in ocean/atmosphere interactions and atmospheric chemistry. In 1987 I took on my present job at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Mainz, Germany, and, after leaving the seacoast, my interests shifted to interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere, including the role of vegetation fires. My present focus is on the role of biogenic aerosols and biomass smoke in regulating cloud properties and influencing climate.

  1. Consequences of climate change for biogeochemical cycling in forests of northeastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Lindsey E. Rustad; Elizabeth W. Boyer; Sheila F. Christopher; Charles T. Driscoll; Ivan .J. Fernandez; Peter M. Groffman; Daniel Houle; Jana Kiekbusch; Alison H. Magill; Myron J. Mitchell; Scott V. Ollinger

    2009-01-01

    A critical component of assessing the impacts of climate change on forest ecosystems involves understanding associated changes in biogeochemical cycling of elements. Evidence from research on northeastern North American forests shows that direct effects of climate change will evoke changes in biogeochemical cycling by altering plant physiology forest productivity, and...

  2. Biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems of the Caatinga Biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, R S C; Sampaio, E V S B; Giongo, V; Pérez-Marin, A M

    2012-08-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of C, N, P and water, the impacts of land use in the stocks and flows of these elements and how they can affect the structure and functioning of Caatinga were reviewed. About half of this biome is still covered by native secondary vegetation. Soils are deficient in nutrients, especially N and P. Average concentrations of total soil P and C in the top layer (0-20 cm) are 196 mg kg(-1) and 9.3 g kg(-1), corresponding to C stocks around 23 Mg ha(-1). Aboveground biomass of native vegetation varies from 30 to 50 Mg ha(-1), and average root biomass from 3 to 12 Mg ha(-1). Average annual productivities and biomass accumulation in different land use systems vary from 1 to 7 Mg ha(-1) year(-1). Biological atmospheric N2 fixation is estimated to vary from 3 to 11 kg N ha(-1) year-1 and 21 to 26 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) in mature and secondary Caatinga, respectively. The main processes responsible for nutrient and water losses are fire, soil erosion, runoff and harvest of crops and animal products. Projected climate changes in the future point to higher temperatures and rainfall decreases. In face of the high intrinsic variability, actions to increase sustainability should improve resilience and stability of the ecosystems. Land use systems based on perennial species, as opposed to annual species, may be more stable and resilient, thus more adequate to face future potential increases in climate variability. Long-term studies to investigate the potential of the native biodiversity or adapted exotic species to design sustainable land use systems should be encouraged.

  3. Controls on Biogeochemical Cycling of Nitrogen in Urban Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, P. H.; Hutyra, L.; Decina, S.; Rao, P.; Gately, C.

    2017-12-01

    Rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition are declining across much of the United States and Europe, yet they remain substantially elevated by almost an order of magnitude over pre-industrial levels and occur as hot spots in urban areas. We measured atmospheric inputs of inorganic and organic nitrogen in multiple urban sites around the Boston Metropolitan area, finding that urban rates are substantially elevated compared to nearby rural areas, and that the range of these atmospheric inputs are as large as observed urban to rural gradients. Within the City of Boston, the variation in deposition fluxes can be explained by traffic intensity, vehicle emissions, and spring fertilizer additions. Throughfall inputs of nitrogen are approximately three times greater than bulk deposition inputs in the city, demonstrating that the urban canopy amplifies rates of nitrogen reaching the ground surface. Similar to many other metropolitan areas of the United States, the City of Boston has 25% canopy cover; however, 25% of this tree canopy is located above impervious pavement. Throughfall inputs that do not have soil below the canopy to retain excess nitrogen may lead to greater inputs of nitrogen into nearby waterways through runoff. Most measurement stations for atmospheric nitrogen deposition are intentionally located away from urban areas and point sources of pollution to capture regional trends. Our data show that a major consequence of this network design is that hotspots of nitrogen deposition and runoff into urban and coastal waterways is likely underestimated to a significant degree. A more complete determination of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and its fate in urban ecosystems is critical for closing regional nitrogen budgets and for improving our understanding of biogeochemical nitrogen cycling across multiple spatial scales.

  4. Biogeochemical cycle of mercury species in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branica, M.

    1987-10-01

    Mercury contamination of the coastal marine environment is an important concern as highly toxic methyl-mercury may be formed biogenically in sediments rich in organic matter. The present study was conducted using a highly sensitive adaptation of Cold Vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (CVAAS) in which mercury was re-mineralised from a variety of marine matrices (water, sediments and organisms), separated and concentrated by ion-exchange chromatography, trapped as an amalgam in gold wool and subsequently re-released by heating to 900 deg. C. Total and organomercury forms were detected respectively by measuring, in the case of seawater, sample extracts treated and untreated with uv light and, in the case of solid matrices, by ''total digestion'' and 6M HCl extractions. Detection limits were 0.1 ng/1 from a 200 ml water sample and 0.2 μg/kg for a lg solid sample. Water, sediments and organisms were collected by scuba diving from the unpolluted Sibenik aquatorium (including the Krka river estuary), Yugoslavia, and the polluted Kastela Bay, which receives discharge from a chlor-alkali plant. Mercury levels were low in the Sibenik aquatorium (0.34-2.4 ng/dm 3 water, 78-1522 μg/kg sediments and 24-39 μg/kg w.w. in mussels). Organo-mercury was generally below detection limits in water and represented below 0.5% of the total Hg in sediments but 13-88% of the mercury in mussels and fish. In the Kastela Bay, up to 90 ng/dm 3 (water), 11870 μg/kg w.w. (mussels) and 48600 μg kg w.w. (oysters) of Hg was detected. Fortunately methyl-mercury was below 0.5% of this total in all matrices. Hg levels in mussels decreased to 41.3 μg/kg w.w. at 600 m from the source. Further research will now be conducted on the biogeochemical cycle of Hg in estuarine and marine environments, with special attention being paid to the fresh/saline water interface. 9 refs, 2 figs, 5 tabs

  5. Implications of a More Comprehensive Nitrogen Cycle in a Global Biogeochemical Ocean Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, K. D.; Ilyina, T.

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen plays a crucial role for nearly all living organisms in the Earth system. Changes in the marine nitrogen cycle not only alter the marine biota, but will also have an impact on the marine carbon cycle and, in turn, on climate due to the close coupling of the carbon-nitrogen cycle. The understanding of processes and controls of the marine nitrogen cycle is therefore a prerequisite to reduce uncertainties in the prediction of future climate. Nevertheless, most ocean biogeochemical components of modern Earth system models have a rather simplistic representation of marine N-cycle mainly focusing on nitrate. Here we present results of the HAMburg Ocean Carbon Cycle model (HAMOCC) as part of the MPI-ESM which was extended by a prognostic representation of ammonium and nitrite to resolve important processes of the marine N-cycle such as nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Additionally, we updated the production of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse gas, allowing for two sources from oxidation of ammonium (nitrification) and from reduction of nitrite (nitrifier-denitrification) at low oxygen concentrations. Besides an extended model data comparison we discuss the following aspects of the N-cycle by model means: (1) contribution of anammox to the loss of fixed nitrogen, and (2) production and emission of marine nitrous oxide.

  6. Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Rumpel, C.; Paustian, K.; Kuikman, P. J.; Elliott, J. A.; McDowell, R.; Griffiths, R. I.; Asakawa, S.; Bustamante, M.; House, J. I.; Sobocká, J.; Harper, R.; Pan, G.; West, P. C.; Gerber, J. S.; Clark, J. M.; Adhya, T.; Scholes, R. J.; Scholes, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    Soils play a pivotal role in major global biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nutrient and water), while hosting the largest diversity of organisms on land. Because of this, soils deliver fundamental ecosystem services, and management to change a soil process in support of one ecosystem service can either provide co-benefits to other services or can result in trade-offs. In this critical review, we report the state-of-the-art understanding concerning the biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity in soil, and relate these to the provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural ecosystem services which they underpin. We then outline key knowledge gaps and research challenges, before providing recommendations for management activities to support the continued delivery of ecosystem services from soils. We conclude that although there are knowledge gaps that require further research, enough is known to start improving soils globally. The main challenge is in finding ways to share knowledge with soil managers and policy-makers, so that best-practice management can be implemented. A key element of this knowledge sharing must be in raising awareness of the multiple ecosystem services underpinned by soils, and the natural capital they provide. The International Year of Soils in 2015 presents the perfect opportunity to begin a step-change in how we harness scientific knowledge to bring about more sustainable use of soils for a secure global society.

  7. [Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and their important roles in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Wu, Wei-Xiang; Ding, Ying; Shi, De-Zhi; Chen, Ying-Xu

    2010-08-01

    As the first step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation is the key process in global nitrogen biogeochemical cycling. So far, the autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the beta- and gamma-subgroups of proteobacteria have been considered as the most important contributors to ammonia oxidation, but the recent researches indicated that ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are widely distributed in various kinds of ecosystems and quantitatively predominant, playing important roles in the global nitrogen biogeochemical cycling. This paper reviewed the morphological, physiological, and ecological characteristics and the molecular phylogenies of AOA, and compared and analyzed the differences and similarities of the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and its encoding genes between AOA and AOB. In addition, the potential significant roles of AOA in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems were summarized, and the future research directions of AOA in applied ecology and environmental protection were put forward.

  8. Dynamics of biogeochemical sulfur cycling in Mono Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A. A.; Fairbanks, D.; Wells, M.; Fullerton, K. M.; Bao, R.; Johnson, H.; Speth, D. R.; Stamps, B. W.; Miller, L.; Sessions, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Mono Lake, California is a closed-basin soda lake (pH 9.8) with high sulfate (120mM), and is an ideal natural laboratory for studying microbial sulfur cycling. Mono Lake is typically thermally stratified in summer while mixing completely in winter. However, large snowmelt inputs may induce salinity stratification that persists for up to five years, causing meromixis. During the California drought of 2014-16, the lake has mixed thoroughly each winter, but the abundant 2017 snowmelt may usher in a multi-year stratification. This natural experiment provides an opportunity to investigate the temporal relationship between microbial sulfur cycling and lake biogeochemistry. We analyzed water samples from five depths at two stations in May of 2017, before the onset of meromixis. Water column sulfate isotope values were generally constant with depth, centering at a δ34SVCDT of 17.39 ± 0.06‰. Organic sulfur isotopes were consistently lighter than lake sulfate, with a δ34SVCDT of 15.59 ± 0.56‰. This significant offset between organic and inorganic sulfur contradicts the minimal isotope effect associated with sulfate assimilation. Sediment push core organic values were further depleted, ranging between δ34SVCDT of -8.94‰ and +0.23‰, implying rapid turnover of Mono Lake sulfur pools. Both lipid biomarkers and 16S rRNA gene amplicons identify Picocystis salinarum, a unicellular green alga, as the dominant member of the microbial community. However, bacterial biomarkers and 16S rRNA genes point to microbes capable of sulfur cycling. We found that dsrA increased with depth (R2 = 0.9008, p reducers and sulfide oxidizers after >1 year of stratification. We saw no evidence in May of 2017 of sulfate reducing bacteria across the oxycline. Additionally, no sulfide was detectable in lake bottom waters despite oxygen below 6.25 µM. Preliminary results suggest a dynamic interplay between sulfide oxidation, sulfate reduction, and the onset of lake stratification. Additional

  9. Effects of Solar UV Radiation and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions...

  10. Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Pete; Cotrufo, M.F.; Rumpel, C.; Paustian, K.; Kuikman, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Soils play a pivotal role in major global biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nutrient, and water), while hosting the largest diversity of organisms on land. Because of this, soils deliver fundamental ecosystem services, and management to change a soil process in support of one ecosystem service can

  11. Organochlorine compounds and the biogeochemical cycle of chlorine in soils: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Makarov, M. I.

    2017-09-01

    Chloride ions in soil may interact with soil organic matter and form organochlorine compounds in situ. The biotic chlorination of soil organic substances takes places under aerobic conditions with participation of H2O2 forming from peroxidases released by soil microorganisms (in particular, by microscopic fungi). The abiotic chlorination results also from the redox reactions with the participation of Fe3+/Fe2+ system, but it develops several times slower. Chlorination of soil organic substances is favored by Cl- coming to soil both from natural (salinized soil-forming rocks and groundwater, sea salt) and anthropogenic sources of chlorides, i.e., spills of saline water at oil production, road deicing chemicals, mineral fertilizers, etc. The study of the biogeochemical chlorine cycle should take into account the presence of organochlorine compounds in soils, in addition to transformation and migration of chloride ions.

  12. Earth's Early Biosphere and the Biogeochemical Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David

    2004-01-01

    Our biosphere has altered the global environment principally by influencing the chemistry of those elements most important for life, e g., C, N, S, O, P and transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn). The coupling of oxygenic photosynthesis with the burial in sediments of photosynthetic organic matter, and with the escape of H2 to space, has increased the state of oxidation of the Oceans and atmosphere. It has also created highly reduced conditions within sedimentary rocks that have also extensively affected the geochemistry of several elements. The decline of volcanism during Earth's history reduced the flow of reduced chemical species that reacted with photosynthetically produced O2. The long-term net accumulation of photosynthetic O2 via biogeochemical processes has profoundly influenced our atmosphere and biosphere, as evidenced by the O2 levels required for algae, multicellular life and certain modem aerobic bacteria to exist. When our biosphere developed photosynthesis, it tapped into an energy resource that was much larger than the energy available from oxidation-reduction reactions associated with weathering and hydrothermal activity. Today, hydrothermal sources deliver globally (0.13-1.1)x10(exp l2) mol yr(sup -1) of reduced S, Fe(2+), Mn(2+), H2 and CH4; this is estimated to sustain at most about (0.2-2)xl0(exp 12)mol C yr(sup -1) of organic carbon production by chemautotrophic microorganisms. In contrast, global photosynthetic productivity is estimated to be 9000x10(exp 12) mol C yr(sup -1). Thus, even though global thermal fluxes were greater in the distant geologic past than today, the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis probably increased global organic productivity by some two or more orders of magnitude. This enormous productivity materialized principally because oxygenic photosynthesizers unleashed a virtually unlimited supply of reduced H that forever freed life from its sole dependence upon abiotic sources of reducing power such as hydrothermal emanations

  13. Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Rumpel, C.; Paustian, K.; Kuikman, P. J.; Elliott, J. A.; McDowell, R.; Griffiths, R. I.; Asakawa, S.; Bustamante, M.; House, J. I.; Sobocká, J.; Harper, R.; Pan, G.; West, P. C.; Gerber, J. S.; Clark, J. M.; Adhya, T.; Scholes, R. J.; Scholes, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Soils play a pivotal role in major global biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nutrient, and water), while hosting the largest diversity of organisms on land. Because of this, soils deliver fundamental ecosystem services, and management to change a soil process in support of one ecosystem service can either provide co-benefits to other services or result in trade-offs. In this critical review, we report the state-of-the-art understanding concerning the biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity in soil, and relate these to the provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural ecosystem services which they underpin. We then outline key knowledge gaps and research challenges, before providing recommendations for management activities to support the continued delivery of ecosystem services from soils. We conclude that, although soils are complex, there are still knowledge gaps, and fundamental research is still needed to better understand the relationships between different facets of soils and the array of ecosystem services they underpin, enough is known to implement best practices now. There is a tendency among soil scientists to dwell on the complexity and knowledge gaps rather than to focus on what we do know and how this knowledge can be put to use to improve the delivery of ecosystem services. A significant challenge is to find effective ways to share knowledge with soil managers and policy makers so that best management can be implemented. A key element of this knowledge exchange must be to raise awareness of the ecosystems services underpinned by soils and thus the natural capital they provide. We know enough to start moving in the right direction while we conduct research to fill in our knowledge gaps. The lasting legacy of the International Year of Soils in 2015 should be for soil scientists to work together with policy makers and land managers to put soils at the centre of environmental policy making and land management decisions.

  14. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly - Interacting Physical, Biogeochemical and Biolological Controls of Nutrient Cycling at Ecohydrological Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, S.; Baranov, V. A.; Lewandowski, J.; Blaen, P. J.; Romeijn, P.

    2016-12-01

    The interfaces between streams, lakes and their bed sediments have for a long time been in the research focus of ecohydrologists, aquatic ecologists and biogeochemists. While over the past decades, critical understanding has been gained of the spatial patterns and temporal dynamics in nutrient cycling at sediment-freshwater interfaces, important question remain as to the actual drivers (physical, biogeochemical and biological) of the often observed hot spots and hot moments of nutrient cycling at these highly reactive systems. This study reports on a combination of laboratory manipulation, artificial stream and field experiments from reach to river network scales to investigate the interplay of physical, biogeochemical and biological drivers of interface nutrient cycling under the impact of and resilience to global environmental change. Our results indicate that biogeochemical hotspots at sediment-freshwater interfaces were controlled not only by reactant mixing ratios and residence time distributions, but strongly affected by patterns in streambed physical properties and bioavailability of organic carbon. Lab incubation experiments revealed that geology, and in particular organic matter content strongly controlled the magnitude of enhanced streambed greenhouse gas production caused by increasing water temperatures. While these findings help to improve our understanding of physical and biogeochemical controls on nutrient cycling, we only start to understand to what degree biological factors can enhance these processes even further. We found that for instance chironomid or brittle star facilitated bioturbation in has the potential to substantially enhance freshwater or marine sediment pore-water flow and respiration. We revealed that ignorance of these important biologically controls on physical exchange fluxes can lead to critical underestimation of whole system respiration and its increase under global environmental change.

  15. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfur and Nitrogen in the Remote Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Charlson, Robert; Andreae, Meinrat; Rodhe, Henning

    1985-01-01

    Viewed from space, the Earth appears as a globe without a beginning or an end. Encompassing the globe is the atmosphere with its three phases-­ gaseous, liquid, and solid--moving in directions influenced by sunlight, gravity, and rotation. The chemical compositions of these phases are determined by biogeochemical cycles. Over the past hundred years, the processes governing the rates and reactions in the atmospheric biogeochemical cycles have typically been studied in regions where scientists lived. Hence, as time has gone by, the advances in our knowledge of atmospheric chemical cycles in remote areas have lagged substantially behind those for more populated areas. Not only are the data less abundant, they are also scattered. Therefore, we felt a workshop would be an excellent mechanism to assess the state­ of-knowledge of the atmospheric cycles of sulfur and nitrogen in remote areas and to make recommendations for future research. Thus, a NATO Advanced Research Workshop '~he Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfu...

  16. Biogeochemical Cycling of Iron and Phosphorous in Deep Saprolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, H. L.; Bruns, M. A.; Williams, J. Z.; White, A. F.; Brantley, S. L.

    2006-12-01

    Few microbiological studies have been conducted within the unsaturated zones between rooting depth and bedrock and thus the relationships between biological activity and mineral nutrient cycling in deep regolith are poorly understood. Here we investigate the weathering of primary minerals containing iron (hornblende and biotite) and phosphorous (apatite) and the role of resident microorganisms in the cycling of these elements in the deep saprolite of the Rio Icacos watershed in Puerto Rico's Luquillo Mountains. In the Rio Icacos watershed, which has one of the fastest documented chemical weathering rates of granitic rock in the world, the quartz diorite bedrock weathers spheroidally, producing a complex interface comprised of partially weathered rock layers called rindlets. This rindlet zone (0.2-2 m thick) is overlain by saprolite (2-8 m) topped by soil (0.5-1 m). With the objective of understanding interactions among mineral weathering, substrate availability and resident microorganisms, we made geochemical and microbiological measurements as a function of depth in 5 m of regolith (soil + saprolite) and examined mineral weathering reactions within a 0.5 m thick spheroidally weathering rindlet zone. We measured total cell densities, culturable aerobic chemoorganotrophs, and microbial DNA yields; and performed biochemical tests for iron-oxidizing bacteria in the regolith samples. Total cell densities, which ranged from 2.5 x 106 to 1.6 x 1010 g-1 regolith, were higher than 108 g-1 at three depths: in the upper 1 m, at 2.1 m, and between 3.7-4.9 m, just above the rindlet zone. Biochemical tests for aerobic iron-oxidizers were also positive at 0.15-0.6 m, at 2.1-2.4 m, and at 4.9 m depths. High proportions of inactive or unculturable cells were indicated throughout the profile by very low percentages of culturable chemoorganotrophs. The observed increases in total and culturable cells and DNA yields at lower depths were correlated with an increase in HCl

  17. Biogeochemical cycle of boron in a forest ecosystem: the case study of Montiers beech-stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims at establishing and understanding the biogeochemical cycle of boron and its isotopes within a forest ecosystem. In that context, many questions remain concerning the dynamics of boron within terrestrial ecosystems: - What are the major sources of boron? - What type of transfer occurs between the compartments of the environment? - What mechanisms are controlling those transfers? In order to establish this biogeochemical cycle, we quantified the different stocks (vegetation, humus and soil) and fluxes (atmospheric dust and dissolved deposition, throughfall, stem-flows, litterfall and drainage) of boron in the study site of Montiers. The use of boron isotopes will give us insight concerning the mechanisms controlling the dynamics of boron. This thesis is divided in 4 main parts: 1. The first part aims at establishing a new method of extraction, purification and measurement of boron and its isotopes within vegetation samples. 2. The second part focuses on the sources and mechanisms controlling boron within atmospheric dust and dissolved deposition on the study site of Montiers. 3. The third part aims at establishing the stocks and fluxes of boron on two distinct soils: a rendisoil (basic pH) and an alocrisoil (acid pH). The goal is to determine the influence of different soil properties on boron dynamics within its biogeochemical cycle. 4. The last part aims at establishing a model of boron and boron isotopes dynamics in the soil plant system. This model is mainly based of the measurement made in 2012. (author) [fr

  18. Mercury Biogeochemical Cycling in the Ocean and Policy Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Robert P.; Choi, Anna L.; Fitzgerald, William F.; Hammerschmidt, Chad R.; Lamborg, Carl H.; Soerensen, Anne L.; Sunderland, Elsie M.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have enriched mercury in the biosphere by at least a factor of three, leading to increases in total mercury (Hg) in the surface ocean. However, the impacts on ocean fish and associated trends in human exposure as a result of such changes are less clear. Here we review our understanding of global mass budgets for both inorganic and methylated Hg species in ocean seawater. We consider external inputs from atmospheric deposition and rivers as well as internal production ...

  19. Photoreduction fuels biogeochemical cycling of iron in Spain's acid rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammons, C.H.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; Snyder, D.M.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Amils, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    A number of investigations have shown that photoreduction of Fe(III) causes midday accumulations of dissolved Fe(II) in rivers and lakes, leading to large diel (24-h) fluctuations in the concentration and speciation of total dissolved iron. Less well appreciated is the importance of photoreduction in providing chemical energy for bacteria to thrive in low pH waters. Diel variations in water chemistry from the highly acidic (pH 2.3 to 3.1) Ri??o Tinto, Ri??o Odiel, and Ri??o Agrio of southwestern Spain (Iberian Pyrite Belt) resulted in daytime increases in Fe(II) concentration of 15 to 66????M at four diel sampling locations. Dissolved Fe(II) concentrations increased with solar radiation, and one of the stream sites showed an antithetic relationship between dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(III) concentrations; both results are consistent with photoreduction. The diel data were used to estimate rates of microbially catalyzed Fe(II) oxidation (1 to 3??nmol L- 1 s- 1) and maximum rates of Fe(III) photoreduction (1.7 to 4.3??nmol L- 1 s- 1). Bioenergetic calculations indicate that the latter rates are sufficient to build up a population of Fe-oxidizing bacteria to the levels observed in the Ri??o Tinto in about 30??days. We conclude that photoreduction plays an important role in the bioenergetics of the bacterial communities of these acidic rivers, which have previously been shown to be dominated by autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. Given the possibility of the previous existence of acidic, Fe(III)-rich water on Mars, photoreduction may be an important process on other planets, a fact that could have implications to astrobiological research. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mercury biogeochemical cycling in the ocean and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robert P; Choi, Anna L; Fitzgerald, William F; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Lamborg, Carl H; Soerensen, Anne L; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2012-11-01

    Anthropogenic activities have enriched mercury in the biosphere by at least a factor of three, leading to increases in total mercury (Hg) in the surface ocean. However, the impacts on ocean fish and associated trends in human exposure as a result of such changes are less clear. Here we review our understanding of global mass budgets for both inorganic and methylated Hg species in ocean seawater. We consider external inputs from atmospheric deposition and rivers as well as internal production of monomethylmercury (CH₃Hg) and dimethylmercury ((CH₃)₂Hg). Impacts of large-scale ocean circulation and vertical transport processes on Hg distribution throughout the water column and how this influences bioaccumulation into ocean food chains are also discussed. Our analysis suggests that while atmospheric deposition is the main source of inorganic Hg to open ocean systems, most of the CH₃Hg accumulating in ocean fish is derived from in situ production within the upper waters (ocean basins are changing at different rates due to differences in atmospheric loading and that the deeper waters of the oceans are responding slowly to changes in atmospheric Hg inputs. Most biological exposures occur in the upper ocean and therefore should respond over years to decades to changes in atmospheric mercury inputs achieved by regulatory control strategies. Migratory pelagic fish such as tuna and swordfish are an important component of CH₃Hg exposure for many human populations and therefore any reduction in anthropogenic releases of Hg and associated deposition to the ocean will result in a decline in human exposure and risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biogeochemical cycles and continental ecosystems - Report on Science and Technology no. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedro, Georges; Blanzat, Bernard; Albrecht, Pierre; Berthelin, Jacques; Boudot, Jean-Pierre; Munier-Lamy, Colette; Cossa, Daniel; Feix, Isabelle; Guillaumont, Robert; HUC, Alain Yves; Lavelle, Patrick; Lebrun, Michel; Lucas, Yves; Metivier, Henri; Ourisson, Guy; Raimbault, Patrick; Ranger, Jacques; Gerard, Frederic; Schmidt-Laine, Claudine; Dercourt, Jean; Gaillardet, Jerome; Bourrie, Guilhem; Trolard, Fabienne; Gerard, Frederic; Dambrine, Etienne; Meunier, Jean Dominique; Benoit, Marc; Breda, Nathalie; Dupouey, Jean-Luc; Granier, Andre; Franc, Alain; GARBAYE, Jean; Martin, Francis; Landmann, Guy; Loustau, Denis; Martinez, Jose; Crochon, Philippe; Gay, Jean-Didier; Peres, Jean-Marc; Tamponnet, Christian; Andreux, Francis; Tusseauvuillemin, Marie-Helene; Barker, Evelyne; Bouisset, Patrick; Germain, Pierre; Masson, Olivier; Boust, Dominique; Bailly du Bois, Pascal; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Grambow, Bernd; Ansoborlo, Erich; Chiappini, Remo; Lobinski, Ryzsard; Montavon, Gilles; Moulin, Christophe; Moulin, Valerie; Ollivier, Bernard; Haeseler, Franck; Prieur, Daniel; Magot, Michel; Charmasson, Sabine; Poss, Roland; Grimaldi, Catherine; Grimaldi, Michel; Malet, Caroline

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate that the biogeochemical approach provides a uniting framework for managing the environment of our planet and in particular the environment of a planet reshaped by Man in the best possible way. This framework is based on the study of the biogeochemical cycles that characterize the biosphere (i.e. the place where life is present) and that are naturally linked to the Earth's overall geochemical cycles. The goal of this report is not to describe the biogeochemical cycles of all the chemical elements, but to show why and how these cycles have a significant role in the evolution of a planet shaped by man. In order to do so, the report is divided into two units and four parts: In the first unit, all the information that is directly linked to understanding geochemical cycles is brought together. It is divided in two parts. The first part concerns the description of the biogeochemical cycle of some of the elements that play a major role in the bio-geosphere. We have focused on: - carbon, because it is involved in all of the cycles, i.e. the atmospheric, ecological and geological cycles (chapter 1); - nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur because they are specific to the living world and because their role is likely to be primordial in the environment (chapter 2); - silicon, aluminum and iron because they allow us to make a bridge between the ecological and the geological systems (chapter 3); - finally, radionuclides (natural and artificial), due to their impact on the biological environment (chapter 4); The second part concerns the biogeochemical study of a number of representative environments of the natural and man-shaped planet. Regarding natural ecosystems, we have focused on: - forest ecosystems, which are highly characteristic of terrestrial environments and which are the site of often very efficient biogeochemical recycling (chapter 5.1); - oceanic environments. Although not part of our topic, the biogeochemistry of these

  2. The effect of gold mining and processing on biogeochemical cycles in Muteh area, Isfahan province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, B.; Moore, F.

    2009-04-01

    The environmental impacts of gold mining and processing on geochemical and biogeochemical cycles in Muteh region located northwest of Esfahan province and northeast of Golpaygan city is investigated. For this purpose systematic sampling was carried out in, rock, soil, water, and sediment environments along with plant, livestocks and human hair samples. Mineralogical and Petrological studies show that ore mineral such as pyrite and arsenopyrite along with fluorine-bearing minerals like tremolite, actinolite, biotite and muscovite occur in green schist, amphibolite and lucogranitic rocks in the area. The hydrochemistry of the analysed water samples indicate that As and F display the highest concentrations among the analysed elements. Indeed arsenic has the highest concentration in both topsoil and subsoil samples when compared with other potentially toxic elements. Anthropogenic activity also have it s greatest effect on increasing arsenic concentration among the analysed samples. The concentration of the majority of the analysed elements in the shoots and leaves of two local plants of the region i.e Artemesia and Penagum is higher than their concentration in the roots. Generally speaking, Artemesia has a greater tendency for bioaccumulating heavy metals. The results of cyanide analysis in soil samples show that cyanide concentration in the soils near the newly built tailing dam is much higher than that in the vicinity of the old tailing dam. The high concentration of fluorine in the drinking water of the Muteh village is the main reason of the observed dental fluorosis symptoms seen in the inhabitants. One of the two drinking water wells which is located near the metamorphic complex and supplies part of the tap water in the village, probably has the greatest impact in this regard. A decreasing trend in fluorine concentration is illustrated with increasing distance from the metamorphic complex. Measurements of As concentration in human hair specimens indicate that As

  3. Biogeochemical cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.; Boersema, J.J.; Reijnders, L.

    2009-01-01

    It is now often assumed that life first appeared on planet Earth about 3,500 million years ago. Since then ‘our’ Sun has changed considerably. While the flux of solar energy to the Earth has increased by about 30% over this period, though, this has not led to a corresponding increase in the Earth's

  4. Supercontinent tectonics and biogeochemical cycle: A matter of ‘life and death’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Santosh

    2010-10-01

    speculate a relationship between superplumes, supercontinent breakup and mass extinction. Upwelling plumes cause continental rifting and formation of large igneous provinces. Subsequent volcanic emissions and resultant plume-induced “winter” have catastrophic effect on the atmosphere that lead to mass extinctions and long term oceanic anoxia. The assembly and dispersal of continents appear to have influenced the biogeochemical cycle, but whether the individual stages of organic evolution and extinction on the planet are closely linked to Solid Earth processes remains to be investigated.

  5. Environmental Assessment for Potential Impacts of Ocean CO2 Storage on Marine Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, N.; Tsurushima, N.; Suzumura, M.; Shibamoto, Y.; Harada, K.

    2008-12-01

    Ocean CO2 storage that actively utilizes the ocean potential to dissolve extremely large amounts of CO2 is a useful option with the intent of diminishing atmospheric CO2 concentration. CO2 storage into sub-seabed geological formations is also considered as the option which has been already put to practical reconnaissance in some projects. Direct release of CO2 in the ocean storage and potential CO2 leakage from geological formations into the bottom water can alter carbonate system as well as pH of seawater. It is essential to examine to what direction and extent chemistry change of seawater induced by CO2 can affect the marine environments. Previous studies have shown direct and acute effects by increasing CO2 concentrations on physiology of marine organisms. It is also a serious concern that chemistry change can affect the rates of chemical, biochemical and microbial processes in seawater resulting in significant influences on marine biogeochemical cycles of the bioelements including carbon, nutrients and trace metals. We, AIST, have conducted a series of basic researches to assess the potential impacts of ocean CO2 storage on marine biogeochemical processes including CaCO3 dissolution, and bacterial and enzymatic decomposition of organic matter. By laboratory experiments using a special high pressure apparatus, the improved empirical equation was obtained for CaCO3 dissolution rate in the high CO2 concentrations. Based on the experimentally obtained kinetics with a numerical simulation for a practical scenario of oceanic CO2 sequestration where 50 Mton CO2 per year is continuously injected to 1,000-2,500 m depth within 100 x 333 km area for 30 years, we could illustrate precise 3-D maps for the predicted distributions of the saturation depth of CaCO3, in situ Ω value and CaCO3 dissolution rate in the western North Pacific. The result showed no significant change in the bathypelagic CaCO3 flux due to chemistry change induced by ocean CO2 sequestration. Both

  6. Did large animals play an important role in global biogeochemical cycling in the past?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, C.

    2014-12-01

    In the late Pleistocene (~50-10,000 years ago), ninety-seven genera of large animals (>44kg) (megafauna) went extinct, concentrated in the Americas and Australia. The loss of megafauna had major effects on ecosystem structure, seed dispersal and land surface albedo. However, the impact of this dramatic extinction on ecosystem nutrient biogeochemistry, through the lateral transport of dung and bodies, has never been explored. Here we explore these nutrient impacts using a novel mathematical framework that analyses this lateral transport as a diffusion-like process and demonstrates that large animals play a disproportionately large role in the horizontal transfer of nutrients across landscapes. For example, we estimate that the extinction of the Amazonian megafauna led to a >98% reduction in the lateral transfer flux of the limiting nutrient phosphorus (P) with similar, though less extreme, decreases in all continents outside of Africa. This resulted in strong decreases in phosphorus availability in Eastern Amazonia away from fertile floodplains, a decline which may still be ongoing, and current P limitation in the Amazon basin may be partially a relic of an ecosystem without the functional connectedness it once had. More broadly, the Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions resulted in major and ongoing disruptions to terrestrial biogeochemical cycling at continental scales and increased nutrient heterogeneity globally.

  7. Prokaryotic diversity, distribution, and insights into their role in biogeochemical cycling in marine basalts and gabbros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, O. U.; di Meo-Savoie, C. A.; Nakagawa, T.; van Nostrand, J. D.; Rosner, M.; Maruyama, A.; Zhou, J.; Fisk, M. R.; Giovannoni, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    Oceanic crust covers nearly 70% of the Earth's surface, of which, the upper, sediment layer is estimated to harbor substantial microbial biomass. Marine crust, however, extends several kilometers beyond this surficial layer, and includes the basalt and gabbro layers. The microbial diversity in basalts is well characterized, yet metabolic diversity is unknown. To date, the microflora associated with gabbros, including microbial and metabolic diversity has not been reported. In our analyses basaltic and gabbroic endoliths were analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, cloning and sequencing, and microarray analysis of functional genes. Our results suggest that despite nearly identical chemical compositions of basalt and gabbro the associated microflora did not overlap. Basalt samples harbor a surprising diversity of seemingly cosmopolitan microorganisms, some of which appear to be basalt specialists. Conversely, gabbros have a low diversity of endoliths, none of which appear to be specifically adapted to the gabbroic environment. Microarray analysis (GeoChip) was used to assay for functional gene diversity in basalts and gabbros. In basalt genes coding for previously unreported processes such as carbon fixation, methane-oxidation, methanogenesis, and nitrogen fixation were present, suggesting that basalts harbor previously unrecognized metabolic diversity. Similar processes were observed in gabbroic samples, yet metabolic inference from phylogenetic relationships of gabbroic endoliths with other microorganisms, suggests that hydrocarbon oxidation is the prevailing metabolism in this environment. Our analyses revealed that the basalt and gabbro layers harbor microorganisms with the genetic potential to significantly impact biogeochemical cycling in the lithosphere and overlying hydrosphere.

  8. Effects of Climate and Ecosystem Disturbances on Biogeochemical Cycling in a Semi-Natural Terrestrial Ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beier, Claus; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Kristensen, Hanne Lakkenborg

    2004-01-01

    The effects of increased temperature and potential ecosystem disturbances on biogeochemical cycling were investigated by manipulation of temperature in a mixed Calluna/grass heathland in Denmark. A reflective curtain covered the vegetation during the night to reduce the heat loss of IR radiation from the ecosystem to the atmosphere. This 'night time warming' was done for 3 years and warmed the air and soil by 1.1 deg. C. Warming was combined with ecosystem disturbances, including infestation by Calluna heather beetles (Lochmaea suturalis Thompson) causing complete defoliation of Calluna leaves during the summer 2000, and subsequent harvesting of all aboveground biomass during the autumn. Small increases in mineralisation rates were induced by warming and resulted in increased leaching of nitrogen from the organic soil layer. The increased nitrogen leaching from the organic soil layer was re-immobilised in the mineral soil layer as warming stimulated plant growth and thereby increased nitrogen immobilisation. Contradictory to the generally moderate effects of warming, the heather beetle infestation had very strong effects on mineralisation rates and the plant community. The grasses completely out-competed the Calluna plants which had not re-established two years after the infestation, probably due to combined effects of increased nutrient availability and the defoliation of Calluna. On the short term, ecosystem disturbances may have very strong effects on internal ecosystem processes and plant community structure compared to the more long-term effects of climate change

  9. Reconstructing the Nd oceanic cycle using a coupled dynamical – biogeochemical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Arsouze

    2009-12-01

    Nd concentrations in the deep Pacific Ocean may reveal an underestimation of the particle fields by the biogeochemical model. Our results indicate 1 vertical cycling (scavenging/remineralisation is absolutely necessary to simulate both concentration and εNd, and 2 BE is the dominant Nd source to the ocean. The estimated BE flux (1.1×1010 g(Nd/yr is much higher than both dissolved river discharge (2.6×108 g(Nd/yr and atmospheric inputs (1.0×108 g(Nd/yr that both play negligible role in the water column but are necessary to reconcile Nd IC in surface and subsurface waters. This leads to a new calculated residence time of 360 yrs for Nd in the ocean. The BE flux requires the dissolution of 3 to 5% of the annual flux of continental weathering deposited via the solid river discharge to the continental margin.

  10. Deep water convection and biogeochemical cycling of carbon in the Northern North Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buch, E.; Gissel Nielsen, T.; Lundsgaard, C.; Bendtsen, J.

    2001-01-01

    production and export of DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon) and the role of UV radiation on biological productivity and DOC mineralization are in focus. The biogeochemical results are implemented in general circulation models in order to evaluate the role of the studied processes on the oceanic carbon cycling. (LN)

  11. Ecosystem services and biogeochemical cycles on a global scale: valuation of water, carbon and nitrogen processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Marcos D.B.; Ortega, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) are provided by healthy ecosystems and are fundamental to support human life. However, natural systems have been degraded all over the world and the process of degradation is partially attributed to the lack of knowledge regarding the economic benefits associated with ES, which usually are not captured in the market. To valuate ES without using conventional approaches, such as the human's willingness-to-pay for ecosystem goods and services, this paper uses a different method based on Energy Systems Theory to estimate prices for biogeochemical flows that affect ecosystem services by considering their emergy content converted to equivalent monetary terms. Ecosystem services related to water, carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical flows were assessed since they are connected to a range of final ecosystem services including climate regulation, hydrological regulation, food production, soil formation and others. Results in this paper indicate that aquifer recharge, groundwater flow, carbon dioxide sequestration, methane emission, biological nitrogen fixation, nitrous oxide emission and nitrogen leaching/runoff are the most critical biogeochemical flows in terrestrial systems. Moreover, monetary values related to biogeochemical flows on a global scale could provide important information for policymakers concerned with payment mechanisms for ecosystem services and costs of greenhouse gas emissions.

  12. The Seasonal Cycle of Carbon in the Southern Pacific Ocean Observed from Biogeochemical Profiling Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, J. L.; Gray, A. R.; Johnson, K. S.; Carter, B.; Riser, S.; Talley, L. D.; Williams, N. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Southern Ocean is thought to play an important role in the ocean-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. However, the total number of observations of the carbonate system in this region is small and heavily biased towards the summer. Here we present 1.5 years of biogeochemical measurements, including pH, oxygen, and nitrate, collected by 11 autonomous profiling floats deployed in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean in April 2014. These floats sampled a variety of oceanographic regimes ranging from the seasonally ice-covered zone to the subtropical gyre. Using an algorithm trained with bottle measurements, alkalinity is estimated from salinity, temperature, and oxygen and then used together with the measured pH to calculate total carbon dioxide and pCO2 in the upper 1500 dbar. The seasonal cycle in the biogeochemical quantities is examined, and the factors governing pCO2 in the surface waters are analyzed. The mechanisms driving the seasonal cycle of carbon are further investigated by computing budgets of heat, carbon, and nitrogen in the mixed layer. Comparing the different regimes sampled by the floats demonstrates the complex and variable nature of the carbon cycle in the Southern Ocean.

  13. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2006-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  14. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2005-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  15. Biogeochemical Cycles for Combining Chemical Knowledge and ESD Issues in Greek Secondary Schools Part I: Designing the Didactic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutalidi, Sophia; Scoullos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biogeochemical cycles support all anthropogenic activities and are affected by them, therefore they are intricately interlinked with global environmental and socioeconomic issues. Elements of these cycles that are already included in the science/chemical curriculum and textbooks intended for formal education in Greek secondary schools were…

  16. How does global biogeochemical cycle become complicated by terrestrial-aquatic interactions ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2015-04-01

    Inland water such as river and lake are now known to be important and active components of global carbon cycle though its contribution has remained uncertain due to data scarcity (Battin et al., 2009; Aufdenkampe et al., 2011). The author has developed process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a-b, 2010, 2011a-b, 2012a-c, 2013; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Shankman, 2013a-b; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a-b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012), which incorporates surface-groundwater interactions, includes up- and down-scaling processes between local-global scales, and can simulate iteratively nonlinear feedback between hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological processes. In this study, NICE was coupled with various biogeochemical models to incorporate biogeochemical cycle including reaction between inorganic and organic carbons (DOC, POC, DIC, pCO2, etc.) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems including surface water and groundwater. The coupled model simulated CO2 evasion from inland water in global scale, was relatively in good agreement in that estimated by empirical regression model (Raymond et al., 2013). In particular, the simulated result implied importance of connectivity between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in addition to surface and groundwater, and hillslopes and stream channels, etc. The model further improved the accuracy of CH4 flux in wetland which is sensitive to fluctuations of shallow groundwater because the original NICE incorporates 3-D groundwater sub-model and simulates lateral subsurface flow more reasonably. This simulation system would play important role in integration of greenhouse gas budget of the biosphere, quantification of hot spots in boundless biogeochemical cycle, and bridging gap between top-down and bottom-up approaches (Cole et al., 2007; Frei et al., 2012; Kiel and Cardenas, 2014). References; Aufdenkampe, A.K., et al

  17. Biogeochemical Cycling and Sea Ice Dynamics in the Bering Sea across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlef, H.; Sosdian, S. M.; Belt, S. T.; Smik, L.; Lear, C. H.; Hall, I. R.; Kender, S.; Leng, M. J.; Husum, K.; Cabedo-Sanz, P.

    2017-12-01

    Today the Bering Sea is characterized by high primary productivity (PP) along the eastern shelf, maintained by CO2 and nutrient rich upwelled deep waters and nutrient release during spring sea ice melting. As such, low oxygen concentrations are pervasive in mid-depth waters. Changes in ventilation and export productivity in the past have been shown to impact this oxygen minimum zone. On glacial/interglacial (G/IG) timescales sea ice formation plays a pivotal role on intermediate water ventilation with evidence pointing to the formation of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) in the Bering Sea during Pleistocene glacial intervals. In addition, sea ice plays a significant role in both long- and short-term climate change via associated feedback mechanisms. Thus, records of sea ice dynamics and biogeochemical cycling in the Bering Sea are necessary to fully understand the interaction between PP, circulation patterns, and past G/IG climates with potential implications for the North Pacific carbon cycle. Here we use a multi-proxy approach to study sea ice dynamics and bottom water oxygenation, across three intervals prior to, across, and after the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT, 1.2-0.7 Ma) from International Ocean Discovery Program Site U1343. The MPT, most likely driven by internal climate mechanisms, is ideal to study changes in sea ice dynamics and sedimentary redox conditions on orbital timescales and to investigate the implications for associated feedback mechanisms. The sea ice record, based on various biomarkers, including IP25, shows substantial increase in sea ice extent across the MPT and the occurrence of a late-glacial/deglacial sea ice spike, with consequences for glacial NPIW formation and land glacier retreat via the temperature-precipitation feedback. U/Mn of foraminiferal authigenic coatings, a novel proxy for bottom water oxygenation, also shows distinct variability on G/IG timescales across the MPT, most likely a result of PP and water mass

  18. Numerical modeling of watershed-scale radiocesium transport coupled with biogeochemical cycling in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Tada, K.; Tawara, Y.; Tosaka, H.; Ohno, K.; Asami, M.; Kosaka, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, intensive monitoring and modeling works on radionuclide transfer in environment have been carried out. Although Cesium (Cs) concentration has been attenuating due to both physical and environmental half-life (i.e., wash-off by water and sediment), the attenuation rate depends clearly on the type of land use and land cover. In the Fukushima case, studying the migration in forest land use is important for predicting the long-term behavior of Cs because most of the contaminated region is covered by forests. Atmospheric fallout is characterized by complicated behavior in biogeochemical cycle in forests which can be described by biotic/abiotic interactions between many components. In developing conceptual and mathematical model on Cs transfer in forest ecosystem, defining the dominant components and their interactions are crucial issues (BIOMASS, 1997-2001). However, the modeling of fate and transport in geosphere after Cs exports from the forest ecosystem is often ignored. An integrated watershed modeling for simulating spatiotemporal redistribution of Cs that includes the entire region from source to mouth and surface to subsurface, has been recently developed. Since the deposited Cs can migrate due to water and sediment movement, the different species (i.e., dissolved and suspended) and their interactions are key issues in the modeling. However, the initial inventory as source-term was simplified to be homogeneous and time-independent, and biogeochemical cycle in forests was not explicitly considered. Consequently, it was difficult to evaluate the regionally-inherent characteristics which differ according to land uses, even if the model was well calibrated. In this study, we combine the different advantages in modeling of forest ecosystem and watershed. This enable to include more realistic Cs deposition and time series of inventory can be forced over the land surface. These processes are integrated

  19. Development of an advanced eco-hydrologic and biogeochemical coupling model aimed at clarifying the missing role of inland water in the global biogeochemical cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu

    2017-04-01

    Recent research showed that inland water including rivers, lakes, and groundwater may play some role in carbon cycling, although its contribution has remained uncertain due to limited amount of reliable data available. In this study, the author developed an advanced model coupling eco-hydrology and biogeochemical cycle (National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE)-BGC). This new model incorporates complex coupling of hydrologic-carbon cycle in terrestrial-aquatic linkages and interplay between inorganic and organic carbon during the whole process of carbon cycling. The model could simulate both horizontal transports (export from land to inland water 2.01 ± 1.98 Pg C/yr and transported to ocean 1.13 ± 0.50 Pg C/yr) and vertical fluxes (degassing 0.79 ± 0.38 Pg C/yr, and sediment storage 0.20 ± 0.09 Pg C/yr) in major rivers in good agreement with previous researches, which was an improved estimate of carbon flux from previous studies. The model results also showed global net land flux simulated by NICE-BGC (-1.05 ± 0.62 Pg C/yr) decreased carbon sink a little in comparison with revised Lund-Potsdam-Jena Wetland Hydrology and Methane (-1.79 ± 0.64 Pg C/yr) and previous materials (-2.8 to -1.4 Pg C/yr). This is attributable to CO2 evasion and lateral carbon transport explicitly included in the model, and the result suggests that most previous researches have generally overestimated the accumulation of terrestrial carbon and underestimated the potential for lateral transport. The results further implied difference between inverse techniques and budget estimates suggested can be explained to some extent by a net source from inland water. NICE-BGC would play an important role in reevaluation of greenhouse gas budget of the biosphere, quantification of hot spots, and bridging the gap between top-down and bottom-up approaches to global carbon budget.

  20. Development of Modal Aerosol Module in CAM5 for Biogeochemical Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaohong [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-11-18

    This project aims at developing new capabilities for the Modal Aerosol Module in the DOE’s E3SM model with the applications to the global biogeochemical cycle. The impacts of the new developments on model simulations of clouds and climate will be examined. There are thee objectives for this project study: Implementing primary marine organic aerosols into the modal aerosol module (MAM) and investigate effects of primary marine organic aerosols on climate in E3SM; Implementing dust speciation in MAM and investigate the effect of dust species on mixed-phase clouds through indirect effects in E3SM; Writing papers documenting the new MAM developments (e.g., MAM4 documentation paper, marine organic aerosol paper, dust speciation); These objectives will be accomplished in collaborations with Drs. Phil Rasch, Steve Ghan, and Susannah Burrows at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  1. Insight from Genomics on Biogeochemical Cycles in a Shallow-Sea Hydrothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G. S.; Amend, J.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow-sea hydrothermal ecosystems are dynamic, high-energy systems influenced by sunlight and geothermal activity. They provide accessible opportunities for investigating thermophilic microbial biogeochemical cycles. In this study, we report biogeochemical data from a shallow-sea hydrothermal system offshore Paleochori Bay, Milos, Greece, which is characterized by a central vent covered by white microbial mats with hydrothermally influenced sediments extending into nearby sea grass area. Geochemical analysis and deep sequencing provide high-resolution information on the geochemical patterns, microbial diversity and metabolic potential in a two-meter transect. The venting fluid is elevated in temperature (~70oC), low in pH (~4), and enriched in reduced species. The geochemical pattern shows that the profile is affected by not only seawater dilution but also microbial regulation. The microbial community in the deepest section of vent core (10-12 cm) is largely dominated by thermophilic archaea, including a methanogen and a recently described Crenarcheon. Mid-core (6-8 cm), the microbial community in the venting area switches to the hydrogen utilizer Aquificae. Near the sediment-water interface, anaerobic Firmicutes and Actinobacteria dominate, both of which are commonly associated with subsurface and hydrothermal sites. All other samples are dominated by diverse Proteobacteria. The sulfate profile is strongly correlated with the population size of delta- and episilon-proteobactia. The dramatic decrease in concentrations of As and Mn in pore fluids as a function of distance from the vent suggests that in addition to seawater dilution, microorganisms are likely transforming these and other ions through a combination of detoxification and catabolism. In addition, high concentrations of dissolved Fe are only measurable in the shallow sea grass area, suggesting that iron-transforming microorganisms are controlling Fe mobility, and promoting biomineralization. Taken

  2. Iron chemistry of Hawaiian rainforest soil solution: Biogeochemical implications of multiple Fe redox cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A.; Chorover, J.; Chadwick, O.

    2003-12-01

    Iron (Fe)-oxides are important sorbents for nutrients, pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM). When flucutations in soil oxygen status exist, Fe can cycle through reduced and oxidized forms and thus greatly affect the aqueous conc. of nutrients and metals. We are examining the influence of oscillating oxic/anoxic conditions on Fe-oxide formation and biogeochemical processes (microbial community composition, and carbon, nutrient and trace metal availability). Our work makes use of a natural rainfall gradient ranging from 2.2 to 4.2 m mean annual precipitation (MAP) on the island of Maui, Hawaii, USA. All sites developed on a 400ky basaltic lava flow and comprise soils under similar vegetation. Solid phase Fe concentration and oxidation state vary systematically across this rainfall gradient with a sharp decrease in pedogenic Fe between 2.8 m and 3.5 m MAP that corresponds with an Eh of 330 mV (1-yr ave.). Fe isotopic composition and Fe-oxide associated rare earth elements (REE) also suggest a shift from ligand-promoted to redutive Fe dissolution with increasing rainfall. To examine the effects of multiple Fe oxidation/reduction cycles, we constructed a set of redox-stat reactors that maintain Eh values within a set range by small Eh-triggered additions of oxygen. Triplicate soil slurry reactors are subjected to redox (Eh) oscillations such that Fe is repeatedly cycled from oxidized to reduced forms. During our current experiment, we measure pH and Eh dynamics and monitor the distribution of Fe(II) and Fe(III), major ion and anion concentrations, a range of trace metals including the REE, and total organic carbon (TOC) in three Stokes-effective particle size fractions (DNA fingerprinting is used to track changes in the microbial community. Prior to implementing the rigorous sampling procedure above, we completed two preliminary reactor experiments focusing only on Fe distribution between aqueous, HCl, and oxalate extractions. These experiments illustrated (1) a

  3. Change in gene abundance in the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle with temperature and nitrogen addition in Antarctic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Yeom, Jinki; Kim, Jisun; Han, Jiwon; Lim, Hyoun Soo; Park, Hyun; Hyun, Seunghun; Park, Woojun

    2011-12-01

    The microbial community (bacterial, archaeal, and fungi) and eight genes involved in the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle (nifH, nitrogen fixation; bacterial and archaeal amoA, ammonia oxidation; narG, nitrate reduction; nirS, nirK, nitrite reduction; norB, nitric oxide reduction; and nosZ, nitrous oxide reduction) were quantitatively assessed in this study, via real-time PCR with DNA extracted from three Antarctic soils. Interestingly, AOB amoA was found to be more abundant than AOA amoA in Antarctic soils. The results of microcosm studies revealed that the fungal and archaeal communities were diminished in response to warming temperatures (10 °C) and that the archaeal community was less sensitive to nitrogen addition, which suggests that those two communities are well-adapted to colder temperatures. AOA amoA and norB genes were reduced with warming temperatures. The abundance of only the nifH and nirK genes increased with both warming and the addition of nitrogen. NirS-type denitrifying bacteria outnumbered NirK-type denitrifiers regardless of the treatment used. Interestingly, dramatic increases in both NirS and NirK-types denitrifiers were observed with nitrogen addition. NirK types increase with warming, but NirS-type denitrifiers tend to be less sensitive to warming. Our findings indicated that the Antarctic microbial nitrogen cycle could be dramatically altered by temperature and nitrogen, and that warming may be detrimental to the ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to investigate genes associated with each process of the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle in an Antarctic terrestrial soil environment. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Short-term effects of salinity reduction and drainage on salt-marsh biogeochemical cycling and Spartina (Cordgrass) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, J.W.; Valiela, I.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the biogeochemical effects of tidal restrictions on salt-marsh sulfur cycling and plant growth, cores of short-form Spartina alterniflora peat were desalinated and kept either waterlogged or drained in greenhouse microcosms. Changes in net Spartina production, and porewater and solid phase chemistry of treated cores were compared to natural conditions in the field collection site over a 21-mo period. Net production among treatments increased significantly in drained and waterlogged peat compared to field conditions during the first growing season. Constantly high sulfide in waterlogged cores accompanied reduced plant growth. Aeration invigorated growth in drained cores but led to oxidization of sulfide minerals and to lowered pH. During the second growing season, growth declined in the drained treatment, probably because of acidification and decreased dissolved inorganic nitrogen. Results are pertinent to the success of current wetland protection and restoration activities in the coastal zone.

  5. Advances in understanding of soil biogeochemical cycles: the mechanism of HS entry into the root interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Humic substances represent the major reservoir of carbon (C) in ecosystems, and their turnover is crucial for understanding the global C cycle. As shown by some investigators [1-2], the phenomenon of the uptake of the whole humic particles by plant roots is a significant step of biogeochemical cycle of carbon in soils. The mechanism of HS entry the root interior remained unknown for a long time. However recently, the last one was discovered [3]. An advanced model [3] includes two hypotheses. These hypotheses are as follows: (1) each nano-size particle possesses a quantum image that can be revealed as a packet of electromagnetic waves; (2) the interaction of nano-size particle with the membrane (plasma membrane) of living cells, on which it is adsorbed, occurs via the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability on the membrane surface. An advanced model allows us to look insight some into some phenomena that were observed by experiments but remained not understood [2]. The authors [2] applied tritium autoradiography to wheat seedlings cultivated with tritium-labeled HS to consider the uptake of humic particles by plant roots. They found a significant increase in the content of some polar (monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC)) and neutral (free fatty acids, FFA) lipids which were detected in the wheat seedlings treated with humic particles. Authors [2] pointed that lipids MGDG, DGDG, SQDG are crucial for functional and structural integrity of the photosystem complex. Therefore, a stimulating action of adsorbed humic particles evoked phenomena like photosynthesis in root cells that can be interpreted using an advanced model: humic particles being nano-size particles become adsorbed on the plant roots in soils, and influence their micro environment, where they are located, with the specific electromagnetic exposure. Another finding of authors consisted in the

  6. Biomass burning in the tropics: Impact on atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemical cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutzen, P.J.; Andreae, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    Biomass burning is widespread, especially in the tropics. It serves to clear land for shifting cultivation, to convert forests to agricultural and pastoral lands, and to remove dry vegetation in order to promote agricultural productivity and the growth of higher yield grasses. Furthermore, much agricultural waste and fuel wood is being combusted, particularly in developing countries. Biomass containing 2 to 5 petagrams of carbon is burned annually (1 petagram = 10 15 grams), producing large amounts of trace gases and aerosol particles that play important roles in atmospheric chemistry and climate. Emissions of carbon monoxide and methane by biomass burning affect the oxidation efficiency of the atmosphere by reacting with hydroxyl radicals, and emissions of nitric oxide and hydrocarbons lead to high ozone concentrations in the tropics during the dry season. Large quantities of smoke particles are produced as well, and these can serve as cloud condensation nuclei. These particles may thus substantially influence cloud microphysical and optical properties, an effect that could have repercussions for the radiation budget and the hydrological cycle in the tropics. Widespread burning may also disturb biogeochemical cycles, especially that of nitrogen. About 50% of the nitrogen in the biomass fuel can be released as molecular nitrogen. This pyrodenitrification process causes a sizable loss of fixed nitrogen in tropical ecosystems, in the range of 10 to 20 teragrams per year (1 teragram = 10 12 grams)

  7. GEOTRACES – An international study of the global marine biogeochemical cycles of trace elements and their isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, G.M.; Anderson, R.F.; Adkins, J.; Andersson, P.; Boyle, E.A.; Cutter, Greg; Baar, H. de; Eisenhauer, Anton; Frank, Martin; Francois, R.; Orians, Kristin; Gamo, T.; German, C.; Jenkins, W.; Moffett, J.

    2007-01-01

    Trace elements serve important roles as regulators of ocean processes including marine ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycling. The role of iron, for instance, is well known as a limiting micronutrient in the surface ocean. Several other trace elements also play crucial roles in ecosystem function and their supply therefore controls the structure, and possibly the productivity, of marine ecosystems. Understanding the biogeochemical cycling of these micronutrients requires knowledge of their div...

  8. The biogeochemical role of baleen whales and krill in Southern Ocean nutrient cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavenia Ratnarajah

    Full Text Available The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas.

  9. Assessing the impact of Narasin on biogeochemical N-cycling in unsaturated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, S. L.; Loving, M.; Logozzo, L. A.; Zhang, P.

    2016-12-01

    Agricultural soils are exposed to Narasin, an anti-coccidiodal drug, when poultry litter is applied as a nitrogen fertilizer. Though it has a relatively short half-life in soil, narasin may persist at concentrations ranging from pg·kg-1 to ng·kg-1. A recent study reported that that exposure in this range affect the composition of soil microbial communities, leading to delayed or modified rates of biogeochemical nitrogen redox reactions. The objective of this experiment was to conduct a comprehensive examination into the effects of 1-1000 ng kg-1 Narasin on the rates of nitrogen mineralization, nitrification, and denitrification as well as the associated impacts on soil N availability and N2O losses. Soils tested at 40%, 60%, and 80% WFPS showed that ultralow doses of narasin (1-1000 ng kg-1) can significantly alter one or more steps in the N cycle in ways that may impact N availability to crop plants and increase non-point source N pollution.

  10. Tracing global biogeochemical cycles and meridional overturning circulation using chromophoric dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Norman B.; Siegel, David A.; Carlson, Craig A.; Swan, Chantal M.

    2010-02-01

    Basin-scale distributions of light absorption by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are positively correlated (R2 > 0.8) with apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) within the top kilometer of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. However, a much weaker correspondence is found for the Atlantic (R2 organic matter from sinking particles. The observed meridional-depth sections of CDOM result from a balance between biogeochemical processes (autochthonous production and solar bleaching) and the meridional overturning circulation. Rapid mixing in the Atlantic dilutes CDOM in the interior and implies that the time scale for CDOM accumulation is greater than ˜50 years. CDOM emerges as a unique tracer for diagnosing changes in biogeochemistry and the overturning circulation, similar to dissolved oxygen, with the additional feature that it can be quantified from satellite observation.

  11. Biogeochemical cycles of Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems: long-term dynamics of the migration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Ol'ga; Klyashtorin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Biogeochemical migration is a dominant factor of the radionuclide transport through the biosphere. In the early XX century, V.I. Vernadskii, a Russian scientist known, noted about a special role living things play in transport and accumulation of natural radionuclide in various environments. The role of biogeochemical processes in migration and redistribution of technogenic radionuclides is not less important. In Russia, V. M. Klechkovskii and N.V. Timofeev-Ressovskii showed some important biogeochemical aspects of radionuclide migration by the example of global fallout and Kyshtym accident. Their followers, R.M. Alexakhin, M.A. Naryshkin, N.V. Kulikov, F.A. Tikhomirov, E.B. Tyuryukanova, and others also contributed a lot to biogeochemistry of radionuclides. In the post-Chernobyl period, this area of knowledge received a lot of data that allowed building the radioactive element balance and flux estimation in various biogeochemical cycles [Shcheglov et al., 1999]. Regrettably, many of recent radioecological studies are only focused on specific radionuclide fluxes or pursue some applied tasks, missing the holistic approach. Most of the studies consider biogeochemical fluxes of radioactive isotopes in terms of either dose estimation or radionuclide migration rates in various food chains. However, to get a comprehensive picture and develop a reliable forecast of environmental, ecological, and social consequences of radioactive pollution in a vast contaminated area, it is necessary to investigate all the radionuclide fluxes associated with the biogeochemical cycles in affected ecosystems. We believe such an integrated approach would be useful to study long-term environmental consequences of the Fukushima accident as well. In our long-term research, we tried to characterize the flux dynamics of the Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems and landscapes as a part of the integrated biogeochemical process. Our field studies were started in June of

  12. Archaea in metazoan diets: implications for food webs and biogeochemical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Andrew R; Levin, Lisa A; Orphan, Victoria J; Marlow, Jeffrey J

    2012-08-01

    Although the importance of trophic linkages, including 'top-down forcing', on energy flow and ecosystem productivity is recognized, the influence of metazoan grazing on Archaea and the biogeochemical processes that they mediate is unknown. Here, we test if: (1) Archaea provide a food source sufficient to allow metazoan fauna to complete their life cycle; (2) neutral lipid biomarkers (including crocetane) can be used to identify Archaea consumers; and (3) archaeal aggregates are a dietary source for methane seep metazoans. In the laboratory, we demonstrated that a dorvilleid polychaete, Ophryotrocha labronica, can complete its life cycle on two strains of Euryarchaeota with the same growth rate as when fed bacterial and eukaryotic food. Archaea were therefore confirmed as a digestible and nutritious food source sufficient to sustain metazoan populations. Both strains of Euryarchaeota used as food sources had unique lipids that were not incorporated into O. labronica tissues. At methane seeps, sulfate-reducing bacteria that form aggregations and live syntrophically with anaerobic-methane oxidizing Archaea contain isotopically and structurally unique fatty acids (FAs). These biomarkers were incorporated into tissues of an endolithofaunal dorvilleid polychaete species from Costa Rica (mean bulk δ(13)C=-92±4‰; polar lipids -116‰) documenting consumption of archaeal-bacterial aggregates. FA composition of additional soft-sediment methane seep species from Oregon and California provided evidence that consumption of archaeal-bacterial aggregates is widespread at methane seeps. This work is the first to show that Archaea are consumed by heterotrophic metazoans, a trophic process we coin as 'archivory'.

  13. IIASA's climate-vegetation-biogeochemical cycle module as a part of an integrated model for climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganopolski, A.V.; Jonas, M.; Krabec, J.; Olendrzynski, K.; Petoukhov, V.K.; Venevsky, S.V.

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of this study is the development of a hierarchy of coupled climate biosphere models with a full description of the global biogeochemical cycles. These models are planned for use as the core of a set of integrated models of climate change and they will incorporate the main elements of the Earth system (atmosphere, hydrosphere, pedosphere and biosphere) linked with each other (and eventually with the antroposphere) through the fluxes of heat, momentum, water and through the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen. This set of integrated models can be considered to fill the gap between highly simplified integrated models of climate change and very sophisticated and computationally expensive coupled models, developed on the basis of general circulation models (GCMs). It is anticipated that this range of integrated models will be an effective tool for investigating the broad spectrum of problems connected with the coexistence of human society and biosphere

  14. Light-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of Genes of Biogeochemical Interest in the Diploid and Haploid Life Cycle Stages of Emiliania huxleyi▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richier, Sophie; Kerros, Marie-Emmanuelle; de Vargas, Colomban; Haramaty, Liti; Falkowski, Paul G.; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The expression of genes of biogeochemical interest in calcifying and noncalcifying life stages of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi was investigated. Transcripts potentially involved in calcification were tested through a light-dark cycle. These transcripts were more abundant in calcifying cells and were upregulated in the light. Their application as potential candidates for in situ biogeochemical proxies is also suggested. PMID:19304825

  15. Searching for biogeochemical hot spots in three dimensions: soil C and N cycling in hydropedologic settings in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Morse; S.F. Werner; C.P. Gillin; C.L. Goodale; S.W. Bailey; K.J. McGuire; P.M. Groffman

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the extent, location, and function of biogeochemical hot spots at the watershed scale is a frontier in environmental science. We applied a hydropedologic approach to identify (1) biogeochemical differences among morphologically distinct hydropedologic settings and (2) hot spots of microbial carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling activity in a...

  16. Implications of meltwater pulse events for soil biology and biogeochemical cycling in a polar desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky A. Ball

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The McMurdo Dry Valleys are one of the most arid environments on Earth. Over the soil landscape for the majority of the year, biological and ecosystem processes in the dry valleys are constrained by the low temperatures and limited availability of water. The prevalence of these physical limitations in controlling biological and ecosystem processes makes the dry valleys a climate-sensitive system, poised to experience substantial changes following projected future warming. Short-duration increases in summer temperatures are associated with pulses of water from melting ice reserves, including glaciers, snow and permafrost. Such pulses alter soil geochemistry by mobilizing and redistributing soil salts (via enhanced weathering, solubility and mobility, which can alter habitat suitability for soil organisms. Resulting changes in soil community composition or distribution may alter the biogeochemical processes in which they take part. Here, we review the potential impacts of meltwater pulses and present new field data documenting instances of meltwater pulse events that result from different water sources and hydrological patterns, and discuss their potential influence on soil biology and biogeochemistry. We use these examples to discuss the potential impacts of future climate change on the McMurdo Dry Valley soil ecosystem.

  17. Using coral Ba/Ca records to investigate seasonal to decadal scale biogeochemical cycling in the surface and intermediate ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVigne, M.; Cobb, K. M.; DeLong, K. L.; Freiberger, M. M.; Grottoli, A. G.; Hill, T. M.; Miller, H. R.; Nurhati, I. S.; Richey, J. N.; Serrato Marks, G.; Sherrell, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Dissolved barium (BaSW), a bio-intermediate element, is linked to several biogeochemical processes such as the cycling and export of nutrients, organic carbon (Corg), and barite in surface and intermediate oceans. Dynamic BaSW cycling has been demonstrated in the water column on short timescales (days-weeks) while sedimentary records have documented geologic-scale changes in barite preservation driven by export production. Our understanding of how seasonal-decadal scale climate variability impacts these biogeochemical processes currently lacks robust records. Ba/Ca calibrations in surface and deep sea corals suggest barium is incorporated via cationic substitution in both aragonite and calcite. Here we demonstrate the utility of Ba/Ca for reconstructing biogeochemical variability using examples of surface and deep sea coral records. Century-long deep sea coral records from the California Current System (bamboo corals: 900-1500m) record interannual variations in Ba/Ca, likely reflecting changes in barite formation via bacterial Corg respiration or barite saturation state. A surface Porites coral Ba/Ca record from Christmas Island (central equatorial Pacific: 1978-1995) shows maxima during low productivity El Niño warm periods, suggesting that variations in BaSW are driven by biological removal via direct cellular uptake or indirectly via barite precipitation with the decomposition of large phytoplankton blooms at this location. Similarly, a sixteen-year long Siderastera siderea surface coral record from Dry Tortugas, FL (Gulf of Mexico: 1991-2007) shows seasonal Ba/Ca cycles that align with annual chlorophyll and δ13C. Taken together, these records demonstrate the linkages among Corg, nutrient cycling and BaSW in the surface and intermediate ocean on seasonal to decadal timescales. Multi-proxy paleoceanographic reconstructions including Ba/Ca have the potential to elucidate the mechanisms linking past climate, productivity, nutrients, and BaSW cycling in the past.

  18. The significance of biogeochemical cycles of macro- and microelements in connection with man-made evolution of the living matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Biogeochemistry as an integrated science studying the elemental composition of the living matter and its role in migration, transformation, accumulation of chemical elements and their compounds in the biosphere, has again become the leading scientific branch highlighting the man-made evolution of the planet and the pathways of interaction between the man and environment. Nowadays the central problem of biogeochemistry as science about the biosphere is that of pollution of the different taxons of the biosphere. In the most case man-made factors effect on the different organisms and the flow of chemical elements changing their local, regional and global biogeochemical cycles. The concept of balance of O 2 , CO 2 and H 2 O as general condition of the sustained development of the biosphere is considered. The questions of biological rhythms, appearance of microelementhoses and modern systemic biogeochemical methodology of assessment of taxons of the biosphere are considered too

  19. Tidal Marsh Outwelling of Dissolved Organic Matter and Resulting Temporal Variability in Coastal Water Optical and Biogeochemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortziou, Maria; Neale, Patrick J.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Butterworth, Megan; Jaffe, Rudolf; Yamashita, Youhei

    2010-01-01

    Coastal wetlands are highly dynamic environments at the land-ocean interface where human activities, short-term physical forcings and intense episodic events result in high biological and chemical variability. Long being recognized as among the most productive ecosystems in the world, tidally-influenced coastal marshes are hot spots of biogeochemical transformation and exchange. High temporal resolution observations that we performed in several marsh-estuarine systems of the Chesapeake Bay revealed significant variability in water optical and biogeochemical characteristics at hourly time scales, associated with tidally-driven hydrology. Water in the tidal creek draining each marsh was sampled every hour during several semi-diurnal tidal cycles using ISCO automated samplers. Measurements showed that water leaving the marsh during ebbing tide was consistently enriched in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), frequently by more than a factor of two, compared to water entering the marsh during flooding tide. Estimates of DOC fluxes showed a net DOC export from the marsh to the estuary during seasons of both low and high biomass of marsh vegetation. Chlorophyll amounts were typically lower in the water draining the marsh, compared to that entering the marsh during flooding tide, suggesting that marshes act as transformers of particulate to dissolved organic matter. Moreover, detailed optical and compositional analyses demonstrated that marshes are important sources of optically and chemically distinctive, relatively complex, high molecular weight, aromatic-rich and highly colored dissolved organic compounds. Compared to adjacent estuarine waters, marsh-exported colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) was characterized by considerably stronger absorption (more than a factor of three in some cases), larger DOC-specific absorption, lower exponential spectral slope, larger fluorescence signal, lower fluorescence per unit absorbance, and higher fluorescence at visible wavelengths

  20. Improvement of wine terroir management according to biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najat, Nassr; Aude, Langenfeld; Mohammed, Benbrahim; Lionel, Ley; Laurent, Deliere; Jean-Pascal, Goutouly; David, Lafond; Marie, Thiollet-Scholtus

    2015-04-01

    Good wine terroir production implies a well-balanced Biogeochemical Cycle of Nitrogen (BCN) at field level i.e. in soil and in plant. Nitrogen is very important for grape quality and soil sustainability. The mineralization of organic nitrogen is the main source of mineral nitrogen for the vine. This mineralization depends mainly on the soil microbial activity. This study is focused on the functional microbial populations implicated in the BCN, in particular nitrifying bacteria. An experimental network with 6 vine sites located in Atlantic coast (Loire valley and Bordeaux) and in North-East (Alsace) of France has been set up since 2012. These vine sites represent a diversity of environmental factors (i.e. soil and climate). The adopted approach is based on the measure of several indicators to assess nitrogen dynamic in soil, i.e. nitrogen mineralization, regarding microbial biomass and activity. Statistical analyses are performed to determine the relationship between biological indicator and nitrogen mineralisation regarding farmer's practices. The variability of the BCN indicators seems to be correlated to the physical and chemical parameters in the soil of the field. For all the sites, the bacterial biomass is correlated to the rate and kinetic of nitrogen in soil, however this bioindicator depend also on others parameters. Moreover, the functional bacterial diversity depends on the soil organic matter content. Differences in the bacterial biomass and kinetic of nitrogen mineralization are observed between the sites with clayey (Loire valley site) and sandy soils (Bordeaux site). In some tested vine systems, effects on bacterial activity and nitrogen dynamic are also observed depending on the farmer's practices: soil tillage, reduction of inputs, i.e. pesticides and fertilizers, and soil cover management between rows. The BCN indicators seem to be strong to assess the dynamics of the nitrogen in various sites underline the functional diversity of the soils. These

  1. Belowground Carbon Allocation to Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Links Biogeochemical Cycles of Boron and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, R. W.; Högberg, P.; Ingri, J. N.

    2011-12-01

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient to most trees and represents an important limiting resource in some regions, deficient trees experiencing the loss of apical dominance, altered stem growth, and even tree death in extreme cases. Similar to the acquisition of most soil nutrients, B is likely supplied to host trees by mycorrhizal symbionts in exchange for recently fixed carbohydrates. In this way, belowground allocation of photosynthate, which drives the majority of biological processes belowground, links the biogeochemical cycles of B and nitrogen (N). Using a long-term N addition experiment in a Pinus sylvestris forest that has been ongoing for 41 years, we examined how the availability of inorganic N mediates the response of B isotopes in the tree needles, organic soil, and fungal pools in a boreal forest in northern Sweden. Using archived needle samples collected annually from the current year's needle crop, we observed δ11B to increase from 30.8 (0.5 se) to 41.8 (0.7 se)% in N fertilized plots from 1970 to 1979, a period of increasing B deficiency stress induced by N fertilization; the concentration of B in tree needles during 1979 dropping as low as 3.0 μg g-2. During the same period, B concentrations in tree needles from control plots remained relatively unchanged and δ11B remained at a steady state value of 34.1 (1.0 se)%. Following a distinct, large-scale, pulse labeling event in 1980 in which 2.5 kg ha-1 of isotopically distinct B was applied to all treatment and control plots to alleviate the N-induced B deficiency, concentrations of B in current needles increased immediately in all treatments, the magnitude of the response being dependent upon the N treatment. But unlike other pool dilution studies, δ11B of current tree needles did not return to pre-addition, steady-state levels. Instead, δ11B continued to decrease over time in both N addition and control treatments. This unexpected pattern has not been previously described but can be explained

  2. Abiotic and biotic controls over biogeochemical cycles in drylands: Insights from climate change and nitrogen deposition experiments on the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S.; Ferrenberg, S.; Tucker, C.; Rutherford, W. A.; Wertin, T. M.; McHugh, T. A.; Morrissey, E.; Kuske, C.; Mueller, R.; Belnap, J.

    2016-12-01

    As for all ecosystems, biogeochemical cycling in drylands represents numerous intricate connections between biotic and abiotic controls. However, patterns of many fundamental ecosystem processes that generally hold across global gradients fall apart at the arid and semiarid end of the spectrum, and data point to an exceptionally strong role for abiotic controls in explaining these patterns. Further, there are multiple dryland characteristics - such as extreme aridity and high UV radiation, as well as specialized biological communities - which can point to a conclusion that "drylands are different". Indeed, drylands are often characterized by their harsh environment, by the diverse classes of biota representing a range of traits aimed at surviving such harsh conditions, and, more recently, by the suggestion of dramatic biotic responses to seemingly subtle changes in abiotic factors. In this talk, we will explore a range of biotic and abiotic controls over fundamental biogeochemical cycling in drylands using data from a suite of manipulation experiments on the Colorado Plateau, USA. We will present results from field treatments that speak to the effects of increasing temperature, altered precipitation regimes, increased nitrogen availability via deposition, and the effects of altered litterfall inputs. Biogeochemical processes we explore will include plant photosynthesis, soil photosynthesis and respiration (with a focus on biological soil crusts), litter decomposition, and nutrient cycling. In addition, we will assess how treatments alter dryland community composition, as well as the resultant feedbacks of community shifts to environmental change. Taken together we will use these diverse datasets to ask questions about what makes drylands different or, instead, if a holistic joining of biotic and abiotic perspectives suggests they are not so different after all. These data will not only lend insight into the partitioning of and balance between biotic and abiotic

  3. 2500 high-quality genomes reveal that the biogeochemical cycles of C, N, S and H are cross-linked by metabolic handoffs in the terrestrial subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, K.; Brown, C. T.; Hug, L. A.; Sharon, I.; Castelle, C. J.; Shelton, A.; Bonet, B.; Probst, A. J.; Thomas, B. C.; Singh, A.; Wilkins, M.; Williams, K. H.; Tringe, S. G.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms drive the transformations of carbon compounds in the terrestrial subsurface, a key reservoir of carbon on earth, and impact other linked biogeochemical cycles. Our current knowledge of the microbial ecology in this environment is primarily based on 16S rRNA gene sequences that paint a biased picture of microbial community composition and provide no reliable information on microbial metabolism. Consequently, little is known about the identity and metabolic roles of the uncultivated microbial majority in the subsurface. In turn, this lack of understanding of the microbial processes that impact the turnover of carbon in the subsurface has restricted the scope and ability of biogeochemical models to capture key aspects of the carbon cycle. In this study, we used a culture-independent, genome-resolved metagenomic approach to decipher the metabolic capabilities of microorganisms in an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River, near Rifle, CO, USA. We sequenced groundwater and sediment samples collected across fifteen different geochemical regimes. Sequence assembly, binning and manual curation resulted in the recovery of 2,542 high-quality genomes, 27 of which are complete. These genomes represent 1,300 non-redundant organisms comprising both abundant and rare community members. Phylogenetic analyses involving ribosomal proteins and 16S rRNA genes revealed the presence of up to 34 new phyla that were hitherto unknown. Less than 11% of all genomes belonged to the 4 most commonly represented phyla that constitute 93% of all currently available genomes. Genome-specific analyses of metabolic potential revealed the co-occurrence of important functional traits such as carbon fixation, nitrogen fixation and use of electron donors and electron acceptors. Finally, we predict that multiple organisms are often required to complete redox pathways through a complex network of metabolic handoffs that extensively cross-link subsurface biogeochemical cycles.

  4. How do persistent organic pollutants be coupled with biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems under global climate change?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Ying [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). Key Lab. of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation; Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). Environmetnal Futures Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences; Xu, Zhihong; Reverchon, Frederique [Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). Environmetnal Futures Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences; Luo, Yongming [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). Key Lab. of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation

    2012-03-15

    Global climate change (GCC), especially global warming, has affected the material cycling (e.g., carbon, nutrients, and organic chemicals) and the energy flows of terrestrial ecosystems. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were regarded as anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) source, and be coupled with the natural carbon (C) and nutrient biogeochemical cycling in ecosystems. The objective of this work was to review the current literature and explore potential coupling processes and mechanisms between POPs and biogeochemical cycles of C and nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems induced by global warming. Global warming has caused many physical, chemical, and biological changes in terrestrial ecosystems. POPs environmental fate in these ecosystems is controlled mainly by temperature and biogeochemical processes. Global warming may accelerate the re-emissions and redistribution of POPs among environmental compartments via soil-air exchange. Soil-air exchange is a key process controlling the fate and transportation of POPs and terrestrial ecosystem C at regional and global scales. Soil respiration is one of the largest terrestrial C flux induced by microbe and plant metabolism, which can affect POPs biotransformation in terrestrial ecosystems. Carbon flow through food web structure also may have important consequences for the biomagnification of POPs in the ecosystems and further lead to biodiversity loss induced by climate change and POPs pollution stress. Moreover, the integrated techniques and biological adaptation strategy help to fully explore the coupling mechanisms, functioning and trends of POPs and C and nutrient biogeochemical cycling processes in terrestrial ecosystems. There is increasing evidence that the environmental fate of POPs has been linked with biogeochemical cycles of C and nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems under GCC. However, the relationships between POPs and the biogeochemical cycles of C and nutrients are still not well understood. Further

  5. Dynamic of biogeochemical selenium cycle in terrestrial ecosystems: retention and reactivity in soil; role of vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Tullo, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This work was performed in the frame of the safety assessment program prior to the possible construction of an underground repository for nuclear waste (HAVL). To consolidate risk assessment models associated to a potential 79 Se biosphere contamination, biogeochemistry of stable selenium was investigated, aiming firstly to highlight the dynamics of Se cycling in a forest ecosystem, in terms of inventories and annual fluxes. Consequently to these first results, which suggest a clay role of soil and its organic pool in the global Se cycle, two studies based on the use of isotopically enriched tracers were further carried out in order to clarify the processes involved in (i) Se retention and reactivity in soils and (ii) incorporation of inorganic Se within organic pool of vegetal biomass. (author) [fr

  6. Multimillennium changes in dissolved oxygen under global warming: results from an AOGCM and offline ocean biogeochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Oka, A.; Takahashi, K.; Ohgaito, R.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term oceanic oxygen change due to global warming is still unclear; most future projections (such as CMIP5) are only performed until 2100. Indeed, few previous studies using conceptual models project oxygen change in the next thousands of years, showing persistent global oxygen reduction by about 30% in the next 2000 years, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. Yet, these models cannot sufficiently represent the ocean circulation change: the key driver of oxygen change. Moreover, considering serious effect oxygen reduction has on marine life and biogeochemical cycling, long-term oxygen change should be projected for higher validity. Therefore, we used a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) and an offline ocean biogeochemical model, investigating realistic long-term changes in oceanic oxygen concentration and ocean circulation. We integrated these models for 2000 years under atmospheric CO2 doubling and quadrupling. After global oxygen reduction in the first 500 years, oxygen concentration in deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea recovers and overshoots, after initial cessation. Thus, enhanced deep convection and associated Antarctic Bottom Water supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean, resulting global deep ocean oxygenation. We conclude that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in the deep ocean; contrary to past reported long-term oxygen reduction and general expectation. In presentation, we will discuss the mechanism of response of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea and show the volume changes of hypoxic waters.

  7. Enhanced biogeochemical cycling and subsequent reduction of hydraulic conductivity associated with soil-layer interfaces in the vadose zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David J.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2013-01-01

    Biogeochemical dynamics in the vadose zone are poorly understood due to the transient nature of chemical and hydrologic conditions, but are nonetheless critical to understanding chemical fate and transport. This study explored the effects of a soil layer on linked geochemical, hydrological, and microbiological processes. Three laboratory soil columns were constructed: a homogenized medium-grained sand, a homogenized organic-rich loam, and a sand-over-loam layered column. Upward and downward infiltration of water was evaluated during experiments to simulate rising water table and rainfall events respectively. In-situ collocated probes measured soil water content, matric potential, and Eh while water samples collected from the same locations were analyzed for Br−, Cl−, NO3−, SO42−, NH4+, Fe2+, and total sulfide. Compared to homogenous columns, the presence of a soil layer altered the biogeochemistry and water flow of the system considerably. Enhanced biogeochemical cycling was observed in the layered column over the texturally homogeneous soil columns. Enumerations of iron and sulfate reducing bacteria showed 1-2 orders of magnitude greater community numbers in the layered column. Mineral and soil aggregate composites were most abundant near the soil-layer interface; the presence of which, likely contributed to an observed order-of-magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity. These findings show that quantifying coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes occurring at small-scale soil interfaces is critical to accurately describing and predicting chemical changes at the larger system scale. Findings also provide justification for considering soil layering in contaminant fate and transport models because of its potential to increase biodegradation and/or slow the rate of transport of contaminants. PMID:22031578

  8. Interactions of C, N, P and S biogeochemical cycles and global change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollast, R.; Mackenzie, F.T.

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur are tied to each other through biological productivity and to problems of global environmental change. Both natural changes in the cycles of the elements and interference and distortion of these cycles by human activities (e.g. disturbancies by agricultural, industrial and urbanization activities) will have impacts on ecosystems and human society. (UT)

  9. The role of industrial nitrogen in the global nitrogen biogeochemical cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Baojing; Chang, Jie; Min, Yong; Ge, Ying; Zhu, Qiuan; Galloway, James N.; Peng, Changhui

    2013-01-01

    Haber-Bosch nitrogen (N) has been increasingly used in industrial products, e.g., nylon, besides fertilizer. Massive numbers of species of industrial reactive N (Nr) have emerged and produced definite consequences but receive little notice. Based on a comprehensive inventory, we show that (1) the industrial N flux has increased globally from 2.5 to 25.4 Tg N yr−1 from 1960 through 2008, comparable to the NOx emissions from fossil fuel combustion; (2) more than 25% of industrial products (primarily structural forms, e.g., nylon) tend to accumulate in human settlements due to their long service lives; (3) emerging Nr species define new N-assimilation and decomposition pathways and change the way that Nr is released to the environment; and (4) the loss of these Nr species to the environment has significant negative human and ecosystem impacts. Incorporating industrial Nr into urban environmental and biogeochemical models could help to advance urban ecology and environmental sciences. PMID:23999540

  10. Biogeochemical Cycles for Combining Chemical Knowledge and ESD Issues in Greek Secondary Schools Part II: Assessing the Impact of the Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutalidi, Sophia; Psallidas, Vassilis; Scoullos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In searching for effective ways to combine science/chemical education with EE/ESD, new didactic materials were designed and produced focussing on biogeochemical cycles and their connection to sustainable development. The materials were experimentally applied in 16 Greek schools under the newly introduced compulsory "school project" which…

  11. Ramsey Results for Cycle Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, S.; Joos, F.; Muttel, J.

    2013-01-01

    Let C(G) denote the set of lengths of cycles of a graph G of order n and let (G) over bar denote the complement of G. We show that if n >= 6, then C(G) boolean OR C((G) over bar) contains all odd l with 3......Let C(G) denote the set of lengths of cycles of a graph G of order n and let (G) over bar denote the complement of G. We show that if n >= 6, then C(G) boolean OR C((G) over bar) contains all odd l with 3...

  12. Life under ice: Investigating microbial-related biogeochemical cycles in the seasonally-covered Great Lake Onego, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Camille; Ariztegui, Daniel; Victor, Frossard; Emilie, Lyautey; Marie-Elodie, Perga; Life Under Ice Scientific Team

    2016-04-01

    The Great European lakes Ladoga and Onego are important resources for Russia in terms of drinking water, energy, fishing and leisure. Because their northern location (North of Saint Petersburgh), these lakes are usually ice-covered during winter. Due to logistical reasons, their study has thus been limited to the ice-free periods, and very few data are available for the winter season. As a matter of fact, comprehension of large lakes behaviour in winter is very limited as compared to the knowledge available from small subpolar lakes or perennially ice-covered polar lakes. To tackle this issue, an international consortium of scientists has gathered around the « life under ice » project to investigate physical, chemical and biogeochemical changes during winter in Lake Onego. Our team has mainly focused on the characterization and quantification of biological processes, from the water column to the sediment, with a special focus on methane cycling and trophic interactions. A first « on-ice » campaign in March 2015 allowed the sampling of a 120 cm sedimentary core and the collection of water samples at multiple depths. The data resulting from this expedition will be correlated to physical and chemical parameters collected simultaneously. A rapid biological activity test was applied immediately after coring in order to test for microbial activity in the sediments. In situ adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) measurements were carried out in the core and taken as an indication of living organisms within the sediments. The presence of ATP is a marker molecule for metabolically active cells, since it is not known to form abiotically. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) were extracted from these samples, and quantified. Quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed on archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes used to reconstruct phylogenies, as well as on their transcripts. Moreover, functional genes involved in the methane and nitrogen cycles

  13. Biogeochemical Cycling of Nutrients and Trace Metals in the Sediment of Haringvliet Lake: Response to Salinization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canavan, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines sediment redox processes associated with organic matter degradation and their impact on the cycling of nutrients (N, P) and trace metals (Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, Zn). Our study site, Haringvliet Lake, is located in the Rhine-Meuse River Delta in the southwest of The Netherlands. This

  14. Can neap-spring tidal cycles modulate biogeochemical fluxes in the abyssal near-seafloor water column?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnewitsch, Robert; Dale, Andrew; Lahajnar, Niko; Lampitt, Richard S.; Sakamoto, Kei

    2017-05-01

    Before particulate matter that settles as 'primary flux' from the interior ocean is deposited into deep-sea sediments it has to traverse the benthic boundary layer (BBL) that is likely to cover almost all parts of the seafloor in the deep seas. Fluid dynamics in the BBL differ vastly from fluid dynamics in the overlying water column and, consequently, have the potential to lead to quantitative and compositional changes between primary and depositional fluxes. Despite this potential and the likely global relevance very little is known about mechanistic and quantitative aspects of the controlling processes. Here, results are presented for a sediment-trap time-series study that was conducted on the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the abyssal Northeast Atlantic, with traps deployed at 2, 40 and 569 m above bottom (mab). The two bottommost traps were situated within the BBL-affected part of the water column. The time series captured 3 neap and 4 spring tides and the arrival of fresh settling material originating from a surface-ocean bloom. In the trap-collected material, total particulate matter (TPM), particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), biogenic silica (BSi), particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), total hydrolysable amino acids (AA), hexosamines (HA) and lithogenic material (LM) were determined. The biogeochemical results are presented within the context of time series of measured currents (at 15 mab) and turbidity (at 1 mab). The main outcome is evidence for an effect of neap/spring tidal oscillations on particulate-matter dynamics in BBL-affected waters in the deep sea. Based on the frequency-decomposed current measurements and numerical modelling of BBL fluid dynamics, it is concluded that the neap/spring tidal oscillations of particulate-matter dynamics are less likely due to temporally varying total free-stream current speeds and more likely due to temporally and vertically varying turbulence intensities that result from the temporally varying

  15. Biogeochemical cycles of chlorine in the coniferous forest ecosystem: practical implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matucha, Miroslav; Clarke, N.; Lachmanová, Z.; Forczek, Sándor; Fuksová, Květa; Gryndler, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 8 (2010), s. 357-367 ISSN 1214-1178 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7F09026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : chlorine cycle * chlorination * enzymatic Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.076, year: 2010 www.agriculturejournals.cz/publishedArticle?journal=PSE&volume=56&firstPage=357

  16. Sulfur isotopic analysis of carbonyl sulfide and its application for biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shohei; Kamezaki, Kazuki; Ogawa, Takahiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Katayama, Yoko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS) is the most abundant gas containing sulfur in the atmosphere, with an average mixing ratio of 500 p.p.t.v. in the troposphere. OCS is suggested as a sulfur source of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSA) which plays an important role in Earth's radiation budget and ozone depletion. Therefore, OCS budget should be validated for prediction of climate change, but the global OCS budget is imbalance. Recently we developed a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions of OCS using nanomole level samples: the direct isotopic analytical technique of on-line gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions S+ (Hattori et al., 2015). The first measurement of the δ34S value for atmospheric OCS coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere (Hattori et al., 2011; Schmidt et al., 2012; Hattori et al., 2012) explains the reported δ34S value for background stratospheric sulfate, suggesting that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols. This new method measuring δ34S values of OCS can be used to investigate OCS sources and sinks in the troposphere to better understand its cycle. It is known that some microorganisms in soil can degrade OCS, but the mechanism and the contribution to the OCS in the air are still uncertain. In order to determine sulfur isotopic enrichment factor of OCS during degradation via microorganisms, incubation experiments were conducted using strains belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus, isolated from natural soil environments (Kato et al., 2008). As a result, sulfur isotope ratios of OCS were increased during degradation of OCS, indicating that reaction for OC32S is faster than that for OC33S and OC34S. OCS degradation via microorganisms is not mass-independent fractionation (MIF) process, suggesting that this

  17. Thickness of Weathering Profiles:Relaying Tectonic Signal to Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Weinman, B. A.; Hurst, M. D.; Mudd, S. M.; Gabet, E. J.; Attal, M.; Maher, K.

    2011-12-01

    Generation and transport of sediment across hillslopes and rivers are closely tied to mechanisms that produce and remove weathered material; in uplands this production and transport controls the thicknesses of weathering profiles. These processes, by controlling the residence time of minerals in the weathering profiles, further regulate the interactions between these minerals and largely biologically cycled elements like carbon and calcium. Here, we present and discuss the thicknesses of colluvial soils and underlying saprolites along three hillslopes that are subject to different rates of basal channel incision. Our field site is within a tributary basin to the Middle Folk Feather River in the Northern Sierra Nevada of California where the river has been down cutting through an uplifting granitic batholith over the past five to ten million years. Conventional modeling predicts that colluvial soil thickness declines with increasing denudation rates. Contrary to this expectation, intensive measurements of colluvial soil thickness show largely consistent values across the three hillslopes examined. This finding, in combination with the abrupt transitions to partial or full bare-rock landscapes with further increase in slope curvature or greater proximity to the Middle Folk Feather River, suggests that the mechanisms of soil production are capable of keeping pace with physical erosion rate until a certain threshold erosion rate is reached. We observe, however, that thicknesses of the underlying saprolite and the morphology (eg., color and texture) and geochemistry (eg., elemental concentration and extraction chemistry of iron) of both colluvial soil and saprolite materials vary systematically with the total denudation rates. This finding further allows us to build a simple relationship to describe and predict how the changes in erosion rates translate to the soils' capacity to store biologically cycled elements within rooting depths. Therefore, geomorphic and

  18. Anthropogenic influences on the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and mercury in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naftz, David [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City 84119, UT (United States)], E-mail: dlnaftz@usgs.gov; Angeroth, Cory; Kenney, Terry [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City 84119, UT (United States); Waddell, Bruce; Darnall, Nathan [US Fish and Wildlife Service, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Silva, Steven [US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Perschon, Clay [Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Whitehead, John [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake (GSL), little is known about the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and trace elements in the lake. In response to increasing public concern regarding anthropogenic inputs to the GSL ecosystem, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) initiated coordinated studies to quantify and evaluate the significance of nutrient and Hg inputs into GSL. A 6 per mille decrease in {delta}{sup 15}N observed in brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) samples collected from GSL during summer time periods is likely due to the consumption of cyanobacteria produced in freshwater bays entering the lake. Supporting data collected from the outflow of Farmington Bay indicates decreasing trends in {delta}{sup 15}N in particulate organic matter (POM) during the mid-summer time period, reflective of increasing proportions of cyanobacteria in algae exported to GSL on a seasonal basis. The C:N molar ratio of POM in outflow from Farmington Bay decreases during the summer period, supportive of the increased activity of N fixation indicated by decreasing {delta}{sup 15}N in brine shrimp and POM. Although N fixation is only taking place in the relatively freshwater inflows to GSL, data indicate that influx of fresh water influences large areas of the lake. Separation of GSL into two distinct hydrologic and geochemical systems from the construction of a railroad causeway in the late 1950s has created a persistent and widespread anoxic layer in the southern part of GSL. This anoxic layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), has high rates of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} reduction, likely increasing the Hg methylation capacity. High concentrations of methyl mercury (CH{sub 3}Hg) (median concentration = 24 ng/L) were observed in the DBL with a significant proportion (31-60%) of total Hg in the CH{sub 3}Hg form. Hydroacoustic and sediment-trap evidence indicate that turbulence introduced by internal waves

  19. The importance of kinetics and redox in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in the surface ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Croot

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that Iron (Fe is a limiting element in many regions of the open ocean. Our current understanding of the key processes which control iron distribution in the open ocean have been largely based on thermodynamic measurements performed under the assumption of equilibrium conditions. Using this equilibrium approach, researchers have been able to detect and quantify organic complexing ligands in seawater and examine their role in increasing the overall solubility of iron. Our current knowledge about iron bioavailability to phytoplankton and bacteria is also based heavily on carefully controlled laboratory studies where it is assumed the chemical species are in equilibrium in line with the free ion association model (FIAM and/or its successor the biotic ligand model (BLM. Similarly most field work on Fe biogeochemistry generally consists of a single profile which is in essence a ‘snap-shot’ in time of the system under investigation. However it is well known that the surface ocean is an extremely dynamic environment and it is unlikely if thermodynamic equilibrium between all the iron species present is ever truly achieved. In sunlit waters this is mostly due to the daily passage of the sun across the sky leading to photoredox processes which alter Fe speciation by cycling between redox states and between inorganic and organic species. Episodic deposition events, are also important perturbations to iron cycling as they bring new iron to the system altering the equilibrium between species and phases. Over the last 20 years the mesoscale iron enrichment experiments (e.g. IronEx I /II, SOIREE, EisenEx, SOFeX, EIFeX, SAGE, SEEDS and SERIES I /II and the FeCycle (I/II experiments have provided the first insights into processes altering iron speciation and distribution which occur over temporal scales of days to weeks. Here we utilize new field data collected in the open ocean on the redox and complexation kinetics of iron in the

  20. Biogeochemical characterization of the Cointzio reservoir (Morelia, Mexico) and identification of a watershed-dependent cycling of nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Némery, J.; Alvarado, R.; Gratiot, N.; Duvert, C.; Mahé, F.; Duwig, C.; Bonnet, M.; Prat, C.; Esteves, M.

    2009-12-01

    (June to October) bring a high amount of suspended sediments (up to 50g/L) that transport nutrients such as particulate P. Despite the high turbidity level of the reservoir, chlorophyll a concentrations appear important (70 µg/L during the dry season) especially in the first five meters of the water column. The phytoplankton community is dominated by Euglenophyta and Cyanobacteria groups typical of eutrophic waters. This study is the first complete biogeochemical survey of the Cointzio watershed. Results acquired will be used in a 3D biogeochemical model ELMO (Bonnet and Wessen, 2001) with the objective of providing a quantitative and update analysis of the water quality. The model already reproduced thermal stratification but furthers runs are needed to calibrate the biogeochemical modules and provide an efficient tool to reservoir’s managers.

  1. Dynamics of soil biogeochemical gas emissions shaped by remolded aggregate sizes and carbon configurations under hydration cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2018-01-01

    Changes in soil hydration status affect microbial community dynamics and shape key biogeochemical processes. Evidence suggests that local anoxic conditions may persist and support anaerobic microbial activity in soil aggregates (or in similar hot spots) long after the bulk soil becomes aerated. To facilitate systematic studies of interactions among environmental factors with biogeochemical emissions of CO 2 , N 2 O and CH 4 from soil aggregates, we remolded silt soil aggregates to different sizes and incorporated carbon at different configurations (core, mixed, no addition). Assemblies of remolded soil aggregates of three sizes (18, 12, and 6 mm) and equal volumetric proportions were embedded in sand columns at four distinct layers. The water table level in each column varied periodically while obtaining measurements of soil GHG emissions for the different aggregate carbon configurations. Experimental results illustrate that methane production required prolonged inundation and highly anoxic conditions for inducing measurable fluxes. The onset of unsaturated conditions (lowering water table) resulted in a decrease in CH 4 emissions while temporarily increasing N 2 O fluxes. Interestingly, N 2 O fluxes were about 80% higher form aggregates with carbon placement in center (anoxic) core compared to mixed carbon within aggregates. The fluxes of CO 2 were comparable for both scenarios of carbon sources. These experimental results highlight the importance of hydration dynamics in activating different GHG production and affecting various transport mechanisms about 80% of total methane emissions during lowering water table level are attributed to physical storage (rather than production), whereas CO 2 emissions (~80%) are attributed to biological activity. A biophysical model for microbial activity within soil aggregates and profiles provides a means for results interpretation and prediction of trends within natural soils under a wide range of conditions. © 2017 John

  2. Microbial Iron Oxidation in the Arctic Tundra and Its Implications for Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jarrod J.; Benes, Joshua; Bowden, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The role that neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria play in the Arctic tundra is unknown. This study surveyed chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing communities at the North Slope of Alaska near Toolik Field Station (TFS) at Toolik Lake (lat 68.63, long −149.60). Microbial iron mats were common in submerged habitats with stationary or slowly flowing water, and their greatest areal extent is in coating plant stems and sediments in wet sedge meadows. Some Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) produce easily recognized sheath or stalk morphotypes that were present and dominant in all the mats we observed. The cool water temperatures (9 to 11°C) and reduced pH (5.0 to 6.6) at all sites kinetically favor microbial iron oxidation. A microbial survey of five sites based on 16S rRNA genes found a predominance of Proteobacteria, with Betaproteobacteria and members of the family Comamonadaceae being the most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs). In relative abundance, clades of lithotrophic FeOB composed 5 to 10% of the communities. OTUs related to cyanobacteria and chloroplasts accounted for 3 to 25% of the communities. Oxygen profiles showed evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis at the surface of some mats, indicating the coexistence of photosynthetic and FeOB populations. The relative abundance of OTUs belonging to putative Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) averaged around 11% in the sampled iron mats. Mats incubated anaerobically with 10 mM acetate rapidly initiated Fe reduction, indicating that active iron cycling is likely. The prevalence of iron mats on the tundra might impact the carbon cycle through lithoautotrophic chemosynthesis, anaerobic respiration of organic carbon coupled to iron reduction, and the suppression of methanogenesis, and it potentially influences phosphorus dynamics through the adsorption of phosphorus to iron oxides. PMID:26386054

  3. Data-model integration to interpret connectivity between biogeochemical cycling, and vegetation phenology and productivity in mountainous ecosystems under changing hydrologic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, E.; Arora, B.; Beller, H. R.; Bill, M.; Bouskill, N.; Chakraborty, R.; Conrad, M. E.; Dafflon, B.; Enquist, B. J.; Falco, N.; Henderson, A.; Karaoz, U.; Polussa, A.; Sorensen, P.; Steltzer, H.; Wainwright, H. M.; Wang, S.; Williams, K. H.; Wilmer, C.; Wu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In mountainous systems, snow-melt is associated with a large pulse of nutrients that originates from under-snow microbial mineralization of organic matter and microbial biomass turnover. Vegetation phenology in these systems is regulated by environmental cues such as air temperature ranges and photoperiod, such that, under typical conditions, vegetation greening and nutrient uptake occur in sync with microbial biomass turnover and nutrient release, closing nutrient cycles and enhancing nutrient retention. However, early snow-melt has been observed with increasing frequency in the mountainous west and is hypothesized to disrupt coupled plant-microbial behavior, potentially resulting in a temporal discontinuity between microbial nutrient release and vegetation greening. As part of the Watershed Function Scientific Focus Area (SFA) at Berkeley Lab we are quantifying below-ground biogeochemistry and above-ground phenology and vegetation chemistry and their relationships to hydrologic events at a lower montane hillslope in the East River catchment, Crested Butte, CO. This presentation will focus on data-model integration to interpret connectivity between biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen and vegetation nitrogen demand. Initial model results suggest that early snow-melt will result in an earlier accumulation and leaching loss of nitrate from the upper soil depths but that vegetation productivity may not decline as traits such as greater rooting depth and resource allocation to stems are favored.

  4. [Biogeochemical cycles in natural forest and conifer plantations in the high mountains of Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Juan Diego; González, María Isabel; Gallardo, Juan Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Plant litter production and decomposition are two important processes in forest ecosystems, since they provide the main organic matter input to soil and regulate nutrient cycling. With the aim to study these processes, litterfall, standing litter and nutrient return were studied for three years in an oak forest (Quercus humboldtii), pine (Pinus patula) and cypress (Cupressus lusitanica) plantations, located in highlands of the Central Cordillera of Colombia. Evaluation methods included: fine litter collection at fortnightly intervals using litter traps; the litter layer samples at the end of each sampling year and chemical analyses of both litterfall and standing litter. Fine litter fall observed was similar in oak forest (7.5 Mg ha/y) and in pine (7.8 Mg ha/y), but very low in cypress (3.5 Mg ha/y). Litter standing was 1.76, 1.73 and 1.3 Mg ha/y in oak, pine and cypress, respectively. The mean residence time of the standing litter was of 3.3 years for cypress, 2.1 years for pine and 1.8 years for oak forests. In contrast, the total amount of retained elements (N, P, S, Ca, Mg, K, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) in the standing litter was higher in pine (115 kg/ha), followed by oak (78 kg/ha) and cypress (24 kg/ha). Oak forests showed the lowest mean residence time of nutrients and the highest nutrients return to the soil as a consequence of a faster decomposition. Thus, a higher nutrient supply to soils from oaks than from tree plantations, seems to be an ecological advantage for recovering and maintaining the main ecosystem functioning features, which needs to be taken into account in restoration programs in this highly degraded Andean mountains.

  5. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yool

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011. The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. However, due to anthropogenic activity, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background. As such, simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a more complete representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter, as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterizations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal spin-up simulation (1860–2005 is performed. The biogeochemical performance of the model is evaluated using a diverse range of observational data, and MEDUSA-2.0 is assessed relative to comparable models using output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5.

  6. Biogeochemical cycling of arsenic in coastal salinized aquifers: Evidence from sulfur isotope study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Wang, Pei-Ling; Wang, Chung-Ho; Maji, Sanjoy Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater, accompanied by critical salinization, occurs in the southwestern coastal area of Taiwan. Statistical analyses and geochemical calculations indicate that a possible source of aqueous arsenic is the reductive dissolution of As-bearing iron oxyhydroxides. There are few reports of the influence of sulfate-sulfide redox cycling on arsenic mobility in brackish groundwater. We evaluated the contribution of sulfate reduction and sulfide re-oxidation on As enrichment using δ 34 S [SO 4 ] and δ 18 O [SO 4 ] sulfur isotopic analyses of groundwater. Fifty-three groundwater samples were divided into groups of high-As content and salinized (Type A), low-As and non-salinized (Type B), and high-As and non-salinized (Type C) groundwaters, based on hydro-geochemical analysis. The relatively high enrichment of 34 S [SO 4 ] and 18 O [SO 4 ] present in Type A, caused by microbial-mediated reduction of sulfate, and high 18 O enrichment factor (ε [SO 4 -H 2 O] ), suggests that sulfur disproportionation is an important process during the reductive dissolution of As-containing iron oxyhydroxides. Limited co-precipitation of ion-sulfide increased the rate of As liberation under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to this, Type B and Type C groundwater samples showed high δ 18 O [SO 4 ] and low δ 34 S [SO 4 ] values under mildly reducing conditions. Base on 18 O mass balance calculations, the oxide sources of sulfate are from infiltrated atmospheric O 2 , caused by additional recharge of dissolved oxygen and sulfide re-oxidation. The anthropogenic influence of extensive pumping also promotes atmospheric oxygen entry into aquifers, altering redox conditions, and increasing the rate of As release into groundwater. - Highlights: → Seawater intrusion and elevated As are the main issues of groundwater in Taiwan. → Sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate were analyzed to evaluate the As mobility. → Reductive dissolution of Fe minerals and

  7. Biogeochemical cycling of arsenic in coastal salinized aquifers: Evidence from sulfur isotope study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Yu-Hsuan [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Sheng-Wei [Agricultural Engineering Research Center, Chungli 320, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Chen-Wuing, E-mail: lcw@gwater.agec.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Pei-Ling [Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Chung-Ho [Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Maji, Sanjoy Kumar [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater, accompanied by critical salinization, occurs in the southwestern coastal area of Taiwan. Statistical analyses and geochemical calculations indicate that a possible source of aqueous arsenic is the reductive dissolution of As-bearing iron oxyhydroxides. There are few reports of the influence of sulfate-sulfide redox cycling on arsenic mobility in brackish groundwater. We evaluated the contribution of sulfate reduction and sulfide re-oxidation on As enrichment using {delta}{sup 34}S{sub [SO{sub 4]}} and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub [SO{sub 4]}} sulfur isotopic analyses of groundwater. Fifty-three groundwater samples were divided into groups of high-As content and salinized (Type A), low-As and non-salinized (Type B), and high-As and non-salinized (Type C) groundwaters, based on hydro-geochemical analysis. The relatively high enrichment of {sup 34}S{sub [SO{sub 4]}} and {sup 18}O{sub [SO{sub 4]}} present in Type A, caused by microbial-mediated reduction of sulfate, and high {sup 18}O enrichment factor ({epsilon}{sub [SO{sub 4-H{sub 2O]}}}), suggests that sulfur disproportionation is an important process during the reductive dissolution of As-containing iron oxyhydroxides. Limited co-precipitation of ion-sulfide increased the rate of As liberation under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to this, Type B and Type C groundwater samples showed high {delta}{sup 18}O{sub [SO{sub 4]}} and low {delta}{sup 34}S{sub [SO{sub 4]}} values under mildly reducing conditions. Base on {sup 18}O mass balance calculations, the oxide sources of sulfate are from infiltrated atmospheric O{sub 2}, caused by additional recharge of dissolved oxygen and sulfide re-oxidation. The anthropogenic influence of extensive pumping also promotes atmospheric oxygen entry into aquifers, altering redox conditions, and increasing the rate of As release into groundwater. - Highlights: {yields} Seawater intrusion and elevated As are the main issues of groundwater in Taiwan

  8. Biogeochemical cycling of lignocellulosic carbon in marine and freshwater ecosystems: relative contributions of procaryotes and eucaryotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, R.; Moran, M.A.; Hodson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The relative contributions of procaryotes and eucaryotes to the degradation of the lignin and polysaccharide components of lignocellulosic detritus in two marine and two freshwater wetland ecosystems were determined. Two independent methods - physical separation of bacteria from fungi and other eucaryotes by size fractionation, and antibiotic treatments - were used to estimate procaryotic and eucaryotic contributions to the degradation of [ 14 C-lignin]lignocelluloses and [ 13 C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses in samples of water and decaying plant material from each environment. Both methods yielded similar results; bacteria were the predominant degraders of lignocellulose in each of the aquatic ecosystems. These results indicate a basic difference between the microbial degradation of lignocellulosic material in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Fungi have long been considered the predominant degraders of lignocellulose in terrestrial systems; our results indicate that in aquatic systems bacteria are the predominant degraders of lignocellulose

  9. Biogeochemical cycling in a subarctic fjord adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meire, L.

    2016-01-01

    Temperatures in the Arctic have increased rapidly in recent years resulting in the melting of sea ice and glaciers at unprecedented rates. In 2012, sea ice extent across the Arctic reached a record minimum and the melt extent of Greenland Ice Sheet reached a record maximum. The accelerated mass loss

  10. From position-specific isotope labeling towards soil fluxomics: a novel toolbox to assess the microbial impact on biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostel, C.; Dippold, M. A.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the microbial impact on C and nutrient cycles is one of the most important challenges in terrestrial biogeochemistry. Transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) is a key step in all biogeochemical cycles because 1) all high molecular substances pass the LMWOS pool during their degradation and 2) only LMWOS can be taken up by microorganisms intact. Thus, the transformations of LMWOS are dominated by biochemical pathways of the soil microorganisms. Thus, understanding fluxes and transformations in soils requires a detailed knowledge on the microbial metabolic network and its control mechanism. Tracing C fate in soil by isotopes became on of the most applied and promising biogeochemistry tools but studies were nearly exclusively based on uniformly labeled substances. However, such tracers do not allow the differentiation of the intact use of the initial substances from its transformation to metabolites. The novel tool of position-specific labeling enables to trace molecule atoms separately and thus to determine the cleavage of molecules - a prerequisite for metabolic tracing. Position-specific labeling of basic metabolites and quantification of isotope incorporation in CO2 and bulk soil enabled following the basic metabolic pathways of microorganisms. However, the combination of position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis of microbial biomarkers and metabolites like phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) or amino sugars revealed new insights into the soil fluxome: First, it enables tracing specific anabolic pathways in diverse microbial communities in soils e.g. carbon starvation pathways versus pathways reflecting microbial growth. Second, it allows identification of specific pathways of individual functional microbial groups in soils in situ. Tracing metabolic pathways and understanding their regulating factors are crucial for soil C fluxomics i.e. the unravaling of the complex network of C transformations

  11. Seasonal dynamics of atmospheric and river inputs of black carbon, and impacts on biogeochemical cycles in Halong Bay, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Mari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of black carbon (BC, a product of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, biofuels and biomass, are high in the Asia-Pacific region, yet input pathways and rates to the ocean are not well constrained. Atmospheric and riverine inputs of BC in Halong Bay (Vietnam, a hotspot of atmospheric BC, were studied at monthly intervals during one year. Climate in Halong Bay is governed by the monsoon regime, characterized by a northeast winter monsoon (dry season and southeast summer monsoon (wet season. During the dry season, atmospheric BC concentrations averaged twice those observed during the wet season. In the sea surface microlayer (SML and underlying water (ULW, concentrations of particulate BC (PBC averaged 539 and 11 μmol C L–1, respectively. Dissolved BC (DBC concentrations averaged 2.6 μmol C L–1 in both the SML and ULW. Seasonal variations indicated that PBC concentration in the SML was controlled by atmospheric deposition during the dry season, while riverine inputs controlled both PBC and DBC concentrations in ULW during the wet season. Spatiotemporal variations of PBC and DBC during the wet season suggest that river runoff was efficient in transporting PBC that had accumulated on land during the dry season, and in mobilizing and transporting DBC to the ocean. The annual river flux of PBC was about 3.8 times higher than that of DBC. The monsoon regime controls BC input to Halong Bay by favoring dry deposition of BC originating from the north during the dry season, and wet deposition and river runoff during the wet season. High PBC concentrations seem to enhance the transfer of organic carbon from dissolved to particulate phase by adsorbing dissolved organic carbon and stimulating aggregation. Such processes may impact the availability and biogeochemical cycling of other dissolved substances, including nutrients, for the coastal marine ecosystem.

  12. Mapping and modeling the biogeochemical cycling of turf grasses in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, Cristina; Running, Steven W; Elvidge, Christopher D; Dietz, John B; Tuttle, Benjamin T; Nemani, Ramakrishna R

    2005-09-01

    Turf grasses are ubiquitous in the urban landscape of the United States and are often associated with various types of environmental impacts, especially on water resources, yet there have been limited efforts to quantify their total surface and ecosystem functioning, such as their total impact on the continental water budget and potential net ecosystem exchange (NEE). In this study, relating turf grass area to an estimate of fractional impervious surface area, it was calculated that potentially 163,800 km2 (+/- 35,850 km2) of land are cultivated with turf grasses in the continental United States, an area three times larger than that of any irrigated crop. Using the Biome-BGC ecosystem process model, the growth of warm-season and cool-season turf grasses was modeled at a number of sites across the 48 conterminous states under different management scenarios, simulating potential carbon and water fluxes as if the entire turf surface was to be managed like a well-maintained lawn. The results indicate that well-watered and fertilized turf grasses act as a carbon sink. The potential NEE that could derive from the total surface potentially under turf (up to 17 Tg C/yr with the simulated scenarios) would require up to 695 to 900 liters of water per person per day, depending on the modeled water irrigation practices, suggesting that outdoor water conservation practices such as xeriscaping and irrigation with recycled waste-water may need to be extended as many municipalities continue to face increasing pressures on freshwater.

  13. Using 67Cu to study the biogeochemical cycling of copper in the northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Semeniuk

    2016-06-01

    bacterial remineralization on dissolved Cu. These results provide a more detailed understanding of the interactions between Cu speciation and microorganisms in seawater, and present evidence that marine phytoplankton modify Cu speciation in the open ocean.

  14. Biogeochemical linkage between atmosphere and ocean in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean: Results from the EqPOS research cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, H.; Inai, Y.; Aoki, S.; Honda, H.; Omori, Y.; Tanimoto, H.; Iwata, T.; Ueda, S.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2012-12-01

    Eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean is a unique oceanic region from several biogeochemical points of view. It is a remote open ocean with relatively high marine biological activity, which would result in limited influence of human activity but enhanced effect of marine natural processes on atmospheric composition. It is also characterized as high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) ocean, in which availability of trace metals such as iron and zinc limits marine primary production and thus atmospheric deposition of these trace elements to the ocean surface is expected to play an important role in regulating marine primary production and defining unique microbial community. High sea surface temperature in the region generates strong vertical air convection which efficiently brings tropospheric atmospheric composition into stratosphere. In this unique eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, EqPOS (Equatorial Pacific Ocean and Stratospheric/Tropospheric Atmospheric Study) research cruise was organized as a part of SOLAS Japan activity to understand biogeochemical ocean-atmospheric interaction in the region. Coordinated atmospheric, oceanic, and marine biological observations including sampling/characterization of thin air-sea interfacial layer (sea surface microlayer: SML) and launching large stratospheric air sampling balloons were carried out on-board R/V Hakuho Maru starting from 29 January for 39 days. Biogeochemically important trace/long-lived gases such as CO2, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and some volatile organic carbons (VOCs) both in the atmosphere and seawater were continuously monitored and their air-sea fluxes were also observed using gradient and eddy-covariance techniques. Atmospheric gas measurement of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2, Ar and isotopic composition of selected gases were further extended to stratospheric air by balloon-born sampling in addition to a vertical profiling of O3, CO2, and H2O with sounding sondes. Physical and chemical properties of marine

  15. Calibration of a biome-biogeochemical cycles model for modeling the net primary production of teak forests through inverse modeling of remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imvitthaya, Chomchid; Honda, Kiyoshi; Lertlum, Surat; Tangtham, Nipon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a net primary production (NPP) modeling of teak (Tectona grandis Lin F.), an important species in tropical deciduous forests. The biome-biogeochemical cycles or Biome-BGC model was calibrated to estimate net NPP through the inverse modeling approach. A genetic algorithm (GA) was linked with Biome-BGC to determine the optimal ecophysiological model parameters. The Biome-BGC was calibrated by adjusting the ecophysiological model parameters to fit the simulated LAI to the satellite LAI (SPOT-Vegetation), and the best fitness confirmed the high accuracy of generated ecophysioligical parameter from GA. The modeled NPP, using optimized parameters from GA as input data, was evaluated using daily NPP derived by the MODIS satellite and the annual field data in northern Thailand. The results showed that NPP obtained using the optimized ecophysiological parameters were more accurate than those obtained using default literature parameterization. This improvement occurred mainly because the model's optimized parameters reduced the bias by reducing systematic underestimation in the model. These Biome-BGC results can be effectively applied in teak forests in tropical areas. The study proposes a more effective method of using GA to determine ecophysiological parameters at the site level and represents a first step toward the analysis of the carbon budget of teak plantations at the regional scale.

  16. Estimating the potential of energy saving and carbon emission mitigation of cassava-based fuel ethanol using life cycle assessment coupled with a biogeochemical process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Tian, Guangjin; Ding, Fangyu

    2017-09-01

    Global warming and increasing concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) have prompted considerable interest in the potential role of energy plant biomass. Cassava-based fuel ethanol is one of the most important bioenergy and has attracted much attention in both developed and developing countries. However, the development of cassava-based fuel ethanol is still faced with many uncertainties, including raw material supply, net energy potential, and carbon emission mitigation potential. Thus, an accurate estimation of these issues is urgently needed. This study provides an approach to estimate energy saving and carbon emission mitigation potentials of cassava-based fuel ethanol through LCA (life cycle assessment) coupled with a biogeochemical process model—GEPIC (GIS-based environmental policy integrated climate) model. The results indicate that the total potential of cassava yield on marginal land in China is 52.51 million t; the energy ratio value varies from 0.07 to 1.44, and the net energy surplus of cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 92,920.58 million MJ. The total carbon emission mitigation from cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 4593.89 million kgC. Guangxi, Guangdong, and Fujian are identified as target regions for large-scale development of cassava-based fuel ethanol industry. These results can provide an operational approach and fundamental data for scientific research and energy planning.

  17. Biogeochemical cycle and speciation of As and Cr in an acid mine environment : The case of Carnoulès Creek, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hécho, I.; Pecheyran, C.; Charles, S.; Monperrus, M.; Pavageau, M.-P.; Casiot, C.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Leblanc, M.; Donard, O. F. X.

    2003-05-01

    The aim of the work was to understand the biogeochemical cycles of two pollutants of interest found in the Carnoulès Creek : arsenic and chromium. The data for dissolved chromium speciation showed that this element is rather homogeneously distributed along the seepage water with 70-80% of Cr (VI); in particles collected from the same samples. chromium is totally present under the trivalent form. These results are consistent with the fact that hexavalent chromium is much more mobile fhan Cr (III).According to the results of dissolved arsenic speciation-arsenite was thé oniy species found. In the particles. As (V) and As (III) were deteeted and arsenate was the predominant fonn. A spatial evolution was evidenced with a global increase of As (V) percentage from the tailing basis to the river. This evolution can be explained by an oxidation phenomenon. Speciation analyses were also performe in solid samples: sediments and bacteria films taken in the seepage water. In sediments, more than 80% of As was under the pentavalent form whereas only 65% of arsenate is found in bacterial films.

  18. Hypoxia Tolerance and Metabolic Suppression in Oxygen Minimum Zone Euphausiids: Implications for Ocean Deoxygenation and Biogeochemical Cycles

    KAUST Repository

    Seibel, Brad A.

    2016-08-10

    The effects of regional variations in oxygen and temperature levels with depth were assessed for the metabolism and hypoxia tolerance of dominant euphausiid species. The physiological strategies employed by these species facilitate prediction of changing vertical distributions with expanding oxygen minimum zones and inform estimates of the contribution of vertically migrating species to biogeochemical cycles. The migrating species from the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP), Euphausia eximia and Nematoscelis gracilis, tolerate a Partial Pressure (PO2) of 0.8 kPa at 10 °C (∼15 µM O2) for at least 12 h without mortality, while the California Current species, Nematoscelis difficilis, is incapable of surviving even 2.4 kPa PO2 (∼32 µM O2) for more than 3 h at that temperature. Euphausia diomedeae from the Red Sea migrates into an intermediate oxygen minimum zone, but one in which the temperature at depth remains near 22 °C. Euphausia diomedeae survived 1.6 kPa PO2 (∼22 µM O2) at 22 °C for the duration of six hour respiration experiments. Critical oxygen partial pressures were estimated for each species, and, for E. eximia, measured via oxygen consumption (2.1 kPa, 10 °C, n = 2) and lactate accumulation (1.1 kPa, 10 °C). A primary mechanism facilitating low oxygen tolerance is an ability to dramatically reduce energy expenditure during daytime forays into low oxygen waters. The ETP and Red Sea species reduced aerobic metabolism by more than 50% during exposure to hypoxia. Anaerobic glycolytic energy production, as indicated by whole-animal lactate accumulation, contributed only modestly to the energy deficit. Thus, the total metabolic rate was suppressed by ∼49–64%. Metabolic suppression during diel migrations to depth reduces the metabolic contribution of these species to vertical carbon and nitrogen flux (i.e., the biological pump) by an equivalent amount. Growing evidence suggests that metabolic suppression is a widespread strategy among migrating

  19. Diazotroph-Bacterial Community Structure of Root Nodules Account for Two-Fold Differences in Plant Growth: Consequences for Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The bacterial communities that inhabit and function as mutualists in the nodules of soybean, a major worldwide crop, are a fundamental determinant of plant growth and global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Unfertilized soybean can derive up to 90% of its nitrogen through bacterial-driven diazotrophy. It was the goal of the research in this study to assess whether different bacterial taxa (e.g. Bradyrhizobia spp.) differ in their soybean growth supportive role, which could then feedback to alter global biogeochemical cycling. Using 16S rRNA and NifH genes, nodule bacterial communities were shown to vary across 9 different cultivars of soybean, and that the variation between cultivars were highly correlated to plant yield (97 to 188 bu/Ha) and nitrogen. The relative abundances of gene sequences associated with the closest taxonomic match (NCBI), indicated that several taxa were (r= 0.76) negatively (e.g. Bradyrhizobium sp Ec3.3) or (r= 0.84) positively (e.g. Bradyrhizobium elkanii WSM 2783) correlated with plant yield. Other non-Rhizobiaceae taxa, such as Rhodopseudomonas spp. were also prevalent and correlated with plant yield. Soybeans and other leguminous crops will become increasingly important part of world food production, soil fertility and global biogeochemical cycles with rising population and food demand. The study demonstrates the importance of plant-microbial feedbacks driving plant growth but also ramifications for global cycling of nitrogen and carbon.

  20. Study of the seasonal cycle of the biogeochemical processes in the Ligurian Sea using a 1D interdisciplinary model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raick, C.; Delhez, E.J.M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Grégoire, M.

    2005-01-01

    A one-dimensional coupled physical–biogeochemical model has been built to study the pelagic food web of the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea). The physical model is the turbulent closure model (version 1D) developed at the GeoHydrodynamics and Environmental Laboratory (GHER) of the University of

  1. High frequency marine biogeochemical monitoring from a Japan-Korea ferry -1991 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashima, A.

    1993-01-01

    A ferry mounted monitoring system was developed and deployed to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of biogeochemical parameters (dissolved nutrients, phytoplankton biomass, temperature, salinity and pH) along the ship's regular route between Pusan, Korea and Kobe, Japan. Semi-continuous data recording (every 10 seconds, 4 transect cruises per week) and automated bottle sampling with filtration (24 cruises per year) were performed using the sea water taken continuously from the engine cooling system intake at 6m depth. These data are expected to clarify the natural variability in and anthropogenic changes to the coastal and marginal seas and the mechanism of algal blooming and to supply the ground truth data for the calibration-validation of algorithms to calculate pigment concentrations from ocean color remote sensing data. Since the start of monitoring (June, 1991), the data have revealed the contrast between the Seto Inland Sea and the outer continental shelf area and the spatial heterogeneities over smaller scales. Among the events apparent in this time series data are the termination of the spring bloom, the mid-summer decrease of phytoplankton biomass due to depletion of nutrients, and autumn blooms, which are characteristic of the periods following storms

  2. Assessing biogeochemical cycling and transient storage of surface water in Eastern Siberian streams using short-term solute additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, J. D.; Seybold, E.; Drake, T. W.; Bulygina, E. B.; Bunn, A. G.; Chandra, S.; Davydov, S.; Frey, K. E.; Holmes, R. M.; Sobczak, W. V.; Spektor, V. V.; Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies highlight the role of stream networks in the processing of nutrient and organic matter inputs from the surrounding watershed. Clear evidence exists that streams actively regulate fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from upland terrestrial ecosystems to downstream aquatic environments. This is of particular interest in Arctic streams because of the potential impact of permafrost thaw due to global warming on inputs of nutrients and organic matter to small streams high in the landscape. Knowledge of functional characteristics of these stream ecosystems is paramount to our ability to predict changes in stream ecosystems as climate changes. Biogeochemical models developed by stream ecologists, specifically nutrient spiraling models, provide a set of metrics that we used to assess nutrient processing rates in several streams in the Eastern Siberian Arctic. We quantified these metrics using solute addition experiments in which nitrogen and phosphorus were added simultaneously with chloride as a conservative tracer. We focused on 5 streams, three flowing across upland yedoma soils and two floodplain streams. Yedoma streams showed higher uptake of N than P, suggesting N limitation of biological processes, with large variation between these three streams in the severity of N limitation. Floodplain streams both showed substantially higher P uptake than N uptake, indicating strong P limitation. Given these results, it is probable that these two types of streams will respond quite differently to changes in nutrient and organic matter inputs as permafrost thaws. Furthermore, uptake was strongly linked to discharge and transient storage of surface water, measured using temporal patterns of the conservative tracer, with higher nutrient uptake in low discharge, high transient storage streams. Given the possibility that both discharge and nutrient inputs will increase as permafrost thaws, longer-term nutrient enrichment experiments are needed to develop

  3. Biogeochemical cycles at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) and geochemical characteristics of the pore fluids offshore southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ching-Yi; Frank Yang, Tsanyao; Burr, George S.; Chuang, Pei-Chuan; Chen, Hsuan-Wen; Walia, Monika; Chen, Nai-Chen; Huang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Saulwood; Wang, Yunshuen; Chung, San-Hsiung; Huang, Chin-Da; Chen, Cheng-Hong

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we used pore water dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), SO42-, Ca2+ and Mg2+ gradients at the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) to estimate biogeochemical fluxes for cored sediments collected offshore SW Taiwan. Net DIC flux changes (ΔDIC-Prod) were applied to determine the proportion of sulfate consumption by organic matter oxidation (heterotrophic sulfate reduction) and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), and to determine reliable CH4 fluxes at the SMTZ. Our results show that SO42- profiles are mainly controlled by AOM rather than heterotrophic sulfate reduction. Refinement of CH4 flux estimates enhance our understanding of methane abundance from deep carbon reservoirs to the SMTZ. Concentrations of chloride (Cl-), bromide (Br-) and iodide (I-) dissolved in pore water were used to identify potential sources that control fluid compositions and the behavior of dissolved ions. Constant Cl- concentrations throughout ∼30 m sediment suggest no influence of gas hydrates for the compositions within the core. Bromide (Br-) and Iodine (I-) concentrations increase with sediment depth. The I-/Br- ratio appears to reflect organic matter degradation. SO42- concentrations decrease with sediment depth at a constant rate, and sediment depth profiles of Br- and I- concentrations suggests diffusion as the main transport mechanism. Therefore diffusive flux calculations are reasonable. Coring sites with high CH4 fluxes are more common in the accretionary wedge, amongst thrust faults and fractures, than in the passive continental margin offshore southwestern Taiwan. AOM reactions are a major sink for CH4 passing upward through the SMTZ and prevent high methane fluxes in the water column and to the atmosphere.

  4. Microbial Diversity, Distribution and Insight into Their Role in S, Fe and N Biogeochemical Cycling in the Hot Springs at Tengchong Geothermal Fields, Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Peng, X.; Zhang, L.

    2014-12-01

    Ten sediment samples collected from one acidic and three alkaline high temperature hot springs at Tengchong terrestrial geothermal field, Southwest China, were examined by the mineralogical, geochemical, and molecular biological techniques. The mineralogical and geochemical analyses suggested that these hot springs contain relative high concentrations of S, Fe and N chemical species. Specifically, the acidic hot spring was rich in Fe2+, SO42- and NH4+, while the alkaline hot springs were high in NO3-, H2S and S2O3-. Analyses of 16S rRNA sequences showed their bacterial communities were dominated by Aquificae, Cyanobacteria, Deinococci-Thermus, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Thermodesulfobacteria, while the archeal clone libraries were dominated by Desulfurococcales, Sulfolobales, and Thermoproteales. Among them, the potential S-, N- and Fe-related oxidizing and reducing prokaryote were presenting as a relative high proportion but with a great difference in diversity and metabolic approaches of each sample. These findings provide some significant implications for the microbial function in element biogeochemical cycles within the Tengchong geothermal environments: i). the distinct differences in abundance and diversity of microbial communities of geothermal sediments were related to in situ different physicochemical conditions; ii). the S-, N- and Fe-related prokaryote would take advantage of the strong chemical disequilibria in the hot springs; iii). in return, their metabolic activities can promote the transformation of S, Fe and N chemical species, thus founded the bases of biogeochemical cycles in the terrestrial geothermal environments.

  5. The Role of Heterotrophic Microbial Communities in Estuarine C Budgets and the Biogeochemical C Cycle with Implications for Global Warming: Research Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O Roger

    2016-05-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive and economically important marine ecosystems at the land-ocean interface and contribute significantly to exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. Estuarine microbial communities are major links in the biogeochemical C cycle and flow of C in food webs from primary producers to higher consumers. Considerable attention has been given to bacteria and autotrophic eukaryotes in estuarine ecosystems, but less research has been devoted to the role of heterotrophic eukaryotic microbes. Current research is reviewed here on the role of heterotrophic eukaryotic microbes in C biogeochemistry and ecology of estuaries, with particular attention to C budgets, trophodynamics, and the metabolic fate of C in microbial communities. Some attention is given to the importance of these processes in climate change and global warming, especially in relation to sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 , while also documenting the current paucity of research on the role of eukaryotic microbes that contribute to this larger question of C biogeochemistry and the environment. Some recommendations are made for future directions of research and opportunities of applying newer technologies and analytical approaches to a more refined analysis of the role of C in estuarine microbial community processes and the biogeochemical C cycle. © 2015 The Author Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  6. From Position-Specific Labeling to Environmental Fluxomics: Elucidating Biogeochemical Cycles from the Metabolic Perspective (BG Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Michaela; Apostel, Carolin; Dijkstra, Paul; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    , oxidizing catabolic pathways and anabolic pathways, i.e. building-up new cellular compounds, occurred in soils simultaneously, a combination unlikely to occur in pure cultures, where constant growth conditions under high C supply allow a straight unidirectional regulation of C metabolism. However, unstable environmental conditions, C scarcity and interactions between a still unknown diversity of microorganisms in soils are likely to induce the observed metabolic diversity. Coupling these results with the position-specific fingerprint of microbial biomarkers revealed that microbial groups show deviating adaptation strategies and that they react on environmental changes by activation or deactivation of specific metabolic pathways such as anaplerotic fluxes. To understand how microorganisms catalyze the biogeochemical fluxes in soil a profound understanding of their metabolic adaptation strategies such as recycling or switching between pathways is crucial. Metabolic flux models adapted to soil microbial communities and their regulatory strategies will not only deepen our understanding on the microorganims' reactions to environmental changes but also create the prerequisits for a quantitative prediction of biogeochemical fluxes based on the underlying microbial processes.

  7. How Reducing was the Late Devonian Ocean? The Role of Extensive Expansion of Anoxia in Marine Biogeochemical Cycles of Redox Sensitive Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jin, H.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of Earth's biogeochemical cycles is intimately linked to the oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere. The Late Devonian is no exception as its characterized with mass extinction and severe euxinia. Here we use concentrations of Molybdenum (Mo), Vanadium (V), Uranium (U) and Chromium (Cr) in organic rich black shales from the Lower Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin, to explore the relationship between extensive anoxia vs. euxinia and it's relation with massive release of oxygen in the ocean atmosphere system. XRF data from 4 core across the basin shows that modern ocean style Mo, U and Cr enrichments are observed throughout the Lower Bakken Formation, yet V is not enriched until later part of the formation. Given the coupling between redox-sensitive-trace element cycles and ocean redox, various models for Late Devonian ocean chemistry imply different effects on the biogeochemical cycling of major and trace nutrients. Here, we examine the differing redox behavior of molybdenum and vanadium under an extreme anoxia and relatively low extent of euxinia. The model suggests that Late Devonian was perhaps extensively anoxic- 40-50% compared to modern seafloor area, and a very little euxinia. Mo enrichments extend up to 500 p.p.m. throughout the section, representative of a modern reducing ocean. However, coeval low V enrichments only support towards anoxia, where anoxia is a source of V, and a sink for Mo. Our model suggests that the oceanic V reservoir is extremely sensitive to perturbations in the extent of anoxic condition, particularly during post glacial times.

  8. Synthesis of low cycle fatigue test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Axial strain controlled cycle fatigue tests were carried out on type 316 stainless steel parent metal, vacuum and non-vacuum electron beams welds, submerged arc welds and gas shielded metal arc welds. Testing covered total strains in the range 0.6% to 2%, and was at room temperature and 550 0 C. Parent metal and the electron beam welds showed rapid cyclic hardening, while arc welds showed little hardening. The weld metal cyclic stress-strain response was above that obtained for the parent metal, although below data obtained by other workers for similar parent materials. Weld metal endurances were above the ASME N47 continuous cycling design line at both temperatures, and comparable with parent metal data. However, the weld metal data approached the design line at low strain ranges (around 0.5%). Endurances were predicted from crack growth rates estimated from striation spacings, giving acceptable results except for the gas shielded metal arc weldments. (author)

  9. How important are intertidal ecosystems for global biogeochemical cycles? Molecular and isotopic evidence for major outwelling of photo-bleached dissolved organic matter from mangroves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, T.; Cooper, W. T.; Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.

    2006-05-01

    Organic matter, which is dissolved in low concentrations in the vast waters of the oceans, contains a total amount of carbon similar to atmospheric carbon dioxide. To understand global biogeochemical cycles it is crucial to quantify the sources of marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We investigated the impact of mangroves, the dominant intertidal vegetation of the tropics, on marine DOC inventories. Stable carbon- isotopes, ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (FTICRMS), lignin-derived phenols and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that mangroves are the main source of terrigenous DOC on the shelf off Northern Brazil. Sunlight efficiently destroyed aromatic molecules during transport offshore, removing about one third of mangrove-derived DOC. The remainder was refractory and may thus be distributed over the oceans. On a global scale, we estimate that mangroves account for more than 10 percent of the terrestrially- derived, refractory DOC transported to the ocean, while they cover less than 0.1 percent of the continents' surface.

  10. The Role of External Inputs and Internal Cycling in Shaping the Global Ocean Cobalt Distribution: Insights From the First Cobalt Biogeochemical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Hawco, Nicholas J.; Bundy, Randelle M.; Landing, William M.; Milne, Angela; Morton, Peter L.; Saito, Mak A.

    2018-04-01

    Cobalt is an important micronutrient for ocean microbes as it is present in vitamin B12 and is a co-factor in various metalloenzymes that catalyze cellular processes. Moreover, when seawater availability of cobalt is compared to biological demands, cobalt emerges as being depleted in seawater, pointing to a potentially important limiting role. To properly account for the potential biological role for cobalt, there is therefore a need to understand the processes driving the biogeochemical cycling of cobalt and, in particular, the balance between external inputs and internal cycling. To do so, we developed the first cobalt model within a state-of-the-art three-dimensional global ocean biogeochemical model. Overall, our model does a good job in reproducing measurements with a correlation coefficient of >0.7 in the surface and >0.5 at depth. We find that continental margins are the dominant source of cobalt, with a crucial role played by supply under low bottom-water oxygen conditions. The basin-scale distribution of cobalt supplied from margins is facilitated by the activity of manganese-oxidizing bacteria being suppressed under low oxygen and low temperatures, which extends the residence time of cobalt. Overall, we find a residence time of 7 and 250 years in the upper 250 m and global ocean, respectively. Importantly, we find that the dominant internal resupply process switches from regeneration and recycling of particulate cobalt to dissolution of scavenged cobalt between the upper ocean and the ocean interior. Our model highlights key regions of the ocean where biological activity may be most sensitive to cobalt availability.

  11. A decade of physical and biogeochemical measurements in the Northern Indian Ocean.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Sardesai, S.; Ramaiah, N.

    at understanding the seasonal variability of physical and biogeochemical parameters. The results showed strongest seasonal cycle in the Arabian Sea with blooms during summer and winter. Upwelling, advection and wind-mixing drive the summer bloom, while the winter...

  12. Biogeochemical Cycling of Fe, S, C, N, and Mo in the 3.2 Ga ocean: Constraints from DXCL-DP Black Shales from Pilbara, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, K. E.; Naraoka, H.; Ikehara, M.; Ito, T.; Kiyokawa, S.

    2014-12-01

    Records of geochemical cycling of bio-essential, redox-sensitive elements have keys to decipher mysteries of the co-evolution of Earth and life. To obtain insight into biogeochemical cycling of those elements and early evolution of microbial biosphere from high-quality samples, we drilled through Mesoarchean strata in coastal Pilbara (Dixon Island-Cleaverville Drilling Project, see Yamaguchi et al., 2009; Kiyokawa et al., 2012), and obtained 3.2 Ga old drillcores (CL1, CL2, and DX) of sulfide-rich black shales in the Cleaverville Group, Pilbara Supergroup. We conducted a systematic geochemical study involving sequential extractions of Fe, S, C, and N for phase-dependent contents (e.g., pyrite-Fe, reactive-Fe, highly reactive-Fe, unreactive-Fe, pyrite-S, sulfate-S, organic-S, elemental-S, Corg, Ccarb, Norg, and Nclay) and their stable isotope compositions, micro FT-IR and laser Raman spectroscopy for extracted kerogen, in addition to major and trace (redox-sensitive; e.g., Mo) element analysis, for >100 samples. Here we integrate our recent multidisciplinary investigations into the redox state of ocean and nature of microbial biosphere in the ocean 3.2 Ga ago. All of the obtained data are very difficult to explain only by geochemical processes in strictly anoxic environments, where both atmosphere and oceans were completely anoxic, like an environment before the inferred "Great Oxidation Event" when pO2 was lower than 0.00001 PAL (e.g., Holland, 1994). Our extensive data set consistently suggests that oxygenic photosynthesis, bacterial sulfate reduction, and microbially mediated redox-cycling of nitrogen, possibly involving denitrification and N2-fixation, are very likely to have been operating, and may be used as a strong evidence for at least local and temporal existence of oxidized environment as far back as 3.2 Ga ago. Modern-style biogeochemical cycling of Fe, S, C, N, and Mo has been operating since then. The atmosphere-hydrosphere system 3.2 Ga ago would have

  13. A regional scale modeling framework combining biogeochemical model with life cycle and economic analysis for integrated assessment of cropping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaie, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Bolte, John P; Murthy, Ganti S

    2018-06-01

    The goal of this study was to integrate a crop model, DNDC (DeNitrification-DeComposition), with life cycle assessment (LCA) and economic analysis models using a GIS-based integrated platform, ENVISION. The integrated model enables LCA practitioners to conduct integrated economic analysis and LCA on a regional scale while capturing the variability of soil emissions due to variation in regional factors during production of crops and biofuel feedstocks. In order to evaluate the integrated model, the corn-soybean cropping system in Eagle Creek Watershed, Indiana was studied and the integrated model was used to first model the soil emissions and then conduct the LCA as well as economic analysis. The results showed that the variation in soil emissions due to variation in weather is high causing some locations to be carbon sink in some years and source of CO 2 in other years. In order to test the model under different scenarios, two tillage scenarios were defined: 1) conventional tillage (CT) and 2) no tillage (NT) and analyzed with the model. The overall GHG emissions for the corn-soybean cropping system was simulated and results showed that the NT scenario resulted in lower soil GHG emissions compared to CT scenario. Moreover, global warming potential (GWP) of corn ethanol from well to pump varied between 57 and 92gCO 2 -eq./MJ while GWP under the NT system was lower than that of the CT system. The cost break-even point was calculated as $3612.5/ha in a two year corn-soybean cropping system and the results showed that under low and medium prices for corn and soybean most of the farms did not meet the break-even point. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcification response of Pleurochrysis carterae to iron concentrations in batch incubations: implication for the marine biogeochemical cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiang; Sun, Shiyong; Lin, Sen; Shen, Kexuan; Dong, Faqin; Tan, Daoyong; Nie, Xiaoqin; Liu, Mingxue; Wei, Jie

    2017-12-01

    Calcified coccolithophores, a diverse and widely distributed group of marine microalgae, produce biogenic calcite in the form of coccoliths located on the cell surface. Using batch incubations of the coccolithophorid Pleurochrysis carterae, we investigated the responses of this calcification process to iron concentrations by changing the iron supply in the initial culture media from a normal concentration to 1 ppm (parts per million), 5 ppm, and 10 ppm. Time-dependent measurements of cell population, production of inorganic carbon (coccoliths), and organic carbon (organic cellular components) showed that elevated iron supply in the growth medium of P. carterae stimulates carbon sequestration by increasing growth along enhanced photosynthetic activity and calcification. In addition, the acquired time-dependent UV-Vis and FT-IR spectra revealed that iron fertilization-enhanced coccolith calcification is accompanied by a crystalline phase transition from calcite to aragonite or amorphous phase. Our results suggest that iron concentration has a significant influence on the marine carbon cycle of coccolithophores.

  15. Impact of vegetation and ecosystems on chlorine(-36) cycling and its modeling: from simplified approaches towards more complex biogeochemical tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Yves; Redon, Paul-Olivier; Gustafsson, Malin; Marang, Laura; Bastviken, David

    2013-04-01

    Chlorine is very soluble at a global scale with chloride (Cl-), the dominating form. Because of its high mobility, chlorine is usually perceived as a good conservative tracer in hydrological studies and by analogy as little reactive in biosphere. Since 36Cl can be considered to have the same behaviour than stable Cl, a good knowledge of chlorine distribution between compartments of terrestrial ecosystems is sufficient to calibrate a specific activity model which supposes rapid dilution of 36Cl within the large pool of stable Cl and isotopic equilibrium between compartments. By assuming 36Cl redistribution similar to that of stable Cl at steady-state, specific activity models are simplified interesting tools for regulatory purposes in environmental safety assessment, especially in case of potential long term chronic contamination of agricultural food chain (IAEA, 2010). In many other more complex scenarios (accidental acute release, intermediate time frame, and contrasted natural ecosystems), new information and tools are necessary for improving (radio-)ecological realism, which entails a non-conservative behavior of chlorine. Indeed observed dynamics of chlorine in terrestrial ecosystems is far from a simple equilibrium notably because of natural processes of organic matter (SOM) chlorination mainly occurring in surface soils (Öberg, 1998) and mediated by microbial activities on a large extent (Bastviken et al. 2007). Our recent studies have strengthened the view that an organic cycle for chlorine should now be recognized, in addition to its inorganic cycle. Major results showed that: organochlorine (Clorg) formation occurs in all type of soils and ecosystems (culture, pasture, forest), leading to an average fraction of the total Cl pool in soil of about 80 % (Redon et al., 2012), chlorination in more organic soils over time leads to a larger Clorg pool and in turn to a possible high internal supply of inorganic chlorine (Clin) upon dechlorination. (Gustafsson et

  16. Molecular biological and isotopic biogeochemical prognoses of the nitrification-driven dynamic microbial nitrogen cycle in hadopelagic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunoura, Takuro; Nishizawa, Manabu; Kikuchi, Tohru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Hirai, Miho; Koide, Osamu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2013-11-01

    There has been much progress in understanding the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters including the recent identification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, and in the comprehensive estimation in abundance and activity of these microbial populations. However, compared with the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters, there are fewer studies concerning the oceanic benthic nitrogen cycle. To further elucidate the dynamic nitrogen cycle in deep-sea sediments, a sediment core obtained from the Ogasawara Trench at a water depth of 9760 m was analysed in this study. The profiles obtained for the pore-water chemistry, and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of pore-water nitrate in the hadopelagic sediments could not be explained by the depth segregation of nitrifiers and nitrate reducers, suggesting the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction in the shallowest nitrate reduction zone. The abundance of SSU rRNA and functional genes related to nitrification and denitrification are consistent with the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction observed in the geochemical analyses. This study presents the first example of cooperation between aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen metabolism in the deep-sea sedimentary environments. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Biogeochemical cycling of Mg and its isotopes in a sugar maple forest in Québec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmig, Sara R.; Holmden, Chris; Bélanger, Nicolas

    2018-06-01

    A Mg isotope study of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) in a field site in southern Québec, Canada, and seedlings grown in sterile soil substrate in the laboratory, both demonstrate per mil level within-tree Mg isotope fractionation. However, only sugar maple seedlings grown in the laboratory fractionate Mg isotopes during uptake into fine roots, favoring heavy isotope enrichment in the plant compared to the growth medium. Absence of uptake-related Mg isotope fractionation in field stands of sugar maple is tentatively attributed to the activities of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize fine roots of the trees in the field, but were absent from the laboratory grown specimens. The fungi facilitate nutrient uptake for the tree, while the tree provides valuable carbohydrates to the fungi. Without the symbiotic fungi, pot-grown trees in the laboratory are visibly stressed and often die. The mechanisms responsible for Mg isotopic fractionation in stressed trees remain to be elucidated. Rivers are isotopically light compared to bedrock weathering sources of Mg, and this has bearing on the δ26Mg value of the continental weathering flux of Mg to the oceans, which is an important parameter in studies of ocean Mg cycling in the geological past. If uptake-related fractionation is negligible in many other naturally growing tree species, as it is in sugar maple, then forest growth will exert little or no influence on the δ26Mg value of the export flux of Mg to first-order streams and rivers, and in turn the ocean Mg cycle. Above the tree line, preferential retention of heavy Mg isotopes in clay minerals formed during silicate weathering has been linked to the low δ26Mg values in rivers. In the forested catchment of this study there is no clear evidence for these effects. The 1 N HNO3 leach of the Bf-BC and C mineral soils, which are often used to identify minerals that may be releasing Mg and other base cations to plant-available pools, have the same average δ26

  18. Rare Earth Element Distribution in the NE Atlantic: Evidence for Benthic Sources, Longevity of the Seawater Signal, and Biogeochemical Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty C. Crocket

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Seawater rare earth element (REE concentrations are increasingly applied to reconstruct water mass histories by exploiting relative changes in the distinctive normalised patterns. However, the mechanisms by which water masses gain their patterns are yet to be fully explained. To examine this, we collected water samples along the Extended Ellett Line (EEL, an oceanographic transect between Iceland and Scotland, and measured dissolved REE by offline automated chromatography (SeaFAST and ICP-MS. The proximity to two continental boundaries, the incipient spring bloom coincident with the timing of the cruise, and the importance of deep water circulation in this climatically sensitive gateway region make it an ideal location to investigate sources of REE to seawater and the effects of vertical cycling and lateral advection on their distribution. The deep waters have REE concentrations closest to typical North Atlantic seawater and are dominated by lateral advection. Comparison to published seawater REE concentrations of the same water masses in other locations provides a first measure of the temporal and spatial stability of the seawater REE signal. We demonstrate the REE pattern is replicated for Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW in the Iceland Basin from adjacent stations sampled 16 years previously. A recently published Labrador Sea Water (LSW dissolved REE signal is reproduced in the Rockall Trough but shows greater light and mid REE alteration in the Iceland Basin, possibly due to the dominant effect of ISOW and/or continental inputs. An obvious concentration gradient from seafloor sediments to the overlying water column in the Rockall Trough, but not the Iceland Basin, highlights release of light and mid REE from resuspended sediments and pore waters, possibly a seasonal effect associated with the timing of the spring bloom in each basin. The EEL dissolved oxygen minimum at the permanent pycnocline corresponds to positive heavy REE

  19. A review and evaluation of stemflow literature in the hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles of forested and agricultural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levia, Delphis F.; Frost, Ethan E.

    2003-04-01

    Stemflow is a spatially localized point input of precipitation and solutes at the plant stem and is of hydrological and ecological significance in forested and agricultural ecosystems. The purpose of this review is to: (1) critically evaluate our current understanding of stemflow; (2) identify gaps in our present knowledge of stemflow; and (3) stimulate further research in areas where present knowledge is weak. The review begins by analyzing stemflow drainage and nutrient inputs under diverse vegetal cover. Stemflow inputs are then examined as a function of meteorological conditions, seasonality, interspecific and intraspecific differences among and within species, canopy structure, spatiality, and atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Stemflow modeling studies are also reviewed and evaluated. Stemflow yield and chemistry are the result of the interaction of the many complex variables listed. By analyzing each separately, it may be possible to isolate their individual affects on stemflow production and chemistry. A comprehensive understanding of each influencing factor would enable the accurate modeling of stemflow water and nutrient inputs into agricultural and forest soils which may result in the optimization of timber and crop harvests. Some areas where present knowledge is particularly weak are: (1) stemflow production and nutrient transfers in northern boreal forests (aspen, birch, conifers) and desert cacti; (2) chemical enrichment of stemflow from live trees charred by forest fires; (3) stemflow yield and nutrient inputs during the winter season; (4) intraspecific variation in stemflow production and chemistry; (5) stemflow chemistry from standing dead trees; (6) influence of canopy structure on stemflow chemistry; (7) understory stemflow generation and nutrient transfer; and (8) stemflow enrichment associated with insect infestations.

  20. Physical and Biogeochemical Controls of the Phytoplankton Blooms in North Western Mediterranean Sea: A Multiplatform Approach Over a Complete Annual Cycle (2012-2013 DEWEX Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayot, Nicolas; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Taillandier, Vincent; Prieur, Louis; de Fommervault, Orens Pasqueron; Claustre, Hervé; Bosse, Anthony; Testor, Pierre; Conan, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    The North Western Mediterranean Sea exhibits recurrent and significant autumnal and spring phytoplankton blooms. The existence of these two blooms coincides with typical temperate dynamics. To determine the potential control of physical and biogeochemical factors on these phytoplankton blooms, data from a multiplatform approach (combining ships, Argo and BGC-Argo floats, and bio-optical gliders) were analyzed in association with satellite observations in 2012-2013. The satellite framework allowed a simultaneous analysis over the whole annual cycle of in situ observations of mixed layer depth, photosynthetical available radiation, particle backscattering, nutrients (nitrate and silicate), and chlorophyll-a concentrations. During the year 2012-2013, satellite ocean color observations, confirmed by in situ data, have revealed the existence of two areas (or bioregions) with comparable autumnal blooms but contrasting spring blooms. In both bioregions, the ratio of the euphotic zone (defined as the isolume 0.415 mol photons m-2 d-1, Z0.415) and the MLD identified the initiation of the autumnal bloom, as well as the maximal annual increase in [Chl-a] in spring. In fact, the autumnal phytoplankton bloom might be initiated by mixing of the summer shallowing deep chlorophyll maximum, while the spring restratification (when Z0.415/MLD ratio became >1) might induce surface phytoplankton production that largely overcomes the losses. Finally, winter deep convection events that took place in one of the bioregions induced higher net accumulation rate of phytoplankton in spring associated with a diatom-dominated phytoplankton community principally. We suggest that very deep winter MLD lead to an increase in surface silicates availability, which favored the development of diatoms.

  1. Multicompartment Ecosystem Mass Balances as a Tool for Understanding and Managing the Biogeochemical Cycles of Human Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence A. Baker

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen remains a ubiquitous pollutant in surface and groundwater throughout the United States, despite 30 years of pollution control efforts. A detailed multicompartment N balance for the Central Arizona-Phoenix ecosystem is used to illustrate how an ecosystem-level approach can be used to develop improved N management strategies. The N balance is used to demonstrate how nitrate in pumped groundwater used for crop irrigation could be used to reduce inputs of commercial fertilizer and decrease N leaching to aquifers. Effectively managing N pollution also will require an understanding of the complex factors that control the N balance, including targeted regulations, individual human behavior, land-use conversion, and other ecosystem management practices that affect the N balance. These sometimes countervailing factors are illustrated with several scenarios of wastewater treatment technology and population growth in the Phoenix area. Management of N eventually must be coupled to management of other elements, notably carbon, phosphorus, and salts. We postulate that an ecosystem framework for pollution management will result in strategies that are more effective, fairer, and less expensive than current approaches.

  2. The upland flooding experiment : assessing the impact of reservoir creation on the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in boreal forest uplands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolfhus, K.R. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Water Chemistry Program; Bodaly, R.A.; Fudge, R.J.P.; Huebert, D.; Paterson, M.J. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Ottawa, ON (Canada) Fresh Water Inst.; Hall, B.D.; St Louis, V.L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Krabbenhoft, D.P. [U.S. Geological Survey (United States); Hurley, J.P. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Water Resources Inst.; Peech, K. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Entomology

    2000-07-01

    One of the major environmental problems associated with boreal hydroelectric reservoirs such as those found in Canada and other northern countries is the elevated concentrations of mercury (Hg) in fish. A flooding experiment was conducted in northern Ontario to study methyl mercury (MeHg) production/bioaccumulation and greenhouse gas dynamics in impoundments with flooded upland forests of different soil carbon content, moisture and vegetation. The study, entitled Upland Flooding Experiment (FLUDEX) took place in June 1999 at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) where three impoundments of 0.7 ha were flooded to a depth of 1 m using oligotrophic lake water. The hydraulic residence time was 10-14 days. Responses to flooding were compared among treatment reservoirs and to previously flooded wetlands. The study included researchers from Canada and the United States who characterized mercury species fluxes from soils, the overall reservoir mass balance for total Hg and MeHg, inorganic Hg and MeHg concentration in zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, emerging insects and fish. Carbon decomposition was also examined. Preliminary results, one year after inundation, show significantly high levels of MeHg concentration compared to the feed water and that of surrounding natural lakes. Outflow samples from the dry forest areas showed the highest concentrations of Hg and MeHg, with lower concentrations from the moist forest. The lowest levels were observed from the outflow from the driest forest reservoir. A rapid pulse of inorganic Hg appears to have been released during the first 2 weeks of flooding. Soil leaching was found to be the main mechanism or inorganic Hg supply while MeHg appears to have been supplied by in situ microbial methylation. It was also shown that forage fish introduced into the reservoir had significantly elevated concentrations of MeHg compared to fish in natural lakes.

  3. Engineering Pseudomonas stutzeri as a biogeochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, L.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are being drastically altered as a result of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and the industrial production of ammonia. We know microbes play a major part in these cycles, but the extent of their biogeochemical roles remains largely uncharacterized due to inadequacies with culturing and measurement. While metagenomics and other -omics methods offer ways to reconstruct microbial communities, these approaches can only give an indication of the functional roles of microbes in a community. These -omics approaches are rapidly being expanded to the point of outpacing our knowledge of functional genes, which highlights an inherent need for analytical methods that non-invasively monitor Earth's processes in real time. Here we aim to exploit synthetic biology methods in order to engineer a ubiquitous denitrifying microbe, Pseudomonas stutzeri that can act as a biosensor in soil and marine environments. By using an easily cultivated microbe that is also common in many environments, we hope to develop a tool that allows us to zoom in on specific aspects of the nitrogen cycle. In order to monitor processes occurring at the genetic level in environments that cannot be resolved with fluorescence-based methods, such as soils, we have developed a system that instead relies on gas production by engineered microbial biosensors. P. stutzeri has been successfully engineered to release a gas, methyl bromide, which can continuously and non-invasively be measured by GC-MS. Similar to using Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, in the biological sciences, the gene controlling gas production can be linked to those involved in denitrification, thereby creating a quantifiable gas signal that is correlated with microbial activity in the soil. Synthetically engineered microbial biosensors could reveal key aspects of metabolism in soil systems and offer a tool for characterizing the scope and degree of microbial impact on major biogeochemical cycles.

  4. Incorporating nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria in the global biogeochemical model HAMOCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Hanna; Ilyina, Tatiana; Six, Katharina

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation by marine diazotrophs plays a fundamental role in the oceanic nitrogen and carbon cycle as it provides a major source of 'new' nitrogen to the euphotic zone that supports biological carbon export and sequestration. Since most global biogeochemical models include nitrogen fixation only diagnostically, they are not able to capture its spatial pattern sufficiently. Here we present the incorporation of an explicit, dynamic representation of diazotrophic cyanobacteria and the corresponding nitrogen fixation in the global ocean biogeochemical model HAMOCC (Hamburg Ocean Carbon Cycle model), which is part of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth system model (MPI-ESM). The parameterization of the diazotrophic growth is thereby based on available knowledge about the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp., which is considered as the most significant pelagic nitrogen fixer. Evaluation against observations shows that the model successfully reproduces the main spatial distribution of cyanobacteria and nitrogen fixation, covering large parts of the tropical and subtropical oceans. Besides the role of cyanobacteria in marine biogeochemical cycles, their capacity to form extensive surface blooms induces a number of bio-physical feedback mechanisms in the Earth system. The processes driving these interactions, which are related to the alteration of heat absorption, surface albedo and momentum input by wind, are incorporated in the biogeochemical and physical model of the MPI-ESM in order to investigate their impacts on a global scale. First preliminary results will be shown.

  5. A biogeochemical model of Lake Pusiano (North Italy and its use in the predictability of phytoplankton blooms: first preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro OGGIONI

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the first preliminary results of the DYRESM-CAEDYM model application to a mid size sub-alpine lake (Lake Pusiano North Italy. The in-lake modelling is a part of a more general project called Pusiano Integrated Lake/Catchment project (PILE whose final goal is to understand the hydrological and trophic relationship between lake and catchment, supporting the restoration plan of the lake through field data analysis and numerical models. DYRESM is a 1D-3D hydrodynamics model for predicting the vertical profile of temperature, salinity and density. CAEDYM is multi-component ecological model, used here as a phytoplankton-zooplankton processes based model, which includes algorithms to simulate the nutrient cycles within the water column as well as the air-water gas exchanges and the water-sediments fluxes. The first results of the hydrodynamics simulations underline the capability of the model to accurately simulate the surface temperature seasonal trend and the thermal gradient whereas, during summer stratification, the model underestimates the bottom temperature of around 2 °C. The ecological model describes the epilimnetic reactive phosphorus (PO4 depletion (due to the phytoplankton uptake and the increase in PO4 concentrations in the deepest layers of the lake (due to the mineralization processes and the sediments release. In terms of phytoplankton dynamics the model accounts for the Planktothrix rubescens dominance during the whole season, whereas it seems to underestimate the peak in primary production related to both the simulated algal groups (P. rubescens and the rest of the other species aggregated in a single class. The future aims of the project are to complete the model parameterization and to connect the in-lake and the catchment modelling in order to gain an integrated view of the lake-catchment ecosystem as well as to develop a three dimensional model of the lake.

  6. Biological oceanography, biogeochemical cycles, and pelagic ecosystem functioning of the east-central South Pacific Gyre: focus on Easter Island and Salas y Gómez Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter von Dassow

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Exclusive Economic Zone of Chile defined by Easter Island and Salas y Gómez Island is in the South Pacific Sub-tropical Gyre (SPSG, putting it at the center of the most oligotrophic and biomass poor waters in the world. Only 10 biological oceanographic expeditions have entered this zone in 105 years (19052010. We review key aspects of the plankton ecosystem and biogeochemical function relevant for the understanding of and conservation planning for marine environments. Plankton production is limited by lack of dissolved inorganic fixed nitrogen, not phosphorous. Higher organic nitrogen levels might be biologically unavailable. Short-term experiments suggested iron is not limiting, yet iron still likely limits nitrogen fixation, and thus production, at longer time scales, as the presence of nitrogen-fixers is exceptionally low compared to other ocean gyres. Plankton function is dominated by the smallest unicellular organisms, picoplankton (<3 μm in diameter. The SPSG represents a center of high biodiversity for picoplankton, as well as heterotrophic organisms such as tinntinids, siphonophores, and possibly amphipods, although data for key zooplankton, such as copepods, are lacking. Many groups exhibit negative relationships between diversity and total plankton biomass. High diversity might result from dispersal from a very large metacommunity and minimal competition within functional groups. Whether an island-mass effect causes a real or apparent increase in plankton biomass around Easter Island must be confirmed by high-resolution sampling in situ. Long-term threats to the planktonic ecosystem may include climate change-enhanced ocean stratification and plastic marine debris accumulation. Finally, priorities for future research are highlighted.

  7. A comparison of simulation results from two terrestrial carbon cycle models using three climate data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Akihiko; Sasai, Takahiro

    2006-01-01

    This study addressed how different climate data sets influence simulations of the global terrestrial carbon cycle. For the period 1982-2001, we compared the results of simulations based on three climate data sets (NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE AMIP-II and ERA40) employed in meteorological, ecological and biogeochemical studies and two different models (BEAMS and Sim-CYCLE). The models differed in their parameterizations of photosynthetic and phenological processes but used the same surface climate (e.g. shortwave radiation, temperature and precipitation), vegetation, soil and topography data. The three data sets give different climatic conditions, especially for shortwave radiation, in terms of long-term means, linear trends and interannual variability. Consequently, the simulation results for global net primary productivity varied by 16%-43% only from differences in the climate data sets, especially in these regions where the shortwave radiation data differed markedly: differences in the climate data set can strongly influence simulation results. The differences among the climate data set and between the two models resulted in slightly different spatial distribution and interannual variability in the net ecosystem carbon budget. To minimize uncertainty, we should pay attention to the specific climate data used. We recommend developing an accurate standard climate data set for simulation studies

  8. Biological oceanography, biogeochemical cycles, and pelagic ecosystem functioning of the east-central South Pacific Gyre: focus on Easter Island and Salas y Gómez Island

    OpenAIRE

    Von Dassow , Peter; Collado-Fabbri , Silvana

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The Exclusive Economic Zone of Chile defined by Easter Island and Salas y Gómez Island is in the South Pacific Subtropical Gyre (SPSG), putting it at the center of the most oligotrophic and biomass poor waters in the world. Only 10 biological oceanographic expeditions have entered this zone in 105 years (1905-2010). We review key aspects of the plankton ecosystem and biogeochemical function relevant for the understanding of and conservation planning for marine environm...

  9. Preliminary results on the influence of river discharges on biogeochemical processes in Godavari estuary and Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    in the following dry seasons. Biological productivity was found to be very high during the retrieval period of the monsoon. These initial results suggest that the Godavari estuary ecosystem is different from what we know of its seasonal variability....

  10. Potential environmental impact of tidal energy extraction in the Pentland Firth at large spatial scales: results of a biogeochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Johan; Ruardij, Piet; Greenwood, Naomi

    2016-05-01

    A model study was carried out of the potential large-scale (> 100 km) effects of marine renewable tidal energy generation in the Pentland Firth, using the 3-D hydrodynamics-biogeochemistry model GETM-ERSEM-BFM. A realistic 800 MW scenario and a high-impact scenario with massive expansion of tidal energy extraction to 8 GW scenario were considered. The realistic 800 MW scenario suggested minor effects on the tides, and undetectable effects on the biogeochemistry. The massive-expansion 8 GW scenario suggested effects would be observed over hundreds of kilometres away with changes of up to 10 % in tidal and ecosystem variables, in particular in a broad area in the vicinity of the Wash. There, waters became less turbid, and primary production increased with associated increases in faunal ecosystem variables. Moreover, a one-off increase in carbon storage in the sea bed was detected. Although these first results suggest positive environmental effects, further investigation is recommended of (i) the residual circulation in the vicinity of the Pentland Firth and effects on larval dispersal using a higher-resolution model and (ii) ecosystem effects with (future) state-of-the-art models if energy extraction substantially beyond 1 GW is planned.

  11. Mercury behaviour and C, N, and P biogeochemical cycles during ecological restoration processes of old mining sites in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couic, Ewan; Grimaldi, Michel; Alphonse, Vanessa; Balland-Bolou-Bi, Clarisse; Livet, Alexandre; Giusti-Miller, Stéphanie; Sarrazin, Max; Bousserrhine, Noureddine

    2018-04-25

    Several decades of gold mining extraction activities in the Amazonian rainforest have caused deforestation and pollution. While ecological rehabilitation is essential for restoring biodiversity and decreasing erosion on deforested lands, few studies note the behaviour or toxicity of trace elements during the rehabilitation process. Our original study focused on the potential use of microbial activity and Hg speciation and compared them with As, Cu, Zn and Cr speciation in assessing the chemical and biological quality of ecological restoration efforts. We sampled two sites in French Guyana 17 years after rehabilitation efforts began. The former site was actively regenerated (R) with the leguminous species Clitoria racemosa and Acacia mangium, and the second site was passively regenerated with spontaneous vegetation (Sv). We also sampled soil from a control site without a history of gold mining (F). We performed microcosm soil experiments for 30 days, where trace element speciation and enzyme activities (i.e., FDA, dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, urease, alkaline and acid phosphatase) were estimated to characterise the behaviour of trace elements and the soil microbial activity. As bioindicators, the use of soil microbial carbon biomass and soil enzyme activities related to the carbon and phosphorus cycles seems to be relevant for assessing soil quality in rehabilitated and regenerated old mining sites. Our results showed that restoration with leguminous species had a positive effect on soil chemical quality and on soil microbial bioindicators, with activities that tended toward natural non-degraded soil (F). Active restoration processes also had a positive effect on Hg speciation by reducing its mobility. While in Sv we found more exchangeable and soluble mercury, in regenerated sites, Hg was mostly bound to organic matter. These results also suggested that enzyme activities and mercury cycles are sensitive to land restoration and must be considered when evaluating

  12. The Southern Ocean biogeochemical divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, I; Gnanadesikan, A; Toggweiler, J R; Sarmiento, J L

    2006-06-22

    Modelling studies have demonstrated that the nutrient and carbon cycles in the Southern Ocean play a central role in setting the air-sea balance of CO(2) and global biological production. Box model studies first pointed out that an increase in nutrient utilization in the high latitudes results in a strong decrease in the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2). This early research led to two important ideas: high latitude regions are more important in determining atmospheric pCO2 than low latitudes, despite their much smaller area, and nutrient utilization and atmospheric pCO2 are tightly linked. Subsequent general circulation model simulations show that the Southern Ocean is the most important high latitude region in controlling pre-industrial atmospheric CO(2) because it serves as a lid to a larger volume of the deep ocean. Other studies point out the crucial role of the Southern Ocean in the uptake and storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and in controlling global biological production. Here we probe the system to determine whether certain regions of the Southern Ocean are more critical than others for air-sea CO(2) balance and the biological export production, by increasing surface nutrient drawdown in an ocean general circulation model. We demonstrate that atmospheric CO(2) and global biological export production are controlled by different regions of the Southern Ocean. The air-sea balance of carbon dioxide is controlled mainly by the biological pump and circulation in the Antarctic deep-water formation region, whereas global export production is controlled mainly by the biological pump and circulation in the Subantarctic intermediate and mode water formation region. The existence of this biogeochemical divide separating the Antarctic from the Subantarctic suggests that it may be possible for climate change or human intervention to modify one of these without greatly altering the other.

  13. Loss of phytotelmata due to an invasive bromeliad-eating weevil and its potential effects on faunal diversity and biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Teresa M.; Frank, J. Howard; Cave, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Epiphytic tank bromeliads are important ecosystem engineers because they form phytotelmata that create habitat, increase species richness and abundance, create water sources and nutrient reservoirs in the canopy, and collect and redirect nutrients in forest ecosystems. Native bromeliad populations have been devastated in Florida (USA) because an invasive bromeliad-eating weevil (Metamasius callizona) has been destroying the plants. Tillandsia utriculata is a tank bromeliad that was once widespread from central to south Florida. Its populations have been hit hard by the weevil and are declining rapidly. This study quantifies the mortality rate caused by the weevil in a population of T. utriculata at the Enchanted Forest Sanctuary in central Florida and estimates the associated loss of phytotelmata. Estimations of phytotelmata were calculated for the T. utriculata baseline population, the population at 6 months into the study when 87% of the population was destroyed, and at the end of the study when less than 3% of the bromeliad population remained (99% of all deaths were caused by the weevil). The baseline population contained 16,758 L of water. At six months, there were 3180 L, and at the end of the study, there were 408 L. The loss of phytotelmata results in the loss of habitat, a decrease in biological diversity, and altered water and nutrient cycles and availability.

  14. The acid and alkalinity budgets of weathering in the Andes-Amazon system: Insights into the erosional control of global biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Mark A.; West, A. Joshua; Clark, Kathryn E.; Paris, Guillaume; Bouchez, Julien; Ponton, Camilo; Feakins, Sarah J.; Galy, Valier; Adkins, Jess F.

    2016-09-01

    The correlation between chemical weathering fluxes and denudation rates suggests that tectonic activity can force variations in atmospheric pCO2 by modulating weathering fluxes. However, the effect of weathering on pCO2 is not solely determined by the total mass flux. Instead, the effect of weathering on pCO2 also depends upon the balance between 1) alkalinity generation by carbonate and silicate mineral dissolution and 2) sulfuric acid generation by the oxidation of sulfide minerals. In this study, we explore how the balance between acid and alkalinity generation varies with tectonic uplift to better understand the links between tectonics and the long-term carbon cycle. To trace weathering reactions across the transition from the Peruvian Andes to the Amazonian foreland basin, we measured a suite of elemental concentrations (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr, Si, Li, SO4, and Cl) and isotopic ratios (87Sr/86Sr and δ34S) on both dissolved and solid phase samples. Using an inverse model, we quantitatively link systematic changes in solute geochemistry with elevation to downstream declines in sulfuric acid weathering as well as the proportion of cations sourced from silicates. With a new carbonate-system framework, we show that weathering in the Andes Mountains is a CO2 source whereas foreland weathering is a CO2 sink. These results are consistent with the theoretical expectation that the ratio of sulfide oxidation to silicate weathering increases with increasing erosion. Altogether, our results suggest that the effect of tectonically-enhanced weathering on atmospheric pCO2 is strongly modulated by sulfide mineral oxidation.

  15. Financial Instability - a Result of Excess Liquidity or Credit Cycles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heebøll-Christensen, Christian

    This paper compares the financial destabilizing effects of excess liquidity versus credit growth, in relation to house price bubbles and real economic booms. The analysis uses a cointegrated VAR model based on US data from 1987 to 2010, with a particulary focus on the period preceding the global...... financial crisis. Consistent with monetarist theory, the results suggest a stable money supply-demand relation in the period in question. However, the implied excess liquidity only resulted in financial destabilizing effect after year 2000. Meanwhile, the results also point to persistent cycles of real...... house prices and leverage, which appear to have been driven by real credit shocks, in accordance with post-Keynesian theories on financial instability. Importantly, however, these mechanisms of credit growth and excess liquidity are found to be closely related. In regards to the global financial crisis...

  16. The Hamburg oceanic carbon cycle circulation model. Cycle 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier-Reimer, E.; Heinze, C.

    1992-02-01

    The carbon cycle model calculates the prognostic fields of oceanic geochemical carbon cycle tracers making use of a 'frozen' velocity field provided by a run of the LSG oceanic circulation model (see the corresponding manual, LSG=Large Scale Geostrophic). The carbon cycle model includes a crude approximation of interactions between sediment and bottom layer water. A simple (meridionally diffusive) one layer atmosphere model allows to calculate the CO 2 airborne fraction resulting from the oceanic biogeochemical interactions. (orig.)

  17. Using Coupled Models to Study the Effects of River Discharge on Biogeochemical Cycling and Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penta, Bradley; Ko, D.; Gould, Richard W.; Arnone, Robert A.; Greene, R.; Lehrter, J.; Hagy, James; Schaeffer, B.; Murrell, M.; Kurtz, J.; hide

    2009-01-01

    We describe emerging capabilities to understand physical processes and biogeoehemical cycles in coastal waters through the use of satellites, numerical models, and ship observations. Emerging capabilities provide significantly improved ability to model ecological systems and the impact of environmental management actions on them. The complex interaction of physical and biogeoehemical processes responsible for hypoxic events requires an integrated approach to research, monitoring, and modeling in order to fully define the processes leading to hypoxia. Our efforts characterizes the carbon cycle associated with river plumes and the export of organic matter and nutrients form coastal Louisiana wetlands and embayments in a spatially and temporally intensive manner previously not possible. Riverine nutrients clearly affect ecosystems in the northern Gulf of Mexico as evidenced in the occurrence of regional hypoxia events. Less known and largely unqualified is the export of organic matter and nutrients from the large areas of disappearing coastal wetlands and large embayments adjacent to the Louisiana Continental Shelf. This project provides new methods to track the river plume along the shelf and to estimate the rate of export of suspended inorganic and organic paniculate matter and dissolved organic matter form coastal habitats of south Louisiana.

  18. Biogeochemical Reactions Under Simulated Europa Ocean Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, X.; Connon, S. A.; Gleeson, D. F.; Kowalczyk, R. S.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    Galileo data have demonstrated the probable presence of a liquid water ocean on Europa, and existence of salts and carbon dioxide in the satellite's surface ice (e.g., Carr et al., 1998; McCord et al., 1999, Pappalardo et al., 1999; Kivelson et al., 2000). Subsequently, the discovery of chemical signatures of extinct or extant life in Europa's ocean and on its surface became a distinct possibility. Moreover, understanding of Europa's potential habitability is now one of the major goals of the Europa Orbiter Flagship mission. It is likely, that in the early stages of Europa's ocean formation, moderately alkaline oceanic sulfate-carbonate species and a magnetite-silicate mantel could have participated in low-temperature biogeochemical sulfur, iron and carbon cycles facilitated by primitive organisms (Zolotov and Shock, 2004). If periodic supplies of fresh rock and sulfate-carbonate ions are available in Europa's ocean, then an exciting prospect exists that life may be present in Europa's ocean today. In our laboratory, we began the study of the plausible biogeochemical reactions under conditions appropriate to Europa's ocean using barophilic psychrophilic organisms that thrive under anaerobic conditions. In the near absence of abiotic synthetic pathways due to low Europa's temperatures, the biotic synthesis may present a viable opportunity for the formation of the organic and inorganic compounds under these extreme conditions. This work is independent of assumptions regarding hydrothermal vents at Europa's ocean floor or surface-derived oxidant sources. For our studies, we have fabricated a high-pressure (5,000 psi) reaction vessel that simulates aqueous conditions on Europa. We were also successful at reviving barophilic psychrophilic strains of Shewanella bacterium, which serve as test organisms in this investigation. Currently, facultative barophilic psychrophilic stains of Shewanella are grown in the presence of ferric food source; the strains exhibiting iron

  19. Business cycles and mortality: results from Swedish microdata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Johannesson, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    We assess the relationship between business cycles and mortality risk using a large individual level data set on over 40,000 individuals in Sweden who were followed for 10-16 years (leading to over 500,000 person-year observations). We test the effect of six alternative business cycle indicators on the mortality risk: the unemployment rate, the notification rate, the deviation from the GDP trend, the GDP change, the industry capacity utilization, and the industry confidence indicator. For men we find a significant countercyclical relationship between the business cycle and the mortality risk for four of the indicators and a non-significant effect for the other two indicators. For women we cannot reject the null hypothesis of no effect for any of the business cycle indicators.

  20. Evolution of biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus during 45~50 Ma revealed by sequential extraction analysis of IODP Expedition 302 cores from the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, S.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Takahashi, K.

    2012-12-01

    The modern Arctic Ocean plays crucial roles in controlling global climate system with the driving force of global thermohaline circulation through the formation of dense deep water and high albedo due to the presence of perennial sea-ice. However, the Arctic sea-ice has not always existed in the past. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 302 Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) has clarified that global warming (water temperature: ca. 14~16○C) during 48~49 Ma Azolla Event induced the loss of sea-ice and desalination of surface ocean, and that sea-ice formed again some million years later (45 Ma). In the Arctic Ocean, warming and cooling events repeated over and over (e.g., Brinkhuis et al., 2006; Moran et al., 2006; März et al., 2010). Large variations in the extent of thermohaline circulation through time often caused stagnation of seawater and appearance of anaerobic environment where hydrogen sulfide was produced by bacterial sulfate reduction. Ogawa et al. (2009) confirmed occurrence of framboidal pyrite in the ACEX sediments, and suggested that the Arctic Ocean at the time was anoxic, analogous to the modern Black Sea, mainly based on sulfur isotope analysis. To further clarify the variations in the nutrient status of the Arctic Ocean, we focus on the geochemical cycle of phosphorus. We performed sequential extraction analysis of sedimentary phosphorus in the ACEX sediments, using the method that we improvped based on the original SEDEX method by Ruttenberg (1992) and Schenau et al. (2000). In our method, phosphorus fractions are divided into five forms; (1) absorbed P, (2) Feoxide-P, (4) carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP) + CaCO3-P + hydroxylapatite (HAP), (4) detrital P, and (5) organic P. Schenau et al. (2000) divided the (3) fraction into non-biological CFAP and biological HAP and CaCO3-P. When the Arctic Ocean was closed and in its warming period, the water mass was most likely stratified and an anaerobic condition would have prevailed where

  1. Argonne Fuel Cycle Facility ventilation system -- modeling and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Danielson, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated study of the Argonne-West Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) interconnected ventilation systems during various operations. Analyses and test results include first a nominal condition reflecting balanced pressures and flows followed by several infrequent and off-normal scenarios. This effort is the first study of the FCF ventilation systems as an integrated network wherein the hydraulic effects of all major air systems have been analyzed and tested. The FCF building consists of many interconnected regions in which nuclear fuel is handled, transported and reprocessed. The ventilation systems comprise a large number of ducts, fans, dampers, and filters which together must provide clean, properly conditioned air to the worker occupied spaces of the facility while preventing the spread of airborne radioactive materials to clean am-as or the atmosphere. This objective is achieved by keeping the FCF building at a partial vacuum in which the contaminated areas are kept at lower pressures than the other worker occupied spaces. The ventilation systems of FCF and the EBR-II reactor are analyzed as an integrated totality, as demonstrated. We then developed the network model shown in Fig. 2 for the TORAC code. The scope of this study was to assess the measured results from the acceptance/flow balancing testing and to predict the effects of power failures, hatch and door openings, single-failure faulted conditions, EBR-II isolation, and other infrequent operations. The studies show that the FCF ventilation systems am very controllable and remain stable following off-normal events. In addition, the FCF ventilation system complex is essentially immune to reverse flows and spread of contamination to clean areas during normal and off-normal operation

  2. Species and biogeochemical cycles of organic phosphorus in sediments from a river with different aquatic plants located in Huaihe River Watershed, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, He Zhong; Pan, Wei; Ren, Li Jun; Liu, Eeng Feng; Shen, Ji; Geng, Qi Fang; An, Shu Qing

    2015-01-01

    The results of phosphorus fractionation in the sediments from a contaminated river containing different aquatic plants, analyzed by solution 31P-NMR for Organic Phosphorus, showed that the concentration of Inorganic Phosphorus dominated in all species and Organic Phosphorus accounted for over 20% of Total Phosphorus. In general, orthophosphate was dominant in all the sampling sites. The proportion of Organic Phosphorus accounting for the Total Phosphorus in the sediments with different plant decreased in the following order: Paspalum distichum>Typha orientalis>Hydrilla verticillata. Phosphorus-accumulation ability of Paspalum distichum was obviously stronger than Typha orientalis and Hydrilla verticillata. The Organic Phosphorus was in aquatic plants dominated by humic-associated P (Hu-P), which converted to Inorganic Ohosphorus more significantly in submerged plants than in emerged plants. The sediment dominated by Paspalum distichum abundantly accumulated Organic Phosphorus in the orthophosphate monoester fraction. The degradation and mineralization of orthophosphate monoester was the important source of high Inorganic Phosphorus concentration and net primary productivity in Suoxu River. The Organic Phosphorus derived from Typha orientalis and Hydrilla verticillata was dramatically converted to Inorganic Phosphorus when the environmental factors varied.

  3. Calcium biogeochemical cycle at the beech tree-soil solution interface from the Strengbach CZO (NE France): insights from stable Ca and radiogenic Sr isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Gangloff, Sophie; Labolle, François; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) is the fourth most abundant element in mineral nutrition and plays key physiological and structural roles in plant metabolism. At the soil-water-plant scale, stable Ca isotopes are a powerful tool for the identification of plant-mineral interactions and recycling via vegetation. Radiogenic Sr isotopes are often used as tracers of Ca sources and mixtures of different reservoirs. In this study, stable Ca and radiogenic Sr are combined and analysed in several organs from two beech trees that were collected in June and September in the Strengbach critical zone observatory (CZO) (NE France) and in corresponding soil solutions. At the beech-tree scale, this study confirms the field Ca adsorption (i.e., physico-chemical mechanism and not vital effects) on carboxyl acid groups of pectin in the apoplasm of small roots. The analysis of the xylem sap and corresponding organs shows that although the Strengbach CZO is nutrient-poor, Ca seems to be non-limiting for tree-growth. Different viscosities of xylem sap between the stemwood and branches or leaves can explain δ44/40Ca values in different tree-organs. The bark and phloem 40Ca-enrichments could be due to Ca-oxalate precipitation in the bark tissues and in the phloem. The results from this study regarding the combination of these two isotopic systems show that the isotopic signatures of the roots are dominated by Ca fractionation mechanisms and Sr, and thus Ca, source variations. In contrast, translocation mechanisms are only governed by Ca fractionation processes. This study showed that at the root-soil solution interface, litter degradation was not the main source of Ca and Sr and that the soil solutions are not the complement of uptake by roots for samples from the 2011/2013 period. The opposite is observed for older samples. These observations indicate the decreasing contribution of low radiogenic Sr fluxes, such as recycling, alimenting the soil solutions. Such reduced importance of nutrient uptake and

  4. Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A history is given of low Earth orbit (LEO) laboratory test data on a 6.5 ampere-hour bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery, of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low-Earth-orbit regimes. Over 4100 LEO cycles were established on a ten cell battery. It seems that any perturbation on normal cycling effects the cells performance. Explanations and theories of the battery's behavior are varied and widespread among those closely associated with it. Deep discharging does provide a reconditioning effect and further experimentation is planned in this area. The battery watt-hour efficiency is about 75 percent and the time averaged, discharge voltage is about 1.26 volts for all cells at both the C/4 and LEO rate. Since a significant portion of the electrode capacity has degraded, the LEO cycle discharges are approaching depths of 90 to 100 percent of the high rate capacity. Therefore, the low end-of-discharge voltages occur precipitously after the knee of the discharge curve and is more an indication of electrode capacity and is a lesser indicator of overall cell performance.

  5. Biogeochemical cycling and phyto- and bacterioplankton communities in a large and shallow tropical lagoon (Términos Lagoon, Mexico) under 2009-2010 El Niño Modoki drought conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conan, Pascal; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Agab, Marina; Calva-Benítez, Laura; Chifflet, Sandrine; Douillet, Pascal; Dussud, Claire; Fichez, Renaud; Grenz, Christian; Gutierrez Mendieta, Francisco; Origel-Moreno, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Blanco, Arturo; Sauret, Caroline; Severin, Tatiana; Tedetti, Marc; Torres Alvarado, Rocío; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2017-03-01

    The 2009-2010 period was marked by an episode of intense drought known as the El Niño Modoki event. Sampling of the Términos Lagoon (Mexico) was carried out in November 2009 in order to understand the influence of these particular environmental conditions on organic matter fluxes within the lagoon's pelagic ecosystem and, more specifically, on the relationship between phyto- and bacterioplankton communities. The measurements presented here concern biogeochemical parameters (nutrients, dissolved and particulate organic matter [POM], and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs]), phytoplankton (biomass and photosynthesis), and bacteria (diversity and abundance, including PAH degradation bacteria and ectoenzymatic activities). During the studied period, the water column of the Términos Lagoon functioned globally as a sink and, more precisely, as a nitrogen assimilator. This was due to the high production of particulate and dissolved organic matter (DOM), even though exportation of autochthonous matter to the Gulf of Mexico was weak. We found that bottom-up control accounted for a large portion of the variability of phytoplankton productivity. Nitrogen and phosphorus stoichiometry mostly accounted for the heterogeneity in phytoplankton and free-living prokaryote distribution in the lagoon. In the eastern part, we found a clear decoupling between areas enriched in dissolved inorganic nitrogen near the Puerto Real coastal inlet and areas enriched in phosphate (PO4) near the Candelaria estuary. Such a decoupling limited the potential for primary production, resulting in an accumulation of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC and DON, respectively) near the river mouths. In the western part of the lagoon, maximal phytoplankton development resulted from bacterial activity transforming particulate organic phosphorus (PP) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) to available PO4 and the coupling between Palizada River inputs of nitrate (NO3) and PP. The

  6. Biogeochemical aspects of aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    During the process of aquifer thermal energy storage the in situ temperature of the groundwater- sediment system may fluctuate significantly. As a result the groundwater characteristics can be considerably affected by a variety of chemical, biogeochemical and microbiological

  7. Biotic and Biogeochemical Feedbacks to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, M. S.; Harte, J.

    2002-12-01

    Feedbacks to paleoclimate change are evident in ice core records showing correlations of temperature with carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane. Such feedbacks may be explained by plant and microbial responses to climate change, and are likely to occur under impending climate warming, as evidenced by results of ecosystem climate manipulation experiments and biometeorological observations along ecological and climate gradients. Ecosystems exert considerable influence on climate, by controlling the energy and water balance of the land surface as well as being sinks and sources of greenhouse gases. This presentation will focus on biotic and biogeochemical climate feedbacks on decadal to century time scales, emphasizing carbon storage and energy exchange. In addition to the direct effects of climate on decomposition rates and of climate and CO2 on plant productivity, climate change can alter species composition; because plant species differ in their surface properties, productivity, phenology, and chemistry, climate-induced changes in plant species composition can exert a large influence on the magnitude and sign of climate feedbacks. We discuss the effects of plant species on ecosystem carbon storage that result from characteristic differences in plant biomass and lifetime, allocation to roots vs. leaves, litter quality, microclimate for decomposition and the ultimate stabilization of soil organic matter. We compare the effect of species transitions on transpiration, albedo, and other surface properties, with the effect of elevated CO2 and warming on single species' surface exchange. Global change models and experiments that investigate the effect of climate only on existing vegetation may miss the biggest impacts of climate change on biogeochemical cycling and feedbacks. Quantification of feedbacks will require understanding how species composition and long-term soil processes will change under global warming. Although no single approach, be it experimental

  8. Increase of carbon cycle feedback with climate sensitivity: results from a coupled climate and carbon cycle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindasamy, B.; Thompson, S.; Mirin, A.; Wickett, M.; Caldeira, K.; Delire, C.

    2005-01-01

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modelling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in greater warming. In this paper we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year 2100 global warming in the range of 0 to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO 2 content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 scenario are used. We use a fully coupled climate and carbon cycle model, the INtegrated Climate and CArbon model (INCCA), the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model coupled to the IBIS terrestrial biosphere model and a modified OCMIP ocean biogeochemistry model. In our integrated model, for scenarios with year 2100 global warming increasing from 0 to 8 K, land uptake decreases from 47% to 29% of total CO 2 emissions. Due to competing effects, ocean uptake (16%) shows almost no change at all. Atmospheric CO 2 concentration increases are 48% higher in the run with 8 K global climate warming than in the case with no warming. Our results indicate that carbon cycle amplification of climate warming will be greater if there is higher climate sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO 2 content; the carbon cycle feedback factor increases from 1.13 to 1.48 when global warming increases from 3.2 to 8 K

  9. Primary water chemistry optimization for extended fuel cycle operation. Results of the 'Duo experimentation' after three cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viricel, L.; Andrieu, C.; Segura, J.C.; Rocher, A.; Thomazet, J.; Clinard, M.H.; Dacquait, F.

    2002-01-01

    The primary coolant conditioning in French nuclear power plants is essentially based on the boron-lithium coordinated chemistry, with a target pH of 7.2 at 300 C and a maximum lithium concentration of 2.2 mg/kg. In 1996, EDF 1300 MWe units began operating 18-month fuel cycles, increasing boron concentrations at the beginning of the cycles. Since today the maximum lithium concentration in normal operation is 2.2 mg/kg, extended cycle operation results in a decrease in the pH at the beginning of the cycles, which may possibly lead to deposits in RCS, and particularly on the fuel cladding, and increased dose rates. It has to be noted that today, the fuel assemblies maximum burnup is set at 52 GWd/tU. One solution is to adjust the pH by increasing the lithium content at the beginning of the cycles, which is easy to implement and does not require any modification on the units. Hence, EDF is testing a ''modified'' chemistry regime in the > during 4 fuel cycles, with a maximum authorized lithium content of 3.5 mg/kg at the beginning of the cycles in the Cattenom 2 pilot unit. The Golfech 1 reference unit implements a standard boron-lithium coordination pH 300 7.2. The major goal of the experimentation is to assess the impact of elevated lithium concentrations at the beginning of the cycles on fuel cladding oxide behavior, mass transport and dose rates. This paper presents the results of the first three cycles of the Duo experimentation. (author)

  10. Diel biogeochemical processes in terrestrial waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimick, David A.; Gammons, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Many biogeochemical processes in rivers and lakes respond to the solar photocycle and produce persistent patterns of measureable phenomena that exhibit a day–night, or 24-h, cycle. Despite a large body of recent literature, the mechanisms responsible for these diel fluctuations are widely debated, with a growing consensus that combinations of physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved. These processes include streamflow variation, photosynthesis and respiration, plant assimilation, and reactions involving photochemistry, adsorption and desorption, and mineral precipitation and dissolution. Diel changes in streamflow and water properties such as temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen concentration have been widely recognized, and recently, diel studies have focused more widely by considering other constituents such as dissolved and particulate trace metals, metalloids, rare earth elements, mercury, organic matter, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and nutrients. The details of many diel processes are being studied using stable isotopes, which also can exhibit diel cycles in response to microbial metabolism, photosynthesis and respiration, or changes in phase, speciation, or redox state. In addition, secondary effects that diel cycles might have, for example, on biota or in the hyporheic zone are beginning to be considered.This special issue is composed primarily of papers presented at the topical session “Diurnal Biogeochemical Processes in Rivers, Lakes, and Shallow Groundwater” held at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in October 2009 in Portland, Oregon. This session was organized because many of the growing number of diel studies have addressed just a small part of the full range of diel cycling phenomena found in rivers and lakes. This limited focus is understandable because (1) fundamental aspects of many diel processes are poorly understood and require detailed study, (2) the interests and expertise of individual

  11. Modelling benthic biophysical drivers of ecosystem structure and biogeochemical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Nicholas; Bruggeman, Jorn; Lessin, Gennadi; Allen, Icarus

    2016-04-01

    The fate of carbon deposited at the sea floor is ultimately decided by biophysical drivers that control the efficiency of remineralisation and timescale of carbon burial in sediments. Specifically, these drivers include bioturbation through ingestion and movement, burrow-flushing and sediment reworking, which enhance vertical particulate transport and solute diffusion. Unfortunately, these processes are rarely satisfactorily resolved in models. To address this, a benthic model that explicitly describes the vertical position of biology (e.g., habitats) and biogeochemical processes is presented that includes biological functionality and biogeochemical response capturing changes in ecosystem structure, benthic-pelagic fluxes and biodiversity on inter-annual timescales. This is demonstrated by the model's ability to reproduce temporal variability in benthic infauna, vertical pore water nutrients and pelagic-benthic solute fluxes compared to in-situ data. A key advance is the replacement of bulk parameterisation of bioturbation by explicit description of the bio-physical processes responsible. This permits direct comparison with observations and determination of key parameters in experiments. Crucially, the model resolves the two-way interaction between sediment biogeochemistry and ecology, allowing exploration of the benthic response to changing environmental conditions, the importance of infaunal functional traits in shaping benthic ecological structure and the feedback the resulting bio-physical processes exert on pore water nutrient profiles. The model is actively being used to understand shelf sea carbon cycling, the response of the benthos to climatic change, food provision and other societal benefits.

  12. Biogeochemical Controls on Technetium Mobility in Biogeochemical Controls on Technetium Mobility in FRC Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, J.R.; McBeth, J.M.; Livens, F.R.; Bryan, N.D.; Ellis, B.; Sharma, H.; Burke, I.T.; Morris, K.

    2004-01-01

    Technetium-99 is a priority pollutant at numerous DOE sites, due to its long half-life (2.1 x 10 5 years), high mobility as Tc(VII) in oxic waters, and bioavailability as a sulfate analog. 99 Tc is far less mobile under anaerobic conditions, forming insoluble Tc(IV) precipitates. As anaerobic microorganisms can reduce soluble Tc(VII) to insoluble Tc(IV), microbial metabolism may have the potential to treat sediments and waters contaminated with Tc. Baseline studies of fundamental mechanisms of Tc(VII) bioreduction and precipitation (reviewed by Lloyd et al, 2002) have generally used pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, in order to develop conceptual models for the biogeochemical cycling of Tc. There is, however, comparatively little known about interactions of metal-reducing bacteria with environmentally relevant trace concentrations of Tc, against a more complex biogeochemical background provided by mixed microbial communities in the subsurface. The objective of this new NABIR project is to probe the site specific biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC (Oak Ridge, TN). This information is required for the rational design of in situ bioremediation strategies for technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. We will use a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological and spectroscopic techniques to determine the solubility and phase associations of Tc in FRC sediments, and characterize the underpinning biogeochemical controls. A key strength of this project is that many of the techniques we are using have already been optimized by our research team, who are also studying the biogeochemical controls on Tc mobility in marine and freshwater sediments in the UK in a NERC funded companion study.

  13. Life cycle analysis of electricity systems: Methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, R.; Marheineke, T.

    1996-01-01

    The two methods for full energy chain analysis, process analysis and input/output analysis, are discussed. A combination of these two methods provides the most accurate results. Such a hybrid analysis of the full energy chains of six different power plants is presented and discussed. The results of such analyses depend on time, site and technique of each process step and, therefore have no general validity. For renewable energy systems the emissions form the generation of a back-up system should be added. (author). 7 figs, 1 fig

  14. Stream biogeochemical resilience in the age of Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H.; Creed, I. F.

    2017-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that biogeochemical cycles are being pushed beyond the tolerance limits of the earth system in the age of the Anthropocene placing terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems at risk. Here, we explored the question: Is there empirical evidence of global atmospheric changes driving losses in stream biogeochemical resilience towards a new normal? Stream biogeochemical resilience is the process of returning to equilibrium conditions after a disturbance and can be measured using three metrics: reactivity (the highest initial response after a disturbance), return rate (the rate of return to equilibrium condition after reactive changes), and variance of the stationary distribution (the signal to noise ratio). Multivariate autoregressive models were used to derive the three metrics for streams along a disturbance gradient - from natural systems where global drivers would dominate, to relatively managed or modified systems where global and local drivers would interact. We observed a loss of biogeochemical resilience in all streams. The key biogeochemical constituent(s) that may be driving loss of biogeochemical resilience were identified from the time series of the stream biogeochemical constituents. Non-stationary trends (detected by Mann-Kendall analysis) and stationary cycles (revealed through Morlet wavelet analysis) were removed, and the standard deviation (SD) of the remaining residuals were analyzed to determine if there was an increase in SD over time that would indicate a pending shift towards a new normal. We observed that nitrate-N and total phosphorus showed behaviours indicative of a pending shift in natural and managed forest systems, but not in agricultural systems. This study provides empirical support that stream ecosystems are showing signs of exceeding planetary boundary tolerance levels and shifting towards a "new normal" in response to global changes, which can be exacerbated by local management activities. Future work will consider

  15. Robustness of life cycle assessment results : influence of data variation and modelling choices on results for beverage packaging materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harst-Wintraecken, van der E.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a well-established method to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of product and service systems throughout their life cycles. However, it can happen that LCAs for the same product have different and even conflicting outcomes. LCA results need to be robust

  16. Cyclic biogeochemical processes and nitrogen fate beneath a subtropical stormwater infiltration basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P

    2012-05-15

    A stormwater infiltration basin in north-central Florida, USA, was monitored from 2007 through 2008 to identify subsurface biogeochemical processes, with emphasis on N cycling, under the highly variable hydrologic conditions common in humid, subtropical climates. Cyclic variations in biogeochemical processes generally coincided with wet and dry hydrologic conditions. Oxidizing conditions in the subsurface persisted for about one month or less at the beginning of wet periods with dissolved O(2) and NO(3)(-) showing similar temporal patterns. Reducing conditions in the subsurface evolved during prolonged flooding of the basin. At about the same time O(2) and NO(3)(-) reduction concluded, Mn, Fe and SO(4)(2-) reduction began, with the onset of methanogenesis one month later. Reducing conditions persisted up to six months, continuing into subsequent dry periods until the next major oxidizing infiltration event. Evidence of denitrification in shallow groundwater at the site is supported by median NO(3)(-)-N less than 0.016 mg L(-1), excess N(2) up to 3 mg L(-1) progressively enriched in δ(15)N during prolonged basin flooding, and isotopically heavy δ(15)N and δ(18)O of NO(3)(-) (up to 25‰ and 15‰, respectively). Isotopic enrichment of newly infiltrated stormwater suggests denitrification was partially completed within two days. Soil and water chemistry data suggest that a biogeochemically active zone exists in the upper 1.4m of soil, where organic carbon was the likely electron donor supplied by organic matter in soil solids or dissolved in infiltrating stormwater. The cyclic nature of reducing conditions effectively controlled the N cycle, switching N fate beneath the basin from NO(3)(-) leaching to reduction in the shallow saturated zone. Results can inform design of functionalized soil amendments that could replace the native soil in a stormwater infiltration basin and mitigate potential NO(3)(-) leaching to groundwater by replicating the biogeochemical

  17. Cyclic biogeochemical processes and nitrogen fate beneath a subtropical stormwater infiltration basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    A stormwater infiltration basin in north–central Florida, USA, was monitored from 2007 through 2008 to identify subsurface biogeochemical processes, with emphasis on N cycling, under the highly variable hydrologic conditions common in humid, subtropical climates. Cyclic variations in biogeochemical processes generally coincided with wet and dry hydrologic conditions. Oxidizing conditions in the subsurface persisted for about one month or less at the beginning of wet periods with dissolved O2 and NO3- showing similar temporal patterns. Reducing conditions in the subsurface evolved during prolonged flooding of the basin. At about the same time O2 and NO3- reduction concluded, Mn, Fe and SO42- reduction began, with the onset of methanogenesis one month later. Reducing conditions persisted up to six months, continuing into subsequent dry periods until the next major oxidizing infiltration event. Evidence of denitrification in shallow groundwater at the site is supported by median NO3-–N less than 0.016 mg L-1, excess N2 up to 3 mg L-1 progressively enriched in δ15N during prolonged basin flooding, and isotopically heavy δ15N and δ18O of NO3- (up to 25‰ and 15‰, respectively). Isotopic enrichment of newly infiltrated stormwater suggests denitrification was partially completed within two days. Soil and water chemistry data suggest that a biogeochemically active zone exists in the upper 1.4 m of soil, where organic carbon was the likely electron donor supplied by organic matter in soil solids or dissolved in infiltrating stormwater. The cyclic nature of reducing conditions effectively controlled the N cycle, switching N fate beneath the basin from NO3- leaching to reduction in the shallow saturated zone. Results can inform design of functionalized soil amendments that could replace the native soil in a stormwater infiltration basin and mitigate potential NO3- leaching to groundwater by replicating the biogeochemical conditions under the observed basin.

  18. Projecting the long-term biogeochemical impacts of a diverse agroforestry system in the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolz, K. J.; DeLucia, E. H.; Paul, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Annual, monoculture cropping systems have become the standard agricultural model in the Midwestern US. Unintended consequences of these systems include surface and groundwater pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, loss of biodiversity, and soil erosion. Diverse agroforestry (DA) systems dominated by fruit and nut trees/shrubs have been proposed as an agricultural model for the Midwestern US that can restore ecosystem services while simultaneously providing economically viable and industrially relevant staple food crops. A DA system including six species of fruit and nut crops was established on long-time conventional agricultural land at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2012, with the conventional corn-soybean rotation (CSR) as a control. Initial field measurements of the nitrogen and water cycles during the first two years of transition have indicated a significant decrease in N losses and modification of the seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) pattern. While these early results suggest that the land use transition from CSR to DA can have positive biogeochemical consequences, models must be utilized to make long-term biogeochemical projections in agroforestry systems. Initial field measurements of plant phenology, net N2O flux, nitrate leaching, soil respiration, and soil moisture were used to parameterize the DA system within the DayCENT biogeochemical model as the "savanna" ecosystem type. The model was validated with an independent subset of field measurements and then run to project biogeochemical cycling in the DA system for 25 years past establishment. Model results show that N losses via N2O emission or nitrate leaching reach a minimum within the first 5 years and then maintain this tight cycle into the future. While early ET field measurements revealed similar magnitudes between the DA and CSR systems, modeled ET continued to increase for the DA system throughout the projected time since the trees would continue to grow larger. These modeling

  19. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O' Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  20. Biogeochemical processes on tree islands in the greater everglades: Initiating a new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, P.R.; Sklar, Fred H.; Coronado, C.A.; Troxler, T.G.; Krupa, S.L.; Sullivan, P.L.; Ewe, S.; Price, R.M.; Newman, S.; Orem, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientists' understanding of the role of tree islands in the Everglades has evolved from a plant community of minor biogeochemical importance to a plant community recognized as the driving force for localized phosphorus accumulation within the landscape. Results from this review suggest that tree transpiration, nutrient infiltration from the soil surface, and groundwater flow create a soil zone of confluence where nutrients and salts accumulate under the head of a tree island during dry periods. Results also suggest accumulated salts and nutrients are flushed downstream by regional water flows during wet periods. That trees modulate their environment to create biogeochemical hot spots and strong nutrient gradients is a significant ecological paradigm shift in the understanding of the biogeochemical processes in the Everglades. In terms of island sustainability, this new paradigm suggests the need for distinct dry-wet cycles as well as a hydrologic regime that supports tree survival. Restoration of historic tree islands needs further investigation but the creation of functional tree islands is promising. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  1. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part B - Results from overcoring and evidence of strong buffering by the rock formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroleva, M. [Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Lerouge, C. [BRGM, French Geological Survey, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Maeder, U., E-mail: urs.maeder@geo.unibe.ch [Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Claret, F.; Gaucher, E. [BRGM, French Geological Survey, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > A 5-year in situ porewater chemistry experiment in Opalinus Clay was overcored and examined. > A microbial perturbation induced sulfate reduction, pH decrease and alkalinity / P{sub CO2} increase. > Changes to mineralogy, isotopic composition and bulk properties could not be detected. > Precipitation of Fe-sulfides and carbonate occurred at the interface of the test interval. > The chemical perturbation was effectively buffered by the claystone's large capacity. - Abstract: An in situ Porewater Chemistry (PC) experiment in the Opalinus Clay formation was carried out at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Jura Mountains, Switzerland) for a period of 5 a. A traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed-off borehole to achieve diffusive equilibration. An unwanted microbial perturbation changed the water composition, characterized by reduction of SO{sub 4} combined with increasing sulfide, increasing alkalinity, decreasing pH and increasing P(CO{sub 2}). In contrast, the main cations (Na, Ca, Mg) remained remarkably constant during the experiment, thus indicating the strong buffering of the formation via cation and proton exchange as well as carbonate dissolution/precipitation reactions. After 5 a, the 4.5 m long vertical test interval was overcored and Opalinus Clay samples were analyzed along ca. 15 cm long radial profiles. The analytical investigations included mineralogy (XRD, SEM-EDX), bulk parameters (water content, density, C, S), cation exchange capacity and occupancy, aqueous leachates for Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and water and carbonate stable isotopes. Emphasis was put on best sample preparation and conservation techniques. Results show that the distribution of non-reactive tracers (Br{sup -} and {sup 2}H) follows the expected out/in-diffusion profiles compatible with the time-dependent boundary conditions in the test interval of the

  2. Possible impacts of global warming on tundra and boreal forest ecosystems - comparison of some biogeochemical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploechl, M.; Cramer, W.

    1995-06-01

    Global warming affects the magnitude of carbon, water and nitrogen fluxes between biosphere and atmosphere as well as the distribution of vegetation types. Biogeochemical models, global as well as patch models, can be used to estimate the differences between the mean values of annual net primary production (NPP) for the present and for future climate scenarios. Both approaches rely on the prescribed pattern of vegetation types. Structural, rule based models can predict such patterns, provided that vegetation and climate are in equilibrium. The coupling of biogeochemical and structural models gives the opportunity to test the sensitivity of biogeochemical processes not only to climatic change but also to biome shifts. Whether the annual mean NPP of a vegetation type increses or decreases depends strongly on the assumptions about a CO{sub 2} fertilization effect and nitrogen cycling. Results from our coupled model show that, given that direct CO{sub 2} effects are uncertain, (i) average NPP of these northern biomes might decrease under global warming, but (ii) total NPP of the region would increase, due to the northward shift of the taiga biome. (orig.)

  3. Using geochemical indicators to distinguish high biogeochemical activity in floodplain soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenwell, Amy [Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis, E-mail: asitchle@mines.edu [Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Prugue, Rodrigo [Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Spear, John R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Hering, Amanda S. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Maxwell, Reed M. [Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Carroll, Rosemary W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Division of Hydrologic Sciences, 2215 Raggio Parkway, Reno, NV 89512 (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of how microbial communities interact with their surroundings in physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface environments will lead to improved quantification of biogeochemical reactions and associated nutrient cycling. This study develops a methodology to predict potential elevated rates of biogeochemical activity (microbial “hotspots”) in subsurface environments by correlating microbial DNA and aspects of the community structure with the spatial distribution of geochemical indicators in subsurface sediments. Multiple linear regression models of simulated precipitation leachate, HCl and hydroxylamine extractable iron and manganese, total organic carbon (TOC), and microbial community structure were used to identify sample characteristics indicative of biogeochemical hotspots within fluvially-derived aquifer sediments and overlying soils. The method has been applied to (a) alluvial materials collected at a former uranium mill site near Rifle, Colorado and (b) relatively undisturbed floodplain deposits (soils and sediments) collected along the East River near Crested Butte, Colorado. At Rifle, 16 alluvial samples were taken from 8 sediment cores, and at the East River, 46 soil/sediment samples were collected across and perpendicular to 3 active meanders and an oxbow meander. Regression models using TOC and TOC combined with extractable iron and manganese results were determined to be the best fitting statistical models of microbial DNA (via 16S rRNA gene analysis). Fitting these models to observations in both contaminated and natural floodplain deposits, and their associated alluvial aquifers, demonstrates the broad applicability of the geochemical indicator based approach. - Highlights: • Biogeochemical characterization of alluvial floodplain soils and sediments was performed to investigate parameters that may indicate microbial hot spot formation. • A correlation between geochemical parameters (total organic carbon and

  4. Using geochemical indicators to distinguish high biogeochemical activity in floodplain soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenwell, Amy; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Prugue, Rodrigo; Spear, John R.; Hering, Amanda S.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Carroll, Rosemary W.H.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of how microbial communities interact with their surroundings in physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface environments will lead to improved quantification of biogeochemical reactions and associated nutrient cycling. This study develops a methodology to predict potential elevated rates of biogeochemical activity (microbial “hotspots”) in subsurface environments by correlating microbial DNA and aspects of the community structure with the spatial distribution of geochemical indicators in subsurface sediments. Multiple linear regression models of simulated precipitation leachate, HCl and hydroxylamine extractable iron and manganese, total organic carbon (TOC), and microbial community structure were used to identify sample characteristics indicative of biogeochemical hotspots within fluvially-derived aquifer sediments and overlying soils. The method has been applied to (a) alluvial materials collected at a former uranium mill site near Rifle, Colorado and (b) relatively undisturbed floodplain deposits (soils and sediments) collected along the East River near Crested Butte, Colorado. At Rifle, 16 alluvial samples were taken from 8 sediment cores, and at the East River, 46 soil/sediment samples were collected across and perpendicular to 3 active meanders and an oxbow meander. Regression models using TOC and TOC combined with extractable iron and manganese results were determined to be the best fitting statistical models of microbial DNA (via 16S rRNA gene analysis). Fitting these models to observations in both contaminated and natural floodplain deposits, and their associated alluvial aquifers, demonstrates the broad applicability of the geochemical indicator based approach. - Highlights: • Biogeochemical characterization of alluvial floodplain soils and sediments was performed to investigate parameters that may indicate microbial hot spot formation. • A correlation between geochemical parameters (total organic carbon and

  5. Wetland biogeochemical processes and simulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Huang, Laibin; Gao, Haifeng; Jia, Jia; Wang, Xin

    2018-02-01

    As the important landscape with rich biodiversity and high productivity, wetlands can provide numerous ecological services including playing an important role in regulating global biogeochemical cycles, filteringpollutants from terrestrial runoff and atmospheric deposition, protecting and improving water quality, providing living habitats for plants and animals, controlling floodwaters, and retaining surface water flow during dry periods (Reddy and DeLaune, 2008; Qin and Mitsch, 2009; Zhao et al., 2016). However, more than 50% of the world's wetlands had been altered, degraded or lost through a wide range of human activities in the past 150 years, and only a small percentage of the original wetlands remained around the world after over two centuries of intensive development and urbanization (O'connell, 2003; Zhao et al., 2016).

  6. Oceanographic and Biogeochemical Insights from Diatom Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Chris; Vardi, Assaf; Allen, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    Diatoms are the most successful group of eukaryotic phytoplankton in the modern ocean and have risen to dominance relatively quickly over the last 100 million years. Recently completed whole genome sequences from two species of diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, have revealed a wealth of information about the evolutionary origins and metabolic adaptations that have led to their ecological success. A major finding is that they have incorporated genes both from their endosymbiotic ancestors and by horizontal gene transfer from marine bacteria. This unique melting pot of genes encodes novel capacities for metabolic management, for example, allowing the integration of a urea cycle into a photosynthetic cell. In this review we show how genome-enabled approaches are being leveraged to explore major phenomena of oceanographic and biogeochemical relevance, such as nutrient assimilation and life histories in diatoms. We also discuss how diatoms may be affected by climate change-induced alterations in ocean processes.

  7. High resolution modelling of the biogeochemical processes in the eutrophic Loire River (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaudo, Camille; Moatar, Florentina; Curie, Florence; Gassama, Nathalie; Billen, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    A biogeochemical model was developed, coupling a physically based water temperature model (T-NET) with a semi-mechanistic biogeochemical model (RIVE, used in ProSe and Riverstrahler models) in order to assess at a fine temporal and spatial resolution the biogeochemical processes in the eutrophic Middle Loire hydrosystem (≈10 000 km², 3361 river segments). The code itself allows parallelized computing, which decreased greatly the calculation time (5 hours for simulating 3 years hourly). We conducted a daily survey during the period 2012-2014 at 2 sampling stations located in the Middle Loire of nutrients, chlorophyll pigments, phytoplankton and physic-chemical variables. This database was used as both input data (upstream Loire boundary) and validation data of the model (basin outlet). Diffuse and non-point sources were assessed based on a land cover analysis and WWTP datasets. The results appeared very sensible to the coefficients governing the dynamic of suspended solids and of phosphorus (sorption/desorption processes) within the model and some parameters needed to be estimated numerically. Both the Lagrangian point of view and fluxes budgets at the seasonal and event-based scale evidenced the biogeochemical functioning of the Loire River. Low discharge levels set up favorable physical conditions for phytoplankton growth (long water travel time, limited water depth, suspended particles sedimentation). Conversely, higher discharge levels highly limited the phytoplankton biomass (dilution of the colony, washing-out, limited travel time, remobilization of suspended sediments increasing turbidity), and most biogeochemical species were basically transferred downstream. When hydrological conditions remained favorable for phytoplankton development, P-availability was the critical factor. However, the model evidenced that most of the P in summer was recycled within the water body: on one hand it was assimilated by the algae biomass, and on the other hand it was

  8. Temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes at the Norman Landfill site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The temporal variability observed in redox sensitive species in groundwater can be attributed to coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbial processes. These controlling processes are typically nonstationary, and distributed across various time scales. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate biogeochemical data sets from a municipal landfill site to identify the dominant modes of variation and determine the physical controls that become significant at different time scales. Data on hydraulic head, specific conductance, δ2H, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon were collected between 1998 and 2000 at three wells at the Norman Landfill site in Norman, OK. Wavelet analysis on this geochemical data set indicates that variations in concentrations of reactive and conservative solutes are strongly coupled to hydrologic variability (water table elevation and precipitation) at 8 month scales, and to individual eco-hydrogeologic framework (such as seasonality of vegetation, surface-groundwater dynamics) at 16 month scales. Apart from hydrologic variations, temporal variability in sulfate concentrations can be associated with different sources (FeS cycling, recharge events) and sinks (uptake by vegetation) depending on the well location and proximity to the leachate plume. Results suggest that nitrate concentrations show multiscale behavior across temporal scales for different well locations, and dominant variability in dissolved organic carbon for a closed municipal landfill can be larger than 2 years due to its decomposition and changing content. A conceptual framework that explains the variability in chemical concentrations at different time scales as a function of hydrologic processes, site-specific interactions, and/or coupled biogeochemical effects is also presented.

  9. PCR cycles above routine numbers do not compromise high-throughput DNA barcoding results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierna, J; Doña, J; Vizcaíno, A; Serrano, D; Jovani, R

    2017-10-01

    High-throughput DNA barcoding has become essential in ecology and evolution, but some technical questions still remain. Increasing the number of PCR cycles above the routine 20-30 cycles is a common practice when working with old-type specimens, which provide little amounts of DNA, or when facing annealing issues with the primers. However, increasing the number of cycles can raise the number of artificial mutations due to polymerase errors. In this work, we sequenced 20 COI libraries in the Illumina MiSeq platform. Libraries were prepared with 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 PCR cycles from four individuals belonging to four species of four genera of cephalopods. We found no relationship between the number of PCR cycles and the number of mutations despite using a nonproofreading polymerase. Moreover, even when using a high number of PCR cycles, the resulting number of mutations was low enough not to be an issue in the context of high-throughput DNA barcoding (but may still remain an issue in DNA metabarcoding due to chimera formation). We conclude that the common practice of increasing the number of PCR cycles should not negatively impact the outcome of a high-throughput DNA barcoding study in terms of the occurrence of point mutations.

  10. [An application of the strategy results cycle to HIV/AIDS strategic planning in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Rosalía; Rosenberg, Hernán

    2013-07-01

    To describe the Strategy Results Cycle (SRC), a model that approaches planning as an ongoing cycle of seven phases that continually responds and adapts to existing evidence. Reliable sources were used for the preparation of databases and expenditure-costing data for resources needs analysis. The planning process 6-9 months to complete a national strategic plan that was informed by evidence, focused on results and costed. Knowledge transfer facilitated national leadership and stakeholders' participation. Between 2007 and 2011, 13 of 16 countries adopted the Strategy Results Cycle model. The evidence supported the identification of results and the expenditure-costing analysis improved budget allocation efficiency. The SRC facilitated purposeful participation and added value to previous planning approaches by connecting "thinking" and "doing" which resulted in national strategic plans that are designed by stakeholders, relevant to local conditions, and can guide implementation and resource mobilization.

  11. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    of the oxygen uptake in laboratory incubations of initially homogenized and stabilized sediment. Using microsensors and process rate measurements we further investigated the effect of the electric currents on sediment biogeochemistry. Dissolved sulfide readily donated electrons to the networks and could...... confirmed the depth range of the electric communication and indicated donation of electrons directly from organotrophic bacteria. The separation of oxidation and reduction processes created steep pH gradients eventually causing carbonate precipitation at the surface. The results indicate that electron...... exchanging organisms have major biogeochemical importance as they allow widely separated electron donors and acceptors to react with one another....

  12. Ecogenomics and potential biogeochemical impacts of globally abundant ocean viruses

    KAUST Repository

    Roux, Simon

    2016-05-12

    Ocean microbes drive biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. However, this cycling is constrained by viruses that affect community composition, metabolic activity, and evolutionary trajectories. Owing to challenges with the sampling and cultivation of viruses, genome-level viral diversity remains poorly described and grossly understudied, with less than 1% of observed surface-ocean viruses known. Here we assemble complete genomes and large genomic fragments from both surface-and deep-ocean viruses sampled during the Tara Oceans and Malaspina research expeditions, and analyse the resulting â global ocean virome\\' dataset to present a global map of abundant, double-stranded DNA viruses complete with genomic and ecological contexts. A total of 15,222 epipelagic and mesopelagic viral populations were identified, comprising 867 viral clusters (defined as approximately genus-level groups). This roughly triples the number of known ocean viral populations and doubles the number of candidate bacterial and archaeal virus genera, providing a near-complete sampling of epipelagic communities at both the population and viral-cluster level. We found that 38 of the 867 viral clusters were locally or globally abundant, together accounting for nearly half of the viral populations in any global ocean virome sample. While two-thirds of these clusters represent newly described viruses lacking any cultivated representative, most could be computationally linked to dominant, ecologically relevant microbial hosts. Moreover, we identified 243 viral-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes, of which only 95 were previously known. Deeper analyses of four of these auxiliary metabolic genes (dsrC, soxYZ, P-II (also known as glnB) and amoC) revealed that abundant viruses may directly manipulate sulfur and nitrogen cycling throughout the epipelagic ocean. This viral catalog and functional analyses provide a necessary foundation for the meaningful integration of viruses into ecosystem models where

  13. Ecogenomics and potential biogeochemical impacts of globally abundant ocean viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R; Dutilh, Bas E; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Duhaime, Melissa B; Loy, Alexander; Poulos, Bonnie T; Solonenko, Natalie; Lara, Elena; Poulain, Julie; Pesant, Stéphane; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Cruaud, Corinne; Alberti, Adriana; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Vaqué, Dolors; Bork, Peer; Acinas, Silvia G; Wincker, Patrick; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-09-29

    Ocean microbes drive biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. However, this cycling is constrained by viruses that affect community composition, metabolic activity, and evolutionary trajectories. Owing to challenges with the sampling and cultivation of viruses, genome-level viral diversity remains poorly described and grossly understudied, with less than 1% of observed surface-ocean viruses known. Here we assemble complete genomes and large genomic fragments from both surface- and deep-ocean viruses sampled during the Tara Oceans and Malaspina research expeditions, and analyse the resulting 'global ocean virome' dataset to present a global map of abundant, double-stranded DNA viruses complete with genomic and ecological contexts. A total of 15,222 epipelagic and mesopelagic viral populations were identified, comprising 867 viral clusters (defined as approximately genus-level groups). This roughly triples the number of known ocean viral populations and doubles the number of candidate bacterial and archaeal virus genera, providing a near-complete sampling of epipelagic communities at both the population and viral-cluster level. We found that 38 of the 867 viral clusters were locally or globally abundant, together accounting for nearly half of the viral populations in any global ocean virome sample. While two-thirds of these clusters represent newly described viruses lacking any cultivated representative, most could be computationally linked to dominant, ecologically relevant microbial hosts. Moreover, we identified 243 viral-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes, of which only 95 were previously known. Deeper analyses of four of these auxiliary metabolic genes (dsrC, soxYZ, P-II (also known as glnB) and amoC) revealed that abundant viruses may directly manipulate sulfur and nitrogen cycling throughout the epipelagic ocean. This viral catalog and functional analyses provide a necessary foundation for the meaningful integration of viruses into ecosystem models where they

  14. Ecogenomics and potential biogeochemical impacts of globally abundant ocean viruses

    KAUST Repository

    Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R; Dutilh, Bas E.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Duhaime, Melissa B; Loy, Alexander; Poulos, Bonnie T; Solonenko, Natalie; Lara, Elena; Poulain, Julie; Pesant, Stephane; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Dimier, Celine; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Cruaud, Corinne; Alberti, Adriana; Duarte, Carlos M.; Gasol, Josep M M; Vaque, Dolors; Bork, Peer; Acinas, Silvia G; Wincker, Patrick; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    Ocean microbes drive biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. However, this cycling is constrained by viruses that affect community composition, metabolic activity, and evolutionary trajectories. Owing to challenges with the sampling and cultivation of viruses, genome-level viral diversity remains poorly described and grossly understudied, with less than 1% of observed surface-ocean viruses known. Here we assemble complete genomes and large genomic fragments from both surface-and deep-ocean viruses sampled during the Tara Oceans and Malaspina research expeditions, and analyse the resulting â global ocean virome' dataset to present a global map of abundant, double-stranded DNA viruses complete with genomic and ecological contexts. A total of 15,222 epipelagic and mesopelagic viral populations were identified, comprising 867 viral clusters (defined as approximately genus-level groups). This roughly triples the number of known ocean viral populations and doubles the number of candidate bacterial and archaeal virus genera, providing a near-complete sampling of epipelagic communities at both the population and viral-cluster level. We found that 38 of the 867 viral clusters were locally or globally abundant, together accounting for nearly half of the viral populations in any global ocean virome sample. While two-thirds of these clusters represent newly described viruses lacking any cultivated representative, most could be computationally linked to dominant, ecologically relevant microbial hosts. Moreover, we identified 243 viral-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes, of which only 95 were previously known. Deeper analyses of four of these auxiliary metabolic genes (dsrC, soxYZ, P-II (also known as glnB) and amoC) revealed that abundant viruses may directly manipulate sulfur and nitrogen cycling throughout the epipelagic ocean. This viral catalog and functional analyses provide a necessary foundation for the meaningful integration of viruses into ecosystem models where they

  15. Abstract of results of safety study. Nuclear fuel cycle field in fiscal 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    This report descried the results of studies of nuclear fuel cycle field (nuclear fuel facilities, seismic design, all subjects of environmental radiation and waste disposal, and subjects on nuclear fuel cycle in probabilistic safety assessment) in fiscal 2003 on the basis of the principle project of safety study (from fiscal 2001 to 2005). It consists of four chapters; the first chapter is outline of the principle of project, the second is objects and subjects of safety study in the nuclear fuel cycle field, the third list of questionnaire of results of safety study and the forth investigation of results of safety study in fiscal 2003. There are 49 lists, which include 22 reports on the nuclear fuel facility, one on the seismic design, 4 on the probabilistic safety assessment, 7 on the environmental radiation and 15 on the waste disposal. (S.Y.)

  16. Effects of the menstrual cycle phases on the tilt testing results in vasovagal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Terpiłowski, Lukasz; Agrawal, Anil Kumar; Wróblewski, Paweł; Rudnicki, Jerzy

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the distribution of positive tilt testing (TT) throughout the menstrual cycle and to determine if the phase of menstrual cycle contributes to the duration of the loss of consciousness. TT results of 183 premenopausal women, aged 29.5 ± 9.8 years, were studied. The menstrual cycle was divided into four phases based on the first day of the last menstrual bleeding: perimenstrual (M), preovulatory (F), periovulatory (O) and postovulatory (L). Positive TT results were equally distributed. In patients with TT in O phase, the highest percentage of NTG provocation was needed. Patients in L phase had significantly lower incidence of cardioinhibitory reaction. The longest duration of loss of consciousness was in the M phase. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the duration of loss of consciousness during positive TT was significantly associated with higher number of syncopal events, TT performed in M phase and lower heart rate at TT termination. Cardiodepressive type of neurocardiogenic reaction was more frequent during M and O phase than during L phase. The distribution of positive TT results as well as syncope and presyncope does not differ throughout the menstrual cycle. Diagnostic TT in premenopausal women with unexplained syncope could be performed irrespective of the phase of menstrual cycle. TT has similar sensitivity throughout the menstrual cycle. During the postovulatory phase, cardioinhibitory reaction is less frequent than in M and O phases. The duration of loss of consciousness is longer during the M phase of the menstrual cycle independently of the higher syncope number and lower heart rate at TT termination.

  17. Development of a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model for the Marseille coastal area (NW Mediterranean Sea: what complexity is required in the coastal zone?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Fraysse

    Full Text Available Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C and nitrogen (N cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007-2011. The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model.

  18. Development of a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model for the Marseille coastal area (NW Mediterranean Sea): what complexity is required in the coastal zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraysse, Marion; Pinazo, Christel; Faure, Vincent Martin; Fuchs, Rosalie; Lazzari, Paolo; Raimbault, Patrick; Pairaud, Ivane

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic) from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P) cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007-2011). The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model.

  19. Ecotoxicological, ecophysiological and biogeochemical fundamentals of risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkin, V.; Evstafjeva, E.

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative risk assessment (RA) for complex influence of different factors in heavy polluted regions is possible to carry out only on a basis of determination of various links of biogeochemical trophical chains and analysis of the whole biogeochemical structure of the region under study. As an integrative assessment, the human adaptability should be chosen because the majority of trophical chains are closed by man. The given integrative criteria includes biogeochemical, ecophysiological and ecotoxicological assessment of risk factors. Consequently, ecological-biogeochemical regionalization, ecophysiological and ecotoxicological monitoring of human population health are the important approaches to RA. These criteria should be conjugated with LCA of various industrial and agricultural products. At the ultimate degree, the given approaches are needed for areas where traditional pollutants (heavy metals, POPS, pesticides, fertilizers) are enforced sharply by radioactive pollution. Due to the complex influence of pollutants, it is impossible to use individual guidelines. For RA of these complex pollutants, the methods of human adaptability assessment to a polluted environment have to be carried out. These methods include biogeochemical, ecotoxicological and ecophysiological analysis of risk factors as well as quantitative uncertainty analysis. Furthermore, the modern statistical methods such as correlative graphs etc., have to be used for quantitative assessment of human adaptability to complex influence of pollutants. The results obtained in the Chernobyl region have shown the acceptability of suggested methods

  20. Factors Influencing Divergent Patterns of Phosphorus Availability in NY and PA Biogeochemical `Hotspots'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, S. M.; Hofmeister, K.; Regan, J. M.; Buda, A. R.; Carrick, H. J.; Walter, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of the soil phosphorus (P) cycle leads to subsequent water quality issues in agricultural dominated watersheds. In the humid Northeastern United States (NE US), variably saturated areas can generate surface runoff that transports P and stimulates biogeochemical processes; these hydrologically dynamic locations are often called biogeochemical `hotspots'. Many studies have evaluated nitrogen and carbon cycling in biogeochemical hot spots but few have focused on P. We hypothesized seasonally wet parts of the landscape (i.e., hotspots) have smaller biologically available P pools because runoff events frequently carry away nutrients like P. To test this hypothesis, we generated soil wetness index (SWI) maps from soil (SURRGO) and elevation (LiDAR rescaled to 3 m) data and used these maps to direct seasonal soil sampling near Klingerstown, Pennsylvania (PA) and Ithaca, New York (NY). We collected 5cm deep soil samples in PA (bimonthly) and NY (monthly) along soil moisture gradients for a range of land cover types (forest, fallow, and cropped) from May through October. We measured soil moisture in the field and percent organic matter (OM), pH, and three increasingly strong soil P extractions (dilute-salt-extractable P, oxalate-extractable P, and total-extractable P) in the laboratory. Our results indicated a negative relationship between dilute-salt-extractable P concentrations and SWI in PA and no relationship between these same variables in NY. We also found positive relationships between each of the three P extractions in PA but only a positive relationship between oxalate-extractable P and total-extractable P in NY. Our findings in PA support our hypothesis; namely, less biologically available P (i.e. dilute-salt-extractable P) is found in wetter areas of the landscape. However, divergent P availability patterns in NY point to further complexities and confounding variables in our understanding in soil P processes. Further studies will look

  1. Aeroelastic Limit-Cycle Oscillations resulting from Aerodynamic Non-Linearities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, A.C.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamic non-linearities, such as shock waves, boundary layer separation or boundary layer transition, may cause an amplitude limitation of the oscillations induced by the fluid flow around a structure. These aeroelastic limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs) resulting from aerodynamic non-linearities

  2. Traceable components of terrestrial carbon storage capacity in biogeochemical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianyang; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Ying-Ping; Hararuk, Oleksandra

    2013-07-01

    Biogeochemical models have been developed to account for more and more processes, making their complex structures difficult to be understood and evaluated. Here, we introduce a framework to decompose a complex land model into traceable components based on mutually independent properties of modeled biogeochemical processes. The framework traces modeled ecosystem carbon storage capacity (Xss ) to (i) a product of net primary productivity (NPP) and ecosystem residence time (τE ). The latter τE can be further traced to (ii) baseline carbon residence times (τ'E ), which are usually preset in a model according to vegetation characteristics and soil types, (iii) environmental scalars (ξ), including temperature and water scalars, and (iv) environmental forcings. We applied the framework to the Australian Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) model to help understand differences in modeled carbon processes among biomes and as influenced by nitrogen processes. With the climate forcings of 1990, modeled evergreen broadleaf forest had the highest NPP among the nine biomes and moderate residence times, leading to a relatively high carbon storage capacity (31.5 kg cm(-2) ). Deciduous needle leaf forest had the longest residence time (163.3 years) and low NPP, leading to moderate carbon storage (18.3 kg cm(-2) ). The longest τE in deciduous needle leaf forest was ascribed to its longest τ'E (43.6 years) and small ξ (0.14 on litter/soil carbon decay rates). Incorporation of nitrogen processes into the CABLE model decreased Xss in all biomes via reduced NPP (e.g., -12.1% in shrub land) or decreased τE or both. The decreases in τE resulted from nitrogen-induced changes in τ'E (e.g., -26.7% in C3 grassland) through carbon allocation among plant pools and transfers from plant to litter and soil pools. Our framework can be used to facilitate data model comparisons and model intercomparisons via tracking a few traceable components for all terrestrial carbon

  3. Linking Chaotic Advection with Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, D. C.; Freedman, V. L.; White, S. K.; Fang, Y.; Neupauer, R.

    2017-12-01

    This work investigates the extent to which groundwater flow kinematics drive subsurface biogeochemical processes. In terms of groundwater flow kinematics, we consider chaotic advection, whose essential ingredient is stretching and folding of plumes. Chaotic advection is appealing within the context of groundwater remediation because it has been shown to optimize plume spreading in the laminar flows characteristic of aquifers. In terms of subsurface biogeochemical processes, we consider an existing model for microbially-mediated reduction of relatively mobile uranium(VI) to relatively immobile uranium(IV) following injection of acetate into a floodplain aquifer beneath a former uranium mill in Rifle, Colorado. This model has been implemented in the reactive transport code eSTOMP, the massively parallel version of STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases). This presentation will report preliminary numerical simulations in which the hydraulic boundary conditions in the eSTOMP model are manipulated to simulate chaotic advection resulting from engineered injection and extraction of water through a manifold of wells surrounding the plume of injected acetate. This approach provides an avenue to simulate the impact of chaotic advection within the existing framework of the eSTOMP code.

  4. Ecotoxicological, ecophysiological, and biogeochemical fundamentals of risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkin, V.N.; Kozlov, M.Ya.; Evstafjeva, E.V.

    1993-01-01

    Risk assessment (RA) influenced by different factors in radionuclide polluted regions is carried out by determining the biogeochemical structure of a region. Consequently, ecological-biogeochemical regionalization, ecotoxicological and ecophysiological monitoring of human population health are the important approach to RA. These criteria should conjugate with LCA of various industrial and agricultural products. Given fundamentals and approaches are needed for areas where traditional pollutants (heavy metals, pesticides, fertilizers, POPs etc) are enforced sharply by radioactive pollution. For RA of these complex pollutants, the methods of human adaptability to a polluted environment have been carried out. These techniques include biogeochemical, ecotoxicological, and ecophysiological analyses of risk factors as well as quantitative analysis of uncertainties using expert-modeling systems. Furthermore, the modern statistical methods are used for quantitative assessment of human adaptability to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. The results obtained in Chernobyl regions show the acceptability of these methods for risk assessment

  5. Assessing the utility of frequency dependent nudging for reducing biases in biogeochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Karl B.; Fennel, Katja; Thompson, Keith R.; Bianucci, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Bias errors, resulting from inaccurate boundary and forcing conditions, incorrect model parameterization, etc. are a common problem in environmental models including biogeochemical ocean models. While it is important to correct bias errors wherever possible, it is unlikely that any environmental model will ever be entirely free of such errors. Hence, methods for bias reduction are necessary. A widely used technique for online bias reduction is nudging, where simulated fields are continuously forced toward observations or a climatology. Nudging is robust and easy to implement, but suppresses high-frequency variability and introduces artificial phase shifts. As a solution to this problem Thompson et al. (2006) introduced frequency dependent nudging where nudging occurs only in prescribed frequency bands, typically centered on the mean and the annual cycle. They showed this method to be effective for eddy resolving ocean circulation models. Here we add a stability term to the previous form of frequency dependent nudging which makes the method more robust for non-linear biological models. Then we assess the utility of frequency dependent nudging for biological models by first applying the method to a simple predator-prey model and then to a 1D ocean biogeochemical model. In both cases we only nudge in two frequency bands centered on the mean and the annual cycle, and then assess how well the variability in higher frequency bands is recovered. We evaluate the effectiveness of frequency dependent nudging in comparison to conventional nudging and find significant improvements with the former.

  6. Intra- versus inter-site macroscale variation in biogeochemical properties along a paddy soil chronosequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mueller-Niggemann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the intrinsic heterogeneity of paddy soils, a set of biogeochemical soil parameters was investigated in five field replicates of seven paddy fields (50, 100, 300, 500, 700, 1000, and 2000 yr of wetland rice cultivation, one flooded paddy nursery, one tidal wetland (TW, and one freshwater site (FW from a coastal area at Hangzhou Bay, Zhejiang Province, China. All soils evolved from a marine tidal flat substrate due to land reclamation. The biogeochemical parameters based on their properties were differentiated into (i a group behaving conservatively (TC, TOC, TN, TS, magnetic susceptibility, soil lightness and colour parameters, δ13C, δ15N, lipids and n-alkanes and (ii one encompassing more labile properties or fast cycling components (Nmic, Cmic, nitrate, ammonium, DON and DOC. The macroscale heterogeneity in paddy soils was assessed by evaluating intra- versus inter-site spatial variability of biogeochemical properties using statistical data analysis (descriptive, explorative and non-parametric. Results show that the intrinsic heterogeneity of paddy soil organic and minerogenic components per field is smaller than between study sites. The coefficient of variation (CV values of conservative parameters varied in a low range (10% to 20%, decreasing from younger towards older paddy soils. This indicates a declining variability of soil biogeochemical properties in longer used cropping sites according to progress in soil evolution. A generally higher variation of CV values (>20–40% observed for labile parameters implies a need for substantially higher sampling frequency when investigating these as compared to more conservative parameters. Since the representativeness of the sampling strategy could be sufficiently demonstrated, an investigation of long-term carbon accumulation/sequestration trends in topsoils of the 2000 yr paddy chronosequence under wetland rice cultivation

  7. Deep-Sea Microbes: Linking Biogeochemical Rates to -Omics Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndl, G. J.; Sintes, E.; Bayer, B.; Bergauer, K.; Amano, C.; Hansman, R.; Garcia, J.; Reinthaler, T.

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade substantial progress has been made in determining deep ocean microbial activity and resolving some of the enigmas in understanding the deep ocean carbon flux. Also, metagenomics approaches have shed light onto the dark ocean's microbes but linking -omics approaches to biogeochemical rate measurements are generally rare in microbial oceanography and even more so for the deep ocean. In this presentation, we will show by combining metagenomics, -proteomics and biogeochemical rate measurements on the bulk and single-cell level that deep-sea microbes exhibit characteristics of generalists with a large genome repertoire, versatile in utilizing substrate as revealed by metaproteomics. This is in striking contrast with the apparently rather uniform dissolved organic matter pool in the deep ocean. Combining the different -omics approaches with metabolic rate measurements, we will highlight some major inconsistencies and enigmas in our understanding of the carbon cycling and microbial food web structure in the dark ocean.

  8. Aqueous complexation reactions governing the rate and extent of biogeochemical U(VI) reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Brooks, Scott C.; Dong, Wenming; Carroll, Sue; Fredrickson, James K.

    2006-01-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments

  9. Modelling of transport and biogeochemical processes in pollution plumes: Vejen landfill, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brun, A.; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2002-01-01

    A biogeochemical transport code is used to simulate leachate attenuation. biogeochemical processes. and development of redox zones in a pollution plume downstream of the Vejen landfill in Denmark. Calibration of the degradation parameters resulted in a good agreement with the observed distribution...

  10. GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks

  11. Global biogeochemical provinces of the mesopelagic zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reygondeau, Gabriel; Guidi, Lionel; Beaugrand, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Aim: Following the biogeographical approach implemented by Longhurst for the epipelagic layer, we propose here to identify a biogeochemical 3-D partition for the mesopelagic layer. The resulting partition characterizes the main deep environmental biotopes and their vertical boundaries on a global...... scale, which can be used as a geographical and ecological framework for conservation biology, ecosystem-based management and for the design of oceanographic investigations. Location: The global ocean. Methods: Based on the most comprehensive environmental climatology available to date, which is both...... of the mesopelagic layer. Results: First, we show via numerical interpretation that the vertical division of the pelagic zone varies and, hence, is not constant throughout the global ocean. Indeed, a latitudinal gradient is found between the epipelagic-mesopelagic and mesopelagic-bathypelagic vertical limits. Second...

  12. The significance of GW-SW interactions for biogeochemical processes in sandy streambeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shai; De Falco, Natalie; Fox, Aryeh; Laube, Gerrit; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan; Boano, Fulvio

    2015-04-01

    Stream-groundwater interactions have a major impact on hyporheic exchange fluxes in sandy streambeds. However, the physical complexity of natural streams has limited our ability to study these types of interactions systematically, and to evaluate their importance to biogeochemical processes and nutrient cycling. In this work we were able to quantify the effect of losing and gaining fluxes on hyporheic exchange and nutrient cycling in homogeneous and heterogeneous streambeds by combining experiments in laboratory flumes and modeling. Tracer experiments for measuring hyporheic exchange were done using dyes and NaCl under various combinations of overlying water velocity and losing or gaining fluxes. Nutrient cycling experiments were conducted after growing a benthic biofilm by spiking with Sodium Benzoate (as a source of labile dissolved organic carbon, DOC) and measuring DOC and oxygen dynamics. The combination of experimental observations and modeling revealed that interfacial transport increases with the streambed hydraulic conductivity and proportional to the square of the overlying water velocity. Hyporheic exchange fluxes under losing and gaining flow conditions were similar, and became smaller when the losing or gaining flux increases. Increasing in streambed hydraulic conductivity led to higher hyporheic fluxes and reduction in the effects of losing and gaining flow conditions to constrain exchange. Despite the evident effect of flow conditions on hyporheic exchange, labile DOC uptake was positively linked to increasing overlying water velocity but was not affected by losing and gaining fluxes. This is because microbial aerobic activity was taking place at the upper few millimeters of the streambed as shown by local oxygen consumption rates, which was measured using microelectrodes. Based on modeling work, it is expected that GW-SW interaction will be more significant for less labile DOC and anaerobic processes. Our results enable us to study systematically

  13. Understanding oceanic migrations with intrinsic biogeochemical markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raül Ramos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Migratory marine vertebrates move annually across remote oceanic water masses crossing international borders. Many anthropogenic threats such as overfishing, bycatch, pollution or global warming put millions of marine migrants at risk especially during their long-distance movements. Therefore, precise knowledge about these migratory movements to understand where and when these animals are more exposed to human impacts is vital for addressing marine conservation issues. Because electronic tracking devices suffer from several constraints, mainly logistical and financial, there is emerging interest in finding appropriate intrinsic markers, such as the chemical composition of inert tissues, to study long-distance migrations and identify wintering sites. Here, using tracked pelagic seabirds and some of their own feathers which were known to be grown at different places and times within the annual cycle, we proved the value of biogeochemical analyses of inert tissue as tracers of marine movements and habitat use. Analyses of feathers grown in summer showed that both stable isotope signatures and element concentrations can signal the origin of breeding birds feeding in distinct water masses. However, only stable isotopes signalled water masses used during winter because elements mainly accumulated during the long breeding period are incorporated into feathers grown in both summer and winter. Our findings shed new light on the simple and effective assignment of marine organisms to distinct oceanic areas, providing new opportunities to study unknown migration patterns of secretive species, including in relation to human-induced mortality on specific populations in the marine environment.

  14. Outline of results of safety research (in nuclear fuel cycle field in fiscal year 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The safety research in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation in fiscal year 1996 has been carried out based on the basic plan of safety research (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000) which was decided in March, 1996. In this report, on nuclear fuel cycle field, namely all the subjects in the fields of nuclear fuel facilities, environmental radioactivity and waste disposal, and the subjects related to nuclear fuel facilities among the fields of aseismatic and probabilistic safety assessments, the results of research in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5-year project, are summarized together with the outline of the basic plan of safety research. The basic policy, objective and system for promotion of the safety research are described. The objectives of the safety research are the advancement of safety technology, the safety of facilities, stable operation techniques, the safety design and the evaluation techniques of next generation facilities, and the support of transferring nuclear fuel cycle to private businesses. The objects of the research are uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication and reprocessing, and waste treatment and storage. 52 investigation papers of the results of the safety research in nuclear fuel cycle field in fiscal year 1996 are collected in this report. (K.I.)

  15. Standalone BISON Fuel Performance Results for Watts Bar Unit 1, Cycles 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pawlowski, Roger [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is moving forward with more complex multiphysics simulations and increased focus on incorporating fuel performance analysis methods. The coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics capabilities within the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS) have become relatively stable, and major advances have been made in analysis efforts, including the simulation of twelve cycles of Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) operation. While this is a major achievement, the VERA-CS approaches for treating fuel pin heat transfer have well-known limitations that could be eliminated through better integration with the BISON fuel performance code. Several approaches are being implemented to consider fuel performance, including a more direct multiway coupling with Tiamat, as well as a more loosely coupled one-way approach with standalone BISON cases. Fuel performance typically undergoes an independent analysis using a standalone fuel performance code with manually specified input defined from an independent core simulator solution or set of assumptions. This report summarizes the improvements made since the initial milestone to execute BISON from VERA-CS output. Many of these improvements were prompted through tighter collaboration with the BISON development team at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A brief description of WBN1 and some of the VERA-CS data used to simulate it are presented. Data from a small mesh sensitivity study are shown, which helps justify the mesh parameters used in this work. The multi-cycle results are presented, followed by the results for the first three cycles of WBN1 operation, particularly the parameters of interest to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) screening (fuel-clad gap closure, maximum centerline fuel temperature, maximum/minimum clad hoop stress, and cumulative damage index). Once the mechanics of this capability are functioning, future work will target cycles with

  16. Vehicle lightweighting vs. electrification: Life cycle energy and GHG emissions results for diverse powertrain vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Anne Marie; Kelly, Jarod C.; Keoleian, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We modeled life cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from diverse powertrain vehicles. • Lightweight versions of the vehicle models were compared against baseline models. • Maximum energy and GHG emissions occur with aluminum vs. advanced high strength steel. • Design harmonization method shows 0.2–0.3 kg of support required per 1 kg powertrain mass increase. - Abstract: This work assesses the potential of electrified vehicles and mass reduction to reduce life cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to account for processes upstream and downstream of the vehicle operation, thereby incorporating regional variation of energy and GHG emissions due to electricity production and distinct energy and GHG emissions due to conventional and lightweight materials. Design harmonization methods developed in previous work are applied to create baseline and lightweight vehicle models of an internal combustion vehicle (ICV), hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Thus, each vehicle is designed to be functionally equivalent and incorporate the structural support required for heavier powertrains. Lightweight vehicles are designed using body-in-white (BIW) mass reduction scenarios with aluminum and advanced/high strength steel (A/HSS). For the mass reduction scenarios considered in this work, results indicate that the greatest life cycle energy and GHG emissions reductions occur when steel is replaced by aluminum. However, since A/HSS requires less energy to produce as compared to aluminum, the energy and GHG reductions per unit mass removed is greatest for A/HSS. Results of the design harmonization modeling method show that 0.2–0.3 kg of structural support is required per unit increase in powertrain mass, thus extending previous methods

  17. Primary water chemistry optimization for extended fuel cycle operation. Results of the 'Duo experimentation' after three cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viricel, L.; Andrieu, C.; Segura, J.C.; Rocher, A. [Electricite de France (France); Thomazet, J.; Clinard, M.H. [Framatome ANP (France); Dacquait, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (France)

    2002-07-01

    The primary coolant conditioning in French nuclear power plants is essentially based on the boron-lithium coordinated chemistry, with a target pH of 7.2 at 300 C and a maximum lithium concentration of 2.2 mg/kg. In 1996, EDF 1300 MWe units began operating 18-month fuel cycles, increasing boron concentrations at the beginning of the cycles. Since today the maximum lithium concentration in normal operation is 2.2 mg/kg, extended cycle operation results in a decrease in the pH at the beginning of the cycles, which may possibly lead to deposits in RCS, and particularly on the fuel cladding, and increased dose rates. It has to be noted that today, the fuel assemblies maximum burnup is set at 52 GWd/tU. One solution is to adjust the pH by increasing the lithium content at the beginning of the cycles, which is easy to implement and does not require any modification on the units. Hence, EDF is testing a ''modified'' chemistry regime in the << Duo experimentation >> during 4 fuel cycles, with a maximum authorized lithium content of 3.5 mg/kg at the beginning of the cycles in the Cattenom 2 pilot unit. The Golfech 1 reference unit implements a standard boron-lithium coordination pH{sub 300} 7.2. The major goal of the experimentation is to assess the impact of elevated lithium concentrations at the beginning of the cycles on fuel cladding oxide behavior, mass transport and dose rates. This paper presents the results of the first three cycles of the Duo experimentation. (author)

  18. Results of FY 2002 of feasibility study on commercialized fast reactor cycle systems. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC, that is the representative of the electric utilities in Japan) established a new organization to develop a commercialized fast reactor (FR) cycle system on July 1, 1999 and feasibility study (F/S) was undertaken in order to determine the promising concepts and to define the necessary R and D tasks. During Phase 1 (JFY 1999 and 2000), a number of candidate concepts were screened from various options, featuring innovative technologies. In the F/S, the options were evaluated and conceptual designs were examined considering the attainable perspectives for following: 1) ensuring safety, 2) economic competitiveness to future LWRs, 3) efficient utilization of resources, 4) reduction of environmental burden and 5) enhancement of nuclear non-proliferation. The F/S should also guide the necessary R and D to commercialize FR cycle system. To begin with the study of feasible candidate concepts screened in Phase I, Phase 2 started in the plan for five years in 2001. This aims at clarifying several feasible candidate concepts and deciding the research plan after Phase 3 as taking into consideration the innovative technology. As for this plan, an interim report will be carried out in 2003 as one pause and the prospect to clarify the feasible candidates will be expected. Furthermore, after the completion of this research and investigation program, research and development activities will be carried out under a rolling plan in which reviews will be carried out approximately every five years. The objective of these R and D activities is to make a proposal regarding highly attractive and competitive FR cycle system technology that assures safety by 2015. This report summarizes the results of F/S of Phase 2 in 2002. In 2002, the second year of Phase 2, the study was advanced along with the plan which was evaluated by the committee for the Evaluation. Then, in the study of FR system and fuel cycle

  19. Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Gnanadesikan, Anand [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Gruber, Nicolas [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jin, Xin [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Armstrong, Robert [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States)

    2007-06-21

    This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1; and, December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the

  20. Biogeochemical reactive transport of carbon, nitrogen and iron in the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Newcomer, M. E.; Arora, B.; Spycher, N.; Hammond, G. E.; Moulton, J. D.; Fox, P. M.; Nico, P. S.; Williams, K. H.; Dafflon, B.; Carroll, R. W. H.

    2017-12-01

    To understand how biogeochemical processes in the hyporheic zone influence carbon and nitrogen cycling as well as stream biogeochemistry, we developed a biotic and abiotic reaction network and integrated it into a reactive transport simulator - PFLOTRAN. Three-dimensional reactive flow and transport simulations were performed to describe the hyporheic exchange of fluxes from and within an intra-meander region encompassing two meanders of East River in the East Taylor watershed, Colorado. The objectives of this study were to quantify (1) the effect of transience on the export of carbon, nitrogen, and iron; and (2) the biogeochemical transformation of nitrogen and carbon species as a function of the residence time. The model was able to capture reasonably well the observed trends of nitrate and dissolved oxygen values that decreased as well as iron (Fe (II)) values that increased along the meander centerline away from the stream. Hyporheic flow paths create lateral redox zonation within intra-meander regions, which considerably impact nitrogen export into the stream system. Simulation results further demonstrated that low water conditions lead to higher levels of dissolved iron in groundwater, which (Fe (II)> 80%) is exported to the stream on the downstream side during high water conditions. An important conclusion from this study is that reactive transport models representing spatial and temporal heterogeneities are required to identify important factors that contribute to the redox gradients at riverine scales.

  1. Late winter biogeochemical conditions under sea ice in the Canadian High Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen S. Findlay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the Arctic summer sea-ice extent in decline, questions are arising as to how changes in sea-ice dynamics might affect biogeochemical cycling and phenomena such as carbon dioxide (CO2 uptake and ocean acidification. Recent field research in these areas has concentrated on biogeochemical and CO2 measurements during spring, summer or autumn, but there are few data for the winter or winter–spring transition, particularly in the High Arctic. Here, we present carbon and nutrient data within and under sea ice measured during the Catlin Arctic Survey, over 40 days in March and April 2010, off Ellef Ringnes Island (78° 43.11′ N, 104° 47.44′ W in the Canadian High Arctic. Results show relatively low surface water (1–10 m nitrate (<1.3 µM and total inorganic carbon concentrations (mean±SD=2015±5.83 µmol kg−1, total alkalinity (mean±SD=2134±11.09 µmol kg−1 and under-ice pCO2sw (mean±SD=286±17 µatm. These surprisingly low wintertime carbon and nutrient conditions suggest that the outer Canadian Arctic Archipelago region is nitrate-limited on account of sluggish mixing among the multi-year ice regions of the High Arctic, which could temper the potential of widespread under-ice and open-water phytoplankton blooms later in the season.

  2. Orbit transfer vehicle advanced expander cycle engine point design study. Volume 2: Study results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    The design characteristics of the baseline engine configuration of the advanced expander cycle engine are described. Several aspects of engine optimization are considered which directly impact the design of the baseline thrust chamber. Four major areas of the power cycle optimization are emphasized: main turbine arrangement; cycle engine source; high pressure pump design; and boost pump drive.

  3. Evidence of linked biogeochemical and hydrological processes in homogeneous and layered vadose zone systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, J. T.; Hansen, D. J.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    flux. No such mineral bands developed in the sterilized column. As a consequence, water content in the lenses of the sterilized column was half that of the other column and flow rates through the lenses were an order of magnitude lower. This flow impedance limited the interaction and mixing of groundwater with infiltrating vadose zone water and led to the formation of geochemically distinct water masses residing in relatively close proximity to one another. Results provide a specific examples of the direct impact of biogeochemical cycling on water flow in the vadose zone and vice versa. In addition, these demonstrate that the presence of layers in vadose zone environments may be an important control on overall chemical fate and transport in subsurface systems.

  4. Development of interactive graphic user interfaces for modeling reaction-based biogeochemical processes in batch systems with BIOGEOCHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Li, M.; Yeh, G.

    2010-12-01

    The BIOGEOCHEM numerical model (Yeh and Fang, 2002; Fang et al., 2003) was developed with FORTRAN for simulating reaction-based geochemical and biochemical processes with mixed equilibrium and kinetic reactions in batch systems. A complete suite of reactions including aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion-exchange, redox, precipitation/dissolution, acid-base reactions, and microbial mediated reactions were embodied in this unique modeling tool. Any reaction can be treated as fast/equilibrium or slow/kinetic reaction. An equilibrium reaction is modeled with an implicit finite rate governed by a mass action equilibrium equation or by a user-specified algebraic equation. A kinetic reaction is modeled with an explicit finite rate with an elementary rate, microbial mediated enzymatic kinetics, or a user-specified rate equation. None of the existing models has encompassed this wide array of scopes. To ease the input/output learning curve using the unique feature of BIOGEOCHEM, an interactive graphic user interface was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio and .Net tools. Several user-friendly features, such as pop-up help windows, typo warning messages, and on-screen input hints, were implemented, which are robust. All input data can be real-time viewed and automated to conform with the input file format of BIOGEOCHEM. A post-processor for graphic visualizations of simulated results was also embedded for immediate demonstrations. By following data input windows step by step, errorless BIOGEOCHEM input files can be created even if users have little prior experiences in FORTRAN. With this user-friendly interface, the time effort to conduct simulations with BIOGEOCHEM can be greatly reduced.

  5. Changes of Soil Aggregate Stability as a Result of the Effect of Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Žabenská

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to assess the changes in soil erodibility during the non-vegetation period as one of the factors affecting the snowmelt erosion. The temperature fluctuation was simulated with the use of a climatic chamber ex situ. The soil surface was for simplicity reasons considered without any plant or snow cover. The paper deals with the rate of soil erodibility determination – the soil erodibility should increase due to the decrease of soil aggregate stability depending on the number of freeze-thaw cycles and initial soil moisture. Soil samples (taken from three sites were subjected to freeze-thaw cycles under laboratory conditions. Changes in soil agreggate stability were monitored as one of the main soil characteristics which determine the soil erodibility. Two methods were used to determine the soil macroaggregate stability (soil aggregate fraction 1–2 mm: standard single-sieve method of wet sieving (Kemper and Rosenau, 1986, and dry aggregate analysis using a set of flat sieves with a diameter of 1 mm and 0.5 mm. The results of each method are controversial. Intended hypothesis has not been clearly confirmed.

  6. Results of Spectral Corona Observations in Solar Activity Cycles 17-24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, A. Kh.; Guseva, S. A.; Tlatov, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    The results of the work of the global observation network are considered, and a comparative analysis of the data of various coronal observatories is performed. The coronal activity index has been reconstructed for the period 1939-2016 based on the data of various observatories in Kislovodsk system. For this purpose, the corona daily intensity maps from the Sacramento Peak and Lomnický Štít observatories according to the Solar-Geophysical Data journal have been digitized; they supplement the data of other observatories. The homogeneity and continuity of the corona observations at the Kislovodsk station, including activity cycle 24, is confirmed. Unfortunately, the only observatory at present that continues observation of the spectral corona in Fe XIV 5303 Å and Fe XIV 6374 Å lines is the Kislovodsk astronomical station Mountain Astronomical Station (MAS) of the Central Astronomical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences (Pulkovo). The data on the combined corona in 5303 Å line are analyzed. It is shown that there is a high correlation of the intensity index of green corona with solar radiation measurements in the vacuum UV region. Data on the beginning of the new 25th activity cycle in the corona at high latitudes are presented.

  7. Results from the first cycle of the PWR crud deposition test (IFA-665.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Peter

    2004-03-01

    The main objective of IFA-665.1 is to deposit crud on fuel rods operating under PWR thermal-hydraulic and water chemistry conditions, and to measure the resulting power reduction due to incorporation of boron into the crud. The test has operated for 160 days at power. Water chemistry conditions were 3.15 ppm LiOH and 1400 ppm boron (pH 300 =7.0). The coolant inlet temperature was 290/294 C, with sub-cooled nucleate boiling along the upper half of the fuel bundle. This report presents the results from the first cycle of operation. Three methods have been used to attempt to accelerate crud formation: (i) injection of simulated crud particles (NiFe 2 O 4 ); (ii) pH transients (reduction of pH 300 from 7.0 to 6.0 for periods of 48 hours); and (iii) oxygen addition transients. While the pH transients resulted in movement of large amounts of corrosion products around the loop, no significant deposition onto the fuel surfaces was measured. Comparison of the heat fluxes in IFA-665 with those in previous tests in which crud deposition has occurred does not clearly identify reasons for the lack of crud formation, although it is noted that higher heat fluxes may be required. In addition, the relatively benign boiling conditions in the current test (small void fraction with no detached voidage) may partly explain the absence of crud formation. For the second cycle of the test, changes will be made to the water chemistry to attempt to increase the concentrations of dissolved and colloidal Fe and Ni in the test rig, such that a continuous (Fe + Ni) level of 100 ppb will be targeted, with short-term concentrations of colloids of up to 500 ppb. (Author)

  8. Aqueous Complexation Reactions Governing the Rate and Extent of Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott C. Brooks; Wenming Dong; Sue Carroll; James K. Fredrickson; Kenneth M. Kemner; Shelly D. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. In addition, the work plan is designed to: (1) Generate fundamental scientific understanding on the relationship between U(VI) chemical speciation and its susceptibility to biogeochemical reduction reactions. (2) Elucidate the controls on the rate and extent of contaminant reactivity. (3) Provide new insights into the aqueous and solid speciation of U(VI)/U(IV) under representative groundwater conditions

  9. Advanced fuel cycle cost estimation model and its cost estimation results for three nuclear fuel cycles using a dynamic model in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungki, E-mail: sgkim1@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Wonil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Saerom; Gao, Ruxing [University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajungro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Sungsig, E-mail: ssbang@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Business and Technology Management, 291 Deahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The nuclear fuel cycle cost using a new cost estimation model was analyzed. • The material flows of three nuclear fuel cycle options were calculated. • The generation cost of once-through was estimated to be 66.88 mills/kW h. • The generation cost of pyro-SFR recycling was estimated to be 78.06 mills/kW h. • The reactor cost was identified as the main cost driver of pyro-SFR recycling. - Abstract: The present study analyzes advanced nuclear fuel cycle cost estimation models such as the different discount rate model and its cost estimation results. To do so, an analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle cost of three options (direct disposal (once through), PWR–MOX (Mixed OXide fuel), and Pyro-SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor)) from the viewpoint of economic sense, focusing on the cost estimation model, was conducted using a dynamic model. From an analysis of the fuel cycle cost estimation results, it was found that some cost gap exists between the traditional same discount rate model and the advanced different discount rate model. However, this gap does not change the priority of the nuclear fuel cycle option from the viewpoint of economics. In addition, the fuel cycle costs of OT (Once-Through) and Pyro-SFR recycling based on the most likely value using a probabilistic cost estimation except for reactor costs were calculated to be 8.75 mills/kW h and 8.30 mills/kW h, respectively. Namely, the Pyro-SFR recycling option was more economical than the direct disposal option. However, if the reactor cost is considered, the economic sense in the generation cost between the two options (direct disposal vs. Pyro-SFR recycling) can be changed because of the high reactor cost of an SFR.

  10. Life-cycle assessment of photovoltaic systems: results of Swiss studies on energy chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dones, Roberto [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Frischknecht, Rolf [Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1998-04-01

    The methodology used and results obtained for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) plants in recent Swiss life-cycle assessment (LCA) studies on current and future energy systems are discussed. Mono- and polycrystalline silicon cell technologies utilised in current panels as well as monocrystalline and amorphous cells for future applications were analysed from Swiss conditions. The environmental inventories of slanted-roof solar panels and large plants are presented. Greenhouse gas emissions from present and future electricity systems are compared. The high electricity requirements for manufacturing determine most of the environmental burdens associated with current photovoltaics. However, due to increasing efficiency of production processes and cells, the environmental performance of PV systems is likely to improve substantially in the future. (Author)

  11. Life-cycle assessment of photovoltaic systems: results of Swiss studies on energy chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dones, Roberto; Frischknecht, Rolf

    1998-01-01

    The methodology used and results obtained for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) plants in recent Swiss life-cycle assessment (LCA) studies on current and future energy systems are discussed. Mono- and polycrystalline silicon cell technologies utilised in current panels as well as monocrystalline and amorphous cells for future applications were analysed from Swiss conditions. The environmental inventories of slanted-roof solar panels and large plants are presented. Greenhouse gas emissions from present and future electricity systems are compared. The high electricity requirements for manufacturing determine most of the environmental burdens associated with current photovoltaics. However, due to increasing efficiency of production processes and cells, the environmental performance of PV systems is likely to improve substantially in the future. (Author)

  12. CYCLES AND CRISES: HISTORY AND MODERNITY (THE RESULTS OF THE INTERNATIONAL NOBEL ECONOMIC FORUM)

    OpenAIRE

    Borys I.KHOLOD; Anatoly O.ZADOYA

    2009-01-01

    The paper analysis the main features of crisis phenomena in the early 21st century taking into consideration the overlapping stages of different types of business cycle (short and medium terms). The authors evaluate different kinds of economic cycles from the viewpoint of both history and modernity on the basis of opinions formulated during the International Nobel Economic Forum ôWord Economy in the 21th Century: Cycles and Crisesö (held in September 2008 at Dnipropetrovsk, University of Econ...

  13. Evaluation of the transport matrix method for simulation of ocean biogeochemical tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Karin F.; Khatiwala, Samar; Dietze, Heiner; Kriest, Iris; Oschlies, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Conventional integration of Earth system and ocean models can accrue considerable computational expenses, particularly for marine biogeochemical applications. Offline numerical schemes in which only the biogeochemical tracers are time stepped and transported using a pre-computed circulation field can substantially reduce the burden and are thus an attractive alternative. One such scheme is the transport matrix method (TMM), which represents tracer transport as a sequence of sparse matrix-vector products that can be performed efficiently on distributed-memory computers. While the TMM has been used for a variety of geochemical and biogeochemical studies, to date the resulting solutions have not been comprehensively assessed against their online counterparts. Here, we present a detailed comparison of the two. It is based on simulations of the state-of-the-art biogeochemical sub-model embedded within the widely used coarse-resolution University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM). The default, non-linear advection scheme was first replaced with a linear, third-order upwind-biased advection scheme to satisfy the linearity requirement of the TMM. Transport matrices were extracted from an equilibrium run of the physical model and subsequently used to integrate the biogeochemical model offline to equilibrium. The identical biogeochemical model was also run online. Our simulations show that offline integration introduces some bias to biogeochemical quantities through the omission of the polar filtering used in UVic ESCM and in the offline application of time-dependent forcing fields, with high latitudes showing the largest differences with respect to the online model. Differences in other regions and in the seasonality of nutrients and phytoplankton distributions are found to be relatively minor, giving confidence that the TMM is a reliable tool for offline integration of complex biogeochemical models. Moreover, while UVic ESCM is a serial code, the TMM can

  14. Cycling and Female Sexual and Urinary Function: Results From a Large, Multinational, Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Thomas W; Awad, Mohannad A; Murphy, Gregory P; Metzler, Ian; Sanford, Thomas; Eisenberg, Michael L; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Osterberg, E Charles; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2018-04-01

    and sampling methods. We found that women cyclists were no more likely to report sexual dysfunction or urinary symptoms than swimmers or runners. Gaither TW, Awad MA, Murphy GP, et al. Cycling and Female Sexual and Urinary Function: Results From a Large, Multinational, Cross-Sectional Study. J Sex Med 2018;15:510-518. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. An isopycnic ocean carbon cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Assmann

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The carbon cycle is a major forcing component in the global climate system. Modelling studies, aiming to explain recent and past climatic changes and to project future ones, increasingly include the interaction between the physical and biogeochemical systems. Their ocean components are generally z-coordinate models that are conceptually easy to use but that employ a vertical coordinate that is alien to the real ocean structure. Here, we present first results from a newly-developed isopycnic carbon cycle model and demonstrate the viability of using an isopycnic physical component for this purpose. As expected, the model represents well the interior ocean transport of biogeochemical tracers and produces realistic tracer distributions. Difficulties in employing a purely isopycnic coordinate lie mainly in the treatment of the surface boundary layer which is often represented by a bulk mixed layer. The most significant adjustments of the ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC, for use with an isopycnic coordinate, were in the representation of upper ocean biological production. We present a series of sensitivity studies exploring the effect of changes in biogeochemical and physical processes on export production and nutrient distribution. Apart from giving us pointers for further model development, they highlight the importance of preformed nutrient distributions in the Southern Ocean for global nutrient distributions. The sensitivity studies show that iron limitation for biological particle production, the treatment of light penetration for biological production, and the role of diapycnal mixing result in significant changes of nutrient distributions and liniting factors of biological production.

  16. 3 Steps to Great Coaching: A Simple but Powerful Instructional Coaching Cycle Nets Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim; Elford, Marti; Hock, Michael; Dunekack, Devona; Bradley, Barbara; Deshler, Donald D.; Knight, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a three-step instructional coaching cycle that can helps coaches become more effective. The article provides the steps and related components to: (1) Identify; (2) Learn; and (3) Improve. While the instructional coaching cycle is only one effective coaching program, coaches also need professional learning that…

  17. The majority of irregular menstrual cycles in adolescence are ovulatory: results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Alexia S; Doherty, Dorota A; Atkinson, Helen C; Hickey, Martha; Norman, Robert J; Hart, Roger

    2018-03-01

    While ovulation is most likely to occur in adolescent girls with regular menstrual cycles, there are limited data on the incidence of ovulation in girls with irregular menstrual cycles in early postmenarcheal years. The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of ovulation in healthy postmenarcheal girls with irregular menstrual cycles. Prospective cohort study over 12 weeks including 40 healthy postmenarcheal girls recruited from the population-based cohort of adolescents from Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study with irregular menstrual cycles defined by either menstrual cycles 35 days in duration or cycle length that varied from month to month by >4 days according to menstrual diaries. Ovulation defined by urinary pregnanediol-3α-glucuronide/creatinine measurements higher than three times above minimum value obtained from 12 samples (1 per week). Forty girls (37 Caucasians) with irregular menstrual cycles aged 15.1 (median (IQR) 14.9-15.4) years who were 2.3 (1.9-3.3) years postmenarche were assessed. Urinary pregnanediol-3α-glucuronide/creatinine values identified that 33 girls (82.5%) ovulated during the 3 months of observation and 7 girls had anovulatory cycles. Menstrual diaries collected for a median (IQR) of 159 (137.5-188.2) days showed median minimal and maximum menstrual cycle duration of 24 (11.5-29) and 38.5 (35-48) days, respectively. A large proportion of healthy adolescent girls with irregular menstrual cycles are still ovulating despite irregular and infrequent menses. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Dynamic biogeochemical provinces in the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reygondeau, Gabriel; Longhurst, Alan; Martinez, Elodie; Beaugrand, Gregory; Antoine, David; Maury, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, it has been found useful to partition the pelagic environment using the concept of biogeochemical provinces, or BGCPs, within each of which it is assumed that environmental conditions are distinguishable and unique at global scale. The boundaries between provinces respond to features of physical oceanography and, ideally, should follow seasonal and interannual changes in ocean dynamics. But this ideal has not been fulfilled except for small regions of the oceans. Moreover, BGCPs have been used only as static entities having boundaries that were originally established to compute global primary production. In the present study, a new statistical methodology based on non-parametric procedures is implemented to capture the environmental characteristics within 56 BGCPs. Four main environmental parameters (bathymetry, chlorophyll a concentration, surface temperature, and salinity) are used to infer the spatial distribution of each BGCP over 1997-2007. The resulting dynamic partition allows us to integrate changes in the distribution of BGCPs at seasonal and interannual timescales, and so introduces the possibility of detecting spatial shifts in environmental conditions.

  19. Results from low cycle fatigue testing of 316L plate and weld material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaellstroem, R.; Josefsson, B.; Haag, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Specimens for low cycle fatigue testing from the second heat of the CEC reference 316L plate and from Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) weld material have been neutron irradiated near room temperature to a displacement dose of approximately 0.3 dpa. The low cycle fatigue testing of both irradiated and unirradiated specimens was performed at 75, 250 and 450 degrees C, and with strain ranges of 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5%. There is no clear effect of the irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties. For the weld material the endurance is shorter than for plate, and the dependences on temperature and strain range are not clear

  20. Biogeochemical cycling of iron and phosphorus under low oxygen conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lomnitz, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Benthic release of the key nutrients iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) is enhanced from sediments that are impinged by oxygen-deficient bottom waters due to its diminished retention capacity for such redox sensitive elements. Suboxic to anoxic and sometimes even euxinic conditions are recently found in open ocean oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, e.g. Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems) and marginal seas (e.g. the Black Sea and the Baltic Sea). Recent studies showed that OMZs expanded in the last decade...

  1. Chromium stable isotope fractionation in modern biogeochemical cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere. Oxidative rock weathering on land induces oxidation of immobile Cr(III) to mobile Cr(VI). Isotopically relatively heavy Cr(VI) is released to runoff, and transported by rivers to the oceans, where it is incorporated into chemical sediments and carbonate shells...... laterite soils from India, formed on ultramafic rocks, indicates extensive leaching of isotopically heavy Cr(VI). Transferring this knowledge to ancient weathering profiles, negatively fractionated Cr is clear evidence for the presence of free oxygen in the atmosphere. The second part demonstrates...

  2. Ectomycorrhizal Fungi and Biogeochemical Cycles of Boreal Forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Inpodzolsin Europe and North America tunnels in weatherable mineral grains were found, presumably created by ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi. This finding was the incentive for a research program on rock-eating mycorrhizas, of which this project is part of. The focus of this

  3. Global change and biogeochemical cycles: The south Asia region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitra, A.P.; DileepKumar, M.; Kumar, K.R.; Abrol, Y.P.; Kalra, N.; Velayutham, M.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    stream_size 33 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Global-Region_Linkage_Earth_Syst_2002_75.pdf.txt stream_source_info Global-Region_Linkage_Earth_Syst_2002_75.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  4. Greenland's glacial fjords and their role in regional biogeochemical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, J.; Arndt, S.

    2017-12-01

    Greenland's coastal fjords serve as important pathways that connect the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) and the surrounding oceans. They export seasonal glacial meltwater whilst being significant sites of primary production. These fjords are home to some of the most productive ecosystems in the world and possess high socio-economic value via fisheries. A growing number of studies have proposed the GrIS as an underappreciated yet significant source of nutrients to surrounding oceans. Acting as both transfer routes and sinks for glacial nutrient export, fjords have the potential to act as significant biogeochemical processors, yet remain underexplored. Critically, an understanding of the quantitative contribution of fjords to carbon and nutrient budgets is lacking, with large uncertainties associated with limited availability of field data and the lack of robust upscaling approaches. To close this knowledge gap we developed a coupled 2D physical-biogeochemical model of the Godthåbsfjord system, a sub-Arctic sill fjord in southwest Greenland, to quantitatively assess the impact of nutrients exported from the GrIS on fjord primary productivity and biogeochemical dynamics. Glacial meltwater is found to be a key driver of fjord-scale circulation patterns, whilst tracer simulations reveal the relative nutrient contributions from meltwater-driven upwelling and meltwater export from the GrIS. Hydrodynamic circulation patterns and freshwater transit times are explored to provide a first understanding of the glacier-fjord-ocean continuum, demonstrating the complex pattern of carbon and nutrient cycling at this critical land-ocean interface.

  5. Integrate life-cycle assessment and risk analysis results, not methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Igor; Trump, Benjamin D; Wender, Ben A; Seager, Thomas P; Kennedy, Alan J; Keisler, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-04

    Two analytic perspectives on environmental assessment dominate environmental policy and decision-making: risk analysis (RA) and life-cycle assessment (LCA). RA focuses on management of a toxicological hazard in a specific exposure scenario, while LCA seeks a holistic estimation of impacts of thousands of substances across multiple media, including non-toxicological and non-chemically deleterious effects. While recommendations to integrate the two approaches have remained a consistent feature of environmental scholarship for at least 15 years, the current perception is that progress is slow largely because of practical obstacles, such as a lack of data, rather than insurmountable theoretical difficulties. Nonetheless, the emergence of nanotechnology presents a serious challenge to both perspectives. Because the pace of nanomaterial innovation far outstrips acquisition of environmentally relevant data, it is now clear that a further integration of RA and LCA based on dataset completion will remain futile. In fact, the two approaches are suited for different purposes and answer different questions. A more pragmatic approach to providing better guidance to decision-makers is to apply the two methods in parallel, integrating only after obtaining separate results.

  6. A soil-landscape framework for understanding spatial and temporal variability in biogeochemical processes in catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, K. J.; Bailey, S. W.; Ross, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    Heterogeneity in biophysical properties within catchments challenges how we quantify and characterize biogeochemical processes and interpret catchment outputs. Interactions between the spatiotemporal variability of hydrological states and fluxes and soil development can spatially structure catchments, leading to a framework for understanding patterns in biogeochemical processes. In an upland, glaciated landscape at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, USA, we are embracing the structure and organization of soils to understand the spatial relations between runoff production zones, distinct soil-biogeochemical environments, and solute retention and release. This presentation will use observations from the HBEF to demonstrate that a soil-landscape framework is essential in understanding the spatial and temporal variability of biogeochemical processes in this catchment. Specific examples will include how laterally developed soils reveal the location of active runoff production zones and lead to gradients in primary mineral dissolution and the distribution of weathering products along hillslopes. Soil development patterns also highlight potential carbon and nitrogen cycling hotspots, differentiate acidic conditions, and affect the regulation of surface water quality. Overall, this work demonstrates the importance of understanding the landscape-level structural organization of soils in characterizing the variation and extent of biogeochemical processes that occur in catchments.

  7. Results of cycling with battery charging management; Resultats de cyclage avec gestion de charge au niveau batterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verniolle, J.; Fernandez, C. [European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    In order to investigate the charging mode of an in-series assembly of lithium-carbon battery cells, a test has been performed on 5 commercial cells (18650) of 0.95 Ah nominal capacity. Results show that it is possible to cycle the cells at 80% of their output capacities during more than 2000 cycles. The management of the battery consists in maintaining a constant battery voltage as soon as a cell reaches its limit voltage during constant current charging. The initial dispersion of cells has been maintained practically constant during the cycling and the charge state of all cells has decreased progressively. (J.S.)

  8. Results of cycling with battery charging management; Resultats de cyclage avec gestion de charge au niveau batterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verniolle, J; Fernandez, C [European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    In order to investigate the charging mode of an in-series assembly of lithium-carbon battery cells, a test has been performed on 5 commercial cells (18650) of 0.95 Ah nominal capacity. Results show that it is possible to cycle the cells at 80% of their output capacities during more than 2000 cycles. The management of the battery consists in maintaining a constant battery voltage as soon as a cell reaches its limit voltage during constant current charging. The initial dispersion of cells has been maintained practically constant during the cycling and the charge state of all cells has decreased progressively. (J.S.)

  9. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. 4: Results of failure analyse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of KOH concentrations on failure modes and mechanisms of nickel-hydrogen cells were studied using long cycled boiler plate cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations ranging 21 to 36 percent. Life of these cells were up to 40,000 cycles in an accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. An interim life test results were reported earlier in J. Power Sources, 22, 213-220, 1988. The results of final life test, end-of-life cell performance, and teardown analyses are discussed. These teardown analyses included visual observations, measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte-flooded cell, dimensional changes of cell components, SEM studies on cell cross section, BET surface area and pore volume distribution in cycled nickel electrodes, and chemical analyses. Cycle life of a nickel-hydrogen cell was improved tremendously as KOH concentration was decreased from 36 to 31 percent and from 31 to 26 percent while effect of further concentration decrease was complicated as described in our earlier report. Failure mode of high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells was gradual capacity decrease, while that of low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells was mainly formation of a soft short. Long cycled (25,000 to 40,000 cycles) nickel electrodes were expanded more than 50 percent of the initial value, but no correlation was found between this expansion and measured capacity. All electrodes cycled in low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells had higher capacity than those cycled in high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells.

  10. Hyporheic zone as a bioreactor: sediment heterogeneity influencing biogeochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perujo, Nuria; Romani, Anna M.; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean fluvial systems are characterized by frequent periods of low flow or even drought. During low flow periods, water from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is proportionally large in fluvial systems. River water might be vertically transported through the hyporheic zone, and then porous medium acts as a complementary treatment system since, as water infiltrates, a suite of biogeochemical processes occurs. Subsurface sediment heterogeneity plays an important role since it influences the interstitial fluxes of the medium and drives biomass growing, determining biogeochemical reactions. In this study, WWTP water was continuously infiltrated for 3 months through two porous medium tanks: one consisting of 40 cm of fine sediment (homogeneous); and another comprised of two layers of different grain size sediments (heterogeneous), 20 cm of coarse sediment in the upper part and 20 cm of fine one in the bottom. Several hydrological, physicochemical and biological parameters were measured periodically (weekly at the start of the experiment and biweekly at the end). Analysed parameters include dissolved nitrogen, phosphorus, organic carbon, and oxygen all measured at the surface, and at 5, 20 and 40 cm depth. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with time were evaluated. Sediment samples were also analysed at three depths (surface, 20 and 40 cm) to determine bacterial density, chlorophyll content, extracellular polymeric substances, and biofilm function (extracellular enzyme activities and carbon substrate utilization profiles). Preliminary results suggest hydraulic conductivity to be the main driver of the differences in the biogeochemical processes occurring in the subsurface. At the heterogeneous tank, a low nutrient reduction throughout the whole medium is measured. In this medium, high hydraulic conductivity allows for a large amount of infiltrating water, but with a small residence time. Since some biological processes are largely time-dependent, small water

  11. Biogeochemical speciation of Fe in ocean water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemical speciation of Fe in seawater has been evaluated using the consistent Non-Ideal Competitive Adsorption model (NICA¿Donnan model). Two types of data sets were used, i.e. Fe-hydroxide solubility data and competitive ligand equilibration/cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE/CSV) Fe

  12. The Halden corrosion cycling experiment IFA-560.2. Experimental results and their interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, W.; Boehner, G.; Eberle, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Halden experiment IFA-560.2 was an experiment in which the corrosion behaviour of PWR fuel rodlets was investigated simultaneously under different load and cooling conditions: Permanent convective cooling at 50% power, permanent nucleate boiling at 100% power and periodic cycling between these two states. The objective was to study possible influences on the corrosion mechanism which might generically be related to the cycling operation. The oxide layer increments after 90 operations days and 60 day/night cycles were evaluated using the Siemens/KWU corrosion model regarding the special thermal hydraulic conditions of the experimental loop. The analysis proves that the layer thickness increases could be described purely following the changes in temperature caused by the power changes. No extra effect due to the frequent changes between the different cooling conditions could be observed. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear steam power plant cycle performance calculations supported by power plant monitoring and results computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettes, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    The paper discusses the real time performance calculations for the turbine cycle and reactor and steam generators of a nuclear power plant. Program accepts plant measurements and calculates performance and efficiency of each part of the cycle: reactor and steam generators, turbines, feedwater heaters, condenser, circulating water system, feed pump turbines, cooling towers. Presently, the calculations involve: 500 inputs, 2400 separate calculations, 500 steam properties subroutine calls, 200 support function accesses, 1500 output valves. The program operates in a real time system at regular intervals

  14. Biogeochemical tracers of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Edward J.; Harvey, H. Rodger; Fry, Brian; Capone, Douglas G.

    1997-01-01

    We examined the utility of several biogeochemical tracers for following the fate of the planktonic diazotrophic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium in the sea. The presence of a (CIO) fatty acid previously reported was observed in a culture of Trichodesmium but was not found in natural samples. This cyanobacterium had high concentrations of C 14 and C 16 acids, with lesser amounts of several saturated and unsaturated C 18 fatty acids. This composition was similar to that of other marine cyanobacteria. The major hydrocarbon identified was the C 17n-alkane, which was present in all samples from the five stations examined. Sterols common to algae and copepods were observed in many samples along with hopanoids representative of bacteria, suggesting a varied community structure in colonies collected from different stations. We found no unique taxonomic marker of Trichodesmium among the sterols. Measurements of the σ 15N and σ 13C in Trichodesmium samples from the SW Sargasso and NW Caribbean Seas averaged -0.4960 (range from -0.7 to -0.25960) and -12.9%0 (range from -15.2 to -11.9960), respectively, thus confirming previous observations that this cyanobacterial diazotroph has both the lowest σ 15N and highest σ 13C of any marine phytoplankter observed to date. A culture of Trichodesmium grown under diazotrophic conditions had a σ 15N between -1.3 and -3.6960. Our results support the supposition that the relatively low σ 15N and high σ 13C values observed in suspended and sediment-trapped material from some tropical and subtropical seas result from substantial input of C and N by Trichodesmium.

  15. Life cycle inventory and external costs of the gas fuel cycle. An overview of the main results and a brief comparison with other fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torfs, R.; De Nocker, L.; Wouters, G.

    1999-01-01

    In the context of a research project funded by the Belgian electricity utilities Electrabel/SPE, VITO made a life cycle inventory of the primary energy use and airborne emissions (including greenhouse gases, SO2 and NOx) of different fuels. Consequently, the impacts of these pollutants on human health, manmade and the natural environment are quantified and these impacts are valued in monetary terms. This analysis is based on the European ExternE methodology to estimate the external costs of energy. The LCI and external cost analysis confirm clearly that natural gas is a relative clean fossil fuel cycle. External cost are in the range of 1.2 to 2.6 EUROcent /kWh, which roughly corresponds from 30 % to 80 % of the private production costs. These results are introduced into a software module, which allows the utilities to compare economic costs and environmental benefits of different measures to reduce CO2 emissions. (author)

  16. First results of the earth observation water cycle multi-mission observation strategy (WACMOS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Fernadez-Prieto, D.; Timmermans, J.; Chen, Xuelong; Hungershoefer, K.; Schröder, M.; Schulz, J.; Stammes, P.; Wang, Peng; Wolters, e.

    2014-01-01

    Observing and monitoring the different components of the global water cycle and their dynamics are essential steps to understand the climate of the Earth, forecast the weather, predict natural disasters like floods and droughts, and improve water resources management. Earth observation technology is

  17. Impact of closed Brayton cycle test results on gas cooled reactor operation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, St.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the measurements and model predictions for a series of tests supported by the U.S. Department of Energy that were performed using the recently constructed Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL-30). From the test results we have developed steady-state power operating curves, controls methodologies, and transient data for normal and off-normal behavior, such as loss of load events, and for decay heat removal conditions after shutdown. These tests and models show that because the turbomachinery operates off of the temperature difference (between the heat source and the heat sink), that the turbomachinery can continue to operate (off of sensible heat) for long periods of time without auxiliary power. For our test hardware, operations up to one hour have been observed. This effect can provide significant operations and safety benefits for nuclear reactors that are coupled to a Brayton cycles because the operating turbomachinery continues to provide cooling to the reactor. These capabilities mean that the decay-heat removal can be accommodated by properly managing the electrical power produced by the generator/alternator. In some conditions, it may even be possible to produce sufficient power to continue operating auxiliary systems including the waste heat circulatory system. In addition, the Brayton plant impacts the consequences of off-normal and accident events including loss of load and loss of on-site power. We have observed that for a loss of load or a loss of on-site power event, with a reactor scram, the transient consists initially of a turbomachinery speed increase to a new stable operating point. Because the turbomachinery is still spinning, the reactor is still being cooled provided the ultimate heat sink remains available. These highly desirable operational characteristics were observed in the Sandia Brayton loop. This type of behavior is also predicted by our models. Ultimately, these results provide the designers the opportunity to design gas

  18. Solar System Chaos and its climatic and biogeochemical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M.; Tada, R.; Ozaki, K.; Olsen, P. E.

    2017-12-01

    Insolation changes caused by changes in Earth's orbital parameters are the main driver of climatic variations, whose pace has been used for astronomically-calibrated geologic time scales of high accuracy to understand Earth system dynamics. However, the astrophysical models beyond several tens of million years ago have large uncertainty due to chaotic behavior of the Solar System, and its impact on amplitude modulation of multi-Myr-scale orbital variations and consequent climate changes has become the subject of debate. Here we show the geologic constraints on the past chaotic behavior of orbital cycles from early Mesozoic monsoon-related records; the 30-Myr-long lake level records of the lacustrine sequence in Newark-Hartford basins (North America) and 70-Myr-long biogenic silica (BSi) burial flux record of pelagic deep-sea chert sequence in Inuyama area (Japan). BSi burial flux of chert could be considered as proportional to the dissolved Si (DSi) input from chemical weathering on timescales longer than the residence time of DSi ( 100 kyr), because chert could represent a major sink for oceanic dissolved silica (Ikeda et al., 2017).These geologic records show multi-Myr cycles with similar frequency modulations of eccentricity solution of astronomical model La2010d (Laskar et al., 2011) compared with other astronomical solutions, but not exactly same. Our geologic records provide convincing evidence for the past chaotic dynamical behaviour of the Solar System and new and challenging additional constraints for astrophysical models. In addition, we find that ˜10 Myr cycle detected in monsoon proxies and their amplitude modulation of ˜2 Myr cycle may be related to the amplitude modulation of ˜2 Myr eccentricity cycle through non-linear process(es) of Earth system dynamics, suggesting possible impact of the chaotic behavior of Solar planets on climate change. Further impact of multi-Myr orbital cycles on global biogeochemical cycles will be discussed.

  19. Restoration of biogeochemical function in mangrove forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K.L.; Faulkner, P.L.

    2000-01-01

    Forest structure of mangrove restoration sites (6 and 14 years old) at two locations (Henderson Creek [HC] and Windstar [WS]) in southwest Florida differed from that of mixed-basin forests (>50 years old) with which they were once contiguous. However, the younger site (HC) was typical of natural, developing forests, whereas the older site (WS) was less well developed with low structural complexity. More stressful physicochemical conditions resulting from incomplete tidal flushing (elevated salinity) and variable topography (waterlogging) apparently affected plant survival and growth at the WS restoration site. Lower leaf fall and root production rates at the WS restoration site, compared with that at HC were partly attributable to differences in hydroedaphic conditions and structural development. However, leaf and root inputs at each restoration site were not significantly different from that in reference forests within the same physiographic setting. Macrofaunal consumption of tethered leaves also did not differ with site history, but was dramatically higher at HC compared with WS, reflecting local variation in leaf litter processing rates, primarily by snails (Melampus coffeus). Degradation of leaves and roots in mesh bags was slow overall at restoration sites, however, particularly at WS where aerobic decomposition may have been more limited. These findings indicate that local or regional factors such as salinity regime act together with site history to control primary production and turnover rates of organic matter in restoration sites. Species differences in senescent leaf nitrogen content and degradation rates further suggest that restoration sites dominated by Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle should exhibit slower recycling of nutrients compared with natural basin forests where Avicennia germinans is more abundant. Structural development and biogeochemical functioning of restored mangrove forests thus depend on a number of factors, but site

  20. Effects of ozone-vegetation coupling on surface ozone air quality via biogeochemical and meteorological feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Mehliyar; Tai, Amos P. K.; Lombardozzi, Danica; Martin, Maria Val

    2017-02-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the most hazardous air pollutants as it harms both human health and plant productivity. Foliage uptake of ozone via dry deposition damages photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. These foliage changes could lead to a cascade of biogeochemical and biogeophysical effects that not only modulate the carbon cycle, regional hydrometeorology and climate, but also cause feedbacks onto surface ozone concentration itself. In this study, we implement a semi-empirical parameterization of ozone damage on vegetation in the Community Earth System Model to enable online ozone-vegetation coupling, so that for the first time ecosystem structure and ozone concentration can coevolve in fully coupled land-atmosphere simulations. With ozone-vegetation coupling, present-day surface ozone is simulated to be higher by up to 4-6 ppbv over Europe, North America and China. Reduced dry deposition velocity following ozone damage contributes to ˜ 40-100 % of those increases, constituting a significant positive biogeochemical feedback on ozone air quality. Enhanced biogenic isoprene emission is found to contribute to most of the remaining increases, and is driven mainly by higher vegetation temperature that results from lower transpiration rate. This isoprene-driven pathway represents an indirect, positive meteorological feedback. The reduction in both dry deposition and transpiration is mostly associated with reduced stomatal conductance following ozone damage, whereas the modification of photosynthesis and further changes in ecosystem productivity are found to play a smaller role in contributing to the ozone-vegetation feedbacks. Our results highlight the need to consider two-way ozone-vegetation coupling in Earth system models to derive a more complete understanding and yield more reliable future predictions of ozone air quality.

  1. Biogeochemical ecology of aquaculture ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisburd, R.S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Two methods to determine rates of organic matter production and consumption were applied in shrimp aquaculture ponds. Several questions were posed: can net rates of organic matter production and consumption be determined accurately through application of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) mass balance in a pond with high advective through-put? Are organically loaded aquaculture ponds autotrophic? How do rates of organic production vary temporally? Are there diurnal changes in respiration rates? Four marine ponds in Hawaii have been evaluated for a 53 day period through the use of geochemical mass balances. All fluxes of DIC into and out of the ponds were considered. DIC was calculated from hourly pH measurements and weekly alkalinity measurements. Average uptake of DIC from the pond water, equivalent to net community production, revealed net autotrophy in all cases. Hourly and longer period variations in organic matter production rates were examined. The daily cycle dominated the variation in rates of net community production. Maximal rates of net community production were maintained for four to six hours starting in mid-morning. Respiration rates decreased rapidly during the night in two of the ponds and remained essentially constant in the others. A similar pattern of decreasing respiration at night was seen in freshwater shrimp ponds which were studied with incubations. A new method involving isotope dilution of 14 C-labeled DIC was used to measure respiration rates in light and dark bottles. This method is an inexpensive and convenient procedure which should also be useful in other environments. The incubations demonstrated that plankton respiration rates peak at or soon after solar noon and vary over the course of the day by about a factor of two

  2. Reconstructing disturbances and their biogeochemical consequences over multiple timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauchlan, Kendra K.; Higuera, Philip E.; Gavin, Daniel G.; Perakis, Steven S.; Mack, Michelle C.; Alexander, Heather; Battles, John; Biondi, Franco; Buma, Brian; Colombaroli, Daniele; Enders, Sara K.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Marlon, Jennifer R.; Marshall, John; McGlone, Matt; Morris, Jesse L.; Nave, Lucas E.; Shuman, Bryan; Smithwick, Erica A.H.; Urrego, Dunia H.; Wardle, David A.; Williams, Christopher J.; Williams, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing changes in disturbance regimes are predicted to cause acute changes in ecosystem structure and function in the coming decades, but many aspects of these predictions are uncertain. A key challenge is to improve the predictability of postdisturbance biogeochemical trajectories at the ecosystem level. Ecosystem ecologists and paleoecologists have generated complementary data sets about disturbance (type, severity, frequency) and ecosystem response (net primary productivity, nutrient cycling) spanning decadal to millennial timescales. Here, we take the first steps toward a full integration of these data sets by reviewing how disturbances are reconstructed using dendrochronological and sedimentary archives and by summarizing the conceptual frameworks for carbon, nitrogen, and hydrologic responses to disturbances. Key research priorities include further development of paleoecological techniques that reconstruct both disturbances and terrestrial ecosystem dynamics. In addition, mechanistic detail from disturbance experiments, long-term observations, and chronosequences can help increase the understanding of ecosystem resilience.

  3. Biogeochemical malfunctioning in sediments beneath a deep-water fish farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdemarsen, Thomas; Bannister, Raymond J; Hansen, Pia K; Holmer, Marianne; Ervik, Arne

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the environmental impact of a deep water fish farm (190 m). Despite deep water and low water currents, sediments underneath the farm were heavily enriched with organic matter, resulting in stimulated biogeochemical cycling. During the first 7 months of the production cycle benthic fluxes were stimulated >29 times for CO(2) and O(2) and >2000 times for NH(4)(+), when compared to the reference site. During the final 11 months, however, benthic fluxes decreased despite increasing sedimentation. Investigations of microbial mineralization revealed that the sediment metabolic capacity was exceeded, which resulted in inhibited microbial mineralization due to negative feed-backs from accumulation of various solutes in pore water. Conclusions are that (1) deep water sediments at 8 °C can metabolize fish farm waste corresponding to 407 and 29 mmol m(-2) d(-1) POC and TN, respectively, and (2) siting fish farms at deep water sites is not a universal solution for reducing benthic impacts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Links between contaminant hotspots in low flow estuarine systems and altered sediment biogeochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Michael D.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Scanes, Peter; Potts, Jaimie; Simpson, Stuart L.; Sim, Vivian X. Y.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2017-11-01

    The urbanisation of coastal zones is a major threat to the health of global estuaries and has been linked to increased contamination (e.g. metals) and excess organic matter. Urban stormwater networks collect and funnel contaminants into waterways at point sources (e.g. stormdrains). Under dry, low flow conditions, these stormwater contaminants can accumulate in sediments over time and result in modifications to benthic sediment biogeochemical processes. To quantify these processes, this field study measured differences in benthic metabolism (CR, GPP, NEM) and sediment-water nutrient fluxes (NH3, NOx, PO4) associated with stormdrains (0 m, 200 m and 1000 m away) and increased water-retention (embayments vs channels). Significant changes to benthic metabolism were detected with distance from stormdrains, and with differences in water-retention rates, above natural spatial and temporal variation. Oxygen consumption was ∼50% higher at stormdrains (0 m) compared to 1000 m away and >70% higher at stormdrains (0 m) located in embayments compared to channels. Oxygen production also appeared to decrease with distance from stormdrains in embayments, but patterns were variable. These changes to benthic metabolism were of a magnitude expected to influence benthic nutrient cycling, but NH3, NOx and PO4 fluxes were generally low, and highly spatially and temporally variable. Overall, metal (Cu) contamination explained most of the variation in sediment biogeochemical processes between embayments and channels, while sediment grain size explained differences in fluxes with distance from stormdrains. Importantly, although there was evidence of increased productivity associated with stormdrains, we also detected evidence of early hypoxia suggesting that systems with legacy stormwater contaminants exist on a tipping point. Future work should investigate changes to sediment processes after a major rainfall event, when large and sudden inputs of potentially toxic contaminants occur

  5. The influence of tides on biogeochemical dynamics at the mouth of the Amazon River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, N. D.; Sawakuchi, H. O.; Neu, V.; de Matos Valerio, A.; Less, D.; Guedes, V.; Wood, J.; Brito, D. C.; Cunha, A. C.; Kampel, M.; Richey, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    A major barrier to computing the flux of constituents from the world's largest rivers to the ocean is understanding the dynamic processes that occur along tidally-influenced river reaches. Here, we examine the response of a suite of biogeochemical parameters to tide-induced flow reversals at the mouth of the Amazon River. Continuous measurements of pCO2, pCH4, dissolved O2, pH, turbidity, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) were made throughout tidal cycles while held stationary in the center of the river and during hourly transects for ADCP discharge measurements. Samples were collected hourly from the surface and 50% depth during stationary samplings and from the surface during ADCP transects for analysis of suspended sediment concentrations along with other parameters such as nutrient and mercury concentrations. Suspended sediment and specific components of the suspended phase, such as particulate mercury, concentrations were positively correlated to mean river velocity during both high and low water periods with a more pronounced response at 50% depth than the surface. Tidal variations also influenced the concentration of O2 and CO2 by altering the dynamic balance between photosynthesis, respiration, and gas transfer. CO2 was positively correlated and O2 and pH were negatively correlated with river velocity. The concentration of methane generally increased during low tide (i.e. when river water level was lowest) both in the mainstem and in small side channels. In side channels concentrations increased by several orders of magnitude during low tide with visible bubbling from the sediment, presumably due to a release of hydrostatic pressure. These results suggest that biogeochemical processes are highly dynamic in tidal rivers, and these dynamic variations need to be quantified to better constrain global and regional scale budgets. Understanding these rapid processes may also provide insight into the long-term response of aquatic systems to change.

  6. Small Moves, NUI. Small Moves: Beginning to Investigate Biogeochemical Exchange From the Seafloor to the Exterior of an Ice-Covered Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, C. R.; Boetius, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from two recent cruises, using the new Nereid Under Ice (NUI) vehicle aboard the FS Polarstern, in which we investigated biogeochemical fluxes from the deep seafloor of the Gakkel Ridge, an ultraslow spreading ridge that spans the ice-covered Arctic Ocean, and the mechanisms by which biogeochemical signals might be transferred from within the underlying ocean to the overlying Arctic ice. The scientific advances for this work progress hand in hand with technological capability. During a first cruise in 2014, our NUI-based investigations focused on photosynthetically-driven biogeochemical cycling in the uppermost water column and how to study such processes using in situ sensing immediately at and beneath the rough topography of the overlying ice-cover. For that work we relied entirely upon human-in-the-loop control of the vehicle via a single optical fiber light tether than provided real-time monitoring and control of the vehicle as it ranged laterally out under the ice up to 1km distant from the ship, conducting physical, geochemical and biological surveys. Instrumentation used for that work included multibeam mapping and imaging (digital still photographs and HD video), in situ spectroscopy to study light transmission through the ice and biogeochemical mapping of the ocean water column using a combination of CTD sensing, fluorometry and an in situ nitrate analyzer. Returning to the Arctic in 2016 we extended our exploration modes with NUI further, investigating for seafloor fluid flow at a shallow setting on the flanks of the Gakkel Ridge where the seabed rises from >4000m to movement of the ship (horizontal displacements of 1km or more) at the ice-covered ocean surface. While the existing NUI vehicle does not map directly to model payloads for future SLS missions to Europa or Enceladus it does provide for important small moves in the right direction.

  7. Cycling, and Male Sexual and Urinary Function: Results from a Large, Multinational, Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mohannad A; Gaither, Thomas W; Murphy, Gregory P; Chumnarnsongkhroh, Thanabhudee; Metzler, Ian; Sanford, Thomas; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Eisenberg, Michael L; Carroll, Peter R; Osterberg, E Charles; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2017-10-13

    We explored the relation of cycling to urinary and sexual function in a large multinational sample of men. Cyclists were recruited to complete a survey through Facebook® advertisements and outreach to sporting clubs. Swimmers and runners were recruited as a comparison group. Cyclists were categorized into low and high intensity cyclists. Participants were queried using validated questionnaires, including SHIM (Sexual Health Inventory for Men), I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) and NIH-CPSI (National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index), in addition to questions about urinary tract infections, urethral stricture, genital numbness and saddle sores. Of 5,488 complete survey responses 3,932 (72%) were included in our analysis. On multivariate analysis swimmers/runners had a lower mean SHIM score than low and high intensity cyclists (19.5 vs 19.9 and 20.7, p = 0.02 and history. Cyclists had statistically higher odds of urethral stricture compared to swimmers/runners (OR 2.5, p = 0.042). Standing more than 20% of the time while cycling significantly reduced the odds of genital numbness (OR 0.4, p = 0.006). Adjusting the handlebar higher or even with the saddle had lower odds of genital numbness and saddle sores (OR 0.8, p = 0.005 and 0.6, p <0.001, respectively). Cyclists had no worse sexual or urinary functions than swimmers or runners but cyclists were more prone to urethral stricture. Increased time standing while cycling and a higher handlebar height were associated with lower odds of genital sores and numbness. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nitrogen in rock: Occurrences and biogeochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of bedrock in global nitrogen cycling and potential for increased ecosystem sensitivity to human impacts in terrains with elevated background nitrogen concentrations. Nitrogen-bearing rocks are globally distributed and comprise a potentially large pool of nitrogen in nutrient cycling that is frequently neglected because of a lack of routine analytical methods for quantification. Nitrogen in rock originates as organically bound nitrogen associated with sediment, or in thermal waters representing a mixture of sedimentary, mantle, and meteoric sources of nitrogen. Rock nitrogen concentrations range from trace levels (>200 mg N kg -1) in granites to ecologically significant concentrations exceeding 1000 mg N kg -1 in some sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks. Nitrate deposits accumulated in arid and semi-arid regions are also a large potential pool. Nitrogen in rock has a potentially significant impact on localized nitrogen cycles. Elevated nitrogen concentrations in water and soil have been attributed to weathering of bedrock nitrogen. In some environments, nitrogen released from bedrock may contribute to nitrogen saturation of terrestrial ecosystems (more nitrogen available than required by biota). Nitrogen saturation results in leaching of nitrate to surface and groundwaters, and, where soils are formed from ammonium-rich bedrock, the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate may result in soil acidification, inhibiting revegetation in certain ecosystems. Collectively, studies presented in this article reveal that geologic nitrogen may be a large and reactive pool with potential for amplification of human impacts on nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Results on safety research for five years (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000). A field of nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This safety research carried out by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) for five years ranged from fiscal year 1996 to 2000, was performed according to the safety research basic plan (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000) established on March, 1996 (revised again on May, 2000). This report was arranged on a field on nuclear fuel cycle (all subjects on fields of nuclear fuel facility, environmental radioactivity and radioactive wastes and a subject on nuclear fuel cycle in a field of seismic resistant and probabilistic safety assessment) by combining its research results for five years ranged from 1996 to 2000 fiscal year with general outlines on the safety research basic plan. Here were shown outlines on the safety research basic plan, aims and subjects on safety research at a field of nuclear fuel cycle, a list of survey sheets on safety research result, and survey sheets on safety research results. The survey sheets containing research field, title, organization, researcher name, researching period, names of cooperative organization, using facilities, research outline, research results, established contents, application, and research trends, are ranged to 21 items on nuclear fuel facility, 1 item on seismic resistance, 2 items on probabilistic safety assessment, 8 items on environmental radioactivity, and 20 items on radioactive wastes. (G.K.)

  10. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. IV - Results of failure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Potassium hydroxide concentration effects on the cycle life of a Ni/H2 cell have been studied by carrying out a cycle life test on ten Ni/H2 boiler plate cells which contain electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. Failure analyses of these cells were carried out after completion of the life test, which accumulated up to 40,000 cycles at an 80-percent depth of discharge over a period of 3.7 years. These failure analyses included studies on changes of electrical characteristics of test cells, and component analyses after disassembly of the cell. The component analyses included visual inspections, dimensional changes, capacity measurements of nickel electrodes, scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, and chemical analyses. Results have indicated that failure mode and change in the nickel electrode varied as the concentration was varied, especially when the concentration was changed from 31 percent or higher to 26 percent or lower.

  11. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. Part 4: Results of failure analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    KOH concentration effects on cycle life of a Ni/H2 cell have been studied by carrying out a cycle life test of ten Ni/H2 boiler plate cells which contain electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. Failure analyses of these cells were carried out after completion of the life test which accumulated up to 40,000 cycles at an 80 percent depth of discharge over a period of 3.7 years. These failure analyses included studies on changes of electrical characteristics of test cells and component analyses after disassembly of the cell. The component analyses included visual inspections, dimensional changes, capacity measurements of nickel electrodes, scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area measurements, and chemical analyses. Results have indicated that failure mode and change in the nickel electrode varied as the concentration was varied, especially, when the concentration was changed from 31 percent or higher to 26 percent or lower.

  12. Is high-intensity interval cycling feasible and more beneficial than continuous cycling for knee osteoarthritic patients? Results of a randomised control feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W. Keogh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA patients often suffer joint pain and stiffness, which contributes to negative changes in body composition, strength, physical performance (function, physical activity and health-related quality of life. To reduce these symptoms and side effects of knee OA, moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT cycling is often recommended. While resistance training is considered the optimal form of training to improve sarcopenic outcomes, it imposes higher joint loads and requires supervision, either initially or continuously by trained exercise professionals. Therefore, this pilot study sought to gain some insight into the feasibility and potential benefits of high-intensity interval training (HIIT cycling as an alternative exercise option to MICT cycling for individuals with knee OA. Methods Twenty-seven middle-aged and older adults with knee OA were randomly allocated to either MICT or HIIT, with both programs involving four unsupervised home-based cycling sessions (∼25 min per session each week for eight weeks. Feasibility was assessed by enrolment rate, withdrawal rate, exercise adherence and number of adverse effects. Efficacy was assessed by health-related quality of life (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC and Lequesne index, physical function (Timed Up and Go (TUG, Sit to Stand (STS and preferred gait speed and body composition (body mass, BMI, body fat percentage and muscle mass. Results Twenty-seven of the interested 50 potential participants (54% enrolled in the study, with 17 of the 27 participants completing the trial (withdrawal rate of 37%; with the primary withdrawal reasons being unrelated injuries or illness or family related issues. Of the 17 participants who completed the trial, exercise adherence was very high (HIIT 94%; MICT 88%. While only three individuals (one in the MICT and two in the HIIT group reported adverse events, a total of 28 adverse events were

  13. Design and performance of subgrade biogeochemical reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamlin, Jeff; Downey, Doug; Shearer, Brad; Favara, Paul

    2017-12-15

    Subgrade biogeochemical reactors (SBGRs), also commonly referred to as in situ bioreactors, are a unique technology for treatment of contaminant source areas and groundwater plume hot spots. SBGRs have most commonly been configured for enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) applications for chlorinated solvent treatment. However, they have also been designed for other contaminant classes using alternative treatment media. The SBGR technology typically consists of removal of contaminated soil via excavation or large-diameter augers, and backfill of the soil void with gravel and treatment amendments tailored to the target contaminant(s). In most cases SBGRs include installation of infiltration piping and a low-flow pumping system (typically solar-powered) to recirculate contaminated groundwater through the SBGR for treatment. SBGRs have been constructed in multiple configurations, including designs capable of meeting limited access restrictions at heavily industrialized sites, and at sites with restrictions on surface disturbance due to sensitive species or habitat issues. Typical performance results for ERD applications include 85 to 90 percent total molar reduction of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) near the SBGR and rapid clean-up of adjacent dissolved contaminant source areas. Based on a review of the literature and CH2M's field-scale results from over a dozen SBGRs with a least one year of performance data, important site-specific design considerations include: 1) hydraulic residence time should be long enough for sufficient treatment but not too long to create depressed pH and stagnant conditions (e.g., typically between 10 and 60 days), 2) reactor material should balance appropriate organic mulch as optimal bacterial growth media along with other organic additives that provide bioavailable organic carbon, 3) a variety of native bacteria are important to the treatment process, and 4) biologically mediated generation of iron sulfides along with

  14. Biogeochemical provinces in the global ocean based on phytoplankton growth limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashioka, T.; Hirata, T.; Aita, M. N.; Chiba, S.

    2016-02-01

    The biogeochemical province is one of the useful concepts for the comprehensive understanding of regional differences of the marine ecosystem. Various biogeochemical provinces for lower-trophic level ecosystem have been proposed using a similarity-based classification of seasonal variations of chl-a concentration typified by Longhurst 1995 and 2006. Such categorizations well capture the regional differences of seasonality as "total phytoplankton". However, background biogeochemical mechanism to characterize the province boundary is not clear. Namely, the dominant phytoplankton group is different among regions and seasons, and their physiological characteristics are significantly different among groups. Recently some pieces of new biogeochemical information are available. One is an estimation of phytoplankton community structure from satellite observation, and it makes clear the key phytoplankton type in each region. Another is an estimation of limitation factors for phytoplankton growth (e.g., nutrients, temperature, light) in each region from modeling studies. In this study, we propose new biogeochemical provinces as a combination between the dominance of phytoplankton (i.e., diatoms, nano-, pico-phytoplankton or coexistence of two/three types) and their growth limitation factors (particularly we focused on nutrient limitation; N, P, Si or Fe). In this combination, we classified the global ocean into 23 biogeochemical provinces. The result suggests that even if the same type of phytoplankton dominates, the background mechanism could be different among regions. On the contrary, even if the regions geographically separate, the background mechanism could be similar among regions. This is important to understand that region/boundary does respond to environmental change. This biogeochemical province is useful for identification of key areas for future observation.

  15. Results of VVER fuel rods tests in the MIR.M1 reactor under power cycling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burukin, A.; Izhutov, A.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Kalygin, V.; Markov, D.; Pimenov, Y.; Novikov, V.; Medvedev, A.; Nesterov, B.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the main results of the 50 ... 60 MWd/kgU burnup VVER fuel rods tests performed in the MIR.M1 reactor loop facilities under power cycling. The non-destructive PIE results are presented as well. A series of experiments was performed, including overall measurement of fuel rod parameters test, in one of which 300 cycles were done. Irradiation under power cycling conditions and PIE of high-burnup VVER fuel rods showed the following: 1) all fuel rods claddings preserved their integrity under irradiation at linear heat rate (LHR) higher than the NPP operating one; 2) experimental data were obtained on the axial and radial cladding strain and fission gas release (FGR) from 50 ... 60 MWd/kgU burnup VVER-440 and VVER-1000 fuel rods as well as on the kinetics of the change in these parameters and fuel temperature under the power cycling; 3) non-destructive PIE results are in a satisfactory correlation with the data obtained by means of in-pile measurement gages during irradiation. (authors)

  16. Society and Ecosystem Carbon Budget through Life Cycle Assessment: Results from Asian Drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.

    2017-12-01

    Land use, land cover changes, and ecosystem-specific management practices are recognized for their roles in mediating the climatic effects on ecosystem structure and function. A major challenge is that our understanding and forecasting of ecosystem functions, such as C fluxes, cannot rely solely on conventional biophysical regulations from the local ecosystem to the global scale. A second challenge lies in quantifying the magnitude of the C fluxes from managed ecosystems and landscapes over the lifetime of the C cycle, and to deduct the various energy inputs during management. Our specific challenge here is to quantify the landscape-scale C footprint of both managed agricultural-forest landscapes and people - the societal input and engagement in ecosystem studies. Using the East Asia Drylands (Chen et al., 2013) and an agricultural watershed in southwestern Michigan as a test bed, the mechanisms (carbon as an example) from both human activities and biophysical changes on ecosystem C dynamics at different temporal and spatial scales are proposed to be explored by modeling total net ecosystem C production (physical and social C fluxes), performing a spatially-explicit life cycle assessment (LCA) on the total C production. Remote sensing technology, available geospatial data, records of management practices, surveys of historical practices, a land surface model, and in situ measurements of C fluxes are all needed to achieve our objectives. Our case study calls for direct involvement of society as both the driver and beneficiary of ecosystem dynamics. Reference Chen, J., Wan, S., Henebry, G., Qi, J., Gutman, G., Sun, G., and Kappas, M. (Eds.) 2013. Dryland East Asia (DEA): Land Dynamics Amid Social And Climate Change. HEP and De Gruyter, 470 pp.

  17. Is high-intensity interval cycling feasible and more beneficial than continuous cycling for knee osteoarthritic patients? Results of a randomised control feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W; Grigg, Josephine; Vertullo, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    attributed to one HIIT participant. Pre-post-test analyses indicated both groups significantly improved their WOMAC scores, with the HIIT group also significantly improving in the TUG and STS. The only significant between-group difference was observed in the TUG, whereby the HIIT group improved significantly more than the MICT group. No significant changes were observed in the Lequesne index, gait speed or body composition for either group. An unsupervised home-based HIIT cycle program appears somewhat feasible for middle-aged and older adults with knee OA and may produce similar improvements in health-related quality of life but greater improvements in physical function than MICT. These results need to be confirmed in larger randomised controlled trials to better elucidate the potential for HIIT to improve outcomes for those with knee OA. Additional research needs to identify and modify the potential barriers affecting the initiation and adherence to home-based HIIT cycling exercise programs by individuals with knee OA.

  18. The two-layer geochemical structure of modern biogeochemical provinces and its significance for spatially adequate ecological evaluations and decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    Contamination of the environment has reached such a scale that ecogeochemical situation in any area can be interpreted now as a result of the combined effect of natural and anthropogenic factors. The areas that appear uncomfortable for a long stay can have natural and anthropogenic genesis, but the spatial structure of such biogeochemical provinces is in any case formed of a combination of natural and technogenic fields of chemical elements. Features of structural organization and the difference in factors and specific time of their formation allow their separation on one hand and help in identification of areas with different ecological risks due to overlay of the two structures on the other. Geochemistry of soil cover reflects the long-term result of the naturally balanced biogeochemical cycles, therefore the soil geochemical maps of the undisturbed areas may serve the basis for evaluation of the natural geochemical background with due regard to the main factors of geochemical differentiation in biosphere. Purposeful and incidental technogenic concentrations and dispersions of chemical elements of specific (mainly mono- or polycentric) structure are also fixed in soils that serve as secondary sources of contamination of the vegetation cover and local food chains. Overlay of the two structures forms specific heterogeneity of modern biogeochemical provinces with different risk for particular groups of people, animals and plants adapted to specific natural geochemical background within particular concentration interval. The developed approach is believed to be helpful for biogeochemical regionalizing of modern biosphere (noosphere) and for spatially adequate ecogeochemical evaluation of the environment and landuse decisions. It allows production of a set of applied geochemical maps such as: 1) health risk due to chemical elements deficiency and technogenic contamination accounting of possible additive effects; 2) adequate soil fertilization and melioration with due

  19. Precise numerical results for limit cycles in the quantum three-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, R.F.; Furnstahl, R.J.; Hammer, H.-W.; Perry, R.J.; Wilson, K.G.

    2006-01-01

    The study of the three-body problem with short-range attractive two-body forces has a rich history going back to the 1930s. Recent applications of effective field theory methods to atomic and nuclear physics have produced a much improved understanding of this problem, and we elucidate some of the issues using renormalization group ideas applied to precise nonperturbative calculations. These calculations provide 11-12 digits of precision for the binding energies in the infinite cutoff limit. The method starts with this limit as an approximation to an effective theory and allows cutoff dependence to be systematically computed as an expansion in powers of inverse cutoffs and logarithms of the cutoff. Renormalization of three-body bound states requires a short range three-body interaction, with a coupling that is governed by a precisely mapped limit cycle of the renormalization group. Additional three-body irrelevant interactions must be determined to control subleading dependence on the cutoff and this control is essential for an effective field theory since the continuum limit is not likely to match physical systems (e.g., few-nucleon bound and scattering states at low energy). Leading order calculations precise to 11-12 digits allow clear identification of subleading corrections, but these corrections have not been computed

  20. Multiple Origins and Nested Cycles of Hybridization Result in High Tetraploid Diversity in the Monocot Prospero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae-Soo; Parker, John S; Emadzade, Khatere; Temsch, Eva M; Leitch, Andrew R; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna

    2018-01-01

    Polyploidy is a major driving force in angiosperm evolution, but our understanding of establishment and early diversification processes following allo- vs. auto-polyploidy is limited. An excellent system to address such questions is the monocot plant Prospero autumnale , as it comprises several genomically and chromosomally distinct diploid cytotypes and their auto- and allotetraploid derivatives. To infer origins and evolutionary trajectories of the tetraploids, we use genome size data, in situ hybridization with parental genomic DNAs and specific probes (satDNA, rDNAs), as well as molecular-phylogenetic analyses. Thus, we demonstrate that an astounding range of allotetraploid lineages has been formed recurrently by chromosomal re-patterning, interactions of chromosomally variable parental genomes and nested cycles of extensive hybridization, whereas autotetraploids have originated at least twice and are cytologically stable. During the recurrent formation and establishment across wide geographic areas hybridization in some populations could have inhibited lineage diversification and nascent speciation of such a hybrid swarm. However, cytotypes that became fixed in populations enhanced the potential for species diversification, possibly exploiting the extended allelic base, and fixed heterozygosity that polyploidy confers. The time required for polyploid cytotype fixation may in part reflect the lag phase reported for polyploids between their formation and species diversification.

  1. Multiple Origins and Nested Cycles of Hybridization Result in High Tetraploid Diversity in the Monocot Prospero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Soo Jang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is a major driving force in angiosperm evolution, but our understanding of establishment and early diversification processes following allo- vs. auto-polyploidy is limited. An excellent system to address such questions is the monocot plant Prospero autumnale, as it comprises several genomically and chromosomally distinct diploid cytotypes and their auto- and allotetraploid derivatives. To infer origins and evolutionary trajectories of the tetraploids, we use genome size data, in situ hybridization with parental genomic DNAs and specific probes (satDNA, rDNAs, as well as molecular-phylogenetic analyses. Thus, we demonstrate that an astounding range of allotetraploid lineages has been formed recurrently by chromosomal re-patterning, interactions of chromosomally variable parental genomes and nested cycles of extensive hybridization, whereas autotetraploids have originated at least twice and are cytologically stable. During the recurrent formation and establishment across wide geographic areas hybridization in some populations could have inhibited lineage diversification and nascent speciation of such a hybrid swarm. However, cytotypes that became fixed in populations enhanced the potential for species diversification, possibly exploiting the extended allelic base, and fixed heterozygosity that polyploidy confers. The time required for polyploid cytotype fixation may in part reflect the lag phase reported for polyploids between their formation and species diversification.

  2. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  3. Diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: 2. Modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panday, Arnico K.; Prinn, Ronald G.; SchäR, Christoph

    2009-11-01

    After completing a 9-month field experiment studying air pollution and meteorology in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, we set up the mesoscale meteorological model MM5 to simulate the Kathmandu Valley's meteorology with a horizontal resolution of up to 1 km. After testing the model against available data, we used it to address specific questions to understand the factors that control the observed diurnal cycle of air pollution in this urban basin in the Himalayas. We studied the dynamics of the basin's nocturnal cold air pool, its dissipation in the morning, and the subsequent growth and decay of the mixed layer over the valley. During mornings, we found behavior common to large basins, with upslope flows and basin-center subsidence removing the nocturnal cold air pool. During afternoons the circulation in the Kathmandu Valley exhibited patterns common to plateaus, with cooler denser air originating over lower regions west of Kathmandu arriving through mountain passes and spreading across the basin floor, thereby reducing the mixed layer depth. We also examined the pathways of pollutant ventilation out of the valley. The bulk of the pollution ventilation takes place during the afternoon, when strong westerly winds blow in through the western passes of the valley, and the pollutants are rapidly carried out through passes on the east and south sides of the valley. In the evening, pollutants first accumulate near the surface, but then are lifted slightly when katabatic flows converge underneath. The elevated polluted layers are mixed back down in the morning, contributing to the morning pollution peak. Later in the morning a fraction of the valley's pollutants travels up the slopes of the valley rim mountains before the westerly winds begin.

  4. Proton cycling, buffering, and reaction stoichiometry in natural waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, A.F.; Middelburg, J.J.; Soetaert, K.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.A.; Meysman, F.J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing acidification of the global ocean necessitates a solid understanding of how biogeochemical processes are driving proton cycling and observed pH changes in natural waters. The standard way of calculating the pH evolution of an aquatic system is to specify first how biogeochemical processes

  5. Hydrodynamical model and experimental results of a calcium looping cycle for CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisbona, Pilar; Martínez, Ana; Romeo, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A scaled experimental cold flow model of a dual fluidized bed facility is presented. ► Two MATLAB models are developed for the single CFB and the dual CFB facility. ► Set of experiments are carried out and used to validate the mathematical model. ► Good agreement between model and experimental tests for sCFB. ► Further work required for validating dual CFB operation. -- Abstract: High temperature looping cycles involving solid circulation, such as carbonation–calcination, play an essential role among the CO 2 capture technologies under development. The low cost and high availability of Ca-based sorbents together with the feasibility of integration between these capture systems and existing power plants lead to very competitive potential costs of avoided CO 2 , below 20 €/tonne. Optimal configurations make use of several interconnected fluidized beds. One promising configuration for Ca-based sorbents looping systems relies on the use of two circulating beds (carbonator and calciner) and two bubbling beds acting as non-mechanical valves. Fluidized beds are well characterized when operating independently since they are extensively used in industrial applications, power and chemical plants. However, the operation when two or more fluidized beds exchange solid material through non-mechanical valves is still uncertain because of the more complex pressure balance of the system. Theoretical studies based on thermo-chemical simulations and experimental studies show that minimum CO 2 capture cost is attained with large solid circulation flow between reactors. The challenge is to reach the required particle circulation in a system with a complex configuration and be able to control it. Solid internal recirculation in any of these fluidized beds would provide flexibility in its control but it will also make harder the characterization of the whole system. The aim of this work is to analyse the hydrodynamics of the system and to generate a

  6. Biogeochemical control points in a water-limited critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorover, J.; Brooks, P. D.; Gallery, R. E.; McIntosh, J. C.; Olshansky, Y.; Rasmussen, C.

    2017-12-01

    The routing of water and carbon through complex terrain is postulated to control structure evolution in the sub-humid critical zone of the southwestern US. By combining measurements of land-atmosphere exchange, ecohydrologic partitioning, and subsurface biogeochemistry, we seek to quantify how a heterogeneous (in time and space) distribution of "reactants" impacts both short-term (sub-)catchment response (e.g., pore and surface water chemical dynamics) and long-term landscape evolution (e.g., soil geochemistry/morphology and regolith weathering depth) in watersheds underlain by rhyolite and schist. Instrumented pedons in convergent, planar, and divergent landscape positions show distinct depth-dependent responses to precipitation events. Wetting front propagation, dissolved carbon flux and associated biogeochemical responses (e.g., pulses of CO2 production, O2 depletion, solute release) vary with topography, revealing the influence of lateral subsidies of water and carbon. The impacts of these episodes on the evolution of porous media heterogeneity is being investigated by statistical analysis of pore water chemistry, chemical/spectroscopic studies of solid phase organo-mineral products, sensor-derived water characteristic curves, and quantification of co-located microbial community activity/composition. Our results highlight the interacting effects of critical zone structure and convergent hydrologic flows in the evolution of biogeochemical control points.

  7. Surrogate-Based Optimization of Biogeochemical Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieß, Malte; Slawig, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    First approaches towards a surrogate-based optimization method for a one-dimensional marine biogeochemical model of NPZD type are presented. The model, developed by Oschlies and Garcon [1], simulates the distribution of nitrogen, phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus in a water column and is driven by ocean circulation data. A key issue is to minimize the misfit between the model output and given observational data. Our aim is to reduce the overall optimization cost avoiding expensive function and derivative evaluations by using a surrogate model replacing the high-fidelity model in focus. This in particular becomes important for more complex three-dimensional models. We analyse a coarsening in the discretization of the model equations as one way to create such a surrogate. Here the numerical stability crucially depends upon the discrete stepsize in time and space and the biochemical terms. We show that for given model parameters the level of grid coarsening can be choosen accordingly yielding a stable and satisfactory surrogate. As one example of a surrogate-based optimization method we present results of the Aggressive Space Mapping technique (developed by John W. Bandler [2, 3]) applied to the optimization of this one-dimensional biogeochemical transport model.

  8. Life-cycle studies of biodiesel in Europe: A review addressing the variability of results and modeling issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malca, Joao; Freire, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    Renewable energy sources, and particularly biofuels, are being promoted as possible solutions to address global warming and the depletion of petroleum resources. Nevertheless, significant disagreement and controversies exist regarding the actual benefits of biofuels displacing fossil fuels, as shown by a large number of life-cycle studies that have varying and sometimes contradictory conclusions. This article presents a comprehensive review of life-cycle studies of biodiesel in Europe. Studies have been compared in terms of nonrenewable primary energy requirement and GHG intensity of biodiesel. Recently published studies negate the definite and deterministic advantages for biodiesel presented in former studies. A high variability of results, particularly for biodiesel GHG intensity, with emissions ranging from 15 to 170 gCO 2 eq MJ f -1 has been observed. A detailed assessment of relevant aspects, including major assumptions, modeling choices and results, has been performed. The main causes for this high variability have been investigated, with emphasis on modeling choices. Key issues found are treatment of co-product and land use modeling, including high uncertainty associated with N 2 O and carbon emissions from cultivated soil. Furthermore, a direct correlation between how soil emissions were modeled and increasing values for calculated GHG emission has been found. A robust biodiesel life-cycle modeling has been implemented and the main sources of uncertainty have been investigated to show how uncertainty can be addressed to improve the transparency and reliability of results. Recommendations for further research work concerning the improvement of biofuel life cycle modeling are also presented. (author)

  9. ALG-2 knockdown in HeLa cells results in G2/M cell cycle phase accumulation and cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Berit Rahbek; la Cour, Peter Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    downregulation induces accumulation of HeLa cells in the G2/M cell cycle phase and increases the amount of early apoptotic and dead cells. Caspase inhibition by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk attenuated the increase in the amount of dead cells following ALG-2 downregulation. Thus, our results indicate...... that ALG-2 has an anti-apoptotic function in HeLa cells by facilitating the passage through checkpoints in the G2/M cell cycle phase.......ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene-2 encoded protein) has been shown to be upregulated in a variety of human tumors questioning its previously assumed pro-apoptotic function. The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the role of ALG-2 in human cancer cells. We show that ALG-2...

  10. Relating hyporheic fluxes, residence times, and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes upstream of beaver dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura; Hare, Danielle K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Small dams enhance the development of patchy microenvironments along stream corridors by trapping sediment and creating complex streambed morphologies. This patchiness drives intricate hyporheic flux patterns that govern the exchange of O2 and redox-sensitive solutes between the water column and the stream bed. We used multiple tracer techniques, naturally occurring and injected, to evaluate hyporheic flow dynamics and associated biogeochemical cycling and microbial reactivity around 2 beaver dams in Wyoming (USA). High-resolution fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing was used to collect temperature data over 9 vertical streambed profiles and to generate comprehensive vertical flux maps using 1-dimensional (1-D) heat-transport modeling. Coincident with these locations, vertical profiles of hyporheic water were collected every week and analyzed for dissolved O2, pH, dissolved organic C, and several conservative and redox-sensitive solutes. In addition, hyporheic and net stream aerobic microbial reactivity were analyzed with a constant-rate injection of the biologically sensitive resazurin (Raz) smart tracer. The combined results revealed a heterogeneous system with rates of downwelling hyporheic flow organized by morphologic unit and tightly coupled to the redox conditions of the subsurface. Principal component analysis was used to summarize the variability of all redox-sensitive species, and results indicated that hyporheic water varied from oxic-stream-like to anoxic-reduced in direct response to the hydrodynamic conditions and associated residence times. The anaerobic transition threshold predicted by the mean O2 Damko

  11. Auditory localisation of conventional and electric cars : laboratory results and implications for cycling safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling-Konczak, A. Hagenzieker, M.P. Commandeur, J.J.F. Agterberg, M.J.H. & Wee, B. van

    2016-01-01

    When driven at low speeds, cars operating in electric mode have been found to be quieter than conventional cars. As a result, the auditory cues which pedestrians and cyclists use to assess the presence, proximity and location oncoming traffic may be reduced, posing a safety hazard. This laboratory

  12. Auditory localisation of conventional and electric cars: laboratory results and implications for cycling safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling-Konczak, A.; Hagenzieker, M.P.; Commandeur, J.J.F.; Agterberg, M.J.H.; van Wee, B.

    2016-01-01

    When driven at low speeds, cars operating in electric mode have been found to be quieter than conventional cars. As a result, the auditory cues which pedestrians and cyclists use to assess the presence, proximity and location oncoming traffic may be reduced, posing a safety hazard. This laboratory

  13. Results of the GABLS3 diurnal-cycle benchmark for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, J. Sanz; Allaerts, D.; Avila, M.

    2017-01-01

    errors are used to quantify model performance. The results of the benchmark are used to discuss input uncertainties from mesoscale modelling, different meso-micro coupling strategies (online vs offline) and consistency between RANS and LES codes when dealing with boundary-layer mean flow quantities....... Overall, all the microscale simulations produce a consistent coupling with mesoscale forcings....

  14. Biogeochemical Modeling of the Second Rise of Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. L.; Catling, D.; Claire, M.; Zahnle, K.

    2014-03-01

    The rise of atmospheric oxygen set the tempo for the evolution of complex life on Earth. Oxygen levels are thought to have increased in two broad steps: one step occurred in the Archean ~ 2.45 Ga (the Great Oxidation Event or GOE), and another step occured in the Neoproterozoic ~750-580 Ma (the Neoprotoerozoic Oxygenation Event or NOE). During the NOE, oxygen levels increased from ~1-10% of the present atmospheric level (PAL) (Holland, 2006), to ~15% PAL in the late Neoproterozoic, to ~100% PAL later in the Phanerozoic. Complex life requires O2, so this transition allowed complex life to evolve. We seek to understand what caused the NOE. To explore causes for the NOE, we build upon the biogeochemical model of Claire et al. (2006), which calculates the redox evolution of the atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, and crust in the Archean through to the early Proterozoic. In this model, the balance between oxygenconsuming and oyxgen-producing fluxes evolves over time such that at ~2.4 Ga, the rapidly acting sources of oxygen outweigh the rapidly-acting sinks. Or, in other words, at ~2.4 Ga, the flux of oxygen from organic carbon burial exceeds the sinks of oxygen from reaction with reduced volcanic and metamoprphic gases. The model is able to drive oxygen levels to 1-10% PAL in the Proterozoic; however, the evolving redox fluxes in the model cannot explain how oxygen levels pushed above 1-10% in the late Proterozoic. The authors suggest that perhaps another buffer, such as sulfur, is needed to describe Proterozoic and Phanerozoic redox evolution. Geologic proxies show that in the Proterozoic, up to 10% of the deep ocean may have been sulfidic. With this ocean chemistry, the global sulfur cycle would have worked differently than it does today. Because the sulfur and oxygen cycles interact, the oxygen concentration could have permanently changed due to an evolving sulfur cycle (in combination with evolving redox fluxes associated with other parts of the oxygen cycle and carbon

  15. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and female reproductive cycle events: results from the OCD and reproduction collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Valeria; Vulink, Nienke C C; Denys, Damiaan; Wang, Ying; Samuels, Jack F; Nestadt, Gerald

    2014-12-01

    Women with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often report that symptoms first appear or exacerbate during reproductive cycle events; however, little is known about these relationships. The goals of this study were to examine, in a US and a European female OCD sample, onset and exacerbation of OCD in reproductive cycle events, and to investigate the likelihood of repeat exacerbation in subsequent pregnancies and postpartum periods. Five hundred forty-two women (United States, n = 352; Dutch, n = 190) who met DSM-IV criteria for OCD, completed self-report questionnaires designed to assess OCD onset and symptom exacerbation associated with reproductive events. OCD onset occurred within 12 months after menarche in 13.0%, during pregnancy in 5.1%, at postpartum in 4.7%, and at menopause in 3.7%. Worsening of pre-existing OCD was reported by 37.6% of women at premenstruum, 33.0% during pregnancy, 46.6% postpartum, and 32.7% at menopause. Exacerbation in first pregnancy was significantly associated with exacerbation in second pregnancy (OR = 10.82, 95% CI 4.48-26.16), as was exacerbation in first postpartum with exacerbation in second postpartum (OR = 6.86, 95% CI 3.27-14.36). Results were replicated in both samples. Reproductive cycle events are periods of increased risk for onset and exacerbation of OCD in women. The present study is the first to provide significant evidence that exacerbation in or after first pregnancy is a substantial risk factor for exacerbation in or after a subsequent pregnancy. Further research is needed to identify factors related to exacerbation, so that physicians may provide appropriate recommendations to women regarding clinical issues involving OCD and reproductive cycle events. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on CNO-cycle reactions and AGB nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cognata, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 100 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method and new experimental facilities such as deep underground laboratories have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results.

  17. On the linkages between the global carbon-nitrogen-phosphorus cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Mackenzie, Fred; Bouchez, Julien; Knutti, Reto

    2013-04-01

    State-of-the-art earth system models used for long-term climate projections are becoming ever more complex in terms of not only spatial resolution but also the number of processes. Biogeochemical processes are beginning to be incorporated into these models. The motivation of this study is to quantify how climate projections are influenced by biogeochemical feedbacks. In the climate modeling community, it is virtually accepted that climate-Carbon (C) cycle feedbacks accelerate the future warming (Cox et al. 2000; Friedlingstein et al. 2006). It has been demonstrated that the Nitrogen (N) cycle suppresses climate-C cycle feedbacks (Thornton et al. 2009). On the contrary, biogeochemical studies show that the coupled C-N-Phosphorus (P) cycles are intimately interlinked via biosphere and the N-P cycles amplify C cycle feedbacks (Ver et al. 1999). The question as to whether the N-P cycles enhance or attenuate C cycle feedbacks is debated and has a significant implication for projections of future climate. We delve into this problem by using the Terrestrial-Ocean-aTmosphere Ecosystem Model 3 (TOTEM3), a globally-aggregated C-N-P cycle box model. TOTEM3 is a process-based model that describes the biogeochemical reactions and physical transports involving these elements in the four domains of the Earth system: land, atmosphere, coastal ocean, and open ocean. TOTEM3 is a successor of earlier TOTEM models (Ver et al. 1999; Mackenzie et al. 2011). In our presentation, we provide an overview of fundamental features and behaviors of TOTEM3 such as the mass balance at the steady state and the relaxation time scales to various types of perturbation. We also show preliminary results to investigate how the N-P cycles influence the behavior of the C cycle. References Cox PM, Betts RA, Jones CD, Spall SA, Totterdell IJ (2000) Acceleration of global warming due to carbon-cycle feedbacks in a coupled climate model. Nature, 408, 184-187. Friedlingstein P, Cox P, Betts R, Bopp L, von Bloh

  18. Results from Cycles 1 and 2 of NNWSI Series 2 spent fuel dissolution tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1987-05-01

    PWR spent fuel rod segments from the H.B. Robinson Unit 2 and Turkey Point Unit 3 reactors were leach tested in Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) reference J-13 water under ambient hot cell conditions. The test matrix included bare fuel plus the cladding, rod segments with artificially induced cladding defects, and undefected rod segments. Radionuclide release results are presented and discussed. The actinides Pu, Am, Cm and Np appear to have been released congruently as the UO 2 oxide fuel matrix dissolved. Preferential U release measured in certain tests may be related to dissolution of oxidized UO/sub 2+x/ from the fuel surface, and/or greater solubility (and mobility) of U relative to the other actinides within defected cladding specimens. Uranium solubility measured in the J-13 water was much greater then that measured in deionized water in previous tests. All of the principal fission products analyzed ( 137 Cs, 129 I, 99 Tc and 90 Sr) were released preferentially relative to the actinides. Preferential release of activation product 14 C was also measured, with a portion of the 14 C release appearing to originate from the cladding exterior surface. Much greater fractional fuel dissolution appeared to have occurred with bare fuel particles than from fuel contained in defected cladding. Actinide release from test specimens containing small (∼200 μm) laser-drilled holes through the cladding was not significantly greater than from undefected specimens

  19. Fast reactors fuel cycle core physics results from the CAPRA-CADRA programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasile, A.; Rimpault, G.; Tommasi, J.; Saint Jean, C. de; Delpech, M. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Hesketh, K. [BNFL, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Beaumont, H.M.; Sunderland, R.E. [NNC Ltd. (United Kingdom); Newton, T.; Smith, P. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom); Raedt, Ch. de [SCK.CEN, Mol (Belgium); Vambenepe, G. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Lefevre, J.C. [FRAMATOME, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Maschek, W.; Haas, D

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of fast reactor core physics results obtained in the context of the CAPRA-CADRA European collaborative programme, whose aim is to investigate a broad range of possible options for plutonium and radioactive waste management. Different types of fast reactors have been studied to evaluate their potential capabilities with respect to the long term management of plutonium, minor actinides (MAs) and long- lived fission products (LLFPs). Among the several options aiming at reducing waste and consequently radio toxicity are: homogeneous recycling of Minor Actinides, heterogeneous recycling of Minor Actinides either without or with moderation, dedicated critical cores (fuelled mainly with Minor Actinides) and Accelerator Driven System (ADS) variants. In order to achieve a detailed understanding of the potential of the various options, advanced core physics methods have been implemented and tested and applied, for example, to improving control rod modeling and to studying safety aspects. There has also been code development and experimental work carried out to improve the understanding of fuel performance behaviors. (author)

  20. Fast reactors fuel cycle core physics results from the CAPRA-CADRA programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, A.; Rimpault, G.; Tommasi, J.; Saint Jean, C. de; Delpech, M.; Hesketh, K.; Beaumont, H.M.; Sunderland, R.E.; Newton, T.; Smith, P.; Raedt, Ch. de; Vambenepe, G.; Lefevre, J.C.; Maschek, W.; Haas, D

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of fast reactor core physics results obtained in the context of the CAPRA-CADRA European collaborative programme, whose aim is to investigate a broad range of possible options for plutonium and radioactive waste management. Different types of fast reactors have been studied to evaluate their potential capabilities with respect to the long term management of plutonium, minor actinides (MAs) and long- lived fission products (LLFPs). Among the several options aiming at reducing waste and consequently radio toxicity are: homogeneous recycling of Minor Actinides, heterogeneous recycling of Minor Actinides either without or with moderation, dedicated critical cores (fuelled mainly with Minor Actinides) and Accelerator Driven System (ADS) variants. In order to achieve a detailed understanding of the potential of the various options, advanced core physics methods have been implemented and tested and applied, for example, to improving control rod modeling and to studying safety aspects. There has also been code development and experimental work carried out to improve the understanding of fuel performance behaviors. (author)

  1. Southern Ocean Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Fluxes Detected by SOCCOM Biogeochemical Profiling Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, J. L.; Bushinksy, S.; Gray, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is known to play an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet historically our measurements of this remote region have been sparse and heavily biased towards summer. Here we present new estimates of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen calculated with measurements from autonomous biogeochemical profiling floats. At high latitudes in and southward of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, we find a significant flux of CO2 from the ocean to the atmosphere during 2014-2016, which is particularly enhanced during winter months. These results suggest that previous estimates may be biased towards stronger Southern Ocean CO2 uptake due to undersampling in winter. We examine various implications of having a source of CO2 that is higher than previous estimates. We also find that CO2:O2 flux ratios north of the Subtropical Front are positive, consistent with the fluxes being driven by changes in solubility, while south of the Polar Front biological processes and upwelling of deep water combine to produce a negative CO2:O2 flux ratio.

  2. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q.; Moran, J.E.; Blackwood, V.

    2007-01-01

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic 129 I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils

  3. Radionuclide release from simulated waste material after biogeochemical leaching of uraniferous mineral samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Aimee Lynn; Caron, François; Spiers, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Biogeochemical mineral dissolution is a promising method for the released of metals in low-grade host mineralization that contain sulphidic minerals. The application of biogeochemical mineral dissolution to engineered leach heap piles in the Elliot Lake region may be considered as a promising passive technology for the economic recovery of low grade Uranium-bearing ores. In the current investigation, the decrease of radiological activity of uraniferous mineral material after biogeochemical mineral dissolution is quantified by gamma spectroscopy and compared to the results from digestion/ICP-MS analysis of the ore materials to determine if gamma spectroscopy is a simple, viable alternative quantification method for heavy nuclides. The potential release of Uranium (U) and Radium-226 ( 226 Ra) to the aqueous environment from samples that have been treated to represent various stages of leaching and passive closure processes are assessed. Dissolution of U from the solid phase has occurred during biogeochemical mineral dissolution in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, with gamma spectroscopy indicating an 84% decrease in Uranium-235 ( 235 U) content, a value in accordance with the data obtained by dissolution chemistry. Gamma spectroscopy data indicate that only 30% of the 226 Ra was removed during the biogeochemical mineral dissolution. Chemical inhibition and passivation treatments of waste materials following the biogeochemical mineral dissolution offer greater protection against residual U and 226 Ra leaching. Pacified samples resist the release of 226 Ra contained in the mineral phase and may offer more protection to the aqueous environment for the long term, compared to untreated or inhibited residues, and should be taken into account for future decommissioning. - Highlights: • Gamma counting showed an 84% decrease in 235 U after biogeochemical mineral leaching. • Chemical digestion/ICP-MS analysis also showed an 84% decrease in total U. • Over

  4. Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics in environmental samples for microbially mediated biogeochemical processes: Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minjing [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Qian, Wei-Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nelson, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Thompson, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Yan, Sen [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen 518055 People' s Republic of China

    2017-07-13

    Microbially mediated biogeochemical processes are catalyzed by enzymes that control the transformation of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in environment. The dynamic linkage between enzymes and biogeochemical species transformation has, however, rarely been investigated because of the lack of analytical approaches to efficiently and reliably quantify enzymes and their dynamics in soils and sediments. Herein, we developed a signature peptide-based technique for sensitively quantifying dissimilatory and assimilatory enzymes using nitrate-reducing enzymes in a hyporheic zone sediment as an example. Moreover, the measured changes in enzyme concentration were found to correlate with the nitrate reduction rate in a way different from that inferred from biogeochemical models based on biomass or functional genes as surrogates for functional enzymes. This phenomenon has important implications for understanding and modeling the dynamics of microbial community functions and biogeochemical processes in environments. Our results also demonstrate the importance of enzyme quantification for the identification and interrogation of those biogeochemical processes with low metabolite concentrations as a result of faster enzyme-catalyzed consumption of metabolites than their production. The dynamic enzyme behaviors provide a basis for the development of enzyme-based models to describe the relationship between the microbial community and biogeochemical processes.

  5. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  6. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  7. Influence of harvesting on biogeochemical exchange in sheetflow and soil processes in a eutrophic floodplain forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.G. Lockaby; R.G. Clawson; K. Flynn; Robert Rummer; S. Meadows; B Stokes; John A. Stanturf

    1997-01-01

    Floodplain forests contribute to the maintenance of water quality as a result of various biogeochemical transformations which occur within them. In particular, they can serve as sinks for nutrient run-off from adjacent uplands or as nutrient transformers as water moves downstream. However, little is known about the potential that land management activities may have for...

  8. Winter flooding in Dutch stream valley floodplains: biogeochemical effects and vegetation consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, V.

    2009-01-01

    Winter flooding in Dutch stream valley floodplains: biogeochemical effects and vegetation consequences Victor Beumer Climatic change has great impacts on stream catchments and their ecology. Expectations are that more extreme climate events will result in undesired flooding in stream catchments. In

  9. Biogeochemical and engineered barriers for preventing spread of contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrėnaitė, Edita; Lietuvninkas, Arvydas; Baltrėnas, Pranas

    2018-02-01

    The intensive industrial development and urbanization, as well as the negligible return of hazardous components to the deeper layers of the Earth, increases the contamination load on the noosphere (i.e., the new status of the biosphere, the development of which is mainly controlled by the conscious activity of a human being). The need for reducing the spread and mobility of contaminants is growing. The insights into the role of the tree in the reduction of contaminant mobility through its life cycle are presented to show an important function performed by the living matter and its products in reducing contamination. For maintaining the sustainable development, natural materials are often used as the media in the environmental protection technologies. However, due to increasing contamination intensity, the capacity of natural materials is not sufficiently high. Therefore, the popularity of engineered materials, such as biochar which is the thermochemically modified lignocellulosic product, is growing. The new approaches, based on using the contaminant footprint, as well as natural (biogeochemical) and engineered barriers for reducing contaminant migration and their application, are described in the paper.

  10. The acclimative biogeochemical model of the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimoglu, Onur; Hofmeister, Richard; Maerz, Joeran; Riethmüller, Rolf; Wirtz, Kai W.

    2017-10-01

    , suggesting that accounting for physiological flexibility might be relevant for a consistent representation of the vertical distribution of phytoplankton biomass. Our results point to significant variability in the cellular chlorophyll-to-carbon ratio (Chl : C) across seasons and the coastal to offshore transition. Up to 3-fold-higher Chl : C at the coastal areas in comparison to those at the offshore areas contribute to the steepness of the chlorophyll gradient. The model also predicts much higher phytoplankton concentrations at the coastal areas in comparison to its non-acclimative equivalent. Hence, findings of this study provide evidence for the relevance of physiological flexibility, here reflected by spatial and seasonal variations in Chl : C, for a realistic description of biogeochemical fluxes, particularly in the environments displaying strong resource gradients.

  11. Deriving forest fire ignition risk with biogeochemical process modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastaugh, C S; Hasenauer, H

    2014-05-01

    Climate impacts the growth of trees and also affects disturbance regimes such as wildfire frequency. The European Alps have warmed considerably over the past half-century, but incomplete records make it difficult to definitively link alpine wildfire to climate change. Complicating this is the influence of forest composition and fuel loading on fire ignition risk, which is not considered by purely meteorological risk indices. Biogeochemical forest growth models track several variables that may be used as proxies for fire ignition risk. This study assesses the usefulness of the ecophysiological model BIOME-BGC's 'soil water' and 'labile litter carbon' variables in predicting fire ignition. A brief application case examines historic fire occurrence trends over pre-defined regions of Austria from 1960 to 2008. Results show that summer fire ignition risk is largely a function of low soil moisture, while winter fire ignitions are linked to the mass of volatile litter and atmospheric dryness.

  12. Deriving forest fire ignition risk with biogeochemical process modelling☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastaugh, C.S.; Hasenauer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Climate impacts the growth of trees and also affects disturbance regimes such as wildfire frequency. The European Alps have warmed considerably over the past half-century, but incomplete records make it difficult to definitively link alpine wildfire to climate change. Complicating this is the influence of forest composition and fuel loading on fire ignition risk, which is not considered by purely meteorological risk indices. Biogeochemical forest growth models track several variables that may be used as proxies for fire ignition risk. This study assesses the usefulness of the ecophysiological model BIOME-BGC's ‘soil water’ and ‘labile litter carbon’ variables in predicting fire ignition. A brief application case examines historic fire occurrence trends over pre-defined regions of Austria from 1960 to 2008. Results show that summer fire ignition risk is largely a function of low soil moisture, while winter fire ignitions are linked to the mass of volatile litter and atmospheric dryness. PMID:26109905

  13. Stopping Onabotulinum Treatment after the First Two Cycles Might Not Be Justified: Results of a Real-life Monocentric Prospective Study in Chronic Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sarchielli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionOnabotulinum toxin A (OnabotA cyclic treatment is approved for the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine (CM, a highly disabling disorder. Although treatment response varies among patients, current guidelines suggest to stop treatment after cycle 2 if no response is achieved. This prospective study aimed to define, in real-life setting, the evolution of the response to OnabotA over five cycles of treatment among patients non-responding to cycle 1. The results of this study might help in decision-making, in particular whether prosecuting OnabotA further or not, when facing a patient not responding to cycle 1.MethodsPatients failing to respond at cycle 1 were recruited to complete five cycles. Key outcomes were: (i a ≥50% reduction in headache days, (ii a ≥50% reduction in total cumulative hours of headache on headache days and (iii a ≥5-point improvement in Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6 scores.ResultsOverall, 56 patients were included. Mean age was 45.7 years (female 83.9%. Severe (≥60 HIT-6 score was reported at baseline by 95.8% of patients. Responders (headache days reduction of more than 50% progressively increased cycle after cycle, doubling from cycle 2 to cycle 5 (from 27 to 48%. In addition, patients regressed from CM to episodic migraine moving on with each cycle, with 78% of them reaching less than nine migraine days/month after cycle 5. The headache days per month decreased significantly from cycle 1 to cycle 5 (overall from 23.3 ± 5.7 to 9.2 ± 3.6; p < 0.001. During 12 months (5 cycles, migraine days per month progressively abated (from 18.5 to 8.7; p < 0.001, days with symptomatic medications intake/month consistently decreased (from 17.4 to 8.1; p < 0.001, and mean HIT-6 score lowered (from 72.4 ± 5.7 to 50.2 ± 4.3; p < 0.001.ConclusionThe positive effect of OnabotA treatment spreads over the course of the treatment and might also manifest late in treatment course

  14. Inhibition of exportin-1 function results in rapid cell cycle-associated DNA damage in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Russell T; Marcus, Joshua M; Orth, James D

    2017-06-13

    Selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) are small molecules in development as anti-cancer agents. The first-in-class SINE, selinexor, is in clinical trials for blood and solid cancers. Selinexor forms a covalent bond with exportin-1 at cysteine-528, and blocks its ability to export cargos. Previous work has shown strong cell cycle effects and drug-induced cell death across many different cancer-derived cell lines. Here, we report strong cell cycle-associated DNA double-stranded break formation upon the treatment of cancer cells with SINE. In multiple cell models, selinexor treatment results in the formation of clustered DNA damage foci in 30-40% of cells within 8 hours that is dependent upon cysteine-528. DNA damage strongly correlates with G1/S-phase and decreased DNA replication. Live cell microscopy reveals an association between DNA damage and cell fate. Cells that form damage in G1-phase more often die or arrest, while those damaged in S/G2-phase frequently progress to cell division. Up to half of all treated cells form damage foci, and most cells that die after being damaged, were damaged in G1-phase. By comparison, non-transformed cell lines show strong cell cycle effects but little DNA damage and less death than cancer cells. Significant drug combination effects occur when selinexor is paired with different classes of agents that either cause DNA damage or that diminish DNA damage repair. These data present a novel effect of exportin-1 inhibition and provide a strong rationale for multiple combination treatments of selinexor with agents that are currently in use for the treatment of different solid cancers.

  15. Reanalysis of biogeochemical properties in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossarini, Gianpiero; Teruzzi, Anna; Salon, Stefano; Solidoro, Cosimo

    2014-05-01

    In the 3D variational (3DVAR) assimilation approach the error covariance matrix can be decomposed in a series of operators. The decomposition makes the 3DVAR particularly suitable for marine biogeochemistry data assimilation, because of the reduced computational costs of the method and its modularity, which allows to define the covariance among the biogeochemical variables in a specific operator. In the present work, the results of 3DVAR assimilation of surface chlorophyll concentration in a multi-annual simulation of the Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry are presented. The assimilated chlorophyll concentrations are obtained from satellite observations (Volpe et al. 2012). The multi-annual simulation is carried out using the OPATM-BFM model (Lazzari et al. 2012), which describes the low trophic web dynamics and is offline coupled with the MFS physical model (Oddo et al. 2009). In the OPATM-BFM four types of phytoplankton are simulated in terms of their content in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, silicon and chlorophyll. In the 3DVAR the error covariance matrix has been decomposed in three different operators, which account for the vertical, the horizontal and the biogeochemical covariance (Teruzzi et al. 2014). The biogeochemical operator propagates the result of the assimilation to the OPATM-BFM variables, providing innovation for the components of the four phytoplankton types. The biogeochemical covariance has been designed supposing that the assimilation preserves the physiological status and the relative abundances of phytoplankton types. Practically, the assimilation preserves the internal quotas of the components for each phytoplankton as long as the optimal growth rate condition are maintained. The quotas preservation is not applied when the phytoplankton is in severe declining growth phase, and the correction provided by the assimilation is set equal to zero. Moreover, the relative abundances among the phytoplankton functional types are preserved. The 3DVAR

  16. Physical/biogeochemical coupled model : impact of an offline vs online strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameau, Angélique; Perruche, Coralie; Bricaud, Clément; Gutknecht, Elodie; Reffray, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Mercator-Ocean, the French ocean forecasting center, has been developing several operational forecasting systems and reanalysis of the physical and biogeochemical 3D-Ocean. Here we study the impact of an offline vs online strategy to couple the physical (OPA) and biogeochemical (PISCES) modules included in the NEMO platform. For this purpose, we perform global one-year long simulations at 1° resolution. The model was initialized with global climatologies. The spin-up involved 10 years of biogeochemical off-line simulation forced by a climatology of ocean physics. The online mode consists in running physical and biogeochemical models simultaneously whereas in the offline mode, the biogeochemical model is launched alone, forced by averaged physical forcing (1 day, 7 days,… ). The Mercator operational biogeochemical system is currently using the offline mode with a weekly physical forcing. A special treatment is applied to the vertical diffusivity coefficient (Kz): as it varies of several orders of magnitude, we compute the mean of the LOG10 of Kz. Moreover, a threshold value is applied to remove the highest values corresponding to enhanced convection. To improve this system, 2 directions are explored. First, 3 physical forcing frequencies are compared to quantify errors due to the offline mode: 1 hour (online mode), 1 day and 1 week (offline modes). Secondly, sensitivity tests to the threshold value applied to Kz are performed. The simulations are evaluated by systematically comparing model fields to observations (Globcolour product and World Ocean Atlas 2005) at global and regional scales. We show first that offline simulations are in good agreement with online simulation. As expected, the lower the physical forcing frequency is, the closer to the online solution is the offline simulation. The threshold value on the vertical diffusivity coefficient manages the mixing strength within the mixed layer. A value of 1 m2.s-1 appears to be a good compromise to approach

  17. Patterns of Transcript Abundance of Eukaryotic Biogeochemically-Relevant Genes in the Amazon River Plume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Zielinski

    Full Text Available The Amazon River has the largest discharge of all rivers on Earth, and its complex plume system fuels a wide array of biogeochemical processes, across a large area of the western tropical North Atlantic. The plume thus stimulates microbial processes affecting carbon sequestration and nutrient cycles at a global scale. Chromosomal gene expression patterns of the 2.0 to 156 μm size-fraction eukaryotic microbial community were investigated in the Amazon River Plume, generating a robust dataset (more than 100 million mRNA sequences that depicts the metabolic capabilities and interactions among the eukaryotic microbes. Combining classical oceanographic field measurements with metatranscriptomics yielded characterization of the hydrographic conditions simultaneous with a quantification of transcriptional activity and identity of the community. We highlight the patterns of eukaryotic gene expression for 31 biogeochemically significant gene targets hypothesized to be valuable within forecasting models. An advantage to this targeted approach is that the database of reference sequences used to identify the target genes was selectively constructed and highly curated optimizing taxonomic coverage, throughput, and the accuracy of annotations. A coastal diatom bloom highly expressed nitrate transporters and carbonic anhydrase presumably to support high growth rates and enhance uptake of low levels of dissolved nitrate and CO2. Diatom-diazotroph association (DDA: diatoms with nitrogen fixing symbionts blooms were common when surface salinity was mesohaline and dissolved nitrate concentrations were below detection, and hence did not show evidence of nitrate utilization, suggesting they relied on ammonium transporters to aquire recently fixed nitrogen. These DDA blooms in the outer plume had rapid turnover of the photosystem D1 protein presumably caused by photodegradation under increased light penetration in clearer waters, and increased expression of silicon

  18. Mutant p53 transfection of astrocytic cells results in altered cell cycle control, radiation sensitivity, and tumorigenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanady, Kirk E.; Mei Su; Proulx, Gary; Malkin, David M.; Pardo, Francisco S.

    1995-01-01

    Introduction: Alterations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are one of the most frequent genetic alterations in malignant gliomas. An understanding of the molecular genetic events leading to glial tumor progression would aid in designing therapeutic vectors for controlling these challenging tumor types. We investigated whether mutations in coding exons of the p53 gene result in functional changes altering cell cycle 'checkpoint' control and the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of glial cells. Methods: An astrocytic cell line was derived from a low grade astrocytoma and characterized to be of human karyotype and GFAP positivity. Additionally, the cellular population has never formed tumors in immune-deficient mice. At early passage ( 2 as parameters. Cell kinetic analyses after 2, 5, and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation were conducted using propidium iodide FACS analyses. Results: Overall levels of p53 expression were increased 5-10 fold in the transfected cellular populations. Astrocytic cellular populations transfected with mutant p53 revealed a statistically significant increase in levels of resistance to ionizing radiation in vitro (2-tailed test, SF2, MID). Astrocytic cellular populations transfected with mutant p53, unlike the parental cells, were tumorigenic in SCID mice. Cell kinetic analyses indicated that the untransfected cell line demonstrated dose dependent G1 and G2 arrests. Following transfection, however, the resultant cellular population demonstrated a predominant G2 arrest. Conclusions: Astrocytic cellular populations derived from low grade astrocytomas, are relatively radiation sensitive, non-tumorigenic, and have intact cell cycle ''checkpoints.'' Cellular populations resulting upon transfection of parental cells with a dominant negative p53 mutation, are relatively radiation resistant, when compared to both parental and mock-transfected cells. Transfected cells demonstrate abnormalities of cell cycle control at the G1/S checkpoint, increases in levels

  19. A framework to assess biogeochemical response to ecosystem disturbance using nutrient partitioning ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranabetter, J. Marty; McLauchlan, Kendra K.; Enders, Sara K.; Fraterrigo, Jennifer M.; Higuera, Philip E.; Morris, Jesse L.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Barnes, Rebecca; Buma, Brian; Gavin, Daniel G.; Gerhart, Laci M.; Gillson, Lindsey; Hietz, Peter; Mack, Michelle C.; McNeil, Brenden; Perakis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances affect almost all terrestrial ecosystems, but it has been difficult to identify general principles regarding these influences. To improve our understanding of the long-term consequences of disturbance on terrestrial ecosystems, we present a conceptual framework that analyzes disturbances by their biogeochemical impacts. We posit that the ratio of soil and plant nutrient stocks in mature ecosystems represents a characteristic site property. Focusing on nitrogen (N), we hypothesize that this partitioning ratio (soil N: plant N) will undergo a predictable trajectory after disturbance. We investigate the nature of this partitioning ratio with three approaches: (1) nutrient stock data from forested ecosystems in North America, (2) a process-based ecosystem model, and (3) conceptual shifts in site nutrient availability with altered disturbance frequency. Partitioning ratios could be applied to a variety of ecosystems and successional states, allowing for improved temporal scaling of disturbance events. The generally short-term empirical evidence for recovery trajectories of nutrient stocks and partitioning ratios suggests two areas for future research. First, we need to recognize and quantify how disturbance effects can be accreting or depleting, depending on whether their net effect is to increase or decrease ecosystem nutrient stocks. Second, we need to test how altered disturbance frequencies from the present state may be constructive or destructive in their effects on biogeochemical cycling and nutrient availability. Long-term studies, with repeated sampling of soils and vegetation, will be essential in further developing this framework of biogeochemical response to disturbance.

  20. Nitrogen cycling responses to mountain pine beetle disturbance in a high elevation whitebark pine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keville, Megan P; Reed, Sasha C; Cleveland, Cory C

    2013-01-01

    Ecological disturbances can significantly affect biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems, but the biogeochemical consequences of the extensive mountain pine beetle outbreak in high elevation whitebark pine (WbP) (Pinus albicaulis) ecosystems of western North America have not been previously investigated. Mountain pine beetle attack has driven widespread WbP mortality, which could drive shifts in both the pools and fluxes of nitrogen (N) within these ecosystems. Because N availability can limit forest regrowth, understanding how beetle-induced mortality affects N cycling in WbP stands may be critical to understanding the trajectory of ecosystem recovery. Thus, we measured above- and belowground N pools and fluxes for trees representing three different times since beetle attack, including unattacked trees. Litterfall N inputs were more than ten times higher under recently attacked trees compared to unattacked trees. Soil inorganic N concentrations also increased following beetle attack, potentially driven by a more than two-fold increase in ammonium (NH₄⁺) concentrations in the surface soil organic horizon. However, there were no significant differences in mineral soil inorganic N or soil microbial biomass N concentrations between attacked and unattacked trees, implying that short-term changes in N cycling in response to the initial stages of WbP attack were restricted to the organic horizon. Our results suggest that while mountain pine beetle attack drives a pulse of N from the canopy to the forest floor, changes in litterfall quality and quantity do not have profound effects on soil biogeochemical cycling, at least in the short-term. However, continuous observation of these important ecosystems will be crucial to determining the long-term biogeochemical effects of mountain pine beetle outbreaks.

  1. Nitrogen cycling responses to mountain pine beetle disturbance in a high elevation whitebark pine ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keville, Megan P.; Reed, Sasha C.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    Ecological disturbances can significantly affect biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems, but the biogeochemical consequences of the extensive mountain pine beetle outbreak in high elevation whitebark pine (WbP) (Pinus albicaulis) ecosystems of western North America have not been previously investigated. Mountain pine beetle attack has driven widespread WbP mortality, which could drive shifts in both the pools and fluxes of nitrogen (N) within these ecosystems. Because N availability can limit forest regrowth, understanding how beetle-induced mortality affects N cycling in WbP stands may be critical to understanding the trajectory of ecosystem recovery. Thus, we measured above- and belowground N pools and fluxes for trees representing three different times since beetle attack, including unattacked trees. Litterfall N inputs were more than ten times higher under recently attacked trees compared to unattacked trees. Soil inorganic N concentrations also increased following beetle attack, potentially driven by a more than two-fold increase in ammonium (NH4+) concentrations in the surface soil organic horizon. However, there were no significant differences in mineral soil inorganic N or soil microbial biomass N concentrations between attacked and unattacked trees, implying that short-term changes in N cycling in response to the initial stages of WbP attack were restricted to the organic horizon. Our results suggest that while mountain pine beetle attack drives a pulse of N from the canopy to the forest floor, changes in litterfall quality and quantity do not have profound effects on soil biogeochemical cycling, at least in the short-term. However, continuous observation of these important ecosystems will be crucial to determining the long-term biogeochemical effects of mountain pine beetle outbreaks.

  2. Results of the German alternative fuel cycle evaluation and further efforts geared toward demonstration of direct disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, R.; Closs, K.D.

    1986-01-01

    In a comparative study initiated by the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology which was carried out by Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in the period from 1981 to 1985, direct disposal of spent fuel was contrasted to the traditional fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycle. The results of the study did not exhibit decisive advantages of direct disposal over fuel reprocessing. Due to this face and legal requirements of the German Atomic Energy Act, the cabinet concluded to continue to adhere to fuel reprocessing as the preferred version of ''Entsorgung''. But the door was left ajar for the direct disposal alternative that, under present atomic law, is permissible for fuel for which reprocessing is neither technically feasible nor economically justified. An ambitious program has been launched in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), geared to bring direct disposal to a point of technical maturity

  3. Summary of estimated doses and risks resulting from routine radionuclide releases from fast breeder reactor fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Meyer, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess the human health and environment effects associated with operation of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor fuel cycle. In this first phase of the work, emphasis was focused on routine radionuclide releases from reactor and reprocessing facilities. For this study, sites for fifty 1-GW(e) capacity reactors and three reprocessing plants were selected to develop scenarios representative of US power requirements. For both the reactor and reprocessing facility siting schemes selected, relatively small impacts were calculated for locality-specific populations residing within 100 km. Also, the results of these analyses are being used in the identification of research priorities. 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Development and review of Euro 5 passenger car emission factors based on experimental results over various driving cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaras, Georgios; Franco, Vicente; Dilara, Panagiota; Martini, Giorgio; Manfredi, Urbano

    2014-01-01

    The mass emissions of CO2 and regulated pollutants (NOX, HC, CO, PM) of thirteen Euro 5 compliant passenger cars (seven gasoline, six Diesel) were measured on a chassis dynamometer. The vehicles were driven repeatedly over the European type-approval driving cycle (NEDC) and the more dynamic WMTC and CADC driving cycles. Distance-specific emission factors were derived for each pollutant and sub-cycle which were subsequently compared to the corresponding emission factors provided by the referen...

  5. Green Infrastructure Increases Biogeochemical Responsiveness, Vegetation Growth and Decreases Runoff in a Semi-Arid City, Tucson, AZ, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, T.; Papuga, S. A.; Luketich, A. M.; Rockhill, T.; Gallo, E. L.; Anderson, J.; Salgado, L.; Pope, K.; Gupta, N.; Korgaonkar, Y.; Guertin, D. P.

    2017-12-01

    Green Infrastructure (GI) is often viewed as a mechanism to minimize the effects of urbanization on hydrology, water quality, and other ecosystem services (including the urban heat island). Quantifying the effects of GI requires field measurements of the dimensions of biogeochemical, ecosystem, and hydrologic function that we expect GI to impact. Here we investigated the effect of GI features in Tucson, Arizona which has a low intensity winter precipitation regime and a high intensity summer regime. We focused on understanding the effect of GI on soil hydraulic and biogeochemical properties as well as the effect on vegetation and canopy temperature. Our results demonstrate profound changes in biogeochemical and hydrologic properties and vegetation growth between GI systems and nearby control sites. In terms of hydrologic properties GI soils had increased water holding capacity and hydraulic conductivity. GI soils also have higher total carbon, total nitrogen, and organic matter in general than control soils. Furthermore, we tested the sampled soils (control and GI) for differences in biogeochemical response upon wetting. GI soils had larger respiration responses indicating greater biogeochemical activity overall. Long-term Lidar surveys were used to investigate the differential canopy growth of GI systems versus control sites. The results of this analysis indicate that while a significant amount of time is needed to observe differences in canopy growth GI features due increase tree size and thus likely impact street scale ambient temperatures. Additionally monitoring of transpiration, soil moisture, and canopy temperature demonstrates that GI features increase vegetation growth and transpiration and reduce canopy temperatures. These biogeochemical and ecohydrologic results indicate that GI can increase the biogeochemical processing of soils and increase tree growth and thus reduce urban ambient temperatures.

  6. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls on fate and distribution of trace metals in oiled Gulf salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevan, J.; Natter, M.; Lee, M.; Keimowitz, A.; Okeke, B.; Savrda, C.; Saunders, J.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010, the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in the release of approximately 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Oil and its associated trace metals have been demonstrated to have a detrimental effect on coastal wetland ecosystems. Wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb organic matter and metals. The biogeochemical cycling of trace metals can be strongly influenced by microbial activity, specifically those of sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria. Microbial activity may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter such as oil. This research incorporates an assessment of levels of trace metals and associated biogeochemical changes from ten coastal marshes in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. These sampling sites range in their pollution levels from pristine to highly contaminated. A total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sr, Co, V, Ba, Hg, As) in heavily-oiled areas compared to less-affected and pristine sites. Due to chemical complexation among organic compounds and metals, crude oils often contain elevated levels (up to hundreds of mg/kg) of trace metals At the heavily-oiled Louisiana sites (e.g., Bay Jimmy, Bayou Dulac, Bay Batiste), elevated levels of metals and total organic carbon have been found in sediments down to depths of 30 cm. Clearly the contamination is not limited to shallow sediments and oil, along with various associated metals, may be invading into deeper (pre-industrial) portions of the marsh sediments. Pore-waters extracted from contaminated sediments are characterized by very high levels of reduced sulfur (up to 80 mg/kg), in contrast to fairly low ferrous iron concentrations (<0.02 mg/kg). The influx of oil into the wetlands might provide the initial substrate and

  7. The Effects of Chlorophyll Assimilation on Carbon Fluxes in a Global Biogeochemical Model. [Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated whether the assimilation of remotely-sensed chlorophyll data can improve the estimates of air-sea carbon dioxide fluxes (FCO2). Using a global, established biogeochemical model (NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model, NOBM) for the period 2003-2010, we found that the global FCO2 values produced in the free-run and after assimilation were within -0.6 mol C m(sup -2) y(sup -1) of the observations. The effect of satellite chlorophyll assimilation was assessed in 12 major oceanographic regions. The region with the highest bias was the North Atlantic. Here the model underestimated the fluxes by 1.4 mol C m(sup -2) y(sup -1) whereas all the other regions were within 1 mol C m(sup -2) y(sup -1) of the data. The FCO2 values were not strongly impacted by the assimilation, and the uncertainty in FCO2 was not decreased, despite the decrease in the uncertainty in chlorophyll concentration. Chlorophyll concentrations were within approximately 25% of the database in 7 out of the 12 regions, and the assimilation improved the chlorophyll concentration in the regions with the highest bias by 10-20%. These results suggest that the assimilation of chlorophyll data does not considerably improve FCO2 estimates and that other components of the carbon cycle play a role that could further improve our FCO2 estimates.

  8. Biogeochemical Processes Regulating the Mobility of Uranium in Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, Keaton M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2016-07-01

    This book chapters reviews the latest knowledge on the biogeochemical processes regulating the mobility of uranium in sediments. It contains both data from the literature and new data from the authors.

  9. Is our youth cycling to health?: Results from the Dutch 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. Ettema; Peter Barendse; Mark S. Tremblay; H.W. Smits; Tim Takken; G.C.W. Wendel-Vos; N.H.M.J. Schipper-van Veldhoven; D.H.H. van Kann; J. Lucassen; Karlijn Knitel; C. Veenhof; R. van den Dool; J. van der Net; T. Altenburg; E.M. Monninkhof; J. Faber; Janke de Groot; Marcella Burghard; S. de Vries; M. Beijersbergen; H.C.G. Kemper; Iris van Oost

    2016-01-01

    The Netherlands is known globally for its widespread use of bicycles and some call it a “cycling nation”. Indeed, many Dutch inhabitants own a bike and cycle frequently. Numbers show that 84% of the Dutch inhabitants from age 4 years and older own a bike. Those owners have an average of 1.3 bikes

  10. Preface to: Indian Ocean biogeochemical processes and ecological variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hood, R.R.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Wiggert, J.D.

    monsoonal in fluence. The biogeochemical and ecological impacts of this complex physical forcing are not yet fully understood. The Indian Ocean is truly one of the last great frontiers of ocea- nographic research. In addition, it appears... to be particularly vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic impacts, yet it has been more than a decade since the last coordinated international study of biogeochemical and ecological proc esses was undertaken in this region. To obtain a better un...

  11. What sea-ice biogeochemical modellers need from observers

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Nadja; Deal, Clara; Lannuzel, Delphine; Lavoie, Diane; Massonnet, François; Miller, Lisa A.; Moreau, Sebastien; Popova, Ekaterina; Stefels, Jacqueline; Tedesco, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerical models can be a powerful tool helping to understand the role biogeochemical processes play in local and global systems and how this role may be altered in a changing climate. With respect to sea-ice biogeochemical models, our knowledge is severely limited by our poor confidence in numerical model parameterisations representing those processes. Improving model parameterisations requires communication between observers and modellers to guide model development and improve the ...

  12. Associations between Safety from Crime, Cycling, and Obesity in a Dutch Elderly Population: Results from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef P. J. Kremers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate differences in associations between crime rates, cycling, and weight status between people living in low and high socioeconomic status (SES neighbourhoods. In total, 470 participants in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were included (age: 63–70 y. Body height and weight were measured using a stadiometer and calibrated weight scale, respectively. Cycling behaviour was assessed in a face-to-face interview, and neighbourhood crime rates were assessed using data from police reports. Men residing in high SES neighbourhoods cycled more than males residing in low SES neighbourhoods. Cycling was negatively related to crime rates among both men and women living in low SES neighbourhoods. Among men living in low SES neighbourhoods, more cycling was associated with lower BMI. Interventions aiming to prevent obesity in older people may consider aiming at increasing bicycle use in lower SES neighbourhoods, but neighbourhood safety issues should be considered.

  13. Soil Biogeochemical and Microbial Feedbacks along a Snowmelt-Dominated Hillslope-to-Floodplain Transect in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, P.; Beller, H. R.; Bill, M.; Bouskill, N.; Brodie, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Conrad, M. E.; Karaoz, U.; Polussa, A.; Steltzer, H.; Wang, S.; Williams, K. H.; Wilmer, C.; Wu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen export from mountainous watersheds is a product of multiple interactions among hydrological processes and soil-microbial-plant feedbacks along the continuum from terrestrial to aquatic environments. In snow-dominated systems, like the East River Watershed (CO), seasonal processes such as snowmelt exert significant influence on the annual hydrologic cycle and may also link spatially distinct catchment subsystems, such as hillslope and adjoining riparian floodplains. Further, snowmelt is occurring earlier each year and this is predicted to result in a temporal asynchrony between historically coupled microbial nutrient release and plant nutrient demand in spring, with the potential to increase N export from the East River Watershed. Here we summarize biogeochemical data collected along a hillslope-to-riparian floodplain transect at the East River site. Starting in Fall 2016, we sampled soils at 3 depths and measured dissolved pools of soil nutrients (e.g., NH4+, NO3-, DOC, P), microbial biomass CN, and microbial community composition over a seasonal time course, through periods of snow accumulation, snowmelt, and plant senescence. Soil moisture content in the top 5 cm of floodplain soils was nearly 4X greater across sampling dates, coinciding with 2X greater microbial biomass C, larger extractable pools of NH4+, and smaller pools of NO3- in floodplain vs. hillslope soils. These results suggest that microbially mediated redox processes played an important role in N cycling along the transect. Hillslope vs. floodplain location also appeared to be a key factor that differentiated soil microbial communities (e.g., a more important factor than seasonality or soil depth or type). Snow accumulation and snowmelt exerted substantial influence on soil biogeochemistry. For example, microbial biomass accumulation increased about 2X beneath the winter snowpack. Snowmelt resulted in a precipitous crash in the microbial population, with 2.5X reductions in floodplain and 2X

  14. Toward explaining the Holocene carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records: Results from transient ocean carbon cycle-climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menviel, L.; Joos, F.

    2012-03-01

    The Bern3D model was applied to quantify the mechanisms of carbon cycle changes during the Holocene (last 11,000 years). We rely on scenarios from the literature to prescribe the evolution of shallow water carbonate deposition and of land carbon inventory changes over the glacial termination (18,000 to 11,000 years ago) and the Holocene and modify these scenarios within uncertainties. Model results are consistent with Holocene records of atmospheric CO2 and δ13C as well as the spatiotemporal evolution of δ13C and carbonate ion concentration in the deep sea. Deposition of shallow water carbonate, carbonate compensation of land uptake during the glacial termination, land carbon uptake and release during the Holocene, and the response of the ocean-sediment system to marine changes during the termination contribute roughly equally to the reconstructed late Holocene pCO2 rise of 20 ppmv. The 5 ppmv early Holocene pCO2 decrease reflects terrestrial uptake largely compensated by carbonate deposition and ocean sediment responses. Additional small contributions arise from Holocene changes in sea surface temperature, ocean circulation, and export productivity. The Holocene pCO2 variations result from the subtle balance of forcings and processes acting on different timescales and partly in opposite direction as well as from memory effects associated with changes occurring during the termination. Different interglacial periods with different forcing histories are thus expected to yield different pCO2 evolutions as documented by ice cores.

  15. Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) components operating with seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangrando, F; Bharathan, D; Green, H J; Link, H F; Parsons, B K; Parsons, J M; Pesaran, A A [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA); Panchal, C B [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

    1990-09-01

    This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. The roles of resuspension, diffusion and biogeochemical processes on oxygen dynamics offshore of the Rhône River, France: a numerical modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Julia M.; Harris, Courtney K.; Fennel, Katja; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Xu, Kehui; Rabouille, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    column. Additionally, entrainment of POM into the water column during resuspension events, and the associated increase in remineralization there, also increased oxygen consumption in the region of the water column below the pycnocline. During these resuspension events, modeled rates of oxygen consumption increased by factors of up to ˜ 2 and ˜ 8 in the seabed and below the pycnocline, respectively. When averaged over 2 months, the intermittent cycles of erosion and deposition led to a ˜ 16 % increase of oxygen consumption in the seabed, as well as a larger increase of ˜ 140 % below the pycnocline. These results imply that observations collected during quiescent periods, and biogeochemical models that neglect resuspension or use typical parameterizations for resuspension, may underestimate net oxygen consumption at sites like the Rhône Delta. Local resuspension likely has the most pronounced effect on oxygen dynamics at study sites with a high oxygen concentration in bottom waters, only a thin seabed oxic layer, and abundant labile organic matter.

  17. Biogeochemical stability and reactions of iron-organic carbon complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Adhikari, D.; Zhao, Q.; Dunham-Cheatham, S.; Das, K.; Mejia, J.; Huang, R.; Wang, X.; Poulson, S.; Tang, Y.; Obrist, D.; Roden, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    Our core hypothesis is that the degradation rate of soil organic carbon (OC) is governed by the amount of iron (Fe)-bound OC, and the ability of microbial communities to utilize OC as an energy source and electron shuttle for Fe reduction that in turn stimulates reductive release of Fe-bound labile dissolved OC. This hypothesis is being systematically evaluated using model Fe-OC complexes, natural soils, and microcosm system. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic C was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic C. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil OC was stabilized by association with Fe oxide. In other studies, pyrogenic OC was found to facilitate the reduction of hematite, by enhancing extracellular electron transport and sorbing Fe(II). For ferrihydrite-OC co-precipitates, the reduction of Fe and release of OC was closely governed by the C/Fe ratio in the system. Based on the XPS, XANES and XAFS analysis, the transformation of Fe speciation was heterogeneous, depending on the conformation and composition of Fe-OC complexes. For natural soils, we investigated the quantity, characteristics, and reactivity of Fe-bound OC in soils collected from 14 forests in the United States. Fe-bound OC contributed up to 57.8% of total OC in the forest soils. Under the anaerobic conditions, the reduction of Fe was positively correlated to the electron accepting capacity of OC. Our findings highlight the closely coupled dynamics of Fe and OC, with broad implications on the turnover of OC and biogeochemical cycles of Fe.

  18. Results of the Collaborative Energy and Water Cycle Information Services (CEWIS) Workshop on Heterogeneous Dataset Analysis Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Steven; Teng, William; Acker, James; Belvedere, Deborah; Liu, Zhong; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    In support of the NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS), the Collaborative Energy and Water Cycle Information Services (CEWIS), sponsored by NEWS Program Manager Jared Entin, was initiated to develop an evolving set of community-based data and information services that would facilitate users to locate, access, and bring together multiple distributed heterogeneous energy and water cycle datasets. The CEWIS workshop, June 15-16, 2010, at NASA/GSFC, was the initial step of the process, starting with identifying and scoping the issues, as defined by the community.

  19. Application of a SEEK filter to a 1D biogeochemical model of the Ligurian Sea: Twin experiments and real data assimilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raick, C.; Alvera-Azcarate, A.; Barth, A.; Brankart, J.-M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Grégoire, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter has been implemented to assimilate in-situ data in a 1D coupled physical-ecosystem model of the Ligurian Sea. The biogeochemical model describes the partly decoupled nitrogen and carbon cycles of the pelagic food web. The GHER hydrodynamic model

  20. Biogeochemical and Ecomorphological Niche Segregation of Mediterranean Woody Species along a Local Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique G. de la Riva; Enrique G. de la Riva; Teodoro Marañón; Cyrille Violle; Rafael Villar; Ignacio M. Pérez-Ramos

    2017-01-01

    According with niche theory the species are specialized in different ecological niches, being able to coexist as result of a differential use of resources. In this context, the biogeochemical niche hypothesis proposes that species have an optimal elemental composition which results from the link between the chemical and morphological traits for the optimum plant functioning. Thus, and attending to the limiting similarity concept, different elemental composition and plant structure among co-oc...

  1. Intraspecific Differences in Biogeochemical Responses to Thermal Change in the Coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G Matson

    Full Text Available The species concept in marine phytoplankton is defined based on genomic, morphological, and functional properties. Reports of intraspecific diversity are widespread across major phytoplankton groups but the impacts of this variation on ecological and biogeochemical processes are often overlooked. Intraspecific diversity is well known within coccolithophores, which play an important role in the marine carbon cycle via production of particulate inorganic carbon. In this study, we investigated strain-specific responses to temperature in terms of morphology, carbon production, and carbonate mineralogy using a combination of microscopy, elemental analysis, flow cytometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Two strains of the cosmopolitan coccolithophore E. huxleyi isolated from different regions (subtropical, CCMP371; temperate, CCMP3266 were cultured under a range of temperature conditions (10°C, 15°C, and 20°C using batch cultures and sampled during both exponential and stationary growth. Results for both strains showed that growth rates decreased at lower temperatures while coccosphere size increased. Between 15°C and 20°C, both strains produced similar amounts of total carbon, but differed in allocation of that carbon between particulate inorganic carbon (PIC and particulate organic carbon (POC, though temperature effects were not detected. Between 10°C and 20°C, temperature effects on daily production of PIC and POC, as well as the cellular quota of POC were detected in CCMP3266. Strain-specific differences in coccolith shedding rates were found during exponential growth. In addition, daily shedding rates were negatively related to temperature in CCMP371 but not in CCMP3266. Despite differences in rates of particulate inorganic carbon production, both strains were found to produce coccoliths composed entirely of pure calcite, as established by solid-state 13C and 43Ca NMR and X-ray diffraction measurements. These results highlight the

  2. Glacial-interglacial variability in ocean oxygen and phosphorus in a global biogeochemical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Palastanga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased transfer of particulate matter from continental shelves to the open ocean during glacials may have had a major impact on the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Here, we assess the response of the coupled oceanic cycles of oxygen, carbon, phosphorus, and iron to the input of particulate organic carbon and reactive phosphorus from shelves. We use a biogeochemical ocean model and specifically focus on the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. When compared to an interglacial reference run, our glacial scenario with shelf input shows major increases in ocean productivity and phosphorus burial, while mean deep-water oxygen concentrations decline. There is a downward expansion of the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, while the extension of the OMZ in the Pacific is slightly reduced. Oxygen concentrations below 2000 m also decline but bottom waters do not become anoxic. The model simulations show when shelf input of particulate organic matter and particulate reactive P is considered, low oxygen areas in the glacial ocean expand, but concentrations are not low enough to generate wide scale changes in sediment biogeochemistry and sedimentary phosphorus recycling. Increased reactive phosphorus burial in the open ocean during the LGM in the model is related to dust input, notably over the southwest Atlantic and northwest Pacific, whereas input of material from shelves explains higher burial fluxes in continental slope and rise regions. Our model results are in qualitative agreement with available data and reproduce the strong spatial differences in the response of phosphorus burial to glacial-interglacial change. Our model results also highlight the need for additional sediment core records from all ocean basins to allow further insight into changes in phosphorus, carbon and oxygen dynamics in the ocean on glacial-interglacial timescales.

  3. Use of various gonadotropin and biosimilar formulations for in vitro fertilization cycles: results of a worldwide Web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Mindy S; Shoham, Gon; Tobler, Kyle J; Zhao, Yulian; Monseur, Brent; Leong, Milton; Shoham, Zeev

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify trends in gonadotropin therapy in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment worldwide. Retrospective evaluation utilizing the results of a Web-based survey, IVF-Worldwide ( www.IVF-worldwide.com ) was performed. Three hundred fourteen centers performing a total of 218,300 annual IVF cycles were evaluated. Respondents representing 62.2% of cycles (n = 135,800) did not believe there was a difference between urinary and recombinant gonadotropins in terms of efficacy and live birth rate. Of the respondents, 67.3% (n = 146,800) reported no difference between recombinant and urinary formulations in terms of short-term safety and risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. In terms of long-term safety using human urinary gonadotropins, 50.6% (n = 110,400) of respondents believe there are potential long-term risks including prion disease. For 95.3% of units (n = 208,000), the clinician was the decision maker determining which specific gonadotropins are used for IVF. Of the units, 62.6% (n = 136,700) identified efficacy as the most important factor in deciding which gonadotropin to prescribe. While most (67.3%, n = 146,800) were aware of new biosimilar recombinant FSH products entering the market, 92% (n = 201,000) reported they would like more information. A fraction of respondents (25.6%, n = 55,900) reported having experience with these new products, and of these, 80.3% (n = 46,200) reported that they were similar in efficacy as previously used gonadotropins in a similar patient group. Respondents representing the majority of centers do not believe a difference exists between urinary and recombinant gonadotropins with respect to efficacy and live birth rates. While many are aware of new biosimilar recombinant FSH products entering the market, over 90% desire more information on these products.

  4. Ecological, biogeochemical and salinity changes in coastal lakes and wetlands over the last 200 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lucy; Holmes, Jonathan; Horne, David

    2016-04-01

    Shallow lakes provide extensive ecosystem services and are ecologically important aquatic resources supporting a diverse flora and fauna. In marginal-marine areas, where such lakes are subjected to the multiple pressures of coastal erosion, sea level rise, increasing sea surface temperature and increasing frequency and intensity of storm surges, environments are complex and unstable. They are characterised by physico-chemical variations due to climatic (precipitation/evaporation cycles) and dynamic factors (tides, currents, freshwater drainage and sea level changes). Combined with human activity in the catchment these processes can alter the salinity, habitat and ecology of coastal fresh- to brackish water ecosystems. In this study the chemical and biological stability of coastal lakes forming the Upper Thurne catchment in the NE of the Norfolk Broads, East Anglia, UK are seriously threatened by long-term changes in salinity resulting from storm surges, complex hydrogeology and anthropogenic activity in the catchment. Future management decisions depend on a sound understanding of the potential ecological impacts, but such understanding is limited by short-term observations and measurements. This research uses palaeolimnological approaches, which can be validated and calibrated with historical records, to reconstruct changes in the aquatic environment on a longer time scale than can be achieved by observations alone. Here, salinity is quantitatively reconstructed using the trace-element geochemistry (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) of low Mg-calcite shells of Ostracoda (microscopic bivalved crustaceans) and macrophyte and macroinvertebrate macrofossil remains are used as a proxy to assess ecological change in response to variations in salinity. δ13C values of Cladocera (which are potentially outcompeted by the mysid Neomysis integer with increasing salinity and eutrophication) can be used to reconstruct carbon cycling and energy pathways in lake food webs, which alongside

  5. Thinking outside the channel: modeling nitrogen cycling in networked river ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley M. Helton; Geoffrey C. Poole; Judy L. Meyer; Wilfred M. Wollheim; Bruce J. Peterson; Patrick J. Mulholland; Emily S. Bernhardt; Jack A. Stanford; Clay Arango; Linda R. Ashkenas; Lee W. Cooper; Walter K. Dodds; Stanley V. Gregory; Robert O. Hall; Stephen K. Hamilton; Sherri L. Johnson; William H. McDowell; Jody D. Potter; Jennifer L. Tank; Suzanne M. Thomas; H. Maurice Valett; Jackson R. Webster; Lydia Zeglin

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and urban development alters nitrogen and other biogeochemical cycles in rivers worldwide. Because such biogeochemical processes cannot be measured empirically across whole river networks, simulation models are critical tools for understanding river-network biogeochemistry. However, limitations inherent in current models restrict our ability to simulate...

  6. Thousands of microbial genomes shed light on interconnected biogeochemical processes in an aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Brown, Christopher T.; Hug, Laura A.; Sharon, Itai; Castelle, Cindy J.; Probst, Alexander J.; Thomas, Brian C.; Singh, Andrea; Wilkins, Michael J.; Karaoz, Ulas; Brodie, Eoin L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-01-01

    The subterranean world hosts up to one-fifth of all biomass, including microbial communities that drive transformations central to Earth's biogeochemical cycles. However, little is known about how complex microbial communities in such environments are structured, and how inter-organism interactions shape ecosystem function. Here we apply terabase-scale cultivation-independent metagenomics to aquifer sediments and groundwater, and reconstruct 2,540 draft-quality, near-complete and complete strain-resolved genomes that represent the majority of known bacterial phyla as well as 47 newly discovered phylum-level lineages. Metabolic analyses spanning this vast phylogenetic diversity and representing up to 36% of organisms detected in the system are used to document the distribution of pathways in coexisting organisms. Consistent with prior findings indicating metabolic handoffs in simple consortia, we find that few organisms within the community can conduct multiple sequential redox transformations. As environmental conditions change, different assemblages of organisms are selected for, altering linkages among the major biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27774985

  7. Multiscale Investigation on Biofilm Distribution and Its Impact on Macroscopic Biogeochemical Reaction Rates: BIOFILM DISTRIBUTION AND RATE SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng [Institute of Surface-Earth System Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen China; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; School of Earth Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Bailey, Vanessa L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms are critical locations for biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface environment. The occurrence and distribution of biofilms at microscale as well as their impacts on macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates are still poorly understood. This paper investigated the formation and distributions of biofilms in heterogeneous sediments using multiscale models, and evaluated the effects of biofilm heterogeneity on local and macroscopic biogeochemical reaction rates. Sediment pore structures derived from X-ray computed tomography were used to simulate the microscale flow dynamics and biofilm distribution in the sediment column. The response of biofilm formation and distribution to the variations in hydraulic and chemical properties was first examined. One representative biofilm distribution was then utilized to evaluate its effects on macroscopic reaction rates using nitrate reduction as an example. The results revealed that microorganisms primarily grew on the surfaces of grains and aggregates near preferential flow paths where both electron donor and acceptor were readily accessible, leading to the heterogeneous distribution of biofilms in the sediments. The heterogeneous biofilm distribution decreased the macroscopic rate of biogeochemical reactions as compared with those in homogeneous cases. Operationally considering the heterogeneous biofilm distribution in macroscopic reactive transport models such as using dual porosity domain concept can significantly improve the prediction of biogeochemical reaction rates. Overall, this study provided important insights into the biofilm formation and distribution in soils and sediments as well as their impacts on the macroscopic manifestation of reaction rates.

  8. Biogeochemical gradients above a coal tar DNAPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherr, Kerstin E., E-mail: kerstin.brandstaetter-scherr@boku.ac.at [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Department IFA-Tulln, Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Backes, Diana [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Department IFA-Tulln, Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Scarlett, Alan G. [University of Plymouth, Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, Biogeochemistry Research Centre, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Lantschbauer, Wolfgang [Government of Upper Austria, Directorate for Environment and Water Management, Division for Environmental Protection, Kärntner Strasse 10-12, 4021 Linz (Austria); Nahold, Manfred [GUT Gruppe Umwelt und Technik GmbH, Ingenieurbüro für Technischen Umweltschutz, Plesching 15, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2016-09-01

    absent or shrinking. - Highlights: • Redox conditions change from aerobic to methanogenic above coal tar DNAPL. • Steep vertical hydrocarbon, biogeochemical and microbial gradients observed • DNAPL impact on groundwater quality is vertically and horizontally highly confined. • Iron reducers absent despite bioavailability of Fe and Mn oxides • Oxygen and nitrate concentrations determine community composition over PAH.

  9. PISCES-v2: an ocean biogeochemical model for carbon and ecosystem studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Aumont

    2015-08-01

    of marine ecosystems (phytoplankton, microzooplankton and mesozooplankton and the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and of the main nutrients (P, N, Fe, and Si. The model is intended to be used for both regional and global configurations at high or low spatial resolutions as well as for short-term (seasonal, interannual and long-term (climate change, paleoceanography analyses. There are 24 prognostic variables (tracers including two phytoplankton compartments (diatoms and nanophytoplankton, two zooplankton size classes (microzooplankton and mesozooplankton and a description of the carbonate chemistry. Formulations in PISCES-v2 are based on a mixed Monod–quota formalism. On the one hand, stoichiometry of C / N / P is fixed and growth rate of phytoplankton is limited by the external availability in N, P and Si. On the other hand, the iron and silicon quotas are variable and the growth rate of phytoplankton is limited by the internal availability in Fe. Various parameterizations can be activated in PISCES-v2, setting, for instance, the complexity of iron chemistry or the description of particulate organic materials. So far, PISCES-v2 has been coupled to the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO and Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS systems. A full description of PISCES-v2 and of its optional functionalities is provided here. The results of a quasi-steady-state simulation are presented and evaluated against diverse observational and satellite-derived data. Finally, some of the new functionalities of PISCES-v2 are tested in a series of sensitivity experiments.

  10. Greater Reduction of Balance as a Result of Increased Plantar Fascia Elasticity at Ovulation during the Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Lee, Haneul

    2015-11-01

    One of the sexual hormones, estrogen, increases elasticity of human connective tissue such as the anterior cruciate ligament during the menstrual cycle in women. In the present investigation, the plantar fascia was investigated to see if there is a difference in elasticity with the menstrual cycle. Fifteen young healthy females in the age range of 18-35 years old with a regular menstrual cycle were tested twice throughout one full menstrual cycle; once during the early follicular phases and once at ovulation. Foot length, while standing on both feet and one foot were used to assess plantar fascia elasticity, ultrasound measured plantar fascia thickness while lying and standing, and posture sway and tremor using a balance platform during 8 different balance tests were assessed to see the impact of elasticity changes. Foot length increased significantly at ovulation compared to menstruation when standing on two feet (p = 0.03) and standing on one foot (p plantar fascia in thinning per kilogram weight applied to the foot at ovulation compared to menstruation (p = 0.014). Associated with this increase in elasticity at ovulation, there was a reduction in balance in the most difficult balance tasks and an increase in tremor during ovulation (p Plantar fascia elasticity change during the menstrual cycle might have effects on posture sway and tremor, which could have a potential risk of falling. Therefore, healthy professionals working with young female adults should recognize these physiological effects.

  11. Biogeochemical Processes Controlling Microbial Reductive Precipitation of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, James K.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2004-01-01

    This project is focused on elucidating the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentrations, chemical speciation, and distribution of the redox sensitive contaminants uranium (U) and technetium (Tc) between the aqueous and solid phases. The research is designed to provide new insights into the under-explored areas of competing geochemical and microbiological oxidation-reduction reactions that govern the fate and transport of redox sensitive contaminants and to generate fundamental scientific understanding of the identity and stoichiometry of competing microbial reduction and geochemical oxidation reactions. These goals and objectives are met through a series of hypothesis-driven tasks that focus on (1) the use of well-characterized microorganisms and synthetic and natural mineral oxidants, (2) advanced spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to monitor redox transformations of U and Tc, and (3) the use of flow-through experiments to more closely approximate groundwater environments. The results are providing an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the redox dynamics of radionuclides in subsurface environments. For purposes of this poster, the results are divided into three sections: (1) influence of Ca on U(VI) bioreduction; (2) localization of biogenic UO 2 and TcO 2 ; and (3) reactivity of Mn(III/IV) oxides.

  12. Dose estimation and prediction of radiation effects on aquatic biota resulting from radioactive releases from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to radionuclides released to the environment during various steps of the nuclear fuel cycle. Routine releases from these processes are limited in compliance with technical specifications and requirements of federal regulations. These regulations reflect I.C.R.P. recommendations which are designed to provide an environment considered safe for man. It is generally accepted that aquatic organisms will not receive damaging external radiation doses in such environments; however, because of possible bioaccumulation of radionuclides there is concern that aquatic organisms might be adversely affected by internal doses. The objectives of this paper are: to estimate the radiation dose received by aquatic biota from the different processes and determine the major dose-contributing radionuclides, and to assess the impact of estimated doses on aquatic biota. Dose estimates are made by using radionuclide concentration measured in the liquid effluents of representative facilities. This evaluation indicates the potential for the greatest radiation dose to aquatic biota from the nuclear fuel supply facilities (i.e., uranium mining and milling). The effects of chronic low-level radiation on aquatic organisms are discussed from somatic and genetic viewpoints. Based on the body of radiobiological evidence accumulated up to the present time, no significant deleterious effects are predicted for populations of aquatic organisms exposed to the estimated dose rates resulting from routine releases from conversion, enrichment, fabrication, reactors and reprocessing facilities. At the doses estimated for milling and mining operations it would be difficult to detect radiation effects on aquatic populations; however, the significance of such radiation exposures to aquatic populations cannot be fully evaluated without further research on effects of chronic low-level radiation. (U.S.)

  13. Mars Methane at Gale Crater Shows Strong Seasonal Cycle: Updated Results from TLS-SAM on Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Flesch, G.; Malespin, C.; McKay, C.; Martinez, G.; Moores, J.; Smith, C. L.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Zorzano, M. P.; Wong, M. H.; Trainer, M. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Glavin, D. P.; Steele, A.; Archer, D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Coll, P. J.; Freissinet, C.; Meslin, P. Y.; Pavlov, A.; Keymeulen, D.; Christensen, L. E.; Gough, R. V.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Pla-García, J.; Rafkin, S. C.; Vicente-Retortillo, Á.; Kahanpää, H.; Viudez-Moreiras, D.; Smith, M. D.; Harri, A. M.; Genzer, M.; Hassler, D.; Lemmon, M. T.; Crisp, J. A.; Zurek, R. W.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric methane have been made over a 5-year period at Gale Crater on Mars using the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) instrument in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on the Curiosity rover. We report two important observations: (i) a background level of mean value of 0.41 ±0.11 (2sem) that is about 5 times lower than some model predictions based on generation from UV degradation of micro-meteorites or interplanetary dust delivered to the martian surface; (ii) "spikes" of elevated levels of 7 ppbv attributed to episodic releases from small local sources, probably to the north of Gale crater1. Reports of plumes, patches or episodic releases of methane in the Martian atmosphere have to date eluded explanation in part because of their lack of repeatability in time or location. Our in situ measurements of the background methane levels exhibit a strong, repeatable seasonal variability. The amplitude of the observed seasonal cycle is 3 times greater than both that expected from the annual sublimation and freezing of polar carbon dioxide and that expected from methane production from ultraviolet (UV) degradation of exogenously-delivered surface material. The observed large seasonal variation in the background, and sporadic observations of higher pulses of 7 ppbv appear consistent with localized small sources of methane release from Martian surface reservoirs that may be occurring throughout the planet. We will present our updated data set, correlations of Mars methane with various other measurements from SAM, REMS, RAD and ChemCam instruments on Curiosity, as well as empirical models of UV surface insolation, and provide preliminary interpretation of results. 1 "Mars Methane Detection and Variability at Gale Crater", C. R. Webster et al., Science, 347, 415-417 (2015) and references therein. The research described here was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the

  14. Biogeochemical and Ecomorphological Niche Segregation of Mediterranean Woody Species along a Local Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique G. de la Riva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available According with niche theory the species are specialized in different ecological niches, being able to coexist as result of a differential use of resources. In this context, the biogeochemical niche hypothesis proposes that species have an optimal elemental composition which results from the link between the chemical and morphological traits for the optimum plant functioning. Thus, and attending to the limiting similarity concept, different elemental composition and plant structure among co-occurring species may reduce competition, promoting different functional niches. Different functional habits associated with leaf life-span or growth forms are associated with different strategies for resource uptake, which could promote niche partitioning. In the present study, based on the biogeochemical niche concept and the use of resources in different proportions, we have focused on leaf traits (morphological and chemical associated with resource uptake, and explored the niche partitioning among functional habits: leaf life-span (deciduous, evergreen, and semideciduous and growth (tree, shrub, and arborescent-shrub. To this end, we have quantified the hypervolume of the leaf functional trait space (both structure and chemical composition in a sample of 45 Mediterranean woody species from Sierra Morena Mountains (Spain growing along a local soil resource gradient. Our results show consistent variation in functional space for woody communities distributed along the environmental gradient. Thus, communities dominated by deciduous trees with faster growth and a predominant acquisitive strategy were characteristic of bottom forests and showed highest leaf biogeochemical space. While semideciduous shrubs and evergreen (arborescent, trees species, characterized by a conservative strategy, dominated ridge forests and showed smaller functional space. In addition, within each topographical zone or environment type, the foliar biogeochemical niche partitioning

  15. Biogeochemical and Ecomorphological Niche Segregation of Mediterranean Woody Species along a Local Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Riva, Enrique G; Marañón, Teodoro; Violle, Cyrille; Villar, Rafael; Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M

    2017-01-01

    According with niche theory the species are specialized in different ecological niches, being able to coexist as result of a differential use of resources. In this context, the biogeochemical niche hypothesis proposes that species have an optimal elemental composition which results from the link between the chemical and morphological traits for the optimum plant functioning. Thus, and attending to the limiting similarity concept, different elemental composition and plant structure among co-occurring species may reduce competition, promoting different functional niches. Different functional habits associated with leaf life-span or growth forms are associated with different strategies for resource uptake, which could promote niche partitioning. In the present study, based on the biogeochemical niche concept and the use of resources in different proportions, we have focused on leaf traits (morphological and chemical) associated with resource uptake, and explored the niche partitioning among functional habits: leaf life-span (deciduous, evergreen, and semideciduous) and growth (tree, shrub, and arborescent-shrub). To this end, we have quantified the hypervolume of the leaf functional trait space (both structure and chemical composition) in a sample of 45 Mediterranean woody species from Sierra Morena Mountains (Spain) growing along a local soil resource gradient. Our results show consistent variation in functional space for woody communities distributed along the environmental gradient. Thus, communities dominated by deciduous trees with faster growth and a predominant acquisitive strategy were characteristic of bottom forests and showed highest leaf biogeochemical space. While semideciduous shrubs and evergreen (arborescent, trees) species, characterized by a conservative strategy, dominated ridge forests and showed smaller functional space. In addition, within each topographical zone or environment type, the foliar biogeochemical niche partitioning would underlie the

  16. Defining Mediterranean and Black Sea biogeochemical subprovinces and synthetic ocean indicators using mesoscale oceanographic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieblas, Anne-Elise; Drushka, Kyla; Reygondeau, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    variables to define integrative indices to monitor the environmental changes within each resultant subprovince at monthly resolutions. Using both the classical and mesoscale features, we find five biogeochemical subprovinces for the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Interestingly, the use of mesoscale variables......The Mediterranean and Black Seas are semi-enclosed basins characterized by high environmental variability and growing anthropogenic pressure. This has led to an increasing need for a bioregionalization of the oceanic environment at local and regional scales that can be used for managerial...... applications as a geographical reference. We aim to identify biogeochemical subprovinces within this domain, and develop synthetic indices of the key oceanographic dynamics of each subprovince to quantify baselines from which to assess variability and change. To do this, we compile a data set of 101 months...

  17. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  18. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and female reproductive cycle events: results from the OCD and reproduction collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guglielmi, Valeria; Vulink, Nienke C. C.; Denys, Damiaan; Wang, Ying; Samuels, Jack F.; Nestadt, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Women with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often report that symptoms first appear or exacerbate during reproductive cycle events; however, little is known about these relationships. The goals of this study were to examine, in a US and a European female OCD sample, onset and exacerbation of OCD

  19. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; Thomas, Brian C; Baker, Brett J; Piceno, Yvette M; Andersen, Gary L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-01-19

    Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of the Acetothermia (OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylum Parcubacteria (OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, including Microgenomates (OP11), Atribacteria (OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, and Marinimicrobia (SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes. The activities of microorganisms in oil reservoirs impact petroleum resource quality and the global carbon cycle. We show that bacteria

  20. Development and review of Euro 5 passenger car emission factors based on experimental results over various driving cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaras, Georgios; Franco, Vicente; Dilara, Panagiota; Martini, Giorgio; Manfredi, Urbano

    2014-01-15

    The emissions of CO2 and regulated pollutants (NOx, HC, CO, PM) of thirteen Euro 5 compliant passenger cars (seven gasoline, six Diesel) were measured on a chassis dynamometer. The vehicles were driven repeatedly over the European type-approval driving cycle (NEDC) and the more dynamic WMTC and CADC driving cycles. Distance-specific emission factors were derived for each pollutant and sub-cycle, and these were subsequently compared to the corresponding emission factors provided by the reference European models used for vehicle emission inventory compilation (COPERT and HBEFA) and put in context with the applicable European emission limits. The measured emissions stayed below the legal emission limits when the type-approval cycle (NEDC) was used. Over the more dynamic cycles (considered more representative of real-world driving) the emissions were consistently higher but in most cases remained below the type-approval limit. The high NOx emissions of Diesel vehicles under real-world driving conditions remain the main cause for environmental concern regarding the emission profile of Euro 5 passenger cars. Measured emissions of NOx exceeded the type-approval limits (up to 5 times in extreme cases) and presented significantly increased average values (0.35 g/km for urban driving and 0.56 g/km for motorway driving). The comparison with the reference models showed good correlation in all cases, a positive finding considering the importance of these tools in emission monitoring and policy-making processes. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogeological and biogeochemical constrains of arsenic mobilization in shallow aquifers from the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Huaming; Zhang Bo; Li Yuan; Berner, Zsolt; Tang Xiaohui; Norra, Stefan; Stueben, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the importance of drainage/irrigation channels and biogeochemical processes in arsenic distribution of shallow groundwaters from the Hetao basin. This investigation shows that although As concentrations are primarily dependent on reducing conditions, evaporation increases As concentration in the centre of palaeo-lake sedimentation. Near drainage channels, groundwater As concentrations are the lowest in suboxic-weakly reducing conditions. Results demonstrate that both drainage and irrigation channels produce oxygen-rich water that recharges shallow groundwaters and therefore immobilize As. Groundwater As concentration increases with a progressive decrease in redox potential along the flow path in an alluvial fan. A negative correlation between SO 4 2- concentrations and δ 34 S values indicates that bacterial reduction of SO 4 2- occurs in reducing aquifers. Due to high concentrations of Fe (>0.5 mg L -1 ), reductive dissolution of Fe oxides is believed to cause As release from aquifer sediments. Target aquifers for safe drinking water resources are available in alluvial fans and near irrigation channels. - Research highlights: → Low As groundwaters occur in alluvial fans. → We find low As groundwaters near irrigation and drainage channels. → Both hydrogeologic conditions and biogeochemical processes control As distribution. - Both hydrogeologic conditions and biogeochemical processes control As distribution of shallow groundwaters, which results in the occurrence of low As groundwater in alluvial fans and near irrigation channels and drainage channels.

  2. Hydrological and associated biogeochemical consequences of rapid global warming during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Matthew J.; Inglis, Gordon N.; Badger, Marcus P. S.; Naafs, B. David A.; Behrooz, Leila; Remmelzwaal, Serginio; Monteiro, Fanny M.; Rohrssen, Megan; Farnsworth, Alexander; Buss, Heather L.; Dickson, Alexander J.; Valdes, Paul J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pancost, Richard D.

    2017-10-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) hyperthermal, 56 million years ago (Ma), is the most dramatic example of abrupt Cenozoic global warming. During the PETM surface temperatures increased between 5 and 9 °C and the onset likely took hydrological and associated biogeochemical feedbacks, and proxy data from the PETM can provide constraints on changes in warm climate hydrology simulated by general circulation models (GCMs). In this paper, we provide a critical review of biological and geochemical signatures interpreted as direct or indirect indicators of hydrological change at the PETM, explore the importance of adopting multi-proxy approaches, and present a preliminary model-data comparison. Hydrological records complement those of temperature and indicate that the climatic response at the PETM was complex, with significant regional and temporal variability. This is further illustrated by the biogeochemical consequences of inferred changes in hydrology and, in fact, changes in precipitation and the biogeochemical consequences are often conflated in geochemical signatures. There is also strong evidence in many regions for changes in the episodic and/or intra-annual distribution of precipitation that has not widely been considered when comparing proxy data to GCM output. Crucially, GCM simulations indicate that the response of the hydrological cycle to the PETM was heterogeneous - some regions are associated with increased precipitation - evaporation (P - E), whilst others are characterised by a decrease. Interestingly, the majority of proxy data come from the regions where GCMs predict an increase in PETM precipitation. We propose that comparison of hydrological proxies to GCM output can be an important test of model skill, but this will be enhanced by further data from regions of model-simulated aridity and simulation of extreme precipitation events.

  3. Differences in labour participation between people living with HIV and the general population: Results from Spain along the business cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Longobardo, Luz María; Oliva-Moreno, Juan

    2018-01-01

    HIV/AIDS (Human immunodeficiency virus/Acquired immune deficiency syndrome) not only has a strong impact on the health of the worldwide population but also affects the labour status of HIV-positive people. The primary aim of this paper is to compare the labour participation of people living with HIV (PlwHIV) with the labour participation of the general population along the last business cycle in Spain. The data used are from the Hospital Survey on HIV-AIDS, with a total sample size of 4,651 PlwHIV and the Labour Force Survey from 2001 to 2010, with a total sample size of 660,674 individuals as general population. Propensity Score Matching method was used to analyse the differences between the labour participation of PlwHIV and the general population. Additionally, several specific models categorised into different subgroups (gender, education, source of infection and level of defences) were also performed. We identified a convergence in labour participation across the period in the two populations considered: PlwHIV was 23% less likely to have a job than the general population during 2001-2002 and 14% less likely during 2009-2010. This convergence is mainly explained by two facts: first, the positive evolution of people infected by sex; second, the change in the PlwHIV population composition with a decreasing weight of people infected by drug use throughout the decade. Thereby, at the end of period, there was no statistical difference in the employment rate between PlwHIV infected through sex and the general population but there was strongly difference in PlwHIV infected through drugs. Inmunological status, source of infection and level of education play a relevant role among the PlwHIV population when comparing their labour participation with the general population. In spite of this positive result, the likelihood of being employed in HIV-positive people continues to be different from that of non-carriers. Our study shows that institutional features of labour

  4. A state-space Bayesian framework for estimating biogeochemical transformations using time-lapse geophysical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Pride, S.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.; Slater, L.

    2009-04-15

    We develop a state-space Bayesian framework to combine time-lapse geophysical data with other types of information for quantitative estimation of biogeochemical parameters during bioremediation. We consider characteristics of end-products of biogeochemical transformations as state vectors, which evolve under constraints of local environments through evolution equations, and consider time-lapse geophysical data as available observations, which could be linked to the state vectors through petrophysical models. We estimate the state vectors and their associated unknown parameters over time using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods. To demonstrate the use of the state-space approach, we apply it to complex resistivity data collected during laboratory column biostimulation experiments that were poised to precipitate iron and zinc sulfides during sulfate reduction. We develop a petrophysical model based on sphere-shaped cells to link the sulfide precipitate properties to the time-lapse geophysical attributes and estimate volume fraction of the sulfide precipitates, fraction of the dispersed, sulfide-encrusted cells, mean radius of the aggregated clusters, and permeability over the course of the experiments. Results of the case study suggest that the developed state-space approach permits the use of geophysical datasets for providing quantitative estimates of end-product characteristics and hydrological feedbacks associated with biogeochemical transformations. Although tested here on laboratory column experiment datasets, the developed framework provides the foundation needed for quantitative field-scale estimation of biogeochemical parameters over space and time using direct, but often sparse wellbore data with indirect, but more spatially extensive geophysical datasets.

  5. An approach to quantify sources, seasonal change, and biogeochemical processes affecting metal loading in streams: Facilitating decisions for remediation of mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.A.; Runkel, R.L.; Walton-Day, K.

    2010-01-01

    Historical mining has left complex problems in catchments throughout the world. Land managers are faced with making cost-effective plans to remediate mine influences. Remediation plans are facilitated by spatial mass-loading profiles that indicate the locations of metal mass-loading, seasonal changes, and the extent of biogeochemical processes. Field-scale experiments during both low- and high-flow conditions and time-series data over diel cycles illustrate how this can be accomplished. A low-flow experiment provided spatially detailed loading profiles to indicate where loading occurred. For example, SO42 - was principally derived from sources upstream from the study reach, but three principal locations also were important for SO42 - loading within the reach. During high-flow conditions, Lagrangian sampling provided data to interpret seasonal changes and indicated locations where snowmelt runoff flushed metals to the stream. Comparison of metal concentrations between the low- and high-flow experiments indicated substantial increases in metal loading at high flow, but little change in metal concentrations, showing that toxicity at the most downstream sampling site was not substantially greater during snowmelt runoff. During high-flow conditions, a detailed temporal sampling at fixed sites indicated that Zn concentration more than doubled during the diel cycle. Monitoring programs must account for diel variation to provide meaningful results. Mass-loading studies during different flow conditions and detailed time-series over diel cycles provide useful scientific support for stream management decisions.

  6. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations associated with Cr(VI) Bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth H.; Conrad, Mark E.; Faybishenko, Boris; Peterson, John; Chen, Jinsong; Long, Philip E.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding how hydrological and biogeochemical properties change over space and time in response to remedial treatments is hindered by our ability to monitor these processes with sufficient resolution and over field relevant scales. Here, we explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations associated with a Cr(VI)bioremediation experiment performed at Hanford, WA. We first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic datasets to estimate hydrological zonation at the study site. Using results from laboratory biogeophysical experiments and constraints provided by field geochemical datasets, we then interpreted time-lapse seismic and radar tomographic datasets, collected during thirteen acquisition campaigns over a three year experimental period, in terms of hydrological and biogeochemical transformations. The geophysical monitoring datasets were used to infer: the spatial distribution of injected electron donor; the evolution of gas bubbles; variations in total dissolved solids (nitrate and sulfate) as a function of pumping activity; the formation of precipitates and dissolution of calcites; and concomitant changes in porosity. Although qualitative in nature, the integrated interpretation illustrates how geophysical techniques have the potential to provide a wealth of information about coupled hydrobiogeochemical responses to remedial treatments in high spatial resolution and in a minimally invasive manner. Particularly novel aspects of our study include the use of multiple lines of evidence to constrain the interpretation of a long-term, field-scale geophysical monitoring dataset and the interpretation of the transformations as a function of hydrological heterogeneity and pumping activity

  7. Error assessment of biogeochemical models by lower bound methods (NOMMA-1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerland, Volkmar; Löptien, Ulrike; Leonhard, Claudine; Oschlies, Andreas; Srivastav, Anand

    2018-03-01

    Biogeochemical models, capturing the major feedbacks of the pelagic ecosystem of the world ocean, are today often embedded into Earth system models which are increasingly used for decision making regarding climate policies. These models contain poorly constrained parameters (e.g., maximum phytoplankton growth rate), which are typically adjusted until the model shows reasonable behavior. Systematic approaches determine these parameters by minimizing the misfit between the model and observational data. In most common model approaches, however, the underlying functions mimicking the biogeochemical processes are nonlinear and non-convex. Thus, systematic optimization algorithms are likely to get trapped in local minima and might lead to non-optimal results. To judge the quality of an obtained parameter estimate, we propose determining a preferably large lower bound for the global optimum that is relatively easy to obtain and that will help to assess the quality of an optimum, generated by an optimization algorithm. Due to the unavoidable noise component in all observations, such a lower bound is typically larger than zero. We suggest deriving such lower bounds based on typical properties of biogeochemical models (e.g., a limited number of extremes and a bounded time derivative). We illustrate the applicability of the method with two real-world examples. The first example uses real-world observations of the Baltic Sea in a box model setup. The second example considers a three-dimensional coupled ocean circulation model in combination with satellite chlorophyll a.

  8. Error assessment of biogeochemical models by lower bound methods (NOMMA-1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sauerland

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogeochemical models, capturing the major feedbacks of the pelagic ecosystem of the world ocean, are today often embedded into Earth system models which are increasingly used for decision making regarding climate policies. These models contain poorly constrained parameters (e.g., maximum phytoplankton growth rate, which are typically adjusted until the model shows reasonable behavior. Systematic approaches determine these parameters by minimizing the misfit between the model and observational data. In most common model approaches, however, the underlying functions mimicking the biogeochemical processes are nonlinear and non-convex. Thus, systematic optimization algorithms are likely to get trapped in local minima and might lead to non-optimal results. To judge the quality of an obtained parameter estimate, we propose determining a preferably large lower bound for the global optimum that is relatively easy to obtain and that will help to assess the quality of an optimum, generated by an optimization algorithm. Due to the unavoidable noise component in all observations, such a lower bound is typically larger than zero. We suggest deriving such lower bounds based on typical properties of biogeochemical models (e.g., a limited number of extremes and a bounded time derivative. We illustrate the applicability of the method with two real-world examples. The first example uses real-world observations of the Baltic Sea in a box model setup. The second example considers a three-dimensional coupled ocean circulation model in combination with satellite chlorophyll a.

  9. A nonlinear look at trend MFP growth and the business cycle: result from a hybrid Kalman/Markov switching model

    OpenAIRE

    Mark W. French

    2005-01-01

    The cycle in output and hours worked is not symmetric: it behaves differently around recessions than in expansions. Similarly, the trend in multifactor productivity (MFP) seems to pass through different regimes; there was an extended period of slow MFP growth from about 1973 through 1995, and faster growth thereafter. Typical linear models and linear filters such as the Kalman filter deal poorly with asymmetry and regime changes. This paper attempts to determine more accurately and quickly an...

  10. The Environmental Consequences of Altered Nitrogen Cycling Resulting from Industrial Activity, Agricultural Production, and Population Growth in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, G.X.; Zhu, Z.L.

    2001-01-01

    Human activities exerted very little effect on nitrogen (N) cycling in China before 1949. Between 1949 and 1999, however, rapid economic development and population growth led to dramatic changes in anthropogenic reactive N, inputted recycling N, N flux on land, N2O emission, and NH3 volatilization. Consequently, these changes have had a tremendous impact on the environment in China. In the current study, we estimated the amount of atmospheric wet N deposition and N transportation into water b...

  11. Test results of an organic Rankine-cycle power module for a small community solar thermal power experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    The organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power conversion assembly was tested. Qualification testing of the electrical transport subsystem was also completed. Test objectives were to verify compatibility of all system elements with emphasis on control of the power conversion assembly, to evaluate the performance and efficiency of the components, and to validate operating procedures. After 34 hours of power generation under a wide range of conditions, the net module efficiency exceeded 18% after accounting for all parasitic losses.

  12. In-Class Cycling to Augment College Student Academic Performance and Reduce Physical Inactivity: Results from an RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanae Joubert

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Most college students sit 14 hours per week on average, excluding sedentary study time. Researchers observing workplace and elementary school settings with active workstations to combat sedentary behavior have shown enhanced cognition without distraction. Until now, incorporating active workstations in college classroom settings remained relatively unexplored. This study’s purpose was to assess academic performance using in-class stationary cycle desks during a semester-long lecture course. Twenty-one college students (19–24 years enrolled in a lecture course volunteered and were split into traditional sit (SIT and stationary cycle (CYC groups randomly, matched on a calculated factor equal to a physical activity (PA score (0–680 multiplied by grade point average (GPA; 4.0 scale. CYC pedaled a prescribed rate of perceived exertion (RPE of less than 2 out of 10 during a 50-min lecture, 3 × week for 12 weeks. CYC averaged 42 min, 7.9 miles, and 1.7 RPE during class throughout the semester. No significant differences (p > 0.05 were observed between CYC and SIT on in-class test scores or overall course grades. Although statistically insignificant, CYC had higher mean test scores and overall course grades vs. SIT (i.e., B+ vs. B, respectively. Low intensity cycling during a college lecture course maintained student academic performance and possibly reduced weekly sedentary behavior time.

  13. Biogeochemical aspects of uranium mineralization, mining, milling, and remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate M.; Gallegos, Tanya J.; Landa, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural uranium (U) occurs as a mixture of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Only 235U is fissionable and makes up about 0.7% of natural U, while 238U is overwhelmingly the most abundant at greater than 99% of the total mass of U. Prior to the 1940s, U was predominantly used as a coloring agent, and U-bearing ores were mined mainly for their radium (Ra) and/or vanadium (V) content; the bulk of the U was discarded with the tailings (Finch et al., 1972). Once nuclear fission was discovered, the economic importance of U increased greatly. The mining and milling of U-bearing ores is the first step in the nuclear fuel cycle, and the contact of residual waste with natural water is a potential source of contamination of U and associated elements to the environment. Uranium is mined by three basic methods: surface (open pit), underground, and solution mining (in situ leaching or in situ recovery), depending on the deposit grade, size, location, geology and economic considerations (Abdelouas, 2006). Solid wastes at U mill tailings (UMT) sites can include both standard tailings (i.e., leached ore rock residues) and solids generated on site by waste treatment processes. The latter can include sludge or “mud” from neutralization of acidic mine/mill effluents, containing Fe and a range of coprecipitated constituents, or barium sulfate precipitates that selectively remove Ra (e.g., Carvalho et al., 2007). In this chapter, we review the hydrometallurgical processes by which U is extracted from ore, the biogeochemical processes that can affect the fate and transport of U and associated elements in the environment, and possible remediation strategies for site closure and aquifer restoration.This paper represents the fourth in a series of review papers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on geochemical aspects of UMT management that span more than three decades. The first paper (Landa, 1980) in this series is a primer on the nature of tailings and radionuclide

  14. Benthic flux of dissolved organic matter from lake sediment at different redox conditions and the possible effects of biogeochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyang; Choi, Jung Hyun; Hur, Jin

    2014-09-15

    The benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM) were studied for the sediment from an artificial lake, based on laboratory benthic chamber experiments. Conservative estimates for the benthic flux of DOC were 71 ± 142 and 51 ± 101 mg m(-2) day(-1) at hypoxic and oxic conditions, respectively. Two humic-like (C1 and C2), one tryptophan-like (C3), and one microbial humic-like (C4) components were identified from the samples using fluorescence excitation emission matrices and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). During the incubation period, C3 was removed while C4 was accumulated in the overlying water with no significant difference in the trends between the redox conditions. The humification index (HIX) increased with time. The combined results for C3, C4 and HIX suggested that microbial transformation may be an important process affecting the flux behaviors of DOM. In contrast, the overall accumulations of CDOM, C1, and C2 in the overlying water occurred only for the hypoxic condition, which was possibly explained by their enhanced photo-degradation and sorption to redox-sensitive minerals under the oxic condition. Our study demonstrated significant benthic flux of DOM in lake sediment and also the possible involvement of biogeochemical transformation in the processes, providing insight into carbon cycling in inland waters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling Biogeochemical-Physical Interactions and Carbon Flux in the Sargasso Sea (Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Sergio R.; McClain, Charles R.; Christian, James R.

    2001-01-01

    An ecosystem-carbon cycle model is used to analyze the biogeochemical-physical interactions and carbon fluxes in the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site for the period of 1992-1998. The model results compare well with observations (most variables are within 8% of observed values). The sea-air flux ranges from -0.32 to -0.50 mol C/sq m/yr, depending upon the gas transfer algorithm used. This estimate is within the range (-0.22 to -0.83 mol C/sq m/yr) of previously reported values which indicates that the BATS region is a weak sink of atmospheric CO2. The overall carbon balance consists of atmospheric CO2 uptake of 0.3 Mol C/sq m/yr, upward dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) bottom flux of 1.1 Mol C/sq m/yr, and carbon export of 1.4 mol C/sq m/yr via sedimentation. Upper ocean DIC levels increased between 1992 and 1996 at a rate of approximately 1.2 (micro)mol/kg/yr, consistent with observations. However, this trend was reversed during 1997-1998 to -2.7 (micro)mol/kg/yr in response to hydrographic changes imposed by the El Nino-La Nina transition, which were manifested in the Sargasso Sea by the warmest SST and lowest surface salinity of the period (1992-1998).

  16. Climate Change Impacts on the Organic Carbon Cycle at the Land-Ocean Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuel, E. A.; Cammer, S. S.; McIntosh, H.; Pondell, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Humans have modified estuaries across the globe by altering the delivery of water, sediments and elements such as carbon and nitrogen that play important roles in biogeochemical processes. These activities have caused declines in the health and quality of estuarine ecosystems globally and this trend will likely continue due to increasing population growth in coastal regions, expected changes associated with climate change, and their interaction with each other, leading to serious consequences for the ecological and societal services they provide. A key function of estuaries is the transfer and transformation of carbon and biogenic elements between land and ocean systems. The anticipated effects of climate change on biogeochemical processes in estuaries are likely to be both numerous and complex but are poorly understood. Climate change has the potential to influence the carbon cycle in estuaries through anticipated changes to organic matter production, transformation, burial and export. Estuarine biogeochemical processes will likely be altered by: 1) sea level rise and increased storm intensity which will amplify the erosion and transfer of terrigenous materials, 2) increases in water temperatures which will enhance the rates of biological and biogeochemical processes (e.g., enzyme kinetics, decomposition rates, and remineralization), while simultaneously decreasing the concentration of dissolved oxygen, 3) changes in particle (or sediment) loadings in response to altered patterns of precipitation and river runoff, and 4) altered inputs of nutrients and dissolved organic materials to coastal waters, also resulting from changing precipitation and runoff. In this presentation, we review the effects of climate change on the carbon cycle in estuaries, with a focus on the temperate estuaries of North America.

  17. Lipids as paleomarkers to constrain the marine nitrogen cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rush, Darci; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    Global climate is, in part, regulated by the effect of microbial processes on biogeochemical cycling. The nitrogen cycle, in particular, is driven by microorganisms responsible for the fixation and loss of nitrogen, and the reduction-oxidation transformations of bio-available nitrogen. Within marine

  18. Lipids as paleomarkers to constrain the marine nitrogen cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rush, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2017-01-01

    Global climate is, in part, regulated by the effect of microbial processes on biogeochemical cycling. The nitrogen cycle, in particular, is driven by microorganisms responsible for the fixation and loss of nitrogen, and the reduction-oxidation transformations of bio-available nitrogen. Within marine

  19. Structure of peat soils and implications for biogeochemical processes and hydrological flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanezhad, F.; McCarter, C. P. R.; Gharedaghloo, B.; Kleimeier, C.; Milojevic, T.; Liu, H.; Weber, T. K. D.; Price, J. S.; Quinton, W. L.; Lenartz, B.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost peatlands contain globally important amounts of soil organic carbon and play major roles in global water, nutrient and biogeochemical cycles. The structure of peatland soils (i.e., peat) are highly complex with unique physical and hydraulic properties; where significant, and only partially reversible, shrinkage occurs during dewatering (including water table fluctuations), compression and/or decomposition. These distinct physical and hydraulic properties controls water flow, which in turn affect reactive and non-reactive solute transport (such as, sorption or degradation) and biogeochemical functions. Additionally, peat further attenuates solute migration through molecular diffusion into the inactive pores of Sphagnum dominated peat. These slow, diffusion-limited solute exchanges between the pore regions may give rise to pore-scale chemical gradients and heterogeneous distributions of microbial habitats and activity in peat soils. Permafrost peat plateaus have the same essential subsurface characteristics as other widely organic soil-covered peatlands, where the hydraulic conductivity is related to the degree of decomposition and soil compression. Increasing levels of decomposition correspond with a reduction of effective pore diameter and consequently restrict water and solute flow (by several orders of magnitude in hydraulic conductivity between the ground surface and a depth of 50 cm). In this presentation, we present the current knowledge of key physical and hydraulic properties related to the structure of globally available peat soils and discuss their implications for water storage, flow and the migration of solutes.

  20. Biogeochemical studies of technetium in marine and estuarine ecosystems. Progress report, 1 July 1980-31 July 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beasley, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes progress from July 1980 through July 1981 on studies dealing with the biogeochemical behavior of technetium in marine and estuarine ecosystems. While the duration of the research has been slightly over two years, the results of our experiments have substantially extended our understanding of the environmental behavior of Tc

  1. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    mobility was monitored using a γ-camera. Incorporation of low concentrations of the long-lived 99Tc gave a tracer that can be followed by scintillation counting, should the metastable form of the radionuclide decay to below detection limits before the end of the experiment (complete immobilization or loss of the Tc from the column). After the Tc was reduced and immobilized, or passed through the system, the columns were dismantled carefully in an anaerobic cabinet and the pore water geochemistry and mineralogy of the columns profiled. Microbial community analysis was determined, again using molecular and culture-dependent techniques. Experimental results were also modeled using an established coupled speciation and transport code, to develop a predictive tool for the mobility of Tc in FRC sediments. From this multidisciplinary approach, we hoped to obtain detailed information on the microorganisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of key elements at the FRC, and we would also be able to determine the key factors that control the mobility of Tc at environmentally relevant concentrations at this site.

  2. Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan R. Lloyd

    2009-02-03

    -200 MBq; half life 6 hours) and its mobility was monitored using a {gamma}-camera. Incorporation of low concentrations of the long-lived 99Tc gave a tracer that can be followed by scintillation counting, should the metastable form of the radionuclide decay to below detection limits before the end of the experiment (complete immobilization or loss of the Tc from the column). After the Tc was reduced and immobilized, or passed through the system, the columns were dismantled carefully in an anaerobic cabinet and the pore water geochemistry and mineralogy of the columns profiled. Microbial community analysis was determined, again using molecular and culture-dependent techniques. Experimental results were also modeled using an established coupled speciation and transport code, to develop a predictive tool for the mobility of Tc in FRC sediments. From this multidisciplinary approach, we hoped to obtain detailed information on the microorganisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of key elements at the FRC, and we would also be able to determine the key factors that control the mobility of Tc at environmentally relevant concentrations at this site.

  3. Biogeochemical response to widespread anoxia in the past ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruvalcaba Baroni, I.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is a key element for life on earth. Oxygen concentrations in the ocean vary greatly in space and time. These changes are regulated by various physical and biogeochemical processes, such as primary productivity, sea surface temperatures and ocean circulation. In the geological past, several

  4. The effect of biogeochemical processes on pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Hofmann, A.F.; Middelburg, J.J.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Greenwood, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of biogeochemical and physical processes on aquatic chemistry is usually expressed in terms of alkalinity. Here we show how to directly calculate the effect of single processes on pH. Under the assumptions of equilibrium and electroneutrality, the rate of change of pH can be calculated as

  5. Determining greenhouse gas balances of biomass fuel cycles. Results to date from task 15 of IEA bio-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlamadinger, B.; Spitzer, J.

    1997-01-01

    Selected activities of IEA Bio-energy Task 15 are described. Task 15 of IEA Bio-energy, entitled 'Greenhouse Gas Balances of Bio-energy Systems', aims at investigating processes involved in the use of bio-energy systems on a full fuel-cycle basis to establish overall greenhouse gas balances. The work of Task 15 includes, among other things, a compilation of existing data on greenhouse gas emissions from various biomass production and conversion processes, a standard methodology for greenhouse gas balances of bio-energy systems, a bibliography, and recommendations for selection of appropriate national strategies for greenhouse gas mitigation. (K.A.)

  6. Improving National Capability in Biogeochemical Flux Modelling: the UK Environmental Virtual Observatory (EVOp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnes, P.; Greene, S.; Freer, J. E.; Bloomfield, J.; Macleod, K.; Reaney, S. M.; Odoni, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    The best outcomes from watershed management arise where policy and mitigation efforts are underpinned by strong science evidence, but there are major resourcing problems associated with the scale of monitoring needed to effectively characterise the sources rates and impacts of nutrient enrichment nationally. The challenge is to increase national capability in predictive modelling of nutrient flux to waters, securing an effective mechanism for transferring knowledge and management tools from data-rich to data-poor regions. The inadequacy of existing tools and approaches to address these challenges provided the motivation for the Environmental Virtual Observatory programme (EVOp), an innovation from the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). EVOp is exploring the use of a cloud-based infrastructure in catchment science, developing an exemplar to explore N and P fluxes to inland and coastal waters in the UK from grid to catchment and national scale. EVOp is bringing together for the first time national data sets, models and uncertainty analysis into cloud computing environments to explore and benchmark current predictive capability for national scale biogeochemical modelling. The objective is to develop national biogeochemical modelling capability, capitalising on extensive national investment in the development of science understanding and modelling tools to support integrated catchment management, and supporting knowledge transfer from data rich to data poor regions, The AERC export coefficient model (Johnes et al., 2007) has been adapted to function within the EVOp cloud environment, and on a geoclimatic basis, using a range of high resolution, geo-referenced digital datasets as an initial demonstration of the enhanced national capacity for N and P flux modelling using cloud computing infrastructure. Geoclimatic regions are landscape units displaying homogenous or quasi-homogenous functional behaviour in terms of process controls on N and P cycling

  7. Results of an analysis of in-core measurements during the first core cycle of the Greifswald nuclear power plant, unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehre, G.

    1982-01-01

    First results of an analysis of flux and temperature values obtained from the in-core system in the third unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant during the first core cycle are presented. The analysis has been performed with the aid of the computer code INCA. Possibilities and limits of this code are shown. (author)

  8. Diel cycling of zinc in a stream impacted by acid rock drainage: Initial results from a new in situ Zn analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, T.P.; Nimick, D.A.; Gammons, C.H.; Wanty, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that many trace metals undergo dramatic diel (24-h) cycles in near neutral pH streams with metal concentrations reproducibly changing up to 500% during the diel period (Nimick et al., 2003). To examine diel zinc cycles in streams affected by acid rock drainage, we have developed a novel instrument, the Zn-DigiScan, to continuously monitor in situ zinc concentrations in near real-time. Initial results from a 3-day deployment at Fisher Creek, Montana have demonstrated the ability of the Zn-DigiScan to record diel Zn cycling at levels below 100 ??g/l. Longer deployments of this instrument could be used to examine the effects of episodic events such as rainstorms and snowmelt pulses on zinc loading in streams affected by acid rock drainage. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  9. Variation of Supergranule Parameters with Solar Cycles: Results from Century-long Kodaikanal Digitized Ca ii K Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Subhamoy; Mandal, Sudip; Banerjee, Dipankar, E-mail: dipu@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India)

    2017-06-01

    The Ca ii K spectroheliograms spanning over a century (1907–2007) from Kodaikanal Solar Observatory, India, have recently been digitized and calibrated. Applying a fully automated algorithm (which includes contrast enhancement and the “Watershed method”) to these data, we have identified the supergranules and calculated the associated parameters, such as scale, circularity, and fractal dimension. We have segregated the quiet and active regions and obtained the supergranule parameters separately for these two domains. In this way, we have isolated the effect of large-scale and small-scale magnetic fields on these structures and find a significantly different behavior of the supergranule parameters over solar cycles. These differences indicate intrinsic changes in the physical mechanism behind the generation and evolution of supergranules in the presence of small-scale and large-scale magnetic fields. This also highlights the need for further studies using solar dynamo theory along with magneto-convection models.

  10. Modeling effects of cadmium on population growth of Palaemonetes pugio: Results of a full life cycle exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manyin, Teresa; Rowe, Christopher L.

    2008-01-01

    In an 8-month laboratory experiment, Palaemonetes pugio (grass shrimp) were exposed to aqueous cadmium (free cadmium ion concentrations of 1.51 or 2.51 μg Cd 2+ /L) for an entire life cycle, from larva to reproductive adult and through to production of second-generation larva. Individual-level effects on survival, life stage duration, and reproduction were measured, and population growth was projected using two models: a stage-based matrix model and a z-transformed life cycle graph analysis. Adult survival was significantly reduced at 2.51 μg Cd 2+ /L, but cadmium exposure had no effects on survival or stage duration of embryos, larvae, or juveniles. Survival of second-generation larvae was unaffected by maternal exposure. Brood size was reduced by 27% at 1.51 μg Cd 2+ /L and by 36% at 2.51 μg Cd 2+ /L. The percent of females in the population that was gravid was approximately 50% lower at 2.51 μg Cd 2+ /L, compared to controls. Both population models projected a dose-dependent decrease in population growth rate (λ), up to a 12% reduction at 2.51 μg Cd 2+ /L, which can be attributed mainly to contributions from reproductive effects. Elasticity analysis revealed that population growth rate was most sensitive to changes in survival of juveniles and adults. However, lethal effects of cadmium made only a small contribution to the effect on population growth rate. Even though both models project positive growth (λ > 1) of grass shrimp populations exposed to low concentrations of cadmium, the ability of populations to withstand predation pressure would be compromised

  11. Modeling effects of cadmium on population growth of Palaemonetes pugio: Results of a full life cycle exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manyin, Teresa [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, PO Box 38, 1 Williams Street, Solomons, MD 20688 (United States)], E-mail: manyin@cbl.umces.edu; Rowe, Christopher L. [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, PO Box 38, 1 Williams Street, Solomons, MD 20688 (United States)

    2008-06-23

    In an 8-month laboratory experiment, Palaemonetes pugio (grass shrimp) were exposed to aqueous cadmium (free cadmium ion concentrations of 1.51 or 2.51 {mu}g Cd{sup 2+}/L) for an entire life cycle, from larva to reproductive adult and through to production of second-generation larva. Individual-level effects on survival, life stage duration, and reproduction were measured, and population growth was projected using two models: a stage-based matrix model and a z-transformed life cycle graph analysis. Adult survival was significantly reduced at 2.51 {mu}g Cd{sup 2+}/L, but cadmium exposure had no effects on survival or stage duration of embryos, larvae, or juveniles. Survival of second-generation larvae was unaffected by maternal exposure. Brood size was reduced by 27% at 1.51 {mu}g Cd{sup 2+}/L and by 36% at 2.51 {mu}g Cd{sup 2+}/L. The percent of females in the population that was gravid was approximately 50% lower at 2.51 {mu}g Cd{sup 2+}/L, compared to controls. Both population models projected a dose-dependent decrease in population growth rate ({lambda}), up to a 12% reduction at 2.51 {mu}g Cd{sup 2+}/L, which can be attributed mainly to contributions from reproductive effects. Elasticity analysis revealed that population growth rate was most sensitive to changes in survival of juveniles and adults. However, lethal effects of cadmium made only a small contribution to the effect on population growth rate. Even though both models project positive growth ({lambda} > 1) of grass shrimp populations exposed to low concentrations of cadmium, the ability of populations to withstand predation pressure would be compromised.

  12. Sensitivity of global ocean biogeochemical dynamics to ecosystem structure in a future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manizza, Manfredi; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Le Quéré, Corinne

    2010-07-01

    Terrestrial and oceanic ecosystem components of the Earth System models (ESMs) are key to predict the future behavior of the global carbon cycle. Ocean ecosystem models represent low complexity compared to terrestrial ecosystem models. In this study we use two ocean biogeochemical models based on the explicit representation of multiple planktonic functional types. We impose to the models the same future physical perturbation and compare the response of ecosystem dynamics, export production (EP) and ocean carbon uptake (OCU) to the same physical changes. Models comparison shows that: (1) EP changes directly translate into changes of OCU on decadal time scale, (2) the representation of ecosystem structure plays a pivotal role at linking OCU and EP, (3) OCU is highly sensitive to representation of ecosystem in the Equatorial Pacific and Southern Oceans.

  13. Assessment of the GHG Reduction Potential from Energy Crops Using a Combined LCA and Biogeochemical Process Models: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose for developing biofuel is to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas emissions, but the comprehensive environmental impact of such fuels is not clear. Life cycle analysis (LCA, as a complete comprehensive analysis method, has been widely used in bioenergy assessment studies. Great efforts have been directed toward establishing an efficient method for comprehensively estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG emission reduction potential from the large-scale cultivation of energy plants by combining LCA with ecosystem/biogeochemical process models. LCA presents a general framework for evaluating the energy consumption and GHG emission from energy crop planting, yield acquisition, production, product use, and postprocessing. Meanwhile, ecosystem/biogeochemical process models are adopted to simulate the fluxes and storage of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen in the soil-plant (energy crops soil continuum. Although clear progress has been made in recent years, some problems still exist in current studies and should be addressed. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art method for estimating GHG emission reduction through developing energy crops and introduces in detail a new approach for assessing GHG emission reduction by combining LCA with biogeochemical process models. The main achievements of this study along with the problems in current studies are described and discussed.

  14. A trait-based framework for understanding how and why litter decay and resource stoichiometry promote biogeochemical syndromes in arbuscular- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.; Brzostek, E. R.; Fisher, J. B.; Sulman, B. N.; Midgley, M.; Craig, M.; Keller, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    While it has long been known that ecosystems dominated by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) plants (e.g., grasslands, tropical forests) cycle carbon (C) and nutrients differently than those dominated by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) plants (e.g., boreal and subarctic forests), demonstrations of these patterns in ecosystems where both mycorrhizal types co-occur are rare. We tested the hypothesis that variation between AM and ECM nutrient use traits (e.g., litter quality) promote distinct microbial traits that track biogeochemical syndromes in temperate forests. We then explored whether such belowground dynamics influence ecosystem responses to elevated CO2. To do this, we calculated the C to N ratios of litter, soil microbes and soil organic matter in AM- and ECM-dominated forests throughout the temperate region. We then used these data to parameterize a coupled plant uptake-microbial decomposition model, in order to determine how belowground interactions feedback to affect ecosystem C and N cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO2. We found support for our hypothesis: AM litters decomposed 50% faster than ECM litters (p litter decay rates were negatively correlated with the C:N of soils (including the microbial biomass and mineral soil; p < 0.05 for both) and positively correlated with net nitrification rates (p < 0.01). However, faster nitrogen (N) cycling in AM plots was also associated with a greater amount of physcially protected N in soil, suggesting that nutrient stabilizing mechanisms may constrain NPP in response to elevated CO2. Our model results supported this prediction. We found that while the C cost of acquiring of N is cheaper for AM trees than ECM trees, this cost difference is reduced under rising atmospheric CO2 owing to the enhanced protection of soil N in AM soils. Taken together, our results demonstrate that variation in AM- and ECM-associated plant and microbial traits promote predictable biogeochemical syndromes in temperate forests that can impact

  15. Modeling the nitrogen fluxes in the Black Sea using a 3D coupledhydrodynamical-biogeochemical model: transport versus biogeochemicalprocesses, exchanges across the shelf break and comparison of the shelf anddeep sea ecodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grégoire

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-compartment biogeochemical model of nitrogen cycling and plankton productivity has been coupled with a 3D general circulation model in an enclosed environment (the Black Sea so as to quantify and compare, on a seasonal and annual scale, the typical internal biogeochemical functioning of the shelf and of the deep sea as well as to estimate the nitrogen and water exchanges at the shelf break. Model results indicate that the annual nitrogen net export to the deep sea roughly corresponds to the annual load of nitrogen discharged by the rivers on the shelf. The model estimated vertically integrated gross annual primary production is 130gCm-2yr-1 for the whole basin, 220gCm-2yr-1 for the shelf and 40gCm-2yr-1 for the central basin. In agreement with sediment trap observations, model results indicate a rapid and efficient recycling of particulate organic matter in the sub-oxic portion of the water column (60-80m of the open sea. More than 95% of the PON produced in the euphotic layer is recycled in the upper 100m of the water column, 87% in the upper 80 m and 67% in the euphotic layer. The model estimates the annual export of POC towards the anoxic layer to 4 1010molyr-1. This POC is definitely lost for the system and represents 2% of the annual primary production of the open sea.

  16. Biogeochemical reactive-diffusive transport of heavy metals in Lake Coeur d'Alene sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevinc Sengoer, S.; Spycher, Nicolas F.; Ginn, Timothy R.; Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Decades of runoff from precious-metal mining operations in the Lake Coeur d'Alene Basin, Idaho, have left the sediments in this lake heavily enriched with toxic metals, most notably Zn, Pb and Cu, together with As. The bioavailability, fate and transport of these metals in the sediments are governed by complex biogeochemical processes. In particular, indigenous microbes are capable of catalyzing reactions that detoxify their environments, and thus constitute an important driving component in the biogeochemical cycling of these metals. Here, the development of a quantitative model to evaluate the transport and fate of Zn, Pb and Cu in Lake Coeur d'Alene sediments is reported. The current focus is on the investigation and understanding of local-scale processes, rather than the larger-scale dynamics of sedimentation and diagenesis, with particular emphasis on metal transport through reductive dissolution of Fe hydroxides. The model includes 1-D inorganic diffusive transport coupled to a biotic reaction network including consortium biodegradation kinetics with multiple terminal electron acceptors and syntrophic consortium biotransformation dynamics of redox front. The model captures the mobilization of metals initially sorbed onto hydrous ferric oxides, through bacterial reduction of Fe(III) near the top of the sediment column, coupled with the precipitation of metal sulfides at depth due to biogenic sulfide production. Key chemical reactions involve the dissolution of ferrihydrite and precipitation of siderite and Fe sulfide. The relative rates of these reactions play an important role in the evolution of the sediment pore-water chemistry, notably pH, and directly depend on the relative activity of Fe and SO 4 reducers. The model captures fairly well the observed trends of increased alkalinity, sulfide, Fe and heavy metal concentrations below the sediment-water interface, together with decreasing terminal electron acceptor concentrations with depth, including the

  17. Biogeochemical hotspots following a simulated tree mortality event of southern pine beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, C. M.; Renninger, H. J.; Karunarathna, S.; Hornslein, N.; Riggins, J. J.; Clay, N. A.; Tang, J. D.; Chaney, B.; Drotar, N.

    2017-12-01

    Disturbances in forest ecosystems can alter functions like productivity, respiration, and nutrient cycling through the creation of biogeochemical hotspots. These events occur sporadically across the landscape, leading to uncertainty in terrestrial biosphere carbon models, which have yet to capture the full complexity of biotic and abiotic factors driving ecological processes in the terrestrial environment. Given the widespread impact of southern pine beetle on forest ecosystems throughout the southeastern United States, it is critical to management and planning activities to understand the role of these disturbances. As such, we hypothesize that bark beetle killed trees create biogeochemical hotspots in the soils surrounding their trunk as they undergo mortality due to (1) increased soil moisture from reductions in plant water uptake and increased stemflow production, (2) enhanced canopy-derived inputs of carbon and nitrogen, and (3) increased microbial activity and root mortality. In 2015, a field experiment to mimic a southern pine beetle attack was established by girdling loblolly pine trees. Subsequent measurements of throughfall and stemflow for water quantity and quality, transpiration, stem respiration, soil respiration, and soil chemistry were used to quantify the extent of spatial and temporal impacts of tree mortality on carbon budgets. Compared to control trees, girdled trees exhibited reduced water uptake within the first 6 months of the study and succumbed to mortality within 18 months. Over two years, the girdled trees generated 33% more stemflow than control trees (7836 vs. 5882 L m-2). Preliminary analysis of carbon and nitrogen concentrations and dissolved organic matter quality are still pending. In the surrounding soils, C:N ratios were greater under control trees (12.8) than under girdled trees (12.1), which was driven by an increase in carbon around control trees (+0.13 mg C mg-1 soil) and not a decrease around girdled trees (-0.01 mg C mg-1

  18. Tracking Water, C, N, and P by Linking Local Scale Soil Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Features to Watershed Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghatdoost, A.; Mohanty, B.; Huang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) have many contemporary significance due to their critical roles in determining the structure and function of ecosystems. The objectives of our study is to find out temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of soil physical, chemical, and biological properties and their interaction with C, N, and P cycles in the soil for different land covers and weather conditions. The study is being conducted at three locations within Texas Water Observatory (TWO), including Riesel (USDA-ARS experimental watersheds), Texas A&M Agrilife Research Farm, and Danciger forest in Texas. Soil physical, hydraulic, chemical (total C, total N, total P, pH, EC, redox potential, N-NO3-, N-NH4+, PO42-, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Mn, and Alox and Feox), and microbiological (Microbial biomass C, N, and P, PLFA analysis, enzymatic activity) properties are being measured in the top 30 cm of the soil profile. Our preliminary data shows that biogeochemical processes would be more profound in the areas with higher temperature and precipitation as these factors stimulate microbial activity and thus influence C, N, and P cycles. Also concentrations of C and N are greater in woodlands relative to remnant grasslands as a consequence of the greater above- and below-ground productivity of woodlands relative to remnant grasslands. We hypothesize that finer soil textures have more organic matter, microbial population, and reactive surfaces for chemicals than coarse soils, as described in some recent literature. However, the microbial activity may not be active in fine textured soils as organic materials may be sorbed to clay surfaces or protected from decomposing organisms. We also expect reduced condition in saturated soils which will decrease carbon mineralization while increase denitrification and alkalinity in the soil. Spatio-temporal data with initial evaluation of biogeochemical factors/processes for different land covers will be presented.

  19. Correlates of time spent walking and cycling to and from work: baseline results from the commuting and health in Cambridge study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panter Jenna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Environmental perceptions and psychological measures appear to be associated with walking and cycling behaviour; however, their influence is still unclear. We assessed these associations using baseline data from a quasi-experimental cohort study of the effects of major transport infrastructural developments in Cambridge, UK. Methods Postal surveys were sent to adults who travel to work in Cambridge (n = 1582. Questions asked about travel modes and time spent travelling to and from work in the last week, perceptions of the route, psychological measures regarding car use and socio-demographic characteristics. Participants were classified into one of two categories according to time spent walking for commuting ('no walking' or 'some walking' and one of three categories for cycling ('no cycling', '1-149 min/wk' and ' ≥ 150 min/wk'. Results Of the 1164 respondents (68% female, mean (SD age: 42.3 (11.4 years 30% reported any walking and 53% reported any cycling to or from work. In multiple regression models, short distance to work and not having access to a car showed strong positive associations with both walking and cycling. Furthermore, those who reported that it was pleasant to walk were more likely to walk to or from work (OR = 4.18, 95% CI 3.02 to 5.78 and those who reported that it was convenient to cycle on the route between home and work were more likely to do so (1-149 min/wk: OR = 4.60, 95% CI 2.88 to 7.34; ≥ 150 min/wk: OR = 3.14, 95% CI 2.11 to 4.66. Positive attitudes in favour of car use were positively associated with time spent walking to or from work but negatively associated with cycling to or from work. Strong perceived behavioural control for car use was negatively associated with walking. Conclusions In this relatively affluent sample of commuters, a range of individual and household characteristics, perceptions of the route environment and psychological measures relating to car use were associated with

  20. Integrative Application of Life Cycle Assessment and Risk Assessment to Environmental Impacts of Anthropogenic Pollutants at a Watershed Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaodan; Yu, Shen; Ma, Hwongwen

    2018-01-01

    Intense human activities have led to increasing deterioration of the watershed environment via pollutant discharge, which threatens human health and ecosystem function. To meet a need of comprehensive environmental impact/risk assessment for sustainable watershed development, a biogeochemical process-based life cycle assessment and risk assessment (RA) integration for pollutants aided by geographic information system is proposed in this study. The integration is to frame a conceptual protocol of "watershed life cycle assessment (WLCA) for pollutants". The proposed WLCA protocol consists of (1) geographic and environmental characterization mapping; (2) life cycle inventory analysis; (3) integration of life-cycle impact assessment (LCIA) with RA via characterization factor of pollutant of interest; and (4) result analysis and interpretation. The WLCA protocol can visualize results of LCIA and RA spatially for the pollutants of interest, which might be useful for decision or policy makers for mitigating impacts of watershed development.

  1. Groundwater Inputs to Rivers: Hydrological, Biogeochemical and Ecological Effects Inferred by Environmental Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellato, L. [Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE), Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); Newman, B. D. [Isotope Hydrology Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    In an effort to improve river management, numerous studies over the past two decades have supported the concept that river water and groundwater need to be considered together, as part of a hydrologic continuum. In particular, studies of the interface between surface water and groundwater (the hyporheic zone) have seen the tight collaboration of catchment hydrologists and stream ecologists in order to elucidate processes affecting stream functioning. Groundwater and surface waters interact at different spatial and temporal scales depending on system hydrology and geomorphology, which in turn influence nutrient cycling and in-stream ecology in relation to climatic, geologic, biotic and anthropogenic factors. In this paper, groundwater inputs to rivers are explored from two different and complementary perspectives: the hydrogeological, describing the generally acknowledged mechanisms of streamflow generation and the main factors controlling stream-aquifer interactions, and the ecologic, describing the processes occurring at the hyporheical and the riparian zones and their possible effects on stream functioning and on nutrient cycling, also taking into consideration the impact of human activities. Groundwater inflows to rivers can be important controls on hot moment/hot spot type biogeochemical behaviors. A description of the common methods used to assess these processes is provided emphasizing tracer methods (including physical, chemical and isotopic). In particular, naturally occurring isotopes are useful tools to identify stream discharge components, biogeochemical processes involved in nutrient cycling (such as N and P dynamics), nutrient sources and transport to rivers, and subsurface storage zones and residence times of hyporheic water. Several studies which have employed isotope techniques to clarify the processes occurring when groundwater enters the river,are reported in this chapter, with a view to highlighting both the advantages and limitations of these

  2. Including the biogeochemical impacts of deforestation increases projected warming of climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Catherine; Monks, Sarah; Spracklen, Dominick; Arnold, Stephen; Forster, Piers; Rap, Alexandru; Carslaw, Kenneth; Chipperfield, Martyn; Reddington, Carly; Wilson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Forests cover almost one third of the Earth's land area and their distribution is changing as a result of human activities. The presence, and removal, of forests affects the climate in many ways, with the net climate impact of deforestation dependent upon the relative strength of these effects (Betts, 2000; Bala et al., 2007; Davin and de Noblet-Ducoudré, 2010). In addition to controlling the surface albedo and exchanging carbon dioxide (CO2) and moisture with the atmosphere, vegetation emits biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which lead to the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and alter the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, affecting ozone (O3) and methane (CH4) concentrations. In this work, we combine a land-surface model with a chemical transport model, a global aerosol model, and a radiative transfer model to compare several radiative impacts of idealised deforestation scenarios in the present day. We find that the simulated reduction in biogenic SOA production, due to complete global deforestation, exerts a positive combined aerosol radiative forcing (RF) of between +308.0 and +362.7 mW m-2; comprised of a direct radiative effect of between +116.5 and +165.0 mW m-2, and a first aerosol indirect effect of between +191.5 and +197.7 mW m-2. We find that the reduction in O3 exerts a negative RF of -150.7 mW m-2 and the reduction in CH4 results in a negative RF of -76.2 mWm-2. When the impacts on biogenic SOA, O3 and CH4 are combined, global deforestation exerts an overall positive RF of between +81.1 and +135.9 mW m-2 through changes to short-lived climate forcers (SLCF). Taking these additional biogeochemical impacts into account increases the net positive RF of complete global deforestation, due to changes in CO2 and surface albedo, by 7-11%. Overall, our work suggests that deforestation has a stronger warming impact on climate than previously thought. References: Bala, G. et al., 2007. Combined climate and carbon-cycle effects

  3. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of the Acetothermia (OP1, was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylum Parcubacteria (OD1 that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, including Microgenomates (OP11, Atribacteria (OP9, candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, and Marinimicrobia (SAR406. The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes.

  4. Glacial cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, R. K.; Juselius, Katarina

    We use a statistical model, the cointegrated vector autoregressive model, to assess the degree to which variations in Earth's orbit and endogenous climate dynamics can be used to simulate glacial cycles during the late Quaternary (390 kyr-present). To do so, we estimate models of varying complexity...... and compare the accuracy of their in-sample simulations. Results indicate that strong statistical associations between endogenous climate variables are not enough for statistical models to reproduce glacial cycles. Rather, changes in solar insolation associated with changes in Earth's orbit are needed...... to simulate glacial cycles accurately. Also, results suggest that non-linear 10 dynamics, threshold effects, and/or free oscillations may not play an overriding role in glacial cycles....

  5. Responses of the ocean carbon cycle to climate change: Results from an earth system climate model simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuang-Jing; CAO Long; LI Na

    2014-01-01

    Based on simulations using the University of Victoria’s Earth System Climate Model, we analyzed the responses of the ocean carbon cycle to increasing atmospheric CO2 levels and climate change from 1800 to 2500 following the RCP 8.5 scenario and its extension. Compared to simulations without climate change, the simulation with a climate sensitivity of 3.0 K shows that in 2100, due to increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the simulated sea surface temperature increases by 2.7 K, the intensity of the North Atlantic deep water formation reduces by4.5 Sv, and the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 decreases by 0.8 Pg C. Climate change is also found to have a large effect on the North Atlantic’s ocean column inventory of anthropogenic CO2. Between the years 1800 and 2500, compared with the simulation with no climate change, the simulation with climate change causes a reduction in the total anthropogenic CO2 column inventory over the entire ocean and in North Atlantic by 23.1% and 32.0%, respectively. A set of simulations with climate sensitivity variations from 0.5 K to 4.5 K show that with greater climate sensitivity climate change would have a greater effect in reducing the ocean’s ability to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere.

  6. An integrated gait rehabilitation training based on Functional Electrical Stimulation cycling and overground robotic exoskeleton in complete spinal cord injury patients: Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, S; Battini, E; Rustici, A; Stampacchia, G

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an integrated gait rehabilitation training based on Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)-cycling and overground robotic exoskeleton in a group of seven complete spinal cord injury patients on spasticity and patient-robot interaction. They underwent a robot-assisted rehabilitation training based on two phases: n=20 sessions of FES-cycling followed by n= 20 sessions of robot-assisted gait training based on an overground robotic exoskeleton. The following clinical outcome measures were used: Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) on spasticity, Penn Spasm Frequency Scale (PSFS), Spinal Cord Independence Measure Scale (SCIM), NRS on pain and International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Data Set (ISCI). Clinical outcome measures were assessed before (T0) after (T1) the FES-cycling training and after (T2) the powered overground gait training. The ability to walk when using exoskeleton was assessed by means of 10 Meter Walk Test (10MWT), 6 Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG), standing time, walking time and number of steps. Statistically significant changes were found on the MAS score, NRS-spasticity, 6MWT, TUG, standing time and number of steps. The preliminary results of this study show that an integrated gait rehabilitation training based on FES-cycling and overground robotic exoskeleton in complete SCI patients can provide a significant reduction of spasticity and improvements in terms of patient-robot interaction.

  7. Marine and estuarine natural microbial biofilms: ecological and biogeochemical dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Roger Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine and estuarine microbial biofilms are ubiquitously distributed worldwide and are increasingly of interest in basic and applied sciences because of their unique structural and functional features that make them remarkably different from the biota in the plankton. This is a review of some current scientific knowledge of naturally occurring microbial marine and estuarine biofilms including prokaryotic and microeukaryotic biota, but excluding research specifically on engineering and applied aspects of biofilms such as biofouling. Because the microbial communities including bacteria and protists are integral to the fundamental ecological and biogeochemical processes that support biofilm communities, particular attention is given to the structural and ecological aspects of microbial biofilm formation, succession, and maturation, as well as the dynamics of the interactions of the microbiota in biofilms. The intent is to highlight current state of scientific knowledge and possible avenues of future productive research, especially focusing on the ecological and biogeochemical dimensions.

  8. Linking the Modern and Recent Record of Cabo Frio Upwelling with Local Climate and Biogeochemical Processes in Hypersaline Coastal Lagoons, Região dos Lagos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Nascimento, G. S.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Belem, A. L.; Carreira, R.; Eglinton, T. I.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2015-12-01

    A unique marine and lagoonal system along the coast east of Rio de Janeiro is being investigated to understand the impact of climatic variability on the South Atlantic carbon cycle and biomineralisation processes involved in carbonate precipitation in the hypersaline coastal lagoons. The region is dominated by a semi-arid microclimate attributed to the local coastal upwelling phenomenon near Cabo Frio. The intensity of the upwelling affects the hydrology of the annual water and biogeochemical cycles in the lagoons, as well as biogeochemical signals of environmental change recorded in both onshore and offshore sediments. Preliminary results of δ18O and δD values of water samples collected monthly in Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho from 2011 to 2014 show lower values for waters corresponding to the wet season, reflecting increased input of meteoric water. The higher values for waters collected during the dry season reflect the greater amount of evaporation with increased seasonal aridity. Radiocarbon dating of Holocene marine and lagoonal cores indicates that Mg-carbonate precipitation in the lagoons is associated with high evaporation. Modern field observations for the last 3 years suggest that the amount of carbonate precipitation is correlated with evaporitic conditions associated with the upwelling phenomenon. A calibration study of hydrogen isotopic fractionation in the modern lagoons is underway to define a relationship between δDlipid of suspended particles and δDwater of associated water. This isotopic relationship will be applied to material obtained in cores from the lagoons. Offshore cores will be studied using well-tested paleotemperature proxies to evaluate the intensity of the upwelling during the Holocene. In summary, linking the coastal upwelling with the lagoonal hydrology has the potential to furnish important insights about the relationship between the local climate and paleoceanographic circulation associated with the regional carbon cycle.

  9. Developing biogeochemical tracers of apatite weathering by ectomycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadeboncoeur, M. A.; Bryce, J. G.; Hobbie, E. A.; Meana-Prado, M. F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2012-12-01

    Chronic acid deposition has depleted calcium (Ca) from many New England forest soils, and intensive harvesting may reduce phosphorus (P) available to future rotations. Thin glacial till soils contain trace amounts of apatite, a primary calcium phosphate mineral, which may be an important long-term source of both P and Ca to ecosystems. The extent to which ECM fungi enhance the weathering rate of primary minerals in soil which contain growth-limiting nutrients remains poorly quantified, in part due to biogeochemical tracers which are subsequently masked by within-plant fractionation. Rare earth elements (REEs) and Pb isotope ratios show some potential for revealing differences in soil apatite weathering rates across forest stands and silvicultural treatments. To test the utility of these tracers, we grew birch seedlings semi-hydroponically under controlled P-limited conditions, supplemented with mesh bags containing granite chips. Our experimental design included nonmycorrhizal (NM) as well as ectomycorrhizal cultures (Cortinarius or Leccinum). Resulting mycorrhizal roots and leachates of granite chips were analyzed for these tracers. REE concentrations in roots were greatly elevated in treatments with granite relative to those without granite, demonstrating uptake of apatite weathering products. Roots with different mycorrhizal fungi accumulated similar concentrations of REEs and were generally elevated compared to the NM cultures. Ammonium chloride leaches of granite chips grown in contact with mycorrhizal hyphae show elevated REE concentrations and significantly radiogenic Pb isotope signatures relative to bulk rock, also supporting enhanced apatite dissolution. Our results in culture are consistent with data from field-collected sporocarps from hardwood stands in the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, in which Cortinarius sporocarp Pb isotope ratios were more radiogenic than those of other ectomycorrhizal sporocarps. Taken together, the experimental

  10. Regulation of nif gene expression and the energetics of N2 fixation over the diel cycle in a hot spring microbial mat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Jensen, Sheila I; Brecht, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation, a prokaryotic, O(2)-inhibited process that reduces N(2) gas to biomass, is of paramount importance in biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. We analyzed the levels of nif transcripts of Synechococcus ecotypes, NifH subunit and nitrogenase activity over the diel cycle...... in the microbial mat of an alkaline hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. The results showed a rise in nif transcripts in the evening, with a subsequent decline over the course of the night. In contrast, immunological data demonstrated that the level of the NifH polypeptide remained stable during the night...

  11. Morphological, hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological changes and challenges in river restoration - the Thur River case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, M.; Luster, J.; Linde, N.; Perona, P.; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Barry, D. A.; Hollender, J.; Cirpka, O. A.; Schneider, P.; Vogt, T.; Radny, D.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2014-06-01

    River restoration can enhance river dynamics, environmental heterogeneity and biodiversity, but the underlying processes governing the dynamic changes need to be understood to ensure that restoration projects meet their goals, and adverse effects are prevented. In particular, we need to comprehend how hydromorphological variability quantitatively relates to ecosystem functioning and services, biodiversity as well as ground- and surface water quality in restored river corridors. This involves (i) physical processes and structural properties, determining erosion and sedimentation, as well as solute and heat transport behavior in surface water and within the subsurface; (ii) biogeochemical processes and characteristics, including the turnover of nutrients and natural water constituents; and (iii) ecological processes and indicators related to biodiversity and ecological functioning. All these aspects are interlinked, requiring an interdisciplinary investigation approach. Here, we present an overview of the recently completed RECORD (REstored CORridor Dynamics) project in which we combined physical, chemical, and biological observations with modeling at a restored river corridor of the perialpine Thur River in Switzerland. Our results show that river restoration, beyond inducing morphologic changes that reshape the river bed and banks, triggered complex spatial patterns of bank infiltration, and affected habitat type, biotic communities and biogeochemical processes. We adopted an interdisciplinary approach of monitoring the continuing changes due to restoration measures to address the following questions: How stable is the morphological variability established by restoration? Does morphological variability guarantee an improvement in biodiversity? How does morphological variability affect biogeochemical transformations in the river corridor? What are some potential adverse effects of river restoration? How is river restoration influenced by catchment-scale hydraulics

  12. Long-term ERT monitoring of biogeochemical changes of an aged hydrocarbon contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterina, David; Flores Orozco, Adrian; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Adequate management of contaminated sites requires information with improved spatio-temporal resolution, in particular to assess bio-geochemical processes, such as the transformation and degradation of contaminants, precipitation of minerals or changes in groundwater geochemistry occurring during and after remediation procedures. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), a geophysical method sensitive to pore-fluid and pore-geometry properties, permits to gain quasi-continuous information about subsurface properties in real-time and has been consequently widely used for the characterization of hydrocarbon-impacted sediments. However, its application for the long-term monitoring of processes accompanying natural or engineered bioremediation is still difficult due to the poor understanding of the role that biogeochemical processes play in the electrical signatures. For in-situ studies, the task is further complicated by the variable signal-to-noise ratio and the variations of environmental parameters leading to resolution changes in the electrical images. In this work, we present ERT imaging results for data collected over a period of two years on a site affected by a diesel fuel contamination and undergoing bioremediation. We report low electrical resistivity anomalies in areas associated to the highest contaminant concentrations likely due transformations of the contaminant due to microbial activity and accompanying release of metabolic products. We also report large seasonal variations of the bulk electrical resistivity in the contaminated areas in correlation with temperature and groundwater level fluctuations. However, the amplitude of bulk electrical resistivity variations largely exceeds the amplitude expected given existing petrophysical models. Our results suggest that the variations in electrical properties are mainly controlled by microbial activity which in turn depends on soil temperature and hydrogeological conditions. Therefore, ERT can be suggested as

  13. Long-term ERT monitoring of biogeochemical changes of an aged hydrocarbon contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterina, David; Flores Orozco, Adrian; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Adequate management of contaminated sites requires information with improved spatio-temporal resolution, in particular to assess bio-geochemical processes, such as the transformation and degradation of contaminants, precipitation of minerals or changes in groundwater geochemistry occurring during and after remediation procedures. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), a geophysical method sensitive to pore-fluid and pore-geometry properties, permits to gain quasi-continuous information about subsurface properties in real-time and has been consequently widely used for the characterization of hydrocarbon-impacted sediments. However, its application for the long-term monitoring of processes accompanying natural or engineered bioremediation is still difficult due to the poor understanding of the role that biogeochemical processes play in the electrical signatures. For in-situ studies, the task is further complicated by the variable signal-to-noise ratio and the variations of environmental parameters leading to resolution changes in the electrical images. In this work, we present ERT imaging results for data collected over a period of two years on a site affected by a diesel fuel contamination and undergoing bioremediation. We report low electrical resistivity anomalies in areas associated to the highest contaminant concentrations likely due transformations of the contaminant due to microbial activity and accompanying release of metabolic products. We also report large seasonal variations of the bulk electrical resistivity in the contaminated areas in correlation with temperature and groundwater level fluctuations. However, the amplitude of bulk electrical resistivity variations largely exceeds the amplitude expected given existing petrophysical models. Our results suggest that the variations in electrical properties are mainly controlled by microbial activity which in turn depends on soil temperature and hydrogeological conditions. Therefore, ERT can be suggested as

  14. Comparative assessment and management of the health and environmental impacts of energy systems. General framework and preliminary results for the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostron, W; Schneider, T; Thieme, M; Dreicer, M

    1992-06-01

    The comparison of the effects of electricity producing systems is of growing importance in decision-making processes for energy planning. This report documents the preliminary results of a project for the CEC-DG XII Radiation Protection Programme on the comparative assessment and management of the health and environmental impacts of energy systems. The work reported in this document has also been supported by EDF - Mission Environnement. In order to profit from the comparative studies already existing, some of the most important ones were surveyed. The aim of these past energy comparison studies was mainly to obtain a global measure of the risks associated with an energy cycle, with a view to ranking the various electricity production systems; but this is now recognised as merely an academic exercise, with a limited impact in decision-making. For energy planning the development of a multi-dimensional approach seems more suitable, as this allows the different types of indicators and measures needed to assess the risks of different energy cycles to be compared. From the past studies it has been seen that health indicators are generally well established, but a weakness is noted with respect to indicators of environmental impacts. This remains a difficult subject, and until such indicators are established, surrogates like concentrations in the environment will have to be used, or qualitative comparisons must suffice. This report presents a general framework allowing for consistent comparisons between different energy systems. The key issues discussed are: assessment by fuel cycle, consideration of the dimensions of time and space, the impact pathway approach for assessing risk, and coherent indicators that can be used to measure the impacts. First results are presented for four activities of the nuclear fuel cycle according to the approach developed: (1) the construction and dismantling of a 900 MWe pressurized water reactor, (2) the transportation of materials between

  15. Bacteria in the greenhouse: Modeling the role of oceanic plankton in the global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducklow, H.W.; Fasham, M.J.R.

    1992-01-01

    To plan effectively to deal with the greenhouse effect, a fundamental understanding is needed of the biogeochemical and physical machinery that cycles carbon in the global system; in addition, models are needed of the carbon cycle to project the effects of increasing carbon dioxide. In this chapter, a description is given of efforts to simulate the cycling of carbon and nitrogen in the upper ocean, concentrating on the model's treatment of marine phytoplankton, and what it reveals of their role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon between the ocean and atmosphere. The focus is on the upper ocean because oceanic uptake appears to regulate the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere

  16. Life Cycle Environmental Impacts Resulting from the Manufacture of the Heliostat Field for a Reference Power Tower Design in the United States: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.

    2012-10-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as a useful analytical approach for quantifying environmental impacts of renewable energy technologies, including concentrating solar power (CSP). An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting a series of LCA studies for various CSP technologies. This paper contributes to a thorough LCA of a 100 MWnet molten salt power tower CSP plant by estimating the environmental impacts resulting from the manufacture of heliostats. Three life cycle metrics are evaluated: greenhouse gas emissions, water consumption, and cumulative energy demand. The heliostat under consideration (the 148 m2 Advanced Thermal Systems heliostat) emits 5,300 kg CO2eq, consumes 274 m3 of water, and requires 159,000 MJeq during its manufacture. Future work will incorporate the results from this study into the LCA model used to estimate the life cycle impacts of the entire 100 MWnet power tower CSP plant.

  17. Preliminary results of effect of environment on the low cycle fatigue behaviour of type 316 stainless steel and 9% Cr ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.; Slattery, G.F.; Wynn, J.; Connaughton, M.D.; Lambert, M.E.

    1976-06-01

    Strain controlled fatigue tests on Type 316 steel at 625 0 C and 9% Cr steel at 525 0 C have been performed in air and in helium containing 200 μ atm H 2 and 1 μ atm H 2 O. In rapid cycling the endurance of Type 316 steel in this helium mixture was found to be about five times longer than in air. When a hold time was introduced into the tension part of the cycle however the endurance in the two environments was found to be virtually identical. Fractomicrographic examinations have been performed which have helped to explain some of these findings which are attributed to differences in oxidation behaviour at the crack tip. In the case of the 90% Cr steel the endurance in the helium mixture was found to be only slightly better than in air. The implications of these results are considered in relation to thermal shock effects on sodium cooled fast reactor components. (author)

  18. Two cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy for low-volume stage II seminoma: results of a retrospective, single-center case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Renate; Leonhartsberger, Nicolai; Stöhr, Brigitte; Horninger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    To report on the oncological outcome and toxicity of patients treated with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy for low-volume metastatic stage II seminoma. We retrospectively identified a case series of 15 patients with seminoma stage IIA (26.7%) and IIB (73.3%) who underwent chemotherapy consisting of 2 cycles of cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin (PEB) (cisplatin 20 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, etoposide 100 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, bleomycin 30 mg on days 1, 8 and 15) according to patient preference (refusing a 3rd cycle of PEB) or institutional practice in the last decades. Complete staging before chemotherapy was available in all patients. Patient age, the side and diameter of the primary tumor, the size of the lymph nodes before and after chemotherapy, acute and late toxicity of chemotherapy, the incidence of second malignancies, the relapse-free rate and cancer-specific mortality were recorded. Chemotherapy was well tolerated and no episode of febrile neutropenia occurred. Thrombocytopenia grade 4 was not seen in any patient, while leukopenia grade 4 was observed in 4 (26.6%) patients. The mean (range) lymph node size decreased significantly from 2.54 cm (1.1-4.0) before chemotherapy to 0.75 cm (0.4-2.2) after chemotherapy (p < 0.001). After a median (range) follow-up of 60 (13-185) months, no patient had relapsed, no patient had died as a result of seminoma and second malignancy was seen in only 1 (6.6%) patient. These excellent long-term results from a retrospective case series of 2 cycles of PEB in stage IIA/IIB seminoma patients represent a hint for further research with a view to reducing treatment burden. However, these incidental findings should be studied in prospective trials prior to drawing any conclusions. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A marine biogeochemical perspective on black shale deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, D. Z.; Calvert, S. E.

    2009-06-01

    Deposition of marine black shales has commonly been interpreted as having involved a high level of marine phytoplankton production that promoted high settling rates of organic matter through the water column and high burial fluxes on the seafloor or anoxic (sulfidic) water-column conditions that led to high levels of preservation of deposited organic matter, or a combination of the two processes. Here we review the hydrography and the budgets of trace metals and phytoplankton nutrients in two modern marine basins that have permanently anoxic bottom waters. This information is then used to hindcast the hydrography and biogeochemical conditions of deposition of a black shale of Late Jurassic age (the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, Yorkshire, England) from its trace metal and organic carbon content. Comparison of the modern and Jurassic sediment compositions reveals that the rate of photic zone primary productivity in the Kimmeridge Sea, based on the accumulation rate of the marine fraction of Ni, was as high as 840 g organic carbon m - 2 yr -1. This high level was possibly tied to the maximum rise of sea level during the Late Jurassic that flooded this and other continents sufficiently to allow major open-ocean boundary currents to penetrate into epeiric seas. Sites of intense upwelling of nutrient-enriched seawater would have been transferred from the continental margins, their present location, onto the continents. This global flooding event was likely responsible for deposition of organic matter-enriched sediments in other marine basins of this age, several of which today host major petroleum source rocks. Bottom-water redox conditions in the Kimmeridge Sea, deduced from the V:Mo ratio in the marine fraction of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, varied from oxic to anoxic, but were predominantly suboxic, or denitrifying. A high settling flux of organic matter, a result of the high primary productivity, supported a high rate of bacterial respiration that led to the

  20. Analysis of the repeatability of the exhaust pollutants emission research results for cold and hot starts under controlled driving cycle conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Artur; Kuszewski, Hubert; Ustrzycki, Adam; Balawender, Krzysztof; Lejda, Kazimierz; Woś, Paweł

    2018-04-20

    Measurement of car engines exhaust pollutants emissions is very important because of their harmful effects on the environment. This article presents the assessment of repeatability of the passenger car engine exhaust pollutants emission research results obtained in the conditions of a chassis dynamometer. The research was conducted in a climate chamber, enabling the temperature conditions to be determined from - 20 to + 30 °C. The emission of CO, CH 4 , CO 2 , NO X , THC, and NMHC was subjected to the analysis. The aim of the research is to draw attention to the accuracy of the pollutant emission research results in driving cycles, and the comparison of pollutant emission results and their repeatability obtained in successive NEDC cycles under cold and hot start conditions. The results of the analysis show that, in the case of a small number of measurements, the results repeatability analysis is necessary for a proper interpretation of the pollutant emission results on the basis of the mean value. According to the authors' judgment, it is beneficial to determine the coefficient of variation for a more complete assessment of exhaust emission result repeatability obtained from a small number of measurements. This parameter is rarely presented by the authors of papers on exhaust components emission research.

  1. Bacterial Production and Enzymatic Activities in Deep-Sea Sediments of the Pacific Ocean: Biogeochemical Implications of Different Temperature Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, R.; Corinaldesi, C.; dell'Anno, A.

    2002-12-01

    The deep-sea bed, acting as the ultimate sink for organic material derived from the upper oceans primary production, is now assumed to play a key role in biogeochemical cycling of organic matter on global scale. Early diagenesis of organic matter in marine sediments is dependent upon biological processes (largely mediated by bacterial activity) and by molecular diffusion. Organic matter reaching the sea floor by sedimentation is subjected to complex biogeochemical transformations that make organic matter largely unsuitable for direct utilization by benthic heterotrophs. Extracellular enzymatic activities in the sediment is generally recognized as the key step in the degradation and utilization of organic polymers by bacteria and a key role in biopolymeric carbon mobilization is played by aminopeptidase, alkaline phosphatase and glucosidase activities. In the present study we investigated bacterial density, bacterial C production and exo-enzymatic activities (aminopeptidase, glucosidase and phosphatase activity) in deep-sea sediments of the Pacific Ocean in relation with the biochemical composition of sediment organic matter (proteins, carbohydrates and lipids), in order to gather information on organic matter cycling and diagenesis. Benthic viral abundance was also measured to investigate the potential role of viruses on microbial loop functioning. Sediment samples were collected at eight stations (depth ranging from 2070-3100 m) along two transects located at the opposite side (north and south) of ocean seismic ridge Juan Fernandez (along latitudes 33° 20' - 33° 40'), constituted by the submerged vulcanoes, which connects the Chilean coasts to Rapa Nui Island. Since the northern and southern sides of this ridge apparently displayed small but significant differences in deep-sea temperature (related to the general ocean circulation), this sampling strategy allowed also investigating the role of different temperature constraints on bacterial activity and

  2. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin induces downregulation of critical Hsp90 protein clients and results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human urinary bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkoulis, Panagiotis K; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Margaritis, Lukas H; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E

    2010-01-01

    17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic, specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone that maintains the structural and functional integrity of various protein clients involved in cellular signaling. In this study, we have investigated the effect of 17-AAG on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. We have used MTT-based assays, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and scratch-wound assay in RT4, RT112 and T24 human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. We have demonstrated that, upon 17-AAG treatment, bladder cancer cells are arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, 17-AAG administration was shown to induce a pronounced downregulation of multiple Hsp90 protein clients and other downstream effectors, such as IGF-IR, Akt, IKK-α, IKK-β, FOXO1, ERK1/2 and c-Met, resulting in sequestration-mediated inactivation of NF-κB, reduced cell proliferation and decline of cell motility. In total, we have clearly evinced a dose-dependent and cell type-specific effect of 17-AAG on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of multiple Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling integrity

  3. A Thermodynamically-consistent FBA-based Approach to Biogeochemical Reaction Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B.; Jin, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial rates are critical to understanding biogeochemical processes in natural environments. Recently, flux balance analysis (FBA) has been applied to predict microbial rates in aquifers and other settings. FBA is a genome-scale constraint-based modeling approach that computes metabolic rates and other phenotypes of microorganisms. This approach requires a prior knowledge of substrate uptake rates, which is not available for most natural microbes. Here we propose to constrain substrate uptake rates on the basis of microbial kinetics. Specifically, we calculate rates of respiration (and fermentation) using a revised Monod equation; this equation accounts for both the kinetics and thermodynamics of microbial catabolism. Substrate uptake rates are then computed from the rates of respiration, and applied to FBA to predict rates of microbial growth. We implemented this method by linking two software tools, PHREEQC and COBRA Toolbox. We applied this method to acetotrophic methanogenesis by Methanosarcina barkeri, and compared the simulation results to previous laboratory observations. The new method constrains acetate uptake by accounting for the kinetics and thermodynamics of methanogenesis, and predicted well the observations of previous experiments. In comparison, traditional methods of dynamic-FBA constrain acetate uptake on the basis of enzyme kinetics, and failed to reproduce the experimental results. These results show that microbial rate laws may provide a better constraint than enzyme kinetics for applying FBA to biogeochemical reaction modeling.

  4. Biogeochemical interactions between of coal mine water and gas well cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, D. M.; Gardiner, J. B.; Kutchko, B. G.; Hakala, A.; Spaulding, R.; Tkach, M. K.; Ross, D.

    2017-12-01

    Unconventional natural gas wells drilled in Northern Appalachia often pass through abandoned coal mines before reaching the Marcellus or Utica formations. Biogeochemical interactions between coal mine waters and gas well cements have the potential to alter the cement and compromise its sealing integrity. This study investigates the mineralogical, geochemical, and microbial changes of cement cores exposed to natural coal mine waters. Static reactors with Class H Portland cement cores and water samples from an abandoned bituminous Pittsburgh coal mine simulated the cement-fluid interactions at relevant temperature for time periods of 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Fluids were analyzed for cation and anion concentrations and extracted DNA was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun sequencing. Cement core material was evaluated via scanning electron microscope. Results suggest that the sampled coal mine water altered the permeability and matrix mineralogy of the cement cores. Scanning electron microscope images display an increase in mineral precipitates inside the cement matrix over the course of the experiment. Chemistry results from the reaction vessels' effluent waters display decreases in dissolved calcium, iron, silica, chloride, and sulfate. The microbial community decreased in diversity over the 6-week experiment, with Hydrogenophaga emerging as dominant. These results provide insight in the complex microbial-fluid-mineral interactions of these environments. This study begins to characterize the rarely documented biogeochemical impacts that coal waters may have on unconventional gas well integrity.

  5. Pre-treatments, characteristics, and biogeochemical dynamics of dissolved organic matter in sediments: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Hur, Jin

    2015-08-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sediments, termed here sediment DOM, plays a variety of important roles in global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients as well as in the fate and transport of xenobiotics. Here we reviewed sediment DOM, including pore waters and water extractable organic matter from inland and coastal sediments, based on recent literature (from 1996 to 2014). Sampling, pre-treatment, and characterization methods for sediment DOM were summarized. The characteristics of sediment DOM have been compared along an inland to coastal ecosystems gradient and also with the overlying DOM in water column to distinguish the unique nature of it. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from inland sediment DOM was generally higher than coastal areas, while no notable differences were found for their aromaticity and apparent molecular weight. Fluorescence index (FI) revealed that mixed sources are dominant for inland sediment DOM, but marine end-member prevails for coastal sediment DOM. Many reports showed that sediments operate as a net source of DOC and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) to the water column. Sediment DOM has shown more enrichment of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds in the elemental signature than the overlying DOM. Fluorescent fingerprint investigated by excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) further demonstrated the characteristics of sediment DOM lacking in the photo-oxidized and the intermediate components, which are typically present in the overlying surface water. In addition, the biogeochemical changes in sediment DOM and the subsequent environmental implications were discussed with the focus on the binding and the complexation properties with pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  7. Disentangling the complexity of nitrous oxide cycling in coastal sediments: Results from a novel multi-isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, S. D.; Buchwald, C.; Charoenpong, C.; Ziebis, W.

    2014-12-01

    Although marine environments contribute approximately 30% of the global atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) flux, coastal systems appear to comprise a disproportionately large majority of the ocean-atmosphere flux. However, there exists a wide range of estimates and future projections of N2O production and emission are confounded by spatial and temporal variability of biological sources and sinks. As N2O is produced as an intermediate in both oxidative and reductive microbial processes and can also be consumed as an electron acceptor, a mechanistic understanding of the regulation of these pathways remains poorly understood. To improve our understanding of N2O dynamics in coastal sediments, we conducted a series of intact flow-through sediment core incubations (Sylt, Germany), while manipulating both the O2 and NO3- concentrations in the overlying water. Steady-state natural abundance isotope fluxes (δ15N and δ18O) of nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and nitrous oxide were monitored throughout the experiments. We also measured both the isotopomer composition (site preference (SP) of the 15N in N2O) as well as the Δ17O composition in experiments conducted with the addition of NO3- with an elevated Δ17O composition (19.5‰), which provide complementary information about the processes producing and consuming N2O. Results indicate positive N2O fluxes (to the water column) across all conditions and sediment types. Decreasing dissolved O2 to 30% saturation resulted in reduced N2O fluxes (5.9 ± 6.5 μmol m2 d-1) compared to controls (17.8 ± 6.5 μmol m-2 d-1), while the addition of 100 μM NO3- yielded higher N2O fluxes (49.0 ± 18.5 μmol m-2 d-1). In all NO3- addition experiments, the Δ17O signal from the NO3- was clearly observed in the N2O efflux implicating denitrification as a large source of N2O. However, Δ17O values were always lower (1.9 to 8.6‰) than the starting NO3- indicating an important role for nitrification-based N2O production and/or O isotope exchange

  8. Volatile earliest Triassic sulfur cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schobben, Martin; Stebbins, Alan; Algeo, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    model experiment. Exposure of evaporite deposits having a high δ 34S may account for the source change, with a possible role for the Siberian Traps volcanism by magmatic remobilization of Cambrian rock salt. A high sulfur cycle turnover rate would have left the ocean system vulnerable to development......Marine biodiversity decreases and ecosystem destruction during the end-Permian mass extinction (EPME) have been linked to widespread marine euxinic conditions. Changes in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and marine dissolved sulfate concentrations during...... fractionation and point to a more universal control, i.e., contemporaneous seawater sulfate concentration.The MSR-trend transfer function yielded estimates of seawater sulfate of 0.6-2.8mM for the latest Permian to earliest Triassic, suggesting a balanced oceanic S-cycle with equal S inputs and outputs...

  9. Freeze-Thaw Cycles and Soil Biogeochemistry: Implications for Greenhouse Gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Milojevic, T.; Oh, D. H.; Parsons, C. T.; Smeaton, C. M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2016-12-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles represent a major natural climate forcing acting on soils at middle and high latitudes. Repeated freezing and thawing of soils changes their physical properties, geochemistry, and microbial community structure, which together govern the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients. In this presentation, we focus on how freeze-thaw cycles regulate carbon and nitrogen cycling and how these transformations influence greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. We present a novel approach, which combines the acquisition of physical and chemical data in a newly developed experimental soil column system. This system simulates realistic soil temperature profiles during freeze-thaw cycles. A high-resolution, Multi-Fiber Optode (MuFO) microsensor technique was used to detect oxygen (O2) continuously in the column at multiple depths. Surface and subsurface changes to gas and aqueous phase chemistry were measured to delineate the pathways and quantify soil respiration rates during freeze-thaw cycles. The results indicate that the time-dependent release of GHG from the soil surface is influenced by a combination of two key factors. Firstly, fluctuations in temperature and O2 availability affect soil biogeochemical activity and GHG production. Secondly, the recurrent development of a physical ice barrier prevents exchange of gaseous compounds between the soil and atmosphere during freezing conditions; removal of this barrier during thaw conditions increases GHG fluxes. During freezing, O2 levels in the unsaturated zone decreased due to restricted gas exchange with the atmosphere. As the soil thawed, O2 penetrated deeper into the soil enhancing the aerobic mineralization of organic carbon and nitrogen. Additionally, with the onset of thawing a pulse of gas flux occurred, which is attributed to the build-up of respiratory gases in the pore space during freezing. The latter implies enhanced anaerobic respiration as O2 supply ceases when the upper soil layer freezes.

  10. Identifying biogeochemical processes beneath stormwater infiltration ponds in support of a new best management practice for groundwater protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P.; Xuan, Zhemin; Schirmer, Mario; Hoehn, Eduard; Vogt, Tobias

    2011-01-01

     When applying a stormwater infiltration pond best management practice (BMP) for protecting the quality of underlying groundwater, a common constituent of concern is nitrate. Two stormwater infiltration ponds, the SO and HT ponds, in central Florida, USA, were monitored. A temporal succession of biogeochemical processes was identified beneath the SO pond, including oxygen reduction, denitrification, manganese and iron reduction, and methanogenesis. In contrast, aerobic conditions persisted beneath the HT pond, resulting in nitrate leaching into groundwater. Biogeochemical differences likely are related to soil textural and hydraulic properties that control surface/subsurface oxygen exchange. A new infiltration BMP was developed and a full-scale application was implemented for the HT pond. Preliminary results indicate reductions in nitrate concentration exceeding 50% in soil water and shallow groundwater beneath the HT pond.

  11. Molecular biogeochemical provinces in the Atlantic Surface Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Bracher, A.; Cooper, W.; Frka, S.; Gašparović, B.; Gonsior, M.; Hertkorn, N.; Jaffe, R.; Jenkins, A.; Kuss, J.; Lara, R. J.; Lucio, M.; McCallister, S. L.; Neogi, S. B.; Pohl, C.; Roettgers, R.; Rohardt, G.; Schmitt, B. B.; Stuart, A.; Theis, A.; Ying, W.; Witt, M.; Xie, Z.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, Z. Y.; Kattner, G.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most important aspects to understand marine organic carbon fluxes is to resolve the molecular mechanisms which convert fresh, labile biomolecules into semi-labile and refractory dissolved and particulate organic compounds in the ocean. In this interdisciplinary project, which was performed on a cruise with RV Polarstern, we carried out a detailed molecular characterisation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on a North-South transect in the Atlantic surface ocean in order to relate the data to different biological, climatic, oceanographic, and meteorological regimes as well as to terrestrial input from riverine and atmospheric sources. Our goal was to achieve a high resolution data set for the biogeochemical characterisation of the sources and reactivity of DOM. We applied ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS), nutrient, trace element, amino acid, and lipid analyses and other biogeochemical measurements for 220 samples from the upper water column (0-200m) and eight deep profiles. Various spectroscopic techniques were applied continuously in a constant sample water flow supplied by a fish system and the moon pool. Radiocarbon dating enabled assessing DOC residence time. Bacterial abundance and production provided a metabolic context for the DOM characterization work and pCO2 concentrations. Combining molecular organic techniques and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) established an important link between organic and inorganic biogeochemical studies. Multivariate statistics, primarily based on FT-ICR-MS data for 220 samples, allowed identifying geographical clusters which matched ecological provinces proposed previously by Longhurst (2007). Our study demonstrated that marine DOM carries molecular information reflecting the “history” of ocean water masses. This information can be used to define molecular biogeochemical provinces and to improve our understanding of element fluxes in

  12. Investigation of Artemisia tridentata as a biogeochemical uranium indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, F E; McGrath, S [Montana Coll. of Mineral Science and Technology, Butte (USA)

    1985-01-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted with seedlings of Artemisia tridentata subsp. tridentata (big sagebrush) to test the effect of the phosphate speciation of uranium in solution on its uptake by big sagebrush. No single complex could be identified as being preferentially taken up by the plant, but the varying aqueous phosphate concentrations did affect uranium uptake by the plants at the higher uranium concentrations in solution. The data also substantiate the tendency for uranium to behave as an essential element in this plant species. The implications for the use of Artemisia tridentata as a biogeochemical uranium indicator are discussed.

  13. Progressive biogeochemical transformation of placer gold particles drives compositional changes in associated biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Maria Angelica; Standish, Christopher D; Shuster, Jeremiah; Bissett, Andrew; Reith, Frank

    2018-05-03

    Biofilms on placer gold (Au)-particle surfaces drive Au solubilization and re-concentration thereby progressively transforming the particles. Gold solubilization induces Au-toxicity; however, Au-detoxifying community members ameliorates Au-toxicity by precipitating soluble Au to metallic Au. We hypothesize that Au-dissolution and re-concentration (precipitation) places selective pressures on associated microbial communities, leading to compositional changes and subsequent Au-particle transformation. We analyzed Au-particles from eight United Kingdom sites using next generation sequencing, electron microscopy and micro-analyses. Gold particles contained biofilms composed of prokaryotic cells and extracellular polymeric substances intermixed with (bio)minerals. Across all sites communities were dominated by Proteobacteria (689, 97% Operational Taxonomic Units, 59.3% of total reads), with β-Proteobacteria being the most abundant. A wide range of Au-morphotypes including nanoparticles, micro-crystals, sheet-like Au and secondary rims, indicated that dissolution and re-precipitation occurred, and from this transformation indices were calculated. Multivariate statistical analyses showed a significant relationship between the extent of Au-particle transformation and biofilm community composition, with putative metal-resistant Au-cycling taxa linked to progressive Au transformation. These included the genera Pseudomonas, Leptothrix and Acinetobacter. Additionally, putative exoelectrogenic genera Rhodoferax and Geobacter were highly abundant. In conclusion, biogeochemical Au-cycling and Au-particle transformation occurred at all sites and exerted a strong influence on biofilm community composition.

  14. Comprehensive assessment of hazard and risk generated by different fuel cycles of electric energy production - results of completed and ongoing EU programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borysiewicz, M.; Garanty, I.; Kozubal, A.

    2007-01-01

    A number of international organizations and research institutions attempted to develop recommended approaches to holistic assessment of hazards and risk generated by fuel cycles of electrical energy production from fuel mining, transportation, plant construction and operation, wastes generation to installation decommissioning. It includes an interagency project coordinated by IAEA and series of projects completed in the EU programme: ExternE and a new project: NEEDS extending the methodology of ExternE for more comprehensive treatment various factors impacting health, environment, economy and energy security. The paper is a brief overview methods used in these projects and the results obtained. (author)

  15. Impact of choice of stabilized hysteresis loop on the end result of investigation of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA steel on low cycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bulatović

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available High strength low-alloy steel under low cycle fatigue at a certain level of strain controlled achieve stabilized condition. During the fatigue loading stabilized hysteresis loop is determined, which typical cycle of stabilization is calculated as half number of cycles to failure. Stabilized hysteresis loop is a representative of all hysteresis and it’s used to determine all of the parameters for the assessment of low cycle fatigue. This paper shows comparison of complete strain-life curves of low cycle fatigue for two chosen stabilized hysteresis loop cycles of base metal HSLA steel marked as Nionikral 70.

  16. Seasonal cycles of pelagic production and consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Alan

    Comprehensive seasonal cycles of production and consumption in the pelagial require the ocean to be partitioned. This can be done rationally at two levels: into four primary ecological domains (three oceanic and one coastal), or about fifty biogeochemical provinces. The domains differ in their characteristic seasonal cycles of stability, nutrient supply and illumination, while provinces are defined by ocean currents, fronts, topography and recurrent features in the sea surface chlorophyll field. For each of these compartments, seasonal cycles of photic depth, primary production and accumulation (or loss) of algal biomass were obtained from the climatological CZCS chlorophyll field and other data and these, together with mixed layer depths, rendered characteristic seasonal cycles of production and consumption, which can be grouped into eight models: i - polar irradiance-mediated production peak; ii - nutrient-limited spring production peak; iii - winter-spring production with nutrient limitation; iv - small amplitude response to trade wind seasonality; v - large amplitude response to monsoon reversal; vi - canonical spring-fall blooms of mid-latitude continental shelves; vii - topography-forced summer production; viii - intermittent production at coastal divergences. For higher latitudes, these models suggest that the observed late-summer ‘blooms’ result not from a renewal of primary production rate, but from a relaxation of grazing pressure; in mid-latitudes, the observed ‘winter’ bloom represents chlorophyll accumulation at a season when loss terms are apparently smaller than during the period of peak primary production rate which occurs later, in spring. Where an episodic seasonal increase in rate of primary production occurs, as in the Arabian Sea, algal biomass accumulation may brief, lasting only until consumption is fully re-established. Only in the low latitude oligotrophic ocean are production and consumption perennially and closely coupled.

  17. Delineating the relationship between chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) variability and biogeochemical parameters in a shallow continental shelf

    OpenAIRE

    Sourav Das; Sugata Hazra; Aneesh A. Lotlikar; Isha Das; Sandip Giri; Abhra Chanda; Anirban Akhand; Sourav Maity; T. Srinivasa Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) at 440 nm [aCDOM (440)], sea surface salinity (SSS), total suspended matter (TSM) and chlorophyll-a (chl-a) were measured during October, 2014 to March, 2015 in the shallow continental shelf waters of the Hugli Estuary, adjacent to West Bengal coast, India. The primary objective of the study was to characterize the relationship between aCDOM (440) and the above mentioned biogeochemical parameters. Upon analyzing the result...

  18. Benchmarking of AREVA BWR FDIC-PEZOG model against first BFE3 cycle 15 application of On-Line NobleChem results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, M.G.; Lamanna, L.S.; Hoornik, A.; Storey, G.C.; Lemons, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    The combination of AREVA's BWR FDIC-PEZOG tools allows the calculation of the total liftoff as a measure of fuel performance and a risk indicator for fuel reliability. The AREVA BWR FDIC tool is a crud modeling tool. The PEZOG tool models the platinum-enhanced zirconium oxide growth of fuel cladding when exposed to platinum during operation. Continuous effort to improve these tools used for the total liftoff calculations is illustrated by the benchmarking of the tools after the application of On-Line NobleChem TM at TVA Browns Ferry Unit 3 during Cycle 15. A set of runs using the modified FDIC-PEZOG model and actual plant water chemistry for Cycle 15 and partial data for Cycle 16 were performed. The updated results' deposit thickness and deposit composition predictions for EOC15 were compared to the measured data from EOC15 and are presented in this paper. The updated predicted deposit thickness matched the actual, measured value exactly. Predicted deposit composition near the fuel rod boundary, nearer to the bulk reactor water, and as an averaged deposit, as presented in the paper, compared extremely well with the measured data at EOC15. The updated AREVA methodology resulted in lower fuel oxide thickness predictions over the life of the fuel as compared to the initial evaluations for BFE3 by incorporating more recent experimental data on the thermal conductivity of zirconia; unnecessary conservatism in the prediction of the fuel oxide thickness over the life of the fuel was removed in the improved model. (authors)

  19. Natural and drought scenarios in an east central Amazon forest: Fidelity of the Community Land Model 3.5 with three biogeochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Koichi; Zeng, Xubin; Christoffersen, Bradley J.; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Saleska, Scott R.; Brando, Paulo M.

    2011-03-01

    Recent development of general circulation models involves biogeochemical cycles: flows of carbon and other chemical species that circulate through the Earth system. Such models are valuable tools for future projections of climate, but still bear large uncertainties in the model simulations. One of the regions with especially high uncertainty is the Amazon forest where large-scale dieback associated with the changing climate is predicted by several models. In order to better understand the capability and weakness of global-scale land-biogeochemical models in simulating a tropical ecosystem under the present day as well as significantly drier climates, we analyzed the off-line simulations for an east central Amazon forest by the Community Land Model version 3.5 of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and its three independent biogeochemical submodels (CASA', CN, and DGVM). Intense field measurements carried out under Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia, including forest response to drought from a throughfall exclusion experiment, are utilized to evaluate the whole spectrum of biogeophysical and biogeochemical aspects of the models. Our analysis shows reasonable correspondence in momentum and energy turbulent fluxes, but it highlights three processes that are not in agreement with observations: (1) inconsistent seasonality in carbon fluxes, (2) biased biomass size and allocation, and (3) overestimation of vegetation stress to short-term drought but underestimation of biomass loss from long-term drought. Without resolving these issues the modeled feedbacks from the biosphere in future climate projections would be questionable. We suggest possible directions for model improvements and also emphasize the necessity of more studies using a variety of in situ data for both driving and evaluating land-biogeochemical models.

  20. Biogeochemical impacts of wildfires over four millennia in a Rocky Mountain subalpine watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnette, Paul V; Higuera, Philip E; McLauchlan, Kendra K; Derr, Kelly M; Briles, Christy E; Keefe, Margaret H

    2014-08-01

    Wildfires can significantly alter forest carbon (C) storage and nitrogen (N) availability, but the long-term biogeochemical legacy of wildfires is poorly understood. We obtained a lake-sediment record of fire and biogeochemistry from a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA, to examine the nature, magnitude, and duration of decadal-scale, fire-induced ecosystem change over the past c. 4250 yr. The high-resolution record contained 34 fires, including 13 high-severity events within the watershed. High-severity fires were followed by increased sedimentary N stable isotope ratios (δ15N) and bulk density, and decreased C and N concentrations--reflecting forest floor destruction, terrestrial C and N losses, and erosion. Sustained low sediment C : N c. 20-50 yr post-fire indicates reduced terrestrial organic matter subsidies to the lake. Low sedimentary δ15N c. 50-70 yr post-fire, coincident with C and N recovery, suggests diminishing terrestrial N availability during stand development. The magnitude of post-fire changes generally scaled directly with inferred fire severity. Our results support modern studies of forest successional C and N accumulation and indicate pronounced, long-lasting biogeochemical impacts of wildfires in subalpine forests. However, even repeated high-severity fires over millennia probably did not deplete C or N stocks, because centuries between high-severity fires allowed for sufficient biomass recovery. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. The Biogeochemical Response to Inter-decadal Atmospheric Forcing Across Watershed Scales in Canada's Subarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, C.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid landscape changes in the circumpolar north have been documented, including degradation of permafrost and alteration of vegetation communities. These are widely expected to have profound impacts on the freshwater fluxes of solutes, carbon and nitrogen across the Arctic domain. However, there have been few attempts to document trends across the diversity of landscapes in the circumpolar north, mostly due to a dearth of long term data. Some of the fastest rates of warming over the last thirty years have occurred in Canada's Northwest Territories, so this region should already exhibit changes in aquatic chemistry. Observations of chemical loads in streams draining the ice-poor discontinuous permafrost subarctic Canadian Shield region were analyzed with the goal of determining how basins across scales have responded to changes in atmospheric forcing. Smaller streams, with much closer linkages to terrestrial processes, experienced a synchrony among hydrological and biogeochemical processes that enhanced chemical flux above that in their larger counterparts. This demonstrates that there are differences in resiliency and resistance across scales to climate change. These results highlight the importance of biogeochemical process understanding to properly explain and predict how chemical loading scales from headwaters to river mouths. This is important information if society is to properly adapt policies for effluent discharge, nearshore marine management, among others.

  2. Implementation ambiguity: The fifth element long lost in uncertainty budgets for land biogeochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have identified four major sources of predictive uncertainty in modeling land biogeochemical (BGC) processes: (1) imperfect initial conditions (e.g., assumption of preindustrial equilibrium); (2) imperfect boundary conditions (e.g., climate forcing data); (3) parameterization (type I equifinality); and (4) model structure (type II equifinality). As if that were not enough to cause substantial sleep loss in modelers, we propose here a fifth element of uncertainty that results from implementation ambiguity that occurs when the model's mathematical description is translated into computational code. We demonstrate the implementation ambiguity using the example of nitrogen down regulation, a necessary process in modeling carbon-climate feedbacks. We show that, depending on common land BGC model interpretations of the governing equations for mineral nitrogen, there are three different implementations of nitrogen down regulation. We coded these three implementations in the ACME land model (ALM), and explored how they lead to different preindustrial and contemporary land biogeochemical states and fluxes. We also show how this implementation ambiguity can lead to different carbon-climate feedback estimates across the RCP scenarios. We conclude by suggesting how to avoid such implementation ambiguity in ESM BGC models.

  3. Global warming impacts on the biogeochemical functioning of two arctic Cryo-sols in the Salluit region, Nunavik, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouche, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Increased organic matter decomposition rate in Arctic Cryo-sols due to warming and to permafrost thawing can lead to the release of greenhouse gases, thus potentially creating a positive feedback on climate change. We aim to assess the interactions between the thermal regime, the hydric behaviour and the biogeochemical functioning of two different permafrost-affected soils (i.e. Cryo-sols), one being developed in frozen peat (Histic Cryo-sol: H), the other being developed in post-glacial marine clays (Turbic Cryo-sol: T), both in natural conditions and under an experimental warming. Profiles were instrumented in Salluit (Nunavik, Canada; 62 deg. 14'N, 75 deg. 38'W) and monitored during summers 2010 and 2011. Both thermal monitoring and modeling results stressed differences between sites due to the insulating properties of dried peat in summer the active layer at the H site is thinner than at the T site. The induced warming increased CO 2 fluxes in both soils; this impact was however more striking at H even if ecosystem respiration (ER) was lower than at T. Temperature sensitivity of ER (Q 10 ), which decreased with warming, was higher at T than at H. We highlighted that diurnal ER cycles showed hysteretic loops as a function of soil surface temperatures. Linear models performed to explain ER variance were improved when we added daily minimum temperature and thaw front depth at H. In contrast at T, adding wind speed and solar radiation in models improved the ER variance explanation. We showed three specific CO 2 flux dynamics related to northern ecosystems: 1) the large difference of ER depending on soil properties and soil solution composition; 2) environmental variables strongly alter CO 2 fluxes and 3) the diurnal Q 10 variations and the inter annual variability of basal respiration. Our results support the assumption that organic matter decomposition might be the major source of CO 2 at H while plant-derived processes dominated ER at T. Finally, the

  4. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-03-31

    The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

  5. Sorption of organic chemicals at biogeochemical interfaces - calorimetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, J.; Lang, F.; Siemens, J.; Kaupenjohann, M.

    2009-04-01

    Biogeochemical interfaces in soil act as sorbents for organic chemicals, thereby controlling the degradation and mobility of these substances in terrestrial environments. Physicochemical properties of the organic chemicals and the sorbent determine sorptive interactions. We hypothesize that the sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals ("R-determined" chemicals) is an entropy-driven partitioning process between the bulk aqueous phase and biogeochemical interface and that the attachment of more polar organic chemicals ("F-determined" chemicals) to mineral surfaces is due to electrostatic interactions and ligand exchange involving functional groups. In order to determine thermodynamic parameters of sorbate/sorbent interactions calorimetric titration experiments have been conducted at 20˚ C using a Nanocalorimeter (TAM III, Thermometric). Solutions of different organic substances ("R-determined" chemicals: phenanthrene, bisphenol A, "F-determined" chemicals: MCPA, bentazone) with concentrations of 100 mol l-1 were added to suspensions of pure minerals (goethite, muscovite, and kaolinite and to polygalacturonic acid (PGA) as model substance for biofilms in soil. Specific surface, porosity, N and C content, particle size and point of zero charge of the mineral were analyzed to characterize the sorbents. The obtained heat quantities for the initial injection of the organic chemicals to the goethite were 55 and 71 J for bisphenol A and phenanthrene ("R-determined representatives") and 92 and 105 J for MCPA and bentazone ("F-determined" representatives). Further experiments with muscovite, kaolinite and PGA are in progress to determine G and H of the adsorption process.

  6. Element cycling in upland/peatland watersheds Chapter 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel Urban; Elon S. Verry; Steven Eisenreich; David F. Grigal; Stephen D. Sebestyen

    2011-01-01

    Studies at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) have measured the pools, cycling, and transport of a variety of elements in both the upland and peatland components of the landscape. Peatlands are important zones of element retention and biogeochemical reactions that greatly influence the chemistry of surface water. In this chapter, we summarize findings on nitrogen (N...

  7. Mortality hotspots: nitrogen cycling in forest soils during vertebrate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decomposing plants and animals fundamentally transform their surrounding environments, and serve as a critical source of limiting nutrients for macro- and micro-fauna. Animal mortality hotspots alter soil biogeochemical cycles, and these natural ephemeral nutrient patches are important for maintaini...

  8. Methods of dealing with co-products of biofuels in life-cycle analysis and consequent results within the U.S. context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Michael, E-mail: mqwang@anl.gov [Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Huo Hong [Institute of Energy, Environment, and Economics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Arora, Salil [Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Products other than biofuels are produced in biofuel plants. For example, corn ethanol plants produce distillers' grains and solubles. Soybean crushing plants produce soy meal and soy oil, which is used for biodiesel production. Electricity is generated in sugarcane ethanol plants both for internal consumption and export to the electric grid. Future cellulosic ethanol plants could be designed to co-produce electricity with ethanol. It is important to take co-products into account in the life-cycle analysis of biofuels and several methods are available to do so. Although the International Standard Organization's ISO 14040 advocates the system boundary expansion method (also known as the 'displacement method' or the 'substitution method') for life-cycle analyses, application of the method has been limited because of the difficulty in identifying and quantifying potential products to be displaced by biofuel co-products. As a result, some LCA studies and policy-making processes have considered alternative methods. In this paper, we examine the available methods to deal with biofuel co-products, explore the strengths and weaknesses of each method, and present biofuel LCA results with different co-product methods within the U.S. context.

  9. Methods of dealing with co-products of biofuels in life-cycle analysis and consequent results within the U.S. context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Michael; Huo Hong; Arora, Salil

    2011-01-01

    Products other than biofuels are produced in biofuel plants. For example, corn ethanol plants produce distillers' grains and solubles. Soybean crushing plants produce soy meal and soy oil, which is used for biodiesel production. Electricity is generated in sugarcane ethanol plants both for internal consumption and export to the electric grid. Future cellulosic ethanol plants could be designed to co-produce electricity with ethanol. It is important to take co-products into account in the life-cycle analysis of biofuels and several methods are available to do so. Although the International Standard Organization's ISO 14040 advocates the system boundary expansion method (also known as the 'displacement method' or the 'substitution method') for life-cycle analyses, application of the method has been limited because of the difficulty in identifying and quantifying potential products to be displaced by biofuel co-products. As a result, some LCA studies and policy-making processes have considered alternative methods. In this paper, we examine the available methods to deal with biofuel co-products, explore the strengths and weaknesses of each method, and present biofuel LCA results with different co-product methods within the U.S. context.

  10. Two cycles of cisplatin-vindesine and radiotherapy for localized nonsmall cell carcinoma of the lung (stage III). Results of a prospective trial with 149 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourani, J.M.; Timsit, J.F.; Delaisement, C.; Balzon, J.C.; Caubarrere, I.; Darse, J.; Geraads, A.; Lebas, F.X.; Andrieu, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred forty-nine patients with localized nonsmall cell carcinoma of the lung (Stage III A and B) were treated with two monthly cycles of initial chemotherapy that included vindesine-cisplatin followed by 6000 cGy of thoracic irradiation. Patients with complete, partial, and minor response after initial chemotherapy were randomized into groups to receive either maintenance chemotherapy (four cycles) after radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. The objective response rate was 24% after chemotherapy and 41% after combined chemoradiotherapy (complete response, 7.5%). The overall median survival was 9 months and the 2-year survival was 14%. Survival was identical with or without maintenance chemotherapy. The 2-year survival of patients with complete response was 75% compared with 9% for patients with partial or minor response. These results suggest that only the few patients (ten) who achieve complete response have a strong probability of survival. It is therefore essential to search for other therapeutic modalities that result in an increase of the complete response rate

  11. Coupling biogeochemical cycles in urban environments: Ecosystemservices, green solutions, and misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane Pataki; Margaret Carreiro; Jennifer Cherrier; Nancy Grulke; Viniece Jennings; Stephanie Pincetl; Richard Pouyat; Thomas Whitlow; Wayne. Zipperer

    2011-01-01

    Urban green space is purported to offset greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions, remove air and water pollutants, cool local climate, and improve public health. To use these services, municipalities have focused efforts on designing and implementing ecosystem-services-based "green infrastructure" in urban environments. In some cases the environmental benefits of this...

  12. Tech