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Sample records for biogenic silica dissolution

  1. The Rate-equation for Biogenic Silica Dissolution in Seawater – New Hypotheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truesdale, V.W.; Greenwood, J.E.; Rendell, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the kinetics of biogenic silica dissolution in seawater, through batch dissolution, where the reaction is observed as the increase in dissolved silicic acid concentration with time. It utilises new data from dissolution of the marine diatom Cyclotella cryptica, and the

  2. Constraining biogenic silica dissolution in marine sediments: a comparison between diagenetic models and experimental dissolution rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, K.; Rabouille, C.; Gallinari, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; DeMaster, D.J.; Ragueneau, O.

    2007-01-01

    The processes controlling preservation and recycling of particulate biogenic silica in sediments must be understood in order to calculate oceanic silica mass balances. The new contribution of this work is the coupled use of advanced models including reprecipitation and different phases of biogenic

  3. Biogenic silica dissolution in diatom aggregates: insights from reactive transport modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Moriceau, B

    2014-12-15

    © Inter-Research 2014. Diatom aggregates contribute significantly to the vertical sinking flux of particulate matter in the ocean. These fragile structures form a specific microhabitat for the aggregated cells, but their internal chemical and physical characteristics remain largely unknown. Studies on the impact of aggregation on the Si cycle led to apparent inconsistency. Despite a lower biogenic silica (bSiO2) dissolution rate and diffusion of the silicic acid (dSi) being similar in aggregates and in sea-water, dSi surprisingly accumulates in aggregates. A reaction-diffusion model helps to clarify this incoherence by reconstructing dSi accumulation measured during batch experiments with aggregated and non-aggregated Skeletonema marinoi and Chaetoceros decipiens. The model calculates the effective bSiO2 dissolution rate as opposed to the experimental apparent bSiO2 dissolution rate, which is the results of the effective dissolution of bSiO2 and transport of dSi out of the aggregate. In the model, dSi transport out of the aggregate is modulated by alternatively considering retention (decrease of the dSi diffusion constant) and adsorption (reversible chemical bonds between dSi and the aggregate matrix) processes. Modelled bSiO2 dissolution is modulated by the impact of dSi concentration inside aggregates and diatom viability, as enhanced persistence of metabolically active diatoms has been observed in aggregates. Adsorption better explains dSi accumulation within and outside aggregates, raising the possible importance of dSi travelling within aggregates to the deep sea (potentially representing 20% of the total silica flux). The model indicates that bSiO2 dissolution is effectively decreased in aggregates mainly due to higher diatom viability but also to other parameters discussed herein.

  4. Dissolution of biogenic silica: Roles of pH, salinity, pressure, electrical charging and reverse weathering. Geologica Ultraiectina (302)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loucaides, S.

    2009-01-01

    The recycling of biogenic silica (bSiO2) produced by diatoms is a vital process sustaining a significant fraction of primary production in the oceans. The efficiency with which bSiO2 dissolves controls the availability of nutrient silicon in the water column, and modulates the export of organic

  5. The relationship between Al and Si in biogenic silica as determined by PIXE and XAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Gehlen, M.; Flank, A.-M.; Bennekom, A.J. van; Beusekom, J.E.E. van

    2002-01-01

    Biogenic silica, one of the major constituents of marine sediments, is a potentially powerful paleoceanographic tool, revealing information on past productivity. Interpreting the sedimentary records of the biogenic silica requires, however, an understanding of its preservation. Dissolution of biogenic silica is controlled by the presence of trace elements such as Al. The work in this paper focuses on the association of Al and Si in biogenic silica. The composition and the atomic structure of cultured and natural diatoms were determined by using PIXE and XAS techniques. This study provides the first evidence for a structural association of Al and Si in biogenic silica

  6. Kinetics of amorphous silica dissolution and the paradox of the silica polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Patricia M; Han, Nizhou; Wallace, Adam F; De Yoreo, James J

    2008-07-22

    The mechanisms by which amorphous silica dissolves have proven elusive because noncrystalline materials lack the structural order that allows them to be studied by the classical terrace, ledge, kink-based models applied to crystals. This would seem to imply amorphous phases have surfaces that are disordered at an atomic scale so that the transfer of SiO(4) tetrahedra to solution always leaves the surface free energy of the solid unchanged. As a consequence, dissolution rates of amorphous phases should simply scale linearly with increasing driving force (undersaturation) through the higher probability of detaching silica tetrahedra. By examining rate measurements for two amorphous SiO(2) glasses we find, instead, a paradox. In electrolyte solutions, these silicas show the same exponential dependence on driving force as their crystalline counterpart, quartz. We analyze this enigma by considering that amorphous silicas present two predominant types of surface-coordinated silica tetrahedra to solution. Electrolytes overcome the energy barrier to nucleated detachment of higher coordinated species to create a periphery of reactive, lesser coordinated groups that increase surface energy. The result is a plausible mechanism-based model that is formally identical with the classical polynuclear theory developed for crystal growth. The model also accounts for reported demineralization rates of natural biogenic and synthetic colloidal silicas. In principle, these insights should be applicable to materials with a wide variety of compositions and structural order when the reacting units are defined by the energies of their constituent species.

  7. Crystallization of biogenic hydrous amorphous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyono, A.; Yokooji, M.; Chiba, T.; Tamura, T.; Tuji, A.

    2017-12-01

    Diatom, Nitzschia cf. frustulum, collected from Lake Yogo, Siga prefecture, Japan was cultured in laboratory. Organic components of the diatom cell were removed by washing with acetone and sodium hypochlorite. The remaining frustules were studied by SEM-EDX, FTIR spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the spindle-shaped morphology of diatom frustule was composed of hydrous amorphous silica. Pressure induced phase transformation of the diatom frustule was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. With exposure to 0.3 GPa at 100 oC, Raman band corresponding to quartz occurred at ν = 465 cm-1. In addition, Raman bands known as a characteristic Raman pattern of moganite was also observed at 501 cm-1. From the integral ratio of Raman bands, the moganite content in the probed area was estimated to be approximately 50 wt%. With the pressure and temperature effect, the initial morphology of diatom frustule was completely lost and totally changed to a characteristic spherical particle with a diameter of about 2 mm. With keeping the compression of 5.7 GPa at 100 oC, a Raman band assignable to coesite appeared at 538 cm-1. That is, with the compression and heating, the hydrous amorphous silica can be readily crystallized into quartz, moganite, and coesite. The first-principles calculations revealed that a disiloxane molecule stabilized in a trans configuration is twisted 60o and changed into the cis configuration with a close approach of water molecule. It is therefore a reasonable assumption that during crystallization of hydrous amorphous silica, the Si-O-Si bridging unit with the cis configuration would survive as a structural defect and then crystallized into moganite by keeping the geometry. This hypothesis is adaptable to the phase transformation from hydrous amorphous silica to coesite as well, because coesite has the four-membered rings and easily formed from the hydrous amorphous silica under high pressure and high

  8. Dissolution rates of amorphous silica in highly alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibori, Yuichi; Tochiyama, Osamu; Kunita, Masahisa; Chida, Tadashi

    2000-01-01

    Cement is an essential materials to construct the subsurface radioactive waste disposal system. However, cementitious materials alter the groundwater pH to highly alkaline condition about 13. To comprehend the effect of such a hyperalkaline condition on the repository surroundings, this study focused on the dissolution rates of amorphous silica at [NaOH]=10 -1 mol·dm -3 . The used samples were three kinds of pure commercial silica and a natural silica scale which was obtained from inside wall of the hot-water pipe of a geothermal power plant. The observed dissolution rates were interpreted with using the model, which assumed that the particle sizes decrease with the progress of dissolution. Moreover, due to the particle size distribution anticipated in the natural silica scale, this analysis assumed it contained particles with various initial diameters. In the results, (1) all pure silica samples and at least 60 wt% of the silica scale showed good agreement of the activation energy of the dissolution in the range of 77 through 88 kJ·mol -1 in the highly alkaline solution, (2) these rate constants were of the order of 10 -8 - 10 -7 mol·m -2 ·s -1 at around 310 K and were definitely larger than those already reported for quartz, (3) the specific surface area based on BET method was revealed to be an important factor to give the main difference in the dissolution rates between the synthetic silica and the natural silica. (author)

  9. Biogenic silica in tidal freshwater marsh sediments and vegetation (Schelde estuary, Belgium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; van Damme, S.; Gribsholt, B.; Middelburg, J.J.; Meire, P.

    2005-01-01

    To date, estuarine ecosystem research has mostly neglected silica cycling in freshwater intertidal marshes. However, tidal marshes can store large amounts of biogenic silica (BSi) in vegetation and sediment. BSi content of the typical freshwater marsh plants Phragmites australis, Impatiens

  10. Picoplankton contribution to biogenic silica stocks and production rates in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, J. W.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Baines, S. B.; Collier, J.; Ohnemus, D.; Twining, B. S.

    2016-02-01

    The picoplankton size class (total biogenic silica (>0.4 µm) standing stock and to its rate of production in the Sargasso Sea. These trends were robust after correcting biogenic silica, and the calculated rates which use these data, for interference by lithogenic silica. The 100-m total integrated biogenic silica concentration was low and ranged from 0.7 - 5.0 mmol Si m-2, with the highest value within a mesoscale eddy. Material within the picoplankton size fraction was present at every low-biomass station and provided a relatively consistent contribution to total biogenic silica (10 - 24%, average 14%). The integrated rates of total biogenic silica production were reflective of the low biomass: 0.2 - 1.8 mmol Si m-2 d-1 in non-eddy stations and 6.0 mmol Si m-2 d-1 within the eddy. The average proportion of biogenic silica production in the picoplankton was 16% (range 3 - 38%), with a lower value within the eddy. Outside the eddy, the biomass-normalized rates of silica production were similar for each size class, 0.6 d-1. Using Synechococcus abundance data in the upper 30 m and assuming this group was the only contributor to the picoplankton biogenic silica, we calculate an average Si quota of 229 amol Si cell-1; this is two-fold higher than reported previously by direct measurement on cells using x-ray fluorescence. In the eddy, the estimated Synechococcus Si-quotas were up to 50-fold higher than estimated at other stations, suggesting that most of the pico-sized biogenic silica in this feature may have been diatom fragments. This interpretation is also supported by the eddy having the lowest biomass-normalized production rates for the picoplankton. Our results suggest picoplankton may have a small, but relatively stable, contribution to biogenic silica in this region, which underlies a more dynamic microplankton biogenic silica pool driven by diatoms.

  11. Biogenic silica in space and time in sediments of Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Gupta, S.M.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Parthiban, G.

    rate averages 2.25 x 10/5 g.cm/2.y/1 and it is contributed from 33 to 50% of the total silica. Higher biogenic silica content of the surface sediment is well correlated with Mn, Cu and Ni concentration of the overlying manganese nodules. Higher biogenic...

  12. Oxygen-isotope fractionation between marine biogenic silica and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheney, Ronald K.; Knauth, L. Paul

    1989-12-01

    A stepwise fluorination technique has been used to selectively react away the water component of hydrous silica in order to better investigate the oxygen-isotope fractionation between biogenic opal and seawater, and to determine whether all taxa produce opal which is suitable for oxygen isotope paleothermometry. δ 18O of the tetrahedrally coordinated silicate oxygen of siliceous sponge spicules grown at a wide variety of temperatures varies independently of temperature. δ 18O from an Eocene radiolarian ooze sample is much more enriched than would be expected from any reasonable isotopic temperature curve, given the probable growing temperature of the sample. δ 18O of diatom samples seems to vary systematically with temperature and to conform approximately to the isotopic temperature curve for diatom frustules obtained by Labeyrie and coworkers using an entirely different analytical technique. Sponges appear to precipitate silica in isotopic disequilibrium with seawater oxygen, and old radiolarian silica may exchange readily with cold oceanic bottom water. Neither will apparently be useful for paleo-climate reconstructions. Diatoms may be useful in deducing ancient surface-water temperatures, but the systematic variation of α with temperature for diatoms may not be related to the quartz-H 2O equilibrium isotope fractionation.

  13. Tidal marshes and biogenic silica recycling at the land-sea interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; Dausse, A.; van Damme, S.; Bal, K.; Gribsholt, B.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Meire, P.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the seasonal exchange of biogenic silica (BSi) and dissolved silica (DSi) between a freshwater and a saltwater tidal marsh and the adjacent coastal waters. Export of DSi was observed from both tidal marshes, whereas BSi was imported in association with suspended solids. The export of DSi

  14. Silicon pool dynamics and biogenic silica export in the Southern Ocean inferred from Si-isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fripiat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon isotopic signatures (δ30Si of water column silicic acid (Si(OH4 were measured in the Southern Ocean, along a meridional transect from South Africa (Subtropical Zone down to 57° S (northern Weddell Gyre. This provides the first reported data of a summer transect across the whole Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC. δ30Si variations are large in the upper 1000 m, reflecting the effect of the silica pump superimposed upon meridional water transfer across the ACC: the transport of Antarctic surface waters northward by a net Ekman drift and their convergence and mixing with warmer upper-ocean Si-depleted waters to the north. Using Si isotopic signatures, we determine different mixing interfaces: the Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW, and thermoclines in the low latitude areas. The residual silicic acid concentrations of end-members control the δ30Si alteration of the mixing products and with the exception of AASW, all mixing interfaces have a highly Si-depleted mixed layer end-member. These processes deplete the silicic acid AASW concentration northward, across the different interfaces, without significantly changing the AASW δ30Si composition. By comparing our new results with a previous study in the Australian sector we show that during the circumpolar transport of the ACC eastward, the δ30Si composition of the silicic acid pools is getting slightly, but significantly lighter from the Atlantic to the Australian sectors. This results either from the dissolution of biogenic silica in the deeper layers and/or from an isopycnal mixing with the deep water masses in the different oceanic basins: North Atlantic Deep Water in the Atlantic, and Indian Ocean deep water in the Indo-Australian sector. This isotopic trend is further transmitted to the subsurface waters, representing mixing interfaces between the surface and deeper layers.

  15. Winter climate change and fine root biogenic silica in sugar maple trees (Acer saccharum): Implications for silica in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Timothy J.; Templer, Pamela H.; Battles, John J.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2017-03-01

    Winter temperatures are projected to increase over the next century, leading to reductions in winter snowpack and increased frequency of soil freezing in many northern forest ecosystems. Here we examine biogenic silica (BSi) concentrations in sugar maple (Acer saccharum) fine roots collected from a snow manipulation experiment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Increased soil freezing significantly lowered the BSi content of sugar maple fine roots potentially decreasing their capacity to take up water and dissolved nutrients. The reduced silica uptake (8 ± 1 kmol silica km-2) by sugar maple fine roots is comparable to silica export from temperate forest watersheds. We estimate that fine roots account for 29% of sugar maple BSi, despite accounting for only 4% of their biomass. These results suggest that increased frequency of soil freezing will reduce silica uptake by temperate tree roots, thereby changing silica availability in downstream receiving waters.

  16. Rate of production, dissolution and accumulation of biogenic solids in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrhenius, G

    1988-01-01

    The equatorial current system, by its response to global circulation changes, provides a unique recording mechanism for long range climatic oscillations. A permanent record of the changes in rate of upwelling and organic production is generated in the equatorial deep sea sediments, particularly by such biogenic components which are unaffected by secondary dissolution. In order to determine the rates of accumulation of various sedimentary components, a reliable differential measurement of age of the strata must be obtained. Various approaches to this problem are reviewed, and sources of error discussed. Secondary dissolution of calcium carbonate introduces a substantial and variable difference between the dissolution-modified, and hence a priori unknown, rate of deposition on one hand and the rate of accumulation, derivable from the observed concentration, on the other. The cause and magnitude of these variations are of importance, particularly since some current dating schemes are based on assumed constancy in the rate of accumulation of this and, in some cases, also all other sedimentary components. The concepts used in rate evaluation are discussed with emphasis on the difference between the state of dissolution, an observable property of the sediment, and the rate of dissolution, a parameter that requires deduction of the carbonate fraction dissolved, and of the time differential. As a most likely cause of the enhanced state of dissolution of the interglacial carbonate sediments is proposed the lowered rates of biogenic production and deposition, which cause longer exposure of the carbonate microfossils to corrosion in the bioturbated surface layer of the sediment. Historical perspective is included in the discussion in view of the dedication of the Symposium to Hans Pettersson, the leader of the Swedish Deep Sea Expedition 1947-1948, an undertaking that opened a new era in deep sea research and planetary dynamics.

  17. Kinetics of amorphous silica dissolution and the paradox of the silica polymorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Dove, Patricia M.; Han, Nizhou; Wallace, Adam F.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which amorphous silica dissolves have proven elusive because noncrystalline materials lack the structural order that allows them to be studied by the classical terrace, ledge, kink-based models applied to crystals. This would seem to imply amorphous phases have surfaces that are disordered at an atomic scale so that the transfer of SiO4 tetrahedra to solution always leaves the surface free energy of the solid unchanged. As a consequence, dissolution rates of amorphous phases...

  18. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshatwi, Ali A.; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO 2 nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica

  19. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120°C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermodynamics of Silica Dissolution From In-situ Raman +Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. K.; Fumagalli, P.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2001-12-01

    Solubilities of cations, such as silicon, in water strongly effect both the physical and thermodynamical properties of supercritical metamorphic fluids. Modeling the thermodynamics of fluid-rock interactions requires therefore a profound understanding of cation dissolution and aqueous speciation. In-situ Raman experiments of the silica-water system were performed in an externally heated Bassett-type diamond-anvil cell at the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan. Natural quartz samples (from Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming) were loaded in the sample chamber with de-ionized or spectrographic water. All experiments used doubly polished rhenium gaskets with a thickness of 200 μ m, diameter of 1.0 mm, and a 500 μ m drillhole for the sample chamber. Temperature was measured using K-type thermocouples wrapped around both the upper and lower diamond anvils. Pressures are obtained on the basis of the shift of the 464 cm-1 Raman mode of quartz. In-situ Raman spectra were collected from 250-1200 cm-1, focusing on the vibrational modes of aqueous silica species at temperatures up to 700 ° C and pressures up to 14 kbar. We observed Si-O stretching modes attributable to dimer (H6Si2O7, 965 cm-1) and monomer (H4SiO4, 771 cm-1) aqueous silica species. The relative intensities of these two bands as a function of isochoric heating place constraints on the energetics of the polymerization reaction, if we assume that the intensity ratio is linearly related to concentration ratio. We have been able to perform experiments along two different isochores (0.9 and 0.75 g/cm3, respectively) from which we are able to derive the enthalpy of reaction.

  1. Land use change affects biogenic silica pool distribution in a subtropical soil toposequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Unzué-Belmonte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Land use change (deforestation has several negative consequences for the soil system. It is known to increase erosion rates, which affect the distribution of elements in soils. In this context, the crucial nutrient Si has received little attention, especially in a tropical context. Therefore, we studied the effect of land conversion and erosion intensity on the biogenic silica pools in a subtropical soil in the south of Brazil. Biogenic silica (BSi was determined using a novel alkaline continuous extraction where Si / Al ratios of the fractions extracted are used to distinguish BSi and other soluble fractions: Si / Al > 5 for the biogenic AlkExSi (alkaline-extractable Si and Si / Al < 5 for the non-biogenic AlkExSi. Our study shows that deforestation can rapidly (< 50 years deplete the biogenic AlkExSi pool in soils depending on the slope of the study site (10–53 %, with faster depletion in steeper sites. We show that higher erosion in steeper sites implies increased accumulation of biogenic Si in deposition zones near the bottom of the slope, where rapid burial can cause removal of BSi from biologically active zones. Our study highlights the interaction of erosion strength and land use for BSi redistribution and depletion in a soil toposequence, with implications for basin-scale Si cycling.

  2. Importance of particle formation to reconstructed water column biogenic silica fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moriceau, B.; Gallinari, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Ragueneau, O.

    2007-01-01

    The particles sinking out of the ocean's surface layer are made up of a mixture of living and dead algal cells, fecal pellets, and aggregates, while the parameters used to describe the behavior of biogenic silica (bSiO2) in today's models are experimentally determined on freely suspended diatoms

  3. Effects of iron availability on pigment signature and biogenic silica production in the coastal diatom Chaetoceros gracilis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Biswas, H.; Bandyopadhyay, D.

    The effects of iron availability on pigment signature and biogenic silica production were investigated for the first time in the coastal diatom Chaetoceros gracilis (isolated from the SW coast of the Bay of Bengal, India). Results revealed...

  4. Skeletonema cf. costatum biogenic silica production rate determinated by PDMPO method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guicheng; Leng, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yuanyuan; Li, Xia; Sun, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Diatoms are the only ecological phytoplankton that require silicic acid for growth. They are also the dominant contributor of ocean's total primary productivity. Generation and circulation with silica walls, which the siliceous organisms form, is an important component of the marine biological pump. It is crucial to the study of the operational mechanisms of biological pump with different sea areas. Moreover, it is the key link to the study of global silicon cycle. This paper introduces the basic mechanism of the formation of diatom silica walls and a new way of researching silicic acid metabolism, namely the 2-(4-pyridyl)-5-((4-(2-dimethylaminoethylaminocarbamoyl)- methoxy)phenyl)oxazole (PDMPO) dyeing method. Under a fluorescence microscope after excitation with bright green fluorescence, it can combine with silicic acid to form a complex into the Si deposition within diatom cells. The advantage of this method is that it can monitor the metabolism of silicate after adding PDMPO. For experimentation and sample collection in each of the specified time points, samples were determinated through the unutilized silicic acid, silica dissoluble intracellular and Si deposition within diatom cells, not only using hot alkaline digestions method but also PDMPO dyeing method. Results showed a good linear relationship between PDMPO fluorescent value and biogenic silica concentration. It was also indicated that PDMPO had no deleterious impact on Skeletonema cf. costatum growth for 34 h and was useful for tracking newly-deposited biogenic silica in diatoms' frustules.

  5. Land use change affects biogenic silica pool distribution in a subtropical soil toposequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzué-Belmonte, Dácil; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Opfergelt, Sophie; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Barão, Lúcia; Minella, Jean; Meire, Patrick; Struyf, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Land use change (deforestation) has several negative consequences for the soil system. It is known to increase erosion rates, which affect the distribution of elements in soils. In this context, the crucial nutrient Si has received little attention, especially in a tropical context. Therefore, we studied the effect of land conversion and erosion intensity on the biogenic silica pools in a subtropical soil in the south of Brazil. Biogenic silica (BSi) was determined using a novel alkaline continuous extraction where Si / Al ratios of the fractions extracted are used to distinguish BSi and other soluble fractions: Si / Al > 5 for the biogenic AlkExSi (alkaline-extractable Si) and Si / Al soils depending on the slope of the study site (10-53 %), with faster depletion in steeper sites. We show that higher erosion in steeper sites implies increased accumulation of biogenic Si in deposition zones near the bottom of the slope, where rapid burial can cause removal of BSi from biologically active zones. Our study highlights the interaction of erosion strength and land use for BSi redistribution and depletion in a soil toposequence, with implications for basin-scale Si cycling.

  6. Composition and variability in the export of biogenic silica in the Changjiang River and the effect of Three Gorges Reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ran, X.; Liu, S.; Liu, J.; Zang, J.; Che, H.; Ma, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) plays an essential role in biogeochemical processes, but is still poorly characterized in the river system. This study addressed the biogenic silica (BSi) composition, origin and variation in the Changjiang River, and estimated the impacts of natural processes and human activities on

  7. Synthesis and biocompatibility assessment of sugarcane bagasse-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alhazmi, Mohammad; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2017-02-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is a fibrous material and an excellent bioresource for biogenic silica. Moreover, sugarcane bagasse has low production costs and is a sustainable precursor for the synthesis of biogenic silica nanoparticles (BSNPs). In this study, we synthesized BSNPs using sugarcane bagasse. The acid pretreatment of sugarcane was carried out in an autoclave, which eliminates metal ions and promotes the hydrolysis of organic substances. Residues of the acid pretreatment were incinerated at different temperatures to determine the role of temperature on the formation of BSNPs. The crystalline nature and morphology of the prepared BSNPs were analyzed using X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis result indicates that the prepared BSNPs have an amorphous nature. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that the BSNPs have an irregular shape with a porous morphology. The biocompatibility of BSNPs was studied by assessing their effect on human lung fibroblast cell viability, morphology, mitochondrial function, reactive oxygen species, and gene expression. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays and microscopy studies suggested that BSNPs do not affect cell viability or morphology. BSNPs slightly affect the mitochondrial membrane potential at high doses. In addition, BSNPs decreased the percentage of human lung fibroblast cell in G1 and G2/M phases and increased the S population. These studies revealed that the BSNPs were biocompatible, indicating that they may be applicable for biomedical applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 340-349, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  9. The behavior of biogenic silica-rich rocks and volcanic tuffs as pozzolanic additives in cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulis, Dimitris; Stamatakis, Michael; Anastasatou, Marianthi

    2015-04-01

    late compressive strength, the worst performing cement was the one with the lowest reactive silica content with biogenic opal-A as the only reactive pozzolana constituent. Cements produced with perlites, raw materials consisting mainly of a glassy phase, were characterized by higher strength and a rather ordinary specific surface area. Cements produced with Turkish zeolite tuff and Milos glassy tuff exhibited higher late compressive strength than those mentioned above. The highest strength was achieved by the implementation of Australian diatomite for cement production. Its 28 day strength exceeded that of the control mixture consisting of 95% clinker and 5% gypsum. That could be attributed to both, high specific surface of cement and reactive SiO2 of diatomite. Therefore, a preliminary assessment regarding late strength of pozzolanic cements could be obtained by the consideration of two main parameters, namely: specific surface area of cement and reactive silica content of pozzolana.

  10. Influence of persistent exchangeable oxygen on biogenic silica δ18O in deep sea cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, A. J.; Spero, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    The removal of exchangeable oxygen from biogenic opal prior to IRMS analysis is critical during sample preparation. Exchangeable oxygen is found in the form of hydroxyl and between defects within the amorphous silicate lattice structure. Typical analytical procedures utilize a variety of dehydroxylation methods to eliminate this exchangeable oxygen, including vacuum dehydroxylation and prefluorination. Such methods are generally considered sufficient for elimination of non-lattice bound oxygen that would obfuscate environmental oxygen isotopic signals contained within the silicate tetrahedra. δ18O data that are then empirically calibrated against modern hydrographic data, and applied down core in paleoceanographic applications. We have conducted a suite of experiments on purified marine opal samples using the new microfluorination method (Menicucci et al., 2013). Our data demonstrate that the amount of exchangeable oxygen in biogenic opal decreases as sample age/depth in core increases. These changes are not accounted for by current researchers. Further, our experimental data indicate that vacuum dehydroxylation does not eliminate all exchangeable oxygen, even after hydroxyl is undetectable. We have conducted experiments to quantify the amount of time necessary to ensure vacuum dehydroxylation has eliminated exchangeable oxygen so that opal samples are stable prior to δ18Odiatom analysis. Our experiments suggest that previously generated opal δ18O data may contain a variable down-core offset due to the presence of exchangeable, non-lattice bound oxygen sources. Our experiments indicate that diatom silica requires dehydroxylation for ≥ 44 hours at 1060oC to quantitatively remove all non-lattice bound oxygen. Further, this variable amount of exchangeable oxygen may be responsible for some of the disagreement between existing empirical calibrations based on core-top diatom frustule remains. Analysis of δ18Odiatom values after this long vacuum dehydroxylation

  11. Vertical Distributions of Coccolithophores, PIC, POC, Biogenic Silica, and Chlorophyll a Throughout the Global Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, William M; Bowler, Bruce C; Drapeau, David T; Lubelczyk, Laura C; Lyczkowski, Emily

    2018-01-01

    Coccolithophores are a critical component of global biogeochemistry, export fluxes, and seawater optical properties. We derive globally significant relationships to estimate integrated coccolithophore and coccolith concentrations as well as integrated concentrations of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) from their respective surface concentration. We also examine surface versus integral relationships for other biogeochemical variables contributed by all phytoplankton (e.g., chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon) or diatoms (biogenic silica). Integrals are calculated using both 100 m integrals and euphotic zone integrals (depth of 1% surface photosynthetically available radiation). Surface concentrations are parameterized in either volumetric units (e.g., m -3 ) or values integrated over the top optical depth. Various relationships between surface concentrations and integrated values demonstrate that when surface concentrations are above a specific threshold, the vertical distribution of the property is biased to the surface layer, and when surface concentrations are below a specific threshold, the vertical distributions of the properties are biased to subsurface maxima. Results also show a highly predictable decrease in explained-variance as vertical distributions become more vertically heterogeneous. These relationships have fundamental utility for extrapolating surface ocean color remote sensing measurements to 100 m depth or to the base of the euphotic zone, well beyond the depths of detection for passive ocean color remote sensors. Greatest integrated concentrations of PIC, coccoliths, and coccolithophores are found when there is moderate stratification at the base of the euphotic zone.

  12. Distribution and sources of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and biogenic silica in the sediments of Chilika lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazneen, Sadaf; Raju, N. Janardhana

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the spatial and vertical distribution of organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and biogenic silica (BSi) in the sedimentary environments of Asia's largest brackish water lagoon. Surface and core sediments were collected from various locations of the Chilika lagoon and were analysed for grain-size distribution and major elements in order to understand their distribution and sources. Sand is the dominant fraction followed by silt + clay. Primary production within the lagoon, terrestrial input from river discharge and anthropogenic activities in the vicinity of the lagoon control the distribution of OC, TN, TP and BSi in the surface as well as in the core sediments. Low C/N ratios in the surface sediments (3.49-3.41) and cores (4-11.86) suggest that phytoplankton and macroalgae may be major contributors of organic matter (OM) in the lagoon. BSi is mainly associated with the mud fraction. Core C5 from Balugaon region shows the highest concentration of OC ranging from 0.58-2.34%, especially in the upper 30 cm, due to direct discharge of large amounts of untreated sewage into the lagoon. The study highlights that Chilika is a dynamic ecosystem with a large contribution of OM by autochthonous sources with some input from anthropogenic sources as well.

  13. Effects of iron availability on pigment signature and biogenic silica production in the coastal diatom Chaetoceros gracilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimanti Biswas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of iron availability on pigment signature and biogenic silica production were investigated for the first time in the coastal diatom Chaetoceros gracilis (isolated from the SW coast of the Bay of Bengal, India. Results revealed that increase in iron supply considerably increases chlorophyll a based specific growth rates, whereas, it decreases the values of diatoxanthin index and photoprotective to light harvesting pigment ratios. It is likely that, under iron stress C. gracilis activated a strong photoprotection mechanism by maximising the conversion of diadinoxanthin to diatoxanthin and by increasing overall amount of photoprotective pigments relative to light harvesting pigments. The xanthophyll cycle comprising of diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin seems to be the principal photoprotective mechanism in C. gracilis and is consistent with some earlier studies. It is suggested that under iron limited conditions the diatoxanthin index and the ratio of photoprotective to light harvesting pigments can be used as physiological markers for iron stress in C. gracilis. The ratios of biogenic silica to chlorophyll a were considerably decreased with increasing iron supply indicating the possibility of reduced cellular silica content under iron enriched conditions; however, supplementary information is required to confirm this observation.

  14. Characterization of a silica-PVA hybrid for high density and stable silver dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorin, Bryce, E-mail: bryce.dorin@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Zhu, Guangyu, E-mail: g.zhu@liverpool.ac.uk [Lairdside Laser Engineering Centre, The University of Liverpool, Campbeltown Road, Merseyside, CH41 9HP (United Kingdom); Parkinson, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.parkinson@manchester.ac.uk [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Perrie, Walter, E-mail: wpfemto1@liverpool.ac.uk [Lairdside Laser Engineering Centre, The University of Liverpool, Campbeltown Road, Merseyside, CH41 9HP (United Kingdom); Benyezzar, Med, E-mail: med.benyezzar@manchester.ac.uk [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Scully, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.scully@manchester.ac.uk [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    A silica and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hybrid material mixed with a high density of silver ions is synthesised and characterized in this work. The hybrid material can be cast into thick films, which we determined to be homogeneous using Raman spectroscopy. We observed that the silver ions remain stable in the material over time and at temperatures of 100 °C, which represents a marked improvement over previous solid solutions of silver. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis indicate the rapid activation of silver at 173 °C, resulting in a dense formation of silver nanoparticles within the hybrid. The activation of silver was also demonstrated in 3-dimensional geometries using femtosecond duration laser pulses. These results illustrate the silica-PVA hybrid is an attractive material for developing silver-insulator composites. - Highlights: • A novel PVA-silica hybrid is developed for silver ion dissolution. • The hybrid exhibits a high silver saturation point and good silver stability. • Heating and laser irradiation are capable of converting the silver ions to metal. • The hybrid material enables the fabrication of 3D metal-insulator composites.

  15. The Effects of Mg and Al on Diagenetically Induced Phase Changes in Biogenic Opal-A: Implications for Biogenic Silica as Paleoenvironmental Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryer, A. D.; Dodd, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen variations in biogenic opal (e.g. diatom frustules, sponge spicules) have been shown to be reliable proxies of paleoenvironmental conditions such as water temperature and salinity; however, diagenetic processes may alter these values by several permil. In marine sediments, a primary concern is the effect of opal phase changes on the chemical and structural composition of the diatom silica. For example, oxygen isotope values of opal in the Monterey Formation, California, are well correlated with the phase change from opal-A to opal-CT and microcrystal quartz as a result of increasing geothermal temperatures with depth (Murata et al., 1997). Additionally, a number of studies have suggested that the presence of metallic cations (e.g. Mg, Al, Fe) in host sediments may affect the rate of phase transitions from opal-A to opal-CT during diagenesis. However, the timing and oxygen isotope fractionation associated with opal phase changes is not well constrained. Opal-A from cultured marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii) was subjected to elevated temperatures (150°C) in acid digestion vessels for 4 - 6 weeks to initiate opal-CT phase changes. During the experiments, magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) were added to pure diatom silica to constrain the effects of Mg and Al on the timing of opal-CT formation and quantify the structural and isotopic (δ18O) changes that occur during these transitions.

  16. A shift in the biogenic silica of sediment in the Larsen B continental shelf, off the Eastern Antarctic Peninsula, resulting from climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Sañé

    Full Text Available In 2002, section B of the Larsen ice shelf, off of the Eastern Antarctic Peninsula, collapsed and created the opportunity to study whether the changes at the sea surface left evidence in the sedimentary record. Biogenic silica is major constituent of Antarctic marine sediment, and its presence in the sediment column is associated with diatom production in the euphotic zone. The abundance of diatom valves and the number of sponge spicules in the biogenic silica was analyzed to determine how the origin of the biogenic silica in the upper layers of the sediment column responded to recent environmental changes. Diatom valves were present only in the upper 2 cm of sediment, which roughly corresponds to the period after the collapse of the ice shelf. In contrast, sponge spicules, a more robust form of biogenic silica, were also found below the upper 2 cm layer of the sediment column. Our results indicate that in this region most of the biogenic silica in the sedimentary record originated from sponge spicules rather than diatoms during the time when the sea surface was covered by the Larsen ice shelf. Since the collapse of the ice shelf, the development of phytoplankton blooms and the consequent influx of diatom debris to the seabed have shifted the biogenic silica record to one dominated by diatom debris, as occurs in most of the Antarctic marine sediment. This shift provides further evidence of the anthropogenic changes to the benthic habitats of the Antarctic and will improve the interpretation of the sedimentary record in Polar Regions where these events occur.

  17. The Deep-Sea Natural Products, Biogenic Polyphosphate (Bio-PolyP and Biogenic Silica (Bio-Silica, as Biomimetic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: Fabrication of a Morphogenetically-Active Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Draenert

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone defects in human, caused by fractures/nonunions or trauma, gain increasing impact and have become a medical challenge in the present-day aging population. Frequently, those fractures require surgical intervention which ideally relies on autografts or suboptimally on allografts. Therefore, it is pressing and likewise challenging to develop bone substitution materials to heal bone defects. During the differentiation of osteoblasts from their mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells and of osteoclasts from their hemopoietic precursor cells, a lineage-specific release of growth factors and a trans-lineage homeostatic cross-talk via signaling molecules take place. Hence, the major hurdle is to fabricate a template that is functioning in a way mimicking the morphogenetic, inductive role(s of the native extracellular matrix. In the last few years, two naturally occurring polymers that are produced by deep-sea sponges, the biogenic polyphosphate (bio-polyP and biogenic silica (bio-silica have also been identified as promoting morphogenetic on both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These polymers elicit cytokines that affect bone mineralization (hydroxyapatite formation. In this manner, bio-silica and bio-polyP cause an increased release of BMP-2, the key mediator activating the anabolic arm of the hydroxyapatite forming cells, and of RANKL. In addition, bio-polyP inhibits the progression of the pre-osteoclasts to functionally active osteoclasts. Based on these findings, new bioinspired strategies for the fabrication of bone biomimetic templates have been developed applying 3D-printing techniques. Finally, a strategy is outlined by which these two morphogenetically active polymers might be used to develop a novel functionally active polymer.

  18. Chalcedony (a crystalline variety of silica): biogenic origin in electric organs from living Psammobatis extenta (family Rajidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado Figueroa, María; Barrera, Facundo; Cesaretti, Nora N

    2008-10-01

    The electric organs of electric fish have been used extensively for the study of peripheral cholinergic synapses. Aluminum and silicon have been observed in the electrocytes of Psammobatis extenta, a fish belonging to the family Rajidae, using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectrometry. Based on this evidence, the presence of silica minerals has been documented by means of mineralogical techniques. Electric organ cryostat sections and subcellular fractions were observed using a Leica DMLP mineralogical microscope. The shape, size and color, among other properties, were analyzed in plane-polarized light, while birefringence and the extinction angle, which allow for mineral identification, were observed through crossed-polarized illumination. The distribution of chalcedony, an oxide silicon mineral, in the sections and all the fractions of the electric organ was recorded. X-ray diffraction analysis of the electric organ segments showed a similar result, with a low-quartz variety. Chalcedony precipitation occurred at a specific pH (7-8) and oxidation potential (Eh; 0.0 to -0.2). This observation supports the important role played by pH and Eh conditions in silica precipitation in electrocytes, as has been reported in geological environments. It is possible that silica formation and silica degradation in electric organs are also related to the enzymes, silicatein and silicase, that direct the polymerization and depolymerization of amorphous silica in sponges. Carbonic anhydrases (silicase) are involved in physiological pH regulation. Crystallization of chalcedony via spiral growth from a partially polymerized fluid is consistent with processes known to occur in organic systems. This is the first time that a biogenically produced crystalline mineral phase (i.e., chalcedony) has been observed in the electrocytes and cholinergic nerves from living electric fish.

  19. Different effects of silica added internal or external on in vitro dissolution of indomethacin hot-melt extrudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yulong; Yuan, Meng; Deng, Yueyang; Ke, Xue; Ci, Tianyuan

    2017-12-20

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect on the dissolution behavior when silica was added in different ways. The solid dispersion was prepared by hot-melt extrusion (HME) using indomethacin (IND) as a model drug and Kollidon VA64 as a carrier. In order to change the dissolution behavior, the silica was added during or after the HME respectively, to obtain the corresponding silica internal-added solid dispersion (InSD) and silica external-added solid dispersion (ExSD). According to the results, the internal-added silicon dioxide could reduce the dissolution rate from 66.91%/h to 24.12%/h and the water infiltration rate from 0.37mm/h to 0.16mm/h in the phosphate buffer solution (PBS) of pH 6.8, so the formulation of InSD had a significant sustained release effect. But the infiltration rate of the ExSD was increased to 13.22mm/h when silica was added external, and the density of VA64 in the powder was decreased from 541.87mg/cm3 to 141.87mg/cm3, leading to a weak resistance to the external force, and the powder was easy to be dispersed after wetted by water so that the formulation of ExSD had a relatively higher dissolution rate. This phenomenon was more visible when the phosphate buffer solution was changed to pH 5.6 in which the API was more difficult to be dissolved. Accordingly, different addition ways of aerosil would change release behavior of the HME preparation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Age and genesis of the Upper Cenozoic deposits of the Tyumen oblast (Western Siberia) enriched in biogenic silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, G. N.; Oreshkina, T. V.; Smirnov, P. V.; Konstantinov, A. O.; Kuzmina, O. B.

    2017-07-01

    An integrated micropaleontological study of deposits enriched in biogenic silica was conducted on material drilled in the Zyryanka and Uspenka fields of the southwestern Tyumen oblast (Western Siberia). The data obtained on palynology and diatoms allowed the assignment of the Zyryanka Field to the Turtas Formation (lower part of the Chattian Stage of the Oligocene) and the deposits of the Uspenka Field to be dated as Pleistocene. The absence in the Zyryanka Field diatom assemblage of in situ marine taxa and the mass occurrence of freshwater species, gemmuloscleres of freshwater sponges, and zygospores of Zygnematales algae suggest that a nonmarine basin existed in the early Turtas time. A considerable proportion of redeposited diatoms and dinocysts in the Quaternary deposits of the Uspenka Field suggest strong erosional processes during the time of deposition.

  1. Advances in the Determination of the Speciation of the Carbon Associated with Biogenic Silica Produced by Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masion, A.; Alexandre, A. E.; Ziarelli, F.; Viel, S.; Santos, G.

    2016-12-01

    Biogenic silica resulting from the precipitation of dissolved Si through biological processes in plants, often contains small amounts of occluded organic carbon. These phases, called phytoliths, have a long persistence in soils, making them tracers of past conditions. In this context, the knowledge of the carbon speciation associated with phytoliths bears significant importance in examining the carbon dynamics in soils. With carbon concentrations as low as the 0.1% range, examining the nature of organic carbon remains very challenging, and available tools (e.g. pyrolysis) are often prone to serious artifacts. Recent improvements of microwave sources enabled the application of the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) technique to NMR, thereby establishing a new non-destructive tool for the qualitative and quantitative determination of the carbon speciation. Applied to the analysis of phytoliths, this method showed the presence of carbons from different sources within the sample: About 20% of the signal correspond to carbohydrates, and are assigned to photosynthetic carbon; the marked alkyl, N-alkyl and carbonyl signals indicate a significant proportion of proteins. This is consistent with the hypothesis that parts of the carbon associated with the phytoliths is imported into the host plant via uptake from the soil. Finally, lignins, glomalin-like and/or humic-like compounds are minor species associated with biogenic silica. This speciation was obtained overnight with a DNP-NMR set-up with an excellent sensitivity (few tens of weight ppm); the same spectrum on a standard NMR spectrometer would have required at least 250 days of data acquisition. The considerable gain in sensitivity associated with the use of DNP now makes NMR a relevant technique for the analysis of environmental samples.

  2. Application of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR for assessing biogenic silica sample purity in geochemical analyses and palaeoenvironmental research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. A. Swann

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of a rapid and non-destructive method to assess purity levels in samples of biogenic silica prior to geochemical/isotope analysis remains a key objective in improving both the quality and use of such data in environmental and palaeoclimatic research. Here a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR mass-balance method is demonstrated for calculating levels of contamination in cleaned sediment core diatom samples from Lake Baikal, Russia. Following the selection of end-members representative of diatoms and contaminants in the analysed samples, a mass-balance model is generated to simulate the expected FTIR spectra for a given level of contamination. By fitting the sample FTIR spectra to the modelled FTIR spectra and calculating the residual spectra, the optimum best-fit model and level of contamination is obtained. When compared to X-ray Fluorescence (XRF the FTIR method portrays the main changes in sample contamination through the core sequence, permitting its use in instances where other, destructive, techniques are not appropriate. The ability to analyse samples of <1 mg enables, for the first time, routine analyses of small sized samples. Discrepancies between FTIR and XRF measurements can be attributed to FTIR end-members not fully representing all contaminants and problems in using XRF to detect organic matter external to the diatom frustule. By analysing samples with both FTIR and XRF, these limitations can be eliminated to accurately identify contaminated samples. Future, routine use of these techniques in palaeoenvironmental research will therefore significantly reduce the number of erroneous measurements and so improve the accuracy of biogenic silica/diatom based climate reconstructions.

  3. Mesoporous silica materials: From physico-chemical properties to enhanced dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Aziz; Kettiger, Helene; Schoubben, Aurélie; Rosenholm, Jessica M; Ambrogi, Valeria; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2017-09-28

    New approaches in pharmaceutical chemistry have resulted in more complex drug molecules in the quest to achieve higher affinity to their targets. However, these 'highly active' drugs can also suffer from poor water solubility. Hence, poorly water soluble drugs became a major challenge in drug formulation, and this problem is increasing, as currently about 40 of the marketed drugs and 90% of drug candidates are classified as poorly water soluble. Various approaches exist to circumvent poor water solubility and poor dissolution rate in aqueous environment, however, each having disadvantages and certain limitations. Recently, mesoporous silica materials (MSMs) have been proposed to be used as matrices for enhancing the apparent solubility and dissolution rate of different drug molecules. MSMs are ideal candidates for this purpose, as silica is a "generally regarded as safe" (GRAS) material, is biodegradable, and can be readily surface-modified in order to optimize drug loading and subsequent release in the human body. The major advantage of mesoporous silica as drug delivery systems (DDSs) for poorly water soluble drugs lies in their pore size, pore morphology, and versatility in alteration of the surface groups, which can result in optimized interactions between a drug candidate and MSM carrier by modifying the pore surfaces. Furthermore, the drug of interest can be loaded into these pores in a preferably amorphous state, which can increase the drug dissolution properties dramatically. The highlights of this review include a critical discussion about the modification of the physico-chemical properties of MSMs and how these physico-chemical modifications influence the drug loading and the subsequent dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs. It aims to further promote the use of MSMs as alternative strategy to common methods like solubility enhancement by cyclodextrins, micronization, or microemulsion techniques. This review can provide guidance on how to tailor MSMs

  4. A laser fluorination method for oxygen isotope analysis of biogenic silica and a new oxygen isotope calibration of modern diatoms in freshwater environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Justin P.; Sharp, Zachary D.

    2010-02-01

    An empirical calibration for the oxygen isotope fractionation between biogenic silica and water was determined for diatom frustules sampled from living diatom communities in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico, USA. Over a temperature range from 5.1 to 37.8 °C, the silica-water fractionation is defined by the equation 1000 ln α (silica-water) = 2.39(±0.13) × 10 6T-2 + 4.23(±1.49). This relationship is in close agreement with other published silica-water fractionation factors for laboratory cultured diatom samples; however, it is as much as 8‰ lower than equilibrium quartz-water fractionations and 3-4‰ lower than observed silica-water fractionations in diatomaceous silica collected from sediment traps and sediment cores. There are three possible explanations for the disparate silica-water fractionation factors observed in diatom silica: (1) silica does not precipitate in equilibrium with ambient water, (2) silica does precipitate in equilibrium with ambient water, but the silica-water fractionation factor for diatom silica is considerably less than the equilibrium fractionation factor for quartz-water, or (3) silica precipitation is influenced by a 'vital' effect, where the δ 18O value of the water inside the diatom cell walls is lower than the δ 18O values of ambient water. Post-mortem loss of organic material results in an alteration or 'maturation' of diatom silica in which silica reequilibrates with a silica-water fractionation closer to the equilibrium quartz-water fractionation. Alteration is likely to occur rapidly after the diatom frustule loses its organic coating, either as it settles through the water column or at the sediment-water interface; δ 18O values recorded by paleo-diatom silica therefore do not record growing conditions but more likely record conditions at the sediment-water interface. In the case of lacustrine environments, where the bottom water remains at a nearly constant 4 °C, the reequilibration of diatom silica with

  5. The Contribution of Siliceous Sponges to the Export of Biogenic Silica to Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, M.; López-Acosta, M.; Sitjà, C.; García, M.

    2016-02-01

    The cycling of silicon (Si) in the various marine compartments plays a pivotal role in the complex biogeochemical network of the ocean. Major Si fluxes related to diatom populations haven been quantified and discussed over the last decades. Nevertheless, very little information is still available about the contribution that siliceous sponges might make to those Si fluxes. Because extensive, dense populations of highly silicified sponges are long known to be a common feature of many shelfs and slope areas of the ocean, the current gap in knowledge may be critical to improve current quantifications of both global and regional Si budgets. Here we present data about the relative contribution of sponge, diatom, and radiolarian silica to marine sediments, using cores collected from 9 different environments across the worlds' oceans, including the Antarctic Ocean. We also show that standard protocols based on wet alkaline digestions of marine sediments are little efficient to reliably retrieve the contribution of sponge silica. We discuss problems, uncertainties, and alternative approaches for estimating the silica in sediments.

  6. Impacts of seawater saturation state (ΩA = 0.4-4.6) and temperature (10, 25 °C) on the dissolution kinetics of whole-shell biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Justin B.; Ghazaleh, Maite N.; Connolly, Brian; Westfield, Isaac; Castillo, Karl D.

    2016-11-01

    Anthropogenic increase of atmospheric pCO2 since the Industrial Revolution has caused seawater pH to decrease and seawater temperatures to increase-trends that are expected to continue into the foreseeable future. Myriad experimental studies have investigated the impacts of ocean acidification and warming on marine calcifiers' ability to build protective shells and skeletons. No studies, however, have investigated the combined impacts of ocean acidification and warming on the whole-shell dissolution kinetics of biogenic carbonates. Here, we present the results of experiments designed to investigate the effects of seawater saturation state (ΩA = 0.4-4.6) and temperature (10, 25 °C) on gross rates of whole-shell dissolution for ten species of benthic marine calcifiers: the oyster Crassostrea virginica, the ivory barnacle Balanus eburneus, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the conch Strombus alatus, the tropical coral Siderastrea siderea, the temperate coral Oculina arbuscula, the hard clam Mercenaria mercenaria, the soft clam Mya arenaria, the branching bryozoan Schizoporella errata, and the coralline red alga Neogoniolithon sp. These experiments confirm that dissolution rates of whole-shell biogenic carbonates decrease with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) saturation state, increase with temperature, and vary predictably with respect to the relative solubility of the calcifiers' polymorph mineralogy [high-Mg calcite (mol% Mg > 4) ≥ aragonite > low-Mg calcite (mol% Mg carbonates. Furthermore, the severity of the temperature effects on gross dissolution rates also varied with respect to carbonate polymorph solubility, with warming (10-25 °C) exerting the greatest effect on biogenic high-Mg calcite, an intermediate effect on biogenic aragonite, and the least effect on biogenic low-Mg calcite. These results indicate that both ocean acidification and warming will lead to increased dissolution of biogenic carbonates in future oceans, with shells/skeletons composed of the more

  7. Biogenicity of silica precipitation around geysers and hot-spring vents, North Island, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Renaut, R.W. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Rosen, M.R. [Wairakei Research Centre, Taupo (New Zealand). Inst. of Geological and Nuclear Sciences

    1997-01-01

    Before anthropogenic modifications, Ohaaki Pool (Broadlands-Ohaaki) and Dragon`s Mouth Geyser (Wairakei) emitted waters at temperatures of 93--98 C. The siliceous sinter that precipitated around their vents has the characteristics of geyserite, a dense laminated deposit of presumed abiogenic origin, that was precipitated from waters too hot (>73C) to support microbes other than thermophilic bacteria. Petrographic and SEM examinations of the sinters show that they incorporate columnar stromatolites and silicified, laminated stromatolitic mats that contain well-preserved filamentous microbes. At both localities the microbes lack evidence of desiccation or shrinkage, which implies that they were silicified rapidly at or shortly after their death. Although boiling and very hot (>90 C) waters were discharged, temperatures at many sites surrounding the vents remained sufficiently low and moist to support a microbial community that included thermophilic bacteria and cyanobacteria. In these cooler niches, the microbes and their biofilms served as highly favorable templates for the nucleation and growth of amorphous silica, and collectively provided a microbial framework for the laminated accretionary sinter. Some columnar, spicular, and stratiform geyserites are probably not abiotic precipitates, but are true silica stromatolites.

  8. Deep-UV Raman spectroscopic analysis of structure and dissolution rates of silica-rich sodium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, Charles F.; Pierce, Eric M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bovaird, Chase C.

    2011-03-24

    As part of ongoing studies to evaluate the relationships between structural variations in silicate glasses and rates of glass dissolution in aqueous media, molecular structures present in sodium borosilicate glasses of composition Na2O.xB2O3.(3-x)SiO2, with x 1 (Na2O/B2O3 ratio 1), were analyzed using deep-UV Raman spectroscopy. The results were quantified in terms of the fraction of SiO4 tetrahedra with one non-bridging oxygen (Q3) and then correlated with Na2O and B2O3 content. Increasing Na2O was found to raise the fraction of Q3 units in the glasses systematically, in agreement with studies on related glasses, and, as long as the value of x was not too high, contribute to higher rates of dissolution in single pass flow-through testing. The finding was obtained across more than one series of silica-rich glasses prepared for independent dissolution studies. In contrast, dissolution rates were less strongly determined by the Q3 fraction when the value of x was near unity and appeared to grow larger upon further reduction of the Q3 fraction. The results were interpreted to indicate the increasingly important role of network hydrolysis in the glass dissolution mechanism as the BO4 tetrahedron replaces the Q3 unit as the charge-compensating structure for Na+ ions. Finally, the use of deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was found to be advantageous in studying finely powdered glasses in cases where visible Raman spectroscopy suffered from weak Raman scattering and fluorescence interference.

  9. Dissolution of biogenic ooze over basement edifices in the equatorial Pacific with implications for hydrothermal ventilation of the oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B.A.; Spivack, A.J.; Davis, E.E.; Mayer, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that curious closed depressions in carbonate sediments overlying basement edifices are widespread in the equatorial Pacific. A possible mechanism for their creation is dissolution by fluids exiting basement vents from off-axis hydrothermal flow. Quantitative analysis based on the retrograde solubility of calcium carbonate and cooling of basement fluids during ascent provides an estimate for the dissolution capacity of the venting fluids. Comparison of the dissolution capacity and fluid flux with typical equatorial Pacific carbonate mass accumulation rates shows that this mechanism is feasible. By maintaining sediment-free basement outcrops, the process may promote widespread circulation of relatively unaltered seawater in the basement in an area where average sediment thicknesses are 300-500 m. The enhanced ventilation can explain several previously puzzling observations in this region, including anomalously low heat flux, relatively unaltered seawater in the basement, and aerobic and nitrate-reducing microbial activity at the base of the sediments. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  10. Dominating diatoms: investigating the coupling between biogenic silica dynamics, primary production and nitrate uptake in a highly productive coastal fjord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbrecht, K. E.; Varela, D. E.

    2016-02-01

    Diatoms, microscopic algae with siliceous cell walls, account for up to 40% of the annual marine biological carbon fixation and for a significant portion of the export of carbon from the surface to the deep ocean. Diatoms are the largest consumers of dissolved Si (Si(OH)4) in the oceans and, through the photosynthetic process, couple the marine cycles of silicon, carbon, and nitrogen (Si, C, and N). However, current knowledge of the marine Si cycle and the processes affecting its relationship to other marine biogeochemical cycles is limited. To better understand how diatoms link the marine cycles of Si, C and N, we evaluated surface biogenic silica (bSiO2) dynamics and the contribution of diatoms to primary production and nitrate uptake in Saanich Inlet, a highly productive coastal fjord on the west coast of British Columbia, Canada. We examined the monthly euphotic zone distributions of dissolved nutrient, chlorophyll a, and bSiO2 concentrations, and determined bSiO2 production rates and 13C and nitrate (15NO3) uptake rates over a two-year period. Our results indicate that diatoms tend to account for most of the primary production and nitrate uptake in Saanich Inlet, though there are occasional periods of high productivity, and in some cases high diatom biomass, that are not linked to high bSiO2 production. Our results also show that these periods can result in changes to the Si:C and Si:N ratios of suspended particles, which are otherwise relatively stable and close to the expected ratios for nutrient replete diatoms throughout the year. These high primary production/low bSiO2 production periods appear to be connected to changes in the nutrient supply, which in turn leads to changes in phytoplankton community composition. Such changes to the status of the phytoplankton community, if sustained, could have significant implications for the strength of the biological carbon pump.

  11. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, a new method for rapid determination of total organic and inorganic carbon and biogenic silica concentration in lake sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosén, Peter; Vogel, Hendrik; Cunningham, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) to make quantitative measures of total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC) and biogenic silica (BSi) concentrations in sediment. FTIRS is a fast and cost-effective technique and only small sediment samples...... varied between r = 0.84-0.99 for TOC, r = 0.85-0.99 for TIC, and r = 0.68-0.94 for BSi. Because FTIR spectra contain information on a large number of both inorganic and organic components, there is great potential for FTIRS to become an important tool in paleolimnology....

  12. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz eSeiffert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872 and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1 to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  13. The occurrence and significance of biogenic opal in the regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jonathan

    2003-02-01

    Biogenic opal produced by vascular plants, diatoms, and siliceous sponges have been found in soils and terrestrial sediments of all continents except Antarctica since the middle of the 19th century. The opal particles range in size from fine silt to fine sand. Almost all soils contain detectable opal up to levels of 2-3%, and a significant number contain values in excess of 5%. Even higher values have been found from soils and sediments of all continents in a wide range of soil types. The most important factor is poor soil drainage and seasonal to permanent water logging. This encourages the proliferation of silica producing organisms. Such conditions have been found in the soils and aquatic sediments of the monsoonal tropics, tropical rain forests, temperate forests, tropical savanna, tropical islands, semi-arid grasslands and savanna, and temperate woodland and grassland. The presence of a volcanic substrate also appears favourable in some cases, but is not necessary. Biogenic opal preferentially collects in the A horizon of soils and, to a lesser extent, in the B horizon. This preferential distribution facilitates identification of palaeosols in stacked soil sequences. Biogenic opal is also a component of windblown dust, even in arid environments. Biogenic opal is significant to regolith processes in a number of ways. Firstly, as in the case in marine environments, it is likely to be important in silica cycling and storage because of its greater lability compared to quartz. Secondly, dissolution and reprecipitation of opal A as opal CT or micro-quartz may play a role in cementation and silicification of regolith to form silica hardpans and silcrete. Thirdly, the organisms that form biogenic opal can have considerable palaeoenvironmental significance and be valuable in reconstructing regolith evolution. Finally, some forms of biogenic silica, in particular sponge spicules, can present a health hazard. Their high abundance in some soils and sediments needs to be

  14. Impact of surface area of silica particles on dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs: a case study with aceclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Sailaja Chirravuri, S V; Shastri, Nalini R

    2014-01-30

    This study aims to evaluate the impact of surface area of silica particles on in vitro release of poorly soluble drug aceclofenac and their in vivo performances. Mesoporous silicas of different surface area and porosity were synthesized and characterized. Aceclofenac loaded silicas were prepared by solvent evaporation technique and characterized for surface area, pore size, DSC, FTIR and p-XRD. The dissolution efficiency (DE) of the mesoporous and nonporous silica was ∼2 times more than that of plain drug and marketed tablets in acidic discriminating media. A significant enhancement of 189% and 164% in oral bioavailability (AUC0-8) was observed for optimized aceclofenac loaded mesoporous formulation (MS11/72) and nonporous silica (NP), respectively, when compared to plain aceclofenac in male Wistar rats. However, no correlation could be established between the enhancements in their oral bioavailability and their corresponding surface area. The surface area of MS11/72 was 5 times more (∼1011 m(2)/g) when compared to NP (∼200 m(2)/g) and the enhancement in the oral bioavailability was only 1.15 times. This could be due to the limiting value of effective surface area of the drug available for in vitro dissolution beyond which, any further increase in surface area fails to improve the release rate or its bioavailability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of the transport parameters of silica at 30°C in Boom Clay by a combined glass dissolution/diffusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aertsens, M.; Lemmens, K.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In Belgium the disposal of vitrified radioactive waste in Boom Clay is considered. The Boom Clay beneath the Mol-Dessel nuclear zone is a reference methodological site for supporting R and D. Safety studies require to estimate the release rate of hazardous radionuclides from the host glass and their transport rate in Boom Clay. The radionuclides are released as a result of the glass matrix dissolution. In the present Belgian reference 'supercontainer' disposal design, the waste glass is surrounded by a concrete buffer, but in the previous disposal design, a bentonite backfill was foreseen. The close interaction between the dissolving glass and clayey materials was studied using Boom Clay as a reference clay. Dissolution of glass next to clay is described by a model initially developed by Pescatore, according to which at large times the glass dissolution rate is controlled by the transport parameters of dissolved silica in Boom Clay: the apparent diffusion coefficient D and the product?R of the diffusion accessible porosity? and the retardation factor R. The values of these parameters have been measured by diffusion experiments. These values and the Pescatore model are validated by experiments where 32 Si doped glass dissolves next to clay. These experiments allow to determine not only the glass mass loss as a function of time, but also the 32 Si profile in the clay and the pore water composition close to the glass. The combination of these measurements makes it possible to determine all parameters of the Pescatore model. Because at 90 deg. C silica precipitates have been observed next to a dissolving glass by Pozo, the Pescatore model is extended with a precipitation term. Another extension takes into account the finite size of the clay cores. Three combined glass dissolution/diffusion tests with durations up to 1600 days were performed with SON68 glass in compact Boom Clay at 30 deg. C. These tests were

  16. Development of Solid-State Electrochemiluminescence (ECL Sensor Based on Ru(bpy32+-Encapsulated Silica Nanoparticles for the Detection of Biogenic Polyamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Spehar-Délèze

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A solid state electrochemiluminescence (ECL sensor based on Ru(bpy32+-encapsulated silica nanoparticles (RuNP covalently immobilised on a screen printed carbon electrode has been developed and characterised. RuNPs were synthesised using water-in-oil microemulsion method, amino groups were introduced on their surface, and they were characterised by transmission electron microscopy. Aminated RuNPs were covalently immobilised on activate screen-printed carbon electrodes to form a solid state ECL biosensor. The biosensor surfaces were characterised using electrochemistry and scanning electron microscopy, which showed that aminated nanoparticles formed dense 3D layers on the electrode surface thus allowing immobilisation of high amount of Ru(bpy32+. The developed sensor was used for ECL detection of biogenic polyamines, namely spermine, spermidine, cadaverine and putrescine. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity and stability.

  17. Mixed biogenic and hydrothermal quartz in Permian lacustrine shale of Santanghu Basin, NW China: implications for penecontemporaneous transformation of silica minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xin; Liu, Yiqun; Yang, Wan; Zhou, Dingwu; Wang, Shuangshuang; Jin, Mengqi; Sun, Bin; Fan, Tingting

    2018-01-01

    The cycling of various isomorphs of authigenic silica minerals is a complex and long-term process. A special type of composite quartz (Qc) grains in tuffaceous shale of Permian Lucaogou Formation in the sediment-starved volcanically and hydrothermally active intracontinental lacustrine Santanghu rift basin (NW China) is studied in detail to demonstrate such processes. Samples from one well in the central basin were subject to petrographic, elemental chemical, and fluid inclusion analyses. About 200 Qc-bearing laminae are 0.1-2 mm and mainly 1 mm thick and intercalated within tuffaceous shale laminae. The Qc grains occur as framework grains and are dispersed in igneous feldspar-dominated matrix, suggesting episodic accumulation. The Qc grains are bedding-parallel, uniform in size (100 s µm), elongate, and radial in crystal pattern, suggesting a biogenic origin. Qc grains are composed of a core of anhedral microcrystalline quartz and an outer part of subhedral mega-quartz grains, whose edges are composed of small euhedral quartz crystals, indicating multiple episodic processes of recrystallization and overgrowth. Abundance of Al and Ti in quartz crystals and estimated temperature from fluid inclusions in Qc grains indicate that processes are related to hydrothermal fluids. Finally, the Qc grains are interpreted as original silica precipitation in microorganism (algae?) cysts, which were reworked by bottom currents and altered by hydrothermal fluids to recrystalize and overgrow during penecontemporaneous shallow burial. It is postulated that episodic volcanic and hydrothermal activities had changed lake water chemistry, temperature, and nutrient supply, resulting in variations in microorganic productivities and silica cycling. The transformation of authigenic silica from amorphous to well crystallized had occurred in a short time span during shallow burial.

  18. Contribution of phytoliths to total biogenic silica volumes in the tropical rivers of Malaysia and associated implications for the marine biogeochemical cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jiaye; Liu, Sen; Liu, Yanguang; Ma, Yongxing; Ran, Xiangbin

    2016-09-01

    The contribution of phytoliths to total biogenic silica (BSi) volumes in rivers worldwide, and the associated implications for the biogeochemical cycle, require in-depth study. Based on samples from rivers in Peninsular Malaysia, this project investigated the source and characteristics of BSi found in Asian tropical rivers, as well as the process of reverse weathering taking place in these fluvial systems. Results indicated that BSi samples collected in sediments consisted of phytolith, diatom and sponge spicules. Phytoliths, predominantly of the elongate form, comprised 92.8%-98.3% of BSi in the Pahang River. Diatom BSi in this river consisted mainly of pennatae diatoms, but represented a relatively small proportion of the total BSi volume. However, diatom BSi (predominantly of the Centricae form) was more prevalent in the Pontian and Endau Rivers with shares of 68.8% and 79.3% of the total BSi volumes, respectively, than Pahang River. Carbon contents of the BSi particulates ranged from 1.85% to 10.8% with an average of 4.79%. These values are higher than those recorded in other studies to date, and indicate that BSi plays a major role in controlling permanent carbon burial. This study suggests that phytoliths from terrestrial plants are the primary constituents of BSi in the rivers of Peninsular Malaysia, and therefore represent a significant proportion of the coastal silica budget.

  19. Synthesis of novel core-shell structured dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres and their application for enhancing the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chao; Sun, Xiaohu; Zhao, Zongzhe; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Liu, Ying; Gao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Novel core-shell dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres (DMSS) with a tunable pore size were synthesized successfully using a styrene monomer as a channel template for the core and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a channel template for the shell in order to improve the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. Simvastatin was used as a model drug and loaded into DMSS and the mesoporous core without the shell (MSC) by the solvent evaporation method. The drug loading efficiency of DMSS and MSC were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). Characterization, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that simvastatin adsorbed in DMSS and MSC was in an amorphous state, and in vitro release test results demonstrated that both DMSS and MSC increased the water solubility and dissolution rate of simvastatin. The shell structure of DMSS was able to regulate the release of simvastatin compared with MSC. It is worth noting that DMSS has significant potential as a carrier for improving the dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs and reducing the rapid release. - Highlights: • A novel core-shell DMSS is prepared for improving the dissolution rate of simvastatin. • The diffusional resistance of the mesoporous shell can delay and regulate drug release. • Simvastatin absorbed in DMSS exists in amorphous form due to spatial confinement

  20. Synthesis of novel core-shell structured dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres and their application for enhancing the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chao, E-mail: wuchao27@126.com [Department of Pharmaceutics, Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China); Sun, Xiaohu [Management Center for Experiments, Bohai University, 19 Keji Road, Songshan District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121000 (China); Zhao, Zongzhe; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Liu, Ying [Department of Pharmaceutics, Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China); Gao, Yu, E-mail: gaoyu_1116@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, 40 Songpo Road, Linghe District, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province 121001 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Novel core-shell dual-mesoporous silica nanospheres (DMSS) with a tunable pore size were synthesized successfully using a styrene monomer as a channel template for the core and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a channel template for the shell in order to improve the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. Simvastatin was used as a model drug and loaded into DMSS and the mesoporous core without the shell (MSC) by the solvent evaporation method. The drug loading efficiency of DMSS and MSC were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). Characterization, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that simvastatin adsorbed in DMSS and MSC was in an amorphous state, and in vitro release test results demonstrated that both DMSS and MSC increased the water solubility and dissolution rate of simvastatin. The shell structure of DMSS was able to regulate the release of simvastatin compared with MSC. It is worth noting that DMSS has significant potential as a carrier for improving the dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs and reducing the rapid release. - Highlights: • A novel core-shell DMSS is prepared for improving the dissolution rate of simvastatin. • The diffusional resistance of the mesoporous shell can delay and regulate drug release. • Simvastatin absorbed in DMSS exists in amorphous form due to spatial confinement.

  1. A High-Resolution Biogenic Silica Record From Lake Titicaca, Peru-Bolivia: South American Millennial-Scale Climate Variability From 18-60 Kya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, E. J.; Fritz, S. C.; Stevens, L. R.; Baker, P. A.; Seltzer, G. O.

    2004-12-01

    Sediments recovered from a deep basin in Lake Titicaca, Peru-Boliva, were analyzed for biogenic silica (BSi) content by extraction of freeze dried sediments in 1% sodium carbonate. Sediments were dated using an age model developed from multiple 14C dates on bulk sediments. The BSi record shows distinct fluctuations in concentration and accumulation rate from 18 to 60 kya. Multi-taper method spectral analysis reveals a significant millennial-scale component to these fluctuations centered at 1370 years. High BSi accumulation rates correlate with enhanced benthic diatom preservation, suggesting that the BSi record is related to variations in lake water level. Modern-day Lake Titicaca lake level and precipitation are strongly related to northern equatorial Atlantic sea surface temperatures, with cooler SSTs related to wetter conditions. Subsequently, the spectral behavior of the GRIP ice core δ 18O record was investigated in order to estimate coherency and linkages between North Atlantic and tropical South American climate. GRIP data exhibit a significant 1370-year spectral peak which comprises approximately 26% of the total variability in the record. Despite a high degree of coherency between millennial-scale periodicities in Lake Titicaca BSi and GRIP δ 18O records, the Lake Titicaca silica record does not show longer term cooling cycles characteristic of D-O cycles found in the GRIP record. Rather, the Lake Titicaca record is highly periodic and more similar in nature to several Antarctic climate proxy records. These results suggest that while South American tropical climate varies in phase with North Atlantic climate, additional forcing mechanisms are manifest in the region which may include tropical Pacific and Southern Ocean variability.

  2. Estabilidade da sílica biogênica extraída de capim Jaraguá (Hyparrhenia rufa em solução de NaOH Stability of biogenic silica extract of Jaraguá grass (Hyparrhenia rufa in NaOH solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liovando M. Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic silica is used to describe compounds of hydrated silica (SiO2.nH2O, with specific shapes and sizes, deposited in plants. The chemical composition of biogenic silica and its stability in Jaraguá grass was studied in increasing concentration of NaOH. The analytical results demonstrated high concentration of Si, Al, Fe, Mg, P and low of Cu, Cd and Zn in the phytoliths composition. The silica bodies stability in NaOH solution with increasing concentration was different among the shapes and sizes. Silicified stomata and silicified plant tissues were dissolved along with the dumbbells because they are the less stable forms of biogenic silica.

  3. Cyclical Changes in the Pleistocene Climate from an Analysis of Biogenic Silica in a Bottom Sediment Core Sample of Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergachev, V. A.; Dmitriev, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    An inhomogeneous time series of measurements of the percentage content of biogenic silica in the samples of joint cores BDP-96-1 and BDP-96-2 from the bottom of Lake Baikal drilled at a depth of 321 m under water has been analyzed. The composite depth of cores is 77 m, which covers the Pleistocene Epoch to 1.8 Ma. The time series was reduced to a regular form with a time step of 1 kyr, which allowed 16 distinct quasi-periodic components with periods from 19 to 251 kyr to be revealed in this series at a significance level of their amplitudes exceeding 4σ. For this, the combined spectral periodogram (a modification of the spectral analysis method) was used. Some of the revealed quasi-harmonics are related to the characteristic cyclical oscillations of the Earth's orbital parameters. Special focus was payed to the temporal change in the parameters of the revealed quasi-harmonic components over the Pleistocene Epoch, which was studied by constructing the spectral density of the analyzed data in the running window of 201 and 701 kyr.

  4. The comparison of biogenic silica, Br and Nd distributions in the sediments of Lake Baikal as proxies of changing paleoclimates of the last 480 kyr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phedorin, M.A.; Goldberg, E.L.; Grachev, M.A.; Levina, O.L.; Khlystov, O.M.; Dolbnya, I.P.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a comparison of the profiles of biogenic silica (BiSi), Br and Nd in the first 20 m of the BDP-96-2 core of sediments of Lake Baikal obtained on top of the underwater Akademichesky Ridge. The concentrations of the two elements mentioned were measured by X-ray fluorescent analysis with synchrotron radiation (SR-XFA) at 10 cm intervals. Br correlates positively, and Nd negatively with BiSi. Spectral analysis of the profiles revealed the 100, 41, 23 and 19 kyr major external forcing periods. We studied the elemental composition of extant diatom algae of Lake Baikal in order to find out whether any elements are bound by them specifically. SR-XFA revealed, among others that Br is accumulated by extant diatom algae of Lake Baikal, presumably due to incorporation into their organic matter. Br can be regarded as a new proxy of the paleo-productivity of Lake Baikal. The paper also considers arguments suggesting that the first 2 m of sediment are missing in the BDP-96-2 core

  5. Deep-UV Raman spectroscopic analysis of structure and dissolution rates of silica-rich sodium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; WindischJr., Charles F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Burton, Sarah D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Bovaird, Chase C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing studies to evaluate relationships between structure and rates of dissolution of silicate glasses in aqueous media, sodium borosilicate glasses of composition Na2O xB2O3 (3 x)SiO2, with x 1 (Na2O/B2O3 ratio 1), were analyzed using deep-UV Raman spectroscopy. Results were quantified in terms of the fraction of SiO4 tetrahedra with one non-bridging oxygen (Q3) and then correlated with Na2O and B2O3 content. The Q3 fractionwas found to increase with increasing Na2O content, in agreement with studies on related glasses, and, as long as the value of x was not too high, this contributed to higher rates of dissolution in single pass flow-through testing. In contrast, dissolution rates were less strongly determined by the Q3 fraction when the value of x was near unity, and appeared to grow larger upon further reduction of the Q3 fraction. Results were interpreted to indicate the increasingly important role of network hydrolysis in the glass dissolution mechanism as the BO4 tetrahedron replaces the Q3 unit as the charge-compensating structure for Na+ ions. Finally, the use of deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was found to be advantageous in studying finely powdered glasses in cases where visible Raman spectroscopy suffered from weak Raman scattering and fluorescence interference.

  6. Knowledge gaps in risk assessment of nanosilica in food: evaluation of the dissolution and toxicity of different forms of silica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, S.; Bouwmeester, H.; Bos, P.M.J.; Peters, R.J.B.; Rietveld, A.; Oomen, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript describes the follow-up study of our previous publication on the presence and risks of nanosilica in food. New information on the presence of nanosilica in the gastrointestinal tract is evaluated and information on nanosilica and synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) is compared to assess

  7. Knowledge gaps in risk assessment of nanosilica in food: evaluation of the dissolution and toxicity of different forms of silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Susan; Bouwmeester, Hans; Bos, Peter M J; Peters, Ruud J B; Rietveld, Anton G; Oomen, Agnes G

    2013-06-01

    This manuscript describes the follow-up study of our previous publication on the presence and risks of nanosilica in food. New information on the presence of nanosilica in the gastrointestinal tract is evaluated and information on nanosilica and synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) is compared to assess its relevance for risk assessment of nanosilica in food. Irrespective of whether SAS should be regarded as a nanomaterial or a non-nanoform of silica, a comparison to nanosilica is relevant to determine whether there are differences in physicochemical properties, which may lead to differences in toxicity. Based on this comparison, knowledge gaps are identified and recommendations for a targeted approach to facilitate risk assessment of nanosilica in food are given. Considering the discussion to which extent nanomaterials with (slightly) different physicochemical characteristics can be grouped for risk assessment--the sameness issue--actual exercises as presented in this manuscript are highly relevant for bringing this discussion forward.

  8. Quantifying Silica Reactivity in Subsurface Environments: Reaction Affinity and Solute Matrix Controls on Quartz and SiO2 Glass Dissolution Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, Patricia M.

    2000-01-01

    During the three years of this project, Professor Dove's laboratory made tremendous progress in understanding controls on amorphous silica dissolution kinetics in aqueous solutions. Our findings have already received considerable attention. In hydrothermal and low temperature studies, the work focused on determining quantitative and mechanistic controls on the most abundant silica polymorphs in Earth environments--quartz and amorphous silica. Our studies achieved goals set forth in the original proposal to establish a new quantitative understanding of amorphous silica dissolution. This support has resulted in 10 journal, 12 abstracts and 2 thesis publications. The PI and students were also recognized with 6 awards during this period. The 1998 EMSP conference in Chicago was an important meeting for our project. The symposium, enabled P.I. Dove to establish valuable contacts with ''users'' having specific needs for the findings of our EMSP project related to the urgency of problems in the Tanks Focus Area (TFA). Since that time, our working relations developed as Dove interacted with TFA scientists and engineers on the problems of waste glass properties. These interactions refined our experimental objectives to better meet their needs. Dove presented the results of EMSP research findings to a TFA subgroup at a Product Acceptance Workshop held in Salt Lake City during December 1998. The travel costs to attend this unanticipated opportunity were paid from EMSP project funds. In January 2000, Dove also attended a similar meeting in Atlanta with PNNL, SRL and BNF scientists/engineers to discuss new issues and make another level of decisions on the Product Acceptance goals. Our EMSP-funded research interfaced very well with the ongoing studies of Dr. Pete McGrail and colleagues in the Applied Geochemistry Group at PNNL. The value of our work to ''users'' was further demonstrated when Dove's EMSP-funded Postdoc, Dr. Jonathan Icenhower was hired by the same PNNL group. With

  9. In vitro and in vivo characteristics of biogenic high surface silica nanoparticles in A549 lung cancer cell lines and Danio rerio model systems for inorganic biomaterials development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaraj, Suriyaprabha; Venkatachalam, Rajendran

    2017-08-24

    Silica based organic-inorganic hybrids are turned over the most necessitate biomaterial due to their exotic biomedical properties. Colloidal silica nanoparticles (SNPs) of high surface area are synthesized from the bamboo wastes (leave biomass) as a viable and promising alternative to synthetic silica sol through alkaline extraction process. Physico-chemical properties of the prepared silica powders are examined employing extensive characterization tools. The characteristic results of the silica sol demonstrate amorphous particles (average size: 25 nm) with relatively high surface area (428 m 2  g -1 ) and spherical morphology. The teratogenicity of the surface and size dependant SNPs is evaluated using an alternative animal model, zebrafish (Danio rerio) in comparison with micron sized particles. LDH based cytotoxicity assay reveals non-significant cell damage in all the tested silica particles. Less mortality, uptake and dysfunctionalities of the organs during the developmental stages of zebrafish treated with bulk and nanoparticles confirm their biocompatibility. The least DNA strand breakage during genotoxic assay and teratogenic parameters are found to exhibit desirable bioactivity of SNPs for clinical applications even at higher concentrations. For the first time, bamboo derived silica sol induced genotoxicity is assessed at molecular level to understand the interaction mechanism with the fish genome.

  10. Dissolution processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    This review contains more than 100 observations and 224 references on the dissolution phenomenon. The dissolution processes are grouped into three categories: methods of aqueous attack, fusion methods, and miscellaneous observations on phenomena related to dissolution problems

  11. Constraining silica diagenesis in methane-seep deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrzka, Daniel; Kraemer, Stephan; Zwicker, Jennifer; Birgel, Daniel; Fischer, David; Kasten, Sabine; Goedert, James; Peckmann, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    Silicified fossils and silicified early diagenetic carbonate minerals as well as authigenic silica phases are common in ancient seep limestones. Silicification of calcareous fossils facilitates the preservation of even fine details and is therefore of great interest to paleontologists, permitting a reliable taxonomic identification of the chemosynthesis-based taxa that lived at ancient hydrocarbon seeps. Four methane-seep limestones of Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic age with abundant silica phases are compared in this study; one, an Eocene seep deposit on the north shore of the Columbia River at Knappton, western Washington State, USA, is described for the first time. Its lithology and fabrics, negative δ13Ccarbonate values as low as -27.6‰, and 13C-depleted biomarkers of archaea involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) reveal that the carbonate rock formed at a methane seep. The background sediments of the studied Phanerozoic seep limestones contain abundant siliceous microfossils, radiolarian tests in case of the Late Carboniferous Dwyka Group deposits from Namibia and the Late Triassic Graylock Butte deposits from eastern Oregon (USA), diatom frustules in case of the Eocene Knappton limestone and an Oligocene seep deposit from the Lincoln Creek Formation (western Washington State, USA). These microfossils are regarded as the source of dissolved silica, causing silicification and silica precipitation. All seep limestones used in this study are characterized by very similar paragenetic sequences. Silicified fossils include brachiopods and worm tubes, silica cements include microquartz, fibrous microcrystalline silica, and megaquartz. The silica cements formed after the AOM-derived cements ceased to precipitate but before equant calcite spar formed. Numerical experiments using the computer code PHREEQC were conducted to test the hypothesis that (1) AOM increases the pH of pore waters and that (2) this pH increase subsequently mobilizes biogenic

  12. Particulate silica and Si recycling in the surface waters of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjou, Mohamed; Tréguer, Paul; Dumousseaud, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    The distributions of biogenic and lithogenic silica concentrations and net silica production rates in the upper 120 m of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) were examined in December 2004, on two transects situated at 110°W (4°N to 3°S) and along the equator (110°W to 140°W). Lithogenic silica (l......-rich waters the biogenic silica (bSiO2) concentrations were generally low, falling between 100 and 180 nmol Si l-1 in the upper 50 m and decreasing to less than 50 nmol Si l-1 below ~90 m. Estimates of net bSiO2 production rates revealed that the rate of production exceeded that of dissolution in the upper...... euphotic layer (0-40 m) along 110°W with net production extending somewhat deeper (60-100 m) to the west along the equator. Net production rates in the surface layer were low, ranging between 5 and 40 nmol Si l-1 d-1, consistent with previous observations that diatoms are small contributors to autotrophic...

  13. Silicon Isotopes of Marine Pore Water: Tracking the Destiny of Marine Biogenic Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassarino, L.; Hendry, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Silicon isotopes (δ30Si) are a powerful tool for the studying of the past and present silicon cycles, which is closely linked to the carbon cycle. Siliceous phytoplankton, such as diatoms, as one of the major conveyors of carbon to marine sediments. δ30Si from fossil diatoms has been shown to represent past silicic acid (DSi) utilization in the photic zone, since the lighter isotope is preferentially incorporated in their skeleton, the frustule. This assumes that species in the sediments depict past blooms and that frustules are preserved in their initial state during burial. Here we present new silicon isotopes data of sea water and pore water of deep marine sediments from two contrasted environments, the Equatorial Atlantic and West Antarctic Peninsula. δ30Si and DSi concentration, of both sea water and pore water, are negatively correlated. Marine biogenic opal dissolution can be tracked using δ30Si signature of pore water as lighter signals and high DSi concentrations are associated with the biogenic silica. Our data enhances post depositional and diagenesis processes during burial with a clear highlight on the sediment water interface exchanges.

  14. Harvesting silica nanoparticles from rice husks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weixing; Martin, Jarett C.; Zhang Ning; Ma Chao; Han Aijie; Sun Luyi

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic silica nanoparticles were synthesized using rice husks (RHs) as the raw material via controlled pyrolysis. The characterization results showed that the morphology of the synthesized silica was highly related to the pretreatment of RHs and the pyrolysis conditions. Particularly, potassium cations in RHs were found to catalyze the melting of silica, during which the amorphous silica were converted to crystalline phase. Two hours of pyrolysis at 700 °C appeared to be ideal to synthesize silica nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 20–30 nm. Higher temperature and longer duration of pyrolysis led to undesired melting of silica nanoparticles, while too low a temperature cannot effectively remove carbonous residues. Such amorphous silica nanoparticles with narrow size distribution and high purity are expected to replace silica gel and fumed silica for various applications.

  15. Biogenic Emission Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic emissions sources come from natural sources and need to accounted for in photochemical grid models. They are computed using a model which utilizes spatial information on vegetation and land use.

  16. Selective silicification of Thalassinoides and other biogenic structures in marine platform limestones and hardground (Lower Albian, Sonabia, Cantabria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bustillo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work different types of chert from the Oriñón Limestone Formation (upper Aptian-lower Albian are studied. This formation outcrops in the eastern coast of Cantabria (Liendo-Castro Urdiales area and includes outstanding and abundant cherty nodules, lenticular layers and crusts. The host rock is mainly a biocalcarenite (wackestone/packstone of pellets, echinoids fragments, oysters, foraminifers and calcareous or calcified siliceous sponge spicules. The Oriñón Limestone Formation was deposited in a marine open-shelf environment and preserves a hardground of regional extent with particular chert crusts. The silica source is associated to the dissolution of siliceous sponge spicules or to their calcification. Most of the chert is constituted by mosaics of micro-cryptocrystalline quartz and calcedonite, and it is generated by the selective silicification of biogenic structures, mainly dwelling trace fossils (Thalassinoides isp. because of the higher amount of organic matter and the higher porosity and permeability of the burrow infill. In the hardground, selective silicification affects body fossils such as belemnites, oysters and echinoids, and trace fossils (feeding burrows and borings where in addition cherts is accumulated as an indeterminate crust. The silicification of the biogenic structures firstly occurred in form of opaline phases during the early diagenesis while the oxidation of the organic matter was active. Thus, Thalassinoides trace fossils affected by silicification preserve filaments and cocoids that might have had a microbial origin. Neoformation of dolomite and calcite occur only within the Thalassinoides trace fossils which indicates that diagenetic processes taking place within these burrows differed from those affecting the host rock and other biogenic structures. Dwelling trace fossils would have supposed a close micro-environment where the oxidation conditions changed from high to low rate.

  17. Dissolution of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uriarte Hueda, A.; Berberana Eizmendi, M.; Pereira Sanchez, G.

    1968-01-01

    The dissolution of aluminum with acid solutions ( nitric acid-mercuric nitrate) and alkaline solutions (sodium hydroxide-sodium nitrate) has been studied. The instantaneous dissolution rate (IDR) has been studied in function of the concentration of the used reagents and the dissolution temperature. The complete dissolution has been included in the second part of this report, to know the total dissolution time, the consume of reagents and the stability of the resultant solutions. (Author)

  18. Can introduction of hydraulic fracturing fluids induce biogenic methanogenesis in the shale reservoirs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S.; Wilson, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Borton, M.; O'Banion, B.

    2017-12-01

    The hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFF) injected into the shale formation are composed primarily of water, proppant and some chemical additives ( 0.5- 2% by volume). The additives contain a lot of organic and inorganic compounds like ammonium sulfate, guar gum, boric acid, hydrochloric acid, citric acid, potassium carbonate, glutaraldehyde, ethylene glycols which serve as friction reducers, gelling agents, crosslinkers, biocides, corrosion/scale inhibitors, etc. The water and additives introduced into the formation ensue a variety of microbiogechmical reactions in the reservoir. For this study produced, water and gas samples were collected from several old and new Marcellus wells in SE Pennsylvania and NE West Virginia to better understand these microbe-water-rock interactions. The carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in the produced fluids and CO2 in produced gas (δ13CCO2) are highly enriched with values > +10‰ and +14 ‰ V-PDB respectively. The injected hydraulic fracturing fluid had low δ13CDIC values of < -8‰ V-PDB. The high carbon isotope values in produced fluids and gas possibly indicate 1) dissolution of 13C enriched carbonates in the host rock of reservoir, cement or drilling muds or 2) biogenic methanogenesis in the reservoir. The carbon signatures of carbonates in and around the landing zone and all possible sources of carbon put downhole were analyzed for their 13C signatures. The cement and silica sand had no detectable carbon in them. The drilling mud and carbonate veins had δ13C values of -1.8 and < 2.0 ‰ V-PDB respectively. Therefore, the high δ13CDIC signatures in produced water are possibly due to the microbial utilization of lighter carbon (12C) by microbes or methanogenic bacteria in the reservoir. It is possible that introduction of C containing nutrients like guar, methanol, methylamines, etc. stimulates certain methanogen species in the reservoir to produce biogenic methane. Genomic analysis reveals

  19. Dissolution Methods Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — For a drug product that does not have a dissolution test method in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the FDA Dissolution Methods Database provides information on...

  20. Reactive silica fractions in coastal lagoon sediments from the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jeffrey W.; Darrow, Elizabeth S.; Pickering, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Ruth H.; Larson, Ashley M.; Basaldua, Jose L.

    2017-12-01

    Continental-margin sediments account for 50% of the oceanic biogenic silica burial despite covering < 10% of its area. In Mississippi Sound, a coastal lagoon in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), we measured sediment biogenic silica at sites removed from major freshwater discharge sources using the traditional method and a method that has been modified for deltaic systems to quantify other reactive silica pools, specifically those involved in the process of reverse weathering. The magnitude of authigenically-altered biogenic silica during our study was significant and represented, on average, 33% of the total sediment biogenic silica among core depths and sites. Additionally, there was a significant relationship between the degree to which the biogenic silica pool was authigenically altered and the source of the sediment organic matter, with lower modification in sediments corresponding with higher terrestrial organic matter. We observed no positive correlation between the magnitude of authigenic modification and sediment clay content. Thus, our findings suggest that these processes may occur within a variety of sediment compositions and add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that reverse weathering of silica in coastal systems is a significant pathway in the global silica budget.

  1. Aqueous corrosion of french R7T7 nuclear waste glass: selective then congruent dissolution by pH increase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Vernaz, E.; Crovisier, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the corrosion of a borosilicate nuclear glass shows the strong effect of the pH on the dissolution mechanism. Acidic media lead to selective extraction of the glass modifier elements (Li, Na, Ca) as well as B, while dissolution is congruent under alkaline conditions. The silica dissolution rate significantly increases with increasing pH [fr

  2. Fabrication of perforated sub-micron silica shells

    OpenAIRE

    Andreyev, Dmitry S.; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2007-01-01

    A new synthetic approach for fabrication of perforated hollow silica morphologies using colloidal template assemblies is demonstrated. As proof-of-principle, the polystyrene/silver colloidal assemblies had chemically modified surfaces. The template dissolution resulted in the fabrication of the submicron perforated hollow silica shells. The morphologies are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and plasmon light extinction spectrophotometry.

  3. Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from vegetation and nitric oxide (NO) emission from soils. Recent BEIS development has been restricted to the SMOKE system

  4. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)∙H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of

  5. Silica Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ghahramani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to heavy metals, organic solvents and silica is associated with a variety of renal manifestations. Improved understanding of occupational renal disease provides insight into environmental renal disease, improving knowledge of disease pathogenesis. Silica (SiO2 is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. Workers exposed to silica include sandblasters, miners, quarry workers, masons, ceramic workers and glass manufacturers. New cases of silicosis per year have been estimated in the US to be 3600–7300. Exposure to silica has been associated with tubulointerstitial disease, immune-mediated multisystem disease, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. A rare syndrome of painful, nodular skin lesions has been described in dialysis patients with excessive levels of silicon. Balkan endemic nephropathy is postulated to be due to chronic intoxication with drinking water polluted by silicates released during soil erosion. The mechanism of silica nephrotoxicity is thought to be through direct nephrotoxicity, as well as silica-induced autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus. The renal histopathology varies from focal to crescentic and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with aneurysm formation suggestive of polyarteritis nodosa. The treatment for silica nephrotoxicity is non-specific and depends on the mechanism and stage of the disease. It is quite clear that further research is needed, particularly to elucidate the pathogenesis of silica nephropathy. Considering the importance of diagnosing exposure-related renal disease at early stages, it is imperative to obtain a thorough occupational history in all patients with renal disease, with particular emphasis on exposure to silica, heavy metals, and solvents.

  6. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  7. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scherer

    Full Text Available Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100. Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  8. Effects of Bacillus subtilis endospore surface reactivity on the rate of forsterite dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Z.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Primary mineral dissolution products, such as silica (Si), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), play an important role in numerous biologic and geochemical cycles including microbial metabolism, plant growth and secondary mineral precipitation. The flux of these and other dissolution products into the environment is largely controlled by the rate of primary silicate mineral dissolution. Bacteria, a ubiquitous component in water-rock systems, are known to facilitate mineral dissolution and may play a substantial role in determining the overall flux of dissolution products into the environment. Bacterial cell walls are complex and highly reactive organic surfaces that can affect mineral dissolution rates directly through microbe-mineral adsorption or indirectly by complexing dissolution products. The effect of bacterial surface adsorption on chemical weathering rates may even outweigh the influence of active processes in environments where a high proportion of cells are metabolically dormant or cell metabolism is slow. Complications associated with eliminating or accounting for ongoing metabolic processes in long-term dissolution studies have made it challenging to isolate the influence of cell wall interactions on mineral dissolution rates. We utilized Bacillus subtilis endospores, a robust and metabolically dormant cell type, to isolate and quantify the effects of bacterial surface reactivity on forsterite (Mg2SiO4) dissolution rates. We measured the influence of both direct and indirect microbe-mineral interactions on forsterite dissolution. Indirect pathways were isolated using dialysis tubing to prevent mineral-microbe contact while allowing free exchange of dissolved mineral products and endospore-ion adsorption. Homogenous experimental assays allowed both direct microbe-mineral and indirect microbe-ion interactions to affect forsterite dissolution rates. Dissolution rates were calculated based on silica concentrations and zero-order dissolution kinetics

  9. Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W.; Subhas, A.; Dong, S.; Naviaux, J.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A geological buffer for high atmospheric CO2 concentrations is neutralization via reaction with CaCO3. We have been studying the dissolution kinetics of carbonate minerals using labeled 13C calcite and Picarro-based measurements of 13C enrichments in solution DIC. This methodology has greatly facilitated our investigation of dissolution kinetics as a function of water carbonate chemistry, temperature and pressure. One can adjust the saturation state Omega by changing the ion activity product (e.g. adjusting carbonate ion concentration), or by changing the solubility product (e.g. adjusting temperature or pressure). The canonical formulation of dissolution rate vs. omega has been refined (Subhas et al. 2015) and shows distinct non-linear behavior near equilibrium and rates in sea water of 1-3 e-6 g/cm2day at omega = 0.8. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of dissolved CO2 to carbonic acid, was shown (in concentrations 500x. This result points to the importance of carbonic acid in enhancing dissolution at low degrees of undersaturation. CA activity and abundance in nature must be considered regarding the role it plays in catalyzing dissolution. We also have been investigating the role of temperature on dissolution kinetics. An increase of 16C yields an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate. Temperature (and P) also change Omega critical, the saturation state where dissolution rates change substantially. Increasing pressure (achieved in a pressure reaction chamber we built) also shifts Omega critical closer to equilibrium and small pressure increases have large impact on dissolution kinetics. Dissolution rates are enhanced by an order of magnitude for a change in pressure of 1500 psi relative to the dissolution rate achieved by water chemistry effects alone for an omega of 0.8. We've shown that the thermodynamic determination of saturation state does not adequately describe the kinetics of dissolution. The interplay of mineral

  10. A review of the Si cycle in the modern ocean: recent progress and missing gaps in the application of biogenic opal as a paleoproductivity proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragueneau, O.; Tréguer, P.; Leynaert, A.; Anderson, R. F.; Brzezinski, M. A.; DeMaster, D. J.; Dugdale, R. C.; Dymond, J.; Fischer, G.; François, R.; Heinze, C.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Martin-Jézéquel, V.; Nelson, D. M.; Quéguiner, B.

    2000-12-01

    Pacific as a continuous new production system regulating on silicate. Nature 391, 270-273.), giving to Si(OH) 4 a major role in the control of the rain ratio, which is of major importance in the global carbon cycle. The fate of the BSi produced in surface waters is then described, in relation to C org, in terms of both dissolution and preservation mechanisms. Difficulties in quantifying the dissolution of biogenic silica in the water column as well as the sinking rates and forms of BSi to the deep, provide evidence for a major gap in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the competition between retention in and export from surface waters. The relative influences of environmental conditions, seasonality, food web structure or aggregation are however explored. Quantitatively, assuming steady state, the measurements of the opal rain rate by means of sediment traps matches reasonably well those obtained by adding the recycling and burial fluxes in the underlying abyssal sediments, for most of the sites where such a comparison is possible. The major exception is the Southern Ocean where sediment focusing precludes the closing of mass balances. Focusing in fact is also an important aspect of the downward revision of the importance of Southern Ocean sediments in the global biogenic silica accumulation. Qualitatively, little is known about the duration of the transfer through the deep and the quality of the material that reaches the seabed, which is suggested to represent a major gap in our understanding of the processes governing the early diagenesis of BSi in sediments. The sediment composition (special emphasis on Al availability), the sedimentation rate or bioturbation are shown to exert an important control on the competition between dissolution and preservation of BSi in sediments. It is suggested that a primary control on the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of BSi dissolution, both in coastal and abyssal sediments, is exerted by water column processes

  11. Biogenic and non-biogenic Si pools in terrestrial ecosystems: results from a novel analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Lucia; Vandevenne, Floor; Clymans, Wim; Meire, Patrick; Frings, Patrick; Conley, Daniel; Struyf, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Silicon (Si) is a chemical element frequently associated with highly abundant silicate minerals in the Earth crust. Over millions of years, the interaction of such minerals with the atmosphere and hydrosphere produces a myriad of processed compounds, and the mineral weathering consumes CO2 during the process. The weathering of minerals also triggers the export of dissolved Si (DSi) to coastal waters and the ocean. Here, DSi is deposited in diatom frustules, in an amorphous biogenic form (BSi). Diatoms account for 50% of the primary production and are crucial for the export of carbon into the deep sea. In recent years, it was acknowledged that terrestrial systems filter the Si transition from the terrestrial mineral to the marine and coastal biological pool, by the incorporation of DSi into plants. In this process, DSi is taken up by roots together with other nutrients and precipitates in plant cells in amorphous structures named phytoliths. After dead, plant tissues become mixed in the top soil, where BSi is available for dissolution and will control the DSi availability in short time scales. Additionally, Si originated from soil forming processes can also significantly interfere with the global cycle. The Si cycle in terrestrial ecosystems is a key factor to coastal ecology, plant ecology, biogeochemistry and agro-sciences, but the high variability of different biogenic and non-biogenic Si pools remains as an obstacle to obtain accurate measurements. The traditional methods, developed to isolate diatoms in ocean sediments, only account for simple mineral corrections. In this dissertation we have adapted a novel continuous analysis method (during alkaline extraction) that uses Si-Al ratios and reactivity to differ biogenic from non-biogenic fractions. The method was originally used in marine sediments, but we have developed it to be applicable in a wide range of terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We first focused on soils under strong human impact in

  12. Nontronite dissolution rates and implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainey, S. R.; Hausrath, E. M.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Milliken, R. E.

    2014-02-01

    nontronite forms it could remain stable at or near the surface of Mars for extended periods of time. Nontronite dissolution rates are faster than dissolution rates of montmorillonite (Rozalén et al., 2008) and kaolinite (Huertas et al., 1999), suggesting that chemical weathering of a mixed clay deposit would enrich the proportions of montmorillonite and kaolinite through the preferential dissolution of nontronite. Vis-NIR analyses of our reacted products and thermodynamic modeling of our experimental conditions both indicate the precipitation of amorphous silica within columns, and amorphous silica has also been observed in association with phyllosilicates on the martian surface (Mustard et al., 2008; Ehlmann et al., 2009; Murchie et al., 2009a). Therefore, chemical weathering of strata containing mixtures of montmorillonite, nontronite and kaolinite provides a potential formation mechanism for the mineralogic stratigraphy observed at Mawrth Vallis and other locations on Mars.

  13. Production and Application of Olivine Nano-Silica in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardiana, Oesman; Haryadi

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this research was to produce nano silica by synthesis of nano silica through extraction and dissolution of ground olivine rock, and applied the nano silica in the design concrete mix. The producing process of amorphous silica used sulfuric acid as the dissolution reagent. The separation of ground olivine rock occurred when the rock was heated in a batch reactor containing sulfuric acid. The results showed that the optimum mole ratio of olivine- acid was 1: 8 wherein the weight ratio of the highest nano silica generated. The heating temperature and acid concentration influenced the mass of silica produced, that was at temperature of 90 °C and 3 M acid giving the highest yield of 44.90%. Characterization using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR ) concluded that amorphous silica at a wavenumber of 1089 cm-1 indicated the presence of siloxane, Si-O-Si, stretching bond. Characterization using Scanning Electron Microscope - Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) showed the surface and the size of the silica particles. The average size of silica particles was between 1-10 μm due to the rapid aggregation of the growing particles of nano silica into microparticles, caused of the pH control was not fully achieved.

  14. Dissolution of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uriarte Hueda, A.; Berberana Eizmendi, M.; Rainey, R.

    1968-01-01

    A laboratory study was made of the instantaneous dissolution rate (IDR) for unirradiated uranium metal rods and UO 2 , PuO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets in boiling nitric acid alone and with additives. The uranium metal and UO 2 dissolved readily in nitric acid alone; PuO 2 dissolved slowly even with the addition of fluoride; PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets containing as much as 35% PuO 2 in UO 2 gave values of the instantaneous dissolution rate to indicate can be dissolved with nitric acid alone. An equation to calculate the time for complete dissolution has been determinate in function of the instantaneous dissolution rates. The calculated values agree with the experimental. Uranium dioxide pellets from various sources but all having a same density varied in instantaneous dissolution rate. All the pellets, however, have dissolved ved in the same time. The time for complete dissolution of PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets, having the same composition, and the concentration of the used reagents are function of the used reagents are function of the fabrication method. (Author) 8 refs

  15. Quantitative laboratory measurements of biogeochemical processes controlling biogenic calcite carbon sequestration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zendejas, Frank; Lane, Todd W.; Lane, Pamela D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to generate data that could be used to populate and thereby reduce the uncertainty in global carbon cycle models. These efforts were focused on developing a system for determining the dissolution rate of biogenic calcite under oceanic pressure and temperature conditions and on carrying out a digital transcriptomic analysis of gene expression in response to changes in pCO2, and the consequent acidification of the growth medium.

  16. Silica precipitation by synthetic minicollagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiher, Felix; Schatz, Michaela; Steinem, Claudia; Geyer, Armin

    2013-03-11

    Oligomeric Pro-Hyp-Gly- (POG-) peptides, wherein the collagenous triple helix is supported by C-terminal capping, exhibit silica precipitation properties (O, Hyp = (2S,4R)hydroxyproline). As quantified by a molybdate assay, the length of the covalently tethered triple helix (number of POG units) determines the amount of amorphous silica obtained from silicic acid solution. Although lacking charged side chains, the synthetic collagens precipitate large quantities of silicic acid resulting in micrometer-sized spheres of varying surface morphologies as analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Similar precipitation efficiencies on a fast time scale of less than 10 min were previously described only for biogenic diatom proteins and sponge collagen, respectively, which have a considerably higher structural complexity and limited accessibility. The minicollagens described here provide an unexpected alternative to the widely used precipitation conditions, which generally depend on (poly-)amines in phosphate buffer. Collagen can form intimate connections with inorganic matter. Hence, silica-enclosed collagens have promising perspectives as composite materials.

  17. Kinetic and thermodynamic controls on silica reactivity: an analog for waste disposal media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, P.M.; Icenhower, J.

    1997-01-01

    Silicate glasses are currently being proposed as the disposal media for radioactive and other toxic wastes. The dissolution behaviour of borosilicate glass is incompletely understood. One approach is to simplify the chemistry and first develop a better understanding of vitreous silica (v-SiO 2 ) as a simple analog of waste glass. This article reviews all the knowledge that is known about the dissolution of silica. Studies quantifying the effects of temperature, solution pH, and single salts on dissolution rates of quartz suggest that pH and cation-dependent dissolution trends hold for all of the silica polymorphs. The purpose of this review is to develop a consistent picture of glass reactivity by understanding how the molecular arrangement of constituents within glass, beginning with the Si-O bond, affects the dissolution processes. (A.C.)

  18. Biogenic Amines in Insect Antennae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna I. Zhukovskaya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Insect antenna is a multisensory organ, each modality of which can be modulated by biogenic amines. Octopamine (OA and its metabolic precursor tyramine (TA affect activity of antennal olfactory receptor neurons. There is some evidence that dopamine (DA modulates gustatory neurons. Serotonin can serve as a neurotransmitter in some afferent mechanosensory neurons and both as a neurotransmitter and neurohormone in efferent fibers targeted at the antennal vessel and mechanosensory organs. As a neurohormone, serotonin affects the generation of the transepithelial potential by sensillar accessory cells. Other possible targets of biogenic amines in insect antennae are hygro- and thermosensory neurons and epithelial cells. We suggest that the insect antenna is partially autonomous in the sense that biologically active substances entering its hemolymph may exert their effects and be cleared from this compartment without affecting other body parts.

  19. Unconventional shallow biogenic gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurr, G.W.; Ridgley, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Unconventional shallow biogenic gas falls into two distinct systems that have different attributes. Early-generation systems have blanketlike geometries, and gas generation begins soon after deposition of reservoir and source rocks. Late-generation systems have ringlike geometries, and long time intervals separate deposition of reservoir and source rocks from gas generation. For both types of systems, the gas is dominantly methane and is associated with source rocks that are not thermally mature. Early-generation biogenic gas systems are typified by production from low-permeability Cretaceous rocks in the northern Great Plains of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Montana. The main area of production is on the southeastern margin of the Alberta basin and the northwestern margin of the Williston basin. The huge volume of Cretaceous rocks has a generalized regional pattern of thick, non-marine, coarse clastics to the west and thinner, finer grained marine lithologies to the east. Reservoir rocks in the lower part tend to be finer grained and have lower porosity and permeability than those in the upper part. Similarly, source beds in the units have higher values of total organic carbon. Patterns of erosion, deposition, deformation, and production in both the upper and lower units are related to the geometry of lineament-bounded basement blocks. Geochemical studies show that gas and coproduced water are in equilibrium and that the fluids are relatively old, namely, as much as 66 Ma. Other examples of early-generation systems include Cretaceous clastic reservoirs on the southwestern margin of Williston basin and chalks on the eastern margin of the Denver basin. Late-generation biogenic gas systems have as an archetype the Devonian Antrim Shale on the northern margin of the Michigan basin. Reservoir rocks are fractured, organic-rich black shales that also serve as source rocks. Although fractures are important for production, the relationships to specific geologic structures are

  20. Silica fractionation and reactivity in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzué Belmonte, Dácil; Barão, Lúcia; Vandevenne, Floor; Schoelynck, Jonas; Struyf, Eric; Meire, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The Si cycle is a globally important biogeochemical cycle, with strong connections to other biogeochemical cycles, including C. Silica is taken up by plants to form protective structures called phytoliths, which become a part of the soil and contribute strongly to soil Si cycling upon litter burial. Different silica fractions are found in soils, with phytoliths among the most easily soluble, especially compared to silicate minerals. A whole set of secondary non-biogenic fractions exist, that also have a high reactivity (adsorbed Si, reactive secondary minerals…). A good characterization of the different fractions of reactive silica is crucial to move forward knowledge on ecosystem Si cycling, which has been recognized in the last decade as crucial for terrestrial Si fluxes. A new method to analyze the different fractions of silica in soils has been described by Koning et al. (2002) and adapted by our research team (Barão et al. 2013). Using a continuous extraction of Si and aluminum in 0.5M NaOH, biogenic and non-biogenic reactive fractions are separated based on their Si/Al ratios and their reactivity in NaOH. Applying this new method I will investigate three emerging ideas on how humans can affect directly terrestrial Si fluxes. -Land use. I expect strong silica fractionation and reactivity differences in different land uses. These effects due to agricultural and forestry management have already been shown earlier in temperate soils (Vandevenne et al. 2012). Now we will test this hypothesis in recently deforested soils, in the south of Brazil. 'Pristine' forest, managed forest and tobacco field soils (with and without rotation crops) will be studied. This research belongs to an interdisciplinary project on soils and global change. -Fire. According to the IPCC report, extreme events such as fires (number and intensity) would increase due to climate change. We analyzed litter from spruce forest, beech forest and peat soils at two burning levels, after 350°C and

  1. Determinants of marriage dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mohd Amirul Rafiq Abu; Shafie, Siti Aishah Mohd; Hadi, Az'lina Abdul; Razali, Nornadiah Mohd; Azid @ Maarof, Nur Niswah Naslina

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, the number of divorce cases among Muslim couples is very worrisome whereby the total cases reported in 2013 increased by half of the total cases reported in the previous year. The questions on the true key factors of dissolution of marriage continue to arise. Thus, the objective of this study is to reveal the factors that contribute to the dissolution of marriage. A total of 181 cases and ten potential determinants were included in this study. The potential determinants considered were age at marriage of husband and wife, educational level of husband and wife, employment status of husband and wife, income of husband and wife, the number of children and the presence at a counseling session. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that four determinants, namely the income of husband and wife, number of children and the presence at a counselling session were significant in predicting the likelihood of divorce among Muslim couples.

  2. [Advances in researches of biogenic molluscicides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Li; Jian-Rong, Dai; Yun-Tian, Xing

    2017-01-05

    Biogenic molluscicides refer to the use of plants, animals and micro-organisms or their metabolites, and synthesis biomimetic molluscicides to kill Oncomelania hupensis snails. With the rapid development of science and technology, new biogenic molluscicides are continuously emerging and the category also continues to expand. According to the molluscicidal active ingredient and sources, at present, the biogenic molluscicides with in-depth studies include plant-derived molluscicides, micro-organism molluscicides, microbial metabolite molluscicides and animal molluscicides. This paper reviews the advances in the researches of biogenic molluscicides in recent years.

  3. Collective dissolution of microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelin, Sébastien; Guérin, Etienne; Lauga, Eric

    2018-04-01

    A microscopic bubble of soluble gas always dissolves in finite time in an undersaturated fluid. This diffusive process is driven by the difference between the gas concentration near the bubble, whose value is governed by the internal pressure through Henry's law, and the concentration in the far field. The presence of neighboring bubbles can significantly slow down this process by increasing the effective background concentration and reducing the diffusing flux of dissolved gas experienced by each bubble. We develop theoretical modeling of such diffusive shielding process in the case of small microbubbles whose internal pressure is dominated by Laplace pressure. We first use an exact semianalytical solution to capture the case of two bubbles and analyze in detail the shielding effect as a function of the distance between the bubbles and their size ratio. While we also solve exactly for the Stokes flow around the bubble, we show that hydrodynamic effects are mostly negligible except in the case of almost-touching bubbles. In order to tackle the case of multiple bubbles, we then derive and validate two analytical approximate yet generic frameworks, first using the method of reflections and then by proposing a self-consistent continuum description. Using both modeling frameworks, we examine the dissolution of regular one-, two-, and three-dimensional bubble lattices. Bubbles located at the edge of the lattices dissolve first, while innermost bubbles benefit from the diffusive shielding effect, leading to the inward propagation of a dissolution front within the lattice. We show that diffusive shielding leads to severalfold increases in the dissolution time, which grows logarithmically with the number of bubbles in one-dimensional lattices and algebraically in two and three dimensions, scaling respectively as its square root and 2 /3 power. We further illustrate the sensitivity of the dissolution patterns to initial fluctuations in bubble size or arrangement in the case

  4. Dissolution of pollucite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, T.; Vezza, T.; White, W.B.; Pantano, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    The dissolution of single crystal and polycrystalline pollucite (Cs 2 O.Al 2 O 3 .4SiO 2 ) has been investigated under static and Soxhlet conditions. Polycrystalline ceramics were prepared from a commercial pollucite powder by sintering at 1100 0 C, 1200 0 C and 1300 0 C, and also by hot isostatic pressing (hip) at 1200 0 C. The static tests were run at 40 0 C and 90 0 C in water (for up to 183 days) and in brine and silicate solutions (for 28 days). The solutions were analyzed with DC-plasma emission and the leached surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other surface analysis techniques. It is concluded that the dissolution of polycrystalline pollucite is due largely to the preferential release of the glassy phase constituents since the single crystal studies verify the insolubility of the pollucite grains at near-neutral pH under static conditions. The dissolution behavior of polycrystalline pollucite under static and Soxhlet conditions is drastically different. Under static conditions, the pollucite grains are in equilibrium with the solution and the dissolved species originate only from the glassy phase. The glassy phase is more prevalent and has a higher Cs 2 O content in the denser ceramics sintered at 1200 0 C; thus, the denser ceramics exhibit higher Cs leach rates. Under Soxhlet conditions the leach rates are linear and proportional to the specific surface area. Thus, the glassy phase is depleted from the surface region of the ceramics very rapidly, and the congruent dissolution of the pollucite grain continues at a linear rate. The Cs leach rates were highest in water, and lowest in the brine solution. 1 table

  5. Surface properties, solubility and dissolution kinetics of bamboo phytoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraysse, Fabrice; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques; Meunier, Jean-Dominique

    2006-04-01

    Although phytoliths, constituted mainly by micrometric opal, exhibit an important control on silicon cycle in superficial continental environments, their thermodynamic properties and reactivity in aqueous solution are still poorly known. In this work, we determined the solubility and dissolution rates of bamboo phytoliths collected in the Réunion Island and characterized their surface properties via electrophoretic measurements and potentiometric titrations in a wide range of pH. The solubility product of "soil" phytoliths ( pKsp0=2.74 at 25 °C) is equal to that of vitreous silica and is 17 times higher than that of quartz. Similarly, the enthalpy of phytoliths dissolution reaction (ΔHr25-80°C=10.85kJ/mol) is close to that of amorphous silica but is significantly lower than the enthalpy of quartz dissolution. Electrophoretic measurements yield isoelectric point pH IEP = 1.2 ± 0.1 and 2.5 ± 0.2 for "soil" (native) and "heated" (450 °C heating to remove organic matter) phytoliths, respectively. Surface acid-base titrations allowed generation of a 2-p K surface complexation model. Phytoliths dissolution rates, measured in mixed-flow reactors at far from equilibrium conditions at 2 ⩽ pH ⩽ 12, were found to be intermediate between those of quartz and vitreous silica. The dissolution rate dependence on pH was modeled within the concept of surface coordination theory using the equation: R=k1·{>SiOH2+}n+k2·{>SiOH0}+k3·{>SiO-}m, where {> i} stands for the concentration of the surface species present at the SiO 2-H 2O interface, ki are the rate constants of the three parallel reactions and n and m represent the order of the proton- and hydroxy-promoted reactions, respectively. It follows from the results of this study that phytoliths dissolution rates exhibit a minimum at pH ˜ 3. This can explain their good preservation in the acidic soil horizons of Réunion Island. In terms of silicon biogeochemical cycle, phytoliths represent a large buffering reservoir

  6. Principles of calcite dissolution in human and artificial otoconia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Erik Walther

    Full Text Available Human otoconia provide mechanical stimuli to deflect hair cells of the vestibular sensory epithelium for purposes of detecting linear acceleration and head tilts. During lifetime, the volume and number of otoconia are gradually reduced. In a process of degeneration morphological changes occur. Structural changes in human otoconia are assumed to cause vertigo and balance disorders such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. The aim of this study was to investigate the main principles of morphological changes in human otoconia in dissolution experiments by exposure to hydrochloric acid, EDTA, demineralized water and completely purified water respectively. For comparison reasons artificial (biomimetic otoconia (calcite gelatin nanocomposits and natural calcite were used. Morphological changes were detected in time steps by the use of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. Under in vitro conditions three main dissolution mechanisms were identified as causing characteristic morphological changes of the specimen under consideration: pH drops in the acidic range, complex formation with calcium ions and changes of ion concentrations in the vicinity of otoconia. Shifts in pH cause a more uniform reduction of otoconia size (isotropic dissolution whereas complexation reactions and changes of the ionic concentrations within the surrounding medium bring about preferred attacks at specific areas (anisotropic dissolution of human and artificial otoconia. Owing to successive reduction of material, all the dissolution mechanisms finally produce fragments and remnants of otoconia. It can be assumed that the organic component of otoconia is not significantly attacked under the given conditions. Artificial otoconia serve as a suitable model system mimicking chemical attacks on biogenic specimens. The underlying principles of calcite dissolution under in vitro conditions may play a role in otoconia degeneration processes such as BPPV.

  7. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  8. Dissolution kinetics of heulandite at pH 2--12 and 25 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnarsdottir, K.V.

    1993-01-01

    Because of their favourable cation exchange reactions, heulandite and clinoptilolite have been suggested as being capable of immobilizing radionuclides and therefore could possibly act as an important barrier for nuclear waste. Recent studies of laboratory-reacted minerals indicate, however, that hydrated surface layers tend to accumulate highly hydrolyzable heavy elements. These hydrated layers may therefore be the most important retardants for radionuclides. The dissolution rate of heulandite depends strongly on pH. Based on silica release, the logarithm of the steady-state dissolution rate at pH 2 is -13.1 mol cm -2 s -1 . The logarithm of the rate decreases to -15.8 mol cm -2 s -1 at pH 7.2 and increases again to -14.6 mol cm -2 s -1 at pH 12.2. At low pH, Al is released preferentially to silica; but at intermediate and high pH, the release of silica appears to be congruent relative to Al. The change in dissolution rate with pH indicates that at low pH, the dissolution mechanism is controlled by the detachment of a positively charged Al species, >Al-OH 2 + . Below pH 5, however, a silica-rich surface layer is formed requiring diffusion through the layer. At intermediate and high pH, it is likely that the dissolution rate is controlled by the detachment of a negatively charged silica species, >Si - O - . The reaction order of the hydrogen ion under low pH conditions is 0.7, and the reaction order of the OH - ion is 0.3 at high pH. The measured dissolution rates indicate that a 1 mm heulandite crystal would dissolve in 300,000 yrs if the solution composition is maintained undersaturated. 75 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  10. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, SC; van Dusseldorp, M; Bottema, KC; Dubois, AEJ

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allergen intoler*, and

  11. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.C.; Dusseldorp, M. van; Bottema, K.C.; Dubois, A.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and

  12. Uranothorite solid solutions: From synthesis to dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costin, Dan-Tiberiu

    2012-01-01

    USiO 4 coffinite appears as one of the potential phases formed in the back-end of the alteration of spent fuel, in reducing storage conditions. A study aiming to assess the thermodynamic data associated with coffinite through an approach based on the preparation of Th 1-x U x SiO 4 uranothorite solid solutions was then developed during this work. First, the preparation of uranothorite samples was successfully undertaken in hydrothermal conditions. However, the poly-phased samples systematically formed for x ≥ 0,2 underlined the kinetic hindering linked with the preparation of uranium-enriched samples, including coffinite end-member. Nevertheless, the characterization of the various samples led to confirm the formation of an ideal solid solution and allowed the constitution of a spectroscopic database. The purification of the samples was then performed by the means of different protocols based on physical (dispersion-centrifugation) or chemical (selective dissolution of secondary phases) methods. This latter led to a complete of the impurities (Th 1-y U y O 2 mixed oxide and amorphous silica) through successive washing steps in acid then basic media. Finally, dissolution experiments were undertaken on uranothorite samples (0 ≤ xexp. ≤ 0,5) and allowed pointing out the influence of composition, pH and temperature on the normalized dissolution rate of the compounds. Also, the associated thermodynamic data, such as activation energy, indicate that the reaction is controlled by surface reactions. Once the equilibrium is reached, the analogous solubility constants were determined for each composition studied, then allowing the extrapolation to coffinite value. It was then finally possible to conclude on the inversion of coffinitisation reaction with temperature. (author) [fr

  13. Feldspar dissolution rates in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, C.R.; Helean, K.B.; Marshall, B.D.; Brady, P.V.

    2009-01-01

    Two different field-based methods are used here to calculate feldspar dissolution rates in the Topopah Spring Tuff, the host rock for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The center of the tuff is a high silica rhyolite, consisting largely of alkali feldspar (???60 wt%) and quartz polymorphs (???35 wt%) that formed by devitrification of rhyolitic glass as the tuff cooled. First, the abundance of secondary aluminosilicates is used to estimate the cumulative amount of feldspar dissolution over the history of the tuff, and an ambient dissolution rate is calculated by using the estimated thermal history. Second, the feldspar dissolution rate is calculated by using measured Sr isotope compositions for the pore water and rock. Pore waters display systematic changes in Sr isotopic composition with depth that are caused by feldspar dissolution. The range in dissolution rates determined from secondary mineral abundances varies from 10-16 to 10-17 mol s-1 kg tuff-1 with the largest uncertainty being the effect of the early thermal history of the tuff. Dissolution rates based on pore water Sr isotopic data were calculated by treating percolation flux parametrically, and vary from 10-15 to 10-16 mol s-1 kg tuff-1 for percolation fluxes of 15 mm a-1 and 1 mm a-1, respectively. Reconciling the rates from the two methods requires that percolation fluxes at the sampled locations be a few mm a-1 or less. The calculated feldspar dissolution rates are low relative to other measured field-based feldspar dissolution rates, possibly due to the age (12.8 Ma) of the unsaturated system at Yucca Mountain; because oxidizing and organic-poor conditions limit biological activity; and/or because elevated silica concentrations in the pore waters (???50 mg L-1) may inhibit feldspar dissolution. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF THE COLLODIAL SOLUTION BASED ON BIOGENIC METAL NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Liapina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was obtaining a stable suspension based on biocompatible substances with application of biogenic metal nanoparticles encapsulated into NaCl salt matrix, as a precursor. Water-soluble complex based on different amine derivatives with antiseptic properties was selected as a liquid for salt dissolution. The solution was subjected to dispersion using ultrasonication at elevated temperature. Dispersion is accompanied by salt shell removal with simultaneous formation of an organic shell on the surfaces of metal nanoparticles that ensure their stabilization. Study of the suspension after soaking at room temperature for 100 days showed that its characteristics remain stable. A method for producing a stable colloidal solution based on nanoparticles of biogenic metal (Cu, Co, fem etc. was developed. Metal nanopowder encapsulated into salt shell was used as a precursor. It is shown that such colloidal solutions are characterized by narrow size dispersion, as well as stability to temperature impact and time factor.

  15. Dissolution kinetics of smectite in geological repository system of TRU waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tsutomu

    2005-02-01

    Extensive use of cement for encapsulation, mine timbering, and grouting purposes is envisaged in geological repositories of TRU waste. Degradation of cement materials in the repositories can produce a high pH pore fluid initially ranging from pH 13.0 to 13.5. The high pH pore fluids can migrate and react chemically with the host rock and bentonites which were employed to enhance repository's integrity. These chemical reactions can effect the capacity of the rocks and bentonites in retarding the migration of radionuclides. Smectite, main component of bentonite, can lose some of their desirable properties at the early stages of bentonite-cement fluid interaction. This has been a key research issue in performance assessment of TRU waste disposal. In this study, firstly, the factors affected on dissolution rate of smectite and equations describing dissolution rate were reviewed. Secondly, the effect of dissolved silica on the dissolution behavior of Na-montmorillonite was investigated. Bulk sample flow-through dissolution experiments at alkaline condition (pH 13.3) with different dissolved silica concentrations at different temperatures were performed. Titration experiments were also carried out at similar conditions. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) ex situ observations (i.e. on samples from flow-through experiments) was also performed to obtain the dissolution rate. Current results from bulk sample surface titration experiments indicate that dissolved silica has no pronounced effect on the surface titration behavior of Na-montmorillonite at any temperature. However, the trends for the surface titration behavior represent the averaged behavior of all particle sizes (i.e. including colloids) such that within an order of magnitude change cannot be quantified appreciably. Bulk flow-through dissolution experiments coupled with ex situ AFM observations indicate that there is also no effect of dissolved silica with comparatively low concentration of the reacting solution on

  16. Silica Synthesis by Sponges: Unanticipated Molecular Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, D. E.; Weaver, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    Oceanic diatoms, sponges and other organisms synthesize gigatons per year of silica from silicic acid, ultimately obtained from the weathering of rock. This biogenic silica exhibits a remarkable diversity of structures, many of which reveal a precision of nanoarchitectural control that exceeds the capabilities of human engineering. In contrast to the conditions of anthropogenic and industrial manufacture, the biological synthesis of silica occurs under mild physiological conditions of low temperatures and pressures and near-neutral pH. In addition to the differentiation between biological and abiotic processes governing silica formation, the biomolecular mechanisms controlling synthesis of these materials may offer insights for the development of new, environmentally benign routes for synthesis of nanostructurally controlled silicas and high-performance polysiloxane composites. We found that the needle-like silica spicules made by the marine sponge, Tethya aurantia, each contain an occluded axial filament of protein composed predominantly of repeating assemblies of three similar subunits we named "silicateins." To our surprise, analysis of the purified protein subunits and the cloned silicatein DNAs revealed that the silicateins are highly homologous to a family of hydrolytic enzymes. As predicted from this finding, we discovered that the silicatein filaments are more than simple, passive templates; they actively catalyze and spatially direct polycondensation to form silica, (as well as the phenyl- and methyl-silsesquioxane) from the corresponding silicon alkoxides at neutral pH and low temperature. Catalytic activity also is exhibited by the silicatein subunits obtained by disaggregation of the protein filaments and those produced from recombinant DNA templates cloned in bacteria. This catalytic activity accelerates the rate-limiting hydrolysis of the silicon alkoxide precursors. Genetic engineering, used to produce variants of the silicatein molecule with

  17. Biorelevant dissolution media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilardia-Arana, David; Kristensen, Henning G; Müllertz, Anette

    2006-01-01

    Biorelevant dissolution media containing bile salt and lecithin at concentrations appropriate for fed and fasted state are useful when testing oral solid formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs. Dilution of amphiphile solutions affects the aggregation state of the amphiphiles because bile salt......, and oleic acid) and a combination of these were prepared at high bile salt concentration. Micelles in the glycocholate solutions decreased in size when diluted. The addition of insoluble amphiphiles led to bigger micelles with no clear correlation between size of the micelles and amphiphile concentration....... Dilution of the two- and four component media caused enlargement of the mixed micelles and formation of vesicles. The solubility of estradiol in the buffer solution was increased with addition of the amphiphiles. A good correlation (R(2) = 0.987) was found between estradiol solubility and mass...

  18. Robotic dissolution station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.; Hollen, R.M.; Temer, D.J.; Haggart, R.J.; Erkkila, T.H.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a robotic station for dissolving active metals in acid in an automated fashion. A vessel with cap, containing the active metal is placed onto a shuttle which retracts to a point at which it is directly beneath a cap removing and retaining mechanism. After the cap is removed, a tube carrying an appropriate acid is inserted into the vessel, and the acid is introduced. The structure of the station forms an open hood which is swept of gases generated by the dissolution and the air removed to a remote location for scrubbing. After the reaction is complete, the shuttle extends and the vessel may be removed by a robot arm.

  19. An experiment to assess the effects of diatom dissolution on oxygen isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew C; Leng, Melanie J; Swann, George E A; Barker, Philip A; Mackay, Anson W; Ryves, David B; Sloane, Hilary J; Chenery, Simon R N; Hems, Mike

    2016-01-30

    Current studies which use the oxygen isotope composition from diatom silica (δ(18) Odiatom ) as a palaeoclimate proxy assume that the δ(18) Odiatom value reflects the isotopic composition of the water in which the diatom formed. However, diatoms dissolve post mortem, preferentially losing less silicified structures in the water column and during/after burial into sediments. The impact of dissolution on δ(18) Odiatom values and potential misinterpretation of the palaeoclimate record are evaluated. Diatom frustules covering a range of ages (6 samples from the Miocene to the Holocene), environments and species were exposed to a weak alkaline solution for 48 days at two temperatures (20 °C and 4 °C), mimicking natural dissolution post mucilage removal. Following treatment, dissolution was assessed using scanning electron microscope images and a qualitative diatom dissolution index. The diatoms were subsequently analysed for their δ(18) O values using step-wise fluorination and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Variable levels of diatom dissolution were observed between the six samples; in all cases higher temperatures resulted in more frustule degradation. Dissolution was most evident in younger samples, probably as a result of the more porous nature of the silica. The degree of diatom dissolution does not directly equate to changes in the isotope ratios; the δ(18) Odiatom value was, however, lower after dissolution, but in only half the samples was this reduction outside the analytical error (2σ analytical error = 0.46‰). We have shown that dissolution can have a small negative impact on δ(18) Odiatom values, causing reductions of up to 0.59‰ beyond analytical error (0.46‰) at natural environmental temperatures. These findings need to be considered in palaeoenvironmental reconstructions using δ(18) Odiatom values, especially when interpreting variations in these values of <1‰. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Biogenic emissions modeling for Southeastern Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, M.; Jacob, D.; Jarvie, J. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) modeling staff performed biogenic hydrocarbon emissions modeling in support of gridded photochemical modeling for ozone episodes in 1992 and 1993 for the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) modeling domain. This paper summarizes the results of the biogenic emissions modeling and compares preliminary photochemical modeling results to ambient air monitoring data collected during the 1993 COAST study. Biogenic emissions were estimated using BIOME, a gridded biogenic emissions model that uses region-specific land use and biomass density data, and plant species-specific emission factor data. Ambient air monitoring data were obtained by continuous automated gas chromatography at two sites, one-hour canister samples at 5 sites, and 24-hour canister samples at 13 other sites. The concentrations of Carbon Bond-IV species (as determined from urban airshed modeling) were compared to measured hydrocarbon concentrations. In this paper, we examined diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as spatial variations.

  1. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numpilai, Thanapha [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Muenmee, Suthaporn [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Center for Advanced Studies in Nanotechnology and Its Applications in Chemical Food and Agricultural Industries, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Witoon, Thongthai, E-mail: fengttwi@ku.ac.th [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Center for Advanced Studies in Nanotechnology and Its Applications in Chemical Food and Agricultural Industries, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); NANOTEC-KU-Center of Excellence on Nanoscale Materials Design for Green Nanotechnology, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2016-02-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N{sub 2}-sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5 nm to 10 nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85 mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8–20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92 wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline. - Highlights: • Impacts of pore characteristics of supports on adsorption and release of ibuprofen • Increasing mesopore size increased the ibuprofen loading and dissolution rate. • Macropores reduced the diffusion pathway of ibuprofen and dissolution medium.

  2. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Muenmee, Suthaporn; Witoon, Thongthai

    2016-01-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N 2 -sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5 nm to 10 nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85 mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8–20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92 wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline. - Highlights: • Impacts of pore characteristics of supports on adsorption and release of ibuprofen • Increasing mesopore size increased the ibuprofen loading and dissolution rate. • Macropores reduced the diffusion pathway of ibuprofen and dissolution medium.

  3. Dissolution of basaltic glass in seawater: Mechanism and rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.L.; Honnorez, J.; Eberhart, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Basaltic glasses are considered as natural analogues for nuclear waste glasses. Thermodynamic computer codes used to evaluate long term behavior of both nuclear waste and basaltic glasses require the knowledge of the dissolution mechanism of the glass network. The paper presents the results of a series of experiments designed to study the structure and chemical composition of alteration layers formed on the surface of artificial tholeiitic glass altered in artificial seawater. Experiments were performed at 60 degree C, 1 bar and 350 bars in non-renewed conditions. A natural sample from Palagonia (Sicily) has been studied by electron microscopy and comparison between natural and experimental palagonitic layers is made. The behavior of dissolved silica during experiments, and both the structure and the chemical composition of the palagonitic layers, indicate that they form by precipitation of secondary minerals from solution after a total breakdown of the glassy network, i.e., congruent dissolution of the glass. Hence the dissolution equation necessary for thermodynamic modelling of basaltic glass dissolution in seawater at low temperature must be written as a simple stoichiometric process. These experiments indicate that the transformation of glass to palagonitic material is not isovolumetric. Hence it is preferable to use Fe or Ti as conservative elements for chemical budget calculations

  4. Mathematical modeling of drug dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2013-08-30

    The dissolution of a drug administered in the solid state is a pre-requisite for efficient subsequent transport within the human body. This is because only dissolved drug molecules/ions/atoms are able to diffuse, e.g. through living tissue. Thus, generally major barriers, including the mucosa of the gastro intestinal tract, can only be crossed after dissolution. Consequently, the process of dissolution is of fundamental importance for the bioavailability and, hence, therapeutic efficacy of various pharmaco-treatments. Poor aqueous solubility and/or very low dissolution rates potentially lead to insufficient availability at the site of action and, hence, failure of the treatment in vivo, despite a potentially ideal chemical structure of the drug to interact with its target site. Different physical phenomena are involved in the process of drug dissolution in an aqueous body fluid, namely the wetting of the particle's surface, breakdown of solid state bonds, solvation, diffusion through the liquid unstirred boundary layer surrounding the particle as well as convection in the surrounding bulk fluid. Appropriate mathematical equations can be used to quantify these mass transport steps, and more or less complex theories can be developed to describe the resulting drug dissolution kinetics. This article gives an overview on the current state of the art of modeling drug dissolution and points out the assumptions the different theories are based on. Various practical examples are given in order to illustrate the benefits of such models. This review is not restricted to mathematical theories considering drugs exhibiting poor aqueous solubility and/or low dissolution rates, but also addresses models quantifying drug release from controlled release dosage forms, in which the process of drug dissolution plays a major role. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics of silica-phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, C.J.

    1993-07-01

    In addition to the stable silica polymorph quartz, several metastable silica phases are present in Yucca Mountain. The conversion of these phases to quartz is accompanied by volume reduction and a decrease in the aqueous silica activity, which may destabilize clinoptilolite and mordenite. The primary reaction sequence for the silica phases is from opal or glass to disordered opal-CT, followed by ordering of the opal-CT and finally by the crystallization of quartz. The ordering of opal-CT takes place in the solid state, whereas the conversion of opal-CT takes place through dissolution-reprecipitation involving the aqueous phase. It is proposed that the rate of conversion of opal-CT to quartz is controlled by diffusion of defects out of a disordered surface layer formed on the crystallizing quartz. The reaction rates are observed to be dependent on temperature, pressure, degree of supersaturation, and pH. Rate equations selected from the literature appear to be consistent with observations at Yucca Mountain.

  6. Dissolution of FFTF vendor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on FFTF vendor fuel (both mechanically mixed and coprecipitated) during 1974, 1975, and 1976. A marked improvement was noted in the completeness of fuel dissolution from 1974 to 1976. The reason for this is unknown but may have been attributable to slight changes in fuel fabrication conditions. In general, the bulk of the fuel pellets tested dissolved to greater than 99.9% in nitric acid alone

  7. Dissolution of FFTF vendor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on FFTF vendor fuel (both mechanically mixed and coprecipitated) during 1974, 1975, and 1976. A marked improvement was noted in the completeness of fuel dissolution from 1974 to 1976. The reason for this is unknown but may have been attributable to slight changes in fuel fabrication conditions. In general, the bulk of the fuel pellets tested dissolved to greater than 99.9% in nitric acid alone.

  8. Dissolution glow curve in LLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkamp, U.; Wiezorek, C.; Poetter, R.

    1990-01-01

    Lyoluminescence dosimetry is based upon light emission during dissolution of previously irradiated dosimetric materials. The lyoluminescence signal is expressed in the dissolution glow curve. These curves begin, depending on the dissolution system, with a high peak followed by an exponentially decreasing intensity. System parameters that influence the graph of the dissolution glow curve, are, for example, injection speed, temperature and pH value of the solution and the design of the dissolution cell. The initial peak does not significantly correlate with the absorbed dose, it is mainly an effect of the injection. The decay of the curve consists of two exponential components: one fast and one slow. The components depend on the absorbed dose and the dosimetric materials used. In particular, the slow component correlates with the absorbed dose. In contrast to the fast component the argument of the exponential function of the slow component is independent of the dosimetric materials investigated: trehalose, glucose and mannitol. The maximum value, following the peak of the curve, and the integral light output are a measure of the absorbed dose. The reason for the different light outputs of various dosimetric materials after irradiation with the same dose is the differing solubility. The character of the dissolution glow curves is the same following irradiation with photons, electrons or neutrons. (author)

  9. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN DIFFERENT WINE SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kántor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five samples of different Slovak wines before and after filtration were analysed in order to determine the content of eight biogenic amines (tryptamine, phenylalanine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine. The method involves extraction of biogenic amines from wine samples with used dansyl chloride. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC was used for determination of biogenic amines equipped with a Rapid Resolution High Definition (RRHD, DAD detectors and Extend-C18 LC column (50 mm x 3.0 mm ID, 1.8 μm particle size. In this study the highest level of biogenic amine in all wine samples represent tryptamine (TRM with the highest content 170.9±5.3 mg/L in Pinot Blanc wine. Phenylalanine (PHE cadaverine (CAD, histamine (HIS and spermidine (SPD were not detected in all wines; mainly SPD was not detected in 16 wines, HIS not detected in 14 wines, PHE and CAD not detected in 2 wines. Tyramine (TYR, spermine (SPN and putrescine (PUT were detected in all wines, but PUT and SPN in very low concentration. The worst wine samples with high biogenic amine content were Saint Laurent (BF, Pinot Blanc (S and Pinot Noir (AF.

  10. Development of Dissolution Test Method for Drotaverine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Sink conditions, drug stability and specificity in different dissolution media were tested to optimize a dissolution test method using a USP paddle type dissolution test apparatus set at a speed of. 50 rpm. The dissolution medium consisted of 900 ml of phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) containing 0.25% w/v cetrimide at 37 ...

  11. Differential dissolution of biogenic carbonates: Implications of secretion at higher pH

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.

    state and thus a more enhanced calcite precipitation than the bicarbonate ions (Lopez et al., 2009). It also helps in dissipation of respired CO 2 into high pH vacuolar seawater thus further increasing the availability of carbonate ions (Nooijer et al...

  12. Synthesis of multivalent silica nanoparticles combining both enthalpic and entropic patchiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Céline; Chomette, Cyril; Désert, Anthony; Sun, Ming; Treguer-Delapierre, Mona; Mornet, Stéphane; Perro, Adeline; Duguet, Etienne; Ravaine, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Silica particles with a controlled number of entropic patches, i.e. dimples, are synthesized through the growth of the silica core of binary multipods that have been produced by a seeded-growth emulsion polymerization reaction. Transmission electron microscopy studies indicate that the silica surface conforms to the shape of the polystyrene (PS) nodules of the multipods while growing, allowing good control of the final shape of the dimpled silica particles. The PS nodules are also used as protecting masks to regioselectively graft amino groups, as revealed by the adsorption of gold markers. After dissolution of the PS nodules, some polymer chains remain grafted onto the silica surface, forming organic bumps. These residues are also selectively functionalized, leading to silica particles with both entropic and enthalpic patches.

  13. Influence of Structural Defects on Biomineralized ZnS Nanoparticle Dissolution: An in-Situ Electron Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelsen, Jeremy R; Xu, Jie; Chiu, Michelle; Moon, Ji-Won; Wilkins, Branford; Graham, David E; Gu, Baohua; Pierce, Eric M

    2018-02-06

    The dissolution of metal sulfides, such as ZnS, is an important biogeochemical process affecting fate and transport of trace metals in the environment. However, current studies of in situ dissolution of metal sulfides and the effects of structural defects on dissolution are lacking. Here we have examined the dissolution behavior of ZnS nanoparticles synthesized via several abiotic and biological pathways. Specifically, we have examined biogenic ZnS nanoparticles produced by an anaerobic, metal-reducing bacterium Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 in a Zn-amended, thiosulfate-containing growth medium in the presence or absence of silver (Ag), and abiogenic ZnS nanoparticles were produced by mixing an aqueous Zn solution with either H 2 S-rich gas or Na 2 S solution. The size distribution, crystal structure, aggregation behavior, and internal defects of the synthesized ZnS nanoparticles were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The characterization results show that both the biogenic and abiogenic samples were dominantly composed of sphalerite. In the absence of Ag, the biogenic ZnS nanoparticles were significantly larger (i.e., ∼10 nm) than the abiogenic ones (i.e., ∼3-5 nm) and contained structural defects (e.g., twins and stacking faults). The presence of trace Ag showed a restraining effect on the particle size of the biogenic ZnS, resulting in quantum-dot-sized nanoparticles (i.e., ∼3 nm). In situ dissolution experiments for the synthesized ZnS were conducted with a liquid-cell TEM (LCTEM), and the primary factors (i.e., the presence or absence structural defects) were evaluated for their effects on the dissolution behavior using the biogenic and abiogenic ZnS nanoparticle samples with the largest average particle size. Analysis of the dissolution results (i.e., change in particle radius with time) using the Kelvin equation shows that the defect-bearing biogenic ZnS nanoparticles

  14. The ABAG biogenic emissions inventory project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Henry, C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The ability to identify the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions in contributing to overall ozone production in the Bay Area, and to identify the significance of that role, were investigated in a joint project of the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and NASA/Ames Research Center. Ozone, which is produced when nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons combine in the presence of sunlight, is a primary factor in air quality planning. In investigating the role of biogenic emissions, this project employed a pre-existing land cover classification to define areal extent of land cover types. Emission factors were then derived for those cover types. The land cover data and emission factors were integrated into an existing geographic information system, where they were combined to form a Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Inventory. The emissions inventory information was then integrated into an existing photochemical dispersion model.

  15. Dissolution of aluminium; Disolucion de aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uriarte Hueda, A.; Berberana Eizmendi, M.; Pereira Sanchez, G.

    1968-07-01

    The dissolution of aluminum with acid solutions ( nitric acid-mercuric nitrate) and alkaline solutions (sodium hydroxide-sodium nitrate) has been studied. The instantaneous dissolution rate (IDR) has been studied in function of the concentration of the used reagents and the dissolution temperature. The complete dissolution has been included in the second part of this report, to know the total dissolution time, the consume of reagents and the stability of the resultant solutions. (Author)

  16. Mineralogical characteristics of the silica polymorphs in relation to their biological activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heaney, P.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geological and Geophysical Sciences

    1993-10-01

    Numerous aspects of minerals (including the silica polymorphs) can effect their biological activities. These include periodic structures, compositional variations, dissolution characteristics, surface properties, and particle size/shape. In order to understand mineral-induced pathogenesis in a mechanistic way, the links between these properties and biochemical processes must be elucidated. This paper presents some of the basic properties of the silica polymorphs that may relate to pathogenicity and mineralogical strategies for designing biological assays to evaluate these properties.

  17. Microporous silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability is a crucial factor for the application of microporous silica-based membranes in industrial processes. Indeed, it is well established that steam exposure may cause densification and defect formation in microporous silica membranes, which are detrimental to both membrane...... permeability and selectivity. Numerous previous studies show that microporous transition metal doped-silica membranes are hydrothermally more stable than pure silica membranes, but less permeable. Here we present a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions...... on the microporous structure, stability and permeability of amorphous silica-based membranes, providing information on how to design chemical compositions and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile microporous structure....

  18. Glass properties in the yttria-alumina-silica system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, M. J.; Day, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The glass formation region in the yttria-alumina-silica system was investigated. Properties of glasses containing 25 to 55 wt pct yttria were measured and the effect of the composition was determined. The density, refractive index, thermal-expansion coefficient, and microhardness increased with increasing yttria content. The dissolution rate in 1N HCl increased with increasing yttria content and temperature. These glasses were also found to have high electrical resistivity.

  19. In vitro dissolution of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusbert, P.J.; Carter, M.W. (Alligator Rivers Region Research Inst., Jabiru, NT (Australia)); Woods, D.A. (Office of the Supervising Scientist, Parkes, ACT (Australia))

    1994-01-01

    As part of the recommended procedure for calculating radiation doses from inhaled radioactive material, the ICR divides radionuclides into three transportability classes on the basis of their dissolution half-times. A method of measuring dissolution rates of uranium compounds in lung fluid using a batch replacement method has been commonly used to determine the transportability class for dosimetry purposes. A report by Stockwell et al however, suggested that the batch replacement technique produced results that varied with the experimental design. Studies are reported of measurements of the dissolution rate of uranium concentrate from an Australian mill and a NBS uranium reference material and the results confirm that the batch replacement method does not produce valid results. The apparent transportability of the uranium is affected by the frequency of solvent replacement. Hence a change in technique will cause a change in the result. (Author).

  20. Thermokinetic model of borosilicate glass dissolution: contextual affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Vernaz, E.; Crovisier, J.L.; Fritz, B.

    1989-01-01

    Short and long-term geochemical interactions of R7T7 nuclear glass with water at 100 0 C were simulated with the DISSOL thermokinetic computer code. Both the dissolved glass quantity and the resulting water composition, saturation states and mineral quantities produced were calculated as a function of time. The rate equation used in the simulation was first proposed by Aagaard and Helgeson. It simulates a gradually diminishing dissolution rate as the reaction affinity diminishes. The best agreement with 1-year experimental data was obtained with a reaction affinity calculated from silica activity (Grambow's hypothesis) rather than taking into account the activity of all the glass components as proposed by Jantzen and Plodinec. The concept of residual affinity was introduced by Grambow to express the fact that the glass dissolution rate does not cease. We prefer to replace the term residual affinity by contextual affinity, which expresses the influence on the dissolution rate of three factors: the solution chemistry, the metastability of SiO 2 (m), and the possible precipitation of certain aluminosilicates such as zeolites. 19 refs

  1. Improving the dissolution properties of spironolactone using liquisolid technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Akbari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of liquisolid technique on the dissolution profile of spironolactone was evaluated. Different formulations of spironolactone liquisolid compacts were prepared using various amounts of non-volatile vehicles (Poly ethylene glycol 400 and glycerin. The ratio of microcrystalline cellulose (as carrier to silica (as coating powder material was 20 for all formulations. After preparing tablets by direct compression with constant compression load, the release profiles were evaluated by USP paddle method. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and FTIR were used to evaluate any interaction between spironolactone and other ingredients. The liquisolid tablets exhibited significantly higher dissolution rates in comparison with conventionally direct compressed tablets. Furthermore results showed dissolution rate enhancement of liquisolid tablets by increase in the amounts of non-volatile vehicles. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that, the drug has got solubilized in the liquid vehicle. FT-IR spectroscopy studies of pure spironolactone, liquisolid compacts, glycerin and PEG400 supported solubilization of the drug in the liquid vehicle too. The FT-IR spectra also showed that no interactions have been occurred between spironolactone and other ingredients. In conclusion the liquisolid technique can be a suitable method in order to prepare rapid release tablets of poorly water-soluble drugs such as spironolactone.

  2. Actor bonds after relationship dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne

    2000-01-01

    Most of the presented papers at the 1st NoRD Workshop can be classified as belonging to the business marketing approach to relationship dissolution. Two papers were conceptual, and the remaining six were empirical studies. The first conceptual study by Skaates (2000) focuses on the nature...... of the actor bonds that remain after a business relationship has ended. The study suggests that an interdisciplinary approach would provide a richer understanding of the phenomenon; this could be achieved by using e.g. Bourdieu's sociological concepts in dissolution research....

  3. Dissolution Threats and Legislative Bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, Michael; Christiansen, Flemming Juul

    2015-01-01

    Chief executives in many parliamentary democracies have the power to dissolve the legislature. Despite a well-developed literature on the endogenous timing of parliamentary elections, political scientists know remarkably little about the strategic use of dissolution power to influence policymaking....... To address this gap, we propose and empirically evaluate a theoretical model of legislative bargaining in the shadow of executive dissolution power. The model implies that the chief executive's public support and legislative strength, as well as the time until the next constitutionally mandated election...

  4. Biogenic amines in meat and meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that biogenic amines occur in a wide range of foods, among them meat and meat products. Meat is an important component of the diet in developed countries. The presence of these amines in food is of interest for two reasons: firstly, for toxicological reasons, in the sense that high levels of dietary biogenic amines can be toxic for certain consumers, and secondly, for their role as possible quality indicators. Based on these two premises, the present article offers a new analysis on aspects of toxicology and on the use of biogenic amines as a quality control method, as well as on their presence in meat and meat products. The article focuses particularly on factors affecting the production of biogenic amines, with reference to various parameters relating to microorganisms, meat raw materials, and processing conditions. A better understanding of the factors determining their formation (i.e., microorganisms, raw materials used, and technological processes applied) and their effects could lead to ways of controlling their production, limiting their presence in the end product, and hence, rendering them less toxic.

  5. Microbiological, physicochemical properties and biogenic amine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty three strained yoghurt samples were collected from local open markets in different provinces of Turkey (Afyon [AF], Aydın [AY], Burdur [B], Isparta [I] and Muğla [M]). Physicochemical and microbiological properties, as well as biogenic amine content, were examined in each of the samples. The dry matter (17.90 to ...

  6. Measurements of biogenic hydrocarbons and carbonyl compounds emitted by trees from temperate warm Atlantic rainforest, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Lilian R F; Vasconcellos, Perola C; Mantovani, Waldir; Pool, Cristina S; Pisani, Silvana O

    2005-05-01

    This study is part of a three-year project on biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from trees of the temperate warm Atlantic rainforest found in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo City (MASP). No study of VOC emission rates from plant species has been carried out in the temperate warm Atlantic rainforest of Brazil prior to this work. Eleven species were selected (Alchornea sidifolia, Cupania oblongifolia, Cecropia pachystachia, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Casearia sylvestris, Machaerium villosum, Trema micrantha, Croton floribundus, Myrcia rostrata, Solanum erianthum and Ficus insipida) and some of them were studied in urban, sub-urban and forest areas inside the MASP in order to evaluate biogenic VOC composition at sites characterized by different emission sources. Biogenic VOC emissions were determined by placing branches of plants in a dynamic enclosure system, an all-Teflon cuvette, and by sampling the compounds in the air leaving the cuvette. Pre-concentration using adsorbents to retain the VOC, followed by GC-MS after thermal desorption of the sample, was employed to determine the amount of biogenic hydrocarbons. The collection of carbonyl compounds on a 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated silica followed by HPLC-UV was used to analyze low molecular weight carbonyl compounds. Emission rates of isoprene, alpha-pinene, camphene and limonene ranged from 0.01 to 2.16 microg C h(-1) g(-1) and emission rates of aldehydes (C(2)-C(6)), acrolein, methacrolein and 2-butanone ranged from 1.5 x 10(-2) to 2.3 micro g C h(-1) g (-1). Ambient and leaf temperatures, relative humidity, light intensity, O(3) and NO(x) levels in the local atmosphere were monitored during experiments. It was possible to identify different biogenic VOCs emitted from typical plants of temperate warm Atlantic rainforest. The emission rates were reported as a function of the type of site investigated and were only provided for compounds for which quantification was feasible. Other biogenic

  7. Presence of nano-sized silica during in vitro digestion of foods containing silica as a food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ruud; Kramer, Evelien; Oomen, Agnes G; Rivera, Zahira E Herrera; Oegema, Gerlof; Tromp, Peter C; Fokkink, Remco; Rietveld, Anton; Marvin, Hans J P; Weigel, Stefan; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2012-03-27

    The presence, dissolution, agglomeration state, and release of materials in the nano-size range from food containing engineered nanoparticles during human digestion is a key question for the safety assessment of these materials. We used an in vitro model to mimic the human digestion. Food products subjected to in vitro digestion included (i) hot water, (ii) coffee with powdered creamer, (iii) instant soup, and (iv) pancake which either contained silica as the food additive E551, or to which a form of synthetic amorphous silica or 32 nm SiO(2) particles were added. The results showed that, in the mouth stage of the digestion, nano-sized silica particles with a size range of 5-50 and 50-500 nm were present in food products containing E551 or added synthetic amorphous silica. However, during the successive gastric digestion stage, this nano-sized silica was no longer present for the food matrices coffee and instant soup, while low amounts were found for pancakes. Additional experiments showed that the absence of nano-sized silica in the gastric stage can be contributed to an effect of low pH combined with high electrolyte concentrations in the gastric digestion stage. Large silica agglomerates are formed under these conditions as determined by DLS and SEM experiments and explained theoretically by the extended DLVO theory. Importantly, in the subsequent intestinal digestion stage, the nano-sized silica particles reappeared again, even in amounts higher than in the saliva (mouth) digestion stage. These findings suggest that, upon consumption of foods containing E551, the gut epithelium is most likely exposed to nano-sized silica. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  8. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  9. Silica from Ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silica (SiOz) is one of the valuable inorganic multipurpose chemical compounds. It can exist in gel, crystalline and amorphous forms. It is the most abundant material on the earth's crust. However, manufacture of pure silica is energy intensive. A variety of industrial processes, involving conven- tional raw materials require ...

  10. Random effects in drug dissolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čupera, J.; Lánský, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 41, 3-4 (2010), s. 430-439 ISSN 0928-0987 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : dissolution * stochastic differential equations * Wiener process Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.291, year: 2010

  11. Silica precipitation in acidic solutions: mechanism, pH effect, and salt effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrepati, Elizabeth A; Wongthahan, Pattanapong; Raha, Sasanka; Fogler, H Scott

    2010-07-06

    This study is the first to show that silica precipitation under very acidic conditions ([HCl] = 2-8 M) proceeds through two distinct steps. First, the monomeric form of silica is quickly depleted from solution as it polymerizes to form primary particles approximately 5 nm in diameter. Second, the primary particles formed then flocculate. A modified Smoluchowski equation that incorporates a geometric population balance accurately describes the exponential growth of silica flocs. Variation of the HCl concentration between 2 and 8 M further showed that polymerization to form primary particles and subsequent particle flocculation become exponentially faster with increasing acid concentration. The effect of salt was also studied by adding 1 M chloride salts to the solutions; it was found that salts accelerated both particle formation and growth rates in the order: AlCl(3) > CaCl(2) > MgCl(2) > NaCl > CsCl > no salt. It was also found that ionic strength, over cation identity, determines silica polymerization and particle flocculation rates. This research reveals that precipitation of silica products from acid dissolution of minerals can be studied apart from the mineral dissolution process. Thus, silica product precipitation from mineral acidization follows a two-step process--formation of 5 nm primary particles followed by particle flocculation--which becomes exponentially faster with increasing HCl concentration and with salts accelerating the process in the above order. This result has implications for any study of acid dissolution of aluminosilicate or silicate material. In particular, the findings are applicable to the process of acidizing oil-containing rock formations, a common practice of the petroleum industry where silica dissolution products encounter a low-pH, salty environment within the oil well.

  12. Influence of Structural Defects on Biomineralized ZnS Nanoparticle Dissolution: An In-Situ Electron Microscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskelsen, Jeremy R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Xu, Jie [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Geological Sciences; Chiu, Michelle Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Moon, Ji-Won [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Wilkins, Branford O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Graham, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Gu, Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Pierce, Eric M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    2017-12-19

    The dissolution of metal sulfides, such as ZnS, plays an important role in the fate of metal contaminants in the environment. Here we have examined the dissolution behavior of ZnS nanoparticles synthesized via several abiotic and biological pathways. Specifically, the biogenic ZnS nanoparticles were produced by an anaerobic, metal-reducing bacterium Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 in a Zn-amended, thiosulfate-containing growth medium, whereas the abiogenic ZnS nanoparticles were produced by mixing an aqueous Zn solution with either H2S-rich gas or Na2S solution. For biogenic synthesis, we prepared two types of samples, in the presence or absence of trace silver (Ag). The size distribution, crystal structure, aggregation behavior, and internal defects of the synthesized ZnS nanoparticles were primarily examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The characterization results show that both the biogenic and abiogenic samples were dominantly composed of sphalerite. In the absence of Ag, the biogenic ZnS nanoparticles were significantly larger (i.e., ~10 nm) than the abiogenic ones (i.e., ~3–5 nm) and contained structural defects (e.g., twins and stacking faults). The presence of trace Ag showed a restraining effect on the particle size of the biogenic ZnS, resulting in quantum-dot-sized nanoparticles (i.e., ~3 nm). In situ dissolution experiments for the synthesized ZnS were conducted with a liquid-cell coupled to a transmission electron microscope (LCTEM), and the primary factors (i.e., the presence or absence structural defects) were evaluated for their effects on the dissolution behavior using the biogenic and abiogenic ZnS nanoparticle samples with the largest average particle size. Analysis of the dissolution results (i.e., change in particle radius with time) using the Kelvin equation shows that the defect-bearing biogenic ZnS nanoparticles (γ = 0.799 J/m2) have

  13. Dissolution characteristics of chalcedony under alkaline condition. Study for changes in mineral composition of engineered barrier composed by bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yasutaka; Yokoyama, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    In the engineered barrier of radioactive waste disposal facilities, it is expected that bentonite is exposed to alkaline groundwater which arise from leaching of cementations materials. Minerals contained in the bentonite will be dissolved by reactions of the alkaline groundwater. Some bentonite contains silica such as quartz and chalcedony. Chalcedony is categorized in intermediate silica which is microcrystalline. It is known that dissolution of silica influences to the dissolution of smectite by means of solubility. However, dissolution kinetics of chalcedony in the alkaline condition has not been investigated, which is an uncertainty in geochemical simulations to evaluate a long-term stability of the engineered barrier. Therefore, this study performed flow-through experiments in alkaline conditions using chalcedony in order to obtain the dissolution rate of the chalcedony. The flow-through experiments was performed using NaOH-NaCl solution adjusted to 0.3 mol/L of ionic strength. Initial pH of the solution was from 8.9 to 13.5. As a result, higher pH and higher temperature showed higher Si ion concentrations of reacted solutions. The dissolution rate of the samples was calculated using Si ion concentrations at steady state of the experiment. Note that, the dissolution rate of the chalcedony was almost same as that of quartz at same temperature. After the experiments, SEM observation showed that rough surface of the chalcedony partly changed to smooth surface like quartz. It is supposed that rough surface of chalcedony was rapidly dissolved because of low degree of crystallization. The dissolution rate obtained is supposedly applicable to highly crystalline SiO 2 of chalcedony. (author)

  14. Enhanced performance large volume dissolution-DNP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Sean; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study of the performance of the dissolution process in dissolution-DNP is presented. A relatively simple set of modifications is made to the standard Hypersense dissolution system to enable polarization of large volume samples. These consist of a large volume sample cup along with su...

  15. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, Anna M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  16. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments.

  17. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources. EPA developed the revised report, Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, to present a methodological framework for assessing the extent to which the production, processing, and use of biogenic material at stationary sources for energy production results in a net atmospheric contribution of biogenic CO2 emissions. Biogenic carbon dioxide emissions are defined as CO2 emissions related to the natural carbon cycle, as well as those resulting from the production, harvest, combustion, digestion, decomposition, and processing of biologically-based materials. The EPA is continuing to refine its technical assessment of biogenic CO2 emissions through another round of targeted peer review of the revised study with the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB). This study was submitted to the SAB's Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel in February 2015. http://yosemite.epa.gov/sab/sabproduct.nsf/0/3235dac747c16fe985257da90053f252!OpenDocument&TableRow=2.2#2 The revised report will inform efforts by policymakers, academics, and other stakeholders to evaluate the technical aspects related to assessments of biogenic feedstocks used for energy at s

  18. Dissolution Kinetics of Alumina Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2001-09-01

    Dissolution kinetics of alumina type non-radioactive calcine was investigated as part of ongoing research that addresses permanent disposal of Idaho High Level Waste (HLW). Calcine waste was produced from the processing of nuclear fuel at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Acidic radioactive raffinates were solidified at ~500°C in a fluidized bed reactor to form the dry granular calcine material. Several Waste Management alternatives for the calcine are presented in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The Separations Alternative addresses the processing of the calcine so that the HLW is ready for removal to a national geological repository by the year 2035. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the separations alternative.

  19. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R; Feitosa, L O; Ballottin, D; Tasic, L; Durán, N; Marcato, P D

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (− 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  20. Rett syndrome - Stimulation of endogenous biogenic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelligra, R.; Norton, R. D.; Wilkinson, R.; Leon, H. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient hypercapnic hyperoxemia was induced in two Rett syndrome children by the administration of a gaseous mixture of 80 percent O2 and 20 percent CO2. Time course studies of neurotransmitters and their metabolites showed an immediate and marked increase in central biogenic amine turnover following inhalation of the gas mixture. The increased turnover of biogenic amines was associated with improved clinical changes. This suggests a coupled relationship and provides further support for an etiological role of neurotransmitter dysfunction in Rett syndrome. In a complementary study, elevation of pulmonary CO2 by application of a simple rebreathing device resulted in improvement of abnormal blood gases and elimination of the Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern of the Rett syndrome. Near normalization of the EEG occurred when a normal respiratory pattern was imposed by means of a respirator. Taken together, these results lead to the preliminary conclusion that cerebral hypoxemia secondary to abnormal respiratory function may contribute to diminished production of biogenic amines in Rett syndrome.

  1. Prevention and management of silica scaling in membrane distillation using pH adjustment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, John A.; Vanneste, Johan; Gustafson, Emily M.; Waechter, Christopher A.; Jassby, David; Turchi, Craig S.; Cath, Tzahi Y.

    2018-05-01

    Membrane scaling by silica is a major challenge in desalination, particularly for inland desalination of brackish groundwater or geothermal resources, which often contain high concentrations of silica and dissolved solids. Adjustment of feed pH may reduce silica scaling risk, which is important for inland facilities that operate at high water recoveries to reduce brine disposal costs. However, water recovery of reverse osmosis is also limited due to increased osmotic pressure with feed water concentration. Membrane distillation (MD) is a thermally driven membrane desalination technique that is not limited by increased osmotic pressure of the feed. In this investigation, pH adjustment was tested as a strategy to reduce silica scaling risk in the MD process. With feed water pH less than 5 or higher than 10, scaling impacts were negligible at silica concentrations up to 600 mg/L. Scaling rates were highest at neutral pH between 6 and 8. Cleaning strategies were also explored to remove silica scale from membranes. Cleaning using NaOH solutions at pH higher than 11 to induce dissolution of silica scale was effective at temporarily restoring performance; however, some silica remained on membrane surfaces and scaling upon re-exposure to supersaturated silica concentrations occurred faster than with new membranes.

  2. Silica aerogel Cerenkov counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumi, S.; Masaike, A.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kawai, H.

    1984-03-01

    In order to obtain silica aerogel radiators of good quality, the prescription used by Saclay group has been developed. We have done several experiments using beams from KEK.PS to test the performance of a Cerenkov counter with aerogel modules produced in KEK. It turned out that these modules had excellent quality. The production rate of silica aerogel in KEK is 15 -- 20 litres a week. Silica aerogel modules of 20 x 10 x 3 cm 3 having the refractive index of 1.058 are successfully being used by Kyoto University group in the KEK experiment E92 (Σ). Methodes to produce silica aerogel with higher refractive index than 1.06 has been investigated both by heating an module with the refractive index of 1.06 and by hydrolyzing tetraethyl silicate. (author)

  3. Cellulose-silica aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demilecamps, Arnaud; Beauger, Christian; Hildenbrand, Claudia; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana

    2015-05-20

    Aerogels based on interpenetrated cellulose-silica networks were prepared and characterised. Wet coagulated cellulose was impregnated with silica phase, polyethoxydisiloxane, using two methods: (i) molecular diffusion and (ii) forced flow induced by pressure difference. The latter allowed an enormous decrease in the impregnation times, by almost three orders of magnitude, for a sample with the same geometry. In both cases, nanostructured silica gel was in situ formed inside cellulose matrix. Nitrogen adsorption analysis revealed an almost threefold increase in pores specific surface area, from cellulose aerogel alone to organic-inorganic composite. Morphology, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties under uniaxial compression were investigated. Thermal conductivity of composite aerogels was lower than that of cellulose aerogel due to the formation of superinsulating mesoporous silica inside cellulose pores. Furthermore, composite aerogels were stiffer than each of reference aerogels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrochemical Sensors: Functionalized Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana

    2009-03-24

    This chapter summarizes recent devellopment of electrochemical sensors based on functionlized mesoporous silica materials. The nanomatrials based sensors have been developed for sensitive and selective enrironmental detection of toxic heavy metal and uranium ions.

  5. To what extent can biogenic SOA be controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Pinder, Robert W; Bhave, Prakash V; Pouliot, George A

    2010-05-01

    The implicit assumption that biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is natural and can not be controlled hinders effective air quality management. Anthropogenic pollution facilitates transformation of naturally emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the particle phase, enhancing the ambient concentrations of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). It is therefore conceivable that some portion of ambient biogenic SOA can be removed by controlling emissions of anthropogenic pollutants. Direct measurement of the controllable fraction of biogenic SOA is not possible, but can be estimated through 3-dimensional photochemical air quality modeling. To examine this in detail, 22 CMAQ model simulations were conducted over the continental U.S. (August 15 to September 4, 2003). The relative contributions of five emitted pollution classes (i.e., NO(x), NH(3), SO(x), reactive non methane carbon (RNMC) and primary carbonaceous particulate matter (PCM)) on biogenic SOA were estimated by removing anthropogenic emissions of these pollutants, one at a time and all together. Model results demonstrate a strong influence of anthropogenic emissions on predicted biogenic SOA concentrations, suggesting more than 50% of biogenic SOA in the eastern U.S. can be controlled. Because biogenic SOA is substantially enhanced by controllable emissions, classification of SOA as biogenic or anthropogenic based solely on VOC origin is not sufficient to describe the controllable fraction.

  6. Thorium oxide dissolution: kinetics and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonnet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Studies of new energy sources are necessary to meet the rising global demand. In the nuclear area, Th-U cycle has been reinvestigated to supplement or replace the currently used U-Pu cycle. This project though needs further improvement to be operated in an industrial plant, especially on the reprocessing process, which consists in fuel dissolution in nitric acid medium, followed by liquid-liquid extraction. Still, unlike uranium, thorium oxide does not dissolve in concentrated nitric acid. Small amounts of fluoride are required to achieve the dissolution. The dissolution is rather slow and HNO 3 -HF mixture is very corrosive. The aim of this project is thus to find an efficient dissolution method which both decreases corrosion and improves dissolution rate. The synthesized thorium oxide powder has been dissolved in chosen conditions. Effects of solid parameters, dissolution method and dissolution medium have been studied. Results show a strong dependence on oxide crystallinity. No improvement on dissolution rate was observed with power ultrasounds, except for the temperature increase, which greatly enhances dissolution rate. No other complexing agents than fluoride allows total dissolution. Rising HNO 3 and HF concentrations increases dissolution rate until the amount of fluorides is so high that a precipitate forms at the surface. This study led to the proposal of a dissolution mechanism whose limiting step is the formation of an activated complex. Based on kinetics and equilibrium equations, initial dissolution rate was then written as a function of the different studied parameters. Experimental results were finally fitted by this relation to find kinetics and thermodynamics constants, proving the accuracy of the proposed mechanism. (author)

  7. The effect of dissolution of volcanic glass on the water chemistry in a tuffaceous aquifer, Rainier Mesa, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Art F.; Claassen, H.C.; Benson, Larry V.

    1980-01-01

    Geochemistry of ground water associated with the Tertiary tuffs within Rainier Mesa, southern Nevada, was investigated to determine the relative importance of glass dissolution in controlling water chemistry. Water samples were obtained both from interstitial pores in core sections and from free-flowing fractures. Cation com- positions showed that calcium and magnesium decreased as a function of depth in the mesa, as sodium increased. The maximum effect occurs within alteration zones containing clinoptilolite and montmorillonite, suggesting these minerals effectively remove bivalent cations from the system. Comparisons are made between compositions of ground waters found within Rainier Mesa that apparently have not reacted with secondary minerals and compositions of waters produced by experimental dissolution of vitric and crystalline tufts which comprise the principal aquifers in the area. The two tuff phases have the same bulk chemistry but produce aqueous solutions of different chemistry. Rapid parabolic dissolution of sodium and silica from, and the retention of, potassium within the vitric phase verify previous predictions concerning water compositions associated with vitric volcanic rocks. Parabolic dissolution of the crystalline phase results in solutions high in calcium and magnesium and low in silica. Extrapolation of the parabolic dissolution mechanism for the vitric tuff to long times successfully reproduces, at com- parable pH, cation ratios existing in Rainier Mesa ground water. Comparison of mass- transfer rates of the vitric and crystalline tuffs indicates that the apparent higher glass-surface to aqueous-volume ratio associated with the vitric rocks may account for dominance of the glass reaction.

  8. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Muenmee, Suthaporn; Witoon, Thongthai

    2016-02-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N2-sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5nm to 10nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8-20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of changes in river fluxes of silica on the global marine silicon cycle: a model comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Bernard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The availability of dissolved silica (Si in the ocean provides a major control on the growth of siliceous phytoplankton. Diatoms in particular account for a large proportion of oceanic primary production. The original source of the silica is rock weathering, followed by transport of dissolved and biogenic silica to the coastal zone. This model study aims at assessing the sensitivity of the global marine silicon cycle to variations in the river input of silica on timescales ranging from several centuries to millennia. We compare the performance of a box model for the marine silicon cycle to that of a global biogeochemical ocean general circulation model (HAMOCC2 and 5. Results indicate that the average global ocean response to changes in river input of silica is comparable in the models on time scales up to 150 kyrs. While the trends in export production and opal burial are the same, the box model shows a delayed response to the imposed perturbations compared to the general circulation model. Results of both models confirm the important role of the continental margins as a sink for silica at the global scale. Our work also demonstrates that the effects of changes in riverine dissolved silica on ocean biogeochemistry depend on the availability of the other nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus and iron. The model results suggest that the effects of reduced silica inputs due to river damming are particularly pronounced in the Gulf of Bengal, Gulf of Mexico and the Amazon plume where they negatively affect opal production. While general circulation models are indispensable when assessing the spatial variation in opal export production and biogenic Si burial in the ocean, this study demonstrates that box models provide a good alternative when studying the average global ocean response to perturbations of the oceanic silica cycle (especially on longer time scales.

  10. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O'Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination

  11. Stability of Decontamination Foam Containing Silica Nanoparticles and Viscosifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, In Ho; Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, Suk Bon; Kim, Chorong; Jung, Jun Young; Park, Sang Yoon; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Wang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This formulation can significantly decrease the amounts of chemical reagents and secondary waste. The advantage of decontamination foam is its potentially wide application for metallic walls, overhead surfaces, and the elements of complex components and facilities. In addition, foam is a good material for in situ decontamination because it generates low final waste volumes owing to its volume expansion. The application of foam allows for remote decontamination processing using only an injection nozzle and the equipment to generate the decontamination foam, which reduces operator exposure to high radioactivity. The decontamination efficiency can be enhanced by improving the contact time between chemical reagents and a contaminated surface through the addition of surfactants and viscosifiers into the decontamination foam. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of silica nanoparticles and a viscosifier on the foam stability and the dissolution behaviors of corroded specimens using a non-ionic surfactant. This study showed the effect of viscosifiers and nanoparticles on the foam stability when developing new formulations of decontamination foam. The addition of xanthan gum and the mixture of xanthan gum and silica nanoparticles (M-5) significantly increased the foam stability, compared to the surfactant solution alone. This result indicates that both the viscosifier and nanoparticles have a synergistic effect on the foam stability. As the contact time increased, the dissolution rate increased to become similar to the dissolution that contained decontamination liquid.

  12. Tracking single coccolith dissolution with picogram resolution and implications for CO2 sequestration and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassenkam, T.; Johnsson, A.; Bechgaard, K.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Coccoliths are micrometer scale shields made from 20 to 60 individual calcite (CaCO3) crystals that are produced by some species of algae. Currently, coccoliths serve as an important sink in the global carbon cycle, but decreasing ocean pH challenges their stability. Chalk deposits, the fossil remains of ancient algae, have remained remarkably unchanged by diagenesis, the process that converts sediment to rock. Even after 60 million years, the fossil coccolith crystals are still tiny (one day old crystals can be 10 times larger, which raises the question if the biogenic nature of coccolith calcite gives it different properties than inorganic calcite? And if so, can these properties protect coccoliths in CO2 challenged oceans? Here we describe a new method for tracking dissolution of individual specimens, at picogram (10-12 g) resolution. The results show that the behavior of modern and fossil coccoliths is similar and both are more stable than inorganic calcite. Organic material associated with the biogenic calcite provides the explanation. However, ancient and modern coccoliths, that resist dissolution in Ca-free artificial seawater at pH > 8, all dissolve when pH is 7.8 or lower. Ocean pH is predicted to fall below 7.8 by the year 2100, in response to rising CO2 levels. Our results imply that at these conditions the advantages offered by the biogenic nature of calcite will disappear putting coccoliths on algae and in the calcareous bottom sediments at risk. PMID:21551094

  13. Secondary biogeneous radiation of human organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    When studying samples of three types of tissues of alive healthy human organism (hands, surface of breast, hair) it is shown that hair permanently emit secondary biogeneous radiation (SBR) which may registered with biological detectors. The hypothesis is suggested that natural background radiation permanently exciting biopolymers (proteins, nuclei acids) being present in alive organism in condensed state induces permanently present electromagnetic field of SBR which is vitally important for human organism. The field partly extends beyond the organism, where it is registered with sensitive biological detectors [ru

  14. Kinetics of silica polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

    1980-05-01

    The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

  15. Post-column derivatization capillary electrochromatography for detection of biogenic amines in tuna-meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Shigeyuki; Okuya, Yukie; Yanase, Yukiko; Suzuki, Sayaka

    2008-08-15

    A system to perform post-column derivatization capillary electrochromatography (CEC) was developed for the first time. The system mainly included a 4-microm (O.D.) silica packed column (200 mm effective length x 0.1 mm inner diameter I.D.) with micro-magnetic particles (MMPs) frits, a T-junction connector, an in-line fluorescence detector and a high-voltage power supply. The system was evaluated by using histamine (HA) as a standard biogenic amine for this study. A 5 microM HA solution was loaded at the anodic site of the capillary column by applying 3 kV for 5s. Then, HA was electrophoretically eluted with a 20mM phosphate buffer (pH 7) by applying 3 kV, and was derivatized with 3mM o-phthalaldehyde (OPA)/N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in 100 mM borate (pH 10), which was continuously delivered through the reagent-loading capillary tube by gravity into the T-junction connector. HA derivative was finally detected with the in-line fluorescence detector (lambda(Ex)=340 nm, lambda(Em)=450 nm) at 9.7 min after sample loading. To test the utility of this system, it was next employed for its ability to detect the presence of HA and other kinds of biogenic amines, including cadaverine (Cad), spermidine (Spm) and tyramine (Tyr) in tuna-meat, once the validity of the method had been confirmed.

  16. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  17. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  18. Silica coated ionic liquid templated mesoporous silica nanoparticles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Silica coated ionic liquid templated mesoporous silica nanoparticles. E.D.M. Isa, M. B. A. Rahman, H. Ahmad. Abstract. A series of long chain pyridinium based ionic liquids 1-tetradecylpyridinium bromide, 1-hexadecylpyridinium bromide and 1-1-octadecylpyridinium bromide were used as templates to prepare silica coated ...

  19. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jeong; K. Kim; W. Choi

    2012-01-01

    Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a~new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4), the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phas...

  20. Optimization of Dissolution Compartments in a Biorelevant Dissolution Apparatus Golem v2, Supported by Multivariate Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Stupák

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Biorelevant dissolution instruments represent an important tool for pharmaceutical research and development. These instruments are designed to simulate the dissolution of drug formulations in conditions most closely mimicking the gastrointestinal tract. In this work, we focused on the optimization of dissolution compartments/vessels for an updated version of the biorelevant dissolution apparatus—Golem v2. We designed eight compartments of uniform size but different inner geometry. The dissolution performance of the compartments was tested using immediate release caffeine tablets and evaluated by standard statistical methods and principal component analysis. Based on two phases of dissolution testing (using 250 and 100 mL of dissolution medium, we selected two compartment types yielding the highest measurement reproducibility. We also confirmed a statistically ssignificant effect of agitation rate and dissolution volume on the extent of drug dissolved and measurement reproducibility.

  1. Removal of colloidal biogenic selenium from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, Lucian C; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Mehmet A; Ackerson, Christopher J; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic selenium, Se(0), has colloidal properties and thus poses solid-liquid separation problems, such as poor settling and membrane fouling. The separation of Se(0) from the bulk liquid was assessed by centrifugation, filtration, and coagulation-flocculation. Se(0) particles produced by an anaerobic granular sludge are normally distributed, ranging from 50 nm to 250 nm, with an average size of 166±29 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.18. Due to its nanosize range and protein coating-associated negative zeta potential (-15 mV to -23 mV) between pH 2 and 12, biogenic Se(0) exhibits colloidal properties, hampering its removal from suspension. Centrifugation at different centrifugal speeds achieved 22±3% (1500 rpm), 73±2% (3000 rpm) and 91±2% (4500 rpm) removal. Separation by filtration through 0.45 μm filters resulted in 87±1% Se(0) removal. Ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate were used as coagulants in coagulation-flocculation experiments. Aluminum sulfate achieved the highest turbidity removal (92±2%) at a dose of 10(-3) M, whereas ferric chloride achieved a maximum turbidity removal efficiency of only 43±4% at 2.7×10(-4) M. Charge repression plays a minor role in particle neutralization. The sediment volume resulting from Al2(SO3)4 treatment is three times larger than that produced by FeCl3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Incidence of biogenic amines in foods implications for the Gambia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amines are found in food. Biogenic amines are a class of amines, which result from decarboxylation. They are food quality indicators. Health-wise biogenic amines play positive roles and have adverse effects as well; they are a public health concern. Certain conditions make it possible for them to be produced. These could ...

  3. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvier-Brown, N.C.; Goldstein, A.H.; Worton, D.R.; Matross, D.M.; Gilman, J.B.; Kuster, W.C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J.A.; Cahill, M.J.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  4. Aniline incorporated silica nanobubbles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the synthesis of stearate functionalized nanobubbles of SiO2 with a few aniline molecules inside, represented as C6H5NH2@SiO2@stearate, exhibiting fluorescence with red-shifted emission. Stearic acid functionalization allows the materials to be handled just as free molecules, for dissolution, precipitation, ...

  5. Biogenic features in calcretes developed on mudstone: Examples from Paleogene sequences of the Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. P.; Lee, Yong Il; Pawar, J. S.; Charak, R. S.

    2007-09-01

    Calcrete occurring in the Paleogene sequences of the western Himalayan foreland basin offers very useful information regarding climate and paleogeography of northern part of the Indian subcontinent. These calcretes possess variety of biogenic features (beta fabrics) that include rhizoliths, alveolar septal and vermiform fabric and Microcodium. The Microcodium rosettes show filamentous structures. The rhizoliths and alveolar septal fabric formed by the precipitation of carbonate in soil vadose zone and the vermiform fabric may be a root mat. Perhaps microbes helped in dissolution of carbonate fillings and they were instrumental in precipitation of calcite in the form of rosettes and filaments. Here, the filamentous structure in the Microcodium is significant. We suggest that the Microcodium formed as a result of fungal dissolution and microbial mediation. The lighter values of δ13C and δ18O (calcretes suggest that they developed through meteoric water in the presence of soil organic matter within the dry subtropical climatic zone when the northern part of the Indian subcontinent moved out of wet equatorial climate during its northward flight.

  6. Silica reinforced triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theunissen, E.; Overbergh, N.; Reynaers, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of silica and polymer coated silica particles as reinforcing agents on the structural and mechanical properties of polystyrene-poly(ethylene/butylene)-polystyrene (PS-PEB-PS) triblock gel has been investigated. Different types of chemically modified silica have been compared in order...

  7. Aluminosilicate Dissolution and Silicate Carbonation during Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yujia

    silicates dissolution to the high salinity conditions in subsurface environments. In addition to cations, the role of anions in geochemical reactions in subsurfaces are important. This study investigated the anion effects by studying sulfate and oxalate. Sulfate formed monodentate surface complexes with the Al sites on plagioclase surface and enhanced the dissolution. Oxalate was also found to enhance the plagioclase dissolution. Co-existing oxalate and sulfate suppressed the effects of sulfate on plagioclase dissolution. This information provides useful insights for understanding the roles of sulfate and organic compounds on the CO2 water-mineral interactions during scCO2 enhanced oil recovery. The results also aid in formulating a scientific guideline of the proper amount of SO2 co-injection with CO2. Water in GCS sites can exist in water-bearing scCO2 in addition to the aqueous phase in brine. Thus, it is important to understand the effects of water-bearing scCO2 on the carbonation of silicates. To address the gap between the nano- and micro-sized particles used in the laboratory to the large grains in field sites, we utilized wollastonite and investigated the effects of particle sizes on the wollastonite carbonation in water-bearing scCO2. The thickness of the reacted layer on the particle surfaces was found to be constant for different sized particles. The amorphous silica layer formed act as a diffusion barrier for water-bearing scCO2. In addition, the reaction extent was higher with more water, lower temperature, and higher pressure. Further, higher water saturation percentage and lower temperature can lead to the formation of more permeable amorphous silica layers. This thesis included the investigations of both liquid phase and vapor phase water that contacted with scCO2, and the effects of cations and anions on both formation and caprock minerals. The findings from this work improve our knowledge of the geochemical reactions at CO2-water-mineral interfaces, which

  8. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  9. Biogenic silica in the Bay of Bengal during the southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, G.V; Sarma, V.V

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Oceanol_Acta_20_493.pdf.txt stream_source_info Oceanol_Acta_20_493.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  10. Evidence of intensified biogenic silica recycling in the Black Sea after 1970

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousing, Erik Askov; Adjou, Mohamed; Ellegaard, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The Black Sea has been subject to increased levels of nitrogen and phosphorus loading and a decrease in silicate input after around 1970. Changes in phytoplankton community composition from diatoms to non-diatom groups have been attributed to the decrease in silicate. However, a discrepancy betwe...

  11. Biogenic Silica and Carbon 14 Age Dates from Lake Victoria Cruise V95 Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The LLO operates in conjunction with the Limnological Research Center (LRC) in working towards fulfilling the objectives of the International Decade for the East...

  12. MECHANISMS CONTROLLING Ca ION RELEASE FROM SOL-GEL DERIVED IN SITU APATITE-SILICA NANOCOMPOSITE POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Latifi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ca ion release from bioactive biomaterials could play an important role in their bioactivity and osteoconductivity properties. In order to improve hydroxyapatite (HA dissolution rate, in situ apatite-silica nanocomposite powders with various silica contents were synthesized via sol-gel method and mechanisms controlling the Ca ion release from them were investigated. Obtained powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM techniques, acid dissolution test, and spectroscopy by atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS. Results indicated the possible incorporation of (SiO44- into the HA structure and tendency of amorphous silica to cover the surface of HA particles. However, 20 wt. % silica was the lowest amount that fully covered HA particles. All of the nanocomposite powders showed more Ca ion release compared with pure HA, and HA - 10 wt. % silica had the highest Ca ion release. The crystallinity, the crystallite size, and the content of HA, along with the integrity, thickness, and ion diffusion possibility through the amorphous silica layer on the surface of HA, were factors that varied due to changes in the silica content and were affected the Ca ion release from nanocomposite powders.

  13. Silica from Ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and may change the product characteristics (colour, etc.). This method of quality assessment is more suitable to workers at the processing site as it does not involve lab-scale analysis. Process. The initial step is extraction of silica from ash as sodium silicate using caustic soda. This reaction is carried out at a temperature.

  14. Aniline incorporated silica nanobubbles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2006-09-14

    Sep 14, 2006 ... persed in diverse media. 2. Experimental. 2.1 Materials. Chloroauric acid, trisodium citrate, ... molecules such as ciprofloxacin, we could see the same kind of carbon onion structures inside the silica .... molecule. The supernatant, after precipitation of ani- line@SiO2 by centrifugation, did not show aniline.

  15. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Sun, Jihong; Li, Yuzhen

    2011-08-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation ft= ktn was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties.

  16. Emotional and Cognitive Coping in Relationship Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrape, Elizabeth R.; Jenkins, Sharon Rae; Callahan, Jennifer L.; Nowlin, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution of a romantic relationship can adversely affect functioning among college students and represents one primary reason for seeking campus counseling. This study examined the associations among common coping strategies and distress following relationship dissolution. Avoidance and repetitive negative thinking (RNT) were significantly…

  17. Numerical modelling of multicomponent LNAPL dissolution kinetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the initial phase, the dissolution rate of a soluble compound is very high due to the high concentration gradient, and as dissolution progresses, its effective solubility decreases with change in mole fraction. At higher pore volumes, the mole fractions of lower solubility fractions increase which can result in higher ...

  18. On the dissolution of vapors and gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstneck, N; Wüstneck, R; Pison, U; Möhwald, H

    2007-02-13

    The captive bubble technique in combination with axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA-CB) and with micro gas chromatography is used to study the dynamics of dissolution of different gases and vapors in water in situ. The technique yields the changes in the interfacial tension and bubble volume and surface. As examples, the dissolution of methanol and hexane vapors, inhaled anesthetic vapors, and gases, that is, diethyl ether, chloroform, isoflurane, enflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, N2O, and xenon, and as nonimmobilizers perfluoropentane and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro-ethane (R113) were investigated. The examination of interfacial tension-time and bubble volume-time functions permits us to distinguish between water-soluble and -insoluble substances, gases, and vapors. Vapors and gases generally differ in terms of the strength of their intermolecular interactions. The main difference between dissolution processes of gases and vapors is that, during the entire process of gas dissolution, no surface tension change occurs. In contrast, during vapor dissolution the surface tension drops immediately and decreases continuously until it reaches the equilibrium surface tension of water at the end of dissolution. The results of this study show that it is possible to discriminate anesthetic vapors from anesthetic gases and nonimmobilizers by comparing their dissolution dynamics. The nonimmobilizers have extremely low or no solubility in water and change the surface tension only negligibly. By use of newly defined molecular dissolution/diffusion coefficients, a simple model for the determination of partition coefficients is developed.

  19. Hydrothermal stability of silica, hybrid silica and Zr-doped hybrid silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hove, Marcel; Luiten-Olieman, Mieke W.J.; Huiskes, Cindy; Nijmeijer, Arian; Winnubst, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid silica membranes have demonstrated to possess a remarkable hydrothermal stability in pervaporation and gas separation processes allowing them to be used in industrial applications. In several publications the hydrothermal stability of pure silica or that of hybrid silica membranes are

  20. Experimental assessment of the liquefaction resistance of calcareous biogenous sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoval Eimar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT

    Liquefaction is a phenomenon in which soils, typically sands, suddenly loose a substantial amount of their shear strength and stiffness, this often triggered by large-magnitude earthquakes. Most liquefaction research has focused on silicate-based sands and not on other sand types, such as calcareous biogenous sands Calcareous sands are usually composed of skeletal or non-skeletal remains of marine organisms, with unique characteristics in terms of their mineralogy surface roughness, particle shape, crushability, and intraparticle porosity. The unique characteristics of calcareous sands suggest that their geotechnical engineering behaviour can be substantially different compared to that of terrigenous sands, including their behaviour under seismic loading, which have not been very well studied

    This paper presents the results of an experimental programme aimed at studying the cyclic liquefaction resistance of uncemented calcareous biogenous sands retrieved from south-western Puerto Rico Evaluation of liquefaction potential involved a comprehensive set of isotropically consolidated undrained cyclic triaxial tests on reconstituted samples of this calcareous sand. The programme also included tests on Ottawa terrigenous silica sand samples prepared and tested in similar conditions for comparison purposes.

    In general, the experimental results showed that Cabo Rojo calcareous sands had higher liquefaction resistance compared to Ottawa silica sands tested under similar conditions. Important differences between calcareous and silica sands regarding pore pressure generation characteristics and axial strain accumulation were also observed


  1. Magnetic Dinner Salads: The Role of Biogenic Magnetite in Cryopreservation for Common Food Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, T. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenically-precipitated magnetite has been found in organisms ranging from Bacteria, single-celled protists, and many of the animal phyla, where its major function is navigation and magnetoreception. To date there is but a single report of biogenic magnetite in plants (essentially, magnetoferritin), and that is in common grass (Festuca species, from Gajdardziska-Josifovska et. al. doi:10.1127/0935-1221/2001/0013/0863). Recent developments in cryopreservation suggest that ~ 1 mT, ~ 10 Hz oscillating magnetic fields can drastically reduce ice nucleation during freezing, promote supercooling, and minimize cellular damage in living tissues (e.g., Kaku et al., doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2012.02.001). Kobayashi & Kirschvink (2014, doi:10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.12.002) suggest that biogenic magnetite crystals could be the nucleating site for damaging ice crystals, and that they would be driven magneto-mechanically to rotate in those oscillating fields which could inhibit the ice crystal nucleation process. This prompted our investigation into the magnetite content of ordinary fruit and vegetable food products, as knowledge of the natural levels of biogenic magnetite in the human food supply could guide the selection of which foods might work for this type of cryopreservation. Our study involved a range of common foods including avocados, bananas, garlic, and apples. Samples were prepared in a clean lab environment kept free of contaminant particles, and subjected to a variety of standard rock-magnetic tests including IRM and ARM acquisition, and the corresponding Af demagnetization, on a standard 2G™ SRM. Results are consistent with moderately interacting single-domain magnetite (see figure), with moderate inter-particle interaction effects. Typical magnetite concentrations in these samples are in the range of .1 to 1 ng/g for room temperature samples, increasing to the range of 1-10 ng/g when measured frozen (to inhibit thermal rotation of small particles and clumps). If

  2. Kinetics of oxidic phase dissolution in acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorichev, I.G.; Kipriyanov, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    The critical analysis of the experimental data on dissolution kinetics of metal oxides (BeO, V 2 O 5 , UO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , Ta 2 O 5 etc.) in acid media is carried out. Kinetic peculiarities of oxide dissolution are explained on the basis of the notions of electron- proton theory. It is established that the surface nonstoichiometric ccomposition of oxide phase and potential jump, appearing on the interface of the oxide-electrolyte phase are the important factors, determining the dissolution rate of a solid phase. The dissolution rate of metal oxides is limited by the transition of protons into the solid oxide phase. Morphological models of heterogeneous kinetics are used when explaining kinetic regularities of oxide dissolution process [ru

  3. Total balance of biogenic fuels for thermal uses; Ganzheitliche Bilanzierung verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe zur thermischen Nutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, S.; Kaltschmitt, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1996-12-31

    In this situation of unfavourable energy price levels, the use of biogenic fuels for power supply can be recommended only if it serves to reduce environmental pollution. Against this background and on the basis of a primary energy balance, the authors attempted a total balance of selected enfironmental effects (global heating and acidification potential) of biomass use as compared to fossil fuel combustion. (orig) [Deutsch] ie Nutzung biogener Festbrennstoffe zur Energienachfragedeckung ist bei dem gegenwaertigen unguenstigen Energiepreisniveau nur dann zu rechtfertigen, wenn es durch die Biomassenutzung zu einer Reduzierung der energiebedingten Umwelteffekte kommt. Vor disem Hintergrund werden ausgehend von der Primaerenergiebilanz ausgewaehlte Umwelteffekte (d.h. das Treibhaus- und das Versauerungspotential) einer Biomassenutzung im Vergleich zu einer Nutzung fossiler Energietraeger ganzheitlich bilanziert. Die wesentlichen Ergebnisse werden zusammengefasst und interpretiert. (orig)

  4. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  5. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  6. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J M; Coker, V S; Moise, S; Wincott, P L; Vaughan, D J; Tuna, F; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Pattrick, R A D; Lloyd, J R; Telling, N D

    2013-06-06

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 -xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt-iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe(2+) site with Co(2+), with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites.

  7. Climate/chemistry feedbacks and biogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A; Warwick, Nicola; Yang, Xin; Young, Paul J; Zeng, Guang

    2007-07-15

    The oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere is affected by anthropogenic emissions and is projected to change in the future. Model calculations indicate that the change in surface ozone at some locations could be large and have significant implications for human health. The calculations depend on the precise scenarios used for the anthropogenic emissions and on the details of the feedback processes included in the model. One important factor is how natural biogenic emissions will change in the future. We carry out a sensitivity calculation to address the possible increase in isoprene emissions consequent on increased surface temperature in a future climate. The changes in ozone are significant but depend crucially on the background chemical regime. In these calculations, we find that increased isoprene will increase ozone in the Northern Hemisphere but decrease ozone in the tropics. We also consider the role of bromine compounds in tropospheric chemistry and consider cases where, in a future climate, the impact of bromine could change.

  8. Biogenic amines in Portuguese traditional foods and wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Pinho, Olívia

    2006-09-01

    The presence of biogenic amines in foodstuffs is an important food safety problem because of the implication of these compounds in food intolerance and intoxication. The separation and quantification of biogenic amines in foods is normally performed by chromatographic techniques. This review contains descriptions of the quantification of biogenic amines in Portuguese traditional fermented and/or ripened foods and wines, including Protected Denomination of Origin cheeses, dry-cured sausages, and Portuguese wines (including Port wines), using different analytical methods based on high-pressure liquid chromatography (UV or diode array and/or fluorometric detectors) and gas chromatography (with a mass spectrometry detector). The evolution of biogenic amines during fermentation, ripening, aging, or storage of those products was also evaluated. Biogenic amine concentrations ranged widely within individual food items, and storage, transport, and handling conditions can influence to some extent the biogenic amines present and their concentrations. Traditional foods are an important part of the Portuguese diet, and a high intake of harmful amounts of biogenic amines from traditional Portuguese fermented foods is possible. However, extensive research is needed to extend the current limited database.

  9. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite: Implications for surface dynamics and dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Balic-Zunic, T.

    2014-02-01

    Dissolution rates are usually calculated as a function of surface area, which is assumed to remain constant ignoring the changes occurring on the surface during dissolution. Here we present a study of how topography of natural fluorite surfaces with different orientation changes during up to 3200 h of dissolution. Results are analyzed in terms of changes in surface area, surface reactivity and dissolution rates. All surfaces studied present fast changes in topography during the initial 200 h of dissolution. The controlling factors that cause the development of topography are the stability of the step edges forming the initial surface and its inclination to the closest stable planes, which are specific for each surface orientation. During an initial dissolution regime dissolution rates decrease significantly, even though the total surface area increases. During a second dissolution regime, some surfaces continue to present significant changes in topography, while for others the topography tends to remain approximately constant. The observed variation of dissolution rates are attributed to a decrease of the density of step edges on the surface and the continuous increase in exposure of more stable surfaces. Calculations of dissolution rates, which assume that dissolution rates are directly proportional to surface area, are not valid for the type of surfaces studied. Instead, to develop accurate kinetic dissolution models and more realistic stochastic dissolution simulations the surface reactivity, determined by the relative stability of the planes and type of edges that constitute a surface needs to be considered. Significant differences between dissolution rates calculated based on surface area alone, and based on surface reactivity are expected for materials with the fluorite structure.

  10. Biogenic amines degradation by microorganisms isolated from cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Butor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the isolation and characterization of microorganisms able to degrade biogenic amines and their identification. Individual microorganisms were obtained by isolation from commercially available foodstuffs and food produced in the technological laboratories of Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlín and subsequently identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The results of MALDI-TOF MS identification were verified by 16S rRNA sequenation. In this work was studied the ability of 5 bacterial strains positive to biogenic amines degradation isolated from dairy products to decrease biogenic amines content in vitro and quantified reduction in the concentration of biogenic amines tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine. The level of degradation (decrease of biogenic amines was determined on the base of the ability to grow in media with biogenic amines as the sole source carbon and nitrogen. The isolated strains with the ability of degradation of one or more biogenic amines were cultured in medium supplemented with relevant biogenic amines, the media derivatized with dansyl chloride and these amines separated by HPLC at a wavelength of 254 nm. From five tested strains identified as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Enterobacter cloacae, Rhizobium radiobacter and Acinetobacter pitii, isolated from gouda type cheese, the greatest ability of degradation was observed in Bacillus subtilis, which was capable to degrade almost all amount of histamine, cadaverine and putrescine. Other four strains showed a lower rate of degradation than Bacillus subtilis, but the ability to degrade biogenic amines with these microorganisms was still significant.

  11. In vitro effects of cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles on chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmick, Tridib Kumar; Yoon, Diana [University of Maryland, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States); Patel, Minal; Fisher, John [University of Maryland, Fischell Department of Bioengineering (United States); Ehrman, Sheryl, E-mail: sehrman@umd.ed [University of Maryland, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, we evaluated the combined effect of a known toxic molecule, cisplatin, in combination with relatively nontoxic nanoparticles, amorphous fumed silica, on chondrocyte cells. Cisplatin was attached to silica nanoparticles using aminopropyltriethoxy silane as a linker molecule, and characterized in terms of size, shape, specific surface area, as well as the dissolution of cisplatin from the silica surface. The primary particle diameter of the as-received silica nanoparticles ranged from 7.1 to 61 nm, estimated from measurements of specific surface area, and the primary particles were aggregated. The effects of cisplatin-functionalized silica particles with different specific surface areas (41, 85, 202, 237, and 297 m{sup 2}/g) were compared in vitro on chondrocytes, the parenchymal cell of hyaline cartilage. The results show that adverse effects on cell function, as evidenced by reduced metabolic activity measured by the MTT assay and increased membrane permeability observed using the Live/Dead stain, can be correlated with specific surface area of the silica. Cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles with the highest specific surface area incited the greatest response, which was almost equivalent to that induced by free cisplatin. This result suggests the importance of particle specific surface area in interactions between cells and surface-functionalized nanomaterials.

  12. In vitro effects of cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles on chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmick, Tridib Kumar; Yoon, Diana; Patel, Minal; Fisher, John; Ehrman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the combined effect of a known toxic molecule, cisplatin, in combination with relatively nontoxic nanoparticles, amorphous fumed silica, on chondrocyte cells. Cisplatin was attached to silica nanoparticles using aminopropyltriethoxy silane as a linker molecule, and characterized in terms of size, shape, specific surface area, as well as the dissolution of cisplatin from the silica surface. The primary particle diameter of the as-received silica nanoparticles ranged from 7.1 to 61 nm, estimated from measurements of specific surface area, and the primary particles were aggregated. The effects of cisplatin-functionalized silica particles with different specific surface areas (41, 85, 202, 237, and 297 m 2 /g) were compared in vitro on chondrocytes, the parenchymal cell of hyaline cartilage. The results show that adverse effects on cell function, as evidenced by reduced metabolic activity measured by the MTT assay and increased membrane permeability observed using the Live/Dead stain, can be correlated with specific surface area of the silica. Cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles with the highest specific surface area incited the greatest response, which was almost equivalent to that induced by free cisplatin. This result suggests the importance of particle specific surface area in interactions between cells and surface-functionalized nanomaterials.

  13. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Gianna; Steinacher, Marco; Joos, Fortunat

    2016-05-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 export fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Monte Carlo scheme to construct a 1000-member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates, either a strong or a weak dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. In addition, there is the option to have saturation-independent dissolution above the saturation horizon. The median (and 68 % confidence interval) of the constrained model ensemble for global biogenic CaCO3 export is 0.90 (0.72-1.05) Gt C yr-1, that is within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt C yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport timescales for the different set-ups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve skill. We suggest applying saturation-independent dissolution rates in Earth system

  14. Dissolution of steel slags in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shashikant; Mehra, Anurag

    2017-07-01

    Steel slag is a major industrial waste in steel industries, and its dissolution behavior in water needs to be characterized in the larger context of its potential use as an agent for sequestering CO 2 . For this purpose, a small closed system batch reactor was used to conduct the dissolution of steel slags in an aqueous medium under various dissolution conditions. In this study, two different types of steel slags were procured from steel plants in India, having diverse structural features, mineralogical compositions, and particle sizes. The experiment was performed at different temperatures for 240 h of dissolution at atmospheric pressure. The dissolution rates of major and minor slag elements were quantified through liquid-phase elemental analysis using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy at different time intervals. Advanced analytical techniques such as field emission gun-scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray, BET, and XRD were also used to analyze mineralogical and structural changes in the slag particles. High dissolution of slags was observed irrespective of the particle size distribution, which suggests high carbonation potential. Concentrations of toxic heavy metals in the leachate were far below maximum acceptable limits. Thus, the present study investigates the dissolution behavior of different mineral ions of steel slag in aqueous media in light of its potential application in CO 2 sequestration.

  15. UO2 dissolution rates: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, W.F.

    1992-09-01

    This report reviews literature data on UO 2 dissolution kinetics and provides a framework for guiding future experimental studies as well as theoretical modeling studies. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution involves formation of an oxidized surface layer which is then dissolved by formation of aqueous complexes. Higher oxygen pressures or other oxidants are required at higher temperatures to have dissolution rates independent of oxygen pressure. At high oxygen pressures (1-5 atm, 25-70 C), the dissolution rate has a one-half order dependence on oxygen pressure, whereas at oxygen pressures below 0.2 atm, Grandstaff (1976), but nobody else, observed a first-order dependence on dissolution rate. Most people found a first-order dependence on carbonate concentration; Posey-Dowty (1987) found independence of carbonate at pH 7 to 8.2. Dissolution rates increase with temperature except in experiments involving granitic groundwater. Dissolution rates were generally greater under acid or basic conditions than near neutral pH

  16. Mechanistic Basis of Cocrystal Dissolution Advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fengjuan; Amidon, Gordon L; Rodríguez-Hornedo, Naír; Amidon, Gregory E

    2018-01-01

    Current interest in cocrystal development resides in the advantages that the cocrystal may have in solubility and dissolution compared with the parent drug. This work provides a mechanistic analysis and comparison of the dissolution behavior of carbamazepine (CBZ) and its 2 cocrystals, carbamazepine-saccharin (CBZ-SAC) and carbamazepine-salicylic acid (CBZ-SLC) under the influence of pH and micellar solubilization. A simple mathematical equation is derived based on the mass transport analyses to describe the dissolution advantage of cocrystals. The dissolution advantage is the ratio of the cocrystal flux to drug flux and is defined as the solubility advantage (cocrystal to drug solubility ratio) times the diffusivity advantage (cocrystal to drug diffusivity ratio). In this work, the effective diffusivity of CBZ in the presence of surfactant was determined to be different and less than those of the cocrystals. The higher effective diffusivity of drug from the dissolved cocrystals, the diffusivity advantage, can impart a dissolution advantage to cocrystals with lower solubility than the parent drug while still maintaining thermodynamic stability. Dissolution conditions where cocrystals can display both thermodynamic stability and a dissolution advantage can be obtained from the mass transport models, and this information is useful for both cocrystal selection and formulation development. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of clay rock on the dissolution rate of a simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neeway, J.; Abdelouas, A.; Grambow, B.; Schumacher, S.

    2010-01-01

    dissolution rates were 10-4 g.m -2 .d -1 . The initial rates were much lower than the forward glass dissolution rate indicating that silica saturated conditions and corresponding low reaction rate regimes were attained very rapid. This is probably due to the very high surface to solution volume ratio (for total pore volume of the reactor) of 1.6.10 6 m -1 . Comparison of dissolution rates and their evolution with time for the experiments in presence and absence of clay gave rather similar results: rate decreased proportional to reciprocal time. No effect of clay on glass dissolution rates could be observed. This is surprising since higher glass dissolution rates were expected for the presence of clay since it is well known that sorption on clay of Si dissolved from the glass can accelerate glass dissolution. In the present case, silica concentrations in the water samples passing through the clay core were similar to those in parallel experiments, where only clay but no glass was present. It is interesting to note that concentrations of the fission product element Cs in the out flowing solutions were much lower than expected from congruent glass dissolution. This was interpreted as resulting from the well know very strong sorption of Cs on the clay. All experimental data were modeled using the codes GM2004 and PHREEQC. The calculations reproduce the very low initial rates and the onset of rate decrease with time, but the decrease of rates with time was faster than predicted. (authors)

  18. Dissolution Mechanism of Wollastonite in Alkaline Solutions in Relation to Other Ca- and Mg-Bearing Pyroxenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S.; Walther, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    Sougata Halder, Schlumberger Data & Consulting Services, 1325 S. Dairy Ashford, Houston, Texas 77077, shalder@slb.com and John V. Walther, Department of Earth Sciences, Southern Methodist University, P.O. Box 750395, Dallas, TX-75275, walther@smu.edu. This study is a comparison of alkaline dissolution rates of wollastonite with those of diopside and enstatite under similar experimental conditions. Far from equilibrium wollastonite dissolution rates both open to atmospheric CO2 and CO2-purged were measured as a function of solution pH from 8 to 13 in batch reactors at room temperature. Steady-state dissolution rates of wollastonite decrease with increase in pH throughout the pH range. Steady-state dissolution rates of CO2-purged experiments are similar, within the experimental uncertainties, to the open to atmospheric CO2 dissolution rates. This indicates the decrease in rates with increasing pH is not controlled by surface carbonate complexation as proposed for our diopside and enstatite dissolution studies under similar conditions (Halder and Walther, in press). The absence of a rate minimal close to the pHZPC of wollastonite as observed in the present study points to a dissolution mechanism not controlled directly by the quantity of adsorbed H+ or OH- on the mineral surface. We believe that the dissolution of wollastonite takes place in two distinct steps. The first step is proton-Ca exchange at the mineral surface that partially liberates silica tetrahedral chains of wollastonite, followed by the breaking of Si-O bonds within the tetrahedral chains. In these experiments adsorption of solution carbonate to the positively charged Ca surface sites below the pHZPC of CaO is thought to be inhibited by the lack of Ca on the surface produced by rapid Ca-proton exchange during the first step of dissolution of wollastonite. This also points to a different mechanism of dissolution of the pyroxenoid, wollastonite, in comparison to the dissolution of Ca and/or Mg bearing

  19. Biomimetic synthesis of proline-derivative templated mesoporous silica for increasing the brain distribution of diazepam and improving the pharmacodynamics of nimesulide

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Heran; Wang, Jianxin; Cong, Jialiang; Wei, Chen; Li, Jing; Liu, Hongzhuo; Li, Sanming; Yang, Mingshi

    2017-01-01

    Herein a new kind of proline-derivative templated mesoporous silica with curved channels (CMS) was biomimetically synthesized and applied as carrier to improve the drug dissolution and bioavailability of hydrophobic diazepam (DZP) and nimesulide (NMS). Drugs can be incorporated into CMS with high efficiency; during this process, they successfully transformed to amorphous phase. As a result, the dissolution rate of DZP and NMS was significantly improved. Biodistribution study confirmed that CM...

  20. Dissolution of minerals with rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Thiago A.; Aarão Reis, Fábio D. A.

    2018-05-01

    We study dissolution of minerals with initial rough surfaces using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and a scaling approach. We consider a simple cubic lattice structure, a thermally activated rate of detachment of a molecule (site), and rough surface configurations produced by fractional Brownian motion algorithm. First we revisit the problem of dissolution of initial flat surfaces, in which the dissolution rate rF reaches an approximately constant value at short times and is controlled by detachment of step edge sites. For initial rough surfaces, the dissolution rate r at short times is much larger than rF ; after dissolution of some hundreds of molecular layers, r decreases by some orders of magnitude across several time decades. Meanwhile, the surface evolves through configurations of decreasing energy, beginning with dissolution of isolated sites, then formation of terraces with disordered boundaries, their growth, and final smoothing. A crossover time to a smooth configuration is defined when r = 1.5rF ; the surface retreat at the crossover is approximately 3 times the initial roughness and is temperature-independent, while the crossover time is proportional to the initial roughness and is controlled by step-edge site detachment. The initial dissolution process is described by the so-called rough rates, which are measured for fixed ratios between the surface retreat and the initial roughness. The temperature dependence of the rough rates indicates control by kink site detachment; in general, it suggests that rough rates are controlled by the weakest microscopic bonds during the nucleation and formation of the lowest energy configurations of the crystalline surface. Our results are related to recent laboratory studies which show enhanced dissolution in polished calcite surfaces. In the application to calcite dissolution in alkaline environment, the minimal values of recently measured dissolution rate spectra give rF ∼10-9 mol/(m2 s), and the calculated rate

  1. In silico dissolution rates of pharmaceutical ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Berna; Schneider, Julian; Reuter, Karsten

    2016-10-01

    The correlation between in vitro dissolution rates and the efficiency of drug formulations establishes an opportunity for accelerated drug development. Using in silico methods to predict the dissolution rates bears the prospect of further efficiency gains by avoiding the actual synthesis of candidate formulations. Here, we present a computational protocol that achieves such prediction for molecular crystals at low undersaturation. The protocol exploits the classic spiral dissolution model to minimize the number of material parameters that require explicit molecular simulations. Comparison to available data for acetylsalicylic acid and alpha lactose monohydrate indicates a tunable accuracy within one order of magnitude.

  2. Dissolution of metallic uranium in alkalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.; Wilkinson, Maria V.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of U metallic foils has been studied in the framework of the development of an improved 99 Mo-production process. The best conditions for the dissolution of uranium foils of approximately 150 μm are the following: a) NaClO concentrations of 0.20 and 0.23 M with NaOH of 0.27 and 0.31 M respectively; b) temperature of the solution, 70 C degrees; c) volume of the solution, 15 ml / cm 2 of uranium foil; d) dissolution time, 30 minutes. (author)

  3. Diagenesis of silica-rich mounded chalk, the Coniacian Arnager Limestone, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus Madsen, Heine; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn

    2010-01-01

    The Coniacian Arnager Limestone Formation is exposed on the Danish island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea. It is composed of mound-bedded siliceous chalk, and X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicate a content of 30-70% insoluble minerals, including authigenic opal-CT, quartz...... consist of twomicrofacies, spiculiticwackestone and bioturbated spiculitic wackestone, containing 10-22% and 7-12% moulds after spicules, respectively. Subsequent to deposition and shallow burial, dissolution of siliceous sponge spicules increased the silica activity of the pore water and initiated...... precipitated in pore water with low silica activity during maximum burial, probably to depths of 200-250 m. The dissolution of sponge spicules and decomposition of the sponge tissue also resulted in the release of Ba2+, Sr2+,Mg2+, Ca2+ and CO3 2-, facilitating precipitation of barite and dolomite...

  4. Biogenic Sulfur in the Siple Dome Ice Core, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a continuous, high-resolution record of biogenic sulfur (methanesulfonate, known as MSA and CH3SO3-) in the 1000 m deep Siple Dome A (SDMA) core,...

  5. Biogenic hydrocarbon emission estimates for North Central Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Wade Strange, I.; Allen, D.T. [University of Texas at Austin (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Estes, M. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States); Yarwood, G. [ENVIRON International Corporation, Novato, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were estimated for a 37 county region in North Central Texas. The estimates were based on several sources of land use/land cover data that were combined using geographical information systems. Field studies were performed to collect species and tree diameter distribution data. These data were used to estimate biomass densities and species distributions for each of the land use and cover classifications. VOC emissions estimates for the domain were produced using the new land use/land cover data and a biogenic emissions model. These emissions were more spatially resolved and a factor of 2 greater in magnitude than those calculated based on the biogenic emissions landuse database (BELD) commonly used in biogenic emissions models. (author)

  6. Biogenic sulfur compounds and the global sulfur cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneja, V.P.; Aneja, A.P.; Adams, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    Field measurements of biogenic sulfur compounds shows a great variation in concentrations and emission rates for H 2 S, DMS, CS 2 and COS. Measurements by the chamber method and estimates from micrometeorological sampling are employed to determine the earth-atmosphere flux of these gases. Much of the variation can be attributed to differences of climate and surface conditions, with marshes being a large source of biogenic sulfur (mean contribution 4 x 10 to the 6th ton/year maximum contribution 142 x 10 to the 6th ton/year). Considering that the estimated biogenic contribution needed to balance the global sulfur cycle ranges from 40- 230 x 10 to the 6th tons/year, the mean values are not sufficient to balance this cycle. Further experimental investigations are suggested in order to characterize the biogenic processes adequately

  7. Quantifying the Global Marine Biogenic Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Wang, S.; Lin, J.; Hao, N.; Poeschl, U.; Cheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are among the most important molecules in atmospheric chemistry and nitrogen cycle. The NOx over the ocean areas are traditionally believed to originate from the continental outflows or the inter-continental shipping emissions. By comparing the satellite observations (OMI) and global chemical transport model simulation (GEOS-Chem), we suggest that the underestimated modeled atmospheric NO2 columns over biogenic active ocean areas can be possibly attributed to the biogenic source. Nitrification and denitrification in the ocean water produces nitrites which can be further reduced to NO through microbiological processes. We further report global distributions of marine biogenic NO emissions. The new added emissions improve the agreement between satellite observations and model simulations over large areas. Our model simulations manifest that the marine biogenic NO emissions increase the atmospheric oxidative capacity and aerosol formation rate, providing a closer link between atmospheric chemistry and ocean microbiology.

  8. Micromorphology of carbonate-silica deposits from Trench 14 and Busted Butte, Yucca Mountain, NV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, P.M.; Cerling, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    The origin of banded carbonate-silica deposits in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, NV is controversial and has been attributed to both downward percolating waters, subject to soil-forming processes, and to upward movement and discharge of hot or cold ground waters. Using petrographic and SEM techniques, deposits from Trench 14 were compared to pedogenic carbonates from Busted Butte and carbonate deposits from known modern and paleosprings to determine how they formed. Busted Butte and Trench 14 samples are nearly identical, and contain many common pedogenic micromorphological features such as alveolar texture, calcified needle fibers, tubes, and rhomb chains, peloids and pellets, and silica cementation. Alveolar texture, calcified tubes, and root tubules suggest biogenic mechanisms are important in carbonate formation. The spring carbonates contain greater amounts of sparry calcite in rims and pore fillings, shells, and few biogenic structures while lacking pedogenic features listed previously. This suggests that Trench 14 deposits were not formed by ground water, but by pedogenic processes in both vertically and horizontally oriented deposits. The presence of chemically distinct volcanic ash throughout Trench 14 and Busted Butte carbonate deposits, along with other detrital materials and pedogenic features in a finely banded manner, suggests the deposits were formed over long periods of time by surficial processes. These processes allowed incorporation of surface materials and developed of extensive root systems resulting in deposition of carbonate-silica deposits in the structures observed. No evidence of hydrothermal alteration of either wall rock or included detritus is observed

  9. Role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1 in dissolution of natural rhodochrosite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Pan, X.

    2014-05-01

    Microbially mediated oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides have been demonstrated in previous studies, however, the mechanisms of bacteria how to dissolve and oxidize using a solid Mn(II) origin are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from P. putida strain MnB1 in enhancing dissolution of natural rhodochrosite. The results showed that P. putida strain MnB1 cell can effectively dissolve and oxidize natural rhodochrosite to generate Mn oxides, and EPS were found to play an important role in increasing dissolution of natural rhodochrosite. Compared with EPS-free treatment, dissolution rate of natural rhodochrosite in the presence of bacterial EPS was significantly increased with decreasing initial pH and increasing EPS concentration, ionic strength and rhodochrosite dosage (p < 0.05). The fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis implies that the functional groups like N-H, C=O and C-H in EPS contributed to the dissolution of natural rhodochrosite. This study is helpful for understanding the mechanisms of the formation of biogenic Mn oxides using a solid Mn(II) origin.

  10. [Phytobezoar dissolution with Coca-Cola].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Juan, F; Martínez-Lapiedra, C; Picazo, V

    2006-05-01

    The treatment of phytobezoar is empiric. The various therapeutic choices include dietary modifications, prokinetic drugs, gastric lavage, enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic treatment, and surgery. We present two cases of phytobezoar with successful outcome after Coca-Cola administration.

  11. Low temperature dissolution flowsheet for plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    The H-Canyon flowsheet used to dissolve Pu metal for PuO2 production utilizes boiling HNO3. SRNL was requested to develop a complementary dissolution flowsheet at two reduced temperature ranges. The dissolution and H2 generation rates of Pu metal were investigated using a dissolving solution at ambient temperature (20-30 °C) and for an intermediate temperature of 50-60 °C. Additionally, the testing included an investigation of the dissolution rates and characterization of the off-gas generated from the ambient temperature dissolution of carbon steel cans and the nylon bags that contain the Pu metal when charged to the dissolver.

  12. SIMFUEL dissolution studies in granitic groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Caceci, M.S.; Bruno, J; Sandino, A.

    1991-09-01

    The dissolution behavior of an unirradiated chemical analogue of spent nuclear fuel (SIMFUEL) has been studied in the presence of two different synthetic groundwaters at 25 degrees C and under both oxic and anoxic conditions. The release of U, Mo, Ba, Y and Sr was monitored during static (batch) leaching experiments of long duration (about 250 days). Preliminary results from continuous flow-through reactor experiments are also reported. The results obtained indicate the usefulness and limitations of SIMFUEL in the study of the kinetics and mechanism of dissolution of the minor components of spent nuclear fuel. Molybdenum, barium and strontium have shown a trend of congruent dissolution with the SIMFUEL matrix after a higher initial fractional release has been found to be solubility controlled under the experimental conditions. A clear dependence on the partial pressure of O 2 of the rate of dissolution of uranium has been observed. (au)

  13. Dissolution studies of synthetic soddyite and uranophane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Perez, I.; Torrero, E.; Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Duro, L.

    1997-09-01

    The dissolution of synthetically obtained soddyite and uranophane has been studied in solutions of low ionic strength. These are the likely final phases of the oxidative alternation pathway of uranium dioxide. The thermodynamic and kinetic dissolution properties of these phases have been determined at different bicarbonate concentrations. The solubilities determined in the experiments with soddyite correspond fairly well to the theoretical model calculated with a log K 0 s0 =3.9±0.7. For uranophane, the best fitting was obtained for a log K 0 s0 =11.7±0.6. The dissolution rate in the presence of bicarbonate gave for soddyite an average value of 6.8(±4.4) 10 -10 mol m -2 s -1 . For uranophane, under the same experimental conditions, the following dissolution rate equation has been derived: r 0 (mol m -2 s -1 )=10 -9±2. [HCO 3 - ] 0.69±0.09 2

  14. Behaviour of Silica during Metal Recovery from Bauxite Residue by Acidic Leaching

    OpenAIRE

    Marin Rivera, Rodolfo; Ulenaers, Brecht; Ounoughene, Ghania; Binnemans, Koen; Van Gerven, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Bauxite residue represents an interesting source for not only major elements such as aluminium, iron and titanium, but also for rare earths (REEs), while the residue after metal recovery can be used for low-carbon building materials and cementitious binders. Several methods based on direct acidic leaching for recovering metals from bauxite residue have been reported. The co-dissolution of iron represents a significant drawback for REEs recovery upon silica polymerization. The behaviour of sil...

  15. Dissolution of UO2 in redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Pablo de, J.; Rovira, M.

    1998-01-01

    The performance assessment of the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel in geological formations is strongly dependent on the spent fuel matrix dissolution. Unirradiated uranium (IV) dioxide has shown to be very useful for such purposes. The stability of UO 2 is very dependent on vault redox conditions. At reducing conditions, which are expected in deep groundwaters, the dissolution of the UO 2 -matrix can be explained in terms of solubility, while under oxidizing conditions, the UO 2 is thermodynamically unstable and the dissolution is kinetically controlled. In this report the parameters which affect the uranium solubility under reducing conditions, basically pH and redox potential are discussed. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution rate equations as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and oxidant concentration are reported. Dissolution experiments performed with spent fuel are also reviewed. The experimental equations presented in this work, have been used to model independent dissolution experiments performed with both unirradiated and irradiated UO 2 . (Author)

  16. Experimental determination of chlorite dissolution rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochelle, C.A.; Bateman, K.; MacGregor, R.; Pearce, J.M.; Wetton, P.D.; Savage, D.

    1995-01-01

    Current concepts of the geological disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK envisage the construction of a mined facility (incorporating cementitious engineered barriers) in chlorite-bearing rocks. To model accurately the fluid-rock reactions within the disturbed zone surrounding a repository requires functions that describe mineral dissolution kinetics under pH conditions that vary from near neutral to highly alkaline. Therefore, an experimental study to determine the dissolution rates of Fe-rich chlorite has been undertaken as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Program. Four experiments have been carried out at 25 C and four at 70 C, both sets using a range of NaCl/NaOH solutions of differing pH (of nominal pH 9.0, 10.3, 11.6 and 13.0 [at 25 C]). Dissolution rates have been calculated and were found to increase with increasing pH and temperature. However, increased pH resulted in non-stoichiometric dissolution possibly due to preferential dissolution of part of the chlorite structure relative to another, or reprecipitation of some elements as thin hydroxide or oxyhydroxide surface coatings on the chlorite. These results also show that chlorite dissolution is appreciably slower than that of albite and quartz at both 25 and 70 C, but slightly faster than that of muscovite at 70 C

  17. Evaluation of a three compartment in vitro gastrointestinal simulator dissolution apparatus to predict in vivo dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Susumu; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2014-11-01

    In vitro dissolution tests are performed for new formulations to evaluate in vivo performance, which is affected by the change of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, in the GI tract. Thus, those environmental changes should be introduced to an in vitro dissolution test. Many studies have successfully shown the improvement of in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVC) by introducing those physiological changes into dissolution tests. The gastrointestinal simulator (GIS), a multicompartment in vitro dissolution apparatus, was developed to evaluate in vivo drug dissolution. A gastric-emptying rate along with transit rate are key factors to evaluate in vivo drug dissolution and, hence, drug absorption. Dissolution tests with the GIS were performed with Biopharmaceutical Classification System class I drugs at five different gastric-emptying rates in the fasted state. Computational models were used to determine in vivo gastric-emptying time for propranolol and metoprolol based on the GIS dissolution results. Those were compared with published clinical data to determine the gastric half-emptying time. In conclusion, the GIS is a practical tool to assess dissolution properties and can improve IVIVC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Reducing ZnO nanoparticles toxicity through silica coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sing Ling Chia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ZnO NPs have good antimicrobial activity that can be utilized as agents to prevent harmful microorganism growth in food. However, the use of ZnO NPs as food additive is limited by the perceived high toxicity of ZnO NPs in many earlier toxicity studies. In this study, surface modification by silica coating was used to reduce the toxicity of ZnO NPs by significantly reducing the dissolution of the core ZnO NPs. To more accurately recapitulate the scenario of ingested ZnO NPs, we tested our as synthesized ZnO NPs in ingestion fluids (synthetic saliva and synthetic gastric juice to determine the possible forms of ZnO NPs in digestive system before exposing the products to colorectal cell lines. The results showed that silica coating is highly effective in reducing toxicity of ZnO NPs through prevention of the dissociation of ZnO NPs to zinc ions in both neutral and acidic condition. The silica coating however did not alter the desired antimicrobial activity of ZnO NPs to E. coli and S. aureus. Thus, silica coating offered a potential solution to improve the biocompatibility of ZnO NPs for applications such as antimicrobial agent in foods or food related products like food packaging. Nevertheless, caution remains that high concentration of silica coated ZnO NPs can still induce undesirable cytotoxicity to mammalian gut cells. This study indicated that upstream safer-by-design philosophy in nanotechnology can be very helpful in a product development.

  19. Biogenic antimicrobial silver nanoparticles produced by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Ping, Liu Yu; Marcato, Priscyla D; Alves, Oswaldo L; Silva, Maria C P; Ruiz, Rita C; Melo, Itamar S; Tasic, Ljubica; De Souza, Ana O

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus tubingensis and Bionectria ochroleuca showed excellent extracellular ability to synthesize silver nanoparticles (Ag NP), spherical in shape and 35 ± 10 nm in size. Ag NP were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and photon correlation spectroscopy for particle size and zeta potential. Proteins present in the fungal filtrate and in Ag NP dispersion were analyzed by electrophoresis (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Ag NP showed pronounced antifungal activity against Candida sp, frequently occurring in hospital infections, with minimal inhibitory concentration in the range of 0.11-1.75 μg/mL. Regarding antibacterial activity, nanoparticles produced by A. tubingensis were more effective compared to the other fungus, inhibiting 98.0 % of Pseudomonas. aeruginosa growth at 0.28 μg/mL. A. tubingensis synthesized Ag NP with surprisingly high and positive surface potential, differing greatly from all known fungi. These data open the possibility of obtaining biogenic Ag NP with positive surface potential and new applications.

  20. Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, J; Asensio, D; Tholl, D; Wenke, K; Rosenkranz, M; Piechulla, B; Schnitzler, J P

    2014-08-01

    Volatile compounds are usually associated with an appearance/presence in the atmosphere. Recent advances, however, indicated that the soil is a huge reservoir and source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), which are formed from decomposing litter and dead organic material or are synthesized by underground living organism or organs and tissues of plants. This review summarizes the scarce available data on the exchange of VOCs between soil and atmosphere and the features of the soil and particle structure allowing diffusion of volatiles in the soil, which is the prerequisite for biological VOC-based interactions. In fact, soil may function either as a sink or as a source of bVOCs. Soil VOC emissions to the atmosphere are often 1-2 (0-3) orders of magnitude lower than those from aboveground vegetation. Microorganisms and the plant root system are the major sources for bVOCs. The current methodology to detect belowground volatiles is described as well as the metabolic capabilities resulting in the wealth of microbial and root VOC emissions. Furthermore, VOC profiles are discussed as non-destructive fingerprints for the detection of organisms. In the last chapter, belowground volatile-based bi- and multi-trophic interactions between microorganisms, plants and invertebrates in the soil are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Hydrothermal stability of microporous silica and niobia-silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffa, V.; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrothermal stability of microporous niobia–silica membranes was investigated and compared with silica membranes. The membranes were exposed to hydrothermal conditions at 150 and 200 °C for 70 h. The change of pore structure before and after exposure to steam was probed by single-gas permeation

  2. Development and Validation of a Dissolution Test Method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop and validate a dissolution test method for dissolution release of artemether and lumefantrine from tablets. Methods: A single dissolution method for evaluating the in vitro release of artemether and lumefantrine from tablets was developed and validated. The method comprised of a dissolution medium of ...

  3. Mechanism of drug release from silica-gelatin aerogel-Relationship between matrix structure and release kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Péter; Kéri, Mónika; Bányai, István; Lázár, István; Fábián, István; Domingo, Concepción; Kalmár, József

    2017-04-01

    Specific features of a silica-gelatin aerogel (3 wt.% gelatin content) in relation to drug delivery has been studied. It was confirmed that the release of both ibuprofen (IBU) and ketoprofen (KET) is about tenfold faster from loaded silica-gelatin aerogel than from pure silica aerogel, although the two matrices are structurally very similar. The main goal of the study was to understand the mechanistic background of the striking difference between the delivery properties of these closely related porous materials. Hydrated and dispersed silica-gelatin aerogel has been characterized by NMR cryoporometry, diffusiometry and relaxometry. The pore structure of the silica aerogel remains intact when it disintegrates in water. In contrast, dispersed silica-gelatin aerogel develops a strong hydration sphere, which reshapes the pore walls and deforms the pore structure. The drug release kinetics was studied on a few minutes time scale with 1s time resolution. Simultaneous evaluation of all relevant kinetic and structural information confirmed that strong hydration of the silica-gelatin skeleton facilitates the rapid desorption and dissolution of the drugs from the loaded aerogel. Such a driving force is not operative in pure silica aerogels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Secondary structure and dynamics study of the intrinsically disordered silica-mineralizing peptide P 5 S 3 during silicic acid condensation and silica decondensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerfass, Christian; Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Hobe, Stephan; Paulsen, Harold

    2017-08-24

    The silica forming repeat R5 of sil1 from Cylindrotheca fusiformis was the blueprint for the design of P5S3, a 50-residue peptide which can be produced in large amounts by recombinant bacterial expression. It contains five protein kinase A target sites and is highly cationic due to 10 lysine and 10 arginine residues. In the presence of supersaturated ortho silicic acid P5S3 strongly enhances silica-formation whereas it retards the dissolution of amorphous silica (SiO2) at globally undersaturated concentrations. The secondary structure of P5S3 during these different functions was studied by circular dichroism (CD), complemented by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the peptide in the absence of silicate. The NMR studies of dual-labeled (13C, 15N) P5S3 revealed a disordered structure at pH 2.8 and 4.5. Within the pH range of 4.5 to 9.5, the CD data verified the disordered secondary structure but also suggested the presence of some polyproline II character in the absence of silicic acid. Upon silicic acid polymerization and during dissolution of preformed silica, the CD spectrum of P5S3 indicated partial transition into an α-helical conformation which was transient during silica-dissolution. Consequently, the secondary structural changes observed for P5S3 correlate with the presence of oli-gomeric/polymeric silicic acid, presumably due to P5S3-silicic acid interactions. These interactions appear, at least in part, ionic in nature since dodecylsulfate micelles, which are negatively charged, cause similar conformational shifts to P5S3 in the absence of silica while ß-D-dodecyl maltoside micelles, which are neutral, do not. Thus, P5S3 influences both the condensation of silicic acid into silica and its decondensation back to silicic acid. Moreover, the dynamics of these pro-cesses may be indirectly monitored by following structural changes to P5S3 with CD spectroscopy.

  5. Jarosite dissolution rates in perchlorate brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legett, Carey; Pritchett, Brittany N.; Elwood Madden, Andrew S.; Phillips-Lander, Charity M.; Elwood Madden, Megan E.

    2018-02-01

    Perchlorate salts and the ferric sulfate mineral jarosite have been detected at multiple locations on Mars by both landed instruments and orbiting spectrometers. Many perchlorate brines have eutectic temperatures <250 K, and may exist as metastable or stable liquids for extended time periods, even under current Mars surface conditions. Therefore, jarosite-bearing rocks and sediments may have been altered by perchlorate brines. Here we measured jarosite dissolution rates in 2 M sodium perchlorate brine as well as dilute water at 298 K to determine the effects of perchlorate anions on jarosite dissolution rates and potential reaction products. We developed a simple method for determining aqueous iron concentrations in high salinity perchlorate solutions using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry that eliminates the risk of rapid oxidation reactions during analyses. Jarosite dissolution rates in 2 M perchlorate brine determined by iron release rate (2.87 × 10-12 ±0.85 × 10-12 mol m-2 s-1) were slightly slower than the jarosite dissolution rate measured in ultrapure (18.2 MΩ cm-1) water (5.06 × 10-12 mol m-2 s-1) using identical methods. No additional secondary phases were observed in XRD analyses of the reaction products. The observed decrease in dissolution rate may be due to lower activity of water (ɑH2O = 0.9) in the 2 M NaClO4 brine compared with ultrapure water (ɑH2O = 1). This suggests that the perchlorate anion does not facilitate iron release, unlike chloride anions which accelerated Fe release rates in previously reported jarosite and hematite dissolution experiments. Since dissolution rates are slower in perchlorate-rich solutions, jarosite is expected to persist longer in perchlorate brines than in dilute waters or chloride-rich brines. Therefore, if perchlorate brines dominate aqueous fluids on the surface of Mars, jarosite may remain preserved over extended periods of time, despite active aqueous processes.

  6. Sensitivity of modeled ozone concentrations to uncertainties in biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselle, S.J.

    1992-06-01

    The study examines the sensitivity of regional ozone (O3) modeling to uncertainties in biogenic emissions estimates. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) was used to simulate the photochemistry of the northeastern United States for the period July 2-17, 1988. An operational model evaluation showed that ROM had a tendency to underpredict O3 when observed concentrations were above 70-80 ppb and to overpredict O3 when observed values were below this level. On average, the model underpredicted daily maximum O3 by 14 ppb. Spatial patterns of O3, however, were reproduced favorably by the model. Several simulations were performed to analyze the effects of uncertainties in biogenic emissions on predicted O3 and to study the effectiveness of two strategies of controlling anthropogenic emissions for reducing high O3 concentrations. Biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were adjusted by a factor of 3 to account for the existing range of uncertainty in these emissions. The impact of biogenic emission uncertainties on O3 predictions depended upon the availability of NOx. In some extremely NOx-limited areas, increasing the amount of biogenic emissions decreased O3 concentrations. Two control strategies were compared in the simulations: (1) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions, and (2) reduced anthropogenic hydrocarbon and NOx emissions. The simulations showed that hydrocarbon emission controls were more beneficial to the New York City area, but that combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more beneficial to other areas of the Northeast. Hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were reduced, whereas combined NOx and hydrocarbon controls were more effective as biogenic hydrocarbon emissions were increased

  7. Coordination-Accelerated "Iron Extraction" Enables Fast Biodegradation of Mesoporous Silica-Based Hollow Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Huo, Minfeng; Chen, Yu; Shi, Jianlin

    2017-11-01

    Biodegradation behavior of inorganic silica-based nanoplatforms is of critical importance in their clinical translations, but still remains a great challenge in achieving this goal by composition regulation of biocompatible silica framework. In the present work, a chemical coordination-accelerated biodegradation strategy to endow hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) with unique coordination-responsive biodegradability, on-demand coordination-responsive drug releasing behavior, and significantly enhanced chemotherapeutic efficacy by directly doping iron (Fe) ions into the framework of mesoporous silica is reported. A simple but versatile dissolution-regrowth strategy has been developed to enable the framework Fe doping via chemical bonding. The deferiprone-mediated biodegradation of Fe-doped HMSNs (Fe-HMSNs) has been comprehensively evaluated both in simulated body fluid and intracellular level, which have exhibited a specific coordination-accelerated biodegradation behavior. In addition to high biocompatibility of Fe-HMSNs, the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded Fe-HMSNs show enhanced tumor-suppressing effect on 4T1 mammary cancer xenograft. This work paves a new way for tuning the biodegradation performance of mesoporous silica-based nanoplatforms simply by biocompatible Fe-ion doping into silica framework based on the specific coordination property between introduced metal Fe ions with Fe-coordination proteins. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hydrophobic Nanosized All-Silica Beta Zeolite: Efficient Synthesis and Adsorption Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiguo; Xu, Hao; Jiang, Jingang; Wu, Haihong; Wu, Peng

    2017-08-16

    All-silica beta zeolite, synthesized by conventional hydroxide route, usually possesses small crystal size of a few hundred nanometers but poor hydrophobicity, whereas the fluoride-mediated one exhibits to be highly hydrophobic but microsized. To obtain nanosized all-silica beta zeolite with excellent hydrophobicity, an innovative and efficient hydrothermal route via interzeolite transformation for synthesizing all-silica beta zeolite is proposed in present study. With the assistance of beta seeds and tetraethylammonium hydroxide as the structure-directing agent, siliceous beta zeolite is well-crystallized at a high solid yield via dissolution-recrystallization of all-silica ITQ-1 crystals at an extremely low water content (H 2 O/SiO 2 molar ratio of 1). The obtained all-silica beta crystals are composed of 30-70 nm nanoparticles and highly hydrophobic just next to siliceous beta-F zeolite synthesized by environmentally unfriendly fluoride route, which is derived from relatively small amounts of internal defect sites. Thus, this beta zeolite is superior to other pure silica beta zeolites in the adsorption of large-sized volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which is mainly attributed to its high total pore volume and specific surface area as well as excellent hydrophobicity.

  9. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  10. Seasonal trends of biogenic terpene emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan Woodfin; Milford, Jana; Guenther, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from six coniferous tree species, i.e. Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Picea pungens (Blue Spruce), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir) and Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone Pine), as well as from two deciduous species, Quercus gambelii (Gamble Oak) and Betula occidentalis (Western River Birch) were studied over a full annual growing cycle. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions rates were quantified in a total of 1236 individual branch enclosure samples. MT dominated coniferous emissions, producing greater than 95% of BVOC emissions. MT and SQT demonstrated short-term emission dependence with temperature. Two oxygenated MT, 1,8-cineol and piperitone, were both light and temperature dependent. Basal emission rates (BER, normalized to 1000μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 30°C) were generally higher in spring and summer than in winter; MT seasonal BER from the coniferous trees maximized between 1.5 and 6.0μgg(-1)h(-1), while seasonal lows were near 0.1μgg(-1)h(-1). The fractional contribution of individual MT to total emissions was found to fluctuate with season. SQT BER measured from the coniferous trees ranged from emissions modeling, was not found to exhibit discernible growth season trends. A seasonal correction factor proposed by others in previous work to account for a sinusoidal shaped emission pattern was applied to the data. Varying levels of agreement were found between the data and model results for the different plant species seasonal data sets using this correction. Consequently, the analyses on this extensive data set suggest that it is not feasible to apply a universal seasonal correction factor across different vegetation species. A modeling exercise comparing two case scenarios, (1) without and (2) with consideration of the seasonal changes in emission factors illustrated large deviations when emission factors are applied for other seasons than those in which they were experimentally

  11. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Lin; Sun Jihong; Li Yuzhen

    2011-01-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation f t =kt n was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties. - Graphical abstract: Loading (A) and release profiles (B) of aspirin in N-BMMs and N-MCM-41 indicated that BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that MCM-41. Highlights: → Bimodal mesoporous silicas (BMMs) and MCM-41 modified with amino group via post-treatment procedure. → Loading and release profiles of aspirin in modified BMMs and MCM-41. → Modified BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that modified MCM-41.

  12. Molecular biomineralization: toward an understanding of the biogenic origin of polymetallic nodules, seamount crusts, and hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz C; Schloßmacher, Ute; Müller, Werner E G

    2011-01-01

    Polymetallic nodules and crusts, hydrothermal vents from the Deep Sea are economically interesting, since they contain alloying components, e.g., manganese or cobalt, that are used in the production of special steels; in addition, they contain rare metals applied for plasma screens, for magnets in hard disks, or in hybrid car motors. While hydrothermal vents can regenerate in weeks, polymetallic nodules and seamount crusts grow slowly. Even though the geochemical basis for the growth of the nodules and crusts has been well studied, the contribution of microorganisms to the formation of these minerals remained obscure. Recent HR-SEM (high-resolution scanning electron microscopy) analyses of nodules and crusts support their biogenic origin. Within the nodules, bacteria with surface S-layers are arranged on biofilm-like structures, around which Mn deposition starts. In crusts, coccoliths represent the dominant biologically formed structures that act as bio-seeds for an initial Mn deposition. In contrast, hydrothermal vents have apparently an abiogenic origin; however, their minerals are biogenically transformed by bacteria. In turn, strategies can now be developed for biotechnological enrichment as well as selective dissolution of metals from such concretions. We are convinced that the recent discoveries will considerably contribute to our understanding of the participation of organic matrices in the enrichment of those metals and will provide the basis for feasibility studies for biotechnological applications.

  13. Arresting dissolution by interfacial rheology design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Peter J.; Gupta, Manish; Alicke, Alexandra; Liascukiene, Irma; Gunes, Deniz Z.; Baroud, Charles N.

    2017-01-01

    A strategy to halt dissolution of particle-coated air bubbles in water based on interfacial rheology design is presented. Whereas previously a dense monolayer was believed to be required for such an “armored bubble” to resist dissolution, in fact engineering a 2D yield stress interface suffices to achieve such performance at submonolayer particle coverages. We use a suite of interfacial rheology techniques to characterize spherical and ellipsoidal particles at an air–water interface as a function of surface coverage. Bubbles with varying particle coverages are made and their resistance to dissolution evaluated using a microfluidic technique. Whereas a bare bubble only has a single pressure at which a given radius is stable, we find a range of pressures over which bubble dissolution is arrested for armored bubbles. The link between interfacial rheology and macroscopic dissolution of ∼ 100 μm bubbles coated with ∼ 1 μm particles is presented and discussed. The generic design rationale is confirmed by using nonspherical particles, which develop significant yield stress at even lower surface coverages. Hence, it can be applied to successfully inhibit Ostwald ripening in a multitude of foam and emulsion applications. PMID:28893993

  14. Crystal modifications and dissolution rate of piroxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Lim Yee; Sze, Huan Wen; Rajendran, Adhiyaman; Adinarayana, Gorajana; Dua, Kamal; Garg, Sanjay

    2011-12-01

    Piroxicam is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with low aqueous solubility which exhibits polymorphism. The present study was carried out to develop polymorphs of piroxicam with enhanced solubility and dissolution rate by the crystal modification technique using different solvent mixtures prepared with PEG 4000 and PVP K30. Physicochemical characteristics of the modified crystal forms of piroxicam were investigated by X-ray powder diffractometry, FT-IR spectrophotometry and differential scanning calorimetry. Dissolution and solubility profiles of each modified crystal form were studied and compared with pure piroxicam. Solvent evaporation method (method I) produced both needle and cubic shaped crystals. Slow crystallization from ethanol with addition of PEG 4000 or PVP K30 at room temperature (method II) produced cubic crystal forms. Needle forms produced by method I improved dissolution but not solubility. Cubic crystals produced by method I had a dissolution profile similar to that of untreated piroxicam but showed better solubility than untreated piroxicam. Cubic shaped crystals produced by method II showed improved dissolution, without a significant change in solubility. Based on the XRPD results, modified piroxicam crystals obtained by method I from acetone/benzene were cube shaped, which correlates well with the FTIR spectrum; modified needle forms obtained from ethanol/methanol and ethanol/acetone showed a slight shift of FTIR peak that may be attributed to differences in the internal structure or conformation.

  15. Catalysed electrolytic metal oxide dissolution processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machuron-Mandard, X.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrometallurgical processes designed for recovering valuable metals from mineral ores as well as industrial wastes usually require preliminary dissolution of inorganic compounds in aqueous media before extraction and purification steps. Unfortunately, most of the minerals concerned hardly or slowly dissolve in acidic or basic solutions. Metallic oxides, sulfides and silicates are among the materials most difficult to dissolve in aqueous solutions. They are also among the main minerals containing valuable metals. The redox properties of such materials sometimes permit to improve their dissolution by adding oxidizing or reducing species to the leaching solution, which leads to an increase in the dissolution rate. Moreover, limited amounts of redox promoters are required if the redox agent is regenerated continuously thanks to an electrochemical device. Nuclear applications of such concepts have been suggested since the dissolution of many actinide compounds (e.g., UO 2 , AmO 2 , PuC, PuN,...) is mainly based on redox reactions. In the 1980s, improvements of the plutonium dioxide dissolution process have been proposed on the basis of oxidation-reduction principles, which led a few years later to the design of industrial facilities (e.g., at Marcoule or at the french reprocessing plant of La Hague). General concepts and well-established results obtained in France at the Atomic Energy Commission (''Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique'') will be presented and will illustrate applications to industrial as well as analytical problems. (author)

  16. Influence of biogenic gas production on coalbed methane recovery index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In investigating the effect of biogenic gas production on the recovery of coalbed methane (CBM, coal samples spanning different ranks were applied in the microbial-functioned simulation experiments for biogenic methane production. Based on the biogenic methane yield, testing of pore structures, and the isothermal adsorption data of coals used before and after the simulation experiments, several key parameters related to the recovery of CBM, including recovery rate, gas saturation and ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure, etc., were calculated and the corresponding variations were further analyzed. The results show that one of the significant functions of microbial communities on coal is possibly to weaken its affinity for methane gas, especially with the advance of coal ranks; and that by enhancing the pore system of coal, which can be evidenced by the increase of porosity and permeability, the samples collected from Qianqiu (Yima in Henan and Shaqu (Liulin in Shanxi coal mines all see a notable increase in the critical desorption pressure, gas saturation and recovery rate, as compared to the moderate changes of that of Guandi (Xishan in Shanxi coal sample. It is concluded that the significance of enhanced biogenic gas is not only in the increase of CBM resources and the improvement of CBM recoverability, but in serving as an engineering reference for domestic coalbed biogenic gas production.

  17. Accounting for urban biogenic fluxes in regional carbon budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Brady S; Wang, Jonathan A; Hutyra, Lucy R; Gately, Conor K; Getson, Jackie M; Friedl, Mark A

    2017-08-15

    Many ecosystem models incorrectly treat urban areas as devoid of vegetation and biogenic carbon (C) fluxes. We sought to improve estimates of urban biomass and biogenic C fluxes using existing, nationally available data products. We characterized biogenic influence on urban C cycling throughout Massachusetts, USA using an ecosystem model that integrates improved representation of urban vegetation, growing conditions associated with urban heat island (UHI), and altered urban phenology. Boston's biomass density is 1/4 that of rural forests, however 87% of Massachusetts' urban landscape is vegetated. Model results suggest that, kilogram-for-kilogram, urban vegetation cycles C twice as fast as rural forests. Urban vegetation releases (R E ) and absorbs (GEE) the equivalent of 11 and 14%, respectively, of anthropogenic emissions in the most urban portions of the state. While urban vegetation in Massachusetts fully sequesters anthropogenic emissions from smaller cities in the region, Boston's UHI reduces annual C storage by >20% such that vegetation offsets only 2% of anthropogenic emissions. Asynchrony between temporal patterns of biogenic and anthropogenic C fluxes further constrains the emissions mitigation potential of urban vegetation. However, neglecting to account for biogenic C fluxes in cities can impair efforts to accurately monitor, report, verify, and reduce anthropogenic emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Recrystallization of biogenic carbonates in soils: consequences for palaeological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian, Kazem; Pustovoytov, Konstantin; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The isotopic signatures of biogenic carbonate (BC) in fossils are commonly used to assess environmental conditions during the life time of organisms, their diets and extinction periods. As a proxy, BC represents in many cases the only alternative to organic matter. However, BC in fossils may dissolve in embedded matrix and recrystallize with CO2 respired by roots and microorganisms. Consequently, isotopic composition of BC can be re-equilibrated and the original paleoenvironmental signal may be lost. The dynamics of these processes still remains poorly understood. Here the results of BC recrystallization under controlled conditions have been presented. We aimed 1) To determine the recrystallization amounts of BC as a function of time, 2) To investigate the effects of geogenic carbonates (GC) availability in embedded matrix on recrystallization rate of BC and 3) To evaluate the effects of organic matter (OM) presence in the BC structure on its recrystallization. Loess and a loamy soil were selected as carbonate containing and carbonate free matrixes, respectively. Shells of 'Pacific little-neck clams (Protothaca staminea)' were selected as BC. To evaluate the role of OM presence in the BC structure, heated (550?C) and not heated shells were used. The shells were washed by means of ultrasonic and crashed to a size of 2-2.5 mm. The 14C labeled CO2 (pCO2= 2%) was injected into the airtight bottles. The samples were incubated at room temperature and water content of 60% of water holding capacity of matrixes for 1, 3, 10, 21 and 56 days. At each time the 14C activity was measured in bottle air, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, matrixes and the shells. The recrystallization of shells started even after one day of incubation. However, the amounts of recrystallization were increased by the time. The recrystallization of CaCO3 was higher in shells without OM. Elimination of OM probably increases the porosity of shell structure and led to better water penetration into

  19. On the role of Mn(IV) vacancies in the photoreductive dissolution of hexagonal birnessite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.D.; Refson, K.; Sposito, G.

    2009-06-01

    Photoreductive dissolution of layer type Mn(IV) oxides (birnessite) under sunlight illumination to form soluble Mn(II) has been observed in both field and laboratory settings, leading to a consensus that this process is a key driver of the biogeochemical cycling of Mn in the euphotic zones of marine and freshwater ecosystems. However, the underlying mechanisms for the process remain unknown, although they have been linked to the semiconducting characteristics of hexagonal birnessite, the ubiquitous Mn(IV) oxide produced mainly by bacterial oxidation of soluble Mn(II). One of the universal properties of this biogenic mineral is the presence of Mn(IV) vacancies, long-identified as strong adsorption sites for metal cations. In this paper, the possible role of Mn vacancies in photoreductive dissolution is investigated theoretically using quantum mechanical calculations based on spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT). Our DFT study demonstrates unequivocally that Mn vacancies significantly reduce the band-gap energy for hexagonal birnessite relative to a hypothetical vacancy-free MnO{sub 2} and thus would increase the concentration of photo-induced electrons available for Mn(IV) reduction upon illumination of the mineral by sunlight. Calculations of the charge distribution in the presence of vacancies, although not fully conclusive, show a clear separation of photo-induced electrons and holes, implying a slow recombination of these charge-carriers that facilitates the two-electron reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II).

  20. Template occluded SBA-15: An effective dissolution enhancer for poorly water-soluble drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Tingming; Guo Liwei; Le Kang; Wang Tianyao; Lu Jin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to improve the dissolution rate of piroxicam by inclusion into template occluded SBA-15. Our strategy involves directly introducing piroxicam into as-prepared SBA-15 occluded with P123 (EO 20 PO 70 EO 20 ) by self assembling method in acetonitrile/methylene chloride mixture solution. Ultraviolet spectrometry experiment and thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) profiles show that the piroxicam and P123 contents in the inclusion compound are 12 wt% and 28 wt%, respectively. X-ray powder diffraction and DSC analysis reveal that the included piroxicam is arranged in amorphous form. N 2 adsorption-desorption experiment indicates that the piroxicam has been introduced to the mesopores instead of precipitating at the outside of the silica material. The inclusion compound was submitted to in vitro dissolution tests, the results show that the piroxicam dissolve from template occluded inclusion compound more rapidly, than these from the piroxicam crystalline and template removed samples in all tested conditions. Thus a facile method to improve the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drug was established, and this discovery opens a new avenue for the utilization of templates used for the synthesis of mesoporous materials.

  1. Template occluded SBA-15: An effective dissolution enhancer for poorly water-soluble drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Tingming, E-mail: futingming@gmail.com [College of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029 (China); Guo Liwei; Le Kang; Wang Tianyao; Lu Jin [College of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2010-09-15

    The aim of the present work was to improve the dissolution rate of piroxicam by inclusion into template occluded SBA-15. Our strategy involves directly introducing piroxicam into as-prepared SBA-15 occluded with P123 (EO{sub 20}PO{sub 70}EO{sub 20}) by self assembling method in acetonitrile/methylene chloride mixture solution. Ultraviolet spectrometry experiment and thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) profiles show that the piroxicam and P123 contents in the inclusion compound are 12 wt% and 28 wt%, respectively. X-ray powder diffraction and DSC analysis reveal that the included piroxicam is arranged in amorphous form. N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption experiment indicates that the piroxicam has been introduced to the mesopores instead of precipitating at the outside of the silica material. The inclusion compound was submitted to in vitro dissolution tests, the results show that the piroxicam dissolve from template occluded inclusion compound more rapidly, than these from the piroxicam crystalline and template removed samples in all tested conditions. Thus a facile method to improve the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drug was established, and this discovery opens a new avenue for the utilization of templates used for the synthesis of mesoporous materials.

  2. Dissolution and powder flow characterization of solid self-emulsified drug delivery system (SEDDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vikas; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Ali, Hazem; Nazzal, Sami

    2009-01-21

    In this study, the dynamics of powder flow upon griseofulvin-self-emulsified drug delivery system (SEDDS) addition to silica and silicates and the effect of these adsorbents on drug release were investigated. SEDDS was adsorbed at SEDDS/adsorbent ratios from 0.25:1 to 3:1 on magnesium aluminum silicate [5 and 80 microm], calcium silicate [25 microm], and silicon dioxide [3.6, 20, and 300 microm]. Powder flow was evaluated using the powder rheometer and compared to angle of repose. Release of drug from a 1:1 SEDDS/adsorbent powder was determined by dissolution using USP Type 2 apparatus. Powder rheometer profiles indicated that effect of SEDDS on the flow behavior of the adsorbents could be correlated to stepwise or continuous growing behavior as observed in wet granulation process. However, due to their porous nature, adsorbents exhibited an initial lag phase during which no change in flow was observed. Dissolution of drug from adsorbed-SEDDS was found to be dependent on pore length and nucleation at the lipid/adsorbent interface. Increase in dissolution rate was observed with an increase in surface area and was independent of the chemical nature of the adsorbents. Therefore, in order to manufacture free flowing powder containing liquid SEDDS, special attention should be given to particle size, specific surface area, type and amount of adsorbent.

  3. DISSOLUTION OF IRRADIATED MURR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E.

    2010-06-17

    A literature survey on the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been performed. This survey encompassed both internal and external literature sources for the dissolution of aluminum-clad uranium alloy fuels. The most limiting aspect of dissolution in the current facility configuration involves issues related to the control of the flammability of the off-gas from this process. The primary conclusion of this work is that based on past dissolution of this fuel in H-Canyon, four bundles of this fuel (initial charge) may be safely dissolved in a nitric acid flowsheet catalyzed with 0.002 M mercuric nitrate using a 40 scfm purge to control off-gas flammability. The initial charge may be followed by a second charge of up to five bundles to the same dissolver batch depending on volume and concentration constraints. The safety of this flowsheet relies on composite lower flammability limits (LFL) estimated from prior literature, pilot-scale work on the dissolution of site fuels, and the proposed processing flowsheet. Equipment modifications or improved LFL data offer the potential for improved processing rates. The fuel charging sequence, as well as the acid and catalyst concentrations, will control the dissolution rate during the initial portion of the cycle. These parameters directly impact the hydrogen and off-gas generation and, along with the purge flowrate determine the number of bundles that may be charged. The calculation approach within provides Engineering a means to determine optimal charging patterns. Downstream processing of this material should be similar to that of recent processing of site fuels requiring only minor adjustments of the existing flowsheet parameters.

  4. Potential of Bio-Enhanced DNAPL Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J. M.; Kitanidis, P. K.; McCarty, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    DNAPL contamination is one of most challenging environmental problems. According to EPA's estimation, the total number of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) impacted sites in the U.S. could range from 15,000 to 25,000. It has been generally believed that promoting biological reactions that transform contaminants in DNAPL source zones can increase mass transfer rates, thereby shortening source longevity and total cleanup time. Use of bioremediation to enhance residual DNAPL dissolution, therefore, has potential as an economical and effective approach to accelerate DNAPL cleanup. While promising, some biological processes, such as biomass growth and gas production (CO2 and CH4), may occur together with biodegradation in source zones and adversely affect dissolution enhancement. In addition, the toxic effects of DNAPL compounds and transformation products produced by microorganisms may also adversely affect microbial activity and the extent of the bio-active zones. An understanding of how such factors control the efficiency of bio-enhanced dissolution is of great importance in helping to predict the potential benefits of DNAPL bioremediation. In this presentation, we will integrate the results of experimental and theoretical studies over the past six years on bio-enhanced tetrachloroethene (PCE) DNAPL dissolution to illustrate the effects on dissolution enhancement. Specifically, we will discuss the significance of our theoretical work on: (1) how biomass accumulation can affect dissolution enhancement for a PCE DNAPL pool and (2) the evolution of a bio-active zone in a residual DNAPL area under the influence of DNAPL toxicity. In addition, we will show the interplay between various groups of microorganisms within and around PCE DNAPL source zones as well as how our experimental work can help better understand the toxic effects of PCE and its transformation products on the activity of PCE dehalogenating bacteria. Finally, the presentation will highlight

  5. Formation, transformation and dissolution of phases formed on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1983-03-01

    The basic mechanisms of film growth, transformation, and dissolution of phases formed on surfaces are discussed. Film growth can occur via solid-state processes or via substrate (usally metal or alloy) dissolution, followed by local supersaturation and precipitation of an insoluble phase. The phase(s) formed may be metastable and transform to a more stable phase, via either solid-state or dissolution-reprecipitation processes. Film dissolution reactions can also occur via a variety of mechanisms, including: (i) direct chemical dissolution when no oxidation state change occurs; (ii) redox dissolution when the film dissolves via a redox reaction involving a reducing or oxidizing agent in solution; and (iii) autoreduction, where film dissolution is coupled to metal dissolution. Such film-growth and dissolution processes, which often produce complex multilayer films, are common in the nuclear industry. A number of examples are discussed

  6. Periodic mesoporous silica gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.T.; Martin, J.E.; Odinek, J.G. [and others

    1996-06-01

    We have synthesized monolithic particulate gels of periodic mesoporous silica by adding tetramethoxysilane to a homogeneous alkaline micellar precursor solution. The gels exhibit 5 characteristic length scales over 4 orders of magnitude: fractal domains larger than the particle size (>500 nm), particles that are {approximately}150 to 500 nm in diameter, interparticle pores that are on the order of the particle size, a feature in the gas adsorption measurements that indicates pores {approximately}10-50 nm, and periodic hexagonal arrays of {approximately}3 nm channels within each particle. The wet gel monoliths exhibit calculated densities as low as {approximately}0.02 g/cc; the dried and calcined gels have bulk densities that range from {approximately}0.3-0.5 g/cc. The materials possess large interparticle ({approximately}1.0-2.3 cc/g) and intraparticle ({approximately}0.6 cc/g) porosities.

  7. Biomimetic synthesis of proline-derivative templated mesoporous silica for increasing the brain distribution of diazepam and improving the pharmacodynamics of nimesulide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Heran; Wang, Jianxin; Cong, Jialiang

    2017-01-01

    Herein a new kind of proline-derivative templated mesoporous silica with curved channels (CMS) was biomimetically synthesized and applied as carrier to improve the drug dissolution and bioavailability of hydrophobic diazepam (DZP) and nimesulide (NMS). Drugs can be incorporated into CMS with high...

  8. Microbially mediated barite dissolution in anoxic brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Bingjie; Akob, Denise M.; Dunlap, Darren; Renock, Devon

    2017-01-01

    Fluids injected into shale formations during hydraulic fracturing of black shale return with extraordinarily high total-dissolved-solids (TDS) and high concentrations of barium (Ba) and radium (Ra). Barite, BaSO 4 , has been implicated as a possible source of Ba as well as a problematic mineral scale that forms on internal well surfaces, often in close association with radiobarite, (Ba,Ra)SO 4 . The dissolution of barite by abiotic processes is well quantified. However, the identification of microbial communities in flowback and produced water necessitates the need to understand barite dissolution in the presence of bacteria. Therefore, we evaluated the rates and mechanisms of abiotic and microbially-mediated barite dissolution under anoxic and hypersaline conditions in the laboratory. Barite dissolution experiments were conducted with bacterial enrichment cultures established from produced water from Marcellus Shale wells located in northcentral Pennsylvania. These cultures were dominated by anaerobic halophilic bacteria from the genus Halanaerobium. Dissolved Ba was determined by ICP-OES and barite surfaces were investigated by SEM and AFM. Our results reveal that: 1) higher amounts of barium (up to ∼5 × ) are released from barite in the presence of Halanaerobium cultures compared to brine controls after 30 days of reaction, 2) etch pits that develop on the barite (001) surface in the presence of Halanaerobium exhibit a morphology that is distinct from those that form during control experiments without bacteria, 3) etch pits that develop in the presence of Halanaerobium exhibit a morphology that is similar to the morphology of etch pits formed in the presence of strong organic chelators, EDTA and DTPA, and 4) experiments using dialysis membranes to separate barite from bacteria suggest that direct contact between the two is not required in order to promote dissolution. These results suggest that Halanaerobium increase the rate of barite dissolution in anoxic

  9. Modeling of Dissolution Effects on Waterflooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexeev, Artem; Shapiro, Alexander; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    Physico-chemical interactions between the fluid and reservoir rock due to the presence of active components in the injected brine produce changes within the reservoir and can significantly impact the fluid flow. We have developed a 1D numerical model for waterflooding accounting for dissolution...... and precipitation of the components. Extending previous studies, we consider an arbitrary chemical non-equilibrium reaction-induced dissolution. We account for different individual volumes that a component has when precipitated or dissolved. This volume non-additivity also affects the pressure and the flow rate......-additivity is found to be responsible for insignificant change in the velocity of the displacement front....

  10. Chrysotile dissolution rates: Implications for carbon sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thom, James G.M.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Power, Ian M.; Harrison, Anna L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Uncertainties in serpentine dissolution kinetics hinder carbon sequestration models. • A pH dependent, far from equilibrium dissolution rate law for chrysotile. • F chrysotile (mol/m 2 /s) = 10 −0.21pH−10.57 at 22 °C over pH 2–10. • Laboratory dissolution rates consistent with mine waste weathering observations. • Potential for carbon sequestration in mine tailings and aquifers is assessed. - Abstract: Serpentine minerals (e.g., chrysotile) are a potentially important medium for sequestration of CO 2 via carbonation reactions. The goals of this study are to report a steady-state, far from equilibrium chrysotile dissolution rate law and to better define what role serpentine dissolution kinetics will have in constraining rates of carbon sequestration via serpentine carbonation. The steady-state dissolution rate of chrysotile in 0.1 m NaCl solutions was measured at 22 °C and pH ranging from 2 to 8. Dissolution experiments were performed in a continuously stirred flow-through reactor with the input solutions pre-equilibrated with atmospheric CO 2 . Both Mg and Si steady-state fluxes from the chrysotile surface, and the overall chrysotile flux were regressed and the following empirical relationships were obtained: F Mg =-0.22pH-10.02;F Si =-0.19pH-10.37;F chrysotile =-0.21pH-10.57 where F Mg , F Si , and F chrysotile are the log 10 Mg, Si, and molar chrysotile fluxes in mol/m 2 /s, respectively. Element fluxes were used in reaction-path calculations to constrain the rate of CO 2 sequestration in two geological environments that have been proposed as potential sinks for anthropogenic CO 2 . Carbon sequestration in chrysotile tailings at 10 °C is approximately an order of magnitude faster than carbon sequestration in a serpentinite-hosted aquifer at 60 °C on a per kilogram of water basis. A serpentinite-hosted aquifer, however, provides a larger sequestration capacity. The chrysotile dissolution rate law determined in this study has

  11. Technologies for the utilisation of biogenic waste in the bioeconomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    A brief review has been done of technologies involved in the exploitation of biogenic wastes, in order to provide an introduction to the subject from the technological perspective. Biogenic waste materials and biomass have historically been utilised for thousands of years, but a new conversation is emerging on the role of these materials in modern bioeconomies. Due to the nature of the products and commodities now required, a modern bioeconomy is not simply a rerun of former ones. This new dialogue needs to help us understand how technologies for managing and processing biogenic wastes--both established and novel--should be deployed and integrated (or not) to meet the requirements of the sustainability, closed-loop and resource-security agendas that evidently sit behind the bioeconomy aspirations now being voiced in many countries and regions of the world. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing the effect of dissolved organic ligands on mineral dissolution rates: An example from calcite dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMaio, T.; Grandstaff, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments suggest that dissolved organic ligands may primarily modify mineral dissolution rates by three mechanisms: (1) metal-ligand (M-L) complex formation in solution, which increases the degree of undersaturation, (2) formation of surface M-L complexes that attack the surface, and (3) formation of surface complexes which passivate or protect the surface. Mechanisms (1) and (2) increase the dissolution rate and the third decreases it compared with organic-free solutions. The types and importance of these mechanisms may be assessed from plots of dissolution rate versus degree of undersaturation. To illustrate this technique, calcite, a common repository cementing and vein-filling mineral, was dissolved at pH 7.8 and 22 C in Na-Ca-HCO 3 -Cl solutions with low concentrations of three organic ligands. Low citrate concentrations (50 microM) increased the dissolution rate consistent with mechanism (1). Oxalate decreased the rate, consistent with mechanism (3). Low phthalate concentration (<50 microM) decreased calcite dissolution rates; however, higher concentrations increased the dissolution rates, which became faster than in inorganic solutions. Thus, phthalate exhibits both mechanisms (2) and (3) at different concentrations. In such cases linear extrapolations of dissolution rates from high organic ligand concentrations may not be valid

  13. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  14. Salt Marshes as Sources and Sinks of Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J.; Fulweiler, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    The role of salt marshes in controlling silica exchange between terrestrial and marine environments is unclear. In some studies, large quantities of dissolved silica (DSi) appear to be exported from marshes via tidal exchange, potentially fueling future diatom production in adjacent waters. In contrast, other studies report insignificant DSi export and found instead that salt marshes appeared to be Si sinks. Further, few studies examine salt marsh Si export in relation to inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and phosphorus (DIP). We address these uncertainties by quantifying net fluxes of DSi and biogenic Si (BSi), as well as DIN and DIP during the spring and summer in a relatively undisturbed southern New England salt marsh (Narragansett Bay, USA). Our data demonstrates that during the spring, when estuarine waters are deplete in DSi, the marsh serves as a net sink of BSi (132 mol h-1) and a source of DSi (31 mol h-1) to the estuary. The spring DIN:DSi ratios of ebbing water were more than five times lower than flood waters. Most importantly, the DSi export rates (6.5 x103 mol d-1 km-2) are an order of magnitude larger than the export by rivers in the region (115 mol d-1 km-2), indicating the marsh tidal exchange is vital in supplying the Si necessary for spring diatom blooms in the estuary. Conversely, during the summer the marsh served as a net Si sink, importing on average 59 mol DSi h-1 and 39 mol BSi h-1. These data highlight that the role of salt marshes in silica cycling appears to have a strong seasonality. We hypothesize that net import of Si increases the residence time of Si in estuarine systems, providing an important and previously over-looked ecosystem service. In the absence of salt marshes, ~5.1 x 104 kmol of Si would be exported from this system during the growing season, possibly decreasing Si availability and altering phytoplankton species composition in the estuary.

  15. Streaming current and wall dissolution over 48h in silica nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Bruus, Henrik; Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    2011-01-01

    We present theoretical and experimental studies of the streaming current induced by a pressure-driven flow in long, straight, electrolyte-filled nanochannels. The theoretical work builds on our recent one-dimensional model of electro-osmotic and capillary flow, which self-consistently treats both...... the ion concentration profiles, via the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann equation, and the chemical reactions in the bulk electrolyte and at the solid–liquid interface. We extend this model to two dimensions and validate it against experimental data for electro-osmosis and pressure-driven flows, using eight 1...

  16. Biogenic amines in smear and mould-ripened cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Pleva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the monitoring of six biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, putrescine, and cadaverine and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine in 30 samples of dairy products purchased in the Czech Republic, namely in 15 samples of mould-ripened cheeses and in 15 samples of smear-ripened cheeses. A further goal was the microbiological analysis of the individual samples of cheeses (total count of microorganisms, number of enterobacteria, enterococci, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and moulds. The monitored biogenic amines were analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography equipped with a UV/VIS DAD detector. The amount of enterobacteria in fresh cheese exceeded 105 CFU.g‑1. In smear-ripened cheese flavourless (Romadur type, the amount was >103 CFU.g-1 and 104-105 CFU.g-1 in smear-ripened cheese with flavour. Biogenic amines were observed in two groups of blue cheeses (white veined cheese and blue veined cheese and smear-ripened cheeses. In both groups, there is a possibility of the presence of biogenic amines because the number of microorganisms and concentration of free amino acids increase during ripening. In ten samples of soft smear-ripening acid cheese and in smear-ripened cheese, the total content of biogenic amines were 22-1000 mg.kg-1 and in 5 samples of these cheeses, it was in range 1000-6000 mg.kg-1. The total amount of biogenic amines in the blue cheeses were in range 40-600 mg.kg-1. The presense of the tyramine was observed in the all analysed cheeses. The tyramine producing strains generated more than 900 mg.kg-1 of this biogenic amine. The production of tryptamine in the analysed cheeses was not proved by this study. The results of this study show that biogenic amines and polyamines are common in cheese. However, in some cases, they can pose a significant health danger for consumers. Any legislative control authority does not monitor them, as they are secondary metabolites even

  17. Biogen to produce diagnostic tests, vaccines and ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-11

    In addition to its work on pharmaceuticals and veterinary products, Europe's largest biotechnology company, Biogen, is reported to be working on the production of ethanol from biomass. The process, based on two strains of clostridia bacteria, can convert both the cellulose and hemicellulose of agricultural wastes to ethanol. Biogen is also studying the production of basic chemicals, such as acetic acid, acetone and butane from cellulosic biomass and is looking at various types of organisms to effect low cost chemical conversions.

  18. Determination of Biogenic Amines in Different Shrimp Species for Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myat Myat Thaw; Oo Aung; Aung Myint; Bisswanger, Hans

    2004-06-01

    This study is part of the project on the ''Quality Assurance of Different Shrimp Species for Export''. Local shrimp samples were collected from Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries and various private enterprises. Contents of biogenic amines were determined by using benzoyl chloride derivatization method with HPLC (reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography). Based on the biogenic amines, quality index of shrimps were correlated with freshness index so that the grade of shrimp samples can be classified as excellent, good, and acceptable. All sizes of shrimps such as extra large, large, medium were found to excceptable respectively

  19. Fermented functional foods based on probiotics and their biogenic metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Van Sinderen, Douwe

    2005-04-01

    The claimed health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interaction of ingested live microorganisms, bacteria or yeast with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as a result of ingestion of microbial metabolites produced during the fermentation process (biogenic effect). Although still far from fully understood, several probiotic mechanisms of action have been proposed, including competitive exclusion, competition for nutrients and/or stimulation of an immune response. The biogenic properties of fermented functional foods result from the microbial production of bioactive metabolites such as certain vitamins, bioactive peptides, organic acids or fatty acids during fermentation.

  20. Biomass burning - Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Cahoon, Donald R., Jr.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Sebacher, Shirley; Stocks, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    After detailing a technique for the estimation of the instantaneous emission of trace gases produced by biomass burning, using satellite imagery, attention is given to the recent discovery that burning results in significant enhancement of biogenic emissions of N2O, NO, and CH4. Biomass burning accordingly has an immediate and long-term impact on the production of atmospheric trace gases. It is presently demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions, and could be used to estimate long-term postburn biogenic emission of trace gases to the atmosphere.

  1. Simulation of surface dynamics during dissolution as a function of the surface orientation: Implications for non-constant dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Evans, L.

    2014-12-01

    An important problem in geochemistry is the understanding of how changes occurring on a surface during dissolution affect the variability of measured dissolution rates. In this study a new approach to study the effect of surface dynamics on dissolution rates is tested by coupling experimental data with a numerical model that simulates the retreat of surface profiles during dissolution. We present specific results from the simulation of dissolution of fluorite surfaces. The equations that determine the retreat of a surface are based on experimentally obtained equations that relate the retreat rate of a surface to a single variable, the crystallographic orientation of the surface. Our results show that depending on the starting orientation, different types of topography are developed, similar to those observed experimentally. During the initial dissolution phase, changes of topography are rapid and associated with fast dissolution rates. The progressively slower dissolution rates are coupled with the development of surface segments with orientations that dissolve at a slower rate. Consequently, the overall retreat rate of a profile decreases during the simulation, and tends to a near-constant value. The results show a close relationship between dissolution rates, surface orientation and surface dynamics, which suggests that the dissolution rate of a specific mineral phase is not constant but varies with dissolution time and surface structure. This variability needs to be considered in the evaluation of experimentally derived dissolution rates, future dissolution experiments, and predictive kinetic models of dissolution.

  2. Silica phases in sinters and residues from geothermal fields of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, K. A.; Browne, P. R. L.; Buddle, T. F.; Cook, K. L.; Greatrex, R. A.; Hampton, W. A.; Herdianita, N. R.; Holland, G. R.; Lynne, B. Y.; Martin, R.; Newton, Z.; Pastars, D.; Sannazarro, K. L.; Teece, C. I. A.

    2004-06-01

    Five silica phases are major components of silica sinters, deposited from both near-neutral pH alkali-chloride and acid-sulfate thermal waters, and of silica residues formed at the surface of geothermal fields in New Zealand. In all cases, the initial silica is noncrystalline opal-A deposited commonly as microspheres that possess an underlying nanospherical substructure, upon different substrate templets, including microbes living in hot springs. Deposition may also occur monomerically upon earlier deposited silica. Following microsphere growth through Ostwald ripening, silica remains mobile throughout the postdepositional history of the sinter/residue deposits, resulting in a range of textures. These include the continuing growth of microspheres, the development of secondary microspheres and silica coatings, phase transformations, a reduction in sinter porosity, dissolution features, and late-stage deposition of drusy quartz and opal-A. The sinter mass attempts to achieve thermodynamic equilibrium through stepwise phase transformations (maturation): opal-A crystallises to paracrystalline opal-CT±opal-C, which recrystallises to microcrystalline α-quartz+moganite. No intermediate silica phases are produced, but gradual changes occur among different opal-A or opal-CT/-C phases. The phase maturation produces changes in particle densities, silanol water, and in X-ray powder response of the different silica phases, although the rates of change can be perturbed by heating, weathering, and dissolution of the sinter/residue. The properties of opal-A change little in a sinter/residue mass within the first 10,000 years, but reductions occur in the densities, silanol water, and X-ray scattering bandwidth of older sinters where opal-A can persist for up to 100,000 years. Eventually, opal-A transforms to opal-CT when silanol water is reduced sufficiently for enough -Si-O-Si- linkages to produce a crude diffraction-like X-ray response. The transformation is aided by heat, as

  3. Biogenic nanosilica blended by nanofibrillated cellulose as support for slow-release of tebuconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Bruno D.; Magalhães, Washington L. E.

    2016-09-01

    Despite the potential application of nanotechnology in the agricultural sector, it is not as competitive as other industrial sectors because these approaches do not demonstrate a sufficient economic return to counterbalance the high production costs. For biocidal purposes, the reduction of the initial costs can be addressed if biogenic nanosilica and nanofibrillated cellulose were used to prepare nanocomposite for further utilization as support for slow-release of tebuconazole. Infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that biocide was entrapped in the cellulose/silica nanocomposites network. The scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography evaluation showed the nanocomposite's microstructure based on irregular shape nanosilica blended by nanofibrillated cellulose in a randomly organized network. Elemental mapping images showed the tebuconazole better dispersed in the composite blended with lower content of cellulose. The nanofibrillated cellulose played an important role in the release rate of the biocide mainly at short-term periods. At 15 days of immersion, the pure biocide had 95 % release compared with 30-45 % release of the tebuconazole loaded in the nanocomposites.

  4. Biogenic nanosilica blended by nanofibrillated cellulose as support for slow-release of tebuconazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Bruno D., E-mail: brunodufaumattos@gmail.com [Federal University of Paraná, Integrated Graduate Program in Engineering and Materials Science, Polytechnic Center (Brazil); Magalhães, Washington L. E. [Embrapa Florestas (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Despite the potential application of nanotechnology in the agricultural sector, it is not as competitive as other industrial sectors because these approaches do not demonstrate a sufficient economic return to counterbalance the high production costs. For biocidal purposes, the reduction of the initial costs can be addressed if biogenic nanosilica and nanofibrillated cellulose were used to prepare nanocomposite for further utilization as support for slow-release of tebuconazole. Infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that biocide was entrapped in the cellulose/silica nanocomposites network. The scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography evaluation showed the nanocomposite’s microstructure based on irregular shape nanosilica blended by nanofibrillated cellulose in a randomly organized network. Elemental mapping images showed the tebuconazole better dispersed in the composite blended with lower content of cellulose. The nanofibrillated cellulose played an important role in the release rate of the biocide mainly at short-term periods. At 15 days of immersion, the pure biocide had 95 % release compared with 30–45 % release of the tebuconazole loaded in the nanocomposites.Graphical abstract.

  5. On the dissolution of iridium by aluminum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewson, John C.

    2009-08-01

    The potential for liquid aluminum to dissolve an iridium solid is examined. Substantial uncertainties exist in material properties, and the available data for the iridium solubility and iridium diffusivity are discussed. The dissolution rate is expressed in terms of the regression velocity of the solid iridium when exposed to the solvent (aluminum). The temperature has the strongest influence in the dissolution rate. This dependence comes primarily from the solubility of iridium in aluminum and secondarily from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This dissolution mass flux is geometry dependent and results are provided for simplified geometries at constant temperatures. For situations where there is negligible convective flow, simple time-dependent diffusion solutions are provided. Correlations for mass transfer are also given for natural convection and forced convection. These estimates suggest that dissolution of iridium can be significant for temperatures well below the melting temperature of iridium, but the uncertainties in actual rates are large because of uncertainties in the physical parameters and in the details of the relevant geometries.

  6. Numerical modelling of multicomponent LNAPL dissolution kinetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Characterization of aquifers contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons is limited by the use of dissolution mass transfer correlations developed for single com- pounds without considering the effects of the mass transfer limitations in presence of other components. A one-dimensional implicit numerical model is ...

  7. Physicochemical characterization and dissolution properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    calorimetry (DSC), powder x-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Phase solubility studies revealed an AL-type diagram indicating a 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex and a stability constant value of 914 M-1. Solubility and dissolution rates of PYR and the binary systems were ...

  8. 25 CFR 11.605 - Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dissolution of marriage if: (1) The court finds that the marriage is irretrievably broken, if the finding is... affecting the attitude of one or both of the parties towards the marriage; (2) The court finds that either..., or provided for child custody, the support of any child entitled to support, the maintenance of...

  9. Numerical modelling of multicomponent LNAPL dissolution kinetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Johnson et al 2003; Liu et al 2007). The complexity associated with dissolution mass transfer of organic compounds is closely related to their relative hydrophobic nature, distribution of the non-aqueous phase mass within the aquifer pore volume, prevailing flow and other geochemical properties of the porous medium.

  10. Efavirenz Dissolution Enhancement I: Co-Micronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helvécio Vinícius Antunes Rocha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AIDS constitutes one of the most serious infectious diseases, representing a major public health priority. Efavirenz (EFV, one of the most widely used drugs for this pathology, belongs to the Class II of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System for drugs with very poor water solubility. To improve EFV’s dissolution profile, changes can be made to the physical properties of the drug that do not lead to any accompanying molecular modifications. Therefore, the study objective was to develop and characterize systems with efavirenz able to improve its dissolution, which were co-processed with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The technique used was co-micronization. Three different drug:excipient ratios were tested for each of the two carriers. The drug dispersion dissolution results showed significant improvement for all the co-processed samples in comparison to non-processed material and corresponding physical mixtures. The dissolution profiles obtained for dispersion with co-micronized SLS samples proved superior to those of co-micronized PVP, with the proportion (1:0.25 proving the optimal mixture. The improvements may be explained by the hypothesis that formation of a hydrophilic layer on the surface of the micronized drug increases the wettability of the system formed, corroborated by characterization results indicating no loss of crystallinity and an absence of interaction at the molecular level.

  11. Dissolution of aluminium-cladded fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, G.; Boessert, W.; Hladik, O.; Schwarzbach, R.

    1984-01-01

    In the molybdenum production plant at Rossendorf (AMOR) short-term irradiated aluminium-cladded fuel elements from the Rossendorf research reactor RFR are dissolved for the purpose of molybdenum 99 production. The dissolution behaviour of these fuel elements and the appropriate dissolver are described. (author)

  12. Facies, dissolution seams and stable isotope compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stable isotope analysis of the limestone shows that 13C and 18O values are compatible with the early Mesoproterozoic open seawater composition. The ribbon limestone facies in the Rohtas Limestone is characterized by micritic beds, each decoupled in a lower band enriched and an upper band depleted in dissolution ...

  13. Silica-Immobilized Enzyme Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    metal affinity binding between the ‘his- tag’ and a metal coating ( cobalt ) upon the agarose packing material. The peptide forms silica in situ and...of a nitro group to hydroxylamine resulting in a large electronic change which can be exploited for a variety of biotechnological applications...combined system, or individually as single sequential units will allow for development of complex catalytic sequences. Biologically-derived silica

  14. 76 FR 80368 - Notification of Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Office announces two teleconferences of the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to review EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011). DATES: The...

  15. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and

  16. Biogenic gases in tropical floodplain river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victória Ramos Ballester

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the distribution of biogenic gases in the floodplain of the Mogi-Guaçu River (São Paulo, Brazil enabled the establishment of a "redox hierarchy", in which the main channel was the most oxidizing environment, followed by Diogo Lake, with Infernão Lake having the most reducing conditions of the subsystems evaluated. Diogo Lake exported about 853.4 g C.m-2.year-1, of which, 14.6% was generated from methanogenesis and 36.7% by aerobic respiration. For Infernão Lake, these values were 2016 g C.m-2.year-1, 1.8 % and 41.5 %, respectively. Carbon export by these systems was predominantly in the form of CO2, which was responsible for the release of 728.78 g C.m-2.year-1 at Diogo Lake and 1979.72 g C.m-2. year-1 at Infernão Lake. Such patterns may result from the nature of the hydrological conditions, the action of the hydroperiod, and morphological characteristics of the environment.A análise da distribuição de gases biogênicos na planície de inundação do Rio Mogi Guaçu (São Paulo, Brasil possibilitou o estabelecimento de um gradiente redox para os sistemas aquáticos avaliados, em que o canal principal do rio apresentou-se como o ambiente mais oxidado, seguido da Lagoa do Diogo, e a Lagoa do Infernão apresentando as condições mais redutoras entre os ambientes em questão. A Lagoa do Diogo exporta um total de 853,4 g C.m-2.ano-1, do qual 14,6% é produzido pela metanogênese e 36,7% pela respiração aeróbia. Para a Lagoa do Infernão estes valores foram respectivamente de 2.016 g C.m-2.ano-1, 1,8% e de 41,5%. A exportação de carbono por estes sistemas é realizada, predominantemente na forma de CO2, nos valores de 728,78 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Diogo e 1.979,72 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Infernão. Estes padrões parecem estar relacionados com a natureza das condições hidrológicas, com a ação do hidroperíodo e com as características morfológicas do ambiente.

  17. First-order dissolution rate law and the role of surface layers in glass performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambow, B.; Müller, R.

    2001-09-01

    The first-order dissolution rate law is used for nuclear waste glass performance predictions since 1984. A first discussion of the role of saturation effects was initiated at the MRS conference that year. In paper (1) it was stated that "For glass dissolution A* (the reaction affinity) cannot become zero since saturation only involves the reacting surface while soluble elements still might be extracted from the glass" [B. Grambow, J. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 44 (1985) 15]. Saturation of silica at the surface and condensation of surface silanol groups was considered as being responsible for the slow down of reaction rates by as much as a factor of 1000. Precipitation of Si containing secondary phases such as quartz was invoked as a mechanism for keeping final dissolution affinities higher than zero. Another (2) paper [A.B. Barkatt, P.B. Macedo, B.C. Gibson, C.J. Montrose, J. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 44 (1985) 3] stated that "… under repository conditions the extent of glass dissolution will be moderate due to saturation with respect to certain major elements (in particular, Si, Al and Ca). Consequently, the concentration levels of the more soluble glass constituents in the aqueous medium are expected to fall appreciable below their solubility limit." The formation of dense surface layers was considered responsible for explaining the saturation effect. The mathematical model assumed stop of reaction in closed systems, once solubility limits were achieved. For more than 15 years the question of the correctness of one or the other concept has seldom been posed and has not yet been resolved. The need of repository performance assessment for validated rate laws demands a solution, particularly since the consequences of the two concepts and research requirements for the long-term glass behavior are quite different. In concept (1) the stability of the `equilibrium surface region' is not relevant because, by definition, this region is stable chemically and after a

  18. In vitro Dissolution Studies on Solid Dispersions of Mefenamic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K R S Sambasiva; Nagabhushanam, M V; Chowdary, K P R

    2011-03-01

    Solid dispersions of mefanamic acid with a water-soluble polymer polyvinyl pyrrolidine and a super disintegrant, primojel were prepared by common solvent and solvent evaporation methods employing methanol as the solvent. The dissolution rate and dissolution efficiency of the prepared solid dispersions were evaluated in comparison to the corresponding pure drug. Solid dispersions of mefenamic acid showed a marked enhancement in dissolution rate and dissolution efficiency. At 1:4 ratio of mefenamic acid-primojel a 2.61 fold increase in the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid was observed with solid dispersion. The solid dispersions in combined carriers gave much higher rates of dissolution than super disintegrants alone. Mefanamic acid-primojel-polyvinyl pyrrolidine (1:3.2:0.8) solid dispersion gave a 4.11 fold increase in the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid. Super disintegrants alone or in combination with polyvinyl pyrrolidine could be used to enhance the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid.

  19. Effect of different water conditions on dissolution of nanosilver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Feng; Zhang, Hongyin; Lin, Qing-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the time-dependent dissolution of nanosilver (nAg) in common electrolytes and natural waters. nAg was synthesized via Tollens' method using sodium citrate as stabilizer; its morphology, UV-Vis spectrum, and particle size were characterized. The dissolved silver was monitored over time using filtration, centrifugation, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Our results indicated that nanoparticle aggregation, Cl(-) presence, and natural organic compounds could affect the dissolution behavior of nAg. The dissolution of nAg was highly dependent on Cl(-) concentration. Excessive Cl(-) enhanced nanoparticle dissolution, whereas natural organic compound inhibited the dissolution. The dissolution data fitted well with the first-order kinetic model, and the dissolution rate coefficients were calculated using the first-order equation. This study showed the dissolution of nAg under various water conditions. The obtained results may be helpful in predicting nAg behavior in relevant environmental aquatic systems.

  20. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to

  1. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  2. Biogenic ZnO nanoparticles synthesized using L. aculeata leaf

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. Biogenic ZnO nanoparticles synthesized using L. aculeata leaf extract and their antifungal activity against plant fungal pathogens. S Narendhran Rajeshwari Sivaraj. Volume 39 Issue 1 February 2016 pp 1- ...

  3. Conditions allowing the formation of biogenic amines in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.M.L.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken to reveal the conditions that allow the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.

    The starters most commonly used in the Dutch cheese industry do not have decarboxylative properties. Only if the milk or curd is contaminated with non-starter bacteria, amine

  4. incidence of biogenic amines in foods implications for the gambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Health-wise biogenic amines play positive roles and ... BAs include, fish, fish products, meat products, eggs, cheeses, fermented vegetables, soybean ... The amount of. BAs present in foods, fruits and vegetables provides an index for measuring food quality [3]. In the tropics fish are caught in temperatures more than 200C.

  5. Biogenic volatile compounds of activated sludge and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metals pollution is nowadays one of the most important environmental concerns. This paper illustrates the employment of the biogenic volatile compounds generated during the aerobic growth of activated sludge on raw domestic wastewater for heavy metals removal. Most of the tested metals even as individual or ...

  6. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from forests in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindfors, V.; Laurila, T.

    2000-01-01

    We present model estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the forests in Finland. The emissions were calculated for the years 1995-1997 using the measured isoprene and monoterpene emission factors of boreal tree species together with detailed satellite land cover information and meteorological data. The three-year average emission is 319 kilotonnes per annum, which is significantly higher than the estimated annual anthropogenic VOC emissions of 193 kilotonnes. The biogenic emissions of the Finnish forests are dominated by monoterpenes, which contribute approximately 45% of the annual total. The main isoprene emitter is the Norway spruce (Picea abies) due to its high foliar biomass density. Compared to the monoterpenes, however, the total isoprene emissions are very low, contributing only about 7% of the annual forest VOC emissions. The isoprene emissions are more sensitive to the meteorological conditions than the monoterpene emissions, but the progress of the thermal growing season is clearly reflected in all biogenic emission fluxes. The biogenic emission densities in northern Finland are approximately half of the emissions in the southern parts of the country. (orig.)

  7. The secondary biogenic radiation of gamma-irradiated human blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Surkenova, G.N.; Budagovskij, A.V.; Gudi, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    The sample of blood freshly taken from healthy men were gamma-irradiated with a dose of 10 Gy. It was shown that after the treatment the blood gained the capacity to emit secondary biogenic radiation. Emission lasted for some hours, passed through quartz-glass curette and was revealed by stimulating influence on biological detector (sprouting seeds)

  8. Fingerprinting of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and other biogenic organic compounds (BOC) in oil-contaminated and background soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhendi; Yang, C; Yang, Z; Hollebone, B; Brown, C E; Landriault, M; Sun, J; Mudge, S M; Kelly-Hooper, F; Dixon, D G

    2012-09-01

    Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) or petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) are one of the most widespread soil contaminants in Canada, the United States and many other countries worldwide. Clean-up of PHC-contaminated soils costs the Canadian economy hundreds of millions of dollars annually. In Canada, most PHC-contaminated site evaluations are based on the methods developed by the Canadian Council of the Ministers of the Environment (CCME). However, the CCME method does not differentiate PHC from BOC (the naturally occurring biogenic organic compounds), which are co-extracted with petroleum hydrocarbons in soil samples. Consequently, this could lead to overestimation of PHC levels in soil samples. In some cases, biogenic interferences can even exceed regulatory levels (300 μg g(-1) for coarse soils and 1300 μg g(-1) for fine soils for Fraction 3, C(16)-C(34) range, in the CCME Soil Quality Level). Resulting false exceedances can trigger unnecessary and costly cleanup or remediation measures. Therefore, it is critically important to develop new protocols to characterize and quantitatively differentiate PHC and BOC in contaminated soils. The ultimate objective of this PERD (Program of Energy Research and Development) project is to correct the misconception that all detectable hydrocarbons should be regulated as toxic petroleum hydrocarbons. During 2009-2010, soil and plant samples were collected from over forty oil-contaminated and paired background sites in various provinces. The silica gel column cleanup procedure was applied to effectively remove all target BOC from the oil-contaminated sample extracts. Furthermore, a reliable GC-MS method in combination with the derivatization technique, developed in this laboratory, was used for identification and characterization of various biogenic sterols and other major biogenic compounds in these oil-contaminated samples. Both PHC and BOC in these samples were quantitatively determined. This paper reports the characterization

  9. A thermodynamic and kinetic model for paste–aggregate interactions and the alkali–silica reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, George D.; Carey, J. William

    2015-01-01

    A new conceptual model is developed for ASR formation based on geochemical principles tied to aqueous speciation, silica solubility, kinetically controlled mineral dissolution, and diffusion. ASR development is driven largely by pH and silica gradients that establish geochemical microenvironments between paste and aggregate, with gradients the strongest within the aggregate adjacent to the paste boundary (i.e., where ASR initially forms). Super-saturation of magadiite and okenite (crystalline ASR surrogates) occurs in the zone defined by gradients in pH, dissolved silica, Na + , and Ca 2 + . This model provides a thermodynamic rather than kinetic explanation of why quartz generally behaves differently from amorphous silica: quartz solubility does not produce sufficiently high concentrations of H 4 SiO 4 to super-saturate magadiite, whereas amorphous silica does. The model also explains why pozzolans do not generate ASR: their fine-grained character precludes formation of chemical gradients. Finally, these gradients have interesting implications beyond the development of ASR, creating unique biogeochemical environments

  10. Mineralogical and Biogenic Composition of the Zanzibar Channel Sediments, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaghude, Y. W.; Wannäs, K. O.

    2000-10-01

    Sediments from the Zanzibar Channel have been analysed for mineralogical and biogenic composition. The main objective of the study was to describe the depositional environment of the sediments based on these parameters. The study was also conducted to give an insight into sediment provenance of the sediments. Quartz, feldspar (both microcline and plagioclase) and hornblende are the main mineralogical components, while zircon, muscovite, biotite and augite occur as accessory minerals. The quartz grains are generally angular to sub-angular and highly strained, indicative of immature sediments, probably derived from highly metamorphosed rocks. The presence of hornblende also supports the conclusion that the sediments are immature. A possible source is the metamorphic rocks of the Mozambique belt, located about 25-50 km from the coastline. Benthic foraminifera are the dominant biogenic constituents. Other common biogenic constituents are molluscs (pelecypods and gastropods) and corals. Bryozoans and ostracods are relatively less common, while sea urchins are accessory biogenic components. The composition and abundance of these biogenic components and morphological, sedimentological and mineralogical data permit construction of a simple model which distinguishes between three bio-physiographic settings in the Zanzibar Channel using depth contours: (1) the coastal zone (0-10 m depth); (2) the reef platform/patch reefs zone (10-20 m depth) and (3) the central channel zone (>20 cm depth). In the coastal zone, the sediments are dominated by fine sand, sized with a very prominent fine sand mode. The proportion of benthic foraminifera is lower than in the other two zones (25%). Two lithogenic mineral components (quartz and feldspar) occur in significant proportions. In the reef platform/patch reefs zone, the sediments are coarse to medium sand sized with no distinct mode. the proportion of benthic foraminifera is highest (80-85%) there, and so is the biogenic:quartz ratio

  11. The effects of composition on glass dissolution rates: The application of four models to a data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldart, R.W.; Kindle, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    Four models have been applied to a data base to relate glass dissolution in distilled water to composition. The data base is used to compare the precisions obtained from the models in fitting actual data. The usefulness of the data base in formulating a model is also demonstrated. Two related models in which the composite or pH-adjusted free energy of hydration of the glass is the correlating parameter are compared with experimental data. In a structural model, the nonbridging oxygen content of the glasses is used to correlate glass dissolution rate to composition. In a model formulated for this report, the cation valence and the oxygen content of the glass are compared with observed dissolution rates. The models were applied to the 28-day normalized silica release at 90/sup 0/C for over 285 glass compositions with surface area to volume ratios of 10 m/sup -1/ (Materials Characterization Center MCC-1 glass durability test using distilled water). These glasses included the nonradioactive analogs of WV205 and SRL-165, as well as SRL-131, PNL 76-68, and a European glass, UK209. Predicted glass dissolution rates show similar fits to the data for all four models. The predictions of the models were also plotted for two subsets of the glasses: waste glasses and Savannah River Laboratory glasses. The model predictions fit the data for these groups much better than they fit the data for the entire set of glasses. 14 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Factors influencing temporal changes in chemical composition of biogenic deposits in the middle Tążyna River Valley (Kuyavian Lakeland, central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okupny Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the influence of geochemical properties on biogenic deposits in the Wilkostowo mire near Toruń, central Poland. The analysed core has allowed the documentation of environmental changes between the older part of the Atlantic Period and the present day (probably interrupted at the turn of the Meso- and Neoholocene. In order to reconstruct the main stages in the sedimentation of biogenic deposits, we have used stratigraphic variability of selected litho-geochemical elements (organic matter, calcium carbonate, biogenic and terrigenous silica, macro- and micro-elements: Na, K, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr and Ni. The main litho-geochemical component is CaCO3; its content ranges from 4.1 per cent to 92 per cent. The variability of CaCO3 content reflects mainly changes in hydrological and geomorphological conditions within the catchment area. The effects of prehistoric anthropogenic activities in the catchment of the River Tążyna, e.g., the use of saline water for economic purposes, are recorded in a change from calcareous gyttja into detritus-calcareous gyttja sedimentation and an increased content of lithophilous elements (Na, K, Mg and Ni in the sediments. Principal component analysis (PCA has enabled the distinction the most important factors that affected the chemical composition of sediments at the Wilkostowo site, i.e., mechanical and chemical denudation processes in the catchment, changes in redox conditions, bioaccumulation of selected elements and human activity. Sediments of the Wilkostowo mire are located in the direct vicinity of an archaeological site, where traces of intensive settlement dating back to the Neolithic have been documented. The settlement phase is recorded both in lithology and geochemical properties of biogenic deposits which fill the reservoir formed at the bottom of the Parchania Canal Valley.

  13. Development and validation of dissolution test for Metoprolol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dissolution method which uses USP apparatus I (Basket) with rotating at 100 rpm, 900 ml of different dissolution medium, ultra violet spectroscopy for quantification was demonstrated to be robust, discriminating and transferable. Dissolution tests conditions were selected after it was demonstrated that the Metoprolol ...

  14. Investigation of dissolution kinetics of a Nigerian columbite in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of dissolution kinetics of a Nigerian columbite in hydrofluoric acid using the shrinking core model. ... Experimental results indicate that the dissolution rate is chemical reaction controlled, with reaction order of 0.57. Dissolution of over 90 % of the columbite was achieved in 5 h, using 20 M HF at 90 oC with 100 ...

  15. Characterization and Dissolution Kinetics Testing of Radioactive H-3 Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2002-09-01

    Characterization and dissolution kinetics testing were performed with Idaho radioactive H-3 calcine. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the Separations Alternative identified in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The impact of the extent of dissolution on the feasibility of Separations must be clearly quantified.

  16. Biogenic Calcium Phosphate Transformation in Soils over Millennium Time Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S.; Neves, E; Solomon, D; Liang, B; Lehmann, J

    2009-01-01

    Changes in bioavailability of phosphorus (P) during pedogenesis and ecosystem development have been shown for geogenic calcium phosphate (Ca-P). However, very little is known about long-term changes of biogenic Ca-P in soil. Long-term transformation characteristics of biogenic Ca-P were examined using anthropogenic soils along a chronosequence from centennial to millennial time scales. Phosphorus fractionation of Anthrosols resulted in overall consistency with the Walker and Syers model of geogenic Ca-P transformation during pedogenesis. The biogenic Ca-P (e.g., animal and fish bones) disappeared to 3% of total P within the first ca. 2,000 years of soil development. This change concurred with increases in P adsorbed on metal-oxides surfaces, organic P, and occluded P at different pedogenic time. Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that the crystalline and therefore thermodynamically most stable biogenic Ca-P was transformed into more soluble forms of Ca-P over time. While crystalline hydroxyapatite (34% of total P) dominated Ca-P species after about 600-1,000 years, {Beta}-tricalcium phosphate increased to 16% of total P after 900-1,100 years, after which both Ca-P species disappeared. Iron-associated P was observable concurrently with Ca-P disappearance. Soluble P and organic P determined by XANES maintained relatively constant (58-65%) across the time scale studied. Conclusions - Disappearance of crystalline biogenic Ca-P on a time scale of a few thousand years appears to be ten times faster than that of geogenic Ca-P.

  17. Formation of Nano-crystalline Todorokite from Biogenic Mn Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X.; Zhu, M; Ginder-Vogel, M; Ni, C; Parikh, S; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    Todorokite, as one of three main Mn oxide phases present in oceanic Mn nodules and an active MnO{sub 6} octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), has garnered much interest; however, its formation pathway in natural systems is not fully understood. Todorokite is widely considered to form from layer structured Mn oxides with hexagonal symmetry, such as vernadite ({delta}-MnO{sub 2}), which are generally of biogenic origin. However, this geochemical process has not been documented in the environment or demonstrated in the laboratory, except for precursor phases with triclinic symmetry. Here we report on the formation of a nanoscale, todorokite-like phase from biogenic Mn oxides produced by the freshwater bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. At long- and short-range structural scales biogenic Mn oxides were transformed to a todorokite-like phase at atmospheric pressure through refluxing. Topotactic transformation was observed during the transformation. Furthermore, the todorokite-like phases formed via refluxing had thin layers along the c* axis and a lack of c* periodicity, making the basal plane undetectable with X-ray diffraction reflection. The proposed pathway of the todorokite-like phase formation is proposed as: hexagonal biogenic Mn oxide {yields} 10-{angstrom} triclinic phyllomanganate {yields} todorokite. These observations provide evidence supporting the possible bio-related origin of natural todorokites and provide important clues for understanding the transformation of biogenic Mn oxides to other Mn oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano-crystalline OMS materials for use in practical applications.

  18. Acid leaching of natural chrysotile asbestos to mesoporous silica fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletaškić, Jelena; Stanković, Nadežda; Daneu, Nina; Babić, Biljana; Stoiljković, Milovan; Yoshida, Katsumi; Matović, Branko

    2017-10-01

    Nanofibrous silica with a high surface area was produced from chrysotile by the acid-leaching method. Natural mineral chrysotile asbestos from Stragari, Korlace in Serbia was used as the starting material. The fibers were modified by chemical treatment with 1 M HCl and the mineral dissolution was monitored by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, inductively coupled plasma spectrometry and low-temperature nitrogen adsorption techniques to highlight the effects of the leaching process. The results showed that the applied concentration of acid solution and processing time of 4 h were sufficient to effectively remove the magnesium hydroxide layer and transform the crystal structure of the hazardous starting chrysotile to porous SiO2 nanofibers. With prolonged acid leaching, the specific surface area, S BET, calculated by BET equation, was increased from 147 up to 435 m2 g- 1, with micropores representing a significant part of the specific surface.

  19. Gas Separation through Bilayer Silica, the Thinnest Possible Silica Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bowen; Mandrà, Salvatore; Curry, John O; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Schrier, Joshua

    2017-12-13

    Membrane-based gas separation processes can address key challenges in energy and environment, but for many applications the permeance and selectivity of bulk membranes is insufficient for economical use. Theory and experiment indicate that permeance and selectivity can be increased by using two-dimensional materials with subnanometer pores as membranes. Motivated by experiments showing selective permeation of H 2 /CO mixtures through amorphous silica bilayers, here we perform a theoretical study of gas separation through silica bilayers. Using density functional theory calculations, we obtain geometries of crystalline free-standing silica bilayers (comprised of six-membered rings), as well as the seven-, eight-, and nine-membered rings that are observed in glassy silica bilayers, which arise due to Stone-Wales defects and vacancies. We then compute the potential energy barriers for gas passage through these various pore types for He, Ne, Ar, Kr, H 2 , N 2 , CO, and CO 2 gases, and use the data to assess their capability for selective gas separation. Our calculations indicate that crystalline bilayer silica, which is less than a nanometer thick, can be a high-selectivity and high-permeance membrane material for 3 He/ 4 He, He/natural gas, and H 2 /CO separations.

  20. Thiolated Chitosan Masked Polymeric Microspheres with Incorporated Mesocellular Silica Foam (MCF for Intranasal Delivery of Paliperidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroula Nanaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, mesocellular silica foam (MCF was used to encapsulate paliperidone, an antipsychotic drug used in patients suffering from bipolar disorder. MCF with the drug adsorbed was further encapsulated into poly(lactic acid (PLA and poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA 75/25 w/w microspheres and these have been coated with thiolated chitosan. As found by TEM analysis, thiolated chitosan formed a thin layer on the polymeric microspheres’ surface and was used in order to enhance their mucoadhesiveness. These microspheres aimed at the intranasal delivery of paliperidone. The DSC and XRD studies showed that paliperidone was encapsulated in amorphous form inside the MCF silica and for this reason its dissolution profile was enhanced compared to the neat drug. In coated microspheres, thiolated chitosan reduced the initial burst effect of the paliperidone dissolution profile and in all cases sustained release formulations have been prepared. The release mechanism was also theoretically studied and three kinetic models were proposed and successfully fitted for a dissolution profile of prepared formulations to be found.

  1. Simulation of Peptide Binding to Silica and Silica Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, F. S.; Heinz, H.; Berry, R. J.; Varshney, V.; Farmer, B. L.; Naik, R. R.; Patwardhan, S. V.; Perry, C. C.

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the nature of the interaction of peptides with silica surfaces and their effect on mineralization. Classical force fields (CVFF, PCFF) have been extended for silica aiming at the computation of surface properties in quantitative agreement with experiment, taking explicitly into account water molecules, pH, and surface coverage with peptides. We focus on the interaction of five short peptides (pep1, pep4, 82-4, H4, R5) identified by biopanning with regular and amorphous silica surfaces (Q3 and Q2) to understand the relation between peptide sequence and affinity to the surface. Results of the atomistic molecular dynamics simulation indicate adsorption energies, binding constants and conformational changes upon adsorption. The comparison of NMR chemical shifts in solution and on the surface in computation and experiment further aids in understanding the mechanism of binding.

  2. HEME and HEPA filter element dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant to remove volatile and semi-volatile effluents from the off-gases generated during the vitrification process. When removed, these filters are likely to contain radioactive contaminants, organics, and hazardous materials, which make their disposal by normal methods impractical. Hence, an alternative disposal method is needed. The alternative disposal method evaluated in this study is dissolution of the filters with caustic and acid solutions. Dissolution converts the waste into an aqueous stream, which can be transferred to the Tank Farm and disposed of by normal means. This process was shown to be effective on a small scale in earlier studies, but the results were not well documented and the studies were not performed on fouled filters

  3. [Direct gallstone dissolution therapy with GS-100].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, F; Igimi, H

    1993-07-01

    We have developed GS-100, a new direct dissolving drug with strong dissolution property for cholesterol stone by supplementing d-limonene, a dissolvent used since 1974, with 30% medium-chain monoglyceride (MCM). The new drug was applied in 23 patients with gallbladder stones and three with bile duct stone. The presumptive analysis of the composition of the stones was drawn from the CT recordings. As non-invasive therapies, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) dissolution and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), which are commonly used in Europe and America, have been reported as being favourable; however, GS-100 is superior in respect to safety and applicative dimension, suggesting of the possibility of using GS-100 as an important drug in the non-invasive therapy for gallstone in the near future.

  4. Study of dissolution process and its modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Beltran-Prieto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of mathematical concepts and language aiming to describe and represent the interactions and dynamics of a system is known as a mathematical model. Mathematical modelling finds a huge number of successful applications in a vast amount of science, social and engineering fields, including biology, chemistry, physics, computer sciences, artificial intelligence, bioengineering, finance, economy and others. In this research, we aim to propose a mathematical model that predicts the dissolution of a solid material immersed in a fluid. The developed model can be used to evaluate the rate of mass transfer and the mass transfer coefficient. Further research is expected to be carried out to use the model as a base to develop useful models for the pharmaceutical industry to gain information about the dissolution of medicaments in the body stream and this could play a key role in formulation of medicaments.

  5. The impact of ART on union dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Mariana Veloso; Vassard, Ditte; Hougaard, Charlotte Ørsted

    2018-01-01

    and to deal with the surrounding stigma. Using a population-based study and couple-level data, we investigated the extent to which ART treatment increases the risk for divorce/marital dissolution during up to 16 years of follow-up. STUDY DESIGN SIZE, DURATION: Register-based national cohort study including...... was prospectively sampled. Participants could change status during follow-up if they entered ART. The final sample had 148 972 couples, followed until marital dissolution, death of self/spouse, migration or until 31 December 2010. We used Cox regression models adjusting for female and male age, education, marriage......, common child at baseline and live-born child during follow-up. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: At baseline, the majority of couples were married (69%). More non-ART couples opted for marriage (70% versus 64%; P

  6. Bacterial Association with Particles: Aggregation to Dissolution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, M.J.B.D.

    an important role in the trophic dynamics of an ecosystem (Fig. 1) Bacterial role in aggregation formation and dissolution In aquatic systems particles are important components in the turnover, decomposition and sinking flux of both organic and inorganic... (Nicholas and Walling, 1998). Although bacteria are responsible for assimilating most of the DOC in aquatic ecosystem, yet the fluxes of DOC through bacteria include a wide variety of compounds derived from unknown sources and composition (Azam et al., 1993...

  7. Aggregation, sedimentation, dissolution and bioavailability of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand their fate and transport in estuarine systems, the aggregation, sedimentation, and dissolution of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) in seawater were investigated. Hydrodynamic size increased from 40 to 60 nm to >1 mm within 1 h in seawater, and the aggregates were highly polydispersed. Their sedimentation rates in seawater were measured to be 4–10 mm/day. Humic acid (HA), further increased their size and polydispersity, and slowed sedimentation. Light increased their dissolution and release of dissolved Cd. The ZnS shell also slowed release of Cd ions. With sufficient light, HA increased the dissolution of QDs, while with low light, HA alone did not change their dissolution. The benthic zone in estuarine systems is the most probable long-term destination of QDs due to aggregation and sedimentation. The bioavailability of was evaluated using the mysid Americamysis bahia. The 7-day LC50s of particulate and dissolved QDs were 290 and 23 μg (total Cd)/L, respectively. For mysids, the acute toxicity appears to be from Cd ions; however, research on the effects of QDs should be conducted with other organisms where QDs may be lodged in critical tissues such as gills or filtering apparatus and Cd ions may be released and delivered directly to those tissues. Because of their increasing use and value to society, cadmium-based quantum dots (QDs) will inevitably find their way into marine systems. In an effort to understand the fate and transport of CdSe QDs in estuar

  8. Alloy dissolution in argon stirred steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Darryl Scott

    Alloying is required for the production of all steel products from small castings to large beams. Addition of large quantities of bulk alloys can result in alloy segregation and inconsistent alloy recovery. The objective of this research was to better understand alloy dissolution in liquid steel especially as it relates to Missouri S&Ts' patented continuous steelmaking process. A 45-kilogram capacity ladle with a single porous plug was used to evaluate the effect of four experimental factors on alloy dissolution: alloy species, alloy size or form, argon flow rate, and furnace tap temperature. Four alloys were tested experimentally including Class I low carbon ferromanganese, nickel and tin (as a surrogate for low melting alloys) and Class II ferroniobium. The alloys ranged in size and form from granular to 30 mm diameter lumps. Experimental results were evaluated using a theoretically based numerical model for the steel shell period, alloy mixing (Class I) and alloy dissolution (Class II). A CFD model of the experimental ladle was used to understand steel motion in the ladle and to provide steel velocity magnitudes for the numerical steel shell model. Experiments and modeling confirmed that smaller sized alloys have shorter steel shell periods and homogenize faster than larger particles. Increasing the argon flow rate shortened mixing times and reduced the delay between alloy addition and the first appearance of alloy in the melt. In addition, for every five degree increase in steel bath temperature the steel shell period was shortened by approximately four percent. Class II ferroniobium alloy dissolution was an order of magnitude slower than Class I alloy mixing.

  9. Dissolution and permeation characteristics of artemether tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    U.S.P. dissolution apparatus (Panomex Inc,. India) using the modified method of Sharma et al. [17]. Segments of the intestine of freshly sacrificed pig were obtained and used as donor compartments. Each segment was tied at one end and filled with 5 ml of SGF (pH 1.2) or SIF. (pH 6.8) produced based on USP 33 – NF 28.

  10. Pumping Iron and Silica Bodybuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnair, H.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Krause, J. W.; Parker, C.; Brown, M.; Coale, T.; Bruland, K. W.

    2016-02-01

    The availability of dissolved iron influences the stoichiometry of nutrient uptake by diatoms. Under nutrient replete conditions diatoms consume silicic acid and nitrate in a 1:1 ratio, this ratio increases under iron stress. Using the tracers 32Si and PDMPO, the total community and group-specific silica production rates were measured along a gradient of dissolved iron in an upwelling plume off the California coast. At each station, a control (ambient silicic acid) and +20 µM silicic acid treatment were conducted with each tracer to determine whether silicic acid limitation controlled the rate of silica production. Dissolved iron was 1.3 nmol kg-1 nearshore and decreased to 0.15 nmol kg-1 offshore. Silicic acid decreased more rapidly than nitrate, it was nearly 9 µM higher in the nearshore and 7 µM lower than nitrate in the middle of the transect where the iron concentration had decreased. The rate of diatom silica production decreased in tandem with silicic acid concentration, and silica production limitation by low silicic acid was most pronounced when iron concentrations were >0.4 nmol kg-1. The composition of the diatom assemblage shifted from Chaetoceros spp. dominated nearshore to a more sparse pennate-dominated assemblage offshore. Changes in taxa-specific silica production rates will be reported based on examination of PDMPO labeled cells using confocal microscopy.

  11. Fault controlled dissolution of bedded rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Neil L.; Knapp, Ralph W. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States); Brown, R. James [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of well log and seismic data suggest that about 40 m of Famennian-age bedded rock salt was uniformly deposited within the Wabamun Group in the Stettler area, southeastern Alberta, Canada. Subsequent to deposition, this original rock salt was leached to the extent that is preserved, now only as isolated-to-contiguous bodies of irregular shape and variable thickness. In the immediate study area, dissolution appears to have been initiated by regional faulting and/or fracturing during the mid-Late Cretaceous, and accentuated thereafter by various large-scale mechanisms including glaciation. In this paper, seismic data across a prominent NNE trending salt-dissolution feature in the Stettler area are presented. In short cross-section, this subsidence feature is manifested as an up-ward-expanding zone of measurable subsidence, characterized by increased structural relief at greater depths, and small-amplitude near-vertical offsets. This subsidence feature is consistent with: the onset of salt dissolution as a result of regional faulting and/or fracturing during mid-Late Cretaceous time; the plastic deformation of rock salt creep; the gradual (as opposed to catastrophic) subsidence of the post-salt strata; and accelerated rates of leaching during the Pleistocene and Holocene in response to glacial loading and unloading. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs

  12. Anomalous dissolution of metals and chemical corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGUTIN M. DRAZIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of the anomalous behavior of some metals, in particular Fe and Cr, in acidic aqueous solutions during anodic dissolution. The anomaly is recognizable by the fact that during anodic dissolutionmore material dissolves than would be expected from the Faraday law with the use of the expected valence of the formed ions. Mechanical disintegration, gas bubble blocking, hydrogen embrittlement, passive layer cracking and other possible reasons for such behavior have been discussed. It was shown, as suggested by Kolotyrkin and coworkers, that the reason can be, also, the chemical reaction in which H2O molecules with the metal form metal ions and gaseous H2 in a potential independent process. It occurs simultaneously with the electrochemical corrosion process, but the electrochemical process controls the corrosion potential. On the example of Cr in acid solution itwas shown that the reason for the anomalous behavior is dominantly chemical dissolution, which is considerably faster than the electrochemical corrosion, and that the increasing temperature favors chemical reaction, while the other possible reasons for the anomalous behavior are of negligible effect. This effect is much smaller in the case of Fe, but exists. The possible role of the chemical dissolution reacton and hydrogen evolution during pitting of steels and Al and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue are discussed.

  13. Microbubble dissolution in a multigas environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, James J; Borden, Mark A

    2010-05-04

    Microbubbles occur naturally in the oceans and are used in many industrial and biomedical applications. Here, a theoretical and experimental study was undertaken to determine the fate of a microbubble suddenly suspended in a medium with several gas species as in, for example, the injection of an ultrasound contrast agent into the bloodstream. The model expands on Epstein and Plesset's analysis to include any number of gases. An experimental system was developed which isolates the microbubble in a permeable hollow fiber submerged in a perfusion chamber, allowing rapid exchange of the external aqueous medium. Experimental verification of the model was performed with individual sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) microbubbles coated with the soluble surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). SDS-coated microbubbles suddenly placed in an air-saturated medium initially grew with the influx of O(2) and N(2) and then dissolved under Laplace pressure. SF(6)-filled microbubbles coated with the highly insoluble lipid, dibehenoylphosphatidylcholine, were found to exhibit significantly different behavior owing to a dynamic surface tension. The initial growth phase was diminished, possibly owing to a shell "breakup" tension that exceeded the pure gas/liquid surface tension. Three dissolution regimes were observed: (1) an initial rapid dissolution to the initial diameter followed by (2) steady dissolution with monolayer collapse and finally (3) stabilization below 10 microm diameter. Results indicated that the lipid shell becomes increasingly rigid as the microbubble dissolves, which has important implications on microbubble size distribution, stability, and acoustic properties.

  14. Applications of plutonium dioxide oxydising dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, M.; Bourges, J.; Madic, C.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory investigations having demonstrated the outstanding effectiveness of Ag 2+ ions for the dissolution of plutonium dioxide in nitric medium, two applications of this method were developed at the CEA: dissolution of off-standard PuO 2 , recovery of the plutonium contained in ashes produced by incineration of solid wastes. With respect to PuO 2 dissolution, the parametric investigation of the electrogeneration of Ag (II) and of its reaction with PuO 2 , led to the development of a process and of the equipment required for its implementation. The prototype facility used to dissolve in 4 hours 1 kg of plutonium, in oxide form, was built and tested in the laboratory. This equipment was used to dissolve 30 kg of plutonium oxide in batches of about 700 grams. An in-line spectrophotometric method was developed for process control. The application of this process to the recovery of plutonium from incineration ash is currently being developed. Tested on the scale of about 1 kg of ash, the process helps to recover the plutonium with yields higher than 98 % [fr

  15. Solubility and dissolution studies of tibolone polymorphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Bonfilio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Different solid forms of an active pharmaceutical ingredient can have distinct chemical and physical characteristics. In this work, we studied the solubility and dissolution properties of the described tibolone polymorphic forms (I and II. Both forms were successively recrystallized and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. Equilibrium solubility and dissolution profiles were performed for both forms. Solubility studies demonstrated that form II is statistically more soluble in water, 0.01 mol L-1 HCl and pH 4.5 acetate buffer. The solubility of forms I and II were explained in terms of crystal packing. Dissolution tests of tablets showed a lower release of polymorphic form II than form I from tablets. The results showed an impact of polymorphism on the quality of tibolone tablets and suggest that tibolone forms I and II can show distinct interactions with pharmaceutical excipients used in tablets. Therefore, only form I is acceptable for the preparation of tablet forms. Based on our results, we propose the quality control on tibolone raw materials using X-ray diffraction analysis and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

  16. Results of urinary dissolution therapy for radiolucent calculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Maneesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose In this paper we present our experience with dissolution therapy of radiolucent calculi. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients who were offered urinary dissolution therapy between January 2010 and June 2011. Patients were treated with tablets containing potassium citrate and magnesium oxide. Partial dissolution was defined as at least a 50% reduction in stone size. Patients with complete or partial dissolution were classified in the successful dissolution group. Patients with no change, inadequate reduction, increase in stone size and those unable to tolerate alkali therapy were classified as failures. Patient sex, stenting before alkalinization, stone size, urine pH at presentation and serum uric acid levels were analyzed using Fisher t-test for an association with successful dissolution. Results Out of 67, 48 patients reported for follow up. 10 (15% had complete dissolution and 13 (19% had partial dissolution. Alkalinization was unsuccessful in achieving dissolution in 25 (37%. Stenting before alkalinization, patient weight ( 75kg and serum uric acid levels (≤ 6 vs. > 6 were the only factors to significantly affected dissolution rates (p = 0.039, p 0.035, p 0.01 respectively. CONCLUSIONS A policy of offering dissolution therapy to patients with radiolucent calculi had a successful outcome in 34% of patients.

  17. Monitoring Lidocaine Single-Crystal Dissolution by Ultraviolet Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Jesper; Ye, Fengbin; Rantanen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    ) imaging for conducting single‐crystal dissolution studies was performed. Using lidocaine as a model compound, the aim was to develop a setup capable of monitoring and quantifying the dissolution of lidocaine into a phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, under stagnant conditions. A single crystal of lidocaine...... was placed in the quartz dissolution cell and UV imaging was performed at 254 nm. Spatially and temporally resolved mapping of lidocaine concentration during the dissolution process was achieved from the recorded images. UV imaging facilitated the monitoring of lidocaine concentrations in the dissolution...... media adjacent to the single crystals. The concentration maps revealed the effects of natural convection due to density gradients on the dissolution process of lidocaine. UV imaging has great potential for in vitro drug dissolution testing...

  18. Silica Aerogel: Synthesis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti L. Gurav

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica aerogels have drawn a lot of interest both in science and technology because of their low bulk density (up to 95% of their volume is air, hydrophobicity, low thermal conductivity, high surface area, and optical transparency. Aerogels are synthesized from molecular precursors by sol-gel processing. Special drying techniques must be applied to replace the pore liquid with air while maintaining the solid network. Supercritical drying is most common; however, recently developed methods allow removal of the liquid at atmospheric pressure after chemical modification of the inner surface of the gels, leaving only a porous silica network filled with air. Therefore, by considering the surprising properties of aerogels, the present review addresses synthesis of silica aerogels by the sol-gel method, as well as drying techniques and applications in current industrial development and scientific research.

  19. Development of silica RO membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Ayumi; Kawamoto, Takashi; Matsuyama, Emi; Utsumi, Keisuke; Nomura, Mikihiro; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Silica based membranes have been developed by using a counter diffusion CVD method. Effects of alkyl groups in the silica precursors and deposition temperatures had investigated in order to control pore sizes of the silica membranes. In this study, this type of a silica membrane was applied for RO separation. Effects of silica sources, deposition temperatures and post treatments had been investigated. Tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Ethyltrimethoxysilane (ETMOS) and Phenyltrimethoxysilane (PhTMOS) were used as silica precursors. A counter diffusion CVD method was carried out for 90 min at 270 - 600degC on γ-alumina capillary substrates (effective length: 50 mm, φ: 4 nm: NOK Co.). O 3 or O 2 was introduced into the inside of the substrate at the O 2 rate of 0.2 L min -1 . Ion beam irradiation was carried out for a post treatment using Os at 490 MeV for 1.0 x 10 10 ions cm -2 or 3.0 x 10 10 ions cm -2 . Single gas permeance was measured by using H 2 , N 2 and SF 6 . RO tests were employed at 3.0 or 5.4 MPa for 100 mg L -1 of feed NaCl solution. First, effects of the silica sources were investigated. The total fluxes increased by increasing N 2 permeance through the silica membrane deposited by ETMOS. The maximum NaCl rejection was 28.2% at 12.2 kg m -2 h -1 of the total flux through the membrane deposited at 270degC. N 2 permeance was 9.6 x 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 . While, total fluxes through the membrane deposited by using PhTMOS were smaller than those through the ETMOS membranes. The phenyl groups for the PhTMOS membrane must be important for the hydrophobic properties through the membrane. Next, effects of ion beam irradiation were tested for the TMOS membranes. Water is difficult to permeate through the TMOS membranes due to the low N 2 permeance through the membrane (3.1 x 10 -11 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 ). N 2 permeance increased to 7.3 x 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 by the irradiation. Irradiation amounts had little effects on N 2 permeance. However, NaCl rejections

  20. Synthesis of colloidal silica dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patrick M; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2005-11-22

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of stable suspensions of monodisperse fluorescently labeled silica dumbbell particles. Pure dispersions of silica dumbbells with center-to-center lengths from 174 nm to 2.3 microm were produced with a variety of aspect ratios. Individual particles in concentrated dispersions of these particles could be imaged with confocal microscopy. These particles can be used as a colloidal model system for addressing fundamental questions about crystal and glass formation of low-aspect-ratio anisotropic particles. They also have potential in photonic applications and electro-optical devices.

  1. Niobia-silica and silica membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffa, V.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of ceramic membranes suitable for hydrogen separation and CO2 recovery from gaseous streams. The research work was focused on the three different parts of which gas selective ceramic membranes are composed, i.e., the microporous gas selective silica layer, the

  2. Modeling Global Biogenic Emission of Isoprene: Exploration of Model Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Susan E.; Potter, Christopher S.; Coughlan, Joseph C.; Klooster, Steven A.; Lerdau, Manuel T.; Chatfield, Robert B.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vegetation provides the major source of isoprene emission to the atmosphere. We present a modeling approach to estimate global biogenic isoprene emission. The isoprene flux model is linked to a process-based computer simulation model of biogenic trace-gas fluxes that operates on scales that link regional and global data sets and ecosystem nutrient transformations Isoprene emission estimates are determined from estimates of ecosystem specific biomass, emission factors, and algorithms based on light and temperature. Our approach differs from an existing modeling framework by including the process-based global model for terrestrial ecosystem production, satellite derived ecosystem classification, and isoprene emission measurements from a tropical deciduous forest. We explore the sensitivity of model estimates to input parameters. The resulting emission products from the global 1 degree x 1 degree coverage provided by the satellite datasets and the process model allow flux estimations across large spatial scales and enable direct linkage to atmospheric models of trace-gas transport and transformation.

  3. Biomass burning: Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, J.S.; Cofer, W.R III; Rhinehart, R.P.; Cahoon, D.R. J.; Winstead, E.L.; Sebacher, S.; Sebacher, D.I.; Stocks, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter deals with two different, but related, aspects of biomass burning. The first part of the chapter deals with a technique to estimate the instantaneous emissions of trace gases produced by biomass burning using satellite imagery. The second part of the chapter concerns the recent discovery that burning results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of N 2 O, NO, and CH 4 . Hence, biomass burning has both an immediate and long-term impact on the production of trace gases to the atmosphere. The objective of this research is to better assess and quantify the role of this research is to better assess and quantify the role and impact of biomass as a driver for global change. It will be demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions and may in the future be used to estimate the long-term postburn biogenic emissions of trace gases to the atmosphere

  4. Blue-Emitting Small Silica Particles Incorporating ZnSe-Based Nanocrystals Prepared by Reverse Micelle Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Ando

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnSe-based nanocrystals (ca. 4-5 nm in diameter emitting in blue region (ca. 445 nm were incorporated in spherical small silica particles (20–40 nm in diameter by a reverse micelle method. During the preparation, alkaline solution was used to deposit the hydrolyzed alkoxide on the surface of nanocrystals. It was crucially important for this solution to include Zn2+ ions and surfactant molecules (thioglycolic acid to preserve the spectral properties of the final silica particles. This is because these substances in the solution prevent the surface of nanocrystals from deterioration by dissolution during processing. The resultant silica particles have an emission efficiency of 16% with maintaining the photoluminescent spectral width and peak wavelength of the initial colloidal solution.

  5. Structure of silica-supported catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladden, L.F.; Vignaux, M.; Griffiths, R.W.; Jackson, S.D.; Jones, J.R.; Sharratt, A.P.; Robertson, F.J.; Webb, G.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and SANS studies of silica supported metal catalysts have indicated that more active metal:silica catalysts are produced when the silica support has a relatively high content of three-membered rings in its network structure. SANS studies also suggest that the more active catalysts possess a bimodal metal particle size distribution. (orig.)

  6. Sonochemical coating of magnetite nanoparticles with silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Feng; Enomoto, Naoya; Hojo, Junichi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were coated with silica through the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The ultrasonic irradiation was used to prevent the agglomeration of the magnetite particles and accelerate the hydrolysis and condensation of TEOS. TEM, DLS, XRF, VSM, TG and sedimentation test were used to characterize the silica-coated magnetite particles. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles in aqueous solution was improved significantly and the agglomerate particle size was decreased to 110 nm. It was found that the agglomerate particle size of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the coating temperature and the pH value in the silica-coating process. The weight ratio of silica in silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the pH value in the silica-coating process. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the agglomerate particle size of the suspension. The oxidation of magnetite particles in air was limited through the coated silica. The magnetism of silica-coated magnetite particles decreased slightly after silica-coating.

  7. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Product. Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica or precipitated hydrophobic silica (CAS Reg. No. 68611-0944... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophobic silicas. 584.700 Section 584.700 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE IN FEED AND...

  8. Anisotropic silica mesostructures for DNA encapsulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    functionalizing the pores of silica with amine group, the amount of DNA loaded on the rods decreases which is due to a reduction in the pore size upon grafting of amine groups. Keywords. Surfactant; reverse micellar method; silica mesostructures; surface area. 1. Introduction. Amorphous silica nanoparticles are important ...

  9. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petäjä, Tuukka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Moisseev, Dmitri [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Sinclair, Victoria [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); O' Connor, Ewan J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Manninen, Antti J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Levula, Janne [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Väänänen, Riikka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Heikkinen, Liine [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Äijälä, Mikko [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Juho [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Bäck, Jaana [University of Helsinki, Finland

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  10. Kinetics of dissolution of sapphire in melts in the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Cliff S. J.; Klausen, Kim B.; Mao, Huahai

    2018-05-01

    The dissolution rate of sapphire in melts in the CAS system of varying silica activity, viscosity and degree of alumina saturation has been determined at 1600 °C and 1.5 GPa. After an initiation period of up to 1800 s, dissolution is controlled by diffusion of cations through the boundary layer adjacent to the dissolving sapphire. The dissolution rate decreases with increasing silica activity, viscosity and molar Al2O3/CaO. The calculated diffusion matrix for each solvent melt shows that CAS 1 and 9 which have molar Al2O3/CaO of 0.33 and 0.6 and dissolution rate constants of 0.65 × 10-6 and 0.59 × 10-6 m/s0.5 have similar directions and magnitudes of diffusive coupling: DCaO-Al2O3 and DAl2O3-CaO are both negative are approximately equal. The solvent with the fastest dissolution rate: CAS 4, which has a rate constant of 1.5 × 10-6 m/s0.5 and Al2O3/CaO of 0.31 has positive DCaO-Al2O3 and negative DAl2O3-CaO and the absolute values vary by a factor of 4. Although many studies show that aluminium is added to the melts via the reaction: Si4+ =Al3+ + 0.5Ca2+ the compositional profiles show that this reaction is not the only one involved in accommodating the aluminium added during sapphire dissolution. Rather, aluminium is incorporated as both tetrahedrally coordinated Al charge balanced by Ca and as aluminium not charge balanced by Ca (termed Alxs). This reaction: AlIV -Ca =Alxs +CaNBO where CaNBO is a non-bridging oxygen associated with calcium, may involve the formation of aluminium triclusters. The shape of the compositional profiles and oxide-oxide composition paths is controlled by the aluminium addition reaction. When Alxs exceeds 2%, CaO diffusion becomes increasingly anomalous and since the bond strength of Alxs correlates with CaO/CaO + Al2O3, the presence of more than 2% Alxs leads to significantly slower dissolution than when Alxs is absent or at low concentration. Thus, dissolution is controlled by diffusion of cations through the boundary layer, but this

  11. Determination of the rate of production and dissolution of biosilica in marine waters by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corvaisier, Rudolph [CNRS UMR 6539, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement Marin, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Technopole Brest-Iroise, Place Corpernic, 29280 Brest (France)]. E-mail: rudolph.corvaisier@univ-brest.fr; Treguer, Paul [CNRS UMR 6539, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement Marin, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Technopole Brest-Iroise, Place Corpernic, 29280 Brest (France); Beucher, Charlotte [CNRS UMR 6539, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement Marin, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Technopole Brest-Iroise, Place Corpernic, 29280 Brest (France); Elskens, Marc [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-04-04

    A new method is described for a precise and simultaneous determination of the rate of production and dissolution of biosilica in marine waters, using isotopic dilution technique. No HF or F{sub 2} is required for chemical preparations as the change in isotopic composition is measured on silica producing SiO{sub 2}{sup -} ions. The seawater sample flask is spiked with {sup 30}Si(OH){sub 4} (<10% of increase in situ concentration) and incubated in in situ conditions. At the end of incubation, changes of the {sup 30}Si:{sup 28}Si ratios in particulate and liquid phases are measured by using a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan THQ. The relative analytical precision of the isotopic ratio measurements is <0.5%. The limit of detection of the change in isotopic ratio during incubation is 0.02 atom%. The overall repeatability determined on eight subsamples (average production: 0.23 {mu}M day{sup -1}; average dissolution: 0.07 {mu}M day{sup -1}) is {+-}0.02 and {+-}0.01 {mu}M day{sup -1} for production and dissolution, respectively. Using mass and isotopic balances of the particulate and dissolved phases in the incubation flask, the best estimates for production and dissolution rates are calculated iteratively. This method was applied to 112 samples of marine waters (production, range: 0.00-2.38 {mu}M day{sup -1}; dissolution, range: 0.00-1.18 {mu}M day{sup -1})

  12. Dissolution rate enhancement of piroxicam by ordered mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Vikas Anand; Choudhury, Pratim Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Micronized piroxicam was mixed with lactose, mannitol, sorbitol, maltitol and sodium chloride to produce ordered mixture in a glass vial by manual hand shaking method. The effect of excipients, surfactant, superdisintegrant, drug concentration and carrier particle size on dissolution rate was investigated. Dissolution rate studies of the prepared ordered mixtures revealed that all water soluble excipients increased the dissolution rate of piroxicam when compared to the dissolution rate of piroxicam or its suspension. Ordered mixture formulation PLF4, consisting of lactose as water soluble excipient, SSG (8% w/s) and SLS (1% w/w), released piroxcam at a very fast rate so much so that about 90% of the composition had passed into solution within 2 min. The order of the dissolution rate enhancement for ordered mixtures of various water soluble excipients was: lactose > mannitol > maltitol > sorbitol > sodium chloride. Carrier granules of size 355-710 µm were most effective in increasing the dissolution rate of drug from ordered mixtures. Decreasing the carrier particle size reduced drug dissolution from ordered mixtures. The dissolution rate of ordered mixtures consisting of 1-5% w/w piroxicam was superior to dissolution rate of piroxicam suspension. The dissolution data fitting and the resulting regression parameters indicated Hixson Crowell, cube root law, as the best fit to drug release data of ordered mixtures.

  13. Does Elevated CO2 Alter Silica Uptake in Trees?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson W. Fulweiler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C and N (N cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2 have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global carbon dioxide fertilization, long-term free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine, and five hardwood species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica (BSi concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20% and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.

  14. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W; Maguire, Timothy J; Carey, Joanna C; Finzi, Adrien C

    2014-01-01

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, long-term free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwood species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.

  15. Silica in invasive wetland plant species of lagoons, Côte d'Ivoire: Spatio-temporal patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    José-mathieu Koné, Yéfanlan; Schoelynck, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    Tropical wetlands are known to accumulate a large quantity of Biogenic Silica (BSi) produced by wetland plant species (Struyf et al., 2015), and approximately 70-80% of the total supply of Dissolved Si (DSi) to the coastal zone occurs in (sub) tropical river systems (Jennerjahn et al. 2006). However, the data at these latitudes are limited. Here, we present the BSi concentration from eleven invasive macrophyte species randomly collected in three small ( 800ha) lagoons of Côte d'Ivoire during 12 months. Our data showed a large spatio-temporal variability of BSi in the three lagoons with no consistent trends. In general, the BSi concentrations obtained were high and values ranged from 0 to 54 mg g-1 through the entire sampling period, with the highest values found in Acroceras zizaniodes (emergent species of Poaceae). In general, free floating species had significantly less BSi than emergent species (POkavango Delta silica sink. Wetlands, 5: 171-181.

  16. Functionalized silica materials for electrocatalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electrochemical sensors and biosensors.1–5 Templated routes to synthesize silica materials give rise to well- ordered structures with pores and interconnected chan- nels, whereas a .... 2.2 Fabrication of electrodes. An aqueous colloidal solution (0.5–1.0%) of the res- pective material was prepared together with 0.01% poly.

  17. Poling of Planar Silica Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Jesper; Kristensen, Martin; Jensen, Jesper Bo

    1999-01-01

    UV-written planar silica waveguides are poled using two different poling techniques, thermal poling and UV-poling. Thermal poling induces an electro-optic coefficient of 0.067 pm/V. We also demonstrate simultaneous UV-writing and UV-poling. The induced electro-optic effect shows a linear dependence...

  18. Functionalized silica materials for electrocatalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To increase the efficiency of the electrocatalytic process and to increase the electrochemical accessibility of the immobilized electrocatalysts, functionalized and non-functionalized mesoporous organo-silica (MCM41-type-materials) are used in this study. These materials possess several suitable properties to be durable ...

  19. Dissolution of LMFBR fuel-sodium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.D.; Moss, O.R.

    1979-01-01

    Plutonium dioxide, normally insoluble in biological fluids, becomes much more soluble when mixed with sodium as the aerosol is formed. Sodium-fuel aerosols are approximately 20 times less soluble in simulated lung fluid than in distilled water. Solubility of sodium-fuel aerosols increases when Na 2 CO 3 are added to the distilled-water dissolution fluid. Mixed-oxide fuel aerosols without sodium present are relatively insoluble in distilled water, simulated lung fluid, and distilled water with Na 2 CO 3 and NaHCO 3 added

  20. System and process for dissolution of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liezers, Martin; Farmer, III, Orville T.

    2017-10-10

    A system and process are disclosed for dissolution of solids and "difficult-to-dissolve" solids. A solid sample may be ablated in an ablation device to generate nanoscale particles. Nanoparticles may then swept into a coupled plasma device operating at atmospheric pressure where the solid nanoparticles are atomized. The plasma exhaust may be delivered directly into an aqueous fluid to form a solution containing the atomized and dissolved solids. The composition of the resulting solution reflects the composition of the original solid sample.

  1. Dissolution behavior of lithium compounds in ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Furukawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to exchange the components which received irradiation damage during the operation at the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, the adhered lithium, which is partially converted to lithium compounds such as lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide, should be removed from the components. In this study, the dissolution experiments of lithium compounds (lithium nitride, lithium hydroxide, and lithium oxide were performed in a candidate solvent, allowing the clarification of time and temperature dependence. Based on the results, a cleaning procedure for adhered lithium on the inner surface of the components was proposed.

  2. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  3. Transformation of Strontium during formation of biogenic calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, T.; Kozai, N.; Sakamoto, F.; Yamashita, M.; Horiieke, T.; Utsunomiya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Some amounts of radionuclides contaminated water containing 90Sr generated in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant were leaked to sea water in the port. One of the possible method to eliminate 90Sr is co-precipitated with biogenic carbonates minerals (CCM). Specific bacteria are known to form biogenic CCM in groundwater. In the present study, we have screened specific bacterium to form CCM in saline water, and studied transformation of Sr during biogenic CCM. A marine microbe of strain TK2d, which is screened from Tokyo bay to form CCM in saline solution, was grown in the medium solution contained urea and Sr. The concentratuion of Sr2+ in the solution was monitored by ICP-OES (ICP-OES; 720 Agilent Technologies, Inc., USA) during the formation of biogenic CCM. The precipitates were analyzed by SEM, TEM, and XAFS. When 1.0 mM Sr was dissolved in the medium solution, the concentration of Sr decreased up to 0.02 mM within 10 days, indicating that most of Sr in the solution was eliminated within 10 days. SEM and TEM analyses showed that needle shaped CCM containing Ca and Sr were formed. The CCM was not single crystalline, but poly-crystalline of calcite and aragonite. The elemental mapping showed that Sr was present at the same position of Ca, indicating that Sr was coprecipitated with Ca. The XANES analysis of Sr in the precipitates showed that the XANES spectrum was not the same as that of Sr coprecipitated with an abiotic Ca carbonates. Linear combination fitting of XANES spectra by those of SrCl2 and SrCO3 showed that both Sr2+ and SrCO3 were present in CCM. Longer contact time resulted in higher content of SrCO3, indicating that Sr was incorporated gradually with time into CCM structure. Thus, Sr was changed its chemical species from adsorbed one to the incorporated one in biogenic CCM in saline solution. This work was partially supported by a research grant from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan (research grant No. 260502).

  4. Astronomical pacing of the global silica cycle recorded in Mesozoic bedded cherts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Tada, Ryuji; Ozaki, Kazumi

    2017-06-01

    The global silica cycle is an important component of the long-term climate system, yet its controlling factors are largely uncertain due to poorly constrained proxy records. Here we present a ~70 Myr-long record of early Mesozoic biogenic silica (BSi) flux from radiolarian chert in Japan. Average low-mid-latitude BSi burial flux in the superocean Panthalassa is ~90% of that of the modern global ocean and relative amplitude varied by ~20-50% over the 100 kyr to 30 Myr orbital cycles during the early Mesozoic. We hypothesize that BSi in chert was a major sink for oceanic dissolved silica (DSi), with fluctuations proportional to DSi input from chemical weathering on timescales longer than the residence time of DSi (<~100 Kyr). Chemical weathering rates estimated by the GEOCARBSULFvolc model support these hypotheses, excluding the volcanism-driven oceanic anoxic events of the Early-Middle Triassic and Toarcian that exceed model limits. We propose that the Mega monsoon of the supercontinent Pangea nonlinearly amplified the orbitally paced chemical weathering that drove BSi burial during the early Mesozoic greenhouse world.

  5. Silica-Coated Liposomes for Insulin Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Dwivedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes coated with silica were explored as protein delivery vehicles for their enhanced stability and improved encapsulation efficiency. Insulin was encapsulated within the fluidic phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles by thin film hydration at pH 2.5, and layer of silica was formed above lipid bilayer by acid catalysis. The presence of silica coating and encapsulated insulin was identified using confocal and electron microscopy. The native state of insulin present in the formulation was evident from Confocal Micro-Raman spectroscopy. Silica coat enhances the stability of insulin-loaded delivery vehicles. In vivo study shows that these silica coated formulations were biologically active in reducing glucose levels.

  6. Uranium incorporation into amorphous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Michael S; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Nelson, Joey M; Fendorf, Scott; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of uranium are commonly observed in naturally occurring amorphous silica (including opal) deposits, suggesting that incorporation of U into amorphous silica may represent a natural attenuation mechanism and promising strategy for U remediation. However, the stability of uranium in opaline silicates, determined in part by the binding mechanism for U, is an important factor in its long-term fate. U may bind directly to the opaline silicate matrix, or to materials such as iron (hydr)oxides that are subsequently occluded within the opal. Here, we examine the coordination environment of U within opaline silica to elucidate incorporation mechanisms. Precipitates (with and without ferrihydrite inclusions) were synthesized from U-bearing sodium metasilicate solutions, buffered at pH ∼ 5.6. Natural and synthetic solids were analyzed with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and a suite of other techniques. In synthetic amorphous silica, U was coordinated by silicate in a double corner-sharing coordination geometry (Si at ∼ 3.8-3.9 Å) and a small amount of uranyl and silicate in a bidentate, mononuclear (edge-sharing) coordination (Si at ∼ 3.1-3.2 Å, U at ∼ 3.8-3.9 Å). In iron-bearing synthetic solids, U was adsorbed to iron (hydr)oxide, but the coordination environment also contained silicate in both edge-sharing and corner-sharing coordination. Uranium local coordination in synthetic solids is similar to that of natural U-bearing opals that retain U for millions of years. The stability and extent of U incorporation into opaline and amorphous silica represents a long-term repository for U that may provide an alternative strategy for remediation of U contamination.

  7. 40K in the Black Sea: a proxy to estimate biogenic sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulin, S.B.; Gulina, L.V.; Sidorov, I.G.; Proskurnin, V.Yu.; Duka, M.S.; Moseichenko, I.N.; Rodina, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to estimate the rate of biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea using the naturally occurring radionuclide 40 K has been considered. It allows assessment of the contribution of suspended matter of biological origin to the overall sediment accumulation in the Black Sea coastal, shelf and deep-water areas. Based upon this method, a relationship between the biogenic fraction of the seabed sediments and the water depth has been established with a view to differentiating the contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous suspended matter to the sedimentation rate. Overall, 40 K can be considered as an easily applicable proxy to assess sedimentation rate of biogenic fraction of particulate matter in marine environments. - Highlights: • 40 K-based approach was developed to assess biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea. • 40 K-derived relationship between biogenic sedimentation and water depth was traced. • 40 K is an easily applicable proxy to estimate rate of biogenic sedimentation in sea

  8. Climate dependent diatom production is preserved in biogenic Si isotope signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Sun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reconstruct diatom production in the subarctic northern tip of the Baltic Sea, Bothnian Bay, based on down-core analysis of Si isotopes in biogenic silica (BSi. Dating of the sediment showed that the samples covered the period 1820 to 2000. The sediment core record can be divided into two periods, an unperturbed period from 1820 to 1950 and a second period affected by human activities (from 1950 to 2000. This has been observed elsewhere in the Baltic Sea. The shift in the sediment core record after 1950 is likely caused by large scale damming of rivers. Diatom production was inferred from the Si isotope composition which ranged between δ30Si −0.18‰ and +0.58‰ in BSi, and assuming fractionation patterns due to the Raleigh distillation, the production was shown to be correlated with air and water temperature, which in turn were correlated with the mixed layer (ML depth. The sedimentary record showed that the deeper ML depth observed in colder years resulted in less production of diatoms. Pelagic investigations in the 1990's have clearly shown that diatom production in the Baltic Sea is controlled by the ML depth. Especially after cold winters and deep water mixing, diatom production was limited and dissolved silicate (DSi concentrations were not depleted in the water column after the spring bloom. Our method corroborates these findings and offers a new method to estimate diatom production over much longer periods of time in diatom dominated aquatic systems, i.e. a large part of the world's ocean and coastal seas.

  9. Direct ink writing of silica-bonded calcite scaffolds from preceramic polymers and fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, L; Elsayed, H; Badocco, D; Pastore, P; Bellucci, D; Cannillo, V; Detsch, R; Boccaccini, A R; Bernardo, E

    2017-05-11

    Silica-bonded calcite scaffolds have been successfully 3D-printed by direct ink writing, starting from a paste comprising a silicone polymer and calcite powders, calibrated in order to match a SiO 2 /CaCO 3 weight balance of 35/65. The scaffolds, fabricated with two slightly different geometries, were first cross-linked at 350 °C, then fired at 600 °C, in air. The low temperature adopted for the conversion of the polymer into amorphous silica, by thermo-oxidative decomposition, prevented the decomposition of calcite. The obtained silica-bonded calcite scaffolds featured open porosity of about 56%-64% and compressive strength of about 2.9-5.5 MPa, depending on the geometry. Dissolution studies in SBF and preliminary cell culture tests, with bone marrow stromal cells, confirmed the in vitro bioactivity of the scaffolds and their biocompatibility. The seeded cells were found to be alive, well anchored and spread on the samples surface. The new silica-calcite composites are expected to be suitable candidates as tissue-engineering 3D scaffolds for regeneration of cancellous bone defects.

  10. Surface controlled dissolution rates of gypsum in aqueous solutions exhibit nonlinear dissolution kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Alexander A.; Vosbeck, Katrin; Dreybrodt, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    The effective dissolution rates of gypsum are determined by mixed kinetics, where the rate constants of dissolution at the surface and the transport constant of molecular diffusion of dissolved material are similar. To obtain the surface reaction rate law it is necessary to know the transport constant. We have determined the surface rate law for monocrystalline selenite by using a rotating disc set-up, where the transport coefficients are well known. As a result, up to a calcium concentration of 0.6 · ceq, we find a nearly linear rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, where cs is the total calcium concentration at the surface and ceq the equilibrium concentration with respect to gypsum, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2, and ksl = 1.1 · 10 -4 mmol cm -2 s -1 ± 15%. We also employed batch-experiments for selenite, alabaster and gypsum rock samples. The result of these experiments were interpreted by using a transport constant determined by NaCl dissolution experiments under similar physical conditions. The batch experiments reveal a dissolution rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, ksl = 1.3 · 10 -4 mmol · cm -2 s -1, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2 for c ≤ 0.94 · ceq. Close to equilibrium a nonlinear rate law, Rs = ks2 (1- cs/ ceq) n2, is observed, where ks2 is in the order of 10 mmol · cm -2 s -1 and n2 ≈ 4.5. The experimentally observed gypsum dissolution rates from the batch experiments could be accurately fitted, with only minor variations of the surface reaction constant obtained from the rotating disk experiment and the transport coefficient from the NaCl dissolution batch experiment. Batch experiments on pure synthetic gypsum, reveal a linear rate law up to equilibrium. This indicates inhibition of dissolution in natural samples close to equilibrium, as is known also for calcite minerals.

  11. A Study on the Anodic Dissolution of Aluminum(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, C. W.; Park, C. S.; Park, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    In many cases oxide films formed on metals in atmosphere or aqueous solution are chemically inactive, especially it is the case with aluminum. In this study, anodic dissolution of aluminum was done using various electrolyte and cathode, mechanism of which was examined. As a consequence, oxide film on aluminum surface was dissolved together with the dissolution reaction of metal by the anodic current. It was shown that the dissolution reaction due to the contact between electrolyte and metal happened in the same time

  12. Dissolution Model Development: Formulation Effects and Filter Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Ragna; Holm, Rene; Jacobsen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    This study describes various complications related to sample preparation (filtration) during development of a dissolution method intended to discriminate among different fenofibrate immediate-release formulations. Several dissolution apparatus and sample preparation techniques were tested. The fl....... With the tested drug–formulation combination, the best in vivo–in vitro correlation was found after filtration of the dissolution samples through 0.45-μm hydrophobic PTFE membrane filters....

  13. Buffering children from marital conflict and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, L F; Gottman, J M

    1997-06-01

    Examined several protective mechanisms that may reduce deleterious correlates of marital conflict and marital dissolution in young children. One set of potential buffers focused on parent-child interaction: parental warmth, parental scaffolding/praise, and inhibition of parental rejection. As a second set of potential buffers, each parent was interviewed about their "meta-emotion philosophy"--that is, their feelings about their own emotions, and their attitudes and responses to their children's anger and sadness. The third set of potential buffers concerned intraindividual characteristics of the child, including the child's intelligence and regulatory physiology (basal vagal tone and vagal suppression). Fifty-six families with a preschool child were studied at two time points: when the children were 5 years old (Time 1) and again when the children were 8 years old (Time 2). At Time 1, naturalistic observations of marital and parent-child interaction were conducted and assessment of child regulatory physiology was obtained through measures of basal vagal tone and suppression of vagal tone. Parents were also interviewed individually about their feelings about their own and their children's emotions, and children's intelligence was assessed. At Time 2, assessment of child outcomes were obtained, including observations of peer interaction, mother ratings of behavior problems and mother and teacher ratings of peer aggression, mother ratings of child physical illness, and measures of achievement. Results indicated that all Time 1 buffering factors protected children in face of marital conflict and dissolution.

  14. Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird(reg s ign) sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method

  15. Synthesis and characterization of polyimide silica hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Flexible-chain polyimide (PIF) was synthesized from 4, 4'-oxydianiline (ODA) and pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) and the stiff-chain polyimide (PI S ) was derived from 1, 5-diaminonepthaline (DAN) and pyromellitic anhydride (PMDA). Molecular composites of polyimide were prepared by embedding the stiff-chain polyimide (PIS) in to ductile matrix of flexible-polyimide (PI F ) by blending their respective poly(amic acid) solution (20:80). Blend of rigid and flexible polyimide (20:80) was reinforced with silica up to 35 wt % by sol-gel process to form the silica reinforced molecular composite (SRMC). Silica reinforced molecular composite (SRMC) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG) and tensile testing (TT). FTIR results showed the shifting of Si - O - Si peak toward lower wave number with the increase in the silica wt % indicates the increase in the silica particle size. The oxidative degradation of SRMC showed an improvement of 23 degree C in composite having 30 wt% silica contents. Similarly, modulus of SRMC was increased as the concentration of silica was increased. Silica reinforced (co-)polyimide (SRCO) was prepared from the same monomers DAN, ODA and PMDA (20:80:100) and reinforced with different of silica up to 35 wt%. Comparison of thermo-mechanical properties of SRMC with SRCO was also done. Both the composite showed similar peak shift to low wave number with the increase in the wt% of silica was observed as in the case of SRMC. TG results of SRCO showed the 13 degree C improvement in the oxidative degradation with 30 wt% silica content. Tensile testing shows the 80% increase in the modulus with 35 wt% silica content. The result showed that SRMC are 15 degree C more stable than SRCO with 30 wt% silica. SRMC have 15% more modulus than SRCO with 30 wt% silica. This shows that thermo mechanical stability of SRMC's over SRCO's composites. (author)

  16. Distribution of planktonic biogenic carbonate organisms in the Southern Ocean south of Australia: a baseline for ocean acidification impact assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. W. Trull

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Southern Ocean provides a vital service by absorbing about one-sixth of humankind's annual emissions of CO2. This comes with a cost – an increase in ocean acidity that is expected to have negative impacts on ocean ecosystems. The reduced ability of phytoplankton and zooplankton to precipitate carbonate shells is a clearly identified risk. The impact depends on the significance of these organisms in Southern Ocean ecosystems, but there is very little information on their abundance or distribution. To quantify their presence, we used coulometric measurement of particulate inorganic carbonate (PIC on particles filtered from surface seawater into two size fractions: 50–1000 µm to capture foraminifera (the most important biogenic carbonate-forming zooplankton and 1–50 µm to capture coccolithophores (the most important biogenic carbonate-forming phytoplankton. Ancillary measurements of biogenic silica (BSi and particulate organic carbon (POC provided context, as estimates of the biomass of diatoms (the highest biomass phytoplankton in polar waters and total microbial biomass, respectively. Results for nine transects from Australia to Antarctica in 2008–2015 showed low levels of PIC compared to Northern Hemisphere polar waters. Coccolithophores slightly exceeded the biomass of diatoms in subantarctic waters, but their abundance decreased more than 30-fold poleward, while diatom abundances increased, so that on a molar basis PIC was only 1 % of BSi in Antarctic waters. This limited importance of coccolithophores in the Southern Ocean is further emphasized in terms of their associated POC, representing less than 1 % of total POC in Antarctic waters and less than 10 % in subantarctic waters. NASA satellite ocean-colour-based PIC estimates were in reasonable agreement with the shipboard results in subantarctic waters but greatly overestimated PIC in Antarctic waters. Contrastingly, the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM shows

  17. Distribution of planktonic biogenic carbonate organisms in the Southern Ocean south of Australia: a baseline for ocean acidification impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Thomas W.; Passmore, Abraham; Davies, Diana M.; Smit, Tim; Berry, Kate; Tilbrook, Bronte

    2018-01-01

    The Southern Ocean provides a vital service by absorbing about one-sixth of humankind's annual emissions of CO2. This comes with a cost - an increase in ocean acidity that is expected to have negative impacts on ocean ecosystems. The reduced ability of phytoplankton and zooplankton to precipitate carbonate shells is a clearly identified risk. The impact depends on the significance of these organisms in Southern Ocean ecosystems, but there is very little information on their abundance or distribution. To quantify their presence, we used coulometric measurement of particulate inorganic carbonate (PIC) on particles filtered from surface seawater into two size fractions: 50-1000 µm to capture foraminifera (the most important biogenic carbonate-forming zooplankton) and 1-50 µm to capture coccolithophores (the most important biogenic carbonate-forming phytoplankton). Ancillary measurements of biogenic silica (BSi) and particulate organic carbon (POC) provided context, as estimates of the biomass of diatoms (the highest biomass phytoplankton in polar waters) and total microbial biomass, respectively. Results for nine transects from Australia to Antarctica in 2008-2015 showed low levels of PIC compared to Northern Hemisphere polar waters. Coccolithophores slightly exceeded the biomass of diatoms in subantarctic waters, but their abundance decreased more than 30-fold poleward, while diatom abundances increased, so that on a molar basis PIC was only 1 % of BSi in Antarctic waters. This limited importance of coccolithophores in the Southern Ocean is further emphasized in terms of their associated POC, representing less than 1 % of total POC in Antarctic waters and less than 10 % in subantarctic waters. NASA satellite ocean-colour-based PIC estimates were in reasonable agreement with the shipboard results in subantarctic waters but greatly overestimated PIC in Antarctic waters. Contrastingly, the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) shows coccolithophores as overly

  18. Effect of alteration phase formation on the glass dissolution rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chemical Technology Div. (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The dissolution rates of many glasses have been observed to increase upon the formation of certain alteration phases. While simulations have predicted the accelerating effect of formation of certain phases, the phases predicted to form in computer simulations are usually different than those observed to form in experiments. This is because kinetically favored phases form first in experiments, while simulations predict the thermodynamically favored phases. Static dissolution tests with crushed glass have been used to measure the glass dissolution rate after alteration phases form. Because glass dissolution rates are calculated on a per area basis, an important effect in tests conducted with crushed glass is the decrease in the surface area of glass that is available for reaction as the glass dissolves. This loss of surface area must be taken into account when calculating the dissolution rate. The phases that form and their effect on the dissolution rate are probably related to the glass composition. The impact of phase formation on the glass dissolution rate also varies according to the solubility products of the alteration phases and how the orthocilicic acid activity is affected. Insight into the relationship between the glass dissolution rate, solution chemistry and alteration phase formation is provided by the results of accelerated dissolution tests.

  19. Dissolution behavior of PFBR MOX fuel in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Kapoor, Y.S.; Singh, Mamta; Meena, D.L.; Pandey, Ashish; Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    Present paper describes the dissolution characteristics of PFBR MOX fuel (U,Pu)O 2 in nitric acid. An overview of batch dissolution experiments, studying the percentage dissolution of uranium and plutonium in (U, Pu)O 2 MOX sintered pellets with different percentage of PuO 2 with reference to time and nitric acid concentration are described. 90% of uranium and plutonium of PFBR MOX gets dissolves in 2 hrs and amount of residue increases with the decrease in nitric acid concentration. Overall variation in percentage residue in PFBR MOX fuel after dissolution test also described. (author)

  20. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO 3 ) 3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines

  1. Dissolution studies on Nickel ferrite in dilute chemical decontamination formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, S. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Srinivasan, M.P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) (India). Water and Steam Chemistry Laboratory; Raghavan, P.S. [Madras Christian College, Chennai (India); Narasimhan, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India); Gopalan, R. [Madras Christian College, Chennai (India). Department of Chemistry

    2004-09-01

    Nickel ferrite is one of the important corrosion products in the pipeline surfaces of water-cooled nuclear reactors. The dissolution of the nickel ferrite by chelating agents is very sensitive to the nature of the chelant, the nature of the reductant used in the formulation and the temperature at which the dissolution studies are performed. The dissolution is mainly controlled by the reductive dissolution of the ferrite particles, but complexing agents also play a significant role in the dissolution process. This study deals with the leaching of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite prepared by the solid-state method. The dissolution studies are performed in pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) formulations containing organic reductants like ascorbic acid and low oxidation state transition metal ion reductants like Fe(II)-L (where L = PDCA, NTA, EDTA) at 85 C. The dissolution of nickel ferrite in PDCA, NTA and EDTA formulations is influenced by the presence of reductants in the formulations. The addition of Fe(II)-L in the formulation greatly enhances the dissolution of nickel ferrite. The preferential leaching of nickel over iron during the dissolution of nickel ferrite was observed in all the formulations. (orig.)

  2. Mathematical methods for quantification and comparison of dissolution testing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranić, Edina; Mehmedagić, Aida; Hadzović, Sabira

    2002-12-01

    In recent years, drug release/dissolution from solid dosage forms has been the subject of intense and profitable scientific developments. Whenever a new solid dosage form is developed or produced, it is necessary to ensure that drug dissolution occurs in an appropriate manner. The pharmaceutical industry and the registration authorities do focus, nowadays, on drug dissolution studies. The quantitative analysis of the values obtained in dissolution/release tests is easier when mathematical formulas that express the dissolution results as a function of some of the dosage forms characteristics are used. This work discusses the analysis of data obtained for dissolution profiles under different media pH conditions using mathematical methods of analysis described by Moore and Flanner. These authors have described difference factor (f1) and similarity factor (f2), which can be used to characterise drug dissolution/release profiles. In this work we have used these formulas for evaluation of dissolution profiles of the conventional tablets in different pH of dissolution medium (range of physiological variations).

  3. Targeting polyamines and biogenic amines by green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo, Esther; Urdiales, José Luis; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2010-02-01

    Biogenic amines and polyamines are organic polycations derived from aromatic or cationic amino acids. They exert pleiotropic effects, more related to intercellular communication in the case of biogenic amines, and to intracellular signaling in the case of polyamines. The bioactive compound epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, has been shown to target key enzyme of biogenic amine and polyamine metabolic pathways. Herein, we review the specific effects of EGCG on concrete molecular targets of both biogenic amine and polyamine metabolic pathways, and discuss the relevance of these data to support the potential therapeutic interest of this compound.

  4. Control of Biogenic Amines in Fermented Sausages: Role of Starter Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Moratalla, M.L.; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M.T.; Vidal-Carou, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed. PMID:22586423

  5. Control of biogenic amines in fermented sausages: role of starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluz eLatorre-Moratalla

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed.

  6. Determination of biogenic component in waste and liquid fuels by the 14C method

    OpenAIRE

    Krajcar Bronić, Ines; Barešić, Jadranka; Horvatinčić, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Intensive use of fossil fuels for energy production and transport during 20th century caused an increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. The increase of CO2 concentration can be slowed down by the use of biogenic materials for energy production and/or transport. One of the method for determination of the fraction of the biogenic component in any type of fuel or waste is the 14C method, which is based on different content of 14C in biogenic and in fossil component: while the biogenic c...

  7. LBA-ECO TG-02 Biogenic VOC Emissions from Brazilian Amazon Forest and Pasture Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) collected from tethered balloon-sampling platforms above selected...

  8. LBA-ECO TG-02 Biogenic VOC Emissions from Brazilian Amazon Forest and Pasture Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) collected from tethered balloon-sampling platforms above selected forest and...

  9. Biogenic Calcium Carbonate with Hierarchical Organic-Inorganic Composite Structure Enhancing the Removal of Pb(II) from Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xueli; Liu, Weizhen; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Can; Ou, Xinwen; Tian, Chen; Lin, Zhang; Dang, Zhi

    2017-10-18

    Calcium carbonate from geological sources (geo-CaCO 3 , e.g., calcite, aragonite) is used extensively in removing heavy metals from wastewater through replacement reaction. However, geo-CaCO 3 has an intrinsically compact crystalline structure that results in low efficiency in pollutant removal and thus its use may produce enormous sludge. In this work, biogenic calcium carbonate (bio-CaCO 3 ) derived from oyster shells was used to remove Pb(II) from wastewater and found to significantly outperform geo-CaCO 3 (calcite). The thermodynamics study revealed that the maximum adsorption capacity of bio-CaCO 3 for Pb(II) was three times that of geo-CaCO 3 , reaching up to 1667 mg/g. The kinetics study disclosed that the dissolution kinetics and the rate of intraparticle diffusion of bio-CaCO 3 were faster than those of geo-CaCO 3 . Extensive mechanism research through X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N 2 adsorption/desorption test and mercury intrusion porosimetry showed that the hierarchical porous organic-inorganic hybrid structure of bio-CaCO 3 expedited the dissolution of CaCO 3 to provide abundant CO 3 2- active sites and facilitated the permeation and diffusion of Pb(II) into the bulk solid phases. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, and the examination of Pb(II) removal ability of bio-CaCO 3 after calcination indicated that the organic functional groups of bio-CaCO 3 also facilitated the immobilization of Pb(II) into CaCO 3 particles, although the major contribution was from the hierarchical porous structure of bio-CaCO 3 .

  10. Hydrothermal alteration of the glass R7T7. Glass dissolution kinetics at 150 and 2500, role of neo-formed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurel, J.

    1990-01-01

    The glass R7T7 is chosen in France for vitrification of solution from reprocessing. Safety requires the knowledge of R7T7 long term behavior in deep geologic formations. Temperature dependence of leaching between 50 and 300 0 C is studied by static tests for 7 days. An activation energy of 30kJ/Mole is calculated between 50; 75 or 100 0 C and 250 0 C. Results suggest similar corrosion mechanisms between 90-100 and 250 0 C by a complete change between 250 and 275 0 C. Glass corrosion kinetics at 150 0 C and 250 0 C between 1 day and 1 year evidence the precipitation of aluminosilicates and formation of thick amorphous gels progressively enriched with silica. Glass dissolution at 150 0 C and 250 0 C is simulated with the geochemical DISSOL code. Results suggest that dissolution kinetics are controlled by activity of H 4 SiO 4 in solution only. Silica contained into the gel controls corrosion kinetics different from 0. Even if the nature of dissolution mechanisms does not seem modified between 150 and 250 0 C, sample cracking at 250 0 C induces an increase of dissolved glass that does not allow a direct comparison of corrosion kinetics between 150 and 250 0 C [fr

  11. Dissolution of metallic uranium and its alloys. Part 1. Review of analytical and process-scale metallic uranium dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, C.A.; Gates-Anderson, D.; Fitch, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on dissolution/reaction systems capable of treating uranium metal waste to remove its pyrophoric properties. The primary emphasis is the review of literature describing analytical and production-scale dissolution methods applied to either uranium metal or uranium alloys. A brief summary of uranium's corrosion behavior is included since the corrosion resistance of metals and alloys affects their dissolution behavior. Based on this review, dissolution systems were recommended for subsequent screening studies designed to identify the best system to treat depleted uranium metal wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). (author)

  12. Dissolution and compaction instabilities in geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, I.; Sulem, J.; de Sauvage, J.

    2014-12-01

    Compaction bands play an important role in reservoir engineering and geological storage. Their presence in geological formations may also provide useful information on various geological processes. Several mechanisms can be involved at different scales and may be responsible for compaction band instabilities [1]. Compaction bands can be seen as a particular instability of the governing mathematical system leading to localization of deformation [2-4]. In a saturated porous rock, the progressive mechanical damage of the solid skeleton during compaction, results in the increase of the interface area of the reactants and consequently in the acceleration of the dissolution rate of the solid phase [2,5]. Thus, the solid skeleton is degraded more rapidly (mass removal because of dissolution), the overall mechanical properties of the system diminish (contraction of the elastic domain - chemical softening), deformations increase and the solid skeleton is further damaged (intergranular fractures, debonding, breakage of the porous network etc.). The stability of this positive feedback process is investigated analytically through linear stability analysis by considering the strong chemo-poro-mechanical coupling due to chemical dissolution. The post bifurcation behavior is then studied analytically and numerically revealing the compaction band thickness and periodicity. The effect of various parameters is studied as for instance the influence of the hydraulic diffusivity on the compaction band thickness. [1] P. Baud, S. Vinciguerra, C. David, A. Cavallo, E. Walker and T. Reuschlé (2009), Pure Appl. Geophys., 166(5-7), 869-898 [2] I. Stefanou and J. Sulem (2014), JGR: Solid Earth, 119(2), 880-899. doi:10.1002/2013JB010342I [3] J.W. Rudnicki and J.R. Rice (1975), Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 23(6),: 371-394 [4] K.A. Issen and J.W. Rudnicki (2000), JGR, 105(B9), 21529. doi:10.1029/2000JB900185 [5] R. Nova, R. Castellanza and C. Tamagnini (2003), International

  13. K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel

  14. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  15. EFFICIENCY OF REMOVING BIOGENIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Jachimowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of removal of biogenic compounds from water during the treatment process in water treatment plants of Municipal Water Supply and Sewerage Company in Cracow. The selected water quality indicators were analyzed before and after the treatment process in 2007 - 2014. The research was carried out in waters taken from plants that differed in treatment and production. In the analyzed technological systems it was stated that the biggest objections raised the concentration of nitrates, the average content of which is higher in treated water in three plants: Rudawa, Dłubnia and Bielany.

  16. Carbon nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiao; He, Xiulan; Li, Fangping; Fei, Junjie; Feng, Bo; Ding, Yonglan

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in the use of carbon nanomaterials for electroanalytical detection of biogenic amines (BAs). It starts with a short introduction into carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamonds, carbon nanofibers, fullerenes, and their composites. Next, electrochemical sensing schemes are discussed for various BAs including dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Examples are then given for methods for simultaneous detection of various BAs. Finally, we discuss the current and future challenges of carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for BAs. The review contains 175 references. (author)

  17. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, M.D.; Kohler, J.; Gould, S.; Moseley, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines 14 C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and 3 H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM

  18. Degradation of the electrospun silica nanofiber in a biological medium for primary hippocampal neuron – effect of surface modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng ZV

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Z Vivian Feng,1,* Wen Shuo Chen,2,* Khomson Keratithamkul,1 Michael Stoick,1 Brittany Kapala,3 Eryn Johnson,3 An-Chi Huang,2 Ting Yu Chin,4 Yui Whei Chen-Yang,2 Mong-Lin Yang3 1Chemistry Department, Augsburg College, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Department of Chemistry, Center for Nanotechnology, Center for Biomedical Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung Li, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Department of Science, Concordia University Saint Paul, Saint Paul, MN, USA; 4Department of Bioscience Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung Li, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In this work, silica nanofibers (SNFs were prepared by an electrospinning method and modified with poly-D-lysine (PDL or (3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTS making biocompatible and degradable substrates for neuronal growth. The as-prepared SNF, modified SNF-PDL, and SNF-APTS were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle measurements, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Herein, the scanning electron microscopic images revealed that dissolution occurred in a corrosion-like manner by enlarging porous structures, which led to loss of structural integrity. In addition, covalently modified SNF-APTS with more hydrophobic surfaces and smaller surface areas resulted in significantly slower dissolution compared to SNF and physically modified SNF-PDL, revealing that different surface modifications can be used to tune the dissolution rate. Growth of primary hippocampal neuron on all substrates led to a slower dissolution rate. The three-dimensional SNF with larger surface area and higher surface density of the amino group promoted better cell attachment and resulted in an increased neurite density. This is the first known work addressing the degradability of SNF substrate in physiological conditions with neuron growth in vitro, suggesting a

  19. Dissolution kinetics of pyrite ore by hydrochloric acid | Baba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of HCl concentration, tem-perature and particle size on the dissolution rate indicated that about 76.4 % of the ore of < 0.1 mm particle size was dissolved at 80 ¢ªC and stirring rate of 360 rpm. The dissolution rate was also dependence on hydrogen ion concentration of the reaction system. Activation energy of ...

  20. 20 CFR 404.1219 - Dissolution of political subdivision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dissolution of political subdivision. 404.1219 Section 404.1219 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... Agreements Is Obtained and Continues § 404.1219 Dissolution of political subdivision. If a political...

  1. Dissolution rate enhancement of repaglinide by solid dispersion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    formation, cyclodextrin complexation, salt formation, use of surface active agents, co-solvency are some of the approaches to improve the dissolution rate of the drugs [3]. Solid dispersion (SD) is one of the most widely used techniques to improve solubility as well as dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs. This method ...

  2. Hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling in sediments: Localized mineral dissolution

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Minsu

    2016-06-11

    Mineral dissolution is inherently a chemo-hydro-mechanical coupled process. Field evidence and laboratory results show that dissolution may localize and form open conduits in cohesive media such as carbonate rocks. This study focuses on the evolution of localized dissolution in soils (i.e., frictional and non-cohesive granular materials) under effective confining stresses. Experimental results show the development of localized dissolution (“pipe”) when a carbonate-quartz sand is subjected to reactive fluid flow: only loosely packed quartz grains remain within pipes, and the number of pipes decreases away from the inlet port. Concurrent shear wave velocity measurements show a decrease in stiffness during dissolution due to stress and fabric changes, and more complex signal codas anticipate the development of internal heterogeneity. The discrete element method is used to simulate localized vertical dissolution features in granular materials, under constant vertical stress and zero lateral strain far-field boundaries. As porosity increases along dissolution pipes, vertical load is transferred to the surrounding soils and marked force chains develop. In terms of equivalent stress, principal stress rotation takes place within pipes and the sediment reaches the Coulomb failure condition inside pipes and in the surrounding medium. Dissolution pipes alter the geo-plumbing of the subsurface, enhance fluid transport but limit the long term performance of storage systems, alter the fluid pressure and effective stress fields, soften the sediment and may trigger shear failures.

  3. Development and validation of dissolution test for Metoprolol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-02

    Mar 2, 2007 ... Dissolution test for sustained release capsules of Metoprolol 125 mg was developed and validated according to FDA and ICH guidelines. Metoprolol coated pellets were coated with microcrystalline wax and glyceryl distearate for slow release of drug. The dissolution method which uses USP apparatus I.

  4. Dissolution enhancement of drugs. part i: technologies and effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and steam aided granulation. In these techniques carrier plays an important role in improving solubility and dissolution rate. Polymers, superdisintegrants, surfactants are extensively studied in recent years for dissolution enhancement in drugs. This part of this review discusses technological overview and effect of polymers,

  5. The effect of sentencing types on singlehood and relationship dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter; Andersen, Lars Højsgaard

    Prior research shows that imprisonment may matter for the risk of experiencing divorce or other types of relationship dissolution, as imprisonment implies separation and the social stigma of criminal conviction. Despite these straightforward theoretical mechanisms, we currently lack empirical kno...... monitoring significantly and persistently lower the risk of both singlehood and relationship dissolution following conviction....

  6. Siderophore-mediated iron dissolution from nontronites is controlled by mineral cristallochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien eParrello

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria living in oxic environments experience iron deficiency due to limited solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron-bearing minerals. To cope with iron deprivation, aerobic bacteria have evolved various strategies, including release of siderophores or other organic acids that scavenge external Fe(III and deliver it to the cells. This research investigated the role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the acquisition of Fe(III from two iron-bearing colloidal nontronites (NAu-1 and NAu-2, comparing differences in bioavailability related with site occupancy and distribution of Fe(III in the two lattices. To avoid both the direct contact of the mineral colloids with the bacterial cells and the uncontrolled particle aggregation, nontronite suspensions were homogenously dispersed in a porous silica gel before the dissolution experiments. A multiparametric approach coupling UV-vis spectroscopy and spectral decomposition algorithm was implemented to monitor simultaneously the solubilisation of Fe and the production of pyoverdine in microplate-based batch experiments. Both nontronites released Fe in a particle concentration-dependent manner when incubated with the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain, however iron released from NAu-2 was substantially greater than from NAu-1. The profile of organic acids produced in both cases was similar and may not account for the difference in the iron dissolution efficiency. In contrast, a pyoverdine-deficient mutant was unable to mobilise Fe(III from either nontronite, whereas iron dissolution occurred in abiotic experiments conducted with purified pyoverdine. Overall, our data provide evidence that P. aeruginosa indirectly mobilise Fe from nontronites primarily through the production of pyoverdine. The structural Fe present on the edges of Nau-2 rather than Nau-1 particles appears to be more bio-accessible, indicating that the distribution of Fe, in the tetrahedron and/or in the octahedron

  7. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tie Xuexi; Li Guohui; Ying, Zhuming; Guenther, Alex; Madronich, Sasha

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10 x 10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C 5 H 8 ), monoterpenes (C 1 H 16 ), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year -1 , respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year -1 , respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in

  8. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Li, Guohui; Ying, Zhuming; Guenther, Alex; Madronich, Sasha

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10x10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C(5)H(8)), monoterpenes (C(10)H(16)), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year(-1), respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year(-1), respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in

  9. Aluminum Target Dissolution in Support of the Pu-238 Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Benker, Dennis [ORNL; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Felker, Leslie Kevin [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Selection of an aluminum alloy for target cladding affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the caustic dissolution step, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. We present a study to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal alloy, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. These data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Temperature logging during the transients has been investigated as a means to generate kinetic and mass transport data on the dissolution process. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  10. Chemical Dissolution of Simulant FCA Cladding and Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has received some fast critical assembly (FCA) fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for disposition. Among the JAEA FCA fuel are approximately 7090 rectangular Stainless Steel clad fuel elements. Each element has an internal Pu-10.6Al alloy metal wafer. The thickness of each element is either 1/16 inch or 1/32 inch. The dimensions of each element ranges from 2 inches x 1 inch to 2 inches x 4 inches. This report discusses the potential chemical dissolution of the FCA clad material or stainless steel. This technology uses nitric acid-potassium fluoride (HNO3-KF) flowsheets of H-Canyon to dissolve the FCA elements from a rack of materials. Historically, dissolution flowsheets have aimed to maximize Pu dissolution rates while minimizing stainless steel dissolution (corrosion) rates. Because the FCA cladding is made of stainless steel, this work sought to accelerate stainless steel dissolution.

  11. A novel high throughput method to investigate polymer dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Mallapragada, Surya K; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2010-02-16

    The dissolution behavior of polystyrene (PS) in biodiesel was studied by developing a novel high throughput approach based on Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy. A multiwell device for high throughput dissolution testing was fabricated using a photolithographic rapid prototyping method. The dissolution of PS films in each well was tracked by following the characteristic IR band of PS and the effect of PS molecular weight and temperature on the dissolution rate was simultaneously investigated. The results were validated with conventional gravimetric methods. The high throughput method can be extended to evaluate the dissolution profiles of a large number of samples, or to simultaneously investigate the effect of variables such as polydispersity, crystallinity, and mixed solvents. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A new method for alkaline dissolution of uranium metal foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, A.V.; Wilkinson, M.V.; Manzini, A.C.

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop a production process of 99 Mo by fission of low-enriched uranium, the first purification step, which consists of dissolution of a uranium metal foil target, was studied. It was found that alkaline NaClO gave good results, reaching the dissolution of up to 300 μm of uranium foil. The different conditions for the dissolution were studied and the optimum ones were found. The influence of NaClO and NaOH concentration, temperature, dissolving solution volume per unit of surface and dissolution time were investigated. During this step, a gas identified as H 2 , was generated, and a precipitate characterized as Na 2 U 2 O 7 was observed. A stoichiometric reaction for this uranium dissolution is proposed. (author)

  13. Glass Dissolution Parameters: Update for Entsorgungsnachweis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curti, E

    2003-11-01

    This document provides updated long-term corrosion rates for borosilicate glasses used in Switzerland as a matrix for high-level radioactive waste. The new rates are based on long-term leaching experiments conducted at PSI and are corroborated by recent investigations. The asymptotic rates have been determined through weighted linear regressions of the normalised mass losses, directly calculated from B and Li concentrations in the leaching solutions. Special attention was given to the determination of the analytical uncertainty of the mass losses. The sensitivity of the corrosion rates to analytical uncertainties and to other criteria (e.g. the choice of data points for the regressions) was also studied. A major finding was that the uncertainty of the corrosion rate mainly depends on the uncertainty of the specific glass surface area. The reference rates proposed for safety assessment calculations are 1.5 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for BNFL glasses and 0.2 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for Cogema glasses. The relevance of the proposed corrosion rates for repository conditions is shown based on the analysis of processes and parameters currently known to affect the long-term kinetics of silicate glasses. Specifically, recent studies indicate that potentially detrimental effects, notably the removal of silica from solution through adsorption on clay minerals, are transitory and will not affect the long-term corrosion rate of the Swiss reference glasses. Iron corrosion products are also known to bind silica, but present data are not sufficient to quantify their influence on the long-term rate. (author)

  14. Glass Dissolution Parameters: Update for Entsorgungsnachweis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curti, E.

    2003-11-01

    This document provides updated long-term corrosion rates for borosilicate glasses used in Switzerland as a matrix for high-level radioactive waste. The new rates are based on long-term leaching experiments conducted at PSI and are corroborated by recent investigations. The asymptotic rates have been determined through weighted linear regressions of the normalised mass losses, directly calculated from B and Li concentrations in the leaching solutions. Special attention was given to the determination of the analytical uncertainty of the mass losses. The sensitivity of the corrosion rates to analytical uncertainties and to other criteria (e.g. the choice of data points for the regressions) was also studied. A major finding was that the uncertainty of the corrosion rate mainly depends on the uncertainty of the specific glass surface area. The reference rates proposed for safety assessment calculations are 1.5 mg m -2 d -1 for BNFL glasses and 0.2 mg m -2 d -1 for Cogema glasses. The relevance of the proposed corrosion rates for repository conditions is shown based on the analysis of processes and parameters currently known to affect the long-term kinetics of silicate glasses. Specifically, recent studies indicate that potentially detrimental effects, notably the removal of silica from solution through adsorption on clay minerals, are transitory and will not affect the long-term corrosion rate of the Swiss reference glasses. Iron corrosion products are also known to bind silica, but present data are not sufficient to quantify their influence on the long-term rate. (author)

  15. Arsenic species in weathering mine tailings and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada City, CA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Roger P

    2011-01-01

    less certain. The linear combination, least-squares fits totals of several samples deviate by more than ± 20% from 100%, suggesting that additional phases may be present that were not identified or evaluated in this study. Conclusions Sub- to anoxic conditions minimize dissolution of arsenopyrite at the LCMS site, but may accelerate the dissolution of As-bearing secondary iron phases such as Fe3+-oxyhydroxides and arseniosiderite, if sufficient organic matter is present to spur anaerobic microbial activity. Oxidizing, dry conditions favor the stabilization of secondary phases, while promoting oxidative breakdown of the primary sulfides. The stability of both primary and secondary As phases is likely to be at a minimum under cyclic wet-dry conditions. Biogenic iron (hydroxide flocs can sequester significant amounts of arsenic; this property may be useful for treatment of perpetual sources of As such as mine adit water, but the fate of As associated with natural accumulations of floc material needs to be assessed.

  16. Silica supported nickel catalysts : Tracer studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharratt, Andrew Paul.

    1991-01-01

    A series of silica supported catalysts were prepared by impregnation of the support materials with a nickel(II) nitrate precursor under standard conditions. The catalysts and silicas were characterised using temperature programmed reduction (TPR) techniques, neutron diffraction, small angle neutron scattering, and 29Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). These analyses revealed one significant variable in the silicas:- the surface concentration of strained siloxane ring...

  17. Mesoporous Silica: A Suitable Adsorbent for Amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahzadeh-Ghom Sara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesoporous silica with KIT-6 structure was investigated as a preconcentrating material in chromatographic systems for ammonia and trimethylamine. Its adsorption capacity was compared to that of existing commercial materials, showing its increased adsorption power. In addition, KIT-6 mesoporous silica efficiently adsorbs both gases, while none of the employed commercial adsorbents did. This means that KIT-6 Mesoporous silica may be a good choice for integrated chromatography/gas sensing micro-devices.

  18. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z., E-mail: zzhel@ic.bas.bg; Shopska, M., E-mail: shopska@ic.bas.bg; Paneva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria); Kovacheva, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Bulgaria); Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis (Bulgaria)

    2016-12-15

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media (Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  19. Technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Gardini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BAs are molecules which can be present in foods and, due to their toxicity, can cause adverse effects on the consumers. BAs are generally produced by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids in food products. The most significant BAs occurring in foods are histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine and agmatine. The importance of preventing the excessive accumulation of BAs in food is related to their impact on human health and food quality. Quality criteria in connection with the presence of BAs in food and food products are necessary from a toxicological point of view. This is particularly important in fermented foods in which the massive microbial proliferation required for obtaining specific products is often relater with BA accumulation. In this review, up-to-date information and recent discoveries about technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods are reviewed. Specifically, BA forming-microorganism and decarboxylation activity, genetic and metabolic organization of decarboxylases, risk associated to BAs (histamine, tyramine toxicity and other BAs, environmental factors influencing BA formation (temperature, salt concentration, pH. In addition, the technological factors for controlling BA production (use of starter culture, technological additives, effects of packaging, other non-thermal treatments, metabolising BA by microorganisms, effects of pressure treatments on BA formation and antimicrobial substances are addressed.

  20. Biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in limestone deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Bin R.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Stolz, John F.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on the microbial communities and magnetic phases of samples collected from carbonate oozes at Sugarloaf Key, FL, U.S.A. and calcareous laminated sediments from Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico have revealed the existence of magnetotactic bacteria and ultrafine-grained single domain magnetite in both environments. Magnetotactic bacteria were identified by light and electron microscopy. The single domain magnetite was detected by coercivity spectra analysis with a SQUID magnetometer and examined under the transmission electron microscope. The similarity, in terms of size and shape, between the single domain magnetite found in these sediments and the magnetite observed in the bacterial magnetosome from enriched cultures indicates the ultrafine-grained magnetite in these two marine environments was biologically formed. These results, combined with the common occurrences of ultrafine-grained magnetite in limestone deposits detected rock magnetically, suggest biogenic magnetite may be present and contribute to the magnetic remanence in these rocks. Several Cambrian limestone samples, separately collected from Siberia, China, and Kazakhstan, were examined for the presence of bacterial magnetite. Samples from the Lower Cambrian Sinskian Formation at Siberia Platform were found to contain both a large amount of apparently bacterial magnetite particles and a very stable primary magnetic component. Post-Cambrian diagenesis does not seem to affect the microgranulometry of these apparently bacterial magnetite crystals or the magnetic remanence carried by them. Assessing the potential role of biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in other Phanerozoic limestone deposits ought to be further pursued.

  1. Estimating the Biogenic Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Emissions over Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermioni Dimitropoulou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic emissions affect the urban air quality as they are ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA precursors and should be taken into account when applying photochemical pollution models. The present study presents an estimation of the magnitude of non-methane volatile organic compounds (BNMVOCs emitted by vegetation over Greece. The methodology is based on computation developed with the aid of a Geographic Information System (GIS and theoretical equations in order to produce an emission inventory on a 6 × 6 km2 spatial resolution, in a temporal resolution of 1 h covering one year (2016. For this purpose, a variety of input data was used: updated satellite land-use data, land-use specific emission potentials, foliar biomass densities, temperature, and solar radiation data. Hourly, daily, and annual isoprene, monoterpenes, and other volatile organic compounds (OVOCs were estimated. In the area under study, the annual biogenic emissions were estimated up to 472 kt, consisting of 46.6% isoprene, 28% monoterpenes, and 25.4% OVOCs. Results delineate an annual cycle with increasing values from March to April, while maximum emissions were observed from May to September, followed by a decrease from October to January.

  2. Antimicrobial textiles: Biogenic silver nanoparticles against Candida and Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Cabrini, Flávia; Tsukamoto, Junko; Durán, Nelson; Alves, Oswaldo L; Tasic, Ljubica

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces cotton fibers impregnated with biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), synthesized from a Fusarium oxysporum fungal filtrate (FF) solution, and open up the possibility for their use in medical environment and agriculture clothing as means to avoid microbial spreading. After thorough AgNPs characterization, regarding their physical, chemical and biochemical properties, Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) against some human and orange tree pathogens were determined. We report the strong AgNPs activity against Candida parapsilosis and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) that was morphologically characterized, pointing to strong AgNPs effects on microorganisms' membranes. Cotton fibers were then impregnated with AgNPs suspension and these maintained strong antimicrobial activity even after repeated mechanical washing cycles (up to 10). Reported data might point to an application for biogenic AgNPs as potent agrochemicals, as well as, to their application in textiles for antiseptic clothing for medical and agronomic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical heterogeneity control on effective mineral dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heewon; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis

    2018-04-01

    Hydrologic heterogeneity may be an important factor contributing to the discrepancy in laboratory and field measured dissolution rates, but the governing factors influencing mineral dissolution rates among various representations of physical heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Here, we present multiple reactive transport simulations of anorthite dissolution in 2D latticed random permeability fields and link the information from local grid scale (1 cm or 4 m) dissolution rates to domain-scale (1m or 400 m) effective dissolution rates measured by the flux-weighted average of an ensemble of flow paths. We compare results of homogeneous models to heterogeneous models with different structure and layered permeability distributions within the model domain. Chemistry is simplified to a single dissolving primary mineral (anorthite) distributed homogeneously throughout the domain and a single secondary mineral (kaolinite) that is allowed to dissolve or precipitate. Results show that increasing size in correlation structure (i.e. long integral scales) and high variance in permeability distribution are two important factors inducing a reduction in effective mineral dissolution rates compared to homogeneous permeability domains. Larger correlation structures produce larger zones of low permeability where diffusion is an important transport mechanism. Due to the increased residence time under slow diffusive transport, the saturation state of a solute with respect to a reacting mineral approaches equilibrium and reduces the reaction rate. High variance in permeability distribution favorably develops large low permeability zones that intensifies the reduction in mixing and effective dissolution rate. However, the degree of reduction in effective dissolution rate observed in 1 m × 1 m domains is too small (equilibrium conditions reduce the effective dissolution rate by increasing the saturation state. However, in large domains where less- or non-reactive zones develop, higher

  4. Selection of Nutrient Used in Biogenic Healing Agent for Cementitious Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tziviloglou, E.; Wiktor, V.A.C.; Jonkers, H.M.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic self-healing cementitious materials target on the closure of micro-cracks with precipitated inorganic minerals originating from bacterial metabolic activity. Dormant bacterial spores and organic mineral compounds often constitute a biogenic healing agent. The current paper focuses on the

  5. Measurement of carbon storage in landfills from the biogenic carbon content of excavated waste samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Barlaz, Morton A

    2013-10-01

    Landfills are an anaerobic ecosystem and represent the major disposal alternative for municipal solid waste (MSW) in the U.S. While some fraction of the biogenic carbon, primarily cellulose (Cel) and hemicellulose (H), is converted to carbon dioxide and methane, lignin (L) is essentially recalcitrant. The biogenic carbon that is not mineralized is stored within the landfill. This carbon storage represents a significant component of a landfill carbon balance. The fraction of biogenic carbon that is not reactive in the landfill environment and therefore stored was derived for samples of excavated waste by measurement of the total organic carbon, its biogenic fraction, and the remaining methane potential. The average biogenic carbon content of the excavated samples was 64.6±18.0% (average±standard deviation), while the average carbon storage factor was 0.09±0.06g biogenic-C stored per g dry sample or 0.66±0.16g biogenic-C stored per g biogenic C. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Biogenic Carbon Fraction of Biogas and Natural Gas Fuel Mixtures Determined with 14C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the accuracy of the radiocarbon-based calculation of the biogenic carbon fraction for different biogas and biofossil gas mixtures. The focus is on the uncertainty in the C-14 reference values for 100% biogenic carbon and on the C-13-based isotope fractionation correction of

  7. 77 FR 21772 - Notification of Two Public Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... of Air and Radiation requested SAB review of EPA's draft accounting framework. As noticed in 76 FR... review and discuss its advice on EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from... Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011). DATES: The public...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF SEASONAL AND ANNUAL BIOGENIC EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE U.S. AND CANADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes the development of a biogenic emissions inventory for the U.S. and Canada, to assess the role of biogenic emissions in ozone formation. Emission inventories were developed at hourly and grid (1/4 x 116 degree) level from input data at the same scales. Emissio...

  9. Estimation of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in subtropical island--Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken-Hui; Chen, Tu-Fu; Huang, Ho-Chun

    2005-06-15

    Elevated tropospheric ozone is harmful to human health and plants. It is formed through the photochemical reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)). The elevated ozone episodes occur mainly in summer months in the United States, while the high-ozone episodes frequently occur during the fall in Taiwan. The unique landscape of Taiwan produces tremendous amounts of biogenic VOCs in the mountain regions that are adjacent to concentrated urban areas. The urban areas, in turn, generate prodigious amounts of anthropogenic emissions. Biogenic VOC emissions have direct influence on tropospheric ozone formation. To explore the air quality problems in Taiwan, this study attempts to develop a biogenic VOC emission model suitable for air quality applications in Taiwan. The emission model is based on the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System Version 2 and coupled with a detailed Taiwan land use database. The 1999 total Taiwan biogenic VOC emissions were estimated at 214,000 metric tons. The emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, and other VOCs were about 37.2%, 30.4%, and 32.4% of total biogenic VOC emissions, respectively. The annual total biogenic VOC emission per unit area was more than two times the value of that in any European country, implying that detailed emissions estimates in any size of region will benefit the global biogenic emission inventories.

  10. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, I-Ju [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  11. Airborne silica levels in an urban area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Berardis, B. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena, 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: barbara.deberardis@iss.it; Incocciati, E. [CONTARP Consulenza Tecnica Accertamento Rischi e Prevenzione, INAIL Direzione Generale, 00143 Rome (Italy); Massera, S. [CONTARP Consulenza Tecnica Accertamento Rischi e Prevenzione, INAIL Direzione Generale, 00143 Rome (Italy); Gargaro, G. [CONTARP Consulenza Tecnica Accertamento Rischi e Prevenzione, INAIL Direzione Generale, 00143 Rome (Italy); Paoletti, L. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena, 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2007-09-01

    In order to evaluate the exposure levels of the general population we studied the concentrations of silica particles in the inhalable particulate fraction (PM10) in different meteorological-climate periods in an urban area of Rome. In order to determine the concentration and the granulometric spectrum of silica particles, PM10 sampled by a cascade impactor was analysed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and by scanning electron microscopy equipped with a thin-window system for X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDX). Over the period September 2004-October 2005 the abundance of silica particles as evaluated by SEM/EDX ranged from 1.6 to 10.4% of the total PM10 particulate, with a weight concentration of free crystalline silica, evaluated by XRD, in the range 0.25-2.87 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The mean diameter of silica particles ranged from 0.3 to 10.5 {mu}m, with more than 87% of particles having a diameter of less than 2.5 {mu}m. The correlations between SEM/EDX and XRD data seem to suggest that the airborne silica particles in the urban location studied were mainly in the form crystalline silica. A strong relationship was found between the meteorological-climate conditions and the concentration level of free crystalline silica. This result suggests that the Southern winds from the Sahara desert carry an important amount of silica particles into Mediterranean Europe.

  12. Nanoporous silica membranes with high hydrothermal stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Magnacca, Giualiana; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Despite the use of sol-gel derived nanoporous silica membranes in substitution of traditional separation processes is expected leading to vast energy savings, their intrinsic poor steam-stability hampers their application at an industrial level. Transition metal ions can be used as dopant...... to improve the stability of nanoporous silica structure. This work is a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions on the microporous structure and stability of amorphous silica-based membranes, which provides information on how to design chemical compositions...... and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile nanoporous structure...

  13. Oil absorption in mesoporous silica particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radislav Filipović

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silica particles were prepared from highly basic sodium silicate solutions, having different silica modulus and SiO2 concentrations, by adding sulphuric acid at different temperatures. Pore structure of prepared silica particles (aggregates is strongly influenced by processing conditions and easy controllable in broad range of the specific surface area, pore size, pore volume and size distribution. It is shown that there is a clear correlation between volume of absorbed oil and processing parameters used in preparation of silica aggregates. Thus, oil absorption is higher in the samples prepared from sodium silicate solution with higher SiO2 concentration and at higher synthesis temperature.

  14. Practical Hydrogen Loading of Air Silica Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm

    2005-01-01

    A method for hydrogen-loading air-silica optical fibres has been developed allowing out-diffusion times comparable to standard step-index fibres. Examples of the first grating written in Ge-doped air-silica fibres using a 266nm UV-laser are shown.......A method for hydrogen-loading air-silica optical fibres has been developed allowing out-diffusion times comparable to standard step-index fibres. Examples of the first grating written in Ge-doped air-silica fibres using a 266nm UV-laser are shown....

  15. Development of a novel starch with a three-dimensional ordered macroporous structure for improving the dissolution rate of felodipine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yanna; Wu, Chao, E-mail: wuchao27@126.com; Zhao, Zongzhe; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Jie; Qiu, Yang; Jiang, Jie; Yu, Tong; Ma, Chunyu; Zhou, Buyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, silica nanospheres with different particle sizes were used as hard template for synthesis of a starch with a novel three-dimensional ordered macroporous structure (3DOMTS). As a pharmaceutical adjuvant, 3DOMTS was used to improve the dissolution rate and oral relative bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs. Felodipine (FDP) was chosen as a model drug and was loaded into the 3DOMTS by solvent evaporation. FDP loading into 3DOMTS with different pore sizes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), powder X-ray diffractometer (PXRD) and Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR). The results obtained showed that FDP was present in the pores in an amorphic or microcrystalline state. The in vitro dissolution results showed that 3DOMTS could effectively improve the dissolution rate of FDP in comparison with commercial common tablets. Pharmacokinetic results indicated that the oral relative bioavailability of self-made FDP–3DOMTS tablets were 184%, showing that 3DOMTS produced a significantly increased oral absorption of FDP. In conclusion, 3DOMTS exhibits the dual potential of improving the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs and the novel filler produced by direct compression technology confirming that 3DOMTS will be useful for many applications in the field of pharmaceutics. - Highlights: • We successfully prepared a starch with a novel three-dimensional ordered macroporous structure (3DOMTS). • 3DOMTS can suppress the crystallinity of the drug to maintain it at amorphous state. • In vivo and in vitro experiments proved that 3DOMTS can improve the solubility and bioavailability of felodipine.

  16. Biomimetic synthesized chiral mesoporous silica: Structures and controlled release functions as drug carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Xu, Lu, E-mail: xl2013109@163.com; Yang, Baixue; Bao, Zhihong; Pan, Weisan; Li, Sanming, E-mail: li_sanming2013@163.com

    2015-10-01

    This work initially illustrated the formation mechanism of chiral mesoporous silica (CMS) in a brand new insight named biomimetic synthesis. Three kinds of biomimetic synthesized CMS (B-CMS, including B-CMS1, B-CMS2 and B-CMS3) were prepared using different pH or stirring rate condition, and their characteristics were tested with transmission electron microscope and small angle X-ray diffraction. The model drug indomethacin was loaded into B-CMS and drug loading content was measured using ultraviolet spectroscopy. The result suggested that pH condition influenced energetics of self-assembly process, mainly packing energetics of the surfactant, while stirring rate was the more dominant factor to determine particle length. In application, indomethacin loading content was measured to be 35.3%, 34.8% and 35.1% for indomethacin loaded B-CMS1, indomethacin loaded B-CMS2 and indomethacin loaded B-CMS3. After loading indomethacin into B-CMS carriers, surface area, pore volume and pore diameter of B-CMS carriers were reduced. B-CMS converted crystalline state of indomethacin to amorphous state, leading to the improved indomethacin dissolution. B-CMS1 controlled drug release without burst-release, while B-CMS2 and B-CMS3 released indomethacin faster than B-CMS1, demonstrating that the particle length, the ordered lever of multiple helixes, the curvature degree of helical channels and pore diameter greatly contributed to the release behavior of indomethacin loaded B-CMS. - Highlights: • Chiral mesoporous silica was synthesized using biomimetic method. • pH influenced energetics of self-assembly process of chiral mesoporous silica. • Stirring rate determined the particle length of chiral mesoporous silica. • Controlled release behaviors of chiral mesoporous silica varied based on structures.

  17. Biomimetic synthesized chiral mesoporous silica: Structures and controlled release functions as drug carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jing; Xu, Lu; Yang, Baixue; Bao, Zhihong; Pan, Weisan; Li, Sanming

    2015-01-01

    This work initially illustrated the formation mechanism of chiral mesoporous silica (CMS) in a brand new insight named biomimetic synthesis. Three kinds of biomimetic synthesized CMS (B-CMS, including B-CMS1, B-CMS2 and B-CMS3) were prepared using different pH or stirring rate condition, and their characteristics were tested with transmission electron microscope and small angle X-ray diffraction. The model drug indomethacin was loaded into B-CMS and drug loading content was measured using ultraviolet spectroscopy. The result suggested that pH condition influenced energetics of self-assembly process, mainly packing energetics of the surfactant, while stirring rate was the more dominant factor to determine particle length. In application, indomethacin loading content was measured to be 35.3%, 34.8% and 35.1% for indomethacin loaded B-CMS1, indomethacin loaded B-CMS2 and indomethacin loaded B-CMS3. After loading indomethacin into B-CMS carriers, surface area, pore volume and pore diameter of B-CMS carriers were reduced. B-CMS converted crystalline state of indomethacin to amorphous state, leading to the improved indomethacin dissolution. B-CMS1 controlled drug release without burst-release, while B-CMS2 and B-CMS3 released indomethacin faster than B-CMS1, demonstrating that the particle length, the ordered lever of multiple helixes, the curvature degree of helical channels and pore diameter greatly contributed to the release behavior of indomethacin loaded B-CMS. - Highlights: • Chiral mesoporous silica was synthesized using biomimetic method. • pH influenced energetics of self-assembly process of chiral mesoporous silica. • Stirring rate determined the particle length of chiral mesoporous silica. • Controlled release behaviors of chiral mesoporous silica varied based on structures

  18. Buffering dissociation/formation reaction of biogenic calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    The oscillating stability of coral reef seawater pH has been maintained at around physiological pH values over the past 300 years (Pelejero et al., 2005). The stability mechanism of its pH has been interpreted in terms of the buffering dissolution/formation reaction of CaCO(3) as well as the proton consumption/generation reaction in CaCO(3)-saturated water. Here the pH-dependent solubility product [HCO(3)(-)][Ca(2+)] has been derived on the basis of the actual pH-dependent reactions for the atmospheric CO(2)/CO(2 (aq.))/HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-)/Ca(2+)/CaCO(3) system. Overbasic pH peaks appeared between pH approximately 8 and approximately 9.5 during sodium hydroxide titration, as a result of simultaneous CaCO(3) formation and proton generation. The spontaneous and prompt water pH recovery from the acidic to the physiological range has been confirmed by the observation of acid/base time evolution, because of simultaneous CaCO(3) dissolution and proton consumption. The dissolution/formation of CaCO(3) in water at pH 7.5-9 does not take place without a proton consumption/generation reaction, or a buffering chemical reaction of HCO(3)(-)+Ca(2+)right arrow over left arrowCaCO(3)+H(+). SEM images of the CaCO(3) fragments showed that the acid water ate away at the CaCO(3) formed at physiological pH values. Natural coral reefs can thus recover the physiological pH levels of seawater from the acidic range through partial dissolution of their own skeletons.

  19. Environmental geochemistry of dissolved and biogenic silicon and its nutrient limitation effects in an inland lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Changwei; He, Jiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Mingde

    2015-07-01

    Silicon (Si) processing and retention play a key role in nutrients biogeochemistry cycling in aquatic environment. In order to interpret the possibility of Si limitation, multivariate analysis was performed based on stoichiometric nutrients balance, distribution characteristics of dissolved silicon (DSi) and biogenic silica (BSi), adsorption behavior, and response relation of BSi with paleoenvironment in water-sediment system of Lake Daihai. The spatial distributions of DSi and BSi in the water-sediment system indicated that terrigenous inputs (such as the weathering of rock and soil in the drainage basin) was the main sources of Si. Meanwhile, grain sizes of sediments, water hydrogeochemistry, and space competition between diatoms and submergent or emerging plants also played important roles in regulating BSi spatial distributions. The sediments from the lake presented obvious releasing trend of Si at low initial concentrations (≤ 3 mg/L) in adsorption experiments, indicating that the sediments were the source of Si to the overlying water. Furthermore, the good response relation between BSi and paleoenvironment observed in the sediment profiles from Lake Daihai indicated that the main reasons for Si limitation to siliceous plankton were different during different periods. The multi-evidences of distribution characteristics, stoichiometric nutrient balance, adsorption behaviors, and response to paleoenvironment were jointly indicative of Si limitation on the primary production of siliceous plankton in Lake Daihai.

  20. Carbonate ions and arsenic dissolution by groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, J.; Haack, S.

    2000-01-01

    solutions. The effects of pH and redox conditions on As dissolution were examined. Results showed that As was not leached significantly out of the Marshall Sandstone samples after 3 d using either deionized water or groundwater, but As was leached efficiently by sodium bicarbonate, potassium bicarbonate, and ferric chloride solutions. The leaching rate with sodium bicarbonate was about 25% higher than that with potassium bicarbonate. The data indicated that bicarbonate ion was involved primarily in As dissolution and that hydroxyl radical ion did not affect As dissolution to any significant degree. The amount of As leached was dependent upon the sodium bicarbonate concentration, increasing with reaction time for each concentration. Significant As leaching was found in the extreme pH ranges of <1.9 and 8.0-10.4. The resulting arseno-carbonate complexes formed were stable in groundwater.

  1. 76 FR 61100 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Office announces a public face-to-face meeting of the SAB Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to review EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO 2 Emissions from Stationary Sources (September 2011). DATES...

  2. Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for preformulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsenz, Jochem; Haenel, Elisabeth; Anedda, Aline; Du Castel, Pauline; Cirelli, Giorgio

    2016-05-25

    This study describes a novel Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for measuring disk intrinsic dissolution rates (DIDR). In MINDISS, compacted mini disks of drugs (2-5mg/disk) are prepared in custom made holders with a surface area of 3mm(2). Disks are immersed, pellet side down, into 0.35ml of appropriate dissolution media per well in 96-well microtiter plates, media are stirred and disk-holders are transferred to new wells after defined periods of time. After filtration, drug concentration in dissolution media is quantified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) and solid state property of the disk is characterized by Raman spectroscopy. MINDISS was identified as an easy-to-use tool for rapid, parallel determination of DIDR of compounds that requires only small amounts of compound and of dissolution medium. Results obtained with marketed drugs in MINDISS correlate well with large scale DIDR methods and indicate that MINDISS can be used for (1) rank-ordering of compounds by intrinsic dissolution in late phase discovery and early development, (2) comparison of polymorphic forms and salts, (3) screening and selection of appropriate dissolution media, and (4) characterization of the intestinal release behavior of compounds along the gastro intestinal tract by changing biorelevant media during experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High temperature dissolution of oxides in complexing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyaseelan, Valil S.; Rufus, Appadurai L.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Bhaskarapillai, Anupkumar; Wilson, Shiny; Narasimhan, Sevilimedu V.; Velmurugan, Sankaralingam

    2011-12-01

    Dissolution of transition metal oxides such as magnetite (Fe 3O 4), mixed ferrites (NiFe 2O 4, ZnFe 2O 4, MgFe 2O 4), bonaccordite (Ni 2FeBO 5) and chromium oxide (Cr 2O 3) in organic complexing media was attempted at higher temperatures (80-180 °C). On increasing the temperature from 80 to 180 °C, the dissolution rate of magnetite in nitrilo triacetic acid (NTA) medium increased six folds. The trend obtained for the dissolution of other oxides was ZnFe 2O 4 > NiFe 2O 4 > MgFe 2O 4 > Cr 2O 3, which followed the same trend as the lability of their metal-oxo bonds. Other complexing agents such as ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), pyridine dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), citric acid and reducing agents viz., oxalic acid and ascorbic acid were also evaluated for their oxide dissolution efficiency at 160 °C. EDTA showed maximum dissolution rate of 21.4 μm/h for magnetite. Addition of oxalic acid/ascorbic acid to complexing media (NTA/EDTA) showed identical effect on the dissolution of magnetite. Addition of hydrazine, another reducing agent, to NTA decreased the rate of dissolution of magnetite by 50%.

  4. Dissolution of covalent adaptable network polymers in organic solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Yang, Hua; Dao, Binh H.; Shi, Qian; Yakacki, Christopher M.

    2017-12-01

    It was recently reported that thermosetting polymers can be fully dissolved in a proper organic solvent utilizing a bond-exchange reaction (BER), where small molecules diffuse into the polymer, break the long polymer chains into short segments, and eventually dissolve the network when sufficient solvent is provided. The solvent-assisted dissolution approach was applied to fully recycle thermosets and their fiber composites. This paper presents the first multi-scale modeling framework to predict the dissolution kinetics and mechanics of thermosets in organic solvent. The model connects the micro-scale network dynamics with macro-scale material properties: in the micro-scale, a model is developed based on the kinetics of BERs to describe the cleavage rate of polymer chains and evolution of chain segment length during the dissolution. The micro-scale model is then fed into a continuum-level model with considerations of the transportation of solvent molecules and chain segments in the system. The model shows good prediction on conversion rate of functional groups, degradation of network mechanical properties, and dissolution rate of thermosets during the dissolution. It identifies the underlying kinetic factors governing the dissolution process, and reveals the influence of different material and processing variables on the dissolution process, such as time, temperature, catalyst concentration, and chain length between cross-links.

  5. Evaluation of fluorinated dissolution inhibitors for 157-nm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Alyssandrea H.; Houlihan, Francis M.; Seger, Larry; Chang, Chun; Ober, Christopher K.

    2003-06-01

    Fluorinated diesters were synthesized and evaluated as dissolution inhibitors (DIs) for 157 nm lithography. The results of dissolution rate measurements, exposure studies, and etching experiments on blends of fluorinated polymers containing these dissolution inhibitors are reported. It was shown that the DIs effectively slow the dissolution rate of the matrix polymer, poly(hexafluorohydroxyisopropyl styrene) (PHFHIPS). Etching studies show that they enhance the plasma etch resistance of poly(methyl methacrylate) using tetrafluoromethane plasma. Addition of the best performing dissolution inhibitor, cyclohexane-1,4-dicarboxylic acid bis-(1-cyclohexyl-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-methyl-ethyl) ester) (FCDE1) to candidate 157 nm photoresist polymers, Duvcor and poly(hexafluorohydroxyisopropyl styrene)-co-poly(t-butyl methacrylate) [pPHFHIPS-co-pt-BMA], improves the imaging behavior of these polymers. Our attempts to elucidate the mechanism of dissolution inhibition for this series of compounds will be discussed. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) studies in conjunction with dissolution rate measurements performed on a series of DI analogues suggest a mechanism based on hydrogen bonding.

  6. Short-time dissolution mechanisms of kaolinitic tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malengreau, N.; Sposito, Garrison

    1996-01-01

    Previous research on the short-time dissolution behavior of kaolinitic Oxisols suggested pH-dependent kinetics involving ligand-promoted dissolution, metal readsorption, and colloidal dispersion, with soil organic matter conjectured to play a decisive role. A novel combination of spectroscopy, lightscattering, and batch dissolution experiments, conducted at controlled pH and ionic strength over five dissolution periods ranging from 1 to 12 h, was applied to evaluate this mechanism for samples of a representative kaolinitic Oxisol; collected at both forested and cultivated field sites (leading to significant differences in organic matter content and field soil pH). The overall characteristics of the pH-dependent net release kinetics of Al, Fe, and Si by the soil samples, for any dissolution period in the range investigated, were determined by the pH value at which colloid dispersion commenced, which decreased significantly as the soil organic matter content increased. Plots of log(Si/Al released) (or Si/Fe released) vs. -log [H+] ([H+] is proton concentration) were superimposable for all dissolution periods studied, rising to a plateau value above the point of zero net charge of the soils (pH 3.2). Light-scattering and X-ray diffraction data showed conclusively that this plateau represented the release of siliceous colloids containing kaolinite and X-ray amorphous material. X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, applied to the soil samples before and after dissolution, and after conventional chemical extractions to remove Al, C, Fe, and Si, showed that kaolinite and iron oxide phases (the latter being highly Al-substituted and present in both coatings and occlusions) were essentially unaltered by dissolution, even at -log [H+] = 2, whereas substantial dissolution loss of soil quartz occurred. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy gave strong evidence that C in these soils occurs principally in discrete

  7. Taste-masked orodispersible tablets of cyclosporine self-nanoemulsion lyophilized with dry silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Aljaeid, Bader M; Mokhtar, Mahmoud; Shehata, Tamer M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of formulation parameters on the disintegration, water absorption and dissolution characteristics of cyclosporine A (CyA) loaded self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) in an orodispersible compacts. Its taste masking efficiency was also attempted using an electronic tongue. ODTs were prepared by freeze-drying liquid SEDDS and synthetic amorphous silica suspension followed by direct compression. The influences of the compression forces and super-disintegrant were evaluated to optimize tablet characteristics. The liquid SEDDS was characterized by vesicular size of 48.5 nm, polydispersity index of 0.95, turbidity of 40.7 NTU and rapid CyA dissolution and emulsification rate. The results of micrometric studies demonstrated an acceptable flow, hardness and friability to indicate good mechanical strength of ODTs. The interaction and Pareto charts demonstrated a greater effect of low compression force to increase the porosity and facilitate the disintegration rather than the deformation action of the super-disintegrant. Super-disintegrant level was the most important factor affecting the dissolution parameter followed by the compression force then their interaction effect. Moreover, as indicated by Euclidean distance values and discrimination indices, the unpalatable taste and aversion taste of CyA to stimuli were masked in its optimized SEDDS incorporated ODTs.

  8. Cytotoxicity and intracellular dissolution of nickel nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E.

    2015-12-22

    The assessment of cytotoxicity of nanostructures is a fundamental step for their development as biomedical tools. As widely used nanostructures, nickel nanowires (Ni NWs) seem promising candidates for such applications. In this work, Ni NWs were synthesized and then characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, energy dispersive X-Ray analysis and electron microscopy. After exposure to the NWs, cytotoxicity was evaluated in terms of cell viability, cell membrane damage and induced apoptosis/necrosis on the model human cell line HCT 116. The influence of NW to cell ratio (10:1 to 1000:1) and exposure times up to 72 hours was analyzed for Ni NWs of 5.4 µm in length, as well as for Ni ions. The results show that cytotoxicity markedly increases past 24 hours of incubation. Cellular uptake of NWs takes place through the phagocytosis pathway, with a fraction of the dose of NWs dissolved inside the cells. Cell death results from a combination of apoptosis and necrosis, where the latter is the outcome of the secondary necrosis pathway. The cytotoxicity of Ni ions and Ni NWs dissolution studies suggest a synergistic toxicity between NW aspect ratio and dissolved Ni, with the cytotoxic effects markedly increasing after 24 hours of incubation.

  9. Analysis of dissolution residues of irradiated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnaud, F.; Tcherniatine, N.

    1980-12-01

    In the industrial dissolution conditions obtaining in reprocessing plants, the acid digests the irradiated nuclear fuels and leaves an insoluble product. This phenomenon is particularly conspicuous in the case of the UO 2 , PuO 2 mixed oxides of the fast neutron system irradiated at high specific burn-up. It is observed to a lesser degree in the case of UO 2 oxides of the ordinary water system. The quantity of insoluble product appears to depend on the specific burn-up. These residues are attributed to metallic phases comprising uranium, plutonium, ruthenium, palladium, rhodium and molybdenum. Owing to the existence of these residues, the radioactivity of which is high, the reprocessing plant requires a separation process, particular care in order to avoid their build-up, and packaging and storage facilities. This is why a programme on the physical-chemical study of the compounds has been initiated to develop a chemical digestion method, elemental analysis methods and the study of certain physical parameters such as granulometry [fr

  10. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinho, Jose; Piazolo, Sandra; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2014-01-01

    Dissolution rates are usually calculated as a function of surface area, which is assumed to remain constant ignoring the changes occurring on the surface during dissolution. Here we present a study of how topography of natural fluorite surfaces with different orientation changes during up to 3200...... by the relative stability of the planes and type of edges that constitute a surface needs to be considered. Significant differences between dissolution rates calculated based on surface area alone, and based on surface reactivity are expected for materials with the fluorite structure....

  11. Mongol Warfare in the Pre-Dissolution Period »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy May

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Mongols used many of the tactics and strategies that steppe nomads had used for centuries, the Mongols refined steppe warfare so that this style of warfare reached its apogee during the Mongol Empire. Furthermore, the Mongols developed a style of warfare that made them possibly the greatest military force in history. This work examines several facets of the pre-dissolution period (1200–1260. With the dissolution of the Mongol Empire, Mongol warfare once again changed. In some areas it remained complex while in others it regressed to traditional forces of steppe warfare, still potent but not as effective as the pre-dissolution period.

  12. Dissolution behaviour of silicon nitride coatings for joint replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Maria [Materials in Medicine Group, Div. of Applied Materials Science, Dept. of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Bryant, Michael [Institute of Functional Surfaces (iFS), School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Schmidt, Susann [Thin Film Physics, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping (Sweden); Engqvist, Håkan [Materials in Medicine Group, Div. of Applied Materials Science, Dept. of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Hall, Richard M. [Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (iMBE), School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Neville, Anne [Institute of Functional Surfaces (iFS), School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Persson, Cecilia, E-mail: cecilia.persson@angstrom.uu.se [Materials in Medicine Group, Div. of Applied Materials Science, Dept. of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the dissolution rate of SiN{sub x} coatings was investigated as a function of coating composition, in comparison to a cobalt chromium molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo) reference. SiN{sub x} coatings with N/Si ratios of 0.3, 0.8 and 1.1 were investigated. Electrochemical measurements were complemented with solution (inductively coupled plasma techniques) and surface analysis (vertical scanning interferometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). The dissolution rate of the SiN{sub x} coatings was evaluated to 0.2–1.4 nm/day, with a trend of lower dissolution rate with higher N/Si atomic ratio in the coating. The dissolution rates of the coatings were similar to or lower than that of CoCrMo (0.7–1.2 nm/day). The highest nitrogen containing coating showed mainly Si–N bonds in the bulk as well as at the surface and in the dissolution area. The lower nitrogen containing coatings showed Si–N and/or Si–Si bonds in the bulk and an increased formation of Si–O bonds at the surface as well as in the dissolution area. The SiN{sub x} coatings reduced the metal ion release from the substrate. The possibility to tune the dissolution rate and the ability to prevent release of metal ions encourage further studies on SiN{sub x} coatings for joint replacements. - Graphical abstract: Dissolution rates of SiN{sub 0.3}, SiN{sub 0.8}, and SiN{sub 1.1} coatings on CoCrMo compared to uncoated CoCrMo. Dissolution rates were obtained from i) electrochemical measurements of I{sub corr}, ii) the step height between covered and solution-exposed surfaces, measured using VSI, and iii) the ion concentration in the solution, measured with ICP. - Highlights: • The dissolution of SiN{sub x} coatings was investigated in comparison to (bulk) CoCrMo. • The coatings gave a lower or similar dissolution rate to CoCrMo, of 0.2–1.2 nm/day. • An increased nitrogen content in the coatings gave lower dissolution rates. • SiN{sub x} coatings on CoCrMo reduced the metal ion release

  13. Synthesis of uniform carbon at silica nanocables and luminescent silica nanotubes with well controlled inner diameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Haisheng; Yu Shuhong; Ren Lei; Yang Yipeng; Zhang Wei

    2006-01-01

    Uniform carbon at silica nanocables and silica nanotubes with well-controlled inner diameters can be synthesized in an easy way by a sacrificial templating method. This was performed using carbon nanofibres as hard templates that were synthesized previously by a hydrothermal carbonization process. Silica nanotubes with well-controlled inner diameters were synthesized from carbon at silica core-shell nanostructures by removal of the core carbon component. The inner diameters of the as-prepared silica nanotubes can be well controlled from several nanometres to hundreds of nanometres by adjusting the diameters of the carbon nanofibres. The silica nanotubes synthesized by this method display strong photoluminescence in ultraviolet at room temperature. Such uniform silica nanotubes might find potential applications in many fields such as encapsulation, catalysis, chemical/biological separation, and sensing

  14. Silica gel matrix immobilized Chlorophyta hydrodictyon africanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... immobilization of 300 mg per gram silica. Maximum immobilization was 400 mg biomass per gram silica. Sorption capacity increased with an increase in initial dye concentration and reached equilibrium within. 30 min. Three models were used to simulate kinetic data and the pseudo–second order model ...

  15. Subclinical nephrotoxicity associated with occupational silica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine early signs of renal injury due to occupational silica exposure. Design: Cross-sectional analytical research. Settings: Kenyatta National Hospital for the referent population and Clayworks ceramics, bricks and tiles factory for the assessment of occupational silica exposure. Subjects: Thirty three ...

  16. Medium-range order in metamict silicas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L.C.; Hobbs, L.W.

    1995-01-01

    The first sharp diffraction peak from various forms of aperiodic silica was studied. Materials examined include vitreous silica, electron-metallic quartz, neutron-metallic quartz, and Si + ion-implanted quartz. The peak is attributed to the dominant structural rings existing in the materials, or modification thereof. The anomalous behavior of this peak is also discussed

  17. Bioinspired synthesis of new silica structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Mukherjee, Niloy; Steintz-Kannan, Miriam; Clarson, Stephen J

    2003-05-21

    Silicon and oxygen are the two most abundant elements in the Earth's crust but despite the vast scientific literature on crystalline and amorphous silica, new chemistries, structures and applications continue to be discovered for compounds formed from these elements--thus we present here for the first time the formation of new amorphous silica structures that were uniquely synthesized by a bioinspired synthetic system.

  18. Silica gel matrix immobilized Chlorophyta hydrodictyon africanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlorophyta hydrodictyon africanum was immobilized on a silica gel matrix to improve its mechanical properties. The algae-silica gel adsorbent was used for batch sorption studies of a cationic dye, methylene blue (MB). Optimum adsorption was obtained with a dosage of 0.8 g bio sorbent. Results from sorption studies ...

  19. Active and passive silica waveguide integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas

    2001-01-01

    in existing and future networks without affecting the power budget of the system. Silica on silicon technology offers a unique possibility to selectively dope sections of the integrated circuit with erbium where amplification is desired. Some techniques for active/passive integration are reviewed and a silica...

  20. Magnetic core-shell silica particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claesson, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with magnetic silica core-shell colloids and related functionalized silica structures. Synthesis routes have been developed and optimized. The physical properties of these colloids have been investigated, such as the magnetic dipole moment, dipolar structure formation and

  1. Initial Drug Dissolution from Amorphous Solid Dispersions Controlled by Polymer Dissolution and Drug-Polymer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuejie; Wang, Shujing; Wang, Shan; Liu, Chengyu; Su, Ching; Hageman, Michael; Hussain, Munir; Haskell, Roy; Stefanski, Kevin; Qian, Feng

    2016-10-01

    To identify the key formulation factors controlling the initial drug and polymer dissolution rates from an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD). Ketoconazole (KTZ) ASDs using PVP, PVP-VA, HMPC, or HPMC-AS as polymeric matrix were prepared. For each drug-polymer system, two types of formulations with the same composition were prepared: 1. Spray dried dispersion (SDD) that is homogenous at molecular level, 2. Physical blend of SDD (80% drug loading) and pure polymer (SDD-PB) that is homogenous only at powder level. Flory-Huggins interaction parameters (χ) between KTZ and the four polymers were obtained by Flory-Huggins model fitting. Solution (13)C NMR and FT-IR were conducted to investigate the specific drug-polymer interaction in the solution and solid state, respectively. Intrinsic dissolution of both the drug and the polymer from ASDs were studied using a Higuchi style intrinsic dissolution apparatus. PXRD and confocal Raman microscopy were used to confirm the absence of drug crystallinity on the tablet surface before and after dissolution study. In solid state, KTZ is completely miscible with PVP, PVP-VA, or HPMC-AS, demonstrated by the negative χ values of -0.36, -0.46, -1.68, respectively; while is poorly miscible with HPMC shown by a positive χ value of 0.23. According to solution (13)C NMR and FT-IR studies, KTZ interacts with HPMC-AS strongly through H-bonding and dipole induced interaction; with PVPs and PVP-VA moderately through dipole-induced interactions; and with HPMC weakly without detectable attractive interaction. Furthermore, the "apparent" strength of drug-polymer interaction, measured by the extent of peak shift on NMR or FT-IR spectra, increases with the increasing number of interacting drug-polymer pairs. For ASDs with the presence of considerable drug-polymer interactions, such as KTZ/PVPs, KTZ/PVP-VA, or KTZ /HPMC-AS systems, drug released at the same rate as the polymer when intimate drug-polymer mixing was ensured (i.e., the SDD systems

  2. In vitro characterisation of a sol-gel derived in situ silica-coated silicate and carbonate co-doped hydroxyapatite nanopowder for bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Seyed Mohsen; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Sharifnabi, Ali; Varshosaz, Jaleh

    2017-06-01

    Design and synthesis of materials with better properties and performance are essential requirements in the field of biomaterials science that would directly improve patient quality of life. For this purpose, in situ silica-coated silicate and carbonate co-doped hydroxyapatite (Sc/S.C.HA) nanopowder was synthesized via the sol-gel method. Characterisation of the prepared nanopowder was carried out by XRD, FTIR, TEM, SEM, EDX, ICP, zeta potential, acid dissolution test, and cell culture test. The substitution of the silicate and carbonate ions into hydroxyapatite structure was confirmed by FTIR analysis. XRD analysis showed that silica is an amorphous phase, which played a role in covering the surface of the S.C.HA nanoparticles as confirmed by acid dissolution test. Low thickness and low integrity of the amorphous silica surface layer facilitated ions release from S.C.HA nanoparticles into physiological saline solution. Zeta potential of the prepared nanopowder suspended in physiological saline solution was -27.3±0.2mV at pH7.4. This negatively charged surface, due to the presence of amorphous silica layer upon the S.C.HA nanoparticles, not only had an accelerating effect on in vitro biomineralization of apatite, but also had a positive effect on cell attachment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. FTIR thermal analysis on organofunctionalized silica gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foschiera José L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica gel modified with organic groups is widely used as a stationary phase for liquid chromatography. Grafting synthesis can be used to obtain stable modified silica gel surfaces. In this work, silica gel (10 nm of pore diameter and surface area of 320 m² g-1 was chemically modified with 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane or 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and reacted with aniline, p-anisidine, benzylamine and 3-phenylpropylchloride in order to yield aromatic groups immobilized on the silica gel surface. Infrared spectroscopy was utilized for characterization of the aromatic groups grafted on the silica gel surface, using a quartz cell. The solids were heated at several temperatures in high vacuum and the infrared band areas of the organic groups were used to evaluate the thermal stability.

  4. The Pozzolanic reaction of silica fume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2012-01-01

    Silica fume is a very important supplementary cementitious binder in High-Performance and Ultra High-Performance Concretes. Through its pozzolanic reaction the silica fume densifies the concrete micro-structure, in particular it strengthens the paste-aggregate interfacial transition zone....... In the present paper different aspects of the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume are investigated. These include chemical shrinkage, isothermal heat development and strength development. Key data for these are given and compared with theoretical calculations, and based on presented measurements the energy...... of activation of the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume is estimated. The results show that the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume has notable differences from Portland cement hydration....

  5. Emission of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindwall, Frida

    , emitted in order to communicate within and between trophic levels and as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses, or as byproducts. Some BVOCs are very reactive, and when entering the atmosphere they rapidly react with for example hydroxyl radicals and ozone, affecting the oxidative capacity......Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from arctic ecosystems are scarcely studied and the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions even less so. BVOCs are emitted from all living organisms and play a role for atmospheric chemistry. The major part of BVOCs derives from plants...... dependent and the emissions will increase in a future warmer climate. The aims of this dissertation were to study BVOC emission rates and blends from arctic ecosystems and to reveal the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions from the Arctic. BVOC emissions were measured in ambient and modified...

  6. Monitoring biogenic volatile compounds emitted by Eucalyptus citriodora using SPME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, C A; Augusto, F; Christensen, T E; Smith, B P; Caramão, E B; Pawliszy, J

    2001-10-01

    A procedure to monitor BVOC emitted by living plants using SPME technique is presented. For this purpose, a glass sampling chamber was designed. This device was employed for the characterization of biogenic volatile compounds emitted by leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora. After extraction with SPME fibers coated with PDMS/ DVB, it was possible to identify or detect 33 compounds emitted by this plant. A semiquantitative approach was applied to monitor the behavior of the emitted BVOC during 9 days. Circadian profiles of the variation in the concentration of isoprene were plotted. Using diffusion-based SPME quantitation, a recently introduced analytical approach, with extraction times as short as 15 s, it was possible to quantify subparts-per-billion amounts of isoprene emitted by this plant.

  7. Pharmacological potential of biogenic amine-polyamine interactions beyond neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Ruiz-Pérez, M V; Urdiales, J L; Medina, M A

    2013-09-01

    Histamine, serotonin and dopamine are biogenic amines involved in intercellular communication with multiple effects on human pathophysiology. They are products of two highly homologous enzymes, histidine decarboxylase and l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, and transmit their signals through different receptors and signal transduction mechanisms. Polyamines derived from ornithine (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are mainly involved in intracellular effects related to cell proliferation and death mechanisms. This review summarizes structural and functional evidence for interactions between components of all these amine metabolic and signalling networks (decarboxylases, transporters, oxidases, receptors etc.) at cellular and tissue levels, distinct from nervous and neuroendocrine systems, where the crosstalk among these amine-related components can also have important pathophysiological consequences. The discussion highlights aspects that could help to predict and discuss the effects of intervention strategies. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Impact of biogenic emissions on feedbacks in the climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Impact of biogenic emissions on feedbacks in the climate system Bio-geophysical feedback between marine or continental ecosystems and the atmosphere potentially can alter climate change. A prominent feedback loop which is under discussion since 1983 bases on the emission of biologically produced gases - molecular oxygen, sulphur containing compounds and possibly isoprene, supersaturated in oceanic waters - into the marine troposphere. These by-products of phytoplankton metabolism lead to aerosol production and procure sustained influence on climate via modulation of cloud optical properties. In this contribution some findings related to the above mentioned climate processes are presented with special emphasis on marine ecosystems. A comparison of marine and continental ecosystems is made and different processes with major impact on feedbacks in the climate system are discussed.

  9. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from northern bogs and fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur gases are important components of the global cycle of S. They contribute to the acidity of precipitation and they influence global radiation balance and climate. The role of terrestrial sources of biogenic S and their effect on atmospheric chemistry remain as major unanswered questions in our understanding of the natural S cycle. The role of northern wetlands as sources and sinks of gaseous S by measuring rates of S gas exchange as a function of season, hydrologic conditions, and gradients in tropic status was investigated. Experiments were conducted in wetlands in New Hampshire, particularly a poor fen, and in Mire 239, a poor fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Emissions were determined using Teflon enclosures, gas cryotrapping methods and gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Dynamic (sweep flow) and static enclosures were employed which yielded similar results. Dissolved S gases and methane were determined by gas stripping followed by GC.

  10. Sustainable use of biogenic fuels resources through industrial synergies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuech, Andrea; Nelles, Michael; Nassour, Abdallah

    2017-01-01

    The term industrial symbiosis is used when traditionally separate companies and industries work together in a collective approach to physically exchange materials, energy, water and by-products with a mutual competitive advantage. Aim of the European project ''UBIS - Urban Baltic Industrial Symbiosis'' (INTERREG South-Baltic Programme) is to use biogenic resources as well as waste and residues sustainable in industrial symbiosis and to reduce emissions at the same time. Even if a lot has already been achieved in this area, there are still many unused material flows and there are possibilities to use them even more efficiently. In the project existing collaborations will be investigated as well as new ones identified and evaluated. This article introduces the UBIS project and provides an insight into the subject of industrial symbiosis as well examples described.

  11. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of $\\alpha$-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported...

  12. The MUMBA campaign: measurements of urban, marine and biogenic air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paton-Walsh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Measurements of Urban, Marine and Biogenic Air (MUMBA campaign took place in Wollongong, New South Wales (a small coastal city approximately 80 km south of Sydney, Australia from 21 December 2012 to 15 February 2013. Like many Australian cities, Wollongong is surrounded by dense eucalyptus forest, so the urban airshed is heavily influenced by biogenic emissions. Instruments were deployed during MUMBA to measure the gaseous and aerosol composition of the atmosphere with the aim of providing a detailed characterisation of the complex environment of the ocean–forest–urban interface that could be used to test the skill of atmospheric models. The gases measured included ozone, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and many of the most abundant volatile organic compounds. The aerosol characterisation included total particle counts above 3 nm, total cloud condensation nuclei counts, mass concentration, number concentration size distribution, aerosol chemical analyses and elemental analysis.The campaign captured varied meteorological conditions, including two extreme heat events, providing a potentially valuable test for models of future air quality in a warmer climate. There was also an episode when the site sampled clean marine air for many hours, providing a useful additional measure of the background concentrations of these trace gases within this poorly sampled region of the globe. In this paper we describe the campaign, the meteorology and the resulting observations of atmospheric composition in general terms in order to equip the reader with a sufficient understanding of the Wollongong regional influences to use the MUMBA datasets as a case study for testing a chemical transport model. The data are available from PANGAEA (http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.871982.

  13. Emission of the main biogenic volatile organic compounds in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, L.; Simon, V.; Torres, L.

    2000-01-01

    An estimation of biogenic emissions of the main non-methanic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) due to the forest cover in France has been realized. 32 species representing 98% of French forest have been considered for the estimation. The latter dealt on a net made of 93 irregular spatial grids (Departments) with an average size of 75 km x 75 km. We assigned emission rates and foliar biomass densities specific to each of the 32 species. The environmental variables (temperature, light intensity) have been collected for the whole of French Departments. A special effort was extended so as to use ''Guenther's'' calculation algorithms, and specific emitting factors to species growing in France or in bordering countries. Along the way of the five years (1994-1998) of the study we have calculated the yearly mean of isoprene, mono-terpenes and Other Volatile Organic Compounds (OVOCs) emissions on the scale of the French Departments. At the national level isoprene emission is reckoned at 457 kt yr -1 and represents nearly 49% of the total emission, whereas mono-terpenes with 350 kt yr -1 and OVOCs with 129 kt yr -1 represent respectively 37% and 14% of the total. The yearly biogenic emission of VOCs in France represents virtually half the anthropic source. However in some regions (Mediterranean area) natural emissions can widely exceed anthropic emissions during certain periods. Let's note the whole of our results remains tinged with a great uncertainty because the estimations carried out are presented with correction factors that can reach values comprised between 4 and 7. (author)

  14. The MUMBA campaign: measurements of urban, marine and biogenic air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton-Walsh, Clare; Guérette, Élise-Andrée; Kubistin, Dagmar; Humphries, Ruhi; Wilson, Stephen R.; Dominick, Doreena; Galbally, Ian; Buchholz, Rebecca; Bhujel, Mahendra; Chambers, Scott; Cheng, Min; Cope, Martin; Davy, Perry; Emmerson, Kathryn; Griffith, David W. T.; Griffiths, Alan; Keywood, Melita; Lawson, Sarah; Molloy, Suzie; Rea, Géraldine; Selleck, Paul; Shi, Xue; Simmons, Jack; Velazco, Voltaire

    2017-06-01

    The Measurements of Urban, Marine and Biogenic Air (MUMBA) campaign took place in Wollongong, New South Wales (a small coastal city approximately 80 km south of Sydney, Australia) from 21 December 2012 to 15 February 2013. Like many Australian cities, Wollongong is surrounded by dense eucalyptus forest, so the urban airshed is heavily influenced by biogenic emissions. Instruments were deployed during MUMBA to measure the gaseous and aerosol composition of the atmosphere with the aim of providing a detailed characterisation of the complex environment of the ocean-forest-urban interface that could be used to test the skill of atmospheric models. The gases measured included ozone, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and many of the most abundant volatile organic compounds. The aerosol characterisation included total particle counts above 3 nm, total cloud condensation nuclei counts, mass concentration, number concentration size distribution, aerosol chemical analyses and elemental analysis.The campaign captured varied meteorological conditions, including two extreme heat events, providing a potentially valuable test for models of future air quality in a warmer climate. There was also an episode when the site sampled clean marine air for many hours, providing a useful additional measure of the background concentrations of these trace gases within this poorly sampled region of the globe. In this paper we describe the campaign, the meteorology and the resulting observations of atmospheric composition in general terms in order to equip the reader with a sufficient understanding of the Wollongong regional influences to use the MUMBA datasets as a case study for testing a chemical transport model. The data are available from PANGAEA (http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.871982).

  15. The importance of water transit time and mineral dissolution kinetics for the flux of weathering products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Martin; Bishop, Kevin; Köhler, Stephan; Amvrosiadi, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Soil mineral weathering is one of the major sources of base cations (BC), which play a dual role for a forest ecosystem; they function both as plant nutrients, and for buffering against acidification of catchment runoff. On a long-term basis, the soil weathering rates will determine the highest sustainable forest productivity without causing acidification. It is believed that the hydrologic residence time play a key role in determining weathering rates on a landscape scale. In this study, we investigate the significance of the water transit residence time (WTT) distribution for the transport of base cations to catchment runoff. By modelling hillslope flowpaths with different transit times, using the geochemical computing code PHREEQC, we demonstrate how in-stream dynamics as exemplified by elemental ratios can be explained by mineral dissolution kinetics and equilibria. Specifically, we hypothesize that equilibrium of plagioclase regulates the delivery of base cations and silica to catchment runoff. These patters can be seen in field data from 10 years of sampling from a nested-catchment, where the Na+/BC and the Si/BC-ratios vary systematically with WTT on both a temporal and a spatial scale. This behavior has implications for the total transport of products from mineral dissolution to catchment runoff. As the water entering the stream is a mixture of water with different transit times, the composition of stream water will not only be dependent on the average WTT, but also on the shape of the WTT distribution. For the base cations associated with minerals that becomes supersaturated or with precipitating secondary phases within the range of WTT, i.e. Na+ and K+, the tails of "old water" of the WRT-distribution will not contribute to any extra transport of these elements. Finally, we use the derived relationships to estimate the transport of weathering products from a forested hillslope, given the modelled WRT distribution.

  16. Results from NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] Series 2 bare fuel dissolution tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1990-09-01

    The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Two bare spent fuel specimens plus the empty cladding hulls were tested in NNWSI J-13 well water in unsealed fused silica vessels under ambient hot cell air conditions (25 degree C) in the currently reported tests. One of the specimens was prepared from a rod irradiated in the H. B. Robinson Unit 2 reactor and the other from a rod irradiated in the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor. Results indicate that most radionuclides of interest fall into three groups for release modeling. The first group principally includes the actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm), all of which reached solubility-limited concentrations that were orders of magnitude below those necessary to meet the NRC 10 CFR 60.113 release limits for any realistic water flux predicted for the Yucca Mountain repository site. The second group is nuclides of soluble elements such as Cs, Tc, and I, for which release rates do not appear to be solubility-limited and may depend on the dissolution rate of fuel. In later test cycles, 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 99 Tc, and 129 I were continuously released at rates between about 5 x 10 -5 and 1 x 10 -4 of inventory per year. The third group is radionuclides that may be transported in the vapor phase, of which 14 C is of primary concern. Detailed test results are presented and discussed. 17 refs., 15 figs., 21 tabs

  17. Impacts of biogenic emissions of VOC and NOx on tropospheric ozone during summertime in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin'geng; Han, Zhiwei; Wang, Tijian; Zhang, Renjian

    2008-05-20

    This study is intended to understand and quantify the impacts of biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) on the formation of tropospheric ozone during summertime in eastern China. The model system consists of the non-hydrostatic mesoscale meteorological model (MM5) and a tropospheric chemical and transport model (TCTM) with the updated carbon-bond chemical reaction mechanism (CBM-IV). The spatial resolution of the system domain is 30 km x 30 km. The impacts of biogenic emissions are investigated by performing simulations (36 h) with and without biogenic emissions, while anthropogenic emissions are constant. The results indicate that biogenic emissions have remarkable impacts on surface ozone in eastern China. In big cities and their surrounding areas, surface ozone formation tends to be VOC-limited. The increase in ozone concentration by biogenic VOC is generally 5 ppbv or less, but could be more than 10 ppbv or even 30 ppbv in some local places. The impacts of biogenic NO(x) are different or even contrary in different regions, depending on the relative availability of NO(x) and VOC. The surface ozone concentrations reduced or increased by the biogenic NO(x) could be as much as 10 ppbv or 20 ppbv, respectively. The impacts of biogenic emissions on ozone aloft are generally restricted to the boundary layer and generally more obvious during the daytime than during the nighttime. This study is useful for understanding the role of biogenic emissions and for planning strategies for surface ozone abatement in eastern China. Due to limitations of the emission inventories used and the highly non-linear nature of zone formation, however, some uncertainties remain in the results.

  18. Downward particle fluxes of biogenic matter and Saharan dust across the equatorial North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Laura F.; Brummer, Geert-Jan A.; van der Does, Michèlle; Guerreiro, Catarina V.; Hennekam, Rick; van Hateren, Johannes A.; Jong, Dirk; Munday, Chris I.; Schouten, Stefan; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2017-05-01

    -sized sediments advected towards the deep sediment trap cannot be excluded. Seasonality is most prominent near both continents but generally weak, with mass fluxes dominated by calcium carbonate and clear seasonal maxima of biogenic silica towards the west. The monitoring experiment is now extended, with autonomous dust sampling buoys for better quantification of Saharan dust transport and deposition from source to sink and their impact on fertilization and carbon export to the deep ocean.

  19. Predicting the dissolution kinetics of silicate glasses using machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M.; Mangalathu, Sujith; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Tandia, Adama; Burton, Henry; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2018-05-01

    Predicting the dissolution rates of silicate glasses in aqueous conditions is a complex task as the underlying mechanism(s) remain poorly understood and the dissolution kinetics can depend on a large number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Here, we assess the potential of data-driven models based on machine learning to predict the dissolution rates of various aluminosilicate glasses exposed to a wide range of solution pH values, from acidic to caustic conditions. Four classes of machine learning methods are investigated, namely, linear regression, support vector machine regression, random forest, and artificial neural network. We observe that, although linear methods all fail to describe the dissolution kinetics, the artificial neural network approach offers excellent predictions, thanks to its inherent ability to handle non-linear data. Overall, we suggest that a more extensive use of machine learning approaches could significantly accelerate the design of novel glasses with tailored properties.

  20. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquid: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, N.; Draman, S. F. S.; Salleh, M. S. N.; Yusof, N. B.

    2017-02-01

    Dissolution of cellulose with ionic liquids (IL) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) lets the comprehensive dissolution of cellulose. Basically, cellulose can be dissolved, in some hydrophilic ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) and 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AMIMCl). Chloride based ionic liquids are suitable solvents for cellulose dissolution. Although the ILs is very useful in fine chemical industry, its application in the pharmaceutical and food industry have been very limited due to issues with toxicity, purity, and high cost. Seeing to these limitations, new green alternative solvent which is DES was used. This green solvents, may be definitely treated as the next-generation reagents for more sustainable industrial development. Thus, this review aims to discuss the dissolution of cellulose either with ionic liquids or DES and its application.

  1. Comparative dissolution study on counterfeit medicines of PDE-5 inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Deconinck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Counterfeit medicines are a growing problem in both developing and industrialised countries. In general the evaluation of these medicines is limited to the identification and the dosage of the active ingredients. In this study in vitro dissolution tests were conducted on two sets of counterfeit medicines containing PDE-5 inhibitors (sildenafil citrate and tadalafil. The dissolution profiles were statistically compared to the ones of the genuine products using the f2-method and a comparison at each time point using the Cochran test.The results showed low equivalences between counterfeit and genuine products as well as higher variations around the mean dissolution value at the different time points for the counterfeit products. Keywords: Counterfeit, PDE-5 inhibitors, In vitro dissolution, f2-Method, Cochran test

  2. Evolution, dissolution and reversible generation of gold and silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with variable flux density) in the presence of nonionic micelle, TX-100. Even their cyano complexes break down in TX-100 under UV and hence dissolution and reevolution of almost monodispersed nanoparticles (∼ 3 nm) are possible.

  3. Controlled dissolution of colossal quantities of nitrogen in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel was investigated thermogravimetrically by equilibrating thin foils of AISI 304 and AISI 316 in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. Controlled dissolution of colossal amounts of nitrogen under metastable equilibrium conditions was realized...

  4. Influence of the Efavirenz Micronization on Tableting and Dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Mendes Cabral

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to propose an analytical procedure that provides the effects of particle size and surface area on dissolution of efavirenz. Five different batches obtained by different micronization processes and with different particle size distribution and surface area were studied. The preformulation studies and dissolution curves were used to confirm the particle size distribution effect on drug solubility. No polymorphic variety or amorphization was observed in the tested batches and the particle size distribution was determined as directly responsible for the improvement of drug dissolution. The influence of the preparation process on the tablets derived from efavirenz was observed in the final dissolution result in which agglomeration, usually seen in non-lipophilic micronized material, was avoided through the use of an appropriate wet granulation method. For these reasons, micronization may represent one viable alternative for the formulation of brick dust drugs.

  5. Silver-catalyzed PuO2 dissolution with persulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, F.D.; Barney, G.S.; Cooper, T.D.; Duchsherer, M.J.

    1991-06-01

    This report consists of 14 slides and associated narrative for a presentation to be given at the 15th Annual Actinide Separations Conference on silver-catalyzed PuO 2 dissolution with persulfate. (JL)

  6. Studies on PEM fuel cell noble metal catalyst dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. M.; Grahl-Madsen, L.; Skou, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic and gravimetric methods was carried out on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with the focus on platinum and ruthenium catalysts dissolution, and the membrane degradation. In cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments, the noble metals were...... found to dissolve in 1 M sulfuric acid solution and the dissolution increased exponentially with the upper potential limit (UPL) between 0.6 and 1.6 vs. RHE. 2-20% of the Pt (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved during the experiments. Under the same conditions, 30-100% of the Ru...... (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved. The faster dissolution of ruthenium compared to platinum in the alloy type catalysts was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The dissolution of the carbon supported catalyst was found one order of magnitude higher than the unsupported...

  7. The effect of sentencing types on singlehood and relationship dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter; Andersen, Lars Højsgaard

    Prior research shows that imprisonment may matter for the risk of experiencing divorce or other types of relationship dissolution, as imprisonment implies separation and the social stigma of criminal conviction. Despite these straightforward theoretical mechanisms, we currently lack empirical...

  8. In vivo dissolution measurement with indium-111 summation peak ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay, M.; Woodward, M.A.; Brouwer, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolution of [ 111 In]labeled tablets was measured in vivo in a totally noninvasive manner by using a modification of the perturbed angular correlation technique known as the summation peak ratio method. This method, which requires the incorporation of only 10-12 microCi into the dosage form, provided reliable dissolution data after oral administration of [ 111 In]lactose tablets. These results were supported by in vitro experiments which demonstrated that the dissolution rate as measured by the summation peak ratio method was in close agreement with the dissolution rate of salicylic acid in a [ 111 In]salicylic acid tablet. The method has the advantages of using only one detector, thereby avoiding the need for complex coincidence counting systems, requiring less radioactivity, and being potentially applicable to a gamma camera imaging system

  9. Biologically mediated dissolution of volcanic glass in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudigel, H.; Chastain, R.A.; Yayanos, A.; Davies, G.R.; Verdurmen, E.; Schiffman, P.; Bourcier, R.; de Baar, H.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effects of biological mediation on the dissolution of basaltic glass in seawater. Experiments with typical seawater microbial populations were contrasted with a sterile control, and reactions were monitored chemically and isotopically. Biologically mediated experiments produce twice

  10. Concrete alkali-silica reaction and nuclear radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki

    2008-01-01

    The deterioration of concrete by alkali-silica reaction of aggregates (ASR) and the effect of nuclear radiations on the ASR have been reviewed based on our studies on the mechanism of ASR and the effect of nuclear radiations on the resistivity of minerals to alkaline solution. It has been found that the ASR is initiated by the attack of alkaline solution in concrete to silicious aggregates to convert them into hydrated alkali silicate. The consumption of alkali hydroxide by the aggregates induces the dissolution of Ca 2+ ions into the solution. The alkali silicate surrounding the aggregates then reacts with Ca 2+ ions to convert to insoluble tight and rigid reaction rims. The reaction rim allows the penetration of alkaline solution but prevents the leakage of viscous alkali silicate, so that alkali silicate generated afterward is accumulated in the aggregate to give an expansive pressure enough for cracking the aggregate and the surrounding concrete. The effect of nuclear radiation on the reactivity of quartz and plagioclase, a part of major minerals composing volcanic rocks as popular aggregates, to alkaline solution has been examined for clarifying whether nuclear radiations accelerates the ASR. It has been found that the irradiation of these minerals converts them into alkali-reactive amorphous ones. The radiation dose for plagioclase is as low as 10 8 Gy, which suggests that the ASR of concrete surrounding nuclear reactors is possible to be accelerated by nuclear radiation. (author)

  11. Hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi‐Fen; Chen, Albert

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation of this techn......This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation...

  12. Dissolution of mega-voids in resin transfer molding

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Paul Nordstrom

    2007-01-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a common composite manufacturing process. Voids are a common defect encountered in RTM components. A new type of void, the 'Mega-Void', has been identified and addressed by this research. To produce acceptable RTM components requires that the mega-void be eliminated either through prevention or through dissolution. The latter is the topic of this research. Three process parameters affecting mega-void dissolution are researched; 1) Preform/mold vacuum , 2) Resin...

  13. Investigating Dissolution and Precipitation Phenomena with a Smartphone Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Arcia, Edgar

    2016-10-11

    A novel smartphone microscope can be used to observe the dissolution and crystallization of sodium chloride at a microscopic level. Observation of these seemingly simple phenomena through the microscope at 100× magnification can actually reveal some surprising behavior. These experiments offer the opportunity to discuss some basic concepts such as how the morphological features of the crystals dictates how the dissolution process proceeds, and how materials can be purified by re-crystallization techniques.

  14. Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO 3 Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90 degrees C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO 4 ) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated

  15. Characterization of the hydrodynamics in a miniaturized dissolution apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer E; Plum, Jakob; Mosleh, Majid

    2018-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a miniaturized dissolution apparatus was characterized using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and analyzed in relation to the biorelevance and robustness of measurements of drug dissolution and precipitation kinetics from supersaturated drug solutions. The effect...... geometry influences the hydrodynamics of the system and indicates that an off-center probe position may result in more robust measurements. Furthermore, the study shows that the agitator geometry has a significant effect on supersaturation studies due to differences in the hydrodynamic shear produced...

  16. Dissolution of Kansas evaporites: the radioactive waste disposal problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The radioactive waste repository at Lyons, Kansas, focused attention on the problem of evaporite dissolution. More study is needed in the determination of the mechanisms responsible for deterioration. Also, recent water-use policies have been questioned with the need pointed out for increased effectiveness in planning. Good water planning has to take into account the role of evaporite dissolution in water quality. 23 references

  17. Etudes des mecanismes de dissolution des phosphates naturels de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dans le cadre de la recherche sur la dissolution du phosphate calcique apatitique, une étude du mécanisme de cette dissolution basé sur la complexation des ions métalliques du minerai par deux acides humiques extraits d'un sol (AHS) et d'un compost (AHC) a été réalisée. L'ion calcium (Ca2+), ion majoritaire dans les ...

  18. Operation of Marine Diesel Engines on Biogenic Fuels: Modification of Emissions and Resulting Climate Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Lauer, P.; Fritsche, U.; Hasselbach, J.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Fleischer, F.

    2011-01-01

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO2, NOx, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fue...

  19. Sustainable use of biogenic fuels resources through industrial synergies; Nachhaltige energetische Nutzung biogener Ressourcen durch industrielle Synergien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuech, Andrea [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Professur Abfall- und Stoffstromwirtschaft; Nelles, Michael [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Agrar- und Umweltwissenschaftliche Fakultaet; Nassour, Abdallah

    2017-08-01

    The term industrial symbiosis is used when traditionally separate companies and industries work together in a collective approach to physically exchange materials, energy, water and by-products with a mutual competitive advantage. Aim of the European project ''UBIS - Urban Baltic Industrial Symbiosis'' (INTERREG South-Baltic Programme) is to use biogenic resources as well as waste and residues sustainable in industrial symbiosis and to reduce emissions at the same time. Even if a lot has already been achieved in this area, there are still many unused material flows and there are possibilities to use them even more efficiently. In the project existing collaborations will be investigated as well as new ones identified and evaluated. This article introduces the UBIS project and provides an insight into the subject of industrial symbiosis as well examples described.

  20. Reflectometric monitoring of the dissolution process of thin polymeric films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Räty, Jukka; Korhonen, Kristiina; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2017-05-15

    Pharmaceutical thin films are versatile drug-delivery platforms i.e. allowing transdermal, oral, sublingual and buccal administration. However, dissolution testing of thin films is challenging since the commonly used dissolution tests for conventional dosage forms correspond rather poorly to the physiological conditions at the site of administration. Here we introduce a traditional optical reflection method for monitoring the dissolution behavior of thin polymeric films. The substances, e.g. drug molecules, released from the film generate an increase in the refractive index in the liquid medium which can be detected by reflectance monitoring. Thin EUDRAGIT ® RL PO poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methyl methacrylate-co trimethylammonioethyl methacrylate chloride) (RLPO) films containing the model drug perphenazine (PPZ) were prepared by spraying on a glass substrate. The glass substrates were placed inside the flow cell in the reflectometer which was then filled with phosphate buffer solution. Dissolution was monitored by measuring the reflectance of the buffer liquid. The method was able to detect the distinctive dissolution characteristics of different film formulations and measured relatively small drug concentrations. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that a traditional optical reflection method can provide valuable information about the dissolution characteristics of thin polymeric films in low liquid volume surroundings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.