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Sample records for biogenic manganese oxideproduction

  1. Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

    2004-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

  2. Manganese carbonates as possible biogenic relics in Archean settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Tomás, Blanca; Khonsari, Bahar; Mühlen, Dominik; Wickbold, Christian; Schäfer, Nadine; Hause-Reitner, Dorothea; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate minerals such as dolomite, kutnahorite or rhodochrosite are frequently, but not exclusively generated by microbial processes. In recent anoxic sediments, Mn(II)carbonate minerals (e.g. rhodochrosite, kutnahorite) derive mainly from the reduction of Mn(IV) compounds by anaerobic respiration. The formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling in an oxygenated atmosphere. However, putative anaerobic pathways such as microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation, anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxidation in ultraviolet light may facilitate manganese cycling even in an early Archean environment, without the availability of oxygen. In addition, manganese carbonates precipitate by microbially induced processes without change of the oxidation state, e.g. by pH shift. Hence, there are several ways how these minerals could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. We will summarize microbially induced manganese carbonate deposition in the presence and absence of atmospheric oxygen and we will make some considerations about the biogenic deposition of manganese carbonates in early Archean settings.

  3. Structural Characterization of Biogenic Manganese Oxides Produced in Sea Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. M.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2003-12-01

    Manganese oxides have been coined as the "scavengers of the sea" and play important roles in both marine and freshwater systems. Natural manganese oxide nanoparticles and grain coatings are ubiquitous in the environment and profoundly impact the quality of sediments via their ability to degrade and sequester contaminants. These oxides are believed to form dominantly via oxidation of Mn(II) by marine and freshwater bacteria and have extremely high sorptive capacities for heavy metals. We have used XANES, EXAFS, and synchrotron (SR)-XRD techniques to study biogenic manganese oxides produced by spores of the marine Bacillus sp., strain SG-1 in seawater as a function of reaction time under fully in-situ conditions. The primary biogenic solid-phase Mn oxide product is a hexagonal layered phyollomanganate with an oxidation state similar to that in delta-MnO2. XRD data show the biooxides to have a phyllomanganate 10 basal plane spacing, suggesting the interlayer is hydrated and contains calcium. As the experiment continues, the initial biooxide changes to show triclinic symmetry. Fits to these EXAFS spectra suggest the octahedral layers have low Mn octahedral site vacancies in the lattice and the latyers bend to accommodate Jahn-Teller distortions creating the change in symmetry. The oxides observed in this study as models of Mn(II) bio-oxidation may be representative of the most abundant manganese oxide phase suspended in the oxic and sub-oxic zones of the oceanic water column.

  4. Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

    2010-02-01

    Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

  5. Evidence for the biogenic origin of manganese-enriched layers in Lake Superior sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Christine; Dittrich, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe)-enriched sediment layers were discovered in Lake Superior within, above and below the oxic-anoxic interface. While the role of bacteria in redox reactions with Mn is known to be significant, little information exists about indigenous microbial communities in many freshwater environments. This study examined the bacterial communities of Mn-enriched layers in Lake Superior to identify the potential Mn(II) oxidizers responsible for the formation of Mn oxides. Anaerobic Mn(II) oxidation occurring in the Mn-enriched layers at the oxic-anoxic interface was investigated using Mn(II)-enriched cultures. High-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic investigations provided evidence of the biogenic formation of Mn oxides on cell surfaces. Spectroscopic mapping confirmed high levels of Mn in structures resembling biogenic Mn oxides. These structures were observed in enrichment cultures and in Mn-enriched layer sediment samples, indicating the significance of biogenic Mn oxidation occurring in situ. 16S ribosomal DNA pyrosequencing was used to identify the bacteria potentially responsible for Mnoxide formation in the enrichment cultures and Mn-enriched layers, revealing that the Mn-enriched layer contains classes with known Mn(II)-oxidizing members. Pyrosequencing of bacterial cultures suggested that these bacteria may be Bacillus strains, and that anaerobic microbial-mediated Mn(II) oxidation contributes to the formation of the layers.

  6. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  7. Biogenic precipitation of manganese oxides and enrichment of heavy metals at acidic soil pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanna, Sathish; Peacock, Caroline L.; Schäffner, Franziska; Grawunder, Anja; Merten, Dirk; Kothe, Erika; Büchel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides at acidic pH is rarely reported and poorly understood, compared to biogenic Mn oxide precipitation at near neutral conditions. Here we identified and investigated the precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides in acidic soil, and studied their role in the retention of heavy metals, at the former uranium mining site of Ronneburg, Germany. The site is characterized by acidic pH, low carbon content and high heavy metal loads including rare earth elements. Specifically, the Mn oxides were present in layers identified by detailed soil profiling and within these layers pH varied from 4.7 to 5.1, Eh varied from 640 to 660 mV and there were enriched total metal contents for Ba, Ni, Co, Cd and Zn in addition to high Mn levels. Using electron microprobe analysis, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we identified poorly crystalline birnessite (δ-MnO2) as the dominant Mn oxide in the Mn layers, present as coatings covering and cementing quartz grains. With geochemical modelling we found that the environmental conditions at the site were not favourable for chemical oxidation of Mn(II), and thus we performed 16S rDNA sequencing to isolate the bacterial strains present in the Mn layers. Bacterial phyla present in the Mn layers belonged to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, and from these phyla we isolated six strains of Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria and confirmed their ability to oxidise Mn(II) in the laboratory. The biogenic Mn oxide layers act as a sink for metals and the bioavailability of these metals was much lower in the Mn layers than in adjacent layers, reflecting their preferential sorption to the biogenic Mn oxide. In this presentation we will report our findings, concluding that the formation of natural biogenic poorly crystalline birnessite can occur at acidic pH, resulting in the formation of a biogeochemical barrier which, in turn, can control the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in

  8. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause serious side effects, including symptoms resembling Parkinson's disease, such as shaking (tremors). Special precautions & warnings: Children: ... be careful not to get too much manganese. Nutrition that is given intravenously (by IV). People who ...

  9. Processes of zinc attenuation by biogenic manganese oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Bargar, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and speciation of Zn sorbed to biogenic Mn oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, AZ, was investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and microfocused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) mapping, and chemical extraction. μSXRF and chemical extractions show that contaminant Zn co-varied with Mn in streambed sediment grain coatings. Bulk and microfocused EXAFS spectra of Zn in the biogenic Mn oxide coating are indicative of Zn forming triple-corner-sharing inner-sphere complexes over octahedral vacancies in the Mn oxide sheet structure. Zn desorbed in response to the decrease in pH in batch experiments and resulted in near-equal dissolved Zn at each pH over a 10-fold range in the solid/solution ratio. The geometry of sorbed Zn was unchanged after 50% desorption at pH 5, indicating that desorption is not controlled by dissolution of secondary Zn phases. In summary, these findings support the idea that Zn attenuation in Pinal Creek is largely controlled by sorption to microbial Mn oxides forming in the streambed during hyporheic exchange. Sorption to biogenic Mn oxides is likely an important process of Zn attenuation in circum-neutral pH reaches of many acid-mine drainage contaminated streams when dissolved Mn is present.

  10. Processes of zinc attenuation by biogenic manganese oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher C; Bargar, John R

    2014-02-18

    The distribution and speciation of Zn sorbed to biogenic Mn oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, AZ, was investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and microfocused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) mapping, and chemical extraction. μSXRF and chemical extractions show that contaminant Zn co-varied with Mn in streambed sediment grain coatings. Bulk and microfocused EXAFS spectra of Zn in the biogenic Mn oxide coating are indicative of Zn forming triple-corner-sharing inner-sphere complexes over octahedral vacancies in the Mn oxide sheet structure. Zn desorbed in response to the decrease in pH in batch experiments and resulted in near-equal dissolved Zn at each pH over a 10-fold range in the solid/solution ratio. The geometry of sorbed Zn was unchanged after 50% desorption at pH 5, indicating that desorption is not controlled by dissolution of secondary Zn phases. In summary, these findings support the idea that Zn attenuation in Pinal Creek is largely controlled by sorption to microbial Mn oxides forming in the streambed during hyporheic exchange. Sorption to biogenic Mn oxides is likely an important process of Zn attenuation in circum-neutral pH reaches of many acid-mine drainage contaminated streams when dissolved Mn is present.

  11. Plant extract-mediated biogenic synthesis of silver, manganese dioxide, silver-doped manganese dioxide nanoparticles and their antibacterial activity against food- and water-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaraj, Chandran; Ji, Byoung-Jun; Harper, Stacey L; Yun, Soon-Il

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO₂NPs) and silver-doped manganese dioxide nanoparticles (Ag-doped MnO₂NPs) were synthesized by simultaneous green chemistry reduction approach. Aqueous extract from the leaves of medicinally important plant Cucurbita pepo was used as reducing and capping agents. Various characterization techniques were carried out to affirm the formation of nanoparticles. HR-TEM analysis confirmed the size of nanoparticles in the range of 15-70 nm and also metal doping was confirmed through XRD and EDS analyses. FT-IR analysis confirmed that the presence of biomolecules in the aqueous leaves extract was responsible for nanoparticles synthesis. Further, the concentration of metals and their doping in the reaction mixture was achieved by ICP-MS. The growth curve and well diffusion study of synthesized nanoparticles were performed against food- and water-borne Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The mode of interaction of nanoparticles on bacterial cells was demonstrated through Bio-TEM analysis. Interestingly, AgNPs and Ag-doped MnO₂NPs showed better antibacterial activity against all the tested bacterial pathogens; however, MnO₂NPs alone did not show any antibacterial properties. Hence, AgNPs and Ag-doped MnO₂NPs synthesized from aqueous plant leaves extract may have important role in controlling various food spoilage caused by bacteria.

  12. Biogenic metals in advanced water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebel, Tom; De Gusseme, Bart; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-02-01

    Microorganisms can change the oxidation state of metals and concomitantly deposit metal oxides and zerovalent metals on or into their cells. The microbial mechanisms involved in these processes have been extensively studied in natural environments, and researchers have recently gained interest in the applications of microbe-metal interactions in biotechnology. Because of their specific characteristics, such as high specific surface areas and high catalytic reactivity, biogenic metals offer promising perspectives for the sorption and (bio)degradation of contaminants. In this review, the precipitation of biogenic manganese and iron species and the microbial reduction of precious metals, such as palladium, platinum, silver and gold, are discussed with specific attention to the application of these biogenic metals in innovative remediation technologies in advanced water treatment.

  13. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2002-08-10

    Radionuclide and heavy metal contaminants at DOE sites pose immediate and long-term environmental problems. Under the NABIR program, bacteria are being considered for their role in the cycling of these contaminants because they influence many redox reactions in the subsurface. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are particularly important to controlling the biogeochemistry of subsurface environments through enzymatic reduction of iron and manganese minerals. During reduction of FeIII, biogenic FeII phases form at the cell-mineral interface which may profoundly influence metal reduction.

  14. Biogenic amines in beer

    OpenAIRE

    Čiháková, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with the technological process of brewing beer, describes the raw materials needed for its production, and points out the useful and harmful substances contained in beer as biogenic amines (BA). Furthermore, there are described the issues of biogenic amines in food and primarily in beer, which is a histamine, putrescine, cadaverine, tyramine and tryptamine. In the practical section BA was determined in lager bottom-fermented beers from local microbreweries and large industri...

  15. Manganese Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sousa Galito

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cheickna Bounajim Cissé wrote an article in Mars 2013 in the Journal Les Afriques N. º 237, suggesting a new acronym, MANGANESE, for the nine African countries: Morocco, Angola, Namibia, Ghana, Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, South Africa and Ethiopia. According to Cissé, this group of African nations will be the fastest growing states in the region over the next few years. The purpose of this article is to test the pertinence of the acronym, discuss the credibility and reliability of the future prospects of these countries by comparing selected socioeconomic and sociopolitical indicators based on the latest global rankings and trends. Likewise, the potential of Cissé's claim will be assessed, especially in relationship to drug trafficking and terrorism that may put their recent sustainability in danger now and in the future.

  16. Element substitution by living organisms: the case of manganese in mollusc shell aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, Analia L.; Jacob, Dorrit E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Swarbrick, Janine C.; Geck, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    Determining the manganese concentration in shells of freshwater bivalves provides a unique way to obtain information about climate and environmental changes during time-intervals that pre-date instrumental data records. This approach, however, relies on a thorough understanding of how manganese is incorporated into the shell material -a point that remained controversial so far. Here we clarify this issue, using state-of-the-art X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy in combination with band structure calculations. We verify that in the shells of all studied species manganese is incorporated as high-spin Mn2+, i.e. manganese always has the same valence as calcium. More importantly, the unique chemical sensitivity of valence-to-core X-ray emission enables us to show that manganese is always coordinated by a CO3-octahedron. This, firstly, provides firm experimental evidence for manganese being primarily located in the inorganic carbonate. Secondly, it indicates that the structure of the aragonitic host is locally altered such that manganese attains an octahedral, calcitic coordination. This modification at the atomic level enables the bivalve to accommodate many orders of magnitude more manganese in its aragonitic shell than found in any non-biogenic aragonite. This outstanding feature is most likely facilitated through the non-classical crystallization pathway of bivalve shells.

  17. Biogenic amines in fermented foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spano, G.; Russo, P.; Lonvaud-Funel, A.; Lucas, P.; Alexandre, H.; Grandvalet, C.; Coton, E.; Coton, M.; Barnavon, L.; Bach, B.; Rattray, F.; Bunte, A.; Magni, C.; Ladero, V.; Alvarez, M.; Fernández, M.; Lopez, P.; Palencia, P.F. de; Corbi, A.; Trip, H.; Lolkema, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Food-fermenting lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally considered to be non-toxic and non-pathogenic. Some species of LAB, however, can produce biogenic amines (BAs). BAs are organic, basic, nitrogenous compounds, mainly formed through decarboxylation of amino acids. BAs are present in a wide rang

  18. VERTEX: manganese transport through oxygen minima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John H.; Knauer, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Manganese transport through a well-developed oxygen minimum was studied off central Mexico (18°N, 108°W) in October-November 1981 as part of the VERTEX (Vertical Transport and Exchange) research program. Refractory, leachable and dissolved Mn fractions associated with particulates caught in traps set at eight depths (120-1950 m) were analyzed. Particles entering the oxygen minimum had relatively large Mn loads; however, as the particulates sank further into the minimum, total Mn fluxes steadily decreased from 190 nmol m -2 day -1 at 120 m to 36 nmol m -2 day -1 at 400 m. Manganese fluxes then steadily increased in the remaining 800-1950 m, reaching rates of up to 230 nmol m -2 day -1 at 1950 m. Manganese concentrations were also measured in the water column. Dissolved Mn levels Rate-of-change estimates based on trap flux data yield regeneration rates of up to 0.44 nmol kg -1 yr -1 in the upper oxygen minimum (120-200 m). However, only 30% of the dissolved Mn in the oxygen minimum appears to be from sinking particulate regeneration; the other 70% probably results from continental-slope-release-horizontal-transport processes. Dissolved Mn scavenges back onto particles as oxygen levels begin to increase with depth. Scavenging rates ranging from -0.03 to -0.09 nmol kg -1 yr -1 were observed at depths from 700 to 1950 m. These scavenging rates result in Mn residence times of 16-19 years, and scavenging rate constants on the order of 0.057 yr -1. Manganese removal via scavenging on sinking particles below the oxygen minimum is balanced by Mn released along continental boundaries and transported horizontally via advective-diffusive processes. Manganese appears to be very weakly associated with particulates. Nevertheless, the amounts of Mn involved with sinking biogenic particles are large, and the resulting fluxes are on the same order of magnitude as those necessary to explain the excess Mn accumulating on the sea floor. The overall behavior of Mn observed in this, and

  19. Occupational exposure to manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarić, M; Markićević, A; Hrustić, O

    1977-05-01

    The relationship between the degree of exposure and biological effects of manganese was studied in a group of 369 workers employed in the production of ferroalloys. Two other groups of workers, from an electrode plant and from an aluminium rolling mill, served as controls. Mean manganese concentrations at work places where ferroalloys were produced varied from 0-301 to 20-442 mg/m3. The exposure level of the two control groups was from 2 to 30 microgram/m3 and from 0-05 to 0-07 microgram/m3, in the electrode plant and rolling mill respectively. Sixty-two (16-8%) manganese alloy workers showed some signs of neurological impairment. These signs were noticeably less in the two control groups (5-8% and 0%) than in the occupationally exposed group. Subjective symptoms, which are nonspecific but may be symptoms of subclinical manganism, were not markedly different in the three groups. However, in the manganese alloy workers some of the subjective symptoms occurred more frequently in heavier smokers than in light smokers or nonsmokers. Heavier smokers engaged in manganese alloy production showed some of the subjective symptoms more often than heavier smokers from the control groups.

  20. Manganese in silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.

    2012-02-01

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 °C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [ 1 1 2¯ 3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  1. Manganese in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnarsson, M.K., E-mail: marga@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden); Hallen, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box E229, SE-16440 Kista-Stockhom (Sweden)

    2012-02-15

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 Degree-Sign C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [112{sup Macron }3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  2. Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H, Brurok; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; G, Hansson

    1999-01-01

    Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate (MnDPDP) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Aims of the study were to examine if MnDPDP possesses superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity in vitro, and if antioxidant protection can be demonstrated in an ex vivo rat heart m......, It is concluded that MnDPDP and MnPLED possess SOD mimetic activities and may thereby protect the heart in oxidative stress. (C) 1999 Academic Press....

  3. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.C.; Dusseldorp, M. van; Bottema, K.C.; Dubois, A.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and

  4. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, SC; van Dusseldorp, M; Bottema, KC; Dubois, AEJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allergen intoler*, and

  5. Manganese regulates expression of manganese peroxidase by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J A; Glenn, J K; Gold, M H

    1990-01-01

    The appearance of manganese peroxidase (MnP) activity in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on the presence of manganese. Cultures grown in the absence of Mn developed normally and produced normal levels of the secondary metabolite veratryl alcohol but produced no MnP activity. Immunoblot analysis indicated that appearance of MnP protein in the extracellular medium was also dependent on the presence of Mn. Intracellular MnP protein was detectable only in cel...

  6. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  7. Biogenic silicate accumulation in sediments, Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; DAI Jicui; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; LI Fengye; SUN Song

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that low silicate content in seawater is a major limiting factor to phytoplankton primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. However the reason of Si-limitation remains poorly understood. In the present study we measured the biogenic silicate content and discussed the accumulation of silicate in Jiaozhou Bay sediment. The results show that the biogenic silica content in the sediment of the Jiaozhou Bay is obviously much higher than those in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. The BSi:TN ratios and BSi:16P ratios in the sediment are > 1 and the OC:BSi ratio in sediment is lower than these of Redfield ratio (106:16), indicating that the decomposition rate of OC is much higher than that for BSi in similar conditions. Therefore, the majority of the biogenic silicate was buried and thus did not participate in silicate recycling. Silicate accumulation in sediment may explain why Si limits the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay. Comparing the flux of biogenic silicate from sediments with primary production rate, it can be concluded that only 15.5% of biogenic silicate is hydrolyzed during the journey from surface to bottom in seawater, thus approximate 84.5% of biogenic silicate could reach the bottom. The silicate releasing rate from the sediment to seawater is considerably lower than that of sedimentation of biogenic silicate, indicating silicate accumulation in sediment too. In a word, the silicate accumulation in sediment is the key reason of silicate limiting to phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay.

  8. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN DIFFERENT WINE SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kántor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five samples of different Slovak wines before and after filtration were analysed in order to determine the content of eight biogenic amines (tryptamine, phenylalanine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine. The method involves extraction of biogenic amines from wine samples with used dansyl chloride. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC was used for determination of biogenic amines equipped with a Rapid Resolution High Definition (RRHD, DAD detectors and Extend-C18 LC column (50 mm x 3.0 mm ID, 1.8 μm particle size. In this study the highest level of biogenic amine in all wine samples represent tryptamine (TRM with the highest content 170.9±5.3 mg/L in Pinot Blanc wine. Phenylalanine (PHE cadaverine (CAD, histamine (HIS and spermidine (SPD were not detected in all wines; mainly SPD was not detected in 16 wines, HIS not detected in 14 wines, PHE and CAD not detected in 2 wines. Tyramine (TYR, spermine (SPN and putrescine (PUT were detected in all wines, but PUT and SPN in very low concentration. The worst wine samples with high biogenic amine content were Saint Laurent (BF, Pinot Blanc (S and Pinot Noir (AF.

  9. Biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierina eVisciano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood, associated with either time/temperature conditions or food technologies is discussed in the present paper from a safety and prevention point of view. In particular, storage temperature, handling practices, presence of microbial populations with decarboxylase activity and availability of free amino acids are considered the most important factors affecting the production of biogenic amines in raw seafood. On the other hand, some food technological treatments such as salting, ripening, fermentation or marination can increase the levels of biogenic amines in processed seafood. The consumption of high amount of biogenic amines, above all histamine, can result in food borne poisoning which is a worldwide problem. The European Regulation established as maximum limits for histamine, in fishery products from fish species associated with high histidine amounts, values ranging from 100 to 200 mg/kg, while for products which have undergone enzyme maturation treatment in brine, the aforementioned limits rise to 200 and 400 mg/kg. Preventive measures and emerging methods aiming at controlling the production of biogenic amines are also reported for potential application in seafood industries.

  10. Biogenic crust dynamics on sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Kinast, Shai; Yizhaq, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2012-01-01

    Sand dunes are often covered by vegetation and biogenic crusts. Despite their significant role in dune stabilization, biogenic crusts have rarely been considered in studies of dune dynamics. Using a simple model, we study the existence and stability ranges of different dune-cover states along gradients of rainfall and wind power. Two ranges of alternative stable states are identified: fixed crusted dunes and fixed vegetated dunes at low wind power, and fixed vegetated dunes and active dunes at high wind power. These results suggest a cross-over between two different forms of desertification.

  11. Synthesis of hydroxyapatite from biogenic wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawat Laonapakul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HAp is a major component of human bone, teeth and hard tissue. It is one of only a few bioactive materials. Since HAp is the most widely used ceramic biomaterial, various techniques have been developed to synthesize HAp. In recent years, the use of natural biogenic structures and materials for medical proposes has been motivated by limitations in producing synthetic materials. This article mainly focuses on the use of biogenic wastes to prepare HAp. These include bio-wastes, marine corals, eggshells, seashells and bio-membranes. In the present review, useful information about HAp preparation methodologies has been summarized for further research and development.

  12. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic Model of Manganese Carbonate Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝瑞霞; 彭省临

    1999-01-01

    Manganese carbonate can be converted to many kinds of manganese oxides when it is aerated in air and oxygen.Pure manganese carbonate can be changed into Mn3O4 and γ-MnOOH,and manganese carbonate ore can be converted to MnO2 under the air-aerating and oxygen-aerating circumstances.The oxidation process of manganese carbonate is a changing process of mineral association,and is also a converting process of valence of manganese itself.Not only equilibrium stat,but also nonequilibrium state are involved in this whole process,This process is an irreversible heterogeneous complex reaction,and oberys the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model,The oxidation rate of manganese cabonate is controlled by many factors,especially nonmanganese metallic ions which play an important role in the oxidation process of manganese carbonate.

  13. Organosulfate Formation in Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organosulfates of isoprene, α-pinene, and β-pinene have recently been identified in both laboratory-generated and ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this study, the mechanism and ubiquity of organosulfate formation in biogenic SOA is investigated by a comprehensive seri...

  14. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

    2000-08-08

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  15. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2001-08-15

    The overall purpose of the project was to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addressed how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  16. Syndepositional and postdepositional features of the manganese ore deposits of the Proterozoic Penganga group, Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, P. C.

    1988-04-01

    The Proterozoic Penganga Group consisting of terrigenous and orthochemical sediments including a manganese orebody is well developed in the northwestern part of the Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh. The manganese orebody of unmetamorphosed and undeformed, interbanded manganese oxide ore, chert, and minor calcareous shale has retained excellent syndepositional and postdepositional features both on the macro-and microscales. The primary depositional features include meso- and microbands of manganese oxide and silica of different descriptions, scour-and-fill structures, and Mn oxide micronodules. Spherical siliceous μm-sized structures and other features of biogenic origin have been observed. Diagenetic features such as fabric changes, syneresis cracks, concretionary pods, and Mn oxide nodules have been recorded. They are accompanied by penecontemporaneous deformation structures such as pinch-and-swell structures, gravity-density features, brecciation, and folding and faulting of various kinds. All these features suggest that the manganese orebody was formed in a shallow-marine environment on a stable shelf possibly behind a barrier bar and subsequently underwent diagenetic reorganization and penecontemporaneous deformation when the sediments were still in a hydroplastic state.

  17. Biogenic Methane from Coal: The Oxidation Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, L. K.; Glossner, A. W.; Landkamer, L.; Figueroa, L. A.; Mandernack, K. W.; Munakata Marr, J.

    2011-12-01

    Vast reserves of coal represent an untapped resource that can be used to produce methane gas, a cleaner energy alternative compared to standard fossil fuels. Microorganisms have demonstrated the ability to utilize coal as a carbon source, producing biogenic methane. With increasing demand for cleaner energy resources, understanding and enhancing biogenic methane production has become an area of active research. The conversion of coal to methane by microorganisms has been demonstrated experimentally by a number of research groups, but the state of the coal used as a substrate has not always been reported and may impact biogenic methane production. Microcosm experiments were designed in order to assess how the oxidation state of coal might influence methane production (e.g. as in a dewatered coal-bed natural gas system). Oxidized and un-oxidized coal samples from the Powder River Basin were incubated in microcosms inoculated with an enrichment culture that was derived from coal. Microcosms were characterized by headspace gas analysis, organic acid production, functional gene abundance (qPCR), and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the microbial consortium demonstrated the ability to utilize both oxidized and un-oxidized coal as a sole carbon source to generate methane, it was produced in higher quantities from the un-oxidized coal. This microbial community was dominated by Methanobacteriaceae (45%), epsilon-Proteobacteria (32%) and delta-Proteobacteria (13%). The results of this study provide a basis to develop strategies to enhance biogenic methane production from coal, as well as demonstrate the need for careful substrate preparation for inter-study comparisons.

  18. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    1999-06-01

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals, and the impact of these processes on the solubility of metal contaminants, e.g., uranium, chromium and nickel. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  19. Discrimination of abiogenic and biogenic alkane gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI JinXing; MI JingKui; LI ZhiSheng; HU AnPing; YANG Chun; ZHOU QingHua; SHUAI YanHua; ZHANG Ying; MA ChengHua; ZOU CaiNeng; ZHANG ShuiChang; LI Jian; NI YunYan; HU GuoYi; LUO Xia; TAO ShiZhen; ZHU GuangYou

    2008-01-01

    We have combined the analytical data of the carbon isotope distribution pattern, R/Ra and cliche values of abiogenic and biogenic (referring to the therrnogenic and bacterial or microbial) alkane gases in China with those of alkane gases from USA, Russia, Germany, Australia and other countries. Four discrimination criteria are derived from this comparative study: 1) Carbon isotopic composition is generally greater than -30‰ for abiogenic methane and less than -30‰ for biogenic methane; 2)Abiogenic alkane gases have a carbon isotopic reversal trend (Δ13c1>Δ13c2>Δ13c3>Δ13c4) with Δ13c1>-30‰ in general; 3) Gases with R/Ra>0.5 and Δ13c1- Δ13c2>0 are of abiogenic origin; 4) Gases (methane) with CH4/3He≤106 are of abiogenic origin, whereas gases with CH4/3He≥1011 are of biogenic origin.

  20. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R.; Feitosa, L. O.; Ballottin, D.; Marcato, P. D.; Tasic, L.; Durán, N.

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (- 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  1. Rett syndrome - Stimulation of endogenous biogenic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelligra, R.; Norton, R. D.; Wilkinson, R.; Leon, H. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient hypercapnic hyperoxemia was induced in two Rett syndrome children by the administration of a gaseous mixture of 80 percent O2 and 20 percent CO2. Time course studies of neurotransmitters and their metabolites showed an immediate and marked increase in central biogenic amine turnover following inhalation of the gas mixture. The increased turnover of biogenic amines was associated with improved clinical changes. This suggests a coupled relationship and provides further support for an etiological role of neurotransmitter dysfunction in Rett syndrome. In a complementary study, elevation of pulmonary CO2 by application of a simple rebreathing device resulted in improvement of abnormal blood gases and elimination of the Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern of the Rett syndrome. Near normalization of the EEG occurred when a normal respiratory pattern was imposed by means of a respirator. Taken together, these results lead to the preliminary conclusion that cerebral hypoxemia secondary to abnormal respiratory function may contribute to diminished production of biogenic amines in Rett syndrome.

  2. Discrimination of abiogenic and biogenic alkane gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We have combined the analytical data of the carbon isotope distribution pattern, R/Ra and CH4/3He values of abiogenic and biogenic (referring to the thermogenic and bacterial or microbial) alkane gases in China with those of alkane gases from USA, Russia, Germany, Australia and other countries. Four discrimination criteria are derived from this comparative study: 1) Carbon isotopic composition is generally greater than -30‰ for abiogenic methane and less than -30‰ for biogenic methane; 2) Abiogenic alkane gases have a carbon isotopic reversal trend (δ 13C1> δ 13C2> δ 13C3> δ 13C4) with δ 13C1>-30‰ in general; 3) Gases with R/Ra >0.5 and δ 13C11 δ 13C2>0 are of abiogenic origin; 4) Gases (meth- ane) with CH4/3He≤106 are of abiogenic origin, whereas gases with CH4/3He≥1011 are of biogenic origin.

  3. Constraints on superoxide mediated formation of manganese oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deric R. Learman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn oxides are among the most reactive sorbents and oxidants within the environment, where they play a central role in the cycling of nutrients, metals, and carbon. Recent discoveries have identified superoxide (O2- (both of biogenic and abiogenic origin as an effective oxidant of Mn(II leading to the formation of Mn oxides. Here we examined the conditions under which abiotically produced superoxide led to oxidative precipitation of Mn and the solid-phases produced. Oxidized Mn, as both aqueous Mn(III and Mn(III/IV oxides, was only observed in the presence of active catalase, indicating that hydrogen peroxide, a product of the reaction of O2- with Mn(II, inhibits the oxidation process presumably through the reduction of Mn(III. Citrate and pyrophosphate increased the yield of oxidized Mn but decreased the amount of Mn oxide produced via formation of Mn(III-ligand complexes. While complexing ligands played a role in stabilizing Mn(III, they did not eliminate the inhibition of net Mn(III formation by H2O2. The Mn oxides precipitated were highly disordered colloidal hexagonal birnessite, similar to those produced by biotically generated superoxide. Yet, in contrast to the large particulate Mn oxides formed by biogenic superoxide, abiotic Mn oxides did not ripen to larger, more crystalline phases. This suggests that the deposition of crystalline Mn oxides within the environment requires a biological, or at least organic, influence. This work provides the first direct evidence that, under conditions relevant to natural waters, oxidation of Mn(II by superoxide can occur and lead to formation of Mn oxides. For organisms that oxidize Mn(II by producing superoxide, these findings may also point to other microbially mediated processes, in particular enzymatic hydrogen peroxide degradation and/or production of organic ligand metabolites, that allow for Mn oxide formation.

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  5. Manganese Research Health Project (MHRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    of a GLP compliant micronucleus assay in mice according to the OECD Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals, OECD 474: Mammalian Erythrocyte... Micronucleus Test . Experimental Design The basic experimental design used at ILS and proposed for the definitive in vivo micronucleus assay in manganese...regimen, would be expected to produce lethality”. The limit dose for the in vivo micronucleus assay based on OECD 474 is 2000 mg/kg and testing in a

  6. Mineral resource of the month: manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corathers, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is a silver-colored metal resembling iron and often found in conjunction with iron. The earliest-known human use of manganese compounds was in the Stone Age, when early humans used manganese dioxide as pigments in cave paintings. In ancient Rome and Egypt, people started using it to color or remove the color from glass - a practice that continued to modern times. Today, manganese is predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production. Steel and cast iron together provide the largest market for manganese (historically 85 to 90 percent), but it is also alloyed with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Its importance to steel cannot be overstated, as almost all types of steel contain manganese and could not exist without it.

  7. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... sodium citrate to complete the reaction. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2,...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese violet. 73.2775 Section 73.2775 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR... manganese violet is a violet pigment obtained by reacting phosphoric acid, ammonium...

  9. Biogenic aerosol over the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, P.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Matthias-Maser, S.; Godoi, R. H.; van Grieken, R.; Ebert, M.; Huth, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Taylor, P.; Artaxo, P.; Andreae, M. O.

    2002-12-01

    Biogenic particles form the major component of the atmospheric aerosol above and within the vast Amazonian tropical rainforest under non-polluted "background" conditions. We have employed a variety of different analytical techniques in order to try to better characterise the composition and temporal variation of this aerosol fraction. Microscopic examination reveals that many different types of biological particles are present, including fungal and fern spores, pollen grains, microbes, plant debris and insect parts. These forest-derived particles, and the elements, ions and compounds associated with them, are abundant in both the coarse and fine aerosol fractions, with the highest mass concentrations generally in the coarse fraction. There is a distinct increase in their concentrations at ground level at night. This is probably due to the formation of a shallow nocturnal inversion, which reduces dispersion of the aerosol, whilst convective mixing during the day leads to efficient dilution with air from aloft. Preferential nighttime emission of some types of biogenic particles may also contribute to the observed day-night variation.

  10. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvier-Brown, N.C.; Goldstein, A.H.; Worton, D.R.; Matross, D.M.; Gilman, J.B.; Kuster, W.C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J.A.; Cahill, M.J.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Meth

  11. Preparation of Manganese Oxide Nanobelts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jisen WANG; Jinquan SUN; Ying BAO; Xiufang BIAN

    2003-01-01

    Oriented nanobelts of manganese oxide have been firstly and successfully prepared by a microemulsion techniqueunder controlled circumstances. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronmicroscope (TEM). Influences of sodium chloride and annealed temperature on the synthesis of Mn3O4 nanobeltswere investigated. It was found that NaCl is the key factor to synthesize oriented Mn3O4 nanobelts and 827 K isoptimum temperature to produce fine nanobelts. Oriented growth mechanism of Mn3O4 nanobelts was discussed.

  12. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. eLinares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermented foods are within the food products more often complained of having caused biogenic amines poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain significant levels of biogenic amines, specially tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report about cheese elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting biogenic amines levels. Synthesis of biogenic amines is possible only when three conditions converge: i availability of the substrate amino acids; ii presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and iii environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxilation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization, use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH… which will be discussed in this chapter.

  13. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes.

  14. Revision of the Export Tax Rebate Policy for Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>According to a newly released circular by the Finance Ministry and the State Administration of Taxation, the export tax rebate policy for the manganese products under the tax code No. 811100100 is eliminated as from August 1, 2005. These products mainly include un-wrought manganese, manganese scrap and manganese powder.

  15. Total balance of biogenic fuels for thermal uses; Ganzheitliche Bilanzierung verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe zur thermischen Nutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, S.; Kaltschmitt, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1996-12-31

    In this situation of unfavourable energy price levels, the use of biogenic fuels for power supply can be recommended only if it serves to reduce environmental pollution. Against this background and on the basis of a primary energy balance, the authors attempted a total balance of selected enfironmental effects (global heating and acidification potential) of biomass use as compared to fossil fuel combustion. (orig) [Deutsch] ie Nutzung biogener Festbrennstoffe zur Energienachfragedeckung ist bei dem gegenwaertigen unguenstigen Energiepreisniveau nur dann zu rechtfertigen, wenn es durch die Biomassenutzung zu einer Reduzierung der energiebedingten Umwelteffekte kommt. Vor disem Hintergrund werden ausgehend von der Primaerenergiebilanz ausgewaehlte Umwelteffekte (d.h. das Treibhaus- und das Versauerungspotential) einer Biomassenutzung im Vergleich zu einer Nutzung fossiler Energietraeger ganzheitlich bilanziert. Die wesentlichen Ergebnisse werden zusammengefasst und interpretiert. (orig)

  16. Biogenic catalysis of soil formation on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    The high iron abundance and the weak ferric iron spectral features of martian surface material are consistent with nanophase (nm-sized) iron oxide minerals as a major source of iron in the bright region soil on Mars. Nanophase iron oxide minerals, such as ferrihydrite and schwertmannite, and nanophase forms of hematite and goethite are formed by both biotic and abiotic processes on Earth. The presence of these minerals on Mars does not indicate biological activity on Mars, but it does raise the possibility. This work includes speculation regarding the possibility of biogenic soils on Mars based on previous observations and analyses. A remote sensing goal of upcoming missions should be to determine if nanophase iron oxide minerals, clay silicates and carbonates are present in the martian surface material. These minerals are important indicators for exobiology and their presence on Mars would invoke a need for further investigation and sample return from these sites.

  17. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN SELECTED WINES DURING WINEMAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Flasarová

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the development of selected biogenic amines (histamine; tyramine; phenylethylamine; putrescine; agmatine; and cadaverine during the winemaking in 10 selected species grown in Central Europe in 2008. The analysis was performed using ion-exchange chromatography by the sodium-citrate buffers with the post-column ninhydrin derivatization and photometric detection. A comparison of the content of biogenic amines in red and wine varieties showed that red wines have higher concentrations of biogenic amines.

  18. Manganese-based Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Baker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant gap between the energy product, BH, where B is the magnetic flux density and H is the magnetic field strength, of both the traditional ferrite and AlNiCo permanent magnets of less than 10 MGOe and that of the rare earth magnets of greater than 30 MGOe. This is a gap that Mn-based magnets could potentially, inexpensively, fill. This Special Issue presents work on the development of both types of manganese permanent magnets. Some of the challenges involved in the development of these magnets include improving the compounds’ energy product, increasing the thermal stability of these metastable compounds, and producing them in quantity as a bulk material.[...

  19. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  20. Manganese ferrite thin films Part II: Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, W.S.

    1972-01-01

    Some properties of evaporated manganese ferrite thin films are investigated, e.g. resistivity, magnetization reversal, Curie temperature, Faraday rotation and optical absorption. The properties are partly related to the partial oxygen pressure present during a preceding annealing process.

  1. Biogenic amines in meat and fermented meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Stadnik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends in food quality and safety promote an increasing search for trace compounds that can affect human health. Biogenic amines belong to this group of substances. They can cause distinctive pharmacological, physiological and toxic effects in organisms. Their amounts are usually increasing as a consequence of the use of poor quality raw materials, during controlled or spontaneous microbial fermentation or in the course of food spoilage. The origin of biogenic amines makes them suitable as chemical indicators of the hygienic quality and freshness of some foods being associated to the degree of food fermentation or degradation. The development of appropriate manufacturing technologies to obtain products free or nearly free from biogenic amines is a challenge for the meat industry. This review briefly summarises current knowledge on the biological implications of biogenic amines on human health and collects data on the factors affecting their formation in meat and fermented meat products.

  2. Origin of organism-dependent biogenic silica quartz formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2011-12-15

    Organism-dependent biogenic quartz formation in the steady-state environment is a phenomenon that can address the global environmental issues such as diagenetic evolution, biogeochemical cycling, and reservoir formation, but detailed studies have not been performed so far. Here, steady-state quartz formation is studied for amorphous silica of different biogenic origin on the basis of the recently established mechanistic model [Sato et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 18131]. Amorphous silica originated from rice husks possesses angstrom-scale pores larger by 1.3 Å than those originated from diatom algae. The slight difference of pore size dramatically reduces activation energies of water diffusion by 78% and reactions of water molecules at pore surfaces by 47%, resulting in the reduction of activation energy of biogenic quartz formation by 64%. The present findings evidence that angstrom-scale pores intrinsically residing in the amorphous matrix are the organism-dependent origin of steady-state biogenic quartz formation.

  3. Biogenic amines in italian pecorino cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirone, Maria; Tofalo, Rosanna; Visciano, Pierina; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations, and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (∼62.000t of production in 2010). Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or pasteurized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA). Bacterial amino acid decarboxylase activity and BA content have to be investigated within the complex microbial community of raw milk cheese for different cheese technologies. The results emphasize the necessity of controlling the indigenous bacterial population responsible for high production of BA and the use of competitive adjunct cultures could be suggested. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA's in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, water activity, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge), and the presence of cofactor (pyridoxal phosphate, availability of aminases and deaminases). In fact physico-chemical parameters seem to favor biogenic amine-positive microbiota; both of these environmental factors can easily be modulated, in order to control growth of undesirable microorganisms. Generally, the total content of BA's in Pecorino cheeses can range from about 100-2400

  4. Organosulfate formation in biogenic secondary organic aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, Jason D; Gómez-González, Yadian; Chan, Arthur W H; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Shahgholi, Mona; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O; Offenberg, John H; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Maenhaut, Willy; Claeys, Magda; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2008-09-11

    Organosulfates of isoprene, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene have recently been identified in both laboratory-generated and ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this study, the mechanism and ubiquity of organosulfate formation in biogenic SOA is investigated by a comprehensive series of laboratory photooxidation (i.e., OH-initiated oxidation) and nighttime oxidation (i.e., NO3-initiated oxidation under dark conditions) experiments using nine monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, d-limonene, l-limonene, alpha-terpinene, gamma-terpinene, terpinolene, Delta(3)-carene, and beta-phellandrene) and three monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, d-limonene, and l-limonene), respectively. Organosulfates were characterized using liquid chromatographic techniques coupled to electrospray ionization combined with both linear ion trap and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Organosulfates are formed only when monoterpenes are oxidized in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol, a result consistent with prior work. Archived laboratory-generated isoprene SOA and ambient filter samples collected from the southeastern U.S. were reexamined for organosulfates. By comparing the tandem mass spectrometric and accurate mass measurements collected for both the laboratory-generated and ambient aerosol, previously uncharacterized ambient organic aerosol components are found to be organosulfates of isoprene, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and limonene-like monoterpenes (e.g., myrcene), demonstrating the ubiquity of organosulfate formation in ambient SOA. Several of the organosulfates of isoprene and of the monoterpenes characterized in this study are ambient tracer compounds for the occurrence of biogenic SOA formation under acidic conditions. Furthermore, the nighttime oxidation experiments conducted under highly acidic conditions reveal a viable mechanism for the formation of previously identified nitrooxy organosulfates found in ambient nighttime aerosol samples. We estimate

  5. Composition and recovery method for electrolytic manganese residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶长元; 李明艳; 刘作华; 杜军

    2009-01-01

    According to the statistic analysis,the reserve of manganese in electrolytic manganese residue deposit is over 780 kt. The average contents of available manganese and ammonium reach 3.90% and 1.68% (mass fraction),respectively. Large amount of manganese compounds and ammonium sulfate are detruded without any treatment or recovery. The compositions of the main elements in electrolytic manganese residue were analyzed comprehensively based on the extensive research data. According to the new development of electrolytic manganese residue comprehensively used in recent years,a water washing residue-twice precipitation process was also proposed. The experimental results indicate that manganese dioxide silicon dioxide and calcium sulfate are presented as amorphous state in the manganese residues. The recovery rates of manganese and nitrogen reach up to 99.5% and 94.5 %,respectively. The recovery process can be easily implemented,environment-friendly and fitting for industrial production.

  6. On Mineral Retrosynthesis of a Complex Biogenic Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Ashit Rao; José L Arias; Helmut Cölfen

    2017-01-01

    Synergistic relations between organic molecules and mineral precursors regulate biogenic mineralization. Given the remarkable material properties of the egg shell as a biogenic ceramic, it serves as an important model to elucidate biomineral growth. With established roles of complex anionic biopolymers and a heterogeneous organic scaffold in egg shell mineralization, the present study explores the regulation over mineralization attained by applying synthetic polymeric counterparts (polyethyle...

  7. Geochemical characteristics and origin of light hydrocarbons in biogenic gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The light hydrocarbon geochemical characteristics of biogenic gases from Sebei 1 gas field in the Qaidam Basin, Baoshan gas field in the Baoshan Basin and Alaxin gas field, Puqian gas pool, Aonan gas pool in the Songliao Basin are studied and the origin is discussed based on the composition and isotope data of gases. The isoalkane contents among light hydrocarbons in natural gas show a negative relationship with δ13C1 values. The isoalkane contents of the gases with δ13C1 values of less than ?60‰ are also high with more than 40% among light hydrocarbons in Sebei 1 gas field and Puqian gas pool. Moreover, the 2,2-dimethylbutane and 2-methylpentane, mainly sourced from bacteria, have predominance among isoalkanes, which suggests that light hydrocarbons in biogenic gases from these gas fields or pools were probably generated by microbial action. However, the cycloalkane contents among light hydrocarbons in biogenic gas are related to δ13C1 values positively. In Alaxin gas field and Aonan gas pool, where δ13C1 values of biogenic gases are less than ?60‰, the average contents of cycloalkane are higher than 44%. Light hydrocarbons among biogenic gases from these gas fields were probably generated by catalysis. The isoalkane and cycloalkane contents among light hydrocarbons from biogenic gases in the Baoshan gas field are both high, which might be generated by these two actions. The results show that the data of light hydrocarbons in biogenic gas can provide important information for understanding the generation mechanisms of light hydrocarbons during geological evolution and identifying biogenic gas and low mature gas.

  8. Biogenic amines in wines from three Spanish regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete, José M; Ferrer, Sergi; Polo, Lucía; Pardo, Isabel

    2005-02-23

    One hundred and sixty-three wines from La Rioja, Utiel-Requena, and Tarragona were analyzed to determine if there were any differences in the concentrations of six biogenic amines that are found in these three regions. The influence of grape variety, type of vinification, wine pH, malolactic fermentation, and storage in bottle on biogenic amine concentrations was studied. Results show important differences in putrescine and histamine concentrations among regions, varieties of grape, and type of wine; differences were less appreciable for the remaining biogenic amines studied. Low pH prevented biogenic amine formation. Malolactic fermentation and short storage periods in bottle (3-6 months) showed increases in histamine concentration, whereas longer periods of storage led to a general decrease in histamine. Several strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated in this work, and their ability to form biogenic amines was assayed in synthetic media, grape must, and wine. Grape varieties, different types of winemaking, pH, and lactic acid bacteria may be responsible for the differences observed in the biogenic amine concentrations of the wines analyzed.

  9. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  10. Biogeochemical cycling of manganese in Oneida Lake, New York: whole lake studies of manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    Oneida Lake, New York is a eutrophic freshwater lake known for its abundant manganese nodules and a dynamic manganese cycle. Temporal and spatial distribution of soluble and particulate manganese in the water column of the lake were analyzed over a 3-year period and correlated with other variables such as oxygen, pH, and temperature. Only data from 1988 are shown. Manganese is removed from the water column in the spring via conversion to particulate form and deposited in the bottom sediments. This removal is due to biological factors, as the lake Eh/pH conditions alone can not account for the oxidation of the soluble manganese Mn(II). During the summer months the manganese from microbial reduction moves from the sediments to the water column. In periods of stratification the soluble Mn(II) builds up to concentrations of 20 micromoles or more in the bottom waters. When mixing occurs, the soluble Mn(II) is rapidly removed via oxidation. This cycle occurs more than once during the summer, with each manganese atom probably being used several times for the oxidation of organic carbon. At the end of the fall, whole lake concentrations of manganese stabilize, and remain at about 1 micromole until the following summer, when the cycle begins again. Inputs and outflows from the lake indicate that the active Mn cycle is primarily internal, with a small accumulation each year into ferromanganese nodules located in the oxic zones of the lake.

  11. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, W W; Angle, C R; Willcockson, N K; Padula, M A; Korn, T

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a "frog shop" for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6-10 years before and 1.2-3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m3 in 29% and 0.2 mg/m3 in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR' interval) and the rates of change at low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (0.15-0.40 Hz). MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used. The five frog shop workers had abnormal sympathovagal balance with decreased high frequency variability (increased ln LF/ln HF). Seven of the eight workers had symptoms of autonomic dysfunction and significantly decreased heart rate variability (rMSSD) but these did not distinguish the relative exposure. Mood or affect was disturbed in all with associated changes in short-term memory and attention in four of the subjects. There were no significant correlations with serum or urine manganese. Power spectrum analysis of 24-h ambulatory ECG indicating a decrease in parasympathetic high frequency activation of heart rate variability may provide a sensitive index of central autonomic dysfunction reflecting increased exposure to manganese, although the contribution of exposures to solvents and other metals cannot be excluded. Neurotoxicity due to the gouging

  12. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    North, P; Jablonka, P; Hill, V; Shetrone, M; Letarte, B; Lemasle, B; Venn, K A; Battaglia, G; Tolstoy, E; Irwin, M J; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2012-01-01

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other elements in these galaxies, including alpha and iron-peak ones, which allowed us to build [Mn/Fe] and [Mn/alpha] versus [Fe/H] diagrams. The Mn abundances imply sub-solar [Mn/Fe] ratios for the stars in all four galaxies examined. In Sculptor, [Mn/Fe] stays roughly constant between [Fe/H]\\sim -1.8 and -1.4 and decreases at higher iron abundance. In Fornax, [Mn/Fe] does not vary in any significant way with [Fe/H]. The relation between [Mn/alpha] and [Fe/H] for the dSph galaxies is clearly systematically offset from that for the Milky Way, which reflects the different star formation histories of the respective galaxies. The [Mn/alpha] behavior can be interpreted as a result of the metal-dependent Mn yields of type II and ...

  13. Metal Inhibition of Growth and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J.; Sposito, G.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (MnO2) are ubiquitous nanoparticulate minerals that contribute to the adsorption of nutrient and toxicant metals, the oxidative degradation of various organic compounds, and the respiration of metal-reducing bacteria in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The formation of these minerals is catalyzed by a diverse and widely-distributed group of bacteria and fungi, often through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn(II) to Mn(IV). In metal-impacted ecosystems, toxicant metals may alter the viability and metabolic activity of Mn-oxidizing organisms, thereby limiting the conditions under which biogenic MnO2 can form and diminishing their potential as adsorbent materials. Pseudomonas putida GB-1 (P. putida GB-1) is a model Mn-oxidizing laboratory culture representative of freshwater and soil biofilm-forming bacteria. Manganese oxidation in P. putida GB-1 occurs via two single-electron-transfer reactions, involving a multicopper oxidase enzyme found on the bacterial outer membrane surface. Near the onset of the stationary phase of growth, dark brown MnO2 particles are deposited in a matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, thus forming heterogeneous biomineral assemblages. In this study, we assessed the influence of various transition metals on microbial growth and manganese oxidation capacity in a P. putida GB-1 culture propagated in a nutrient-rich growth medium. The concentration-response behavior of actively growing P. putida GB-1 cells was investigated for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at pH ≈ 6 in the presence and absence of 1 mM Mn. Toxicity parameters such as EC0, EC50 and Hillslope, and EC100 were obtained from the sigmoidal concentration-response curves. The extent of MnO2 formation in the presence of the various metal cations was documented 24, 50, 74 and 104 h after the metal-amended medium was inoculated. Toxicity values were compared to twelve physicochemical properties of the metals tested. Significant

  14. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  15. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  16. Seasonal trends of biogenic terpene emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan Woodfin; Milford, Jana; Guenther, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from six coniferous tree species, i.e. Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Picea pungens (Blue Spruce), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir) and Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone Pine), as well as from two deciduous species, Quercus gambelii (Gamble Oak) and Betula occidentalis (Western River Birch) were studied over a full annual growing cycle. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions rates were quantified in a total of 1236 individual branch enclosure samples. MT dominated coniferous emissions, producing greater than 95% of BVOC emissions. MT and SQT demonstrated short-term emission dependence with temperature. Two oxygenated MT, 1,8-cineol and piperitone, were both light and temperature dependent. Basal emission rates (BER, normalized to 1000μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 30°C) were generally higher in spring and summer than in winter; MT seasonal BER from the coniferous trees maximized between 1.5 and 6.0μgg(-1)h(-1), while seasonal lows were near 0.1μgg(-1)h(-1). The fractional contribution of individual MT to total emissions was found to fluctuate with season. SQT BER measured from the coniferous trees ranged from temperature dependence in emissions modeling, was not found to exhibit discernible growth season trends. A seasonal correction factor proposed by others in previous work to account for a sinusoidal shaped emission pattern was applied to the data. Varying levels of agreement were found between the data and model results for the different plant species seasonal data sets using this correction. Consequently, the analyses on this extensive data set suggest that it is not feasible to apply a universal seasonal correction factor across different vegetation species. A modeling exercise comparing two case scenarios, (1) without and (2) with consideration of the seasonal changes in emission factors illustrated large deviations when emission factors are applied for other seasons than those in which

  17. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); H.J. Kuijpers (Harold)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instabi

  18. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Kuijpers, H.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later,

  19. An evaluation of pretreatment agents for the stimulation of secondary biogenic coalbed natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zaixing

    permanganate treated samples, which had a much lower TOC (5%), were more promising in terms of biological conversion potential. The biometer assay data indicated that up to 1.1% of the coal carbon was mineralized to carbon dioxide (CO2) within a period of two weeks. On this basis, permanganate treated samples were utilized in subsequent experiments to evaluate potential biogenic methane generation. For the permanganate treated samples, 5.4% of the coal carbon was solubilized/depolymerized, and 3.2% of the soluble carbon was converted to methane (CH4). The methane was rapidly generated and peaked at 40-days with a cumulative amount of 93.4 mumol/g coal (73.9 standard cubic feet (Scf)/ton coal equivalent using linear extrapolation). This compares very favorably to the 22-74 Scf/ton said to exist within the PBR coalbeds prior to resource exploitation. Our data also showed that a small fraction, 143 mumol/g coal, of the soluble carbon which was designated as the volatile fraction (i.e., the purgeable fraction removable by sparging with N2 gas) is essential to the generation of biogenic methane from coal derived constituents. Subsequent studies evaluating the influence of the chemical pretreatment agents (HNO3, NaOH, catalyzed H 2O2, KMnO4) on the subsequent enzymatic conversion of subbituminous coal using a fungal manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced by the agaric white-rot fungus Bjerkandera adusta have shown that chemical pretreatments can also enhance the coal solubilization performance of MnP.

  20. Manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen and scrap recycling workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, F; Kristiansen, J; Lauritsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Cast iron products are alloyed with small quantities of manganese, and foundry furnacemen are potentially exposed to manganese during tapping and handling of smelts. Manganese is a neurotoxic substance that accumulates in the central nervous system, where it may cause a neurological disorder that...

  1. Kinetics of Nitrogen Diffusion in Granular Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-zhu; XU Chu-shao; ZHAO Yue-ping

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and the influence of time on granular manganese nitriding were studied by means of a vacuum resistance furnace, X-ray diffraction technique, and LECO TC-436 oxygen/nitrogen determinator. The longer the nitriding time, the more the nitrogen pickup. Except for a trace of oxide MnO that developed, the metal manganese could thoroughly be nitrided to form Mn4N and a little ζ-phase (the stoichiometric components as Mn2N) with the nitriding time lasting. A kinetic model is developed to reveal the nitriding situation and agrees well with the experimental results.

  2. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and post pollination. For Ficus hispida, there are three floral stages of a fig-wasp dependency mechanism: receptive, post pollinator and interfloral. Of 28 compounds detected, transcaryophyllene with trans-β-farnesene were the most important at the receptor stage, trans-caryophyllene was the most abundant at the post-pollinator stage, and isoprene was the most abundant in the interfloral stage. Alpinia kwangsiensis presents two morphologies for the reproductive parts of the flower. The "anaflexistyle" morphology has the flower style lowered in the

  3. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  4. Biogenic amines in smear and mould-ripened cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Pleva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the monitoring of six biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, putrescine, and cadaverine and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine in 30 samples of dairy products purchased in the Czech Republic, namely in 15 samples of mould-ripened cheeses and in 15 samples of smear-ripened cheeses. A further goal was the microbiological analysis of the individual samples of cheeses (total count of microorganisms, number of enterobacteria, enterococci, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and moulds. The monitored biogenic amines were analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography equipped with a UV/VIS DAD detector. The amount of enterobacteria in fresh cheese exceeded 105 CFU.g‑1. In smear-ripened cheese flavourless (Romadur type, the amount was >103 CFU.g-1 and 104-105 CFU.g-1 in smear-ripened cheese with flavour. Biogenic amines were observed in two groups of blue cheeses (white veined cheese and blue veined cheese and smear-ripened cheeses. In both groups, there is a possibility of the presence of biogenic amines because the number of microorganisms and concentration of free amino acids increase during ripening. In ten samples of soft smear-ripening acid cheese and in smear-ripened cheese, the total content of biogenic amines were 22-1000 mg.kg-1 and in 5 samples of these cheeses, it was in range 1000-6000 mg.kg-1. The total amount of biogenic amines in the blue cheeses were in range 40-600 mg.kg-1. The presense of the tyramine was observed in the all analysed cheeses. The tyramine producing strains generated more than 900 mg.kg-1 of this biogenic amine. The production of tryptamine in the analysed cheeses was not proved by this study. The results of this study show that biogenic amines and polyamines are common in cheese. However, in some cases, they can pose a significant health danger for consumers. Any legislative control authority does not monitor them, as they are secondary metabolites even

  5. Mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Jriuan; Shafi, Kurikka V.P.M.; Ulman, Abraham; Loos, Katja; Yang, Nan-Loh; Cui, Min-Hui; Vogt, Thomas; Estournès, Claude; Locke, Dave C.

    2004-01-01

    Designing nanoparticles for practical applications requires knowledge and control of how their desired properties relate to their composition and structure. Here, we present a detailed systematic study of mixed iron-manganese oxide nanoparticles, showing that ultrasonication provides the high-energy

  6. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varghese Mathew; Jochan Joseph; Sabu Jacob; K E Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The preparation of manganese malonate crystals by gel method and its spectroscopic studies are reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern reveals the crystalline nature. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the crystals are recorded and the vibrational assignments are given with possible explanations. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is used to measure the bandgap (g) of the material.

  7. Manganese ore tailing: optimization of acid leaching conditions and recovery of soluble manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Olívia de Souza Heleno; Carvalho, Cornélio de Freitas; Silva, Gilmare Antônia da; Santos, Cláudio Gouvêa Dos

    2015-01-01

    Manganese recovery from industrial ore processing waste by means of leaching with sulfuric acid was the objective of this study. Experimental conditions were optimized by multivariate experimental design approaches. In order to study the factors affecting leaching, a screening step was used involving a full factorial design with central point for three variables in two levels (2(3)). The three variables studied were leaching time, concentration of sulfuric acid and sample amount. The three factors screened were shown to be relevant and therefore a Doehlert design was applied to determine the best working conditions for leaching and to build the response surface. By applying the best leaching conditions, the concentrations of 12.80 and 13.64 %w/w of manganese for the global sample and for the fraction -44 + 37 μm, respectively, were found. Microbeads of chitosan were tested for removal of leachate acidity and recovering of soluble manganese. Manganese recovery from the leachate was 95.4%. Upon drying the leachate, a solid containing mostly manganese sulfate was obtained, showing that the proposed optimized method is efficient for manganese recovery from ore tailings.

  8. Biogenic gases in tropical floodplain river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victória Ramos Ballester

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the distribution of biogenic gases in the floodplain of the Mogi-Guaçu River (São Paulo, Brazil enabled the establishment of a "redox hierarchy", in which the main channel was the most oxidizing environment, followed by Diogo Lake, with Infernão Lake having the most reducing conditions of the subsystems evaluated. Diogo Lake exported about 853.4 g C.m-2.year-1, of which, 14.6% was generated from methanogenesis and 36.7% by aerobic respiration. For Infernão Lake, these values were 2016 g C.m-2.year-1, 1.8 % and 41.5 %, respectively. Carbon export by these systems was predominantly in the form of CO2, which was responsible for the release of 728.78 g C.m-2.year-1 at Diogo Lake and 1979.72 g C.m-2. year-1 at Infernão Lake. Such patterns may result from the nature of the hydrological conditions, the action of the hydroperiod, and morphological characteristics of the environment.A análise da distribuição de gases biogênicos na planície de inundação do Rio Mogi Guaçu (São Paulo, Brasil possibilitou o estabelecimento de um gradiente redox para os sistemas aquáticos avaliados, em que o canal principal do rio apresentou-se como o ambiente mais oxidado, seguido da Lagoa do Diogo, e a Lagoa do Infernão apresentando as condições mais redutoras entre os ambientes em questão. A Lagoa do Diogo exporta um total de 853,4 g C.m-2.ano-1, do qual 14,6% é produzido pela metanogênese e 36,7% pela respiração aeróbia. Para a Lagoa do Infernão estes valores foram respectivamente de 2.016 g C.m-2.ano-1, 1,8% e de 41,5%. A exportação de carbono por estes sistemas é realizada, predominantemente na forma de CO2, nos valores de 728,78 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Diogo e 1.979,72 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Infernão. Estes padrões parecem estar relacionados com a natureza das condições hidrológicas, com a ação do hidroperíodo e com as características morfológicas do ambiente.

  9. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina-Maria Bordean

    Full Text Available Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  10. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to co

  11. Conditions allowing the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.M.L.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken to reveal the conditions that allow the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.The starters most commonly used in the Dutch cheese industry do not have decarboxylative properties. Only if the milk or curd is contaminated with non-starter bacteria, amine formation may be observ

  12. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  13. Biogenic and synthetic high magnesium calcite - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xia; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Systematic studies on the Mg distributions, the crystal orientations, the formation mechanisms and the mechanical properties of biogenic high-Mg calcites in different marine organisms were summarized in detail in this review. The high-Mg calcites in the hard tissues of marine organisms mentioned generally own a few common features as follows. Firstly, the Mg distribution is not uniform in most of the minerals. Secondly, high-Mg calcite biominerals are usually composed of nanoparticles that own almost the same crystallographic orientations and thus they behave like single crystals or mesocrystals. Thirdly, the formation of thermodynamically unstable high-Mg calcites in marine organisms under mild conditions is affected by three key factors, that is, the formation of amorphous calcium (magnesium) carbonate precursor, the control of polymorph via biomolecules and the high Mg/Ca ratios in modern sea. Lastly, the existence of Mg ions in the Mg-containing calcite may improve the mechanical properties of biogenic minerals. Furthermore, the key progress in the synthesis of high-Mg calcites in the laboratory based on the formation mechanisms of the biogenic high-Mg calcites was reviewed. Many researchers have realized the synthesis of high-Mg calcites in the laboratory under ambient conditions with the help of intermediate amorphous phase, mixed solvents, organic/inorganic surfaces and soluble additives. Studies on the structural analysis and formation mechanisms of thermodynamically unstable biogenic high-Mg calcite minerals may shed light on the preparation of functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  14. Modeling biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianlin; Wang, Peng; Ying, Qi; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Jianjun; Ge, Xinlei; Li, Xinghua; Jiang, Jingkun; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Yingyi

    2017-01-01

    A revised Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with updated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields and a more detailed description of SOA formation from isoprene oxidation was applied to study the spatial and temporal distribution of SOA in China in the entire year of 2013. Predicted organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon and volatile organic compounds agreed favorably with observations at several urban areas, although the high OC concentrations in wintertime in Beijing were under-predicted. Predicted summer SOA was generally higher (10-15 µg m-3) due to large contributions of isoprene (country average, 61 %), although the relative importance varies in different regions. Winter SOA was slightly lower and was mostly due to emissions of alkane and aromatic compounds (51 %). Contributions of monoterpene SOA was relatively constant (8-10 %). Overall, biogenic SOA accounted for approximately 75 % of total SOA in summer, 50-60 % in autumn and spring, and 24 % in winter. The Sichuan Basin had the highest predicted SOA concentrations in the country in all seasons, with hourly concentrations up to 50 µg m-3. Approximately half of the SOA in all seasons was due to the traditional equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile components followed by oligomerization, while the remaining SOA was mainly due to reactive surface uptake of isoprene epoxide (5-14 %), glyoxal (14-25 %) and methylglyoxal (23-28 %). Sensitivity analyses showed that formation of SOA from biogenic emissions was significantly enhanced due to anthropogenic emissions. Removing all anthropogenic emissions while keeping the biogenic emissions unchanged led to total SOA concentrations of less than 1 µg m-3, which suggests that manmade emissions facilitated biogenic SOA formation and controlling anthropogenic emissions would result in reduction of both anthropogenic and biogenic SOA.

  15. The Potential of the Yeast Debaryomyces hansenii H525 to Degrade Biogenic Amines in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Bäumlisberger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six yeasts from different genera were investigated for their ability to metabolize biogenic amines. About half of the yeast strains produced one or more different biogenic amines, but some strains of Debaryomyces hansenii and Yarrowia lipolytica were also able to degrade such compounds. The most effective strain D. hanseniii H525 metabolized a broad spectrum of biogenic amines by growing and resting cells. Degradation of biogenic amines by this yeast isolate could be attributed to a peroxisomal amine oxidase activity. Strain H525 may be useful as a starter culture to reduce biogenic amines in fermented food.

  16. Utilisation of biogenic waste through hydrothermal carbonisation; Nutzung biogener Reststoffe mit hydrothermaler Carbonisierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badoux, Francois [AVA-CO2, Zug (Switzerland)

    2011-03-15

    If deployed properly, biogenic residues and biomass, which could not be used for food production, may serve as a valuable resource, too. The preferred method to do so profitably is hydrothermal carbonization (HTC). The Swiss company AVA-CO2 brought this process to industrial maturity and recently presented an HTC plant in Karlsruhe. Research partner is the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The HTC method processes various types of wet and dry biomass into CO{sub 2}-neutral biocoal with high calorific value or biochar for soil improvement. The process, running at a pressure of 22-25 bar and temperatures of 210-220 C, is robust and exothermic. The industrial-size demonstration plant features a 14-cubic-meter reactor and processes up to 8,400 tons of biomass per year. A typical plant for the industry will consist of 6 to 12 reactors, and thus have an annual capacity of 50,000 up to 100,000 tons of biomass. Thanks to the modular principle, a plant can at any time be increased to any desired capacity level. The HTC plant developed by AVA-CO2 is reliable and can be seamlessly integrated into a client's continuous production processes. (orig.)

  17. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-quan Lin; Guo-hua Gu; Hui Wang; Ren-feng Zhu; You-cai Liu; and Jian-gang Fu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leach-ing efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sul-furic acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respec-tively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent ac-tivation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol−1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  18. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  19. Manganese concentration in human saliva using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewgoy, Hugo R., E-mail: hugorl@usp.br [Universidade Bandeirante Anhanguera (UNIBAN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B.; Medeiros, Ilca M.M.A.; Medeiros, Jose A.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this investigation the Manganese levels in human whole saliva were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering gender and lifestyle factors of Brazilian inhabitants (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure). The results emphasize that the indicative interval is statistically different by gender. These data are useful for identifying or preventing some diseases in the Brazilian population. (author)

  20. Manganese Abnormity in Holocene Sediments of the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Manganese abnormity has been observed in the Holocene sediments of the mud area of Bohai Sea. On the basis of grain size, chemical composition, heavy mineral content and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating of foraminifer, relationships between manganese abnormity and sedimentation rates, material source, hydrodynamic conditions are probed. Manganese abnormity occurred during the Middle Holocene when sea level and sedimentation rates were higher than those at present. Sedimentary hiatus was not observed when material sources and hydrodynamic conditions were quite similar. Compared with the former period, the latter period showed a decrease in reduction environment and an inclination toward oxidation environment with high manganese content, whereas provenance and hydrodynamic conditions showed only a slight change. From the above observations, it can be concluded that correlation among manganese abnormity, material source, and hydrodynamic conditions is not obvious. Redox environment seems to be the key factor for manganese enrichment, which is mainly related to marine authigenic process.

  1. Probing tRNA interaction with biogenic polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouameur, Amin Ahmed; Bourassa, Philippe; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2010-10-01

    Biogenic polyamines are found to modulate protein synthesis at different levels. This effect may be explained by the ability of polyamines to bind and influence the secondary structure of tRNA, mRNA, and rRNA. We report the interaction between tRNA and the three biogenic polyamines putrescine, spermidine, spermine, and cobalt(III)hexamine at physiological conditions, using FTIR spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and molecular modeling. The results indicated that tRNA was stabilized at low biogenic polyamine concentration, as a consequence of polyamine interaction with the backbone phosphate group. The main tRNA reactive sites for biogenic polyamine at low concentration were guanine-N7/O6, uracil-O2/O4, adenine-N3, and 2'OH of the ribose. At high polyamine concentration, the interaction involves guanine-N7/O6, adenine-N7, uracil-O2 reactive sites, and the backbone phosphate group. The participation of the polycation primary amino group, in the interaction and the presence of the hydrophobic contact, are also shown. The binding affinity of biogenic polyamine to tRNA molecule was in the order of spermine > spermidine > putrescine with K(Spm) = 8.7 × 10(5) M(-1), K(Spd) = 6.1 × 10(5) M(-1), and K(Put) = 1.0 × 10(5) M(-1), which correlates with their positively charged amino group content. Hill analysis showed positive cooperativity for the biogenic polyamines and negative cooperativity for cobalt-hexamine. Cobalt(III)hexamine contains high- and low-affinity sites in tRNA with K(1) = 3.2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(2) = 1.7 × 10(5) M(-1), that have been attributed to the interactions with guanine-N7 sites and the backbone PO(2) group, respectively. This mechanism of tRNA binding could explain the condensation phenomenon observed at high Co(III) content, as previously shown in the Co(III)-DNA complexes.

  2. Illumina sequencing of fungi associated with manganese oxide deposits in cave systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, B. T.; Santelli, C. M.; Carmichael, S. K.; Pepe-Ranney, C. P.; Roble, L.; Carmichael, M.; Bräuer, S.

    2013-12-01

    The environmental cycling of manganese (Mn) remains relatively poorly characterized when compared with other metals such as iron. However, fungi have been observed to produce Mn(III/IV) oxides resembling buserite, birnessite, and todorokite on the periphery of vegetative hyphae, hyphal branching points and at the base of fruiting bodies. Recent studies indicate that some of these oxides may be generated by a two-stage reaction with soluble Mn(II) and biogenic reactive oxygen species for some groups of fungi, in particular the Ascomycota. These oxides can provide a versatile protective barrier or aid in the capture of trace metals in the environment, although the exact evolutionary function and trigger is unclear. In this study, two caves in the southern Appalachians, a pristine cave and an anthropogenically impacted cave, were compared by analyzing fungal community assemblages in manganese oxide rich deposits. Quantitative PCR data indicated that fungi are present in a low abundance (18S rDNA clone library, over 88% were representative of the phylum Basidiomycota (predominantly Agaricomycetes), 2.74% of Ascomycota, 2.28% of Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota, 0.46% of Zygomycota, and 3.65% of Eukarya or Fungi incertae sedis. Using Illumina's MiSeq to sequence amplicons of the fungal ITS1 gene has yielded roughly 100,000-200,000 paired-end reads per sample. These data are currently being analyzed to compare fungal communities before and after induced Mn oxidation in the field. In addition, sites within the pristine cave are being compared with analogous sites in the impacted cave. Culturing efforts have thus far yielded Mn oxide producing members of the orders Glomerales and Pleosporales as well as two Genus incertae sedis (Fungal sp. YECT1, and Fungal sp. YECT3, growing on discarded electrical tape) that do not appear to be closely related to any other known Mn oxidizing fungi.

  3. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  4. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Tammie L., E-mail: Tammie.Gerke@miamioh.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States); Little, Brenda J., E-mail: brenda.little@nrlssc.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 (United States); Barry Maynard, J., E-mail: maynarjb@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+}) and hollandite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. - Highlights: • Oxidation and deposition of Mn deposits in drinking water distribution pipes • In-situ synchrotron-based μ-XANES and μ-XRF mapping • Toxic metal sorption in Mn deposits.

  5. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality.

  6. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a New Manganese Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; LIU Ping; CHEN Yun

    2003-01-01

    @@ In order to study the relationship between the manganese ion and the biological coordination agent, the role ofmanganese ion in the active sites and the structure of the active sites in the manganese enzymes, small molecule complexes are often applied to modeling the structure and the properties of reaction in the active centers. In this pa per, we will report the synthesis and crystal structure of a new manganese(Ⅱ) complex, catena[ aqua-(p-methoxybenzoato- O, O′ ) - (p-methoxybenzoato- O )- (2,2′-bipyridine)-manganese (Ⅱ) ] (p-methoxybenzoic acid). The crystal structure was confirmeded by X-ray crystallography analysis.

  8. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli – Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and accelerated the dissolution of manganese in acidic media.

  9. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan;

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron....../manganese-uptake systems relevant for growth in defined medium. Based on these results an exit strategy enabling the cell to cope with iron depletion and use of manganese as an alternative for iron could be shown. Such a strategy would also explain why E. coli harbors some iron- or manganese-dependent iso......-enzymes such as superoxide dismutases or ribonucleotide reductases. The benefits for gaining a means for survival would be bought with the cost of less efficient metabolism as indicated in our experiments by lower cell densities with manganese than with iron. In addition, this strain was extremely sensitive to the metalloid...

  10. [Metabolism of various biogenic amines in acute viral neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, I N; Shchegoleva, R A; Ponomarenko, V P; Leshchinskaia, E V; Kodkind, G Kh

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of biogenic amines was examined in 62 patients with various acute viral neuroinfections. The control group consisted of 57 persons. Depending on the process character and disease period variations of the levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolylacetic acid, coeruloplasmin and histamine were discovered. A comparison of the results obtained with the clinical course of the diseases revealed a certain correlation, especially in patients with acute meningoencephalitis.

  11. Ocean acidification can mediate biodiversity shifts by changing biogenic habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, Jennifer M.; Fabricius, Katharina E.; Kroeker, Kristy J.; Anderson, Kathryn M.; Brown, Norah E.; Barry, James P.; Connell, Sean D.; Dupont, Sam; Gaylord, Brian; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.; Klinger, Terrie; Milazzo, Marco; Munday, Philip L.; Russell, Bayden D.; Sanford, Eric; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Vaughan, Megan L. H.; Widdicombe, Stephen; Harley, Christopher D. G.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of ocean acidification (OA) on the structure and complexity of coastal marine biogenic habitat have been broadly overlooked. Here we explore how declining pH and carbonate saturation may affect the structural complexity of four major biogenic habitats. Our analyses predict that indirect effects driven by OA on habitat-forming organisms could lead to lower species diversity in coral reefs, mussel beds and some macroalgal habitats, but increases in seagrass and other macroalgal habitats. Available in situ data support the prediction of decreased biodiversity in coral reefs, but not the prediction of seagrass bed gains. Thus, OA-driven habitat loss may exacerbate the direct negative effects of OA on coastal biodiversity; however, we lack evidence of the predicted biodiversity increase in systems where habitat-forming species could benefit from acidification. Overall, a combination of direct effects and community-mediated indirect effects will drive changes in the extent and structural complexity of biogenic habitat, which will have important ecosystem effects.

  12. On Mineral Retrosynthesis of a Complex Biogenic Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashit Rao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic relations between organic molecules and mineral precursors regulate biogenic mineralization. Given the remarkable material properties of the egg shell as a biogenic ceramic, it serves as an important model to elucidate biomineral growth. With established roles of complex anionic biopolymers and a heterogeneous organic scaffold in egg shell mineralization, the present study explores the regulation over mineralization attained by applying synthetic polymeric counterparts (polyethylene glycol, poly(acrylic acid, poly(aspartic acid and poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid as additives during remineralization of decalcified eggshell membranes. By applying Mg2+ ions as a co-additive species, mineral retrosynthesis is achieved in a manner that modulates the polymorph and structure of mineral products. Notable features of the mineralization process include distinct local wettability of the biogenic organic scaffold by mineral precursors and mineralization-induced membrane actuation. Overall, the form, structure and polymorph of the mineralization products are synergistically affected by the additive and the content of Mg2+ ions. We also revisit the physicochemical nature of the biomineral scaffold and demonstrate the distinct spatial distribution of anionic biomolecules associated with the scaffold-mineral interface, as well as highlight the hydrogel-like properties of mammillae-associated macromolecules.

  13. Biogenic amines in rhizobia and legume root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Shinsuke

    2009-01-01

    Root-nodule bacteria (rhizobia) are of great importance for nitrogen acquisition through symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a wide variety of leguminous plants. These bacteria differ from most other soil microorganisms by taking dual forms, i.e. a free-living form in soils and a symbiotic form inside of host legumes. Therefore, they should have a versatile strategy for survival, whether inhabiting soils or root nodules formed through rhizobia-legume interactions. Rhizobia generally contain large amounts of the biogenic amine homospermidine, an analog of spermidine which is an essential cellular component in most living systems. The external pH, salinity and a rapid change in osmolarity are thought to be significant environmental factors affecting the persistence of rhizobia. The present review describes the regulation of homospermidine biosynthesis in response to environmental stress and its possible functional role in rhizobia. Legume root nodules, an alternative habitat of rhizobia, usually contain a variety of biogenic amines besides homospermidine and the occurrence of some of these amines is closely associated with rhizobial infections. In the second half of this review, novel biogenic amines found in certain legume root nodules and the mechanism of their synthesis involving cooperation between the rhizobia and host legume cells are also described.

  14. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petäjä, Tuukka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Moisseev, Dmitri [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Sinclair, Victoria [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); O' Connor, Ewan J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Manninen, Antti J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Levula, Janne [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Väänänen, Riikka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Heikkinen, Liine [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Äijälä, Mikko [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Juho [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Bäck, Jaana [University of Helsinki, Finland

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  15. Role of Amorphous Manganese Oxide in Nitrogen Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LILIANG-MO; WUQI-TU

    1991-01-01

    Studies have been made,by 15N-tracer technique on nitrogen loss resulting from adding amorphous manganese oxide to NH4+-N medium under anaerobic conditions.The fact that the total nitrogen recovery was decreased and that 15NO2,15N2O,15N14NO,15NO,15N2 and 15N14N were emitted has proved that,like amorphous iron oxide,amorphous manganese oxide can also act as an electron acceptor in the oxidation of NH4+-N under anaerobic conditions and give rise to nitrogen loss.This once again illustrates another mechanism by which the loss of ammonium nitrogen in paddy soils is brought about by amorphous iron and manganese oxides.The quantity of nitrogen loss by amorphous manganese oxide increased with an increase in the amount of amorphous manganese oxide added and lessened with time of its aging.The nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss by cooperation of amorphous manganese oxide and microorganisms (soil suspension) was larger than that by amorphous manganese oxide alone.In the system,nitrogen loss was associated with the specific surface ares and oxidation-reduction of amorphous manganese oxide.However,their quantitative relationship and the exact reaction processes of nitrogen loss induced by amorphous manganese oxide remain to be further studied.

  16. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  17. Chromium Mobilization by Microbially-Driven Iron and Manganese Redox Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Arredondo, M.; Hausladen, D.; Ying, S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium, a naturally occurring contaminant, poses a significant threat to California groundwater quality when ultramafic rocks weather leaving Cr-enriched serpentine soils. Benign and of limited solubility, Cr(III) can oxidize into soluble and carcinogenic Cr(VI). Under most environmental conditions, Mn-oxides are the principal oxidant of Cr(III). Here we investigate Cr(III) oxidation by both abiotically synthesized birnessite and biogenically produced Mn-oxides. Further, we explore chromium dynamics within artificial soil aggregates composed of Cr(OH)3- and Cr0.25Fe0.75(OH)3-coated quartz grains surrounded by aerated solute flow. Abiotic aggregates contained synthetic birnessite, while biotic aggregates were inoculated with Leptothrix cholodnii, a manganese-oxidizing bacterium, and Shewanella putrefaciens, an iron-reducing bacterium. Results show aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations scaling with Cr-mineral solubility. When Leptothrix sp.-inoculated Cr(III),Fe(III)-aggregates are supplied with aqueous Mn(II), Mn-oxides precipitate in the aerobic aggregate. Cr(VI) production occurs similar to that via synthetic birnessite. With the addition of Shewanella sp., coupled biotic and abiotic processes occur causing the reduction, and subsequent immobilization, of chromium by microbial metabolites (e.g., Fe(II)). This study shows the importance of microbial community composition on chromium dynamics within diffusion-limited zones, and suggests the potential for biological immobilization of Cr even in the presence of Mn-oxidizing bacteria.

  18. Diverse manganese(II)-oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Daniel N; Pinto, Ameet; Anantharaman, Karthik; Ruberg, Steven A; Kramer, Eva L; Raskin, Lutgarde; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-12-09

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are highly reactive minerals that influence the speciation, mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Although Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are known to catalyze the formation of Mn oxides, little is known about the organisms responsible for Mn oxidation in situ, especially in engineered environments. Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are important in drinking water systems, including in biofiltration and water distribution systems. Here, we used cultivation dependent and independent approaches to investigate Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water sources, a treatment plant and associated distribution system. We isolated 29 strains of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and found that highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences were present in all culture-independent datasets and dominant in the studied drinking water treatment plant. These results highlight a potentially important role for Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water systems, where biogenic Mn oxides may affect water quality in terms of aesthetic appearance, speciation of metals and oxidation of organic and inorganic compounds. Deciphering the ecology of these organisms and the factors that regulate their Mn(II)-oxidizing activity could yield important insights into how microbial communities influence the quality of drinking water.

  19. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been inve

  20. Manganese accumulation in the brain: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Nomiyama, K.; Takase, Y.; Nakazono, T.; Nojiri, J.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan); Noguchi, T. [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    Manganese (Mn) accumulation in the brain is detected as symmetrical high signal intensity in the globus pallidi on T1-weighted MR images without an abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. In this review, we present several cases of Mn accumulation in the brain due to acquired or congenital diseases of the abdomen including hepatic cirrhosis with a portosystemic shunt, congenital biliary atresia, primary biliary cirrhosis, congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt without liver dysfunction, Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome with a diffuse intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and patent ductus venosus. Other causes of Mn accumulation in the brain are Mn overload from total parenteral nutrition and welding-related Mn intoxication. (orig.)

  1. Preparation of highly efficient manganese catalase mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, Michael U; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-10-21

    The series of compounds [Mn(bpia)(mu-OAc)](2)(ClO(4))(2) (1), [Mn(2)(bpia)(2)(muO)(mu-OAc)](ClO(4))(3).CH(3)CN (2), [Mn(bpia)(mu-O)](2)(ClO(4))(2)(PF(6)).2CH(3)CN (3), [Mn(bpia)(Cl)(2)](ClO)(4) (4), and [(Mn(bpia)(Cl))(2)(mu-O)](ClO(4))(2).2CH(3)CN (5) (bpia = bis(picolyl)(N-methylimidazol-2-yl)amine) represents a structural, spectroscopic, and functional model system for manganese catalases. Compounds 3 and 5 have been synthesized from 2 via bulk electrolysis and ligand exchange, respectively. All complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. The different bridging ligands including the rare mono-mu-oxo and mono-mu-oxo-mono-mu-carboxylato motifs lead to a variation of the Mn-Mn separation across the four binuclear compounds of 1.50 A (Mn(2)(II,II) = 4.128 A, Mn(2)(III,III) = 3.5326 and 3.2533 A, Mn(2)(III,IV) = 2.624 A). Complexes 1, 2, and 3 are mimics for the Mn(2)(II,II), the Mn(2)(III,III), and the Mn(2)(III,IV) oxidation states of the native enzyme. UV-vis spectra of these compounds show similarities to those of the corresponding oxidation states of manganese catalase from Thermus thermophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Compound 2 exhibits a rare example of a Jahn-Teller compression. While complexes 1 and 3 are efficient catalysts for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide and contain an N(4)O(2) donor set, 4 and 5 show no catalase activity. These complexes have an N(4)Cl(2) and N(4)OCl donor set, respectively, and serve as mimics for halide inhibited manganese catalases. Cyclovoltammetric data show that the substitution of oxygen donor atoms with chloride causes a shift of redox potentials to more positive values. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the most efficient binuclear functional manganese catalase mimic exhibiting saturation kinetics to date.

  2. Forensic differentiation of biogenic organic compounds from petroleum hydrocarbons in biogenic and petrogenic compounds cross-contaminated soils and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhendi; Yang, C; Kelly-Hooper, F; Hollebone, B P; Peng, X; Brown, C E; Landriault, M; Sun, J; Yang, Z

    2009-02-13

    "Total petroleum hydrocarbons" (TPHs) or "petroleum hydrocarbons" (PHCs) are one of the most widespread soil pollutants in Canada, North America, and worldwide. Clean-up of PHC-contaminated soils and sediments costs the Canadian economy hundreds of million of dollars annually. Much of this activity is driven by the need to meet regulated levels of PHC in soil. These PHC values are legally required to be assessed using standard methods. The method most commonly used in Canada, specified by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), measures the total hydrocarbon concentrations in a soil by carbon range (Fraction 1: C(6)-C(10); Fraction 2: C(10)-C(16), Fraction 3: C(16)-C(34): and Fraction 4: C(34)+). Using the CCME method, all of the materials extractible by a mixture of 1:1 hexane:acetone are considered to be petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants. Many hydrocarbon compounds and other extractible materials in soil, however, may originate from non-petroleum sources. Biogenic organic compounds (BOCs) is a general term used to describe a mixture of organic compounds, including alkanes, sterols and sterones, fatty acids and fatty alcohols, and waxes and wax esters, biosynthesized by living organisms. BOCs are also produced during the early stages of diagenesis in recent aquatic sediments. BOC sources could include vascular plants, algae, bacteria and animals. Plants and algae produce BOCs as protective wax coating that are released back into the sediment at the end of their life cycle. BOCs are natural components of thriving plant communities. Many solvent-extraction methods for assessing soil hydrocarbons, however, such as the CCME method, do not differentiate PHCs from BOCs. The naturally occurring organics present in soils and wet sediments can be easily misidentified and quantified as regulated PHCs during analysis using such methods. In some cases, biogenic interferences can exceed regulatory levels, resulting in remediation of petroleum impacts that

  3. Distribution and accumulation of biogenic silica in the intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lijun; LIU Min; XU Shiyuan; YAN Huimin; OU Dongni; CHENG Shubo; LIN Xiao

    2008-01-01

    Sedimentary biogenic silica is known to be all important parameter to understand biogeochemical processes and paleoenviromental records in estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Consequently, it is of great significance to investigate accumulation and distribution of biogenic silica in sediments. The two-step mild acid-mild alkaline extraction procedure was used to leach biogenic silica and its early diagenetic products in intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The results showed that total biogenic silica(t-BSi)in the intertidal sediments varied from 237. 7-419. 4 μmol Si/g. while the mild acid leachable silica(Si-HCl)and the mild alkaline leachable silica(Si-Alk)were in the range of 25. 1-72. 9μmol Si/g and 208. 1-350. 4 μmol Si/g. respectively. Significant correlations were observed for the grain size distributions of sediments and different biogenic silica pools in intertidal sediments. This confirms that grain size distribution Can significantly affect biogenic silica contents in sediments. Close relationships of biogenic silica with organic carbon and nitrogen Were also found, reflecting that there is a strong coupling between biogenic silica and organic matter biogeochemical cycles in the intertidal system of the Yangtze Estuary. Additionally, the early diagenetic changes of biogenic silica in sediments are discussed in the present study.

  4. Control of biogenic amines in fermented sausages: role of starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariluz eLatorre-Moratalla

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed.

  5. Control of biogenic amines in fermented sausages: role of starter cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Moratalla, M L; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M T; Vidal-Carou, M C

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed.

  6. Diffusion abnormalities of the globi pallidi in manganese neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Alexander M.; Filice, Ross W.; Teksam, Mehmet; Casey, Sean; Truwit, Charles; Clark, H. Brent; Woon, Carolyn; Liu, Hai Ying [Department of Radiology, Medical School, Box 292, 420 Delaware Street S.E., 55455, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Manganese is an essential trace metal required for normal central nervous system function, which is toxic when in excess amounts in serum. Manganese neurotoxicity has been demonstrated in patients with chronic liver/biliary failure where an inability to excrete manganese via the biliary system causes increased serum levels, and in patients on total parenteral nutrition (TPN), occupational/inhalational exposure, or other source of excess exogenous manganese. Manganese has been well described in the literature to deposit selectively in the globi pallidi and to induce focal neurotoxicity. We present a case of a 53-year-old woman who presented for a brain MR 3 weeks after liver transplant due to progressively decreasing level of consciousness. The patient had severe liver failure by liver function tests and bilirubin levels, and had also been receiving TPN since the transplant. The MR demonstrated symmetric hyperintensity on T1-weighted images in the globi pallidi. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map indicated restricted diffusion in the globi pallidi bilaterally. The patient eventually succumbed to systemic aspergillosis 3 days after the MR. The serum manganese level was 195 mcg/l (micrograms per liter) on postmortem exam (over 20 times the upper limits of normal). The patient was presumed to have suffered from manganese neurotoxicity since elevated serum manganese levels have been shown in the literature to correlate with hyperintensity on T1-weighted images, neurotoxicity symptoms, and focal concentration of manganese in the globi pallidi. Neuropathologic sectioning of the globi pallidi at autopsy was also consistent with manganese neurotoxicity. (orig.)

  7. Reduction of ripening time of full-scale manganese removal filters with manganese oxide-coated media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, J.H.; Petrusevski, B.; Slokar, Y.M.; Huysman, K.; Joris, K.; Kruithof, J.C.; Kennedy, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Effective manganese removal by conventional aeration-filtration with virgin filter media requires a long ripening time. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of manganese oxide-coated media to shorten the ripening time of filters with virgin media, under practical conditions. A full scal

  8. Formation and occurrence of biogenic iron-rich minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Danielle; Langley, Sean

    2005-09-01

    Iron cycling in the Earth's crust depends on redox reactions, which often trigger the precipitation and dissolution of Fe-rich minerals. Microbial activity is also an integral part of iron cycling, through carbon fixation, respiration and passive sorption reactions. Iron oxides formed in close association with bacteria (either as internal or external precipitates) are referred to as biogenic minerals. They form in several types of environments on Earth, from freshwater to marine systems, aquifers, soils and mining impacted systems. Biogenic iron oxides generally occur as nanocrystals and show a wide range of morphology and mineralogy. These minerals form as a result of the direct metabolic activity of bacteria or as a result of passive sorption and nucleation reactions. The metabolic activity of acidophilic and neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria under oxic conditions promotes the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) and the precipitation of biogenic iron oxides as extracellular precipitates near or on the bacterial cells. Iron oxidation under anoxic conditions can also occur, as a result of the activity of nitrate-reducers and photoautotrophic bacteria using Fe(II) as an electron donor. Secondary Fe-oxide formation has been reported during the microbial reduction of iron oxides. Passive Fe sorption and nucleation onto bacterial cell walls represents another important mechanism leading to iron oxide formation. The surface reactivity of the bacterial surface under environmental pH conditions confers a net negative charge to the cell wall, which leads to the binding of soluble iron and eventually to the precipitation of iron oxides under saturation conditions. Extracellular polymers produced by bacteria can act as a template for iron sorption and Fe-oxide nucleation. Intracellular iron oxide formation has been observed in natural environments. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetosomes, occurring as chains of magnetite crystals within the cells, and an

  9. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Elena Pascu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering bothlocal economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption methods have been applied to determine metals content in accordance to reports of National Water Agency from Romania (ANAR. Every water source contains dissolved or particulate compounds. The concentrations of these compounds can affect health, productivity, compliance requirements, or serviceability and cannot be economically removed by conventional filtration means. In this study, we made a comparison between the electrochemical and adsorption methods (using membranes. Both methods have been used to evaluate the efficiency of iron and manganese removal at various times and temperatures. We used two membrane types: composite and cellulose, respectively. Different approaches, including lowering the initial current density and increasing the initial pH were applied. Reaction kinetics was achieved using mathematical models: Jura and Temkin.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Manganese Ferrite Aluminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Dhiman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum doped manganese ferrites MnAlxFe2−xO4 with 0.0≤x≤1.0 have been prepared by the double ceramic route. The formation of mixed spinel phase has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The unit cell parameter `aO' is found to decrease linearly with aluminum concentration due to smaller ionic radius of aluminum. The cation distributions were estimated from X-ray diffraction intensities of various planes. The theoretical lattice parameter, X-ray density, oxygen positional parameter, ionic radii, jump length, and bonds and edges lengths of the tetrahedral (A and octahedral (B sites were determined. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra recorded at room temperature were fitted with two sextets corresponding to Fe3+ ions at A- and B-sites. In the present ferrite system, the area ratio of Fe3+ ions at the A- and B-sites determined from the spectral analysis of Mössbauer spectra gives evidence that Al3+ ions replace iron ions at B-sites. This change in the site preference reflects an abrupt change in magnetic hyperfine fields at A- and B-sites as aluminum concentration increases, which has been explained on the basis of supertransferred hyperfine field. On the basis of estimated cation distribution, it is concluded that aluminum doped manganese ferrites exhibit a 55% normal spinel structure.

  11. Biogenic syngenetic pyrite from tuffaceous sedimentary RF3-V rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreva, Irina; Nikulova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic framboidal pyrite was found in intraformational tuffaceous sedimentary gravelites, within basic volcanites (RF3-V) in Subpolar Urals (Sablya Ridge). Pyrite grains (Fe 44.07-44,33, S 50.22-53.31 wt. %) are composed of ball-like microconcretions, sometimes intergrown with crystals of pentagondodecahedron and cubic habit. The microconcretions (20 to 40 mcm) are roundish and composed of microcrystals, which end faces form spherical surface. The nuclei of the microconcretions are represented by frambohedrons 4-5 mcm in size, which are pyritized cells of sulphate-reducing colonial coccoid microfossils. The formation of the frambohedrons occurred synchronously to sedimentation in stagnant reducing environment at interaction of biogenic hydrogen sulphide with water-dissolved iron. The biogenic hydrogen sulphide is reduced by microorganisms in the conditions of free and unrestricted access of dissolved sulphate ions sourced from sulphur of fumarole gases. Iron came from washed-out basic volcanites. The growth of outer radial parts of microconcretions occurred during compaction of sediments in diagenetic stage. The quantity of dissolved sulphate and iron during pyrite formation exceeded possibilitites of bacterial "starters" which resulted in the formation of pyrites of other morphological varieties. This is confirmed by the accretion of concentric rays of the concretions and cubic microcrystals of pyrite in the aggregate grains. The formation of tuffaceous sediments occurred during temporary decrease of volcanic activity in a continuous linear water flow with stagnant areas composed of water-displaced pebbles from underlying metaterrigenous rocks (RF 1-2), which were exposed beyond the development area of volcanic strata, unchanged clasts of recent and synchronously formed basic and medium volcanites with participation of air-driven ashes and influence of volcanic gases in the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria. The work is financially supported by the Program

  12. Biogenic influence on cloud microphysics over the global ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols have a large potential to influence climate through their effects on the microphysics and optical properties of clouds and, hence, on the Earth's radiation budget. Aerosol-cloud interactions have been intensively studied in polluted air, but the possibility that the marine biosphere plays a role in regulating cloud brightness in the pristine oceanic atmosphere remains largely unexplored. We used 9 yr of global satellite data and ocean climatologies to derive parameterizations of (a production fluxes of sulfur aerosols formed by the oxidation of the biogenic gas dimethylsulfide emitted from the sea surface; (b production fluxes of secondary organic aerosols from biogenic organic volatiles; (c emission fluxes of biogenic primary organic aerosols ejected by wind action on sea surface; and (d emission fluxes of sea salt also lifted by the wind upon bubble bursting. Series of global weekly estimates of these fluxes were correlated to series of cloud droplet effective radius data derived from satellite (MODIS. Similar analyses were conducted in more detail at 6 locations spread among polluted and clean regions of the oceanic atmosphere. The outcome of the statistical analysis was that negative correlation was common at mid and high latitude for sulfur and organic secondary aerosols, indicating both might be important in seeding cloud droplet activation. Conversely, primary aerosols (organic and sea salt showed more variable, non-significant or positive correlations, indicating that, despite contributing to large shares of the marine aerosol mass, they are not major drivers of the variability of cloud microphysics. Uncertainties and synergisms are discussed, and recommendations of research needs are given.

  13. Post-speleogenetic biogenic modification of Gomantong Caves, Sabah, Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Joyce; McFarlane, Donald A.

    2012-07-01

    The Gomantong cave system of eastern Sabah, Malaysia, is well-known as an important site for harvesting edible bird-nests and, more recently, as a tourist attraction. Although the biology of the Gomantong system has been repeatedly studied, very little attention has been given to the geomorphology. Here, we report on the impact of geobiological modification in the development of the modern aspect of the cave, an important but little recognized feature of tropical caves. Basic modeling of the metabolic outputs from bats and birds (CO2, H2O, heat) reveals that post-speleogenetic biogenic corrosion can erode bedrock by between ~ 3.0 mm/ka (1 m/~300 ka) and ~ 4.6 mm/ka (1 m/~200 ka). Modeling at high densities of bats yields rates of corrosion of ~ 34 mm/ka (or 1 m/~30 ka). Sub-aerial corrosion creates a previously undescribed speleological feature, the apse-flute, which is semicircular in cross-section and ~ 80 cm wide. It is vertical regardless of rock properties, developing in parallel but apparently completely independently, and often unbroken from roof to floor. They end at a blind hemi-spherical top with no extraneous water source. Half-dome ceiling conch pockets are remnants of previous apse-fluting. Sub-cutaneous corrosion creates the floor-level guano notch formed by organic acid dissolution of bedrock in contact with guano. Speleogenetic assessment suggests that as much as 70-95% of the total volume of the modern cave may have been opened by direct subaerial biogenic dissolution and biogenically-induced collapse, and by sub-cutaneous removal of limestone, over a timescale of 1-2 Ma.

  14. Emission and Chemical Transformation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (echo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppmann, R.; Hoffmann, T.; Kesselmeier, J.; Schatzmann, M.

    Forests are complex sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the planetary boundary layer. The impact of biogenic VOC on tropospheric photochem- istry, air quality, and the formation of secondary products affects our climate on a regional and global scale but is far from being understood. A considerable lack of knowledge exists concerning a forest stand as a net source of reactive trace com- pounds, which are transported directly into the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In particular, little is known about the amounts of VOC which are processed within the canopy. The goal of ECHO, which is presented in this poster, is to investigate these questions and to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere interactions and their effects on the PBL. The investigation of emissions, chemical processing and vertical transport of biogenic VOC will be carried out in and above a mixed forest stand in Jülich, Germany. A large set of trace gases, free radicals and meteorologi- cal parameters will be measured at different heights in and above the canopy, covering concentrations of VOC, CO, O3, organic nitrates und NOx as well as organic aerosols. For the first time concentration profiles of OH, HO2, RO2 und NO3 radicals will be measured as well together with the actinic UV radiation field and photolysis frequen- cies of all relevant radical precursors (O3, NO2, peroxides, oxygenated VOC). The different tasks of the field experiments will be supported by simulation experiments investigating the primary emission and the uptake of VOC by the plants in stirred tank reactors, soil parameters and soil emissions in lysimeter experiments, and the chem- ical processing of the trace gases as observed in and above the forest stand in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. The planning and interpretation of the field experiments is supported by simulations of the field site in a wind tunnel.

  15. Genentech/BiogenIdec递交Rituxan治疗CLL的申请

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Genentech和Biogen Idec公司称已向美国食品和药物管理局(FDA)递交了两份补充生物制品许可证申请(sBLAs),申请Rituxan(rituximab)(Ⅰ)联合标准化疗方案用于初洽或已治慢性淋巴细胞白血病(CLL)。如获许可,公司将申请优先审查。

  16. Low-order models of biogenic ocean mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, J. O.; Rosinelli, D.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic ocean mixing, the process whereby swimming animals may affect ocean circulation, has primarily been studied using order-of-magnitude theoretical estimates and a small number of field observations. We describe numerical simulations of arrays of simplified animal shapes migrating in inviscid fluid and at finite Reynolds numbers. The effect of density stratification is modeled in the fluid dynamic equations of motion by a buoyancy acceleration term, which arises due to perturbations to the density field by the migrating bodies. The effects of fluid viscosity, body spacing, and array configuration are investigated to identify scenarios in which a meaningful contribution to ocean mixing by swimming animals is plausible.

  17. PROSPECTS OF MODIFICATION OF BALNEOLOGICAL REMEDIES WITH BIOGENEOUS METALLS NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mamuchieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issues of mineral waters modification with biogeneous metals nanoparticles, since they have extremely important meaning for human's organism and their production in green and biologically compliant form is hard to overestimate. Russian scientists discovered low toxicity of these nanomaterials. So the use of biogeneuos metals in form of nanoparticles allows lowering of their toxicity compared with its use in forms of ions.

  18. Microwave sintering of biogenic hydroxyapatite ceramics for reconstructive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Tovstonoh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics based on biogenic hydroxyapatite have been produced via a microwave sintering at 1000 °C for 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. It was shown that all of the ceramics studied exhibit volumetric shrinkage (2.3–4.6 %, which increases with increasing sintering time at maximum temperature. It was established that the total porosity did not depend on sintering time at 1000 °C and was equal to 38–40 %. Moreover, in all of the materials an open porosity dominated. The ultimate compression strength was in the range 35–40 MPa.

  19. Extracellular proteins limit the dispersal of biogenic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J.W.; Weber, P.K.; Martin, M.C.; Gilbert, B.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution secondary ion microprobe spectrometry, synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated the intimate association of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization. Experiments involving synthetic zinc sulfide nanoparticles and representative amino acids indicated a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticle aggregation. These findings suggest that microbially derived extracellular proteins can limit the dispersal of nanoparticulate metal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation, that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurface fluid flow.

  20. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  1. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, D.; Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-09-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E.T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}/O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This presentation gives the thermodynamic background for consideration of manganese-based sorbents as an alternative to zinc ferrite. To date the work which has been in progress for nine months is limited at this stage to thermogravimetric testing of four formulations of manganese-alumina sorbents to determine the optimum conditions of pelletization and induration to produce reactive pellets.

  2. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  3. Selection and Use of Manganese Dioxide by Neanderthals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Peter J.; Anastasakis, Konstantinos; de Jong, Wiebren; van Hoesel, Annelies; Roebroeks, Wil; Soressi, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these ‘manganese oxides’ were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they needed black material for decoration, soot and charcoal were readily available, whereas obtaining manganese oxides would have incurred considerably higher costs. Compositional analyses lead us to infer that late Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I were deliberately selecting manganese dioxide. Combustion experiments and thermo-gravimetric measurements demonstrate that manganese dioxide reduces wood’s auto-ignition temperature and substantially increases the rate of char combustion, leading us to conclude that the most beneficial use for manganese dioxide was in fire-making. With archaeological evidence for fire places and the conversion of the manganese dioxide to powder, we argue that Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I used manganese dioxide in fire-making and produced fire on demand.

  4. Effect of manganese on the secretion of manganese-peroxidase by the basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Rodrigo A; Canessa, Paulo; Manubens, Augusto; Vicuña, Rafael

    2010-07-01

    The ligninolytic machinery of the widely used model fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes the enzymes manganese-peroxidase (MnP) and laccase (Lcs). In this work the effect of Mn(II) on the secretion of MnP was studied. Cultures grown in the absence of Mn(II) showed high levels of mnp transcripts. However, almost no MnP enzyme was detected in the extracellular medium, either by enzymatic activity assays or Western blot hybridizations. In the corresponding mycelia, immuno-electron microscopy experiments showed high levels of MnP enzyme within intracellular compartments. These results suggest that in addition to its well-known effect on transcription regulation of mnp genes, manganese influences secretion of MnP to the extracellular medium. Experiments carried out in the presence of cycloheximide confirmed that the metal is required to secrete MnP already synthesized and retained within the cell.

  5. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Hydrothermal Manganese Mineralization Near the Samoan Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Hart, S. R.; Dunham, R.

    2006-12-01

    The thickest beds of hydrothermal manganese oxides recovered to date from the global ocean were collected from a volcanic cone in the south Pacific. In April 2005, samples were dredged aboard the R.V. Kilo Moana from a volcanic cone on the lower flank of Tulaga seamount (about 2,700 m water depth; 14° 39.222' S; 170° 1.730' W), located 115 km SW of Vailulu'u, the volcanically and hydrothermally active center of the Samoan hotspot. Additional hydrothermal manganese samples were collected off Ofu Island (dredge Alia 107), 72 km to the WSW of Vailulu'u. Manganese-oxide beds up to 9 cm thick are composed of birnessite and 10 Å manganates. Some layers consist of Mn-oxide columnar structures 4 cm long and 1 cm wide, which have not been described previously. The mean Mn and Fe contents of 18 samples are 51 weight percent and 0.76 weight percent, respectively. Elevated concentrations of Li (mean 0.11 wt. percent) are indicators of a hydrothermal origin, and distinguishes these samples, along with the high Mn and low Fe contents, from hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts. Other enriched elements include Ba (mean 0.14 percent), Cu (249 ppm), Mo (451 ppm), Ni (400 ppm), Zn (394 ppm), V (214 ppm), and W (132 ppm). Chondrite-normalized REE patterns show large negative Ce anomalies and LREE enrichments, both characteristic of hydrothermal Mn deposits. Small negative Eu anomalies are not typical of hydrothermal deposits and can be explained either by the absence of leaching of plagioclase by the hydrothermal fluids or by the precipitation of Eu-rich minerals, such as barite and anhydrite, at depth. The high base-metal contents indicate that sulfides are not forming deeper in the hydrothermal system or that such deposits are being leached by the ascending fluids. Textures of the thickest Mn deposits indicate that the Mn oxides formed below the seabed from ascending fluids during multiple phases of waxing and waning hydrothermal pulses. The deposits were later exposed at the seafloor by

  7. Technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Gardini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BAs are molecules which can be present in foods and, due to their toxicity, can cause adverse effects on the consumers. BAs are generally produced by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids in food products. The most significant BAs occurring in foods are histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine and agmatine. The importance of preventing the excessive accumulation of BAs in food is related to their impact on human health and food quality. Quality criteria in connection with the presence of BAs in food and food products are necessary from a toxicological point of view. This is particularly important in fermented foods in which the massive microbial proliferation required for obtaining specific products is often relater with BA accumulation. In this review, up-to-date information and recent discoveries about technological factors affecting biogenic amine content in foods are reviewed. Specifically, BA forming-microorganism and decarboxylation activity, genetic and metabolic organization of decarboxylases, risk associated to BAs (histamine, tyramine toxicity and other BAs, environmental factors influencing BA formation (temperature, salt concentration, pH. In addition, the technological factors for controlling BA production (use of starter culture, technological additives, effects of packaging, other non-thermal treatments, metabolising BA by microorganisms, effects of pressure treatments on BA formation and antimicrobial substances are addressed.

  8. A biogenic volatile organic compounds emission inventory for Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-hui; BAI Yu-hua; ZHANG Shu-yu

    2005-01-01

    The first detailed inventory for volatile organic compounds(VOC) emissions from vegetation over Yunnan Province, China was presented. The spatially and temporally resolved inventory was developed based on a geographic information system (GIS), remote sensing(RS) data and field measurement data, such as digitized land-use data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVl) and temperature data from direct real-time measurement. The inventory has a spatial resolution of 5 km × 5 km and a time resolution of 1 h.Urban, agriculture, and natural land-use distributions in Yunnan Province were combined with biomass factors for each land-use category to produce a spatially resolved biomass inventory. A biogenic emission inventory was developed by combining the biomass inventory with hourly emission rates for tree, shrub and ground cover species of the study area. Correcting for environmental factors, including light intensity and temperature, a value of 1.1 × 1012 gC for total annual biogenic VOC emissions from Yunnan Province, including 6.1 × 1011 gCfor isoprene, 2.1 × 1011 gC for monoterpenes, and 2.6 × 1011 gC for OVOC was obtained. The highest VOC emissions occurred in the northwestern, southwestern and north region of Yunnan Province. Some uncertainties were also discussed in this study.

  9. Comparative study of biogenic and abiotic iron-containing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkezova-Zheleva, Z.; Shopska, M.; Paneva, D.; Kovacheva, D.; Kadinov, G.; Mitov, I.

    2016-12-01

    Series of iron-based biogenic materials prepared by cultivation of Leptothrix group of bacteria in different feeding media ( Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria isolation medium, Adler, Lieske and silicon-iron-glucose-peptone) were studied. Control samples were obtained in the same conditions and procedures but the nutrition media were not infected with bacteria, i.e. they were sterile. Room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS) were used to reveal the composition and physicochemical properties of biomass and respective control samples. Comparative analysis showed differences in their composition and dispersity of present phases. Sample composition included different ratio of nanodimensional iron oxyhydroxide and oxide phases. Relaxation phenomena such as superparamagnetism or collective magnetic excitation behaviour were registered for some of them. The experimental data showed that the biogenic materials were enriched in oxyhydroxides of high dispersion. Catalytic behaviour of a selected biomass and abiotic material were studied in the reaction of CO oxidation. In situ diffuse-reflectance (DR) IRS was used to monitor the phase transformations in the biomass and CO conversion.

  10. Plio-Pleistocene Biogenic Opal Deposition in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, G.; Gersonde, R.

    2002-12-01

    About 2/3 of the annual supply of silicic acid to the World Ocean is buried in the Southern Ocean as biogenic silica (BSi), formed by diatoms and radiolaria in surface waters and exported to the seafloor. Main BSi accumulation occurs in an area between the sea ice edge and the Polar Front Zone and seems to be steered by a complex interaction of biological and physical parameters governing the modern Southern Ocean ecosystem. Sediment cores recovered during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 177 and expeditions with RV POLARSTERN reveal the history of the opal deposition in the Atlantic and Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean during the Pliocene and the Pleistocene. This period is characterized by distinct changes and variability in global climate and ocean circulation that can be related to the spatial-temporal distribution of BSi deposition on long and short time scales. Changes in ocean circulation, water mass structure, sea ice and climatic variability that impact the distribution of silicic acid and the development of coarsly silicified diatoms (e.g. Actinocyclus ingens, Thalassiosira antarctica, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis), presenting the major carriers of biogenic opal, control past BSi deposition in the Southern Ocean. Major deposition in the area of the modern Southern Ocean opal belt starts at the Plio/Pleistocene transition. Such strong export of BSi and related organic carbon might have reinforced the trend of global cooling observed since the Mid-Pliocene climate optimum.

  11. 78 FR 50135 - Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading August 14, 2013. It appears to... concerning the securities of Soil Biogenics Ltd. because it has not filed ] any periodic reports since...

  12. Concentration of Biogenic Amines in ‘Pinot Noir’ Wines Produced in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Jeromel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The origins of biogenic amines are sound grapes, alcoholic fermentations, malolactic fermentation and microbial activities during wine storage. These biologically produced amines are essential at low concentrations for optimal metabolic and physiological functions in animals, plants and micro-organisms. During alcoholic fermentation the degree of maceration is the first factor that affects the extraction of compounds present in the grape skin, among them aminoacids, precursors of biogenic amines. The aim of the present work was to study the changes of the concentration of biogenic amines in wines made from Vitis vinifera ‘Pinot noir’ from Plešivica (vintage 2009 produced with classical maceration, cold maceration and use of sur lie method. Biogenic amines were quantified using a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with fluorescence detection after pre-column derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA. In ‘Pinot noir’ wines tested, histamine was the most abundant biogenic amine followed by tryptamine and 2-Phenylethylamine. Total amount of biogenic amines ranged from 8.72 mg/L in wines made with classical maceration up to 9.34 mg/L in sur lie wines. In summary, from the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that sur lie technology can influence the formation of biogenic acids since the release of amino acids is probably more pronounced in wines aged with lees and stirred weekly. No significant differences were found in the concentration of biogenic amines in relation to the used maceration process.

  13. Processes of formation of ferromanganese manganese nodules and crusts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    of hydrothermal manganese are supplied to the ocean annually. In an alternate estimate, the supply of labile and dissolved manganese to the ocean is 0.2-0.4million tons yearly through river discharge; 0.05-0.3 million tons yearly by atmospheric material; 1...-10 million tons by hydrothermal material; and 0.4-4 million tons yearly through diagenetic cycling. The amplitude of minimum- maximum estimates is 1.2-14.7 million tons per year. The formation of manganese nodules in the deep oceans would probably account...

  14. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition and generation pathway of biogenic gas in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ping; WANG Xiaofeng; XU Yin; SHI Baoguang; XU Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    The carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic gas is of great importance for the study of its generation pathway and reservoiring characteristics. In this paper, the formation pathways and reservoiring characteristics of biogenic gas reservoirs in China are described in terms of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of 31 gas samples from 10 biogenic gas reservoirs. The study shows that the hydrogen isotopic compositions of these biogenic gas reservoirs can be divided into three intervals:δDCH4>-200‰,-250‰<δDCH4<-200‰ and δDCH4<-250‰. The forerunners believed that the main generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of continental fresh water is acetic fermentation. Our research results showed that the generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of marine facies is typical CO2- reduction, the biogenic gas has heavy hydrogen isotopic composition: its δDCH4 values are higher than -200‰; that the biogenic gas under the condition of continental facies also was generated by the same way, but its hydrogen isotopic composition is lighter than that of biogenetic gas generated under typical marine facies condition: -250‰<δDCH4<-200‰, the δDCH4 values may be related to the salinity of the water medium in ancient lakes. From the relevant data of the Qaidam Basin, it can be seen that the hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic methane has the same variation trend with increasing salinity of water medium. There are biogenic gas reservoirs formed in transitional regions under the condition of continental facies. These gas reservoirs resulted from both CO2- reduction and acetic fermentation, the formation of which may be related to the non-variant salinity of ancient water medium and the relatively high geothermal gradient, as is the case encountered in the Baoshan Basin. The biogenic gas generating in these regions has light hydrogen isotopic composition: δDCH4<-250‰, and relatively heavy carbon isotopic

  15. Effect of autochthonous starter cultures on the biogenic amine content of ewe's milk cheese throughout ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renes, E; Diezhandino, I; Fernández, D; Ferrazza, R E; Tornadijo, M E; Fresno, J M

    2014-12-01

    Cheese is among the most commonly implicated foods associated with biogenic amines poisoning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the type of autochthonous starter culture and ripening time on the concentration of biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, spermine and spermidine) in cheeses made from pasteurized ewe's milk. 4 cheese batches were made, in duplicate, and ripened for 7 months. The biogenic amines of 40 cheeses were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography. The predominant biogenic amines determined at the end of the ripening time were phenylethylamine, spermine and tryptamine. Together, these accounted for 81% of the total of biogenic amines studied. The type of starter culture used to make the ewe's cheese had a significant effect (p culture made up entirely of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris or of the same in combination with Lactobacillus plantarum.

  16. Dermal administration of manganese porphyrin by iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Fuminori; Imamura, Shinya; Asayama, Shoichiro; Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The present study describes a technique for dermal administration of cationic manganese porphyrin (Mn-porphyrin), an antioxidant with superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in hairless mouse. In general, the stratum corneum on the surface of the skin represents a barrier to passive diffusion of therapeutic agents by standard dermal administration. The present study investigated whether, dermal administration of Mn-porphyrin solution using iontophoresis, the electrical dermal administration technique, could overcome this barrier. We visually confirmed that Mn-porphyrin had penetrated to the reverse side of the hairless mouse skin after iontophoresis for a short period. With prolonged iontophoresis, the ratio of detectable Mn-porphyrin solution on the reverse side of the hairless mouse skin increased. In the future, this technique could provide an innovative approach for delivery of this antioxidant in intractable disease.

  17. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    cancer recurrence (BCR) among patients treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy (Cyclo). We compared our findings with published studies using meta-analyses. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of BCR among women in Jutland, Denmark. Subjects were diagnosed with non......BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast......-metastatic breast cancer from 1990-2001, received adjuvant Cyclo, and were registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 118 patients with BCR and 213 matched breast cancer controls. We genotyped SOD2 and used conditional logistic regression to compute the odds ratio (OR) and associated 95...

  18. India's manganese nodule mine site in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.

    This commentary highlights the activities of massive exploration programme for manganese nodule deposits in the Central Indian Basin located 5 km below the ocean surface and India's claim for mine site development and registration with UNCLOS...

  19. Manganese oxidation by bacterial isolates from the Indian Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Krishnan, K.P.; Khedekar, V.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    The abundance and activity of culturable manganese-oxidizing bacteria were assessed from near-bottom water samples of the tectonically active Carlsberg Ridge. Retrievable counts as colony forming units (CFU) on dilute nutrient agar medium (dilNA = 2...

  20. By lithology Zbruch deposits (Lower Sarmatian Nikopol manganese ore Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanovich V.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on lithologic-paleogeographic study Zbruch layers of Nikopol manganese ore Basin sediments described lithological and genetic types of rocks and facies conditions of formation of deposits.

  1. Oxygen toxicity in Streptococcus mutans: manganese, iron and superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.E.; Strachan, R.C.; Aranha, H.; Evans, S.L.; Salin, M.L.; Welch, B.; Arceneaux, J.E.L.; Byers, B.R.

    1984-07-01

    When cultured anaerobically in a chemically defined medium that was treated with Chelex-100 to lower its trace metal content, Streptococcus mutans OMZ176 had no apparent requirement for manganese or iron. Manganese or iron was necessary for aerobic cultivation in deep static cultures. During continuous aerobic cultivation in a stirred chemostat, iron did not support the growth rate achieved with manganese. Since the dissolved oxygen level in the chemostat cultures was higher than the final level in the static cultures, manganese may be required for growth at elevated levels. In medium supplemented with manganese, cells grown anaerobically contained a low level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity; aerobic cultivation increased SOD activity at least threefold. In iron-supplemented medium, cells grown anaerobically also had low SOD activity; aerobic incubation resulted in little increase in SOD activity. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell extracts revealed a major band and a minor band of SOD activity in the cells grown with manganese; however, cells grown with iron contained a single band of SOD activity with an R/sub f/ value similar to that of the major band found in cells grown with manganese. None of the SOD activity bands were abolished by the inclusion of 2 mM hydrogen peroxide in the SOD activity strain. S. mutans may not produce a separate iron-containing SOD but may insert either iron or manganese into an apo-SOD protein. Alternatively, iron may function in another activity (not SOD) that augments the defense against oxygen toxicity at low SOD levels. 28 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  2. Iron and manganese contamination: sources, adverse effects and control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Y V V; Saraf, Renu

    2007-10-01

    This article discusses the problem of iron and manganese contamination, the adverse effects and available control methods. The presence of iron and manganese in water causes serious commercial and health problems. Various treatment methods are available to treat water contaminated with these elements. However, catalytic media is an excellent choice particularly increasing given the preference for non-chemical water treatment. INDION ISR and BIRM are the most popularly used synthetically manufactured catalytic media.

  3. Carbon Nanotube/Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    electrolytes : 0.5 M K2SO4, 1 M sodium chloride (NaCl), and 1 M calcium chloride (CaCl2). The qualitative CV behavior of the three electrolytes can be seen...Carbon Nanotube/ Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Matthew Ervin, Vinay Raju, Mary Hendrickson, and...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6289 December 2012 Carbon Nanotube/ Graphene Supercapacitors Containing Manganese Oxide

  4. Biogenic emission measurement and inventories determination of biogenic emissions in the eastern United States and Texas and comparison with biogenic emission inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Del Negro, L.; Brioude, J.; McKeen, S.; Stark, H.; Kuster, W. C.; Goldan, P. D.; Trainer, M.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Guenther, A. B.; Hansel, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Atlas, E.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Huey, L. G.; Hanks, A. T. Case

    2010-04-01

    During the NOAA Southern Oxidant Study 1999 (SOS1999), Texas Air Quality Study 2000 (TexAQS2000), International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT2004), and Texas Air Quality Study 2006 (TexAQS2006) campaigns, airborne measurements of isoprene and monoterpenes were made in the eastern United States and in Texas, and the results are used to evaluate the biogenic emission inventories BEIS3.12, BEIS3.13, MEGAN2, and WM2001. Two methods are used for the evaluation. First, the emissions are directly estimated from the ambient isoprene and monoterpene measurements assuming a well-mixed boundary layer and are compared with the emissions from the inventories extracted along the flight tracks. Second, BEIS3.12 is incorporated into the detailed transport model FLEXPART, which allows the isoprene and monoterpene mixing ratios to be calculated and compared to the measurements. The overall agreement for all inventories is within a factor of 2 and the two methods give consistent results. MEGAN2 is in most cases higher, and BEIS3.12 and BEIS3.13 lower than the emissions determined from the measurements. Regions with clear discrepancies are identified. For example, an isoprene hot spot to the northwest of Houston, Texas, was expected from BEIS3 but not observed in the measurements. Interannual differences in emissions of about a factor of 2 were observed in Texas between 2000 and 2006.

  5. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  6. Failure of manganese to protect from Shiga toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha A Gaston

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx, the main virulence factor of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, is a major public health threat, causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Currently, there are no approved therapeutics for these infections; however manganese has been reported to provide protection from the Stx1 variant isolated from Shigella dysenteriae (Stx1-S both in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the efficacy of manganese protection from Stx1-S and the more potent Stx2a isoform, using experimental systems well-established for studying Stx: in vitro responses of Vero monkey kidney cells, and in vivo toxicity to CD-1 outbred mice. Manganese treatment at the reported therapeutic concentration was toxic to Vero cells in culture and to CD-1 mice. At lower manganese concentrations that were better tolerated, we observed no protection from Stx1-S or Stx2a toxicity. The ability of manganese to prevent the effects of Stx may be particular to certain cell lines, mouse strains, or may only be manifested at high, potentially toxic manganese concentrations.

  7. Biogenic synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles by seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R Indira; Panda, Tapobrata

    2014-02-01

    Nanoparticles have an enormous range of biomedical and environmental applications and can be used for development of various nanodevices for diagnostics and drug delivery. Biogenic production of nanoparticles, that is of silver and gold, by seed plants, especially flowering plants, has evoked considerable interest in the last decade. Different organs of plants as well as callus cultures have been used for the production of these metal nanoparticles. It is possible to regulate the geometry of the nanoparticles by modifying the experimental parameters. In many cases the phytosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be potentially useful for treatment of various diseases. The production of gold and silver nanoparticles by diverse species of seed plants and their biological activity are discussed in this article.

  8. Grain coarsening of calcite: Fundamental mechanisms and biogenic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    In a saturated solution, submicrometer calcite (CaCO3) crystals recrystallize and coarsen to minimize surface area. The thermodynamic driving force is described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation, but the rates and mechanism are poorly understood. Calcite grain coarsening has many implications...... in industry and nature, but the specific focus of this research project was to understand how small, biogenic calcite particles in chalk have resisted grain coarsening for over 60 million years in saturated reservoir fluids. A new method was developed to produce pure calcite powder that has submicrometer...... coarsening – small grains coarsen by aggregation at high temperatures, followed by Ostwald ripening. Alginate, a model for the acidic polysaccharides produced by coccolithiphores, inhibited coarsening at a steady rate. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm preserved particles for at least 60 days before...

  9. Development of biogenic VOC emission inventories for the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, V.

    2008-07-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by vegetation, especially forests, can affect local and regional atmospheric photochemistry through their reactions with atmospheric oxidants. Their reaction products may also participate in the formation and growth of new particles which affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and thus climate, by scattering and absorbing shortwave and longwave radiation and by modifying the radiative properties, amount and lifetime of clouds. Globally, anthropogenic VOC emissions are far surpassed by the biogenic ones, making biogenic emission inventories an integral element in the development of efficient air quality and climate strategies. The inventories are typically constructed based on landcover information, measured emissions of different plants or vegetation types, and empirical dependencies of the emissions on environmental variables such as temperature and light. This thesis is focused on the VOC emissions from the boreal forest, the largest terrestrial biome with characteristic vegetation patterns and strong seasonality. The isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions of the most prevalent boreal tree species in Finland, Scots pine, have been measured and their seasonal variation and dependence on temperature and light have been studied. The measured emission data and other available observations of the emissions of the principal boreal trees have been used in a biogenic emission model developed for the boreal forests in Finland. The model utilizes satellite landcover information, Finnish forest classification and hourly meteorological data to calculate isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and other VOC emissions over the growing season. The principal compounds emitted by Scots pine are DELTA3-carene and alpha-pinene in the south boreal zone and alpha- and beta-pinene in the north boreal zone. The monoterpene emissions are dependent on temperature and have a clear seasonal cycle with high emissions in spring

  10. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of $\\alpha$-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported...

  11. Emission of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindwall, Frida

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from arctic ecosystems are scarcely studied and the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions even less so. BVOCs are emitted from all living organisms and play a role for atmospheric chemistry. The major part of BVOCs derives from plants...... in the atmosphere. This may warm the climate due to a prolonged lifetime of the potent greenhouse gas methane in the atmosphere. However, oxidized BVOCs may participate in formation or growth of aerosols, which in turn may mitigate climate warming. Climate change in the Arctic, an area characterized by short...... dependent and the emissions will increase in a future warmer climate. The aims of this dissertation were to study BVOC emission rates and blends from arctic ecosystems and to reveal the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions from the Arctic. BVOC emissions were measured in ambient and modified...

  12. Constraining Anthropogenic and Biogenic Emissions Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kathleen M.

    Numerous gas-phase anthropogenic and biogenic compounds are emitted into the atmosphere. These gases undergo oxidation to form other gas-phase species and particulate matter. Whether directly or indirectly, primary pollutants, secondary gas-phase products, and particulate matter all pose health and environmental risks. In this work, ambient measurements conducted using chemical ionization mass spectrometry are used as a tool for investigating regional air quality. Ambient measurements of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) were conducted in Mexico City. A method of inferring the rate of ozone production, PO3, is developed based on observations of HO2NO 2, NO, and NO2. Comparison of this observationally based PO3 to a highly constrained photochemical box model indicates that regulations aimed at reducing ozone levels in Mexico City by reducing NOx concentrations may be effective at higher NO x levels than predicted using accepted photochemistry. Measurements of SO2 and particulate sulfate were conducted over the Los Angeles basin in 2008 and are compared to measurements made in 2002. A large decrease in SO2 concentration and a change in spatial distribution are observed. Nevertheless, only a modest reduction in sulfate concentration is observed at ground sites within the basin. Possible explanations for these trends are investigated. Two techniques, single and triple quadrupole chemical ionization mass spectrometry, were used to quantify ambient concentrations of biogenic oxidation products, hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. The use of these techniques demonstrates the advantage of triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for separation of mass analogues, provided the collision-induced daughter ions are sufficiently distinct. Enhancement ratios of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde in Californian biomass burning plumes are presented as are concentrations of these compounds at a rural ground site downwind of Sacramento.

  13. Biophysics of Magnetic Orientation: Radical Pairs, Biogenic Magnetite, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, Joe

    2011-03-01

    Two major biophysical mechanisms for magnetoreception in terrestrial animals, one based on biogenic magnetite and another on radical-pair biochemical reactions, have been the subject of experiment and debate for the past 30 years. The magnetite hypothesis has stood the test of time: biogenic magnetite is synthesized biochemically in Bacteria, Protists, and numerous Animal phyla, as well as in some plants. Chains of single-domain crystals have been detected by clean-lab based SQUID magnetometry in animal tissues in all major phyla, followed by high-resolution TEM in selected model organisms, as well as by electrophysiological studies demonstrating the role of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve in the magnetoreceptive process. Pulse-remagnetization - configured to uniquely flip the polarity of single-domain ferromagnets - has dramatic effects on the behavior of many birds, honeybees, mole rats, turtles, and bats, to cite a growing list. Magnetite-containing cells in the vicinity of these neurons in fish are now the subject of intense study by our consortium. The existence of a specialized class of magnetite-containing magnetoreceptor cells in animal tissues is no longer controversial. In contrast, less success has been achieved in gaining experimental support across a range of taxa for the radical-pair hypothesis. Although this mechanism was proposed to explain an early observation that birds would not respond to complete inversion of the magnetic vector, many organisms (even some birds) do indeed respond to the field polarity. We also note that few, if any, of these critical experiments have been done using fully double-blind methods. This is joint work with: M. M. Walker (University of Auckland, New Zealand) and M. Winklhofer (LMU Munich, Germany).

  14. Modeling biogenic gas bubbles formation and migration in coarse sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.

    2011-12-01

    Shujun Ye Department of Hydrosciences, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China; sjye@nju.edu.cn Brent E. Sleep Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A4 CANADA; sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca Methane gas generation in porous media was investigated in an anaerobic two-dimensional sand-filled cell. Inoculation of the lower portion of the cell with a methanogenic culture and addition of methanol to the bottom of the cell led to biomass growth and formation of a gas phase. The formation, migration, distribution and saturation of gases in the cell were visualized by the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Gas generated at the bottom of the cell in the biologically active zone moved upwards in discrete fingers, so that gas phase saturations (gas-filled fraction of void space) in the biologically active zone at the bottom of the cell did not exceed 40-50%, while gas accumulation at the top of the cell produced gas phase saturations as high as 80%. Macroscopic invasion percolation (MIP) at near pore scale[Glass, et al., 2001; Kueper and McWhorter, 1992]was used to model gas bubbles growth in porous media. The nonwetting phase migration pathway can be yielded directly by MIP. MIP was adopted to simulate the expansion, fragmentation, and mobilization of gas clusters in the cell. The production of gas, and gas phash saturations were simulated by a continuum model - compositional simulator (COMPSIM) [Sleep and Sykes, 1993]. So a combination of a continuum model and a MIP model was used to simulate the formation, fragmentation and migration of biogenic gas bubbles. Key words: biogenic gas; two dimensional; porous media; MIP; COMPSIM

  15. Occurrence of biogenic amines in Miso, Japanese traditional fermented soybean paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Bo Young; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze overall contents of biogenic amines in Miso and thereby evaluate the safety of the food. Through HPLC analysis of 22 different Miso products, it was found that most samples had low biogenic amine contents. However, some samples contained both histamine and tyramine close to hazardous levels of the amines, which indicate that the amounts of biogenic amines in Miso are not completely within the safe level for human health. Meanwhile, the biogenic amine contents showed no clear relationship with physicochemical parameters, whereas they revealed a good relationship with the ratio of soybean to other grains used in raw material. Thus, it turned out that biogenic amine contents in Miso are primarily affected by the ratio of raw ingredients, especially soybeans. The aerobic plate counts of Miso samples ranged from 3 to 8 Log CFU/g, and all the strains isolated from Miso samples were found to produce biogenic amines. Most strains were identified to be Bacillus subtilis, often regarded as the predominant contaminant bacteria in Miso, and highly capable of producing tyramine and spermine. Taken together, therefore, this study suggests that variability of biogenic amine contents in Miso are primarily attributed to the ratio of raw ingredients in the food that affects the relative contribution level of bacterial contaminants to the contents.

  16. Six-coordinate manganese(3+) in catalysis by yeast manganese superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Yuewei; Gralla, Edith Butler; Schumacher, Mikhail; Cascio, Duilio; Cabelli, Diane E.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone (EWHA); (UCLA); (BNL)

    2012-10-10

    Reduction of superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}) by manganese-containing superoxide dismutase occurs through either a 'prompt protonation' pathway, or an 'inner-sphere' pathway, with the latter leading to formation of an observable Mn-peroxo complex. We recently reported that wild-type (WT) manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans are more gated toward the 'prompt protonation' pathway than human and bacterial MnSODs and suggested that this could result from small structural changes in the second coordination sphere of manganese. We report here that substitution of a second-sphere residue, Tyr34, by phenylalanine (Y34F) causes the MnSOD from S. cerevisiae to react exclusively through the 'inner-sphere' pathway. At neutral pH, we have a surprising observation that protonation of the Mn-peroxo complex in the mutant yeast enzyme occurs through a fast pathway, leading to a putative six-coordinate Mn3+ species, which actively oxidizes O{sub 2}{sup -} in the catalytic cycle. Upon increasing pH, the fast pathway is gradually replaced by a slow proton-transfer pathway, leading to the well-characterized five-coordinate Mn{sup 3+}. We here propose and compare two hypothetical mechanisms for the mutant yeast enzyme, diffeeing in the structure of the Mn-peroxo complex yet both involving formation of the active six-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} and proton transfer from a second-sphere water molecule, which has substituted for the -OH of Tyr34, to the Mn-peroxo complex. Because WT and the mutant yeast MnSOD both rest in the 2+ state and become six-coordinate when oxidized up from Mn{sup 2+}, six-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} species could also actively function in the mechanism of WT yeast MnSODs.

  17. A new test procedure for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincke; Verstichel; Monteny; Verstraete

    1999-01-01

    A new test method is described for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete, more specifically in sewer conditions. The aim of the new test method is the development of an accelerated and reproducible procedure for monitoring the resistance of different types of concrete with regard to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion. This experimental procedure reflects worst case conditions by providing besides H2S, also an enrichment of thiobacilli and biologically produced sulfur. By simulating the cyclic processes occurring in sewer pipes, significant differences between concrete mixtures could be detected after 51 days. Concrete modified by a styrene-acrylic ester polymer demonstrated a higher resistance against biogenic sulfuric acid attack.

  18. Operation of Marine Diesel Engines on Biogenic Fuels: Modification of Emissions and Resulting Climate Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; P. Lauer; Fritsche, U.; Hasselbach, J.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Fleischer, F.

    2011-01-01

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO2, NOx, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fue...

  19. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  20. Impact wear behaviors of Hadfield manganese steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XU Yun-hua; CEN Qi-hong; ZHU Jin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Impact wear behaviors of Hadfield manganese steel at different impact angles were investigated. The results of impact wear tests show that there exists a critical impact load for Hadfield steel. The wear rate suddenly turns down after some impact cycles when the impact load is greater than the critical load. The critical impact load is smaller than 8.2 J in this research because the nano-sized austenitic grains embedded in amorphous delay the crack propagation in subsurface. From high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) examination of subsurface microstructure, it is found that a large amount of nano-sized grains embedded in bulk amorphous matrix are fully developed and no martensitic transformation occurs during the impact wear process. The analytical results of worn surface morphology and debris indicate that the initiation of crack, propagation and spalling are restricted in the amorphous phase, resulting in the size distribution of debris in nano-sizes, which is the reason why the wear rate of Hadfield steel is greatly decreased at high impact load.

  1. Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dworetsky, M M; Patel, K

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic...

  2. Redundancy among manganese peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-04-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn(2+) amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn(2+)-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn(2+)-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn(2+)-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members.

  3. Submicron Features in Higher Manganese Silicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatir Sadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world energy crisis had increased the demand for alternative energy sources and as such is one of the topics at the forefront of research. One way for reducing energy consumption is by thermoelectricity. Thermoelectric effects enable direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy. Higher manganese silicide (HMS, MnSi1.75 is one of the promising materials for applications in the field of thermoelectricity. The abundance and low cost of the elements, combined with good thermoelectric properties and high mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, make it very attractive for thermoelectric applications. Recent studies have shown that Si-rich HMS has improved thermoelectric properties. The most interesting of which is the unusual reduction in thermal conductivity. In the current research, transmission (TEM and scanning (SEM electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction methods were applied for investigation of the govern mechanisms resulting in very low thermal conductivity values of an Si-rich HMS composition, following arc melting and hot-pressing procedures. In this paper, it is shown that there is a presence of sub-micron dislocations walls, stacking faults, and silicon and HMS precipitates inside each other apparent in the matrix, following a high temperature (0.9 Tm hot pressing for an hour. These are not just responsible for the low thermal conductivity values observed but also indicate the ability to create complicate nano-structures that will last during the production process and possibly during the application.

  4. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase: Guardian of the Powerhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daret K. St. Clair

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrion is vital for many metabolic pathways in the cell, contributing all or important constituent enzymes for diverse functions such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, the urea cycle, the citric acid cycle, and ATP synthesis. The mitochondrion is also a major site of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in the cell. Aberrant production of mitochondrial ROS can have dramatic effects on cellular function, in part, due to oxidative modification of key metabolic proteins localized in the mitochondrion. The cell is equipped with myriad antioxidant enzyme systems to combat deleterious ROS production in mitochondria, with the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD acting as the chief ROS scavenging enzyme in the cell. Factors that affect the expression and/or the activity of MnSOD, resulting in diminished antioxidant capacity of the cell, can have extraordinary consequences on the overall health of the cell by altering mitochondrial metabolic function, leading to the development and progression of numerous diseases. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which MnSOD protects cells from the harmful effects of overproduction of ROS, in particular, the effects of ROS on mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, may contribute to the development of novel treatments for various diseases in which ROS are an important component.

  5. Exposure to Environmental Air Manganese and Medication ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element with natural low levels found in water, food, and air, but due to industrialized processes, both workplace and the environmental exposures to Mn have increased. Recently, environmental studies have reported physical and mental health problems associated with air-Mn exposure, but medical record reviews for exposed residents are rare in the literature. When medical records and clinical testing are unavailable, examination of residents’ prescribed medication use may be used as a surrogate of health effects associated with Mn. We examined medication use among adult Ohio residents in two towns with elevated air-Mn (n=185) and one unexposed control town (n=90). Study participants recorded medication use in a health questionnaire and brought their currently prescribed medication, over-the-counter and supplement lists to their interview. Two physicians (family and psychiatric medicine) reviewed the provided medication list and developed medical categories associated with the medications used. The exposed (E) and control (C) groups were compared on the established 12 medication and 1 supplement categories using chi-square tests. The significant medication categories were further analyzed using hierarchical binomial logistic regression adjusting for education, personal income, and years of residency. The two groups were primarily white (E:94.6%; C:96.7%) but differed on education (E:13.8; C:15.2 years), residence length in their re

  6. Nanoflake Manganese Oxide and Nickel-Manganese Oxide Synthesized by Electrodeposition for Electrochemical Capacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoflake structures of electrochemical manganese oxide (EMD and nickel mixed manganese oxide (NiMD were directly deposited on a stainless steel by using Chronoamperometry and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV techniques. The structure, morphology, and capacitive behavior of EMD or NIMD nanoflake were affected by the electrodeposition modes and deposition time. The highest specific capacitance (Csp was obtained for only two-minute deposition by both methods. EMD nanoflakes electrodeposited by CV technique show higher specific capacitance values than those prepared by Chronoamperometry owing to its homogenous and highly porous surface. All EMD samples exhibited excellent cycle behavior, less than 5% capacitance loss after 1000 cycles. Ni mixed MnO2 was prepared at different Mn2+/Ni2+ ratios for 2 minutes of electrodeposition. The presence of Ni2+ ion enhanced the Csp value at high charge-discharge rate due to the decrease of the charge transfer resistance. The supercapacitor prototype of 2 cm × 2 cm was assembled using EMD and NiMD as electrode material and tested at 1 A·g−1.

  7. Cerium, manganese and cerium/manganese ceramic monolithic catalysts. Study of VOCs and PM removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    COLMAN-LERNER Esteban; PELUSO Miguel Andrs; SAMBETH Jorge; THOMAS Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic supported cerium, manganese and cerium-manganese catalysts were prepared by direct impregnation of aqueous precursor, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method (BET), temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) acidity measurements and electrical conductivity. The catalytic activity was evaluated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) (ethanol, methyl ethyl ketone and toluene) oxidation. Additionally, catalysts were tested in particulate matter (PM) combustion. The characterization results indicated that Ce was in the form of Ce4+ and Ce3+, and Mn existed in the form of Mn4+and Mn3+on the surface of the Mn/AC sample and in the form of Mn4+ in the Ce/Mn/AC monolith. VOC oxidation results revealed that the Ce/Mn/AC sample showed an excellent performance compared with ceramic supported CeO2 (Ce/AC) and MnOx (Mn/AC) samples. The PM combustion was also higher on Ce/Mn/AC monoliths. The enhanced catalytic activity was mainly attributed to the Ce and Mn interaction which enhanced the acidity, conductiv-ity and the reducibility of the oxides.

  8. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egger Jos I

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later, several organ systems may be affected and, due to neurotoxicity, an atypical parkinsonian syndrome may emerge. With regard to neuropsychiatry, an array of symptoms may develop up to 30 years after intoxication, of which gait and speech abnormalities, cognitive and motor slowing, mood changes and hallucinations are the most common. Psychotic phenomena are rarely reported. Case presentation We describe the case of a 49-year-old Caucasian man working as a welder who was referred to our facility for evaluation of acute paranoid psychotic behavior. Our patient's medical history made no mention of any somatic complaints or psychiatric symptoms, and he had been involved in a professional career as a metalworker. On magnetic resonance imaging scanning of his brain, a bilateral hyperdensity of the globus pallidus, suggestive for manganese intoxication, was found. His manganese serum level was 52 to 97 nmol/L (range: 7 to 20 nmol/L. A diagnosis of organic psychotic disorder due to manganese overexposure was made. His psychotic symptoms disappeared within two weeks of treatment with low-dose risperidone. At three months later, serum manganese was decreased to slightly elevated levels and the magnetic resonance imaging T1 signal intensity was reduced. No signs of Parkinsonism were found and a definite diagnosis of manganese-induced apathy syndrome was made. Conclusion Although neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms caused by (chronic manganese exposure have been reported frequently in the past, in the present day the disorder is rarely diagnosed. In this report we stress that manganese intoxication can still occur, in our case in a confined

  9. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic isoprene over California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Biogenic isoprene fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene over 7400 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes of isoprene over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate instantaneous isoprene fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 m ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence determined in the racetrack-stacked profiles. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to basal emission factor (BEF) land-cover data sets used to drive BVOC emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. Even though the isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, observations at the Walnut Grove tower south of Sacramento demonstrate that isoprene oxidation products from the high emitting regions in the surrounding oak woodlands accumulate at night in

  10. Biogenic amines formation in Streptococcus thermophilus isolated from home-made natural yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezginc, Yekta; Akyol, Ismail; Kuley, Esmeray; Özogul, Fatih

    2013-05-01

    Twelve different biogenic amines formation in 58 isolates of Streptococcus thermophilus from home-made natural yogurt were investigated in histidine (HDB) and lysine decarboxylase broth (LDB). All S. thermophilus isolates had an ability to produce twelve different biogenic amines in HDB and LDB. Most of the S. thermophilus isolates formed low amounts of histamine (1-50 mg/L) from histidine. Apart from one isolate, S. thermophilus produced tyramine at low (47 isolates) and medium (10 isolates) levels. The amount of each specific biogenic amine produced by S. thermophilus was generally lower than 100 mg L(-1). Also, the presence of hdcA gene was investigated using PCR technique and relation between gene and histamine production was conducted in S. thermophilus isolates. This study showed that most of the S. thermophilus isolates have the ability to form biogenic amines, especially histamine, and tyramine, which is an important consideration when selecting strains as starter cultures.

  11. Biogenic amines degradation by malolactic bacteria: towards a potential application in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio eCapozzi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines in wine represent a toxicological risk for the health of the consumer, with several trade implications. In this study 26 strains of Lactobacillus plantarum were analysed for their ability to degrade biogenic amines commonly found during wine fermentation. Two strains of L. plantarum were selected in reason of their ability to degrade putrescine and tyramine. The degradation was assessed in vitro, both in presence of the biogenic amines and in presence of the specific chemical precursor and of producer bacteria. The two L. plantarum biotypes were found capable to work synergically. In addition, the survival in wine-like medium and the aptitude to degrade malic acid after alcoholic fermentation of the selected L. plantarum strains was analysed. Our results suggest the potential application of wine L. plantarum strains to design malolactic starter cultures able to degrade biogenic amines in wine.

  12. Evolution of cyclonic eddies and biogenic fluxes in the northern Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nuncio, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    of westward propagating Rossby waves. The sediment trap data provided the observational evidence that eddy-induced biological productivity is an important mechanism in the Bay of Bengal that contributes significantly to the mid-depth biogenic flux....

  13. Manganese, iron, and total particulate exposures to welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael R; Susi, Pam

    2010-02-01

    Welders are exposed to a variety of metal fumes, including manganese, that may elevate the risk for neurological disease. This study examines several large data sets to characterize manganese, iron, and total particulate mass exposures resulting from welding operations. The data sets contained covariates for a variety of exposure modifiers, including the presence of ventilation, the degree of confinement, and the location of the personal sampler (i.e., behind or in front of the welding helmet). The analysis suggests that exposures to manganese are frequently at or above the current ACGIH(R) threshold limit value of 0.2 mg/m(3). In addition, there is evidence that local exhaust ventilation can control the exposures to manganese and total fume but that mechanical ventilation may not. The data suggest that higher exposures are associated with a greater degree of enclosure, particularly when local exhaust ventilation is absent. Samples taken behind the helmet were, in general, lower than those measured outside of it. There were strong correlations among manganese, iron, and total particulate mass exposures, suggesting simple equations to estimate one fume component from any of the others.

  14. Motoric impairment following manganese exposure in asteroid echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Baden, Susanne P; Looström, Jakob; Eriksson, Susanne P; Hernroth, Bodil E

    2015-10-01

    In the oceans, naturally occurring manganese (Mn) is released from the sediments during events of hypoxia. While neuro- and immuno-toxic effects of bioavailable manganese are well documented for crustaceans, studies of similar effects of manganese on other marine invertebrates are comparatively few. Here, we developed a new functional test "the repeated turning assay" to investigate if manganese exposure at ∼12 mg L(-1) affected motoric behaviour of two asteroid echinoderms, the Common sea star, Asterias rubens, and the Black brittle star, Ophiocomina nigra. By measuring of the turning-over capacity, from dorsal to ventral position, after one and two weeks of manganese exposure, we showed that for both species Mn exposure significantly delayed the ability to turn. After a recovery period of two weeks, the capacity of turning-over was not restored to that of unexposed animals neither for A. rubens nor for O. nigra. Further investigation of sea stars showed that Mn accumulated ∼5 fold in the tube feet, organs involved in their turning-over activity, and the high concentration remained after the recovery period. In the tube feet we also recorded an increased activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), here used as a proxy for neuromuscular disturbances. The results indicated that Mn induces neuromuscular disturbance in echinoderms which is important news, given that previous studies have concluded that adult echinoderms are relatively tolerant to Mn.

  15. Light Absorption of Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, B. A.; Artaxo, P.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Barbosa, H. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol absorption is a key issue in proper calculation of aerosol radiative forcing. Especially in the tropics with the dominance of natural biogenic aerosol and brown carbon, the so called anomalous absorption is of particular interest. A special experiment was designed to study the wavelength dependence of aerosol absorption for PM2.5 as well as for PM10 particles in the wet season in Central Amazonia. Aerosol analysis occurred from May to August 2014, in the ZF2 ecological reservation, situated at about 55 km North of Manaus in very pristine conditions Two 7 wavelengths AE33 Aethalometers were deployed measuring in parallel, but with a PM2.5 and PM10 inlets. Two MAAP (Multiangle Aerosol Absorption Photometer) were operated in parallel with the AE33 exactly at the same PM2.5 and PM10 inlets. Organic and elemental carbon was analyzed using collection with quartz filters and analysis using a Sunset OC/EC analyzer. Aerosol light scattering for 3 wavelengths was measured using Air Photon and TSI Nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution was measured with one TSI SMPS and a GRIMM OPC to have the size range from 10 nm to 10 micrometers. Particles were measured under dry conditions using diffusion dryers. Aerosol optical depth and absorption was also measured with an AERONET sunphotometer operated close to the site. As the experiment was run in the wet season, very low equivalent black carbon (EBC) were measured, with average concentrations around 50 ng/m³ during May, increasing to 130 ng/m³ in June and July. The measurements adjusted for similar wavelengths shows excellent agreement between the MAAP and AE33 for both inlets (PM2.5 and PM10). It was not possible statistically infer absorption from the coarse mode biogenic particles, since the absorption was completely dominated by fine mode particles. AERONET measurements shows very low values of AOD, at 0.17 at 500 nm and 0.13 at 870 nm, with very low absorption AOD values at 0.00086 at 676 nm and 0.0068 at 872 nm

  16. Biogenic hardparts: Difficult archives of the geological past (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Schone, B. R.; Hoffmann, R.; Niedermayr, A.

    2013-12-01

    Biomineralized exo- or endoskeletons of fossil marine invertebrates are widespread and diverse components of the Phanerozoic rock record of Earth's past and present oceans. Exoskeletons serve as protection against environmental pressure or predators, whilst endoskeletons can act as support or serve as an attachment for muscles and ligaments and hence as a mechanism for transmitting muscular forces. Biogenic hard parts represent sophisticated products resulting from the hierarchical interaction of inorganic minerals (95%) and macromolecular organic matrices, forming commonly less than 5%. The significance of many biogenic carbonate archives lies in the time-resolved growth patterns and their ability to record ambient environmental conditions in the form of multiple geochemical properties (multi-proxy archives) that have been widely used to assess past oceanic seawater properties. Here, we compile and review published work dealing with crystallization pathways of skeletal hard parts secreted by mollusks (i.e., bivalves and cephalopods) as well as brachiopods as widely used archives of ancient neritic epeiric settings. Bivalves and cephalopods (e.g., extinct ammonoids and belemnites and extant Sepia, Nautilus and Spirula) all form accretionary calcitic, aragonitic or vateritic skeletal hard parts. Despite the fact that mollusks and brachiopods form part of very different branches of the animal phylogenetic tree, their biomineralization strategies are surprisingly similar. Our main focus lies in a critical assessment of the complex pathways of ions and aquo-complexes from their source (seawater) to the final product (biomineral). We do this as an attempt to critically test the commonly held hypothesis that many fossil hard parts precipitated (under favorable conditions and pending subsequent diagenetic alteration) in equilibrium with seawater. Two main observations stand out: (1) the present knowledge on pathways and mechanisms (e.g., ion channel trans-membrane or

  17. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: significant contributions from biogenic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, was 21% non-sea salt sulfate 2% nitrate, 7% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea salt signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA profiles could be isolated: an amino acids/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass, a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%, a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 40%, a sea salt OA fraction (SS-OA, 7% and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%. The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (C : N ratio = 0.13, has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea salt aerosol was identified (SS-OA. However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not

  18. Anthropogenic impact on biogenic Si pools in temperate soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Clymans

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Human land use changes directly affect silica (Si mobilisation and Si storage in terrestrial ecosystems and influence Si export from the continents, although the magnitudes of the impact are unknown. Yet biogenic silica (BSi in soils is an understudied aspect. We have quantified and compared total biogenic (PSia and easily soluble (PSie Si pools at four sites along a gradient of disturbance in southern Sweden. An estimate of the magnitude of change in temperate continental BSi pools due to human disturbance is provided. Land use clearly affects BSi pools and their distribution. Total PSia and PSie for a continuous forested site at Siggaboda Nature Reserve (66 900 ± 22 800 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 952 ± 16 kg SiO2 ha−1 are significantly higher than disturbed land use types from the Råshult Culture Reserve including arable land (28 800 ± 7200 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 239 ± 91 kg SiO2 ha−1, pasture sites (27 300 ± 5980 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 370 ± 129 kg SiO2 ha−1 and grazed forest (23 600 ± 6370 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 346 ± 123 kg SiO2 ha−1. Vertical PSia and PSie profiles show significant (p<0.05 variation among the sites. These differences in size and distribution are interpreted as the long-term effect of reduced BSi replenishment and increased mobilisation of the PSia in disturbed soils. In temperate regions, total PSia showed a 10 % decline since agricultural development (3000BCE. Recent agricultural expansion (after 1700CE has resulted in an average export of 1.1 ± 0.8 Tmol Si yr−1, leading to an annual contribution of ca. 20 % to the global land-ocean Si flux carried by rivers. Human activities clearly exert a long-term influence on Si cycling in soils and

  19. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  20. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: dominant contributions from biogenic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, was 21% non-sea-salt sulfate, 2% nitrate, 8% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea spray signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA profiles could be isolated: an amino acid/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass, a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%, a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 41%, a sea spray OA fraction (SS-OA, 7% and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%. The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (N : C ratio = 0.13, has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea spray aerosol was identified (SS-OA. However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not

  1. Metabolism of biogenic amines in acute cerebral ischemia: Influence of systemic hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are biogenic amines which are transmitters of the central nervous system. The effects of ischemia on the brain parenchyma depends on many factors, such is the mechanism of blood flow interruption, velocity of the occurring blood flow interruption, duration of an ischemic episode, organization of anatomical structures of the brain blood vessels etc., which all influence the final outcome. During interruption of the brain circulation in experimental or clinical conditions, neurotransmitter metabolism, primarily of biogenic amines, is disturbed. Many researches with various experimental models of complete ischemia reported a decrease in the content of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the CNS tissue. It was proven that hyperglycemia can drastically increase cerebral injury followed by short-term cerebral ischemia. Considering the fact that biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin influence the size of neurologic damage, as well as the fact that in hyperglycemic conditions infarct size (from the morphological aspect is larger relative to normoglycemic status, the intention was to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in occurrence of damage in conditions of hyperglycemia, i.e. in the case of brain apoplexia in diabetics. Analysis of biogenic amines metabolism in states of acute hyperglycemia, as well as analysis of the effects of reversible and irreversible brain ischemia on metabolism of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, showed that acute hyperglycemia slows down serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine metabolism in the cerebral cortex and n. caudatus. Brain ischemia in normoglycemic animals by itself has no influence on biogenic amines metabolism, but the effect of ischemia becomes apparent during reperfusion. In recirculation, which corresponds to the occurrences in penumbra, release of biogenic amines is uncontrolled and increased. Brain ischemia in acute hyperglycemic animals

  2. Study on biogenic amines in various dry salted fish consumed in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanyan; Chen, Yufeng; Li, Laihao; Yang, Xianqing; Yang, Shaoling; Lin, Wanling; Zhao, Yongqiang; Deng, Jianchao

    2016-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the biogenic amines (BAs), physicochemical property and microorganisms in dry salted fish, a traditional aquatic food consumed in China. Forty three samples of dry salted fish were gathered from retail and wholesale markets and manufacturers, which had been produced in various regions in China. Cadaverine (CAD) and putrescine (PUT) were quantitatively the most common biogenic amines. About 14% of the samples exceeded the histamine content standards established by the FDA and/or EU. The highest histamine content was found in Silver pomfret ( Pampus argenteus) (347.79 mg kg-1). Five of forty three samples exceeded the acceptable content of TYR (100 mg kg-1), and 23.26% of dried-salted fish contained high contents of biogenic amines (above 600 mg kg-1). In addition, species, regions, pickling processes and drying methods made the physicochemical property, microorganisms and biogenic amines in dry salted fish to be different to some extents. The total plate count (TPC) was much higher than that of total halophilic bacteria in all samples. The biogenic amines, physicochemical property and microbiological counts exhibited large variations among samples. Furthermore, no significant correlation between biogenic amines and physicochemical property and TPC was observed. This study indicated that dry salted fish may still present healthy risk for BAs, depending on the processing methods, storage conditions among others.

  3. Operation of marine diesel engines on biogenic fuels: modification of emissions and resulting climate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Lauer, Peter; Fritsche, Uwe; Hasselbach, Jan; Lichtenstern, Michael; Schlager, Hans; Fleischer, Fritz

    2011-12-15

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO(2), NO(x), hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fuel life cycle analysis which included land use changes associated with the growth of energy plants. Emissions of CO(2) and NO(x) per kWh were found to be similar for fossil fuels and biogenic fuels. PM mass emission was reduced to 10-15% of HFO emissions for all low-sulfur fuels including MGO as a fossil fuel. Black carbon emissions were reduced significantly to 13-30% of HFO. Changes in emissions were predominantly related to particulate sulfate, while differences between low-sulfur fossil fuels and low-sulfur biogenic fuels were of minor significance. GHG emissions from the biogenic fuel life cycle (FLC) depend crucially on energy plant production conditions and have the potential of shifting the overall GHG budget from positive to negative compared to fossil fuels.

  4. Characteristics of Carbon Isotopes of Alkane Components and Identification Marks of Biogenic Gases in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴金星; 陈英

    1994-01-01

    The carbon isotope composition of alkane component in biogenic gases of China has the following characteristics:with the increase of carbon number of the alkane molecules in biogenic gases, (i) the distribution range of the δ13C values and their main frequency sections become narrower, and both the heaviest and the lightest δ13C boundary values shift to their heavier end; (ii) the δ13C values of ethane and propane in biogenic gases present a positive linear relationship and (iii) the values of δ13C1, δ13C2 and δ13C3 tend to become heavier with the increase of heavy alkane component (C2+3) in biogenic gases. The authors studied the relationship between the δ13C values and the amount of heavy alkane components in biogenic gases (δ13C1 -C2+3(%). δ13C2 -C2+3(%) ,δ13C3-C2+3(%) for the first time and set up the interrelated regression equations between δ13C and C2+3 content (C2+3%), and advance that δ13C1< -55‰ and C2+3<0. 5% are two fine marks for identification of biogenic gases of China. δ13C

  5. Manganese transport via the transferrin mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Thomas E; Gerstner, Brent; Gunter, Karlene K; Malecki, Jon; Gelein, Robert; Valentine, William M; Aschner, Michael; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    Excessive manganese (Mn) uptake by brain cells, particularly in regions like the basal ganglia, can lead to toxicity. Mn(2+) is transported into cells via a number of mechanisms, while Mn(3+) is believed to be transported similarly to iron (Fe) via the transferrin (Tf) mechanism. Cellular Mn uptake is therefore determined by the activity of the mechanisms transporting Mn into each type of cell and by the amounts of Mn(2+), Mn(3+) and their complexes to which these cells are exposed; this complicates understanding the contributions of each transporter to Mn toxicity. While uptake of Fe(3+) via the Tf mechanism is well understood, uptake of Mn(3+) via this mechanism has not been systematically studied. The stability of the Mn(3+)Tf complex allowed us to form and purify this complex and label it with a fluorescent (Alexa green) tag. Using purified and labeled Mn(3+)Tf and biophysical tools, we have developed a novel approach to study Mn(3+)Tf transport independently of other Mn transport mechanisms. This approach was used to compare the uptake of Mn(3+)Tf into neuronal cell lines with published descriptions of Fe(3+) uptake via the Tf mechanism, and to obtain quantitative information on Mn uptake via the Tf mechanism. Results confirm that in these cell lines significant Mn(3+) is transported by the Tf mechanism similarly to Fe(3+)Tf transport; although Mn(3+)Tf transport is markedly slower than other Mn transport mechanisms. This novel approach may prove useful for studying Mn toxicity in other systems and cell types.

  6. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Woodward W; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet-it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn(2+), and ultimately water.

  7. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  8. Analysis of numerical simulations and influencing factors of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Xilai; Chen, Lei; Wei, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal manganese pollution has become an increasingly pressing water quality issue for water supply reservoirs in recent years. Manganese is a redox-sensitive element and is released from sediment under anoxic conditions near the sediment-water interface during summer and autumn, when water temperature stratification occurs. The reservoir water temperature and water dynamic conditions directly influence the formation of manganese pollution. Numerical models are useful tools to quantitatively evaluate manganese pollution and its influencing factors. This paper presents a reservoir manganese pollution model by adding a manganese biogeochemical module to a water quality model-CE-QUAL-W2. The model is applied to the Wangjuan reservoir (Qingdao, China), which experiences manganese pollution during summer and autumn. Field data are used to verify the model, and the results show that the model can reproduce the main features of the thermal stratification and manganese distribution. The model is used to evaluate the manganese pollution process and its four influencing factors, including air temperature, water level, wind speed, and wind directions, through different simulation scenarios. The results show that all four factors can influence manganese pollution. High air temperature, high water level, and low wind speed aggravate manganese pollution, while low air temperature, low water level, and high wind speed reduce manganese pollution. Wind that travels in the opposite direction of the flow aggravates manganese pollution, while wind in the same direction as the flow reduces manganese pollution. This study provides useful information to improve our understanding of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs, which is important for reservoir manganese pollution warnings and control.

  9. Intellectual Impairment in School-Age Children Exposed to Manganese from Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, Maryse F.; Sauvé, Sébastien; Barbeau, Benoit; Legrand, Melissa; Brodeur, Marie-Ève; Bouffard, Thérèse; Limoges, Elyse; Bellinger, David C.; Mergler, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Background Manganese is an essential nutrient, but in excess it can be a potent neurotoxicant. Despite the common occurrence of manganese in groundwater, the risks associated with this source of exposure are largely unknown. Objectives Our first aim was to assess the relations between exposure to manganese from drinking water and children’s intelligence quotient (IQ). Second, we examined the relations between manganese exposures from water consumption and from the diet with children’s hair ma...

  10. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gac, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.gac@umcs.lublin.pl; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • Formation of MnO with regular rippled-like surface patterns. • Synthesis of copper nanorods supported on MnO nanoparticles. • Hydrogen production in steam methanol reforming over supported copper nanorods. - Abstract: The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper–manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  11. Supported lipid bilayers as templates to design manganese oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Maheshkumar; B Sreedhar; B U Nair; A Dhathathreyan

    2012-09-01

    This work reports on the preparation of nanoclusters of manganese oxide using biotemplating techniques. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on quartz using cationic lipid [Dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DOMA)] and mixed systems with neutral phospholipids dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) have been used as templates to synthesize these nanoparticles in a waterbased medium at room temperature. The Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show manganese oxide nanostructures that are composed of crystals or small clusters in the size range of 20-50 nm in diameter. Small angle XRD showed that template removal through calcining process results in nanostructures of the manganese oxide in sizes from 30 to 50 nm. Using these organized assemblies it is possible to control the nano and mesoscopic morphologies of particles and both rod-like and spherical particles can be synthesized.

  12. High manganese concentrations in rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Nina L.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Wiens, Roger C.; Grotzinger, John; Ollila, Ann M.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Clark, Benton C.; Gellert, Ralf; Mangold, Nicolas; Maurice, Sylvestre; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Nachon, Marion; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Berger, Jeffrey; Clegg, Samuel M.; Forni, Olivier; Hardgrove, Craig; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton E.; Sautter, Violaine

    2014-01-01

    The surface of Mars has long been considered a relatively oxidizing environment, an idea supported by the abundance of ferric iron phases observed there. However, compared to iron, manganese is sensitive only to high redox potential oxidants, and when concentrated in rocks, it provides a more specific redox indicator of aqueous environments. Observations from the ChemCam instrument on the Curiosity rover indicate abundances of manganese in and on some rock targets that are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than previously observed on Mars, suggesting the presence of an as-yet unidentified manganese-rich phase. These results show that the Martian surface has at some point in time hosted much more highly oxidizing conditions than has previously been recognized.

  13. Iron, zinc, and manganese distribution in mature soybean seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta

    2009-01-01

    to reveal the distribution of iron, zinc, manganese and phosphorus within soybean seeds. We show that high concentrations of iron accumulate in the seed coats of mature soybean seeds. This iron accounted for 20 to 40% of the total seed iron. Furthermore, manganese and iron accumulated in close proximity...... to each other in the provascular tissue of the soybean radicle. No regions with increased accumulation of iron, zinc, or manganese were observed in the cotyledons. The concentrations of both phosphorus and zinc were higher in the radicle compared to the cotyledons, and zinc accumulated primarily near...... the radicle tip. Our study provides a thorough description of the distribution of important micronutrients within the mature soybean seed....

  14. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  15. Computation of the Fractal Pattern in Manganese Dendrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Merdan; M. Bayirli

    2005-01-01

    @@ The images of manganese flowers (clusters) on the surface of the natural magnesium silicate substance are scanned and the pictures of them are transferred to computer atmosphere. By using these scanning parameters, the exponents of density correlation function and fractal dimension values are calculated. For all different groups between the least and the most dense in the samples, the correlation function exponents may range from 0.141 to 0.178 and the fractal dimension values may vary between 1.61 and 1.88. In addition, the manganese flowers are divided into seven different groups according to their smallest- and largest-density features. The formation of the natural manganese clusters (flowers, dendrites) on the surface of the magnesium silicate substance can be defined by using the deposition, diffusion and aggregation model.

  16. Contribution of arginase to manganese metabolism of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keni, Sarita; Punekar, Narayan S

    2016-02-01

    Aspects of manganese metabolism during normal and acidogenic growth of Aspergillus niger were explored. Arginase from this fungus was a Mn[II]-enzyme. The contribution of the arginase protein towards A. niger manganese metabolism was investigated using arginase knockout (D-42) and arginase over-expressing (ΔXCA-29) strains of A. niger NCIM 565. The Mn[II] contents of various mycelial fractions were found in the order: D-42 strain niger mycelia harvested from acidogenic growth media contain substantially less Mn[II] as compared to those from normal growth media. Nevertheless, acidogenic mycelia harbor considerable Mn[II] levels and a functional arginase. Altered levels of mycelial arginase protein did not significantly influence citric acid production. The relevance of arginase to cellular Mn[II] pool and homeostasis was evaluated and the results suggest that arginase regulation could occur via manganese availability.

  17. MODULATED STRUCTURES AND ORDERING STRUCTURES IN ALLOYING AUSTENITIC MANGANESE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. He; Z.H. Jin; J.D. Lu

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of Fe-10Mn-2Cr-1.5C alloy has been investigated with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. The superlattice diffraction spots and satellite reflection pattrens have been observed in the present alloy, which means the appearence of the ordering structure and modulated structure in the alloy. It is also proved by X-ray diffraction analysis that the austenite in the alloy is more stable than that in traditional austenitic manganese steel. On the basis of this investigation,it is suggested that the C-Mn ordering clusters exist in austenitic manganese steel and the chromium can strengthen this effect by linking the weaker C-Mn couples together,which may play an important role in work hardening of austenitic manganese steel.

  18. HOx Radical Behavior in Urban, Biogenic and Mixed Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.; Schardt, N.; Mukherjee, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of HOx radicals in tropospheric chemistry is well-recognized. These roles include control of the lifetimes of a wide variety of trace gases, and control of photochemical ozone formation. The continued advance in understanding comes from laboratory investigations and field observations especially as part of comprehensive measurement campaigns. We participated in two recent observational campaigns aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft platform: NOMADSS (Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks) and FRAPPE (Front Range Atmospheric Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment). During these studies, a wide varieties of air masses were sampled ranging from fresh urban to rural both without and without biogenic influence to marine, and including the impacts of emissions from oil and gas extraction and animal production. Among the wide variety of parameters and species related to tropospheric chemistry that were measured, our group made observations of HOx and related species: OH, HO2, HO2+RO2, H2SO4, and stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) using selected ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The paper discusses the functional dependence of these species on other measures of the chemical environment (e.g. NO, VOCs, j-values) as well as comparison of model estimates with the observations.

  19. Biogenic aldehyde determination by reactive paper spray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Soumabha; Hendricks, P.I. [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Reynolds, J.C. [Centre for Analytical Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Cooks, R.G., E-mail: cooks@purdue.edu [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • In-situ derivatization and simultaneous ionization used to detect aldehydes. • Biogenic aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes reacted with 4-aminophenol. • Derivatized products yield structurally characteristic fragment ions. • This measurement demonstrated using a miniaturized portable mass spectrometer. - Abstract: Ionization of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes is improved by performing simultaneous chemical derivatization using 4-aminophenol to produce charged iminium ions during paper spray ionization. Accelerated reactions occur in the microdroplets generated during the paper spray ionization event for the tested aldehydes (formaldehyde, n-pentanaldehyde, n-nonanaldehyde, n-decanaldehyde, n-dodecanaldehyde, benzaldehyde, m-anisaldehyde, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the iminium ions using collision-induced dissociation demonstrated that straight chain aldehydes give a characteristic fragment at m/z 122 (shown to correspond to protonated 4-(methyleneamino)phenol), while the aromatic aldehyde iminium ions fragment to give a characteristic product ion at m/z 120. These features allow straightforward identification of linear and aromatic aldehydes. Quantitative analysis of n-nonaldehyde using a benchtop mass spectrometer demonstrated a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude from 2.5 ng to 5 μg of aldehyde loaded on the filter paper emitter. The limit of detection was determined to be 2.2 ng for this aldehyde. The method had a precision of 22%, relative standard deviation. The experiment was also implemented using a portable ion trap mass spectrometer.

  20. Biogenic amines and hygienic quality of lucerne silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlejnkova Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This experiment examined the influence of two different silage additives of biological (Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, enzyme xylanase and chemical (43% formic acid, 30% ammonium formate, 10% propionic acid, 2% benzoic acid types on biogenic amines concentration, nutrient content, fermentation process, and microbiologic indicators in lucerne (Medicago sativa silage after 90 days of fermentation. The biological additive significantly (P < 0.05 increased putrescine (+51%, lactic acid (+11% and protein content (+11% in comparison with control silage. It significantly decreased cadaverine (−29%, histamine (−57%, spermidine (−15%, spermine (−55%, acetic acid (−40%, ethanol (−55%, ammonium (−25% and ash (−9%. After the chemical-additive treatment, greater amounts of histamine and tyramine were recorded. Significant decrease was observed in the concentrations of putrescine (−18%, cadaverine (−55%, spermidine (−47%, spermine (−45%, lactic acid (−16%, acetic acid (−46%, ammonium (−59%, ash (−13% and fat (−24%. Populations of bacteria associated with lactic acid fermentation, moulds, yeasts, enterobacteria and total microorganisms count were also influenced. Both biological and chemical additives can be highly recommended for producing high-quality silages meeting hygienic requirements. In lucerne silage, the chemical preservative showed a stronger effect in achieving the health safety of silage compared to the biological inoculant.

  1. Technological Factors Affecting Biogenic Amine Content in Foods: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, Fausto; Özogul, Yesim; Suzzi, Giovanna; Tabanelli, Giulia; Özogul, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BAs) are molecules, which can be present in foods and, due to their toxicity, can cause adverse effects on the consumers. BAs are generally produced by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids in food products. The most significant BAs occurring in foods are histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine, and agmatine. The importance of preventing the excessive accumulation of BAs in foods is related to their impact on human health and food quality. Quality criteria in connection with the presence of BAs in food and food products are necessary from a toxicological point of view. This is particularly important in fermented foods in which the massive microbial proliferation required for obtaining specific products is often relater with BAs accumulation. In this review, up-to-date information and recent discoveries about technological factors affecting BA content in foods are reviewed. Specifically, BA forming-microorganism and decarboxylation activity, genetic and metabolic organization of decarboxylases, risk associated to BAs (histamine, tyramine toxicity, and other BAs), environmental factors influencing BA formation (temperature, salt concentration, and pH). In addition, the technological factors for controlling BA production (use of starter culture, technological additives, effects of packaging, other non-thermal treatments, metabolizing BA by microorganisms, effects of pressure treatments on BA formation and antimicrobial substances) are addressed. PMID:27570519

  2. Analysis of Some Biogenic Amines by Micellar Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Malinowska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC with the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to determine some physicochemical parameters of six biogenic amines: adrenaline, dopamine, octopamine, histamine, 2-phenylethylamine, and tyramine. In this paper, an influence of surfactant’s concentration and pH of the micellar mobile phase on the retention of the tested substances was examined. To determine the influence of surfactant’s concentration on the retention of the tested amines, buffered solutions (at pH 7.4 of ionic surfactant—sodium dodecyl sulfate SDS (at different concentrations with acetonitrile as an organic modifier (0.8/0.2 v/v were used as the micellar mobile phases. To determine the influence of pH of the micellar mobile phase on the retention, mobile phases contained buffered solutions (at different pH values of sodium dodecyl sulfate SDS (at 0.1 M with acetonitrile (0.8/0.2 v/v. The inverse of value of retention factor (1/ versus concentration of micelles ( relationships were examined. Other physicochemical parameters of solutes such as an association constant analyte—micelle (ma—and partition coefficient of analyte between stationary phase and water (hydrophobicity descriptor (swΦ were determined by the use of Foley’s equation.

  3. Biogenic Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds by Urban Forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CENTRITTOMauro; LIUShirong; LORETOFrancesco

    2005-01-01

    All plants emit a wide range of volatile compounds, the so-called biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). BVOC emissions have received increased scientific attention in the last two decades because they may profoundly influence the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere, and may modulate plant tolerance to heat, pollutants, oxidative stress and abiotic stresses, and affect plant-plant and plant-insect interactions. Urban forestry may have a high impact on atmospheric composition, air quality, environment,and quality of life in urban areas. However, few studies have been carried out where the emission of BVOC could have important consequence for the quality of air and contribute to pollution episodes. A screening of BVOC emission by the mixed stand constituting urban forests is therefore required if emissions are to be reliably predicted. Monitoring the emission rates simultaneously with measurements of air quality, plant physiology and micrometeorology on selected urban forests, will allow detailed quantitative information on the inventory of BVOC emissions by urban vegetation to be compiled. This information will make it possible to propose an innovative management of urban vegetation in cities characterised by heavy emissions of anthropogenic pollutants, aiming at the abatement of BVOC emissions through the introduction or selection of non-BVOC emitting species in urban areas subjected to pollution episodes and in the new afforestation areas covering peri-urban parks, green belts and green corridors between peri-urban rural areas and the conurbations.

  4. Ambient Gas-Particle Partitioning of Tracers for Biogenic Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Yee, Lindsay D.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Wernis, Rebecca; Moss, Joshua A.; Hering, Susanne V.; de Sa, Suzanne; Martin, Scot T.; Alexander, Mikaela L.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas; Jimenez, Jose L.; Riva, Matthieu; Surratt, Jason D.; Viegas, Juarez; Manzi, Antonio; Edgerton, Eric S.; Baumann, K.; Souza, Rodrigo A.; Artaxo, Paulo; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2016-08-23

    Exchange of atmospheric organic compounds between gas and particle phases is important in the production and chemistry of particle-phase mass but is poorly understood due to a lack of simultaneous measurements in both phases of individual compounds. Measurements of particle- and gas phase organic compounds are reported here for the southeastern United States and central Amazonia. Polyols formed from isoprene oxidation contribute 8% and 15% on average to particle-phase organic mass at these sites but are also observed to have substantial gas-phase concentrations contrary to many models that treat these compounds as nonvolatile. The results of the present study show that the gas-particle partitioning of approximately 100 known and newly observed oxidation products is not well explained by environmental factors (e.g., temperature). Compounds having high vapor pressures have higher particle fractions than expected from absorptive equilibrium partitioning models. These observations support the conclusion that many commonly measured biogenic oxidation products may be bound in low-volatility mass (e.g., accretion products, inorganic organic adducts) that decomposes to individual compounds on analysis. However, the nature and extent of any such bonding remains uncertain. Similar conclusions are reach for both study locations, and average particle fractions for a given compound are consistent within similar to 25% across measurement sites.

  5. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  6. Daxin County in Guangxi will Build China’s Largest Manganese Industry Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The western border county of Daxin County,Chongzuo City,Guangxi,which enjoys the reputation of "Hometown of China’s Manganese Ore",by relying on rich Manganese ore resources and its advantages of direct land access to ASEAN countries,is dedicated to build-ing up China’s largest Manganese industry

  7. Substantial increase in the price of electrolytic manganese as an alternative to nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>A roaring price of nickel and a shortage of the raw material of electrolytic manganese have intensified the demand for electrolytic manganese in China. As an alternative to nickel, electrolytic manganese has been consumed at a quickened speed, which boosts the continuous increase in export quotation. On the third

  8. 75 FR 70665 - Proposed Significant New Use Rule for Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Proposed Significant New Use Rule for Cobalt Lithium Manganese...) for the chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (CAS No. 182442-95-1... substance identified as cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1). This...

  9. 75 FR 70583 - Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide; Withdrawal of Significant New Use Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Cobalt Lithium Manganese Nickel Oxide; Withdrawal of... Control Act (TSCA) for the chemical substance identified as cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (CAS No... cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) at 40 CFR 721.10201 because...

  10. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  11. Manganese-Induced Parkinsonism due to Ephedrone Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sikk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, a syndrome of hypokinesia, dysarthria, dystonia, and postural impairment, related to intravenous use of a “designer” psychostimulant derived from pseudoephedrine using potassium permanganate as the oxidant, has been observed in drug addicts in several countries in Eastern Europe with some cases also in Western countries. A levodopa unresponsive Parkinsonian syndrome occurs within a few months of abusing the homemade drug mixture containing ephedrone (methcathinone and manganese. The development of this neurological syndrome has been attributed to toxic effects of manganese, but the role of the psychostimulant ephedrone is unclear. This paper describes the clinical syndrome, results of neuroimaging, and therapeutic attempts.

  12. Biological removal of iron and manganese in rapid sand filters - Process understanding of iron and manganese removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Katie

    .g. flocculation) and physical (e.g. membrane filtration) based technologies. The removal of dissolved manganese and iron is important. If manganese and iron enter the distribution system, the water will become coloured and have a metallic taste, and it may cause problems in the distribution network due......In Denmark and many other European countries, drinking water is exclusively or mainly based on groundwater. Treatment of the groundwater is rather simple, only including aeration and a subsequent filtration process. The filtration process may take place over to steps. Step 1: Filtration in a pre......-filter, where iron is removed. Step 2: Filtration in an after-filter where e.g. ammonium and manganese is removed. The treatment relies on microbial processes and may present an alternative, greener and more sustainable approach for drinking water production spending less chemicals and energy than chemical (e...

  13. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  14. Airborne flux measurements of Biogenic Isoprene over California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misztal, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Weber, Robin; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-10-10

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK+MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ~10,000-km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z/zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently 1 at 400 m ±50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  15. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Misztal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi. Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l. altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m−2 h−1 above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions

  16. Airborne observations of vegetation and implications for biogenic emission characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Amy K; Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Daniel, John S; Langford, Andrew O; Miller, H LeRoy; Eubank, Charles S; Goldan, Paul; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Atlas, Elliot; Hansel, Armin; Wisthaler, Armin

    2003-12-01

    Measuring hydrocarbons from aircraft represents one way to infer biogenic emissions at the surface. The focus of this paper is to show that complementary remote sensing information can be provided by optical measurements of a vegetation index, which is readily measured with high temporal coverage using reflectance data. We examine the similarities between the vegetation index and in situ measurements of the chemicals isoprene, methacrolein, and alpha-pinene to estimate whether the temporal behavior of the in situ measurements of these chemicals could be better understood by the addition of the vegetation index. Data were compared for flights conducted around Houston in August and September 2000. The three independent sets of chemical measurements examined correspond reasonably well with the vegetation index curves for the majority of flight days. While low values of the vegetation index always correspond to low values of the in situ chemical measurements, high values of the index correspond to both high and low values of the chemical measurements. In this sense it represents an upper limit when compared with in situ data (assuming the calibration constant is adequately chosen). This result suggests that while the vegetation index cannot represent a purely predictive quantity for the in situ measurements, it represents a complementary measurement that can be useful in understanding comparisons of various in situ observations, particularly when these observations occur with relatively low temporal frequency. In situ isoprene measurements and the vegetation index were also compared to an isoprene emission inventory to provide additional insight on broad issues relating to the use of vegetation indices in emission database development.

  17. Biogenic Carbon on Mars: A Subsurface Chauvinistic Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, T. C.; Lau, C. Y. M.; Magnabosco, C.; Harris, R.; Chen, Y.; Slater, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Kieft, T. L.; van Heerden, E.; Borgonie, G.; Dong, H.

    2015-12-01

    A review of 150 publications on the subsurface microbiology of the continental subsurface provides ~1,400 measurements of cellular abundances down to 4,800 meter depth. These data suggest that the continental subsurface biomass is comprised of ~1016-17 grams of carbon, which is higher than the most recent estimates of ~1015 grams of carbon (1 Gt) for the marine deep biosphere. If life developed early in Martian history and Mars sustained an active hydrological cycle during its first 500 million years, then is it possible that Mars could have developed a subsurface biomass of comparable size to that of Earth? Such a biomass would comprise a much larger fraction of the total known Martian carbon budget than does the subsurface biomass on Earth. More importantly could a remnant of this subsurface biosphere survive to the present day? To determine how sustainable subsurface life could be in isolation from the surface we have been studying subsurface fracture fluids from the Precambrian Shields in South Africa and Canada. In these environments the energetically efficient and deeply rooted acetyl-CoA pathway for carbon fixation plays a central role for chemolithoautotrophic primary producers that form the base of the biomass pyramid. These primary producers appear to be sustained indefinitely by H2 generated through serpentinization and radiolytic reactions. Carbon isotope data suggest that in some subsurface locations a much larger population of secondary consumers are sustained by the primary production of biogenic CH4 from a much smaller population of methanogens. These inverted biomass and energy pyramids sustained by the cycling of CH4 could have been and could still be active on Mars. The C and H isotopic signatures of Martian CH4 remain key tools in identifying potential signatures of an extant Martian biosphere. Based upon our results to date cavity ring-down spectroscopic technologies provide an option for making these measurements on future rover missions.

  18. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Julie; West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Collatz, George; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate comprehensive bottom-up estimates of net carbon exchange for global and regional carbon monitoring. We estimated global agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual crop net primary production (NPP), harvested biomass, and consumption of biomass by humans and livestock. These estimates were combined for a single estimate of net carbon exchange (NCE) and spatially distributed to 0.05 degree resolution using MODIS satellite land cover data. Global crop NPP in 2011 was estimated at 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.05 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 was harvested and 0.54 Pg C yr-1 was collected from crop residues for livestock fodder. Total livestock feed intake in 2011 was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CO2, 0.07 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CH4, and 0.04 Pg C yr-1 was contained within milk and egg production. Livestock grazed an estimated 1.27 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, which constituted 52.4% of total feed intake. Global human food intake was 0.57 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, the majority of which is respired as CO2. Completed global cropland carbon budgets accounted for the ultimate use of ca. 80% of harvested biomass. The spatial distribution of these fluxes may be used for global carbon monitoring, estimation of regional uncertainty, and for use as input to Earth system models.

  19. Biogenic silver nanoparticles: efficient and effective antifungal agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netala, Vasudeva Reddy; Kotakadi, Venkata Subbaiah; Domdi, Latha; Gaddam, Susmila Aparna; Bobbu, Pushpalatha; Venkata, Sucharitha K.; Ghosh, Sukhendu Bikash; Tartte, Vijaya

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by exploiting various plant materials is an emerging field and considered green nanotechnology as it involves simple, cost effective and ecofriendly procedure. In the present study AgNPs were successfully synthesized using aqueous callus extract of Gymnema sylvestre. The aqueous callus extract treated with 1nM silver nitrate solution resulted in the formation of AgNPs and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the formed AgNPs showed a peak at 437 nm in the UV Visible spectrum. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). FTIR spectra showed the peaks at 3333, 2928, 2361, 1600, 1357 and 1028 cm-1 which revealed the role of different functional groups possibly involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. TEM micrograph clearly revealed the size of the AgNPs to be in the range of 3-30 nm with spherical shape and poly-dispersed nature; it is further confirmed by Particle size analysis that the stability of AgNPs is due its high negative Zeta potential (-36.1 mV). XRD pattern revealed the crystal nature of the AgNPs by showing the braggs peaks corresponding to (111), (200), (220) and (311) planes of face-centered cubic crystal phase of silver. Selected area electron diffraction pattern showed diffraction rings and confirmed the crystalline nature of synthesized AgNPs. The synthesized AgNPs exhibited effective antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida nonalbicans and Candida tropicalis.

  20. Hyperspectral observation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution in coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrova, Olga; Loupian, Evgeny; Mityagina, Marina; Uvarov, Ivan

    The work presents results of anthropogenic and biogenic pollution detection in coastal zones of the Black and Caspian Seas based on satellite hyperspetral data provided by the Hyperion and HICO instruments. Techniques developed on the basis of the analysis of spectral characteristics calculated in special points were employed to address the following problems: (a) assessment of the blooming intensity of cyanobacteria and their distribution in bays of western Crimea and discrimination between anthropogenic pollutant discharge events and algae bloom; (b) detection of anthropogenic pollution in Crimean lakes utilized as industrial liquid discharge reservoirs; (c) detection of oil pollution in areas of shelf oil production in the Caspian Sea. Information values of different spectral bands and their composites were estimated in connection with the retrieval of the main sea water components: phytoplankton, suspended matter and colored organic matter, and also various anthropogenic pollutants, including oil. Software tools for thematic hyperspectral data processing in application to the investigation of sea coastal zones and internal water bodies were developed on the basis of the See the Sea geoportal created by the Space Research Institute RAS. The geoportal is focused on the study of processes in the world ocean with the emphasis on the advantages of satellite systems of observation. The tools that were introduced into the portal allow joint analysis of quasi-simultaneous satellite data, in particular data from the Hyperion, HICO, OLI Landsat-8, ETM Landsat-7 and TM Landsat-5 instruments. Results of analysis attempts combining data from different sensors are discussed. Their strong and weak points are highlighted. The study was completed with partial financial support from The Russian Foundation for Basic Research grants # 14-05-00520-a and 13-07-12017.

  1. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liggio

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA; however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ether formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α and ranged from 1×10-6-2.5×10-2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7-1×10-4. These processes may potentially lead to a considerable amount of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under acidic conditions, which can be highly significant for freshly nucleated aerosols, particularly given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  2. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liggio

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA; however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ester formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α and ranged from 1×10-6–2.5×10−2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7–1×10-4. These processes are estimated to potentially produce greater than 2.5 μg m−3 of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions, which can be highly significant given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  3. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.

    2008-04-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ether formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ) were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α) and ranged from 1×10-6-2.5×10-2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7-1×10-4. These processes may potentially lead to a considerable amount of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under acidic conditions, which can be highly significant for freshly nucleated aerosols, particularly given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  4. Biogenicity of an Early Quaternary iron formation, Milos Island, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Fru, E; Ivarsson, M; Kilias, S P; Frings, P J; Hemmingsson, C; Broman, C; Bengtson, S; Chatzitheodoridis, E

    2015-05-01

    A ~2.0-million-year-old shallow-submarine sedimentary deposit on Milos Island, Greece, harbours an unmetamorphosed fossiliferous iron formation (IF) comparable to Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs). This Milos IF holds the potential to provide clues to the origin of Precambrian BIFs, relative to biotic and abiotic processes. Here, we combine field stratigraphic observations, stable isotopes of C, S and Si, rock petrography and microfossil evidence from a ~5-m-thick outcrop to track potential biogeochemical processes that may have contributed to the formation of the BIF-type rocks and the abrupt transition to an overlying conglomerate-hosted IF (CIF). Bulk δ(13) C isotopic compositions lower than -25‰ provide evidence for biological contribution by the Calvin and reductive acetyl-CoA carbon fixation cycles to the origin of both the BIF-type and CIF strata. Low S levels of ~0.04 wt.% combined with δ(34) S estimates of up to ~18‰ point to a non-sulphidic depository. Positive δ(30) Si records of up to +0.53‰ in the finely laminated BIF-type rocks indicate chemical deposition on the seafloor during weak periods of arc magmatism. Negative δ(30) Si data are consistent with geological observations suggesting a sudden change to intense arc volcanism potentially terminated the deposition of the BIF-type layer. The typical Precambrian rhythmic rocks of alternating Fe- and Si-rich bands are associated with abundant and spatially distinct microbial fossil assemblages. Together with previously proposed anoxygenic photoferrotrophic iron cycling and low sedimentary N and C potentially connected to diagenetic denitrification, the Milos IF is a biogenic submarine volcano-sedimentary IF showing depositional conditions analogous to Archaean Algoma-type BIFs.

  5. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds & their photochemical transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhujun; Hohaus, Thorsten; Tillmann, Ralf; Andres, Stefanie; Kuhn, Uwe; Rohrer, Franz; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic activities emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) into the atmosphere. While it is known that land vegetation accounts for 90% of the global VOC emissions, only a few molecules' emission factors are understood. Through VOCs atmospheric oxidation intermediate products are formed. The detailed chemical mechanisms involved are insufficiently known to date and need to be understood for air quality management and climate change predictions. In an experiment using a PTR-ToF-MS with the new-built plant chamber SAPHIR-PLUS in Forschungszentrum Juelich, biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from Quercus ilex trees were measured. The BVOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes, minor emissions of isoprene and methanol were also observed with the overall emission pattern typical for Quercus ilex trees in the growing season. Monoterpenes and isoprene emissions showed to be triggered by light. Additionally, their emissions showed clear exponential temperature dependence under constant light condition as reported in literature. As a tracer for leaf growth, methanol emission showed an abrupt increase at the beginning of light exposure. This is explained as instantaneous release of methanol produced during the night once stomata of leaves open upon light exposure. Emission of methanol showed a near linear increase with temperature in the range of 10 to 35 °C. BVOC were transferred from the plant chamber PLUS to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR, where their oxidation products from O3 oxidation were measured with PTR-ToF-MS. Gas phase oxidation products such as acetone and acetaldehyde were detected. A quantitative analysis of the data will be presented, including comparison of observations to the Master Chemical Mechanism model.

  6. Dry fermented sausages of Southern Italy: a comparison of free amino acids and biogenic amines between industrial and homemade products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggio, Antonella; Belsito, Emilia L; De Marco, Rosaria; Di Gioia, Maria L; Liguori, Angelo; Siciliano, Carlo; Spinella, Mariagiovanna

    2012-04-01

    This paper compares some important parameters and the free amino acid and biogenic amine contents of cured industrial and homemade meat products. To this aim, industrial and homemade "soppressata" and "salsiccia", typical dry fermented sausages produced in Southern Italy, were analyzed. The homemade sausages showed a higher level of free biogenic amines than that manufactured industrially, most likely because biogenic amine formation in industrial products is limited by the use of starter cultures. The industrial sausages are characterized by a higher total free amino acid content than the homemade products. Overall, free amino acid and biogenic amine contents demonstrated that appreciable differences exist between homemade and industrial sausages.

  7. Mineralization of Bacteria in Terrestrial Basaltic Rocks: Comparison With Possible Biogenic Features in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stevens, T. O.; Taunton, A. E.; Allen, C. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    The identification of biogenic features altered by diagenesis or mineralization is important in determining whether specific features in terrestrial rocks and in meteorites may have a biogenic origin. Unfortunately, few studies have addressed the formation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, which may be important to these phenomena, including the controversy over possible biogenic features in basaltic martian meteorite ALH84001. To explore the presence of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we examined microcosms growing in basaltic small-scale experimental growth chambers or microcosms. Microbial communities were harvested from aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) group and grown in a microcosm containing unweathered basalt chips and groundwater (technique described in. These microcosms simulated natural growth conditions in the deep subsurface of the CRB, which should be a good terrestrial analog for any putative martian subsurface ecosystem that may have once included ALH84001. Here we present new size measurements and photomicrographs comparing the putative martian fossils to biogenic material in the CRB microcosms. The range of size and shapes of the biogenic features on the CRB microcosm chips overlaps with and is similar to those on ALH84001 chips. Although this present work does not provide evidence for the biogenicity of ALH84001 features, we believe that, based on criteria of size, shape, and general morphology, a biogenic interpretation for the ALH84001 features remains plausible.

  8. Electrochemical Property Bundles with of Manganese Oxide Nanobelt Layered Structure%Electrochemical Property Bundles with of Manganese Oxide Nanobelt Layered Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang, Liping; Jiang, Yishu; Tang, Xiuhua; Yang, Mingyang; Liu, Zonghuai

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional manganese oxide nanobelt bundles with birnessite-type structure have been synthesized by a hydrothermal process in a NaOH solution employing K-type layered manganese oxide as a precursor. The obtained manganese oxide nanobelt bundles exhibit excellent discharge properties and cycle stability. The initial capacity is 376 mAh-g-1 and the reversible capacity of 243 mAhog-1 is maintained after the 50th cycle at a current density of 20 mA·g-t. Meanwhile, the manganese oxide nanobelt bundles show an excellent cycle performance even if at relative high current density.

  9. New manganese-based catalyst systems for alkyd paint drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Z.; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Bouwman, E.

    2007-01-01

    The autoxidation and oligomerisation of ethyl linoleate (EL) catalyzed by manganese salts in combination with several Schiff-base ligands has been studied making use of time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy. The results indicate that several of the combinations exhibit relatively high catalytic activity

  10. Plastic deformation wear in modified medium manganese steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A medium manganese steel with high wear-resistance, strength and toughness has been produced with addition of a complex modifier (or refining agent) containing Nb, N, RE and Si-Ca. The results showed that the wear resistance, strength and toughness of the modified medium manganese steel are respectively 1.92 times, 1.45times and 3.63 times as high as that of the referenced unmodified medium manganese steel. The plastic deformation characteristic involved in the wear mechanism of the modified medium manganese steel was investigated by means of plastic-elasticity calculation and TEM electro-microscopy. The relationship between wear resistance and yield strength of the steel was established. Since the wear volume W is proportional to the square of the loading and to the numbers of the abrasives, and inversely proportional to the square of the yield strength of the materials, the wear resistance can be substantially improved by the enhancement of yield strength of the materials. The calculation results generally agreed with the experimental results.

  11. Plastic deformation wear in modified medium manganese steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUAN Hai-lun

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A medium manganese steel with high wear-resistance, strength and toughness has been produced with addition of a complex modifier (or refining agent containing Nb, N, RE and Si-Ca. The results showed that the wear resistance, strength and toughness of the modified medium manganese steel are respectively 1.92 times, 1.45 times and 3.63 times as high as that of the referenced unmodified medium manganese steel. The plastic deformation characteristic involved in the wear mechanism of the modified medium manganese steel was investigated by means of plastic-elasticity calculation and TEM electro-microscopy. The relationship between wear resistance and yield strength of the steel was established. Since the wear volume W is proportional to the square of the loading and to the numbers of the abrasives, and inversely proportional to the square of the yield strength of the materials, the wear resistance can be substantially improved by the enhancement of yield strength of the materials. The calculation results generally agreed with the experimental results.

  12. The search for magnetic fields in mercury-manganese stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makaganiuk, V.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.; Jeffers, S.V.; Johns-Krull, C. M.; Keller, C.U.; Rodenhuis, M.; Snik, F.; Stempels, H. C.; Valenti, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    A subclass of the upper main-sequence chemically peculiar stars, mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars were traditionally considered to be non-magnetic, showing no evidence of variability in their spectral line profiles. However, discoveries of chemical inhomogeneities on their surfaces imply that this ass

  13. Uranium in Pacific Deep-Sea Sediments and Manganese Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Pluger, W. L.; Friedrich, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A total of 1344 manganese nodules and 187 pelagic sediments from 9 areas in the North and the South Pacific were analyzed for U by the delayed-neutron counting technique. A strong positive correlation between U and Fe in nodules and sediments suggests a co-precipitative removal from sea water int...

  14. Selective Synthesis of Manganese/Silicon Complexes in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of manganese salts (Mn(NO32, MnCl2, MnSO4, and Mn(Ac2 and silicon materials (silica sand, silica sol, and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used to synthesize Mn/Si complexes in supercritical water using a tube reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of the solid products. It was found that MnO2, Mn2O3, and Mn2SiO4 could be obtained in supercritical water at 673 K in 5 minutes. The roles of both anions of manganese salts and silicon species in the formation of manganese silicon complexes were discussed. The inorganic manganese salt with the oxyacid radical could be easily decomposed to produce MnO2/SiO2 and Mn2O3/SiO2. It is interesting to found that Mn(Ac2 can react with various types of silicon to produce Mn2SiO4. The hydroxyl groups of the SiO2 surface from different silicon sources enhance the reactivity of SiO2.

  15. Selection and use of manganese dioxide by Neanderthals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyes, P.J.; Anastasakis, K.; De Jong, W.; Van Hoesel, A.; Roebroeks, W.; Soressi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these ‘manganese oxides’ were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they

  16. Manganese nodules in the Exclusive Economic Zone of Mauritius

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B; ShyamPrasad

    shoals, Rodriguez Ridge, and the Sudan Bank of the Mascarene Plateau and Mascarene Basin. Of the 57 locations sampled, manganese nodules were recovered at 11 sampling stations. The nodules were confined to a small area of approximately 11,900 km2...

  17. Magnetism in bcc and fcc Fe with carbon and manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, N I; Van Aken, D; Medvedeva, J E

    2010-08-11

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to study the structure and magnetic properties of bcc (α) and fcc (γ) Fe with 3 at.% carbon and manganese impurities. We find that all bcc-based Fe, Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C phases exhibit a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state, while the antiferromagnetic double-layer (AFMD) state is lowest in energy within the collinear spin approach in fcc Fe, Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C phases. However, the carbon and manganese impurities affect the local magnetic interactions significantly. The states with opposite manganese magnetic moments are quasi-degenerate in bcc Fe-Mn alloy, whereas octa-site carbon stabilizes ferromagnetic coupling of the nearest manganese atom with the Fe host. We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic (AFM) fcc Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C alloys are intrinsically inhomogeneous magnetic systems. Carbon frustrates the local magnetic order by reorientation of magnetic moments of the nearest Mn and Fe atoms, and favors their ferromagnetic coupling. The competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic Fe-Fe and Fe-Mn interactions and the local magnetovolume instability near carbon may give rise to the spin-glass-like regions observed in austenitic Fe-Mn-C alloys.

  18. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the scale of the problem of arsenic, iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Ghana a survey was performed in the first phase of the research to provide in depth information with respect to these contaminants. Presence of these mentioned contaminants in groundwater is not pecu

  19. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Bastida, C. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Paseo Colón y Tollocan s/n, C.P. 50000, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Martínez-Miranda, V.; Vázquez-Mejía, G. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Solache-Ríos, M., E-mail: marcos.solache@inin.gob.mx [Departamento de Química, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandón, Delegación Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 México, D.F. (Mexico); Fonseca-Montes de Oca, G. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Trujillo-Flores, E. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Cerro de Coatepec s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 50130, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems. - Highlights: ► Corrosion of distribution systems affects the quality of drinking water. ► Corrosion in water distribution systems is related to acidity and carbon dioxide. ► Pipes are corroded and manganese is deposited on pipes and dissolved in water. ► The deterioration of the pipes and the corrosion products were determined. ► Nitrate ions increase the acidity of water in the wells.

  20. Magnetism in bcc and fcc Fe with carbon and manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedeva, N I [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Yekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Van Aken, D [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Medvedeva, J E [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2010-08-11

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to study the structure and magnetic properties of bcc ({alpha}) and fcc ({gamma}) Fe with 3 at.% carbon and manganese impurities. We find that all bcc-based Fe, Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C phases exhibit a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state, while the antiferromagnetic double-layer (AFMD) state is lowest in energy within the collinear spin approach in fcc Fe, Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C phases. However, the carbon and manganese impurities affect the local magnetic interactions significantly. The states with opposite manganese magnetic moments are quasi-degenerate in bcc Fe-Mn alloy, whereas octa-site carbon stabilizes ferromagnetic coupling of the nearest manganese atom with the Fe host. We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic (AFM) fcc Fe-C and Fe-Mn-C alloys are intrinsically inhomogeneous magnetic systems. Carbon frustrates the local magnetic order by reorientation of magnetic moments of the nearest Mn and Fe atoms, and favors their ferromagnetic coupling. The competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic Fe-Fe and Fe-Mn interactions and the local magnetovolume instability near carbon may give rise to the spin-glass-like regions observed in austenitic Fe-Mn-C alloys.

  1. Fluvial and hydrothermal input of manganese into the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Laan, P.; Klunder, M. B.; Shaw, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 773 samples were analysed for dissolved manganese (Mn) in the Arctic Ocean aboard R. V. Polarstern during expedition ARK XXII/2 from 28 July until 07 October 2007 from Tromso (Norway) to Bremerhaven. Concentrations of Mn were elevated in the surface layer with concentrations of up to 6 nM

  2. Exposure to Environmental Air Manganese and Medication Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element with natural low levels found in water, food, and air, but due to industrialized processes, both workplace and the environmental exposures to Mn have increased. Recently, environmental studies have reported physical and mental health problem...

  3. Mineralogy, paragenesis and genesis of the braunite deposits of the Mary Valley Manganese Belt, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, J.

    1992-09-01

    The Mary Valley manganese deposits exhibit mineralogy and textures characteristic of at least four parageneses. The deposits consist mainly of isolated occurrences of braunite, together with a number of lower and higher valency manganese oxides, and manganese silicates, in bedded radiolarian cherts and jaspers of Permian age. The parageneses are: (a) Braunite — quartz (primary), (b) Braunite — hausmannite — spessartine — tephroite — quartz (metamorphic). (c) Hydrated manganese silicates — barite — braunite — hausmannite (hydrothermal veins), (d) Tetravalent manganese oxides (pyrolusite, cryptomelane, manjiroite, nsutite) (supergene). The primary mineralisation is interpreted as the result of the geochemical separation of Mn from Fe in a submarine exhalative system, and the precipitation of Mn as oxide within bedded radiolarian oozes and submarine lavas. During diagenesis this hydrothermal manganese oxide reacted with silica to produce primary braunite. The later geological of evolution of this volcanogenicsedimentary deposit involved metamorphism, hydrothermal veining by remobilised manganese, and supergene enrichment.

  4. Sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Smotraiev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The actual problem of water supply in the world and in Ukraine, in particular, is a high level of pollution in water resources and an insufficient level of drinking water purification. With industrial wastewater, a significant amount of pollutants falls into water bodies, including suspended particles, sulfates, iron compounds, heavy metals, etc. Aim: The aim of this work is to determine the impact of aluminum and manganese ions additives on surface and sorption properties of zirconium oxyhydroxide based sorbents during their production process. Materials and Methods: The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were prepared by sol-gel method during the hydrolysis of metal chlorides (zirconium oxychloride ZrOCl2, aluminum chloride AlCl3 and manganese chloride MnCl2 with carbamide. Results: The surface and sorption properties of sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium, aluminum and manganese oxyhydroxides were investigated. X-ray amorphous structure and evolved hydroxyl-hydrate cover mainly characterize the obtained xerogels. The composite sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide doped with aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 537 m2/g and manganese oxyhydroxide (aS = 356 m2/g have more developed specific surface area than single-component xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide (aS = 236 m2/g and aluminum oxyhydroxide (aS = 327 m2/g. The sorbent based on the xerogel of zirconium and manganese oxyhydroxides have the maximum SO42--ions sorption capacity. It absorbs 1.5 times more SO42–-ions than the industrial anion exchanger AN-221. The sorbents based on xerogels of zirconium oxyhydroxide has the sorption capacity of Fe3+-ions that is 1.5…2 times greater than the capacity of the industrial cation exchanger KU-2-8. The Na+-ions absorption capacity is 1.47…1.56 mmol/g for each sorbent. Conclusions: Based on these data it can be concluded that the proposed method is effective for sorbents production based on

  5. Integration of biogenic emissions in environmental fate, transport, and exposure systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Christos I.

    Biogenic emissions make a significant contribution to the levels of aeroallergens and secondary air pollutants such as ozone. Understanding major factors contributing to allergic airway diseases requires accurate characterization of emissions and transport/transformation of biogenic emissions. However, biogenic emission estimates are laden with large uncertainties. Furthermore, the current biogenic emission estimation models use low-resolution data for estimating land use, vegetation biomass and VOC emissions. Furthermore, there are currently no established methods for estimating bioaerosol emissions over continental or regional scale, which can impact the ambient levels of pollent that have synergestic effects with other gaseous pollutants. In the first part of the thesis, an detailed review of different approaches and available databases for estimating biogenic emissions was conducted, and multiple geodatabases and satellite imagery were used in a consistent manner to improve the estimates of biogenic emissions over the continental United States. These emissions represent more realistic, higher resolution estimates of biogenic emissions (including those of highly reactive species such as isoprene). The impact of these emissions on tropospheric ozone levels was studied at a regional scale through the application of the USEPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Minor, but significant differences in the levels of ambient ozone were observed. In the second part of the thesis, an algorithm for estimating emissions of pollen particles from major allergenic tree and plant families in the United States was developed, extending the approach for modeling biogenic gas emissions in the Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS). A spatio-temporal vegetation map was constructed from different remote sensing sources and local surveys, and was coupled with a meteorological model to develop pollen emissions rates. This model overcomes limitations posed by the lack of

  6. Temperature-dependent accumulation mode particle and cloud nuclei concentrations from biogenic sources during WACS 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ahlm

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Submicron aerosol particles collected simultaneously at the mountain peak (2182 m a.s.l. and at a forested mid-mountain site (1300 m a.s.l. on Whistler Mountain, British Columbia, Canada, during June and July 2010 were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy for quantification of organic functional groups. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to the FTIR spectra. Three PMF factors associated with (1 combustion, (2 biogenics, and (3 vegetative detritus, were identified at both sites. The biogenic factor was correlated with both temperature and several volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The combustion factor dominated the submicron particle mass during the beginning of the campaign when the temperature was lower and advection was from the Vancouver area, but as the temperature started to rise in early July the biogenic factor came to dominate as a result of increased emissions of biogenic VOCs and thereby increased formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. On average, the biogenic factor represented 69% and 49% of the submicron organic particle mass at Whistler Peak and at the mid-mountain site, respectively. The lower fraction at the mid-mountain site was a result of more vegetative detritus there, and also higher influence from local combustion sources.

    The biogenic factor was strongly correlated (r ~ 0.9 to number concentration of particles with diameter (Dp> 100 nm, whereas the combustion factor was better correlated to number concentration of particles with Dp < 100 nm (r~ 0.4. The number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN was correlated (r ~ 0.7 to the biogenic factor for supersaturations (S of 0.2% or higher, which indicates that particle condensational growth from biogenic vapors was an important factor in controlling the CCN concentration for clouds where S≥0.2%. Both the number concentration of particles with

  7. Temperature-dependent accumulation mode particle and cloud nuclei concentrations from biogenic sources during WACS 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ahlm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Submicron aerosol particles collected simultaneously at the mountain peak (2182 m a.s.l. and at a forested mid-mountain site (1300 m a.s.l. on Whistler Mountain, British Columbia, Canada, during June and July 2010 were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy for quantification of organic functional groups. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to the FTIR spectra. Three PMF factors associated with (1 combustion, (2 biogenics, and (3 vegetative detritus were identified at both sites. The biogenic factor was correlated with both temperature and several volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The combustion factor dominated the submicron particle mass during the beginning of the campaign, when the temperature was lower and advection was from the Vancouver area, but as the temperature started to rise in early July, the biogenic factor came to dominate as a result of increased emissions of biogenic VOCs, and thereby increased formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. On average, the biogenic factor represented 69% and 49% of the submicron organic particle mass at Whistler Peak and at the mid-mountain site, respectively. The lower fraction at the mid-mountain site was a result of more vegetative detritus there, and also higher influence from local combustion sources. The biogenic factor was strongly correlated (r~0.9 to number concentration of particles with diameter (Dp> 100 nm, whereas the combustion factor was better correlated to number concentration of particles with Dpr~0.4. The number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN was correlated (r~0.7 to the biogenic factor for supersaturations (S of 0.2% or higher, which indicates that particle condensational growth from biogenic vapors was an important factor in controlling the CCN concentration for clouds where S≥0.2%. Both the number concentration of particles with Dp>100 nm and numbers of CCN for S≥0.2% were correlated to temperature. Considering the biogenic

  8. CORM-EDE1: A Highly Water-Soluble and Nontoxic Manganese-Based photoCORM with a Biogenic Ligand Sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mede, Ralf; Klein, Moritz; Claus, Ralf A; Krieck, Sven; Quickert, Stefanie; Görls, Helmar; Neugebauer, Ute; Schmitt, Michael; Gessner, Guido; Heinemann, Stefan H; Popp, Jürgen; Bauer, Michael; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    [Mn(CO)5Br] reacts with cysteamine and 4-amino-thiophenyl with a ratio of 2:3 in refluxing tetrahydrofuran to the complexes of the type [{(OC)3Mn}2(μ-SCH2CH2NH3)3]Br2 (1, CORM-EDE1) and [{(OC)3Mn}2(μ-SC6H4-4-NH3)3]Br2 (2, CORM-EDE2). Compound 2 precipitates during refluxing of the tetrahydrofuran solution as a yellow solid whereas 1 forms a red oil that slowly solidifies. Recrystallization of 2 from water yields the HBr-free complex [{(OC)3Mn}2(μ-S-C6H4-4-NH2)2(μ-SC6H4-4-NH3)] (3). The n-propylthiolate ligand (which is isoelectronic to the bridging thiolate of 1) leads to the formation of the di- and tetranuclear complexes [(OC)4Mn(μ-S-nPr)2]2 and [(OC)3Mn(μ-S-nPr)]4. CORM-EDE1 possesses ideal properties to administer carbon monoxide to biological and medicinal tissues upon irradiation (photoCORM). Isolated crystalline CORM-EDE1 can be handled at ambient and aerobic conditions. This complex is nontoxic, highly soluble in water, and indefinitely stable therein in the absence of air and phosphate buffer. CORM-EDE1 is stable as frozen stock in aqueous solution without any limitations, and these stock solutions maintain their CO release properties. The reducing dithionite does not interact with CORM-EDE1, and therefore, the myoglobin assay represents a valuable tool to study the release kinetics of this photoCORM. After CO liberation, the formation of MnHPO4 in aqueous buffer solution can be verified.

  9. Managing your wine fermentation to reduce the risk of biogenic amine formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Yolandi Smit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines are nitrogenous organic compounds produced in wine from amino acid precursors mainly by microbial decarboxylation. The concentration of biogenic amines that can potentially be produced is dependent on the amount of amino acid precursors in the medium, the presence of decarboxylase positive microorganisms and conditions that enable microbial or biochemical activity such as the addition of nutrients to support the alcoholic and malolactic fermentation (MLF inoculated starter cultures. MLF can be conducted using co-inoculation or inoculated after the completion of alcoholic fermentation (AF that may also affect the level of biogenic amine in the wine. This study focussed on the impact the addition of complex commercial yeast and bacterial nutrients and the use of different MLF inoculation scenarios could have on the production of biogenic amine in the wine. Results obtained with wine showed that in this study the amine that was influenced by nutrient addition was histamine. In the synthetic winemaking using 12 different treatments no clear tendencies were observed. It was shown that in certain conditions co-inoculation could reduce the amount of biogenic amines produced.

  10. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-06

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods.

  11. Oligocene biogenic siliceous deposits on the slope of the northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The abundance of radiolarian, diatom and sponge spicule and H4SiO4 in pore-waters increase abruptly at the boundary between Early and Late Oligocene (about 30-27.5 Ma) at Site 1148 of the northern South China Sea (SCS), indicating high biogenic silica accumulation during this time. At the same time (about 30-28 Ma), high biogenic silica deposition occurred in the cen tral equatorial Pacific. Comparison of the biogenic silica accumulation at Site 1148 of the SCS with that at Site 929 of the Atlantic verifies that the biogenic silica accumulation between the low lati tude Pacific and Atlantic oceans expresses the evident relationship of compensation during theOligocene. Biogenic silica accumulation decreased in the Atlantic, whereas it increased in the Pa cific at the boundary between the Early and Late Oligocene. It resulted from the formation and presence of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) in the Atlantic basin, indicating an intensive basin-basin fractionation. XRD analysis and SEM observation of the samples from Site 1148 demon strate that most of radiolarian, diatom and sponge spicule have suffered from dissolution and reprecipitation, suggested by the opal-A→opal-CT transformation. As a result of the transformation,porosity increased, but dry and bulk densities decreased, reflecting the consequence of diagenesis on the physical property of sediment.

  12. Cocaine affects foraging behaviour and biogenic amine modulated behavioural reflexes in honey bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Søvik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In humans and other mammals, drugs of abuse alter the function of biogenic amine pathways in the brain leading to the subjective experience of reward and euphoria. Biogenic amine pathways are involved in reward processing across diverse animal phyla, however whether cocaine acts on these neurochemical pathways to cause similar rewarding behavioural effects in animal phyla other than mammals is unclear. Previously, it has been shown that bees are more likely to dance (a signal of perceived reward when returning from a sucrose feeder after cocaine treatment. Here we examined more broadly whether cocaine altered reward-related behaviour, and biogenic amine modulated behavioural responses in bees. Bees developed a preference for locations at which they received cocaine, and when foraging at low quality sucrose feeders increase their foraging rate in response to cocaine treatment. Cocaine also increased reflexive proboscis extension to sucrose, and sting extension to electric shock. Both of these simple reflexes are modulated by biogenic amines. This shows that systemic cocaine treatment alters behavioural responses that are modulated by biogenic amines in insects. Since insect reward responses involve both octopamine and dopamine signalling, we conclude that cocaine treatment altered diverse reward-related aspects of behaviour in bees. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the ecology of cocaine as a plant defence compound. Our findings further validate the honey bee as a model system for understanding the behavioural impacts of cocaine, and potentially other drugs of abuse.

  13. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN SELECTED COMMERCIAL FERMENTED PRODUCTS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vendula Pachlová

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to monitor of biogenic amines contents in commercial fermented products, especially various type of ripening cheeses and fermented meat products (15 cheese samples and nine dry fermented meat products obtained from Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, Poland, and Germany. Furthermore, the changes in samples during storage were also observed. The samples were stored at 6±1°C. The samples were taken the first day of storage and the last day of shelf-life. The biogenic amines content was determined using ion-exchange liquid chromatography with post-column derivatization and photometric detection. The content of biogenic amines increased during storage. The highest biogenic amines content at the end of storage was observed in Dutch-type cheeses and in Smear cheeses, in both the concentrations exceeded 1 000 mg.kg-1. Latter mentioned amount may have serious negative impact on consumer health. The lowest concentration of biogenic amines was detected in Blue cheese.

  14. Sensitivity of global biogenic isoprenoid emissions to climate variability and atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Vaishali; Delire, Christine; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    2004-03-01

    Isoprenoids (isoprene and monoterpenes) are the most dominant class of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and have been shown to significantly affect global tropospheric chemistry and composition, climate, and the global carbon cycle. In this study we assess the sensitivity of biogenic isoprene and monoterpene emissions to combined and isolated fluctuations in observed global climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration during the period 1971-1990. We integrate surface emission algorithms within the framework of a dynamic global ecosystem model, the Integrated Biospheric Simulator (IBIS), to simulate biogenic fluxes of isoprenoids as a component of the climate-vegetation dynamics. IBIS predicts global land surface isoprene emissions of 454 Tg C and monoterpenes of 72 Tg C annually and captures the spatial and temporal patterns well. The combined fluctuations in climate and atmospheric CO2 during 1971-1990 caused significant interannual and seasonal variability in global biogenic isoprenoid fluxes that was somewhat related to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Furthermore, an increasing trend in the simulated emissions was seen during this period that is attributed partly to the warming trend and partly to CO2 fertilization effect. The isolated effect of increasing CO2 during this period was to steadily increase emissions as a result of increases in foliar biomass. These fluctuations in biogenic emissions could have significant impacts on regional and global atmospheric chemistry and the global carbon budget.

  15. Colloidal properties of nanoparticular biogenic selenium govern environmental fate and bioremediation effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Benjamin; Evangelou, Michael W H; Winkel, Lenny H E; Lenz, Markus

    2013-03-05

    Microbial selenium (Se) bioremediation is based on conversion of water soluble, toxic Se oxyanions to water insoluble, elemental Se. Formed biogenic elemental Se is of nanometer size, hampering straightforward separation from the aqueous phase. This study represents the first systematic investigation on colloidal properties of pure biogenic Se suspensions, linking electrophoretic mobility (ζ-potential) to column settling behavior. It was demonstrated that circumneutral pH, commonly applied in bioremediation, is not appropriate for gravitational separation due to the negative ζ-potential preventing agglomeration. Mono/di/trivalent counter cations and acidity (protons) were used to screen efficiently the intrinsic negative charge of biogenic Se suspensions at circumneutral pH. Fast settling was induced by La(3+) addition in the micromolar range (86.2 ± 3.5% within 0.5 h), whereas considerably higher concentrations were needed when Ca(2+) or Na(+) was used. Colloidal stability was furthermore studied in different model waters. It was demonstrated that surface waters as such represent a fragile system regarding colloidal stability of biogenic Se suspensions (ζ-potential ∼ -30 mV), whereas dissolved organic matter increases colloidal stability. In marine waters, biogenic Se is colloidally destabilized and is thus expected to settle, representing a potential sink for Se during transport in the aquatic environment.

  16. Melatonin is formed during winemaking at safe levels of biogenic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Naranjo, M Isabel; Ordóñez, José L; Callejón, Raquel M; Cantos-Villar, Emma; Garcia-Parrilla, M Carmen

    2013-07-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has accepted health claims for the food constituent melatonin because scientific evidence shows that it is effective at reducing sleep onset latency, and that it alleviates subjective feelings of jet lag. According to risk assessment data published by EFSA in 2011, histamine and tyramine are the most toxic biogenic amines and the ones that most affect food safety. The potential formation of biogenic amines is a concern in fermented foods because of the intense microbial activity. Conversely, Saccharomyces cerevisiase produces melatonin during fermentation in the winemaking process. This study aims to evaluate the production of potentially healthy melatonin and toxic biogenic amines during the winemaking process. To this end, 11 biogenic amines (agmatine, cadaverine, histamine, methylamine, 2-phenylethylamine, putrescine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine, tryptamine and melatonin) have been monitored during the making of 5 monovarietal wines (Merlot, Palomino Fino, Syrah, Tempranillo and Tintilla de Rota). This paper shows that alcoholic and malolactic fermentation plays a crucial role in the formation of these compounds. Bioactive melatonin is formed at safe levels of the other biogenic amines.

  17. The Effects of Drought on Predictions of Air Quality in Texas: Vegetation and Biogenic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-Buller, E.; Huang, L.; McGaughey, G.; Kimura, Y.; Allen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbons, primarily isoprene and monoterpenes, are important precursors for tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation. Annual biogenic emissions in Texas ranked first within the continental United States in the 2011 National Emission Inventory. In recent years, the effects of drought in Texas have been among the most severe in the southern United States; during 2011, more than 80% of the state was under exceptional drought. Understanding the effects of drought on vegetation and biogenic emissions is important as the state concurrently faces requirements to achieve and maintain attainment with the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone in several large metropolitan areas. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) has been utilized extensively for the estimation of biogenic emissions on global and regional scales. This research investigates the interannual variability in leaf area index and isoprene and monoterpene emissions estimates from MEGAN in eastern Texas climate regions with diverse climatology and land cover. In MEGAN, the adjustment to emissions from a standardized set of environmental conditions is determined using a multiplication of individual activity factors for leaf age, soil moisture, and the canopy environment. The research also interprets and quantifies differences in environmental activity factors between years with extreme to exceptional drought and average to above average precipitation in eastern Texas and identifies influences on biogenic emissions estimates from MEGAN.

  18. Biogenic amines in table olives. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornero-Méndez, D; Garrido-Fernández, A

    1994-09-01

    Biogenic amines in fermented vegetables have scarcely been studied. Available data show that in table olives and fermented cucumbers their presence is rare and any determinations made have been restricted mainly to histamine. However, some microorganisms, especially those related to spoilage, found in the fermentation brines of such products may have amino acid decarboxylase activity and give rise to biogenic amines by unusual processes. A method for the simultaneous determination of eight biogenic amines (tryptamine, beta-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine, and spermine) has been developed to study their occurrence in fermented vegetables in more detail. The method consists of extraction of the amines from olive paste with 5% m/v trichloracetic acid and successive transfers into water-saturated n-BuOH and 0.1 mol l-1 HCl. An aliquot of this mixture is dried and derivatized with dansyl chloride. The dansyl derivatives are then analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Special emphasis has been given to optimization of the n-BuOH and 0.1 mol l-1 HCl extractions and to the derivatization conditions. By applying this method to the analysis of spoilt olives, the presence of some biogenic amines has been demonstrated. Thus a new method for monitoring the presence of biogenic amines during the fermentation of olives and for detecting anomalous fermentations is envisaged.

  19. Recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, José Luis; Troncoso, Ana Maria; García-Parrilla, Maria Del Carmen; Callejón, Raquel Maria

    2016-10-05

    Biogenic amines (BA) are generally considered as a food hazard, even though there is not a threshold for these biomolecules in the European legislation, except for histamine in fishery products. These compounds are formed during the storage and processing of certain foods through microbiological activity, and when present in high concentrations, could have toxicological effects, causing health problems in consumers, especially to sensitive persons. This fact, in addition to the economical concern involved, makes it necessary to control the amounts of biogenic amines in foods. For all these reasons, literature on biogenic amines in different food products, especially in fermented beverages, is extensive. This review provides an overview of the most recent trends in the determination of biogenic amines in fermented beverages focusing on novelty, improvement and optimization of analytical methods. Hence, the different sample treatment procedures (including derivatization), the most important analytical techniques and the most frequent applications are described and discussed. Although biogenic amines have been determined in wine and other fermented beverages for decades, new advancements and technical possibilities have allowed to increase the accuracy and sensitivity of analytical methods, in order to overcome the challenges posed by the complex matrices and their high intrinsic variability. Thus, the different purposes of BA determination (food safety, production process or food microbiology research) and the most widely employed analytical techniques have been reviewed.

  20. Characterization of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using statistical methods; Charakterisierung Biogener Sekundaerer Organischer Aerosole mit Statistischen Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have important influence on the radiation balance of the Earth, on visibility and human health. Secondary organic aerosol is formed from gas-to-particle conversion of oxidized volatile organic compounds. A dominant fraction of the gases originates from plant emissions, making biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) an especially important constituent of the atmosphere. Knowing the chemical composition of BSOA particles is crucial for a thorough understanding of aerosol processes in the environment. In this work, the chemical composition of BSOA particles was measured with aerosol mass spectrometry and analyzed with statistical methods. The experimental part of the work comprises process studies of the formation and aging of biogenic aerosols in simulation chambers. Using a plant chamber, real tree emissions were used to produce particles in a way close to conditions in forest environments. In the outdoor chamber SAPHIR, OH-radicals were produced from the photooxidation of ozone under illumination with natural sunlight. Here, BSOA was produced from defined mixtures of mono- and sesquiterpenes that represent boreal forest emissions. A third kind of experiments was performed in the indoor chamber AIDA. Here, particles were produced from ozonolysis of single monoterpenes and aged by condensing OH-oxidation products. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to measure the chemical composition of the particles. One of the instruments is equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer providing unit mass resolution. The second instrument contains a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and provides mass resolution sufficient to distinguish different fragments with the same nominal mass. Aerosol mass spectra obtained with these instruments are strongly fragmented due to electron impact ionization of the evaporated molecules. In addition, typical BSOA mass spectra are very similar to each other. In order to get a more detailed knowledge about the mass

  1. Microbial Manganese Oxidation in Saltmarsh Surface Sediments Using a Leuco Crystal Violet Manganese Oxide Detection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Henry G.; Siekmann, Ellen C.; Hodson, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Microbial manganese (Mn) oxide production in surface sediments of a Georgia saltmarsh was directly measured using an assay involving the oxidation of 4,4',4″-methylidynetris (N,N-dimethylaniline), leuco crystal violet (LCV), by Mn oxides to produce crystal violet. The assay exhibits high specificity for Mn oxides without interference by Mn(II) and is sufficiently sensitive to determine rates of Mn oxidation in surface sediment or saltmarsh creek water suspensions. Sample salinity affects crystal violet absorbance in the 0-25 salinity range and must be corrected for in Mn oxide determinations for estuarine samples of variable salinity. Other oxidants found to oxidize LCV slowly included Cl(I), Cr(III), I(V), Fe(III), and Mn(III), although the sensitivity of the assay for Mn(IV) oxides was found to be seven times greater than for Mn(III), and at least 100 times greater than for any of the other oxidants. Rates of abiotic Mn oxide production in sediment suspensions treated with either sodium azide or formalin, or autoclaved, were much slower than rates determined for untreated sediments. Sodium azide (7·7 mM) inhibited Mn oxide production in these sediment suspensions to rates between 5 and 10% of the rates of Mn oxidation determined for unamended suspensions. Manganese oxidation was highly temperature dependent, with maximal rates on a dry weight basis (8·9 nmol mg dwt -1 h -1), occurring at 60°C, and negligible activity at 100 and 0°C. Rates were also dependent on sample pH, with maximal rates at pH 6·7, decreasing to near 0 as the pH was lowered to approximately 3·0. For Mn(II) concentrations ranging from 9 to 91 μM, rates of Mn oxide production were independent of Mn(II) concentration, while Mn oxide production was inhibited at concentrations greater than 91 μM (e.g. by 25-40% at 450 μM). Rates of microbial Mn oxide production in surface sediment/saltmarsh creek water suspensions incubated under natural conditions of temperature, pH, and Mn

  2. The biogenic emission potential of nitric oxide from sandy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J. B.; Meixner, F. X.; Sun, Z. G.; Chen, X. B.; Mamtimin, B.

    2009-04-01

    There are about 160.9 Mha of sandy land in China, about 17.6% of total Chinese area, which mainly distributed in 35°-50° N. The western Songnen Plain, which located in the semi-arid region of Northeastern China, is one of the main sandy soil distribution regions. The changes of land use in sandy soil are accompanied by changes in biogeochemical cycles of nutrients, particularly of the air-surface exchange of trace gases like nitric oxide. Our study, based on results obtained by a laboratory incubation technique, focuses on (a) NO production and consumption in sandy soils from two types of land use as function of soil temperature and soil moisture, and (b) The biogenic emission potential of nitric oxide from sandy soils in semi-arid region. At 25˚C, average NO production (in terms of mass of N) was 0.016,and 0.013 ng kg-1s-1 in sandy soils from soybean land (SL) and man-made forest (MF), re¬spectively. NO consumption rate constant ranged from 0.26×10-6 to 7.28×10-6 m3 kg-1s-1. At 25˚C and under optimum soil moisture conditions for NO production, the NO compensation point mixing ratio was about 266 and 161 ug m-3 (465,and 281 ppb) for soils of SL and MF, respectively. Statistically sound relationships have been observed between NO fluxes and soil moisture (optimum curves). NO fluxes also increased exponentially with soil temperature at any given soil moisture. The optimum soil moisture for which maximum NO flux was observed was independent of soil temperature. The maximum of NO flux potentials for SL and MF soils (at 25°C) were 59.6 and 36.5 ng m-2s-1 at water-filled pore space (%WFPS) of 26 and 24, respectively. The NO flux potential was about 2 times larger for cropland soil than for man-made forest soils, most likely due to fertilizer application to the cropland soils.

  3. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefczak, A.; Leszczyński, B.; Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency.

  4. Geological and geochemical characteristics of the secondary biogenic gas in coalbed gases, Huainan coalfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaojun, Zhang; Zhenglin, Cao; Mingxin, Tao; Wanchun, Wang; Jinlong, Ma

    2010-09-15

    The research results show that the compositions of coalbed gases in Huainan coalfield have high content methane, low content heavy hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide, and special dry gas. The evolution coal is at the stage of generation of thermogenic gases, but the d13C1 values within the range of biogenic gas (d13C1 values from -56.7{per_thousand} to -67.9{per_thousand}). The d13C2 value of coalbed gases in Huainan coalfield shows not only the features of the thermogenic ethane, but also the mixed features of the biogenic methane and thermogenic ethane. In geological characteristics, Huainan coalfield has favorable conditions of generation of secondary biogenic gas.

  5. Evaluation of larvicidal activity of biogenic nanoparticles against filariasis causing Culex mosquito vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, Dharumadurai; Thangaraj, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the larvicidal activity of biogenic nanoparticles against filariasis causing Culex mosquito vector. Methods The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-vis. spectrum, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. Larvae were exposed to varying concentrations of aqueous extract of synthesized AgNPs for 10 min. The different concentrations of 5, 2.5, 1.25, 0.625 and 0.312 mg/L silver nanoparticles were tested against the Culex larvae. Results The mortality rate of Agaricus bisporus biogenic nanoparticles against Culex larvae are 5 mg/L (100%), 2.5 mg/L (81%), 1.25 mg/L (62%), 0.625 mg/L (28%) and 0.312 mg/L (11%). Conclusions These results suggest that the synthesized biogenic AgNPs have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for controlling Culex larvae.

  6. Observations of oxidation products above a forest imply biogenic emissions of very reactive compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holzinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical gradients of mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds have been measured in a Ponderosa pine forest in Central California (38.90° N, 120.63° W, 1315m. These measurements reveal large quantities of previously unreported oxidation products of short lived biogenic precursors. The emission of biogenic precursors must be in the range of 13-66µmol m-2h-1 to produce the observed oxidation products. That is 6-30 times the emissions of total monoterpenes observed above the forest canopy on a molar basis. These reactive precursors constitute a large fraction of biogenic emissions at this site, and are not included in current emission inventories. When oxidized by ozone they should efficiently produce secondary aerosol and hydroxyl radicals.

  7. Carbonyl sulfide as an inverse tracer for biogenic organic carbon in gas and aerosol phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Montzka, S. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Atlas, E. L.; Weber, R. J.; Flocke, F. M.

    2009-03-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a long-lived trace gas in the atmosphere with an oceanic source and a surface sink through the uptake by vegetation and soils. We demonstrate the use of COS as an inverse tracer for the impact of biogenic emissions on an air mass including the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Using airborne data from the summer of 2004 over the northeastern U.S., we find that air masses with reduced COS in the continental boundary layer had on average higher mixing ratios of biogenic VOCs (isoprene, monoterpenes, methanol) and their photo-oxidation products (methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, methyl furan and MPAN, a peroxyacyl nitrate derived from isoprene). Measurements of water-soluble organic carbon were only weakly correlated with COS, indicating that SOA formation from biogenic precursors was a small contribution to the total.

  8. Altervalent substitution of sodium for calcium in biogenic calcite and aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Tamenori, Yusuke; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Iwasaki, Nozomu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Luan T.; Kuroyanagi, Azumi; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Kuroda, Junichiro; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2017-04-01

    Sodium concentrations in biogenic CaCO3 are several thousands of parts per million, and, on a molar basis, Na is among the most abundant constituent minor element in these carbonates. Nevertheless, the chemical form of Na in CaCO3 is not well constrained. We used synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy to identify the dominant molecular host sites for Na in biogenic calcite and aragonite precipitated by corals, bivalves, and foraminifera. We also used the K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure to investigate the chemical environment of Na in biogenic calcium carbonates and identify the altervalent substitution of Na into Ca sites in the lattice structures of calcite and aragonite. Minor cation and anion concentrations in biogenic CaCO3 suggest that the principal substitution mechanism involves charge compensation through the creation of CO32- vacancies. The mostly homogeneous Na concentrations in the skeletal microstructures of the various biota we examined indicate that environmental and biological controls, such as temperature, skeletal microstructure, and calcification rates, have only minor influences on skeletal Na concentrations. A decrease of Na:Ca ratios with increasing age of foraminiferal shells picked from a Quaternary sediment core, indicates progressive release of Na, which suggests that structurally-substituted Na in biogenic CaCO3 is readily leached during burial diagenesis. Whereas the sediment that undergo diagenesis release some Na back to the water column, sodium co-precipitation in biogenic CaCO3 serves as a potential sink of Na for the ocean.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles, and silver chloride nanoparticles: an overview and comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Seabra, Amedea B

    2016-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of biogenic-synthesized silver-based nanoparticles has been the focus of increasing interest. As the antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles is highly dependent on their size and surface, the complete and adequate characterization of the nanoparticle is important. This review discusses the characterization and antimicrobial activity of biogenic synthesized silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles. By revising the literature, there is confusion in the characterization of these two silver-based nanoparticles, which consequently affects the conclusion regarding to their antimicrobial activities. This review critically analyzes recent publications on the synthesis of biogenic silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles by attempting to correlate the characterization of the nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity. It was difficult to correlate the size of biogenic nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity, since different techniques are employed for the characterization. Biogenic synthesized silver-based nanoparticles are not completely characterized, particularly the nature of capped proteins covering the nanomaterials. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of theses nanoparticles is assayed by using different protocols and strains, which difficult the comparison among the published papers. It is important to select some bacteria as standards, by following international foundations (Pharmaceutical Microbiology Manual) and use the minimal inhibitory concentration by broth microdilution assays from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, which is the most common assay used in antibiotic ones. Therefore, we conclude that to have relevant results on antimicrobial effects of biogenic silver-based nanoparticles, it is necessary to have a complete and adequate characterization of these nanostructures, followed by standard methodology in microbiology protocols.

  10. Interactive effects of manganese and/or iron supplementation in adult women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C.D.; Greger, J.L. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Evaluation of the practical significance of manganese-iron interactions has been hampered by the limited methodologies available to assess manganese status. Manganese status has not been monitored longitudinally in control studies with humans. Forty-eight women were recruited for a double blind 125-day supplementation study. After an initial 5-day baseline period, subjects were assigned to one of four treatments: placebo; 30 mg iron as ferrous fumarate daily; 15 mg manganese as an amino acid chelated manganese supplement daily or both the iron and manganese supplements daily. Dietary information, blood and 3-day urine samples were collected during the baseline period and after 20, 55, 85 and 120 days of consuming the supplements. Urinary manganese excretion ranged from 0.11 to 1.40 {mu}g/day. Serum manganese ranged from 0.16 to 1.92 {mu}g/l. Serum was also analyzed for iron, zinc, copper, ferritin and transferrin concentrations. Lymphocytes were isolated and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase activity was determined as a new method to assess manganese status. Plasma cholesterol ranged from 126 to 229 mg/dl and HDL cholesterol ranged from 31 to 84 mg/dl. Plasma triglycerides were determined and LDL cholesterol was calculated by difference.

  11. Experimental assessment of the liquefaction resistance of calcareous biogenous sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoval Eimar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT

    Liquefaction is a phenomenon in which soils, typically sands, suddenly loose a substantial amount of their shear strength and stiffness, this often triggered by large-magnitude earthquakes. Most liquefaction research has focused on silicate-based sands and not on other sand types, such as calcareous biogenous sands Calcareous sands are usually composed of skeletal or non-skeletal remains of marine organisms, with unique characteristics in terms of their mineralogy surface roughness, particle shape, crushability, and intraparticle porosity. The unique characteristics of calcareous sands suggest that their geotechnical engineering behaviour can be substantially different compared to that of terrigenous sands, including their behaviour under seismic loading, which have not been very well studied

    This paper presents the results of an experimental programme aimed at studying the cyclic liquefaction resistance of uncemented calcareous biogenous sands retrieved from south-western Puerto Rico Evaluation of liquefaction potential involved a comprehensive set of isotropically consolidated undrained cyclic triaxial tests on reconstituted samples of this calcareous sand. The programme also included tests on Ottawa terrigenous silica sand samples prepared and tested in similar conditions for comparison purposes.

    In general, the experimental results showed that Cabo Rojo calcareous sands had higher liquefaction resistance compared to Ottawa silica sands tested under similar conditions. Important differences between calcareous and silica sands regarding pore pressure generation characteristics and axial strain accumulation were also observed


  12. Biogenic amine content, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration of pork in tuna sausage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chang, Shih-Chih; Hong, Tang-Yao

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-five tuna sausage products were purchased from retail markets in Taiwan. The rates of occurrence of biogenic amines, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration by pork and poultry were determined. The average content of various biogenic amines in all tested samples was less than 2.0 mg/100 g (sausage. The fish species in the tuna sausage samples were identified as Thunnus albacares for 22 samples (88%), Thunnus alalunga for 1 sample (4%), and Thunnus thynnus for 1 sample (4%), whereas the remaining sample was identified as Makaira nigricans (blue marlin).

  13. Natural biogenic solid fuels - environmentally relevant characteristics and possible influences. Final report; Naturbelassene biogene Festbrennstoffe - umweltrelevante Eigenschaften und Einflussmoeglichkeiten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, H.; Boehm, T.; Maier, L. [Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Landtechnik, Friesing-Weihenstephan (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Festbrennstoffe

    2000-09-01

    , Weizenstroh und Weizenganzpflanzen. Eine Datenbank fuer naturbelassene biogene Festbrennstoffe wurde errichtet. Hierfuer wurde ein relationales Datenbankmodell gewaehlt. Dessen Struktur wurde so angelegt, dass neben den eigentlichen Messgroessen auch eine Vielzahl weiterer Eigenschaften und Informationen zum Brennstoff sowie seine Herkunftsmerkmale und die verwendeten Analyseverfahren festgehalten werden konnten. Die in den eigenen Versuchsserien zustande gekommenen Analyseergebnisse wurden durch weitere Daten aus einer umfangreichen Recherche (Befragung) sowie aus Literaturangaben ergaenzt, so dass insgesamt ca. 1.238 Datensaetze (Stand April 1999) zusammengetragen werden konnten. (orig.)

  14. Interpreting the effect of CO2-induced ocean acidification on elemental partitioning in biogenic carbonates within the framework of Rayleigh fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, R. E.; Eagle, R.; Ries, J. B.; Tripati, A. K.

    2013-05-01

    The elemental composition of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitated by marine invertebrates varies with the physico-chemical properties of seawater, and is thus used for reconstructing past oceanic conditions, including temperature, pH, and seawater composition. Previous studies have used a Rayleigh fractionation model to interpret elemental partitioning within a range of calcitic and aragonitic organisms, including foraminifera and corals. We present elemental ratios for 18 species of calcareous marine invertebrates, including echinoids, corals, bivalves, gastropods, calcifying algae, crustacea, and serpulid worms, which were reared at CO2-induced aragonite saturation states (±SD) of 2.5 (±0.4), 2.0 (±0.4), 1.5 (±0.3), and 0.7 (±0.2). Importantly, specimens were cultured simultaneously at the same temperature and in seawater sourced from the same reservoir, allowing comparison amongst taxa without regard to native water conditions. A combination of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) were used to determine the elemental ratios. We interpret the partitioning of strontium, magnesium, barium, manganese, boron, lithium and uranium within the biogenic carbonates of these 18 invertebrates, along with data from the literature for foraminifera and coccolithophores raised under varying pCO2 and temperature conditions, within a Rayleigh fractionation framework. Application of a Rayleigh model to these systems requires constraints on elemental partitioning into inorganic CaCO3. Our survey of the literature shows that there are limited data for some elements (e.g., Mn) and that, for others (e.g., Sr, Mg), there are a wide range of values reported for a given element. Given this uncertainty, we examine the impact that varying the nominal inorganic partition coefficient has on Rayleigh-derived estimates of calcium-utilization during calcification. The elements examined in this study

  15. Modeling of some biochemical mechanisms of development of manganese hypermicroelementosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Goncharenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the mechanisms of action of sub-toxic dose (LD50 of the manganese chloride on cell metabolism in rats’ organs and tissues under model conditions. A model of assessment of integral response of an organism to exogenous manganese at exposure levels close to the threshold that was realized as the repeated impact of sub-toxic doses. White Wistar rats aged 3 months were injected intramuscularly with MnCl2 with the metal concentration of 50 mg/kg for 8 days. Effect of exogenous manganese load on the content of macro- and microelements, such as Ca, Mg, Mn, Cu, Zn, and Pb, was studied in liver, heart, spleen, kidneys, muscles and bones of experimental animals the use of C-115-M1 atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Study of enzymes activity and lipid peroxidation products in serum and liver homogenates of experimental animals was conducted on a spectrophotometer Spekord UV/VIS. Hemolysis of red blood cells was determined by the Yacher method. Sorption capacity of the erythrocytes glycocalyx to alcian blue was determined by the Artsishevsky method. A study of the influence of Mn-load on the functional activity of energy metabolism was performed on a model system of rat liver mitochondria by the polarography. Intake of MnCl2 in a dose of LD50 generates weight loss of the rats by 44%, hemoglobin level decrease by 25%, and reduction of the transaminases activity by 40%. That indicates serious disorders in ions homeostasis and metabolic processes. MnCl2 load leads to a significant increase in the content of manganese in all tissues tested: the largest amount was found in the spleen (600% increase, liver (300% and muscles (240% as compared with the initial state. Apparently, these organs are depots of manganese. It was established that the introduction of MnCl2 in a dose of LD50 causes a redistribution of elements in the body, resulting in a significant reduction in the concentration of magnesium ions in heart, bones

  16. Compositions containing nucleosides and manganese and their uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Levine, Rodney L.; Wehr, Nancy B.

    2015-11-17

    This invention encompasses methods of preserving protein function by contacting a protein with a composition comprising one or more purine or pyrimidine nucleosides (such as e.g., adenosine or uridine) and an antioxidant (such as e.g., manganese). In addition, the invention encompasses methods of treating and/or preventing a side effect of radiation exposure and methods of preventing a side effect of radiotherapy comprising administration of a pharmaceutically effective amount of a composition comprising one or more purine or pyrimidine nucleosides (such as e.g., adenosine or uridine) and an antioxidant (such as e.g., manganese) to a subject in need thereof. The compositions may comprise D. radiodurans extracts.

  17. Manganese Dioxide with High Specific Surface Area for Alkaline Battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG You-ju; LIN Yu-li; LI Wei-shan

    2012-01-01

    The authors reported a facile method for the synthesis of manganese dioxide without any template and catalyst at a low-temperature.The prepared sample was characterized with X-ray diffraction(XRD),scanning electron microscopy(SEM),Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET) surface analysis,Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectrometry,cyclic voltammetry,altemative current(AC) impedance test and battery discharge test.It is found that the prepared sample belongs to α-MnO2 and has a microsphere morphology and a large BET surface area.The electrochemical characterization indicates that the prepared sample displays a larger electrochemical capacitance than the commercial electrolytic manganese dioxides(EMD) in Na2SO4 solution,and exhibits larger discharge capacity than EMD,especially at a high rate discharge condition when it is used as cathode of alkaline Zn/MnO2 battery.

  18. Giant Magnetic Entropy Change in Manganese Perovskites near Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟伟; 王锦辉; 都有为; 陈伟

    2001-01-01

    A large magnetic entropy change about twice as high as that of pure gadolinium metal near room temperature has been discovered in manganese perovskites La0.837Ca0.098Na0.03sMn0.987O3.00(8.3 J. kg-1.K-1, at 256 K) and La0.s22Ca0.096K0.043Mn0.974O3.00 (6.8 J. kg-1.K-1, at 265K) under a magnetic field of 1.5 T. This phenomenon indicates that manganese perovskites have potential applications for magnetic refrigerants in an extended temperature range even near room temperature.

  19. Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), plant uptake and effects on metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.R.; Lytle, C.M.; Stone, R.L.; Smith, B.N [Department of Botany and Range Science, Brigham Young University, Provo (United States); Hansen, L.D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo (United States)

    2000-04-01

    In the USA and Canada, methylcyclopentadienyl manganese (MMT) is currently added to gasoline to replace tetraethyl lead as an antiknock fuel additive. Manganese concentrations in roadside soil and plants are increasing and correlated with distance from the roadway, traffic volume, plant type, and microhabitat. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings were treated for either five or thirty-five days with different levels of manganous chloride (0-1000ppm). Metabolic heat rates (q) and respiration rates (R{sub CO{sub 2}}), measured calorimetrically, indicated severe stress at Mn concentrations between 10 and 100ppm and at temperatures above 20C. Predicted growth rates (R{sub SG}) also decreased in these circumstances.

  20. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-01-30

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  1. Biogenic arsenic volatilisation from an acidic wetland soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Gunter; Huang, Jen-How; Lu, Shipeng; Tian, Liyan; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic arsenic (As) volatilisation was budgeted at 26000 t yr-1as the largest input of the global As release into the atmosphere, thereby playing an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of As in the surface environment. In order to quantify As volatilisation from wetland soils and to elucidate the geochemical and microbiological factors governing As volatilisation, a series of incubations with an acidic wetland soil collected in NE-Bavaria in Germany were performed at 15oC for 4 months with addition of NaN3, arsenite (As(III)), FeCl3, NaSO4 and NaOAc with N2 and air in the headspace. Speciation of gaseous As in the headspace using GC-ICP-MS/ ESI-MS coupling showed the predominance of either arsine (AsH3) or trimethylarsine ((CH3)3As) in all treatments during the time course of incubation. Monomethylarsine ((CH3)AsH2) and dimethylarsine ((CH3)2AsH) could be only detected in trace amounts. Arsenic speciation in porewater with HPLC-ICP-MS revealed the predominance of As(III) and methylated As was never detectable. Arsenic volatilisation summed to 2.3 ng As (88% as AsH3) in the control incubations, which accounted for ~0.25 % of the total As storage in the wetland soil. Treatments with 10 mM NaN3 resulted in emission of only 0.03 ng As. In contrast, addition of 10 mM NaOAc stimulated microbial activities in wetland soils and subsequently rose As volatilisation to 8.5 ng As. It could be therefore concluded that As volatilisation from the wetland soils was mainly biological. Spiking 67 μM As(III) increased 10 times of As volatilisation and the proportion of methylated arsines increased to 66%, which is supposed to be caused by the largely enhanced As availability in porewater for microbes (480 ppb, ~65 times higher than those in the controls). Adding 10 mM FeCl3 stimulated microbial Fe(III) reducing activities but suppressed other microbial activities by lowering soil pH from 5 to 3.6, decreasing consequently As volatilisation to 0.3 ng As. The much lower redox

  2. Toxicity of manganese to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Bogenrieder, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    Manganese is a toxic element frequently overlooked when assessing toxicity of effluents, sediments and pore waters. Manganese can be present at toxic levels in anoxic solutions due to its increased solubility under chemically-reducing conditions, and it can remain at those levels for days in aerated test waters due to slow precipitation kinetics. Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca are freshwater organisms often used for toxicity testing and recommended for assessments of effluents and pore waters. Lethal and reproductive-inhibition concentrations of Mn were determined for C. dubia in acute 48h tests and chronic 3-brood tests using animals azteca was determined with 7d old animals in acute 96h tests. Tests were run at three levels of water hardness to assess the amelioratory effect, which was often significant. Manganese concentrations were measured analytically at test initiation and after 96 h for calculations of toxicity endpoints and determinations of Mn precipitation during the tests. Minimal amounts of Mn (below 3%) precipitated within 96 h. LC50s determined for H. azteca progressively increased from 3.0 to 8.6 to 13.7 mg Mn/L in soft, moderately-hard and hard waters, respectively. The tolerance of C. dubia to Mn was not significantly different between moderately-hard and hard waters, but was significantly lower in soft water. There was no significant difference in Mn sensitivity between the ages of C. dubia tested. Acute LC50 values for C. dubia averaged 6.2, 14.5 and 15.2 mg Mn/L and chronic IC50 values averaged 3.9, 8.5 and 11.5 mg Mn/L for soft, moderately-hard and hard waters, respectively. Manganese toxicity should be considered when assessing solutions with concentrations near these levels.

  3. Manganese and welding fume exposure and control in construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, John D; Susi, Pam; Flynn, Michael R

    2007-12-01

    Overexposure to welding fume constituents, particularly manganese, is of concern in the construction industry due to the prevalence of welding and the scarcity of engineering controls. The control effectiveness of a commercially available portable local exhaust ventilation (LEV) unit was assessed. It consisted of a portable vacuum and a small bell-shaped hood connected by a flexible 2 inch (50.8 mm) diameter hose, in both experimental and field settings. The experimental testing was done in a semienclosed booth at a pipefitter training facility. Five paired trials of LEV control vs. no control, each approximately 1 hr in duration and conducted during two successive welds of 6 inch (152.4 mm) diameter carbon steel pipe were run in random order. Breathing zone samples were collected outside the welding hood during each trial. In the field scenario, full-shift breathing zone samples were collected from two pipefitters welding carbon steel pipe for a chiller installation on a commercial construction project. Eight days of full-shift sampling were conducted on both workers (n = 16), and the LEV was used by one of the two workers on an alternating basis for 7 of the days. All samples were collected with personal sample pumps calibrated at 2 L/min. Filter cassettes were analyzed for total particulate and manganese concentration by a certified laboratory. In the experimental setting, use of the portable LEV resulted in a 75% reduction in manganese exposure (mean 13 microg/m(3) vs. 51 microg/m(3); p 0.05). These results demonstrate that LEV use can reduce manganese exposure associated with welding tasks in construction.

  4. Recent Development of Air-Cooled Bainitic Steels Containing Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Hong-sheng; YANG Fu-bao; BAI Bing-zhe; YANG Zhi-gang; YIN Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The superiorities of air-cooled bainitic steels were described.A series of air-cooled bainitic steels containing manganese were developed and presented,which include low carbon granular bainitic steels,low carbon grain-boundary allotriomorphic ferrite/granular bainite dual phase steels,medium and medium high carbon bainite/martensite dual phase steels and casting bainitic steels.The development of ultra-low carbon bainitic steels in China was also introduced.

  5. High-valent imido complexes of manganese and chromium corroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicola Y; Eikey, Rebecca A; Loring, Megan I; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2005-05-16

    The oxidation reaction of M(tpfc) [M = Mn or Cr and tpfc = tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole] with aryl azides under photolytic or thermal conditions gives the first examples of mononuclear imido complexes of manganese(V) and chromium(V). These complexes have been characterized by NMR, mass spectrometry, UV-vis, EPR, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry. Two X-ray structures have been obtained for Mn(tpfc)(NMes) and Cr(tpfc)(NMes) [Mes = 2,4,6-(CH(3))(3)C(6)H(2)]. Short metal-imido bonds (1.610 and 1.635 Angstroms) as well as nearly linear M-N-C angles are consistent with triple M triple-bond NR bond formation. The kinetics of nitrene [NR] group transfer from manganese(V) corroles to various organic phosphines have been defined. Reduction of the manganese(V) corrolato complex affords phosphine imine and Mn(III) with reaction rates that are sensitive to steric and electronic elements of the phosphine substrate. An analogous manganese complex with a variant corrole ligand containing bromine atoms in the beta-pyrrole positions, Mn(Br(8)tpfc)(NAr), has been prepared and studied. Its reaction with PEt(3) is 250x faster than that of the parent tpfc complex, and its Mn(V/IV) couple is shifted by 370 mV to a more positive potential. The EPR spectra of chromium(V) imido corroles reveal a rich signal at ambient temperature consistent with Cr(V) triple-bond NR (d(1), S = 1/2) containing a localized spin density in the d(xy) orbital, and an anisotropic signal at liquid nitrogen temperature. Our results demonstrate the synthetic utility of organic aryl azides in the preparation of mononuclear metal imido complexes previously considered elusive, and suggest strong sigma-donation as the underlying factor in stabilizing high-valent metals by corrole ligands.

  6. Complexation of Manganese with Glutarimidedioxime: Implication for Extraction Uranium from Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiang; Tian, Yin; Qin, Zhen; Yu, Qianhong; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Dongqi; Li, Xingliang; Wang, Xiaolin

    2017-03-01

    The molecule of glutaroimidedioxime, a cyclic imidedioxime moiety that can form during the synthesis of the poly(amidoxime)sorbent and is reputedly responsible for the extraction of uranium from seawater. Complexation of manganese (II) with glutarimidedioxime in aqueous solutions was investigated with potentiometry, calorimetry, ESI-mass spectrometry, electrochemical measurements and quantum chemical calculations. Results show that complexation reactions of manganese with glutarimidedioxime are both enthalpy and entropy driven processes, implying that the sorption of manganese on the glutarimidedioxime-functionalized sorbent would be enhanced at higher temperatures. Complex formation of manganese with glutarimidedioxime can assist redox of Mn(II/III). There are about ~15% of equilibrium manganese complex with the ligand in seawater pH(8.3), indicating that manganese could compete to some degree with uranium for sorption sites.

  7. BUILDING MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS BASED ON SILICON MANGANESE SLAGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Currently of particular relevance was given to the matter of introduction in manufacture of building materials and products, resource-saving techniques and technologies; integrated use of raw materials and materials that prevent or significantly reduce their harmful impact on the environment. This allows you to recycle hundreds of thousands of tons of the fiery liquid slags of silicon manganese and to develop effective structural materials that can replace metals, non-metallic building materials of natural origin, concretes, cast stone, plastics and refractories. Purpose. The study of the structure and properties of building materials and products from electric furnace slag of silicon manganese. Conclusion. Slags from the smelting of silicon manganese are classified as acidic. Their lime factor is in the range of 0.47–0.52. The composition of the slag located in the heterogeneous region SiO2 near the line of separation of cristobalite spread to the crystallization of wollastonite, according to the ternary system MnO-CaO-SiO2, which in consideration of their stability, allows the development of technology of building materials (gravel, sand, granulated slag, etc. and products (foundation blocks, road slabs, containers for transportation and storage of hazardous waste, and others.

  8. Diode laser heat treatment of lithium manganese oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proell, J., E-mail: johannes.proell@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kohler, R.; Mangang, A.; Ulrich, S.; Bruns, M.; Seifert, H.J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Pfleging, W. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility, H.-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Egg.-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of lithium manganese oxide thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on stainless steel substrates under 10 Pa argon pressure is demonstrated by a laser annealing technique. Laser annealing processes were developed as a function of annealing time and temperature with the objective to form an electrochemically active lithium manganese oxide cathode. It is demonstrated, that laser annealing with 940 nm diode laser radiation and an annealing time of 2000 s at 600 Degree-Sign C delivers appropriate parameters for formation of a crystalline spinel-like phase. Characteristic features of this phase could be detected via Raman spectroscopy, showing the characteristic main Raman band at 627 cm{sup -1}. Within cyclic voltammetric measurements, the two characteristic redox pairs for spinel lithium manganese oxide in the 4 V region could be detected, indicating that the film was well-crystallized and de-/intercalation processes were reversible. Raman post-analysis of a cycled cathode showed that the spinel-like structure was preserved within the cycling process but mechanical degradation effects such as film cracking were observed via scanning electron microscopy. Typical features for the formation of an additional surface reaction layer could be detected using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  9. Autoradiography of manganese: accumulation and retention in the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyden, A.; Lindquist, N.G. (National Board of Health and Welfare, Department of Drugs, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Uppsala, Sweden); Larsson, B.S. (Department of Toxicology, University of Uppsala, Biomedical Center, Uppsala, Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    By means of whole-body autoradiography, the general distribution of /sup 54/MnCl/sub 2/ was studied in mice and a Marmoset monkey. High accumulation and retention were observed in the pancreas in both species. Gamma counting experiments in mice after a single intravenous injection of /sup 54/MnCl/sub 2/ showed that the level in the pancreas exceeded that of the liver at all survival times (20 min. - 30 days). Also in the monkey, the concentration in the pancreas exceeded that of the liver, and the pancreas had the highest tissue/liver ratio of the organs measured at 24 hours after injection. The high uptake and long retention in the pancreas suggest that manganese is of importance for the pancreatic function but also that the pancreas may be a target organ for manganese toxicity. Positron tomography, using /sup 11/C-labelled amino acids, has been found to be a promising diagnostic technique for the study of pancreatic disease. Positron emitting manganese isotopes may be worth further studies as possible agents for pancreatic imaging.

  10. Titanium-Manganese Oxides. Optical and Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Chernyak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline titanium-manganese mixed oxides (ТМО with the Mn content of 13÷16 % at. were first synthesized by manganese hydroxide precipitation on anatase or rutile particles. The structure, morphology and chemical composition of the samples were characterized using XRD and XRF methods showing that the synthesized mixed oxides are the polydisperse materials of different phase composition containing TiO2, Mn2O3 and MnTiO3. The phase transformations and structure defects of the prepared compounds were characterized by FTIR, FT-FIR, FT-Raman spectroscopies. UV-VIS absorption spectra were investigated in 2,4÷6,0 eV region, and it was revealed that the presence of manganese oxides results in absorption increase and significant red shift of the ТМО absorption edge in comparison with pure TiO2. Photocatalytic activity of pure TiO2, Mn2+-doped TiO2 and ТМО during the photocatalytic decomposition of the safranine dye under UV irradiation was studied. A great improvement of photocatalytic activity is registered for Mn2+-doped TiO2 (anatase and rutile, and rutile-based ТМО sample.

  11. New generation of the zinc - manganese dioxide cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogulski, Z.; Chotkowski, M.; Czerwinski, A. [Warsaw Univ., Warsaw (Poland). Dept. of Chemistry; Industrial Chemistry Research Inst., Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-10-15

    Zinc chloride and alkaline system cells are the 2 most popular types of zinc manganese dioxide cells. They offer excellent shelf life, high-temperature performance, low cost, and favourable charge density and electrode potential. They are also environmentally sound. However, zinc corrosion and the formation of electrochemically inactive products of manganese dioxide reduction are some of the main problems with the storage and operation of rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide (RAM) batteries. Studies have shown that reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can be used as reactive mass carrier and the current collector in lead-acid batteries, zinc-carbon batteries, and secondary cells with NiOOH/Ni(OH){sub 2} cathodes. This paper demonstrated the behaviour of the primary zinc-carbon cell and a secondary battery system (Zn/ZnSO{sub 4}/MnO{sub 2}) with a new current collector. The commonly used graphic rod in the cell for the cathodic current collector was substituted by RVC. This modification enhanced all of the operational parameters of the cell, including voltage stability during discharge and electrical capacity of the cathode. In addition, the application of RVC as both anode and cathode active mass holders in the battery system made it possible to develop a new rechargeable battery system. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Carbon-14 based determination of the biogenic fraction of industrial CO2 emissions : Application and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, S. W. L.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The C-14 method is a very reliable and sensitive method for industrial plants, emission authorities and emission inventories to verify data estimations of biogenic fractions of CO2 emissions. The applicability of the method is shown for flue gas CO2 samples that have been sampled in I-h intervals at

  13. Ozone Tendency in Biomass Burning Plumes: Influence of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Emissions Downwind of Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, D.; Palmer, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    Forest fires emit pollutants that can influence downwind surface concentrations of ozone, with potential implications for exceeding air quality regulations. The influence of emissions from biogenic and anthropogenic sources that are mixed into a biomass burning plume as it travels downwind is not well understood. Using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry transport model and a novel method to track the centre of biomass burning plumes, we identify the chemical reactions that determine ozone production and loss along the plume trajectory. Using a series of sensitivity runs, we quantify the role of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions on the importance of individual chemical reactions. We illustrate the method using data collected during the BORTAS aircraft campaign over eastern Canada during summer 2011. We focus on two contrasting plume trajectories originating from the same multi-day fire in Ontario. The first plume trajectory on 16th July 2011 travels eastward from the fire and eventually mixes with anthropogenic emissions travelling up the east coast of the United States before outflow over the North Atlantic. The second plume trajectory we follow is three days later and travels eastward with a strong northeast component away from large anthropogenic sources. Both trajectories are influenced by downwind biogenic emissions. We generate a chemical reaction narrative for each plume trajectory, allowing is to quantify how mixing pyrogenic, biogenic and anthropogenic emissions influences downwind ozone photochemistry.

  14. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM A LOWLAND TROPICAL WET FOREST IN COSTA RICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty common plant species were screened for emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCS) at a lowland tropical wet forest site in Costa Rica. Ten of the species. examined emitted substantial quantities of isoprene. These species accounted for 35-50% of the total bas...

  15. Inter-laboratory comparison of oxygen isotope compositions from biogenic silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapligin, Bernhard; Leng, Melanie J.; Webb, Elizabeth; Alexandre, Anne; Dodd, Justin P.; Ijiri, Akira; Lücke, Andreas; Shemesh, Aldo; Abelmann, Andrea; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Meyer, Hanno; Moschen, Robert; Okazaki, Yusuke; Rees, Nicholas H.; Sharp, Zachary D.; Sloane, Hilary J.; Sonzogni, Corinne; Swann, George E. A.; Sylvestre, Florence; Tyler, Jonathan J.; Yam, Ruth

    2011-11-01

    Several techniques have been introduced in the last decades for the dehydration and release of O 2 from biogenic silica (opal-A) for oxygen-isotope analysis. However, only one silica standard is universally available: a quartz standard (NBS28) distributed by the IAEA, Vienna. Hence, there is a need for biogenic silica working standards. This paper compares the existing methods of oxygen-isotope analyses of opal-A and aims to characterize additional possible working standards to calibrate the δ18O values of biogenic silica. For this purpose, an inter-laboratory comparison was organized. Six potential working standard materials were analysed repeatedly against NBS28 by eight participating laboratories using their specific analytical methods. The materials cover a wide range of δ18O values (+23 to +43‰) and include diatoms (marine, lacustrine), phytoliths and synthetically-produced hydrous silica. To characterize the proposed standards, chemical analyses and imaging by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were also performed. Despite procedural differences at each laboratory, all methods are in reasonable agreement with a standard deviation (SD) for δ18O values between 0.3‰ and 0.9‰ (1σ). Based on the results, we propose four additional biogenic silica working standards (PS1772-8: 42.8‰; BFC: 29.0‰; MSG60: 37.0‰; G95-25-CL leaves: 36.6‰) for δ18O analyses, available on request through the relevant laboratories.

  16. Detection and quantification of biogenic amines in fermented food products sold in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwamba, Clement; Matsheka, Maitshwarelo Ignatius; Mpuchane, Sisai; Gashe, Berhanu Abegaz

    2010-09-01

    The incidence and concentrations associated with four important biogenic amines in leading commercial fermented beverages consumed in Botswana were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. In 87 sorghum brew and 84 sour milk (madila, amasi) samples tested, putrescine was the most prevalent biogenic amine (63 and 61%, respectively), while histamine was the least prevalent (24 and 8%, respectively). Cadaverine was the most frequently detected biogenic amine in 79 of the commercial sour maize beverage (mageu/mahewu) samples tested (found in 70% of the samples), while tyramine was the least detected (occurring in 3% of the samples). In sorghum brew and sour milk, tyramine was found to be the most concentrated (mean concentration of 2.08 mg/100 ml and 3.2 mg/100 ml, respectively), and histamine was found to be the least concentrated (mean concentration of 0.94 mg/100 ml and 0.31 mg/100 ml, respectively). Overall, the biogenic amine concentrations of all three fermented products were within acceptable limits. However, one sorghum brew sample had a histamine content of 5.8 mg/ 100 ml, which was above the 5.0 mg/100 g allowable limit suggested by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  17. Biogenic amines determination in some traditional cheeses in West Azerbaijan province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mehdi Razavi Rohani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BA are nitrogenous compounds that possess biological activity. The source of production is the microbial decarboxylation of amino acids. This compounds are found in various types of cheese. The aim of this work was to evaluate the BA content of some traditional cheeses in West Azerbaijan province Iran. For this purpose, 70 samples of Koopeh, 10 samples of Lighvan and 5 samples of Red Salmas cheeses were obtained from local supermarkets of different cities of West Azerbaijan province. After preparation of samples, biogenic amines content was evaluated by modified HPLC method. The presence of histamine, cadaverine, putrescine and tyramine in tested cheeses were observed. Total amount of biogenic amines was highest in Red Salmas cheese with 1426.91 ppm. It followed by Lighvan cheese and Koopeh cheese with 1008.98 and 517.71 ppm, respectively. Putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine were detected in Koopeh cheese at levels up to 156.09, 282.34, 70.80, 8.48 ppm respectively. These amines were detected also in Lighvan cheese at levels up to 277.53, 342.74, 37.58, 351.12 ppm and in Red Salmas cheese samples at levels up to 438.03, 701.05, 105.21, 182.62 ppm, respectively. Large amounts of biogenic amines can indicate non hygienic conditions and contamination of used milk for cheese production.

  18. Inhibitory Effects of Spices on Biogenic Amine Accumulation during Fish Sauce Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuxia; Qiu, Mengting; Zhao, Dandan; Lu, Fei; Ding, Yuting

    2016-04-01

    The presence of high levels of biogenic amines is detrimental to the quality and safety of fish sauce. This study investigated the effects of ethanol extracts of spices, including garlic, ginger, cinnamon, and star anise extracts, in reducing the accumulation of biogenic amines during fish sauce fermentation. The concentrations of biogenic amines, which include histamine, putrescine, tyramine, and spermidine, all increased during fish sauce fermentation. When compared with the samples without spices, the garlic and star anise extracts significantly reduced these increases. The greatest inhibitory effect was observed for the garlic ethanolic extracts. When compared with controls, the histamine, putrescine, tyramine, and spermidine contents and the overall biogenic amine levels of the garlic extract-treated samples were reduced by 30.49%, 17.65%, 26.03%, 37.20%, and 27.17%, respectively. The garlic, cinnamon, and star anise extracts showed significant inhibitory effects on aerobic bacteria counts. Furthermore, the garlic and star anise extracts showed antimicrobial activity against amine producers. These findings may be helpful for enhancing the safety of fish sauce.

  19. Biogenic amines in fish: roles in intoxication, spoilage, and nitrosamine formation--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bulushi, Ismail; Poole, Susan; Deeth, Hilton C; Dykes, Gary A

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic amines are non-volatile amines formed by decarboxylation of amino acids. Although many biogenic amines have been found in fish, only histamine, cadaverine, and putrescine have been found to be significant in fish safety and quality determination. Despite a widely reported association between histamine and scombroid food poisoning, histamine alone appears to be insufficient to cause food toxicity. Putrescine and cadaverine have been suggested to potentiate histamine toxicity. With respect to spoilage on the other hand, only cadaverine has been found to be a useful index of the initial stage of fish decomposition. The relationship between biogenic amines, sensory evaluation, and trimethylamine during spoilage are influenced by bacterial composition and free amino acid content. A mesophilic bacterial count of log 6-7 cfu/g has been found to be associated with 5 mg histamine/100 g fish, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) maximum allowable histamine level. In vitro studies have shown the involvement of cadaverine and putrescine in the formation of nitrosamines, nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), and nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), respectively. In addition, impure salt, high temperature, and low pH enhance nitrosamine formation, whereas pure sodium chloride inhibits their formation. Understanding the relationships between biogenic amines and their involvement in the formation of nitrosamines could explain the mechanism of scombroid poisoning and assure the safety of many fish products.

  20. The impact of biogenic carbon sources on aerosol absorption in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Tackett, M.; Sturchio, N. C.; Heraty, L.; Martinez, N.; Hardy, K. D.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Guilderson, T.; MacMillan, A.; Steelman, K.

    2009-03-01

    In order to determine the wavelength dependence of fine (C-4 plants) in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

  1. Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jin

    2007-05-31

    Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

  2. UNITED STATES LAND USE INVENTORY FOR ESTIMATING BIOGENIC OZONE PRECURSOR EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) Data Center's (EDC) 1-km classified land cover data are combined with other land use data using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to create the Biogenic Emissions Landcover Database (BELD). The land...

  3. Biogenic silica microfossils in sediments of the Permian - Carboniferous Unayzah Formation, Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garming, J.F.L.; Franks, S.G.; Cremer, H.; Abbink, O.A.

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic silica particles (BSPs) have been discovered in sediments of the Permian - Carboniferous Unayzah Formation of Saudi Arabia. The BSPs are extracted from sediments that are generally barren of macro- or microfossils. BSPs have been found in the Basal Khuff Clastics (BKC), and the Unayzah A, B

  4. Biogenic silica in space and time in sediments of Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Gupta, S.M.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Parthiban, G.

    silica (30-35%) in the surface sediments from 11 degrees to 13 degrees S, may be due to higher productivity and better preservation of siliceous tests. The lowest biogenic silica at approximately 100 to 140 x 10 sup(3) y BP is suppressed with higher...

  5. Distinguishing black carbon from biogenic humic substances in soil clay fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, D.A.; Chappell, M.A.; Martens, D.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thompson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most models of soil humic substances include a substantial component of aromatic C either as the backbone of humic heteropolymers or as a significant component of supramolecular aggregates of degraded biopolymers. We physically separated coarse (0.2-2.0????m e.s.d.), medium (0.02-0.2????m e.s.d.), and fine (> 0.02????m e.s.d.) clay subfractions from three Midwestern soils and characterized the organic material associated with these subfractions using 13C-CPMAS-NMR, DTG, SEM-EDX, incubations, and radiocarbon age. Most of the C in the coarse clay subfraction was present as discrete particles (0.2-5????m as seen in SEM images) of black carbon (BC) and consisted of approximately 60% aromatic C, with the remainder being a mixture of aliphatic, anomeric and carboxylic C. We hypothesize that BC particles were originally charcoal formed during prairie fires. As the BC particles aged in soil their surfaces were oxidized to form carboxylic groups and anomeric and aliphatic C accumulated in the BC particles either by adsorption of dissolved biogenic compounds from the soil solution or by direct deposition of biogenic materials from microbes living within the BC particles. The biogenic soil organic matter was physically separated with the medium and fine clay subfractions and was dominated by aliphatic, anomeric, and carboxylic C. The results indicate that the biogenic humic materials in our soils have little aromatic C, which is inconsistent with the traditional heteropolymer model of humic substances.

  6. Colloidal properties of nanoparticular biogenic selenium govern environmental fate and bioremediation effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchs, B.; Evangelou, M.H.W.; Winkel, L.; Lenz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial selenium (Se) bioremediation is based on conversion of water soluble, toxic Se oxyanions to water insoluble, elemental Se. Formed biogenic elemental Se is of nanometer size, hampering straightforward separation from the aqueous phase. This study represents the first systematic investigatio

  7. The effect of wind and precipitation on vegetation and biogenic crust covers in the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Raz; Kinast, Shai; Tsoar, Haim; Yizhaq, Hezi; Zaady, Eli; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2014-03-01

    Vegetation and biogenic crust covers play an important role in sand dune stabilization, yet there is a lack of high temporal and spatial resolution data on sand dune cover. A field experiment, aimed at measuring the dynamics of biogenic crust and vegetation in sand dunes, was conducted at the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes in the northwestern Negev Desert, Israel, from July 2008 to August 2010. The climate of the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes is arid (the mean annual precipitation over the past 13 years is 61 mm), and the dunes are linear and partially stable, mainly due to the presence of biogenic crust and partially due to the presence of vegetation. In July 2008, 10×10 m plots on the four dune habitats (crest, interdune, north slope, and south slope) were treated as follows: (i) removal of vegetation and biogenic crust, (ii) removal of biogenic crust only, (iii) removal of vegetation only, (iv) partial removal of biogenic crust and vegetation, and (v) control plot. The surface coverage of sand, biogenic crust, and vegetation was monitored on a monthly basis, using a remote-sensing technique especially developed for the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes. It was found that strong wind events, with durations of several days, accounted for the coverage changes in biogenic crust and vegetation. The response to precipitation was much slower. In addition, no rehabilitation of biogenic crust and vegetation was observed within the experiment time period. The changes in biogenic crust cover were not necessarily related to changes in dune dynamics, since often an increase in biogenic crust cover is a result of wind erosion that exposes old crust that was buried under the sand; wind hardly erodes biogenic crust at all due to its high durability to wind action. The Sde-Hallamish dunes seem to have become more active as a result of a prolonged drought during the past several years. The field experiment reported here indicates that biogenic crust cover exhibits large seasonal variations that are

  8. Thermodynamic Calculation Study on Effect of Manganese on Stability of Austenite in High Nitrogen Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    A series of high nitrogen steels were studied by using thermodynamic calculations to investigate the effect of manganese on the stability of austenite. Surprisingly, it was found that the austenite stabilizing ability of manganese was strongly weakened by chromium, but it was strengthened by molybdenum. In addition, with an increase of manganese content, the ferrite stabilizing ability of chromium significantly increased, but that of molybdenum decreased. Therefore, strong interactions exist between manganese and the other alloying elements, which should be the main reason for the difference among different constituent diagrams.

  9. New procedure of selected biogenic amines determination in wine samples by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piasta, Anna M.; Jastrzębska, Aneta, E-mail: aj@chem.uni.torun.pl; Krzemiński, Marek P.; Muzioł, Tadeusz M.; Szłyk, Edward

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • We proposed new procedure for derivatization of biogenic amines. • The NMR and XRD analysis confirmed the purity and uniqueness of derivatives. • Concentration of biogenic amines in wine samples were analyzed by RP-HPLC. • Sample contamination and derivatization reactions interferences were minimized. - Abstract: A new procedure for determination of biogenic amines (BA): histamine, phenethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine, based on the derivatization reaction with 2-chloro-1,3-dinitro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-benzene (CNBF), is proposed. The amines derivatives with CNBF were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy in solution. The novelty of the procedure is based on the pure and well-characterized products of the amines derivatization reaction. The method was applied for the simultaneous analysis of the above mentioned biogenic amines in wine samples by the reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The procedure revealed correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) between 0.9997 and 0.9999, and linear range: 0.10–9.00 mg L{sup −1} (histamine); 0.10–9.36 mg L{sup -1} (tyramine); 0.09–8.64 mg L{sup −1} (tryptamine) and 0.10–8.64 mg L{sup −1} (phenethylamine), whereas accuracy was 97%–102% (recovery test). Detection limit of biogenic amines in wine samples was 0.02–0.03 mg L{sup −1}, whereas quantification limit ranged 0.05–0.10 mg L{sup −1}. The variation coefficients for the analyzed amines ranged between 0.49% and 3.92%. Obtained BA derivatives enhanced separation the analytes on chromatograms due to the inhibition of hydrolysis reaction and the reduction of by-products formation.

  10. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshatwi, Ali A., E-mail: alshatwi@ksu.edu.sa; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica.

  11. Modeling of microbial gas generation: application to the eastern Mediterranean “Biogenic Play”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Dubille, M.; Montadert, L.

    2016-07-01

    Biogenic gas is becoming increasingly important as an exploration target in the petroleum industry because it occurs in geologically predictable circumstances and in large quantities at shallow depths as free gas or gas hydrates. As accumulations of biogenic gas result in a subtle synchronization between early generation and early trapping, we integrated a macroscopic model of microbial gas generation within a 3D basin and petroleum system forward simulator. The macroscopic model is based on a microscopic model, which consists in a 1D sedimentary column that accounts for sedimentation, compaction, Darcy flow and Diffusion flow. The organic carbon is the only non-soluble element considered in this version of the model. The dissolved elements are O2, SO4 2-, H2, CH3COOH, and CH4. Methane is dissolved in water or present as a free phase if its concentration exceeds its solubility at given pressure and temperature. In this microscopic model, the transformation of substrate into biomass is described through a set of logistic equations coupled with the transport equations (advection and diffusion). Based on the microscopic considerations we developed the macroscopic model of low maturity/biogenic gas generation in which hydrocarbons are generated through first order kinetic reactions at low maturity. This macroscopic model is adapted to petroleum system modeling at basin scale with TemisFlow®, which aims to understand and predict hydrocarbon generation, migration, and accumulation. It is composed of: i) A source rock criteria which allow defining the biogenic gas source rocks potential and ii) A kinetic model of methane generation. The previous model has been successfully applied on different basins such as the Carupano Basin from the offshore Venezuela, the Magdalena Delta (offshore Colombia) and the offshore Vietnam where direct observations of low-maturity gas were available. Furthermore, it has been applied in the offshore Lebanon in order to check the viability of

  12. Improved MEGAN predictions of biogenic isoprene in the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Schade, Gunnar; Estes, Mark; Ying, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Isoprene emitted from biogenic sources significantly contributes to ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation in the troposphere. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) has been widely used to estimate isoprene emissions from local to global scales. However, previous studies have shown that MEGAN significantly over-predicts isoprene emissions in the contiguous United States (US). In this study, ambient isoprene concentrations in the US were simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model (v5.0.1) using biogenic emissions estimated by MEGAN v2.10 with several different gridded isoprene emission factor (EF) fields. Best isoprene predictions were obtained with the EF field based on the Biogenic Emissions Landcover Database v4 (BELD4) from US EPA for its Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) model v3.61 (MEGAN-BEIS361). A seven-month simulation (April to October 2011) of isoprene emissions with MEGAN-BEIS361 and ambient concentrations using CMAQ shows that observed spatial and temporal variations (both diurnal and seasonal) of isoprene concentrations can be well predicted at most non-urban monitors using isoprene emission estimation from the MEGAN-BEIS361 without significant biases. The predicted monthly average vertical column density of formaldehyde (HCHO), a reactive volatile organic compound with significant contributions from isoprene oxidation, generally agree with the spatial distribution of HCHO column density derived using satellite data collected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), although summer month vertical column densities in the southeast US were overestimated, which suggests that isoprene emission might still be overestimated in that region. The agreement between observation and prediction may be further improved if more accurate PAR values, such as those derived from satellite-based observations, were used in modeling the biogenic emissions.

  13. Arsenite Removal from Simulated Groundwater by Biogenic Schwertmannite: A Column Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yue; ZHOU Li-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of biogenic schwertmannite to act as a sorbent for removing arsenite from groundwater,a series of biogenic schwertmannite-packed column adsorption experiments were conducted on simulated As(Ⅲ)-containing groundwater.Empty bed contact time (EBCT),As(Ⅲ) concentration in effluent,and the removal efficiency of As(Ⅲ) through the column were investigated at pH 8.0 and temperature 25 ± 0.5 ℃.The results showed that the breakthrough curves were mainly dependent on EBCT values when the influent As(Ⅲ) concentration was 500 μg L-1 and the optimum EBCT was 4.0 min.When the effluent As(Ⅲ) concentration reached 10 and 50 μg L-1,the breakthrough volumes for the schwertmannite adsorption column were 4200 and 5600 bed volume (BV),with As(Ⅲ) adsorption capacity of 2.1 and 2.8 mg g-1,respectively.Biogenic schwertmannite could be regenerated by 1.0 mol L-1 NaOH solution,and more than 80% of As(Ⅲ) adsorbed on the surface of schwertmannite could be released after 3 successive regenerations.The breakthrough volume for the regenerated schwertmannite-packed column still maintained 4 000-4 200 BV when the As(Ⅲ) concentration in effluent was below 10 μg L-1.Compared with other sorbents for As(Ⅲ) removal,the biogenic schwertmannitepacked column had a higher breakthrough volume and a much higher adsorption capacity,implying that biogenic schwertmannite was a highly efficient and potential sorbent to purify As(Ⅲ)-contaminated groundwater.

  14. Bioassay for estimating the biogenic methane-generating potential of coal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E.J.P.; Voytek, M.A.; Warwick, P.D.; Corum, M.D.; Cohn, A.; Bunnell, J.E.; Clark, A.C.; Orem, W.H.

    2008-01-01

    Generation of secondary biogenic methane in coal beds is likely controlled by a combination of factors such as the bioavailability of coal carbon, the presence of a microbial community to convert coal carbon to methane, and an environment supporting microbial growth and methanogenesis. A set of treatments and controls was developed to bioassay the bioavailability of coal for conversion to methane under defined laboratory conditions. Treatments included adding a well-characterized consortium of bacteria and methanogens (enriched from modern wetland sediments) and providing conditions to support endemic microbial activity. The contribution of desorbed methane in the bioassays was determined in treatments with bromoethane sulfonic acid, an inhibitor of microbial methanogenesis. The bioassay compared 16 subbituminous coal samples collected from beds in Texas (TX), Wyoming (WY), and Alaska (AK), and two bituminous coal samples from Pennsylvania (PA). New biogenic methane was observed in several samples of subbituminous coal with the microbial consortium added, but endemic activity was less commonly observed. The highest methane generation [80????mol methane/g coal (56??scf/ton or 1.75??cm3/g)] was from a south TX coal sample that was collected from a non-gas-producing well. Subbituminous coals from the Powder River Basin, WY and North Slope Borough, AK contained more sorbed (original) methane than the TX coal sample and generated 0-23????mol/g (up to 16??scf/ton or 0.5??cm3/g) new biogenic methane in the bioassay. Standard indicators of thermal maturity such as burial depth, nitrogen content, and calorific value did not explain differences in biogenic methane among subbituminous coal samples. No original methane was observed in two bituminous samples from PA, nor was any new methane generated in bioassays of these samples. The bioassay offers a new tool for assessing the potential of coal for biogenic methane generation, and provides a platform for studying the

  15. Differences between biogenic amine detection by HPLC methods using OPA and dansyl derivates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, María R; Arena, Mario E; De Nadra, María C Manca

    2004-01-01

    Biogenic amines can be formed and degraded as a result of normal metabolic activity in animals, plants, and microorganisms and are usually produced by the decarboxylation of amino acids. Recent trends in food security are promoting an increasing search for trace compounds that can affect human health. Although they are present in fermented foods and beverages in low quantities, they exhibit interactions with normal human metabolism (e.g., having vasoactive or psychoactive properties) that justify the research on their presence in foods and the possible related toxicological effects that they may cause. Estimation of the biogenic amines histamine, tyramine, agmatine, putrescine, and cadaverine is important not only from the point of view of their toxicity, but also because they can be used as indicators of the degree of freshness or spoilage of food. Until recently, because of the difficulty in detecting and quantifying amines reliably we have had insufficient information about their occurrence in different types of foods and beverages. These problems are related to matrix interference (e.g., the presence of free amino acids) and the low levels at which the amines are found. Early techniques for the determination of biogenic amines in foods were based on thin-layer chromatography. More modern analytical techniques have since been developed that allow the acquisition of reliable quantitative data and better separation/resolution of various amines. The quantitative determination of biogenic amines is generally accomplished by overpressure-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas chromatography. The use of reverse-phase column and precolumn derivatization was more efficient and faster than the conventional ion-exchange techniques. This study was conducted to evaluate two HPLC derivatization methods for quantitative determination of biogenic amines: the method described by Gonzales de Llano et al. for amino acid analysis and the

  16. Biogenic nanoparticle-mediated augmentation of seed germination, growth, and antioxidant level of Eruca sativa mill. varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushahra, Jyoti; Bhati-Kushwaha, Himakshi; Malik, C P

    2014-09-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the influence of biogenic nanoparticles synthesized from Tridax procumbens on different parameters of seed germination, seedling growth, and various biochemical parameters in four Eruca sativa varieties having low percentage of germination. Seeds were treated with different concentrations (30 and 40 ppm) of biogenic nanoparticles, of which 30 ppm was found to be the most effective and was therefore used for subsequent studies. Initially, the effect of biogenic nanoparticles on germination percentage, speed of germination, coefficient of germination, mean germination time, shoot and root length, fresh and dry matter, and vigor index was studied. From the experiments performed and the results obtained, it was evident that the treatment with biogenic nanoparticles decreased the electrolyte leakage and level of malondialdehyde as compared to control. The treatment with biogenic nanoparticles enhanced the levels of proline and ascorbic acid and stimulated the antioxidant enzyme activities resulting in the reduced level of reactive oxygen species. These activities were found to be variety-dependent. The possible involvement of biogenic nanoparticles in the production of new pores in seed coat during their penetration, resulting in the influx of the nutrients inside the seed, is suggested. This accelerated seed germination is followed by rapid seedling growth. The present findings indicated that biogenic nanoparticles promote seed germination in E. sativa by overcoming the detrimental effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and improving the antioxidative defense system which finally result in increased seedling growth.

  17. Past occupational exposure to airborne manganese in a manganese alloy plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Mary; Bouchard, Maryse; Larribe, Fabrice; Mergler, Donna

    2008-07-01

    A retrospective exposure assessment of a group of manganese (Mn) alloy workers was performed in conjunction with a 2004 follow-up study, 14 years after cessation of exposure, to evaluate the long-term effects of occupational Mn exposure on neurobehavioral functions. The ferro- and silico-Mn alloy plant opened in 1973 and closed in 1991. The airborne total Mn (TMn) exposures for job groupings were established using personal sampling data from a 1991 industrial hygiene survey. Historical short-term total dust (TDust) data were used to estimate past TDust exposure for job groupings and plant areas. Relationships between Mn content and TDust from the 1991 survey, supported by sparse historical data, were used to estimate TMn content in the historical TDust data. Results showed past personal TDust exposure levels much higher than those found in 1991. Changes in TDust levels and corresponding TMn levels were a function of changes in ventilation, work practices, and operations, not of product (ferro- or silico-Mn). Relationships between TMn and respirable Mn (RMn) from area sampling in 1991 were used to estimate RMn exposure for the job groups. Work histories for 112 workers were developed from payroll records, questionnaires, and interviews and combined with Mn exposure estimates to develop cumulative exposure indices (CEIs). The TMn CEI ranged from 0.27 mg/m(3)x years to 100.24 mg/m(3)x years, with an AM of 24.40 mg/m(3)x years and a GM of 14.06 mg/m(3)x years. The RMn CEI had an AM of 2.95 mg/m(3)x years and a GM of 1.78 mg/m(3)x years with a range of 0.05-12.03 mg/m(3)x years. Overall average TMn exposure intensity, the TMn CEI divided by time worked in years for each worker, had an AM of 1.6 mg Mn/m(3), a GM of 1.0 mg Mn/m(3), range 0.02-6.2 6 mg Mn/m(3). The results of the 2004 follow-up study showed several concentration-response relationships between TMn CEI and neurobehavioral outcomes, which suggest that increase in cumulative TMn exposure level has long

  18. Characterization of chloroplast proteins controlling manganese use efficiency by quantitative proteomics using 2D-LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jørgen; Sprenger, Richard Remko; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina;

    Manganese deficiency is a worldwide problem. We set up to identify and quantify key protein responsible for manganese use efficiency in different genotypes of barley, with the overall aim to make sustainable crops...

  19. High-temperature removal of sulphur for biogenic gas products; Hochtemperatur-Entschwefelung fuer biogene Produktgase. Design und Optimierung - Schlussbericht/Jahresbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schildhauer, T.; Biollaz, S.

    2009-12-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project concerning the development of basics ideas on the design and optimisation of high-temperature methods for the removal of sulphur from biogenic gas products. Tests made as part of the 'Methane from Wood' project at pilot installations in Switzerland and Austria are discussed. Low temperature and high-temperature methods are examined and discussed. A number of sulphur compounds were tested. Also, experiments made using nickel, HDS and CPO catalysers are discussed.

  20. Biogenic isoprene and implications for oxidant levels in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.-C.; Shao, M.; Chou, C. C. K.; Liu, S.-C.; Wang, J.-L.; Lee, K.-Z.; Lai, C.-H.; Zhu, T.; Lin, P.-H.

    2013-10-01

    As the host of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games, Beijing implemented a series of stringent, short-term air quality control measures to reduce the emissions of anthropogenic air pollutants. Large reductions in the daily average concentrations of primary pollutants, e.g., non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) of approximately 50% were observed at the air quality observatory of Peking University. Nevertheless, high levels of ozone were present during the control period. Although anthropogenic precursors were greatly reduced, the meteorological conditions in summer, including high temperature and light flux, are conducive to the production of large amounts of biogenic isoprene, which is extremely reactive. The diurnal pattern of isoprene showed daily maximum mixing ratios of 0.83 ppbv at noon and a minimum at night, reflecting its primarily biogenic properties. Using the ratio of isoprene to vehicle exhaust tracers, approximately 92% of the daytime isoprene was estimated from biogenic sources, and only 8% was attributed to vehicular emissions. In terms of OH reactivity and the ozone formation potential (OFP), biogenic isoprene with its midday surge can contribute approximately 20% of the total OFPs and 40-50% of the total OH reactivities of the 65 measured NMHCs during the midday hours. The discrepancy between decreased precursor levels and the observed high ozone was most likely caused by a combination of many factors. The changes in the partition among the components of oxidation products (O3, NO2 and NOz) and the contribution of air pollutants from regional sources outside Beijing should be two primary reasons. Furthermore, the influences of biogenic isoprene as well as the non-linearity of O3-VOC-NOx chemistry are other major concerns that can reduce the effectiveness of the control measures for decreasing ozone formation. Although anthropogenic precursors were greatly reduced during the Olympic Games, sufficient biogenic isoprene and moderate NOx

  1. Biogenic gas in the Cambrian-Ordovcian Alum Shale (Denmark and Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H.M.; Wirth, R.; Biermann, S.; Arning, E.T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Krueger, M.; Straaten, N. [BGR Hannover (Germany); Bechtel, A. [Montanuniv. Leoben (Austria); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Schovsbo, N.H. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland - GEUS, Copenhagen (Denmark); Crabtree, Stephen [Gripen Gas (Sweden)

    2013-08-01

    Shale gas is mainly produced from thermally mature black shales. However, biogenic methane also represents a resource which is often underestimated. Today biogenic methane is being produced from the Upper Devonian Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin which was the most successfully exploited shale gas system during the 1990-2000 decade in the U.S.A. before significant gas production from the Barnett Shale started (Curtis et al., 2008). The Cambro-Ordovician Alum Shale in northern Europe has thermal maturities ranging from overmature in southern areas (Denmark and southern Sweden) to immature conditions (central Sweden). Biogenic methane is recorded during drilling in central Sweden. The immature Alum Shale in central Sweden has total organic carbon (TOC) contents up to 20 wt%. The hydrogen index HI ranges from 380 to 560 mgHC/gTOC at very low oxygen index (OI) values of around 4 mg CO{sub 2}/gTOC, Tmax ranges between 420 - 430 C. The organic matter is highly porous. In general, the Alum Shale is a dense shale with intercalated sandy beds which may be dense due to carbonate cementation. Secondary porosity is created in some sandy beds due to feldspar dissolution and these beds serve as gas conduits. Methane production rates with shale as substrate in the laboratory are dependent on the kind of hydrocarbon-degrading microbial enrichment cultures used in the incubation experiments, ranging from 10-620 nmol/(g*d). In these experiments, the CO{sub 2} production rate was always higher than for methane. Like the northern part of North America, also Northern European has been covered by glaciers during the Pleistocene and similar geological processes may have developed leading to biogenic shale gas formation. For the Antrim Shale one hypothesis suggests that fresh waters, recharged from Pleistocene glaciation and modern precipitation, suppressed basinal brine salinity along the northern margins of the Michigan Basin to greater depths and thereby enhancing methanogenesis

  2. Biogenic isoprene and implications for oxidant levels in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Chung; Shao, Min; Chou, Charles C. K.; Liu, Shaw-Chen; Zhu, Tong; Lee, Kun-Zhang; Lai, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Po-Hsiung; Wang*, Jia-Lin

    2014-05-01

    As the host of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games, Beijing implemented a series of stringent, short-term air quality control measures to reduce the emissions of anthropogenic air pollutants. Large reductions in the daily average concentrations of primary pollutants, e.g., non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) of approximately 50% were observed at the air quality observatory of Peking University. Nevertheless, high levels of ozone were present during the control period. Although anthropogenic precursors were greatly reduced, the meteorological conditions in summer, including high temperature and light flux, are conducive to the production of large amounts of biogenic isoprene, which is extremely reactive. The diurnal pattern of isoprene showed daily maximum mixing ratios of 0.83 ppbv at noon and a minimum at night, reflecting its primarily biogenic properties. Using the ratio of isoprene to vehicle exhaust tracers, approximately 92% of the daytime isoprene was estimated from biogenic sources, and only 8% was attributed to vehicular emissions. In terms of OH reactivity and the ozone formation potential (OFP), biogenic isoprene with its midday surge can contribute approximately 20% of the total OFPs and 40-50% of the total OH reactivities of the 65 measured NMHCs during the midday hours. The discrepancy between decreased precursor levels and the observed high ozone was most likely caused by a combination of many factors. The changes in the partition among the components of oxidation products (O3, NO2 and NOz) and the contribution of air pollutants from regional sources outside Beijing should be two primary reasons. Furthermore, the influences of biogenic isoprene as well as the non-linearity of O3-VOC-NOx chemistry are other major concerns that can reduce the effectiveness of the control measures for decreasing ozone formation. Although anthropogenic precursors were greatly reduced during the Olympic Games, the presence of sufficient biogenic isoprene

  3. The Escherichia coli small protein MntS and exporter MntP optimize the intracellular concentration of manganese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia E Martin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli does not routinely import manganese, but it will do so when iron is unavailable, so that manganese can substitute for iron as an enzyme cofactor. When intracellular manganese levels are low, the cell induces the MntH manganese importer plus MntS, a small protein of unknown function; when manganese levels are high, the cell induces the MntP manganese exporter and reduces expression of MntH and MntS. The role of MntS has not been clear. Previous work showed that forced MntS synthesis under manganese-rich conditions caused bacteriostasis. Here we find that when manganese is scarce, MntS helps manganese to activate a variety of enzymes. Its overproduction under manganese-rich conditions caused manganese to accumulate to very high levels inside the cell; simultaneously, iron levels dropped precipitously, apparently because manganese-bound Fur blocked the production of iron importers. Under these conditions, heme synthesis stopped, ultimately depleting cytochrome oxidase activity and causing the failure of aerobic metabolism. Protoporphyrin IX accumulated, indicating that the combination of excess manganese and iron deficiency had stalled ferrochelatase. The same chain of events occurred when mutants lacking MntP, the manganese exporter, were exposed to manganese. Genetic analysis suggested the possibility that MntS exerts this effect by inhibiting MntP. We discuss a model wherein during transitions between low- and high-manganese environments E. coli uses MntP to compensate for MntH overactivity, and MntS to compensate for MntP overactivity.

  4. Effect of olfactory manganese exposure on anxiety-related behavior in a mouse model of iron overload hemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-01-01

    Manganese in excess promotes unstable emotional behavior. Our previous study showed that olfactory manganese uptake into the brain is altered in Hfe−/− mice, a model of iron overload hemochromatosis, suggesting that Hfe deficiency could modify the neurotoxicity of airborne manganese. We determined anxiety-related behavior and monoaminergic protein expression after repeated intranasal instillation of MnCl2 to Hfe−/− mice. Compared with manganese-instilled wild-type mice, Hfe−/− mice showed dec...

  5. A Highly Active and Selective Manganese Oxide Promoted Cobalt-on-Silica Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Breejen, Johan P.; Frey, Anne M.; Yang, Jia; Holmen, Anders; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Stephan, Odile; Bitter, Johannes H.; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2011-01-01

    A highly active and selective manganese oxide-promoted silica-supported cobalt catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction is reported. Co/MnO/SiO2 catalysts were prepared via impregnation of a cobalt nitrate and manganese nitrate precursor, followed by drying and calcination in an NO/He flow. The cat

  6. Synthesis of manganese oxide supported on mesoporous titanium oxide: Influence of the block copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmit, F. [Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 5615, Bât. Berthollet, Université Claude Bernard—Lyon 1, 43 Bd 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); IRCELYON, Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (UMR 5256 CNRS/Université Lyon 1), Lyon (France); Bois, L., E-mail: laurence.bois@univ-lyon1.fr [Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 5615, Bât. Berthollet, Université Claude Bernard—Lyon 1, 43 Bd 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Chiriac, R.; Toche, F.; Chassagneux, F. [Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 5615, Bât. Berthollet, Université Claude Bernard—Lyon 1, 43 Bd 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Besson, M.; Descorme, C. [IRCELYON, Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (UMR 5256 CNRS/Université Lyon 1), Lyon (France); Khrouz, L. [ENS LYON Laboratoire de Chimie (LR6, site Monod), 46, allée d’Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2015-01-15

    Manganese oxides supported on mesoporous titanium oxides were synthesized via a sol–gel route using block copolymer self-assembly. The oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, electron microscopy and electronic paramagnetic resonance. A mesoporous anatase containing amorphous manganese oxide particles could be obtained with a 0.2 Mn:Ti molar ratio. At higher manganese loading (0.5 Mn:Ti molar ratio), segregation of crystalline manganese oxide occurred. The influence of block copolymer and manganese salt on the oxide structure was discussed. The evolution of the textural and structural characteristics of the materials upon hydrothermal treatment was also investigated. - Graphical abstract: One-pot amorphous MnO{sub 2} supported on mesoporous anataseTiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Mesoporous manganese titanium oxides were synthesized using block copolymer. • Block copolymers form complexes with Mn{sup 2+} from MnCl{sub 2}. • With block copolymer, manganese oxide can be dispersed around the titania crystallites. • With Mn(acac){sub 2}, manganese is dispersed inside titania. • MnOOH crystallizes outside mesoporous titania during hydrothermal treatment.

  7. Higher Grades and Repeated Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy May Be Related to High Serum Manganese Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtan, Abdelrahman A; El-Kalla, Ferial S; Soliman, Hanan H; Zakaria, Soha S; Goda, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious complication of liver failure. Until now, the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms are not fully determined. It has been demonstrated that manganese plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, we studied manganese levels in serum of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy in relation to grading and recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy. One hundred persons were enrolled in the study, 80 cirrhotic patients with or without encephalopathy and 20 healthy controls. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed clinically and by laboratory findings. Serum manganese levels were measured in all participants. The grading of hepatic encephalopathy was significantly correlated to the severity of liver dysfunction. The mean serum manganese level was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls and in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without encephalopathy. It was also significantly higher in patients with advanced grading of hepatic encephalopathy. Serum manganese level was positively correlated to number of recurrences of encephalopathy during a 6-month follow-up period. Serum manganese levels were able to predict recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy within 6 months following the episode. Serum manganese levels are positively correlated to the modified Child-Pugh score of cirrhosis as well as grading and number of recurrences of hepatic encephalopathy. Higher manganese levels seem to be related to worsening of the condition, and its measurement may be used as a predictor of repeated recurrences.

  8. Evolution of Microstructures During Austempering of Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The influences of relatively high manganese (0.45 through 1.0 wt pct) and copper (0.56 through 1.13 wt pct) contents on microstructure development and phase transformation in three austempered ductile irons have been studied. The experimental ductile irons alloyed with copper and manganese are found to be practically free from intercellular manganese segregation. This suggests that the positive segregation of manganese is largely neutralized by the negative segregation of copper when these alloying elements are added in appropriate proportions. The drop in unreacted austenite volume (UAV) with increasing austempering temperature and time is quite significant in irons alloyed with copper and manganese. The ausferrite morphology also undergoes a transition from lenticular to feathery appearance of increasing coarseness with the increasing austempering temperature and time. SEM micrographs of the austempered samples from the base alloy containing manganese only, as well as copper plus manganese-alloyed irons, clearly reveal the presence of some martensite along with retained austenite and ferrite. X-ray diffraction analysis also confirms the presence of these phases. SEM examination further reveals the presence of twinned martensite in the copper plus manganese-alloyed samples. The possibility of strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite during austempering heat treatment is suggested.

  9. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl(2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl(2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT and dopamine receptor D(1 (D1R levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D(2 (D2R levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status.

  10. A new manganese-mediated, cobalt-catalyzed three-component synthesis of (diarylmethylsulfonamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Pignon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of (diarylmethylsulfonamides and related compounds by a new manganese-mediated, cobalt-catalyzed three-component reaction between sulfonamides, carbonyl compounds and organic bromides is described. This organometallic Mannich-like process allows the formation of the coupling products within minutes at room temperature. A possible mechanism, emphasizing the crucial role of manganese is proposed.

  11. Carboxylate-bridged dinuclear manganese systems - From catalases to oxidation catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Johannes W.; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Hage, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Dinuclear manganese based enzymes engage in processes as diverse as amino acid hydrolysis and hydrogen peroxide disproportionation. Despite the mechanistic diversity displayed by this class of enzymes, a common feature is the presence of carboxylate residues, which serve to bridge the manganese cent

  12. Manganese oxalate nanorods as ballistic modifier for composite solid propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Supriya [Department of Chemistry, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273009, U.P. (India); Chawla, Mohit [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi 175005, H.P. (India); Siril, Prem Felix, E-mail: prem@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi 175005, H.P. (India); Singh, Gurdip [Department of Chemistry, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273009, U.P. (India)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • Manganese oxalate nanorods were prepared using mild thermal precipitation and aging. • The nanorods were found to be efficient ballistic modifier for solid propellants. • The nanorods sensitized the thermolysis of ammonium perchlorate. • Controlled thermal decomposition of nanorods yielded manganese oxide nanoparticles. • MnO nanoparticles formed insitu in the condensed phase enhance the burning rates. - Abstract: Rod-shaped nanostructures of manganese oxalate (MnC{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were synthesized via mild thermal precipitation and aging process. Chemical composition of the MnC{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods was confirmed using Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) studies revealed the crystal structure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) imaging and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were employed to study the structural features of the nanorods. The MnC{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods were found to be efficient ballistic modifier for the burning rate enhancement of composite solid propellants (CSPs). Thermal analysis using TGA-DSC showed that MnC{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods sensitized the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and the CSPs. Controlled thermal decomposition of the MnC{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods resulted in the formation of managanese oxide nanoparticles with mesoporosity. A plausible mechanism for the burning rate enhancement using MnC{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods was proposed.

  13. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  14. Nonlinear optical properties of manganese porphyrin-incorporated PVC film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hyon Ha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We measured thermally originated solid phase nonlinear optical properties of manganese porphyrin-incorporated PVC polymer film using CW low-power Z-scan and optical power limiting methods. The nonlinear refractive index (n2 of this porphyrin film is estimated to have a negative value of 7.2 ⅹ10-5 cm2/W at 632.8 nm and to be larger than that of ZnTPP in the Nafion film. The photodegradation effect common in the solution phase appears to be minor in this solid phase system. The large nonlinear effect is thought to limit the optical power due to the aperture effect.

  15. Cobalt(Ⅱ)/manganese(Ⅱ)-based molecular metamagnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YanLing; HU YueQiao; ZENG MingHua

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review covers recent progress in the field of cobalt(Ⅱ)/manganese(Ⅱ)-based molecular metamagnets,which can undergo magnetic phase transitions to a state with a net magnetic moment under the stimulation of external field.We simply discuss mean field theory describing these compounds and the important role of the magnetic anisotropy.The experimental properties of the known Co(Ⅱ)/Mn(Ⅱ)metamagnets are discussed,with emphasis on the variety of means by which the metamagnetic transitions have been observed and studied.

  16. Silicon facilitates manganese phytoextraction by cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Dragišić-Maksimović, Jelena; Mojović, Miloš; Maksimović, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    The effect of excess nutrient levels of manganese (Mn, 50 and 100 mM) on the growth inhibition and the appearance of Mn-toxicity symptoms in the leaves was studied in cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Chinese long). Silicon (Si), when supplied as 1.5 mM silicic acid, clearly decreased symptoms of Mn-toxicity despite approximately the same total Mn content in the leaves. In treated plants, Si improves growth and biomass production compared with that of non-Si treated plants. Inert deposi...

  17. Structural and mechanical studies of cadmium manganese thiocyanate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; babu, G. Anandha; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) have been synthesized successfully and grown by slow evaporation method. The structural perfection of the grown crystals has been analyzed by High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), which shows the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal is quite good. Optical behavior was assessed by UV-Vis analysis and found that no absorption in the UV visible region and it may be useful for second harmonic applications. The mechanical hardness of the grown crystals was studied and Vicker's microhardness, Stiffness constant was calculated.

  18. Manganese complexes with bicarbonate and sulfate in natural water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, J.D.

    1963-01-01

    The association constant for the dissolved species MnHCO3+ was experimentally determined to be 63. From this value and a published constant for the species MNSO4 aq., a diagram was prepared showing per cent of dissolved manganese complexed in the presence of 10 to 10,000 p.p.m. bicarbonate and 1.0 to 10,000 p.p.m. sulfate. The rate of oxidation of Mn+2 in aerated water is greatly increased by increasing pH, and is retarded when SO4-2and HCO3- are present.

  19. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Manganese nodules as a possible source of precious metals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.

    - nese nodules 8,9 , it is est i mated that at the present market value, more than Rs 750 bil - lion worth precious metal s (e.g. Pt, Pd, Ag), may be present in the entire nodule resources in the Ce n tral Indian Basin (CIB), covering an area... was calculated by multipl y ing the mean elemental concen tration (on dry basis) in nodules with the nodule tonnage and the prevailing inte r national market rate. A comparison o f the conce n tration of a few precious metals in the manganese depo - sits...

  1. Effects of current density on preparation of grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hua-jun; ZHU Bing-quan; LI Xin-hai; ZHANG Xin-ming; WANG Zhi-xing; PENG Wen-jie; LIU Lu-ping

    2005-01-01

    Grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide was prepared by electrodeposition in a 0.9 mol/L MnSO4 and 2.5 mol/L H2SO4 solution. The structure, particle size and appearance of the grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide were determined by powder X-ray diffraction, laser particle size analysis and scanning electron micrographs measurements. Current density has important effects on cell voltage, anodic current efficiency and particle size of the grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide, and the optimum current density is 30 A/dm 2. The grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide electrodeposited under the optimum conditions consists of γ-MnO2 with an orthorhombic lattice structure; the grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide has a spherical or sphere-like appearance and a narrow particle size distribution with an average particle diameter of 7.237 μm.

  2. Some geological problems of bedded manganese ore deposits. Sojo mangankosho no chishitsugakuteki shomondai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momoi, H. (Ehime University, Ehime (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1991-09-15

    This paper summarizes the bedded manganese ore deposits in Japan and in the world. Chert-hosted bedded manganese ore deposits in the Chichibu terrane and similar terranes of the inner zone of Southwest Japan are characterized by numerous small deposits composed of rhodochrosite and manganese silicate ores. They are Triassic to Middle Jurassic in age. The deposits in Japan are, together with those of Coast Ranges in western part of North America, typical in the mobile belts of the world. On the other hand, giant bedded manganese deposits represented by Nikopol, South Ukraine and Groote Eylandt, Australia, occur in the inner parts of stable continents and in platforms and consist of manganese dioxide and rhodochrosite. The deposits in mobile belts and those in stable continents are very contrasting in the scale of deposits, distribution, ore, age, depositional environment and other features. 85 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Cavity-Enhanced Gas Analyzer for In-Situ Sampling of Biogenic Gases and Their Isotopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project concerns the novel application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy to quantify biogenic gases (CH4,...

  4. Biogenic amine accumulation in silver carp sausage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum plus Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiaohua; Zhang, Qilin; Lin, Shengli

    2014-06-15

    The effect of an amine-negative mixed starter culture (Lactobacillus plantarum ZY40 plus Saccharomyces cerevisiae JM19) on biogenic amine accumulation in fermented silver carp sausage was studied. Microbial counts, pH, titratable acid and free amino acids were also determined. Putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine were the main amines formed during sausage fermentation. The contents of putrescine and cadaverine were greatly reduced by the addition of L. plantarum ZY40 plus S. cerevisiae JM19, whereas tyramine accumulation was enhanced as compared to the control batch. Histamine and spermidine were not affected by the mixed starter culture, and their levels varied slightly throughout the fermentation. Besides, no positive correction between pH, free amino acid content and biogenic amine accumulation were found.

  5. Biogenic carbon in combustible waste: Waste composition, variability and measurement uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Fuglsang, Karsten; Pedersen, Niels H.;

    2013-01-01

    described in the literature. This study addressed the variability of biogenic and fossil carbon in combustible waste received at a municipal solid waste incinerator. Two approaches were compared: (1) radiocarbon dating (14C analysis) of carbon dioxide sampled from the flue gas, and (2) mass and energy...... balance calculations using the balance method. The ability of the two approaches to accurately describe short-term day-to-day variations in carbon emissions, and to which extent these short-term variations could be explained by controlled changes in waste input composition, was evaluated. Finally...... method and the balance method represented promising methods able to provide good quality data for the ratio between biogenic and fossil carbon in waste. The relative uncertainty in the individual experiments was 7–10% (95% confidence interval) for the 14C method and slightly lower for the balance method....

  6. Biogenic amines at a low level of evolution: Production, functions and regulation in the unicellular Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, György

    2015-06-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Tetrahymena synthesize, store and secrete biogenic amines (histamine, serotonin, epinephrine, dopamine, melatonin) and also can take up amines from the milieu. It also has (G-protein-coupled) receptors (binding sites) for these amines as well, as second messengers. The factors infuencing the mentioned processes are shown. For certain amines the genes and the coded enzymes are demonstrated. The amines influence phagocytosis, cell division, ciliary regeneration, glucose metabolism and chemotaxis. There are interhormone actions between the amines, and between the amines and other hormones produced by Tetrahymena. The critical review discusses the role of amines in the early stages of evolution and compares this to their functions in mammals. It tries to give answer how and why biogenic amines were selected to hormones, and why new functions formed for them in higher ranked animals, preserving also the ancient ones.

  7. Biogenic Amines as Quality Marker in Organic and Fair-Trade Cocoa-Based Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Restuccia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the quantitative determination of eight biogenic amines (cadaverine, serotonin, histamine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine, putrescine and β-phenylethylamine by an liquid chromatography method with evaporative light scattering detection was performed. The analysis of several samples of conventional, organic and fair trade cocoa-derivatives showed that organic and fair trade samples always contain much lower amine concentrations in comparison with their conventional counterparts, supporting the idea that biogenic amines can be regarded as cocoa quality markers. Irrespective of the kind of sample, results also showed that the most abundant amines were histamine, tyramine, spermidine, putrescine and spermine while β-phenylethylamine, cadaverine and serotonine have been found more rarely, all the amines never reaching dangerous amounts for consumer health. With the aim to confirm the experimental results, clustering analysis was performed on samples and instrumental results using principal component analysis.

  8. [The content of biogenic amines in canned fish from the Turkish market].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, N; Helle, N; Ozden, O

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the determination of biogenic amines in a number of canned fish of the Turkish market by means of HPLC. Over all 39 cans of sardine, tuna, sardel, mackerel, pelamide and trout were tested. The determination of agmatine, cadaverine, histamine, putrescine and tyramine was performed by HPLC with post column derivatization with ortho-phthaldialdehyde. Four samples contained higher amounts of biogenic amines (three sardine samples contained more than 1000 mg/kg histamine) while all other samples were acceptable. These results demonstrate the need of instrumental analyses in the quality control system of Turkish producers of canned fish. The quality of the products at least of some producers has to be improved, e.g. by cooperation between the official food control and the quality assurance system of the producers.

  9. BIOGENIC INFLUENCES ON THE FORMATION AND LONG-TERM DYNAMICS OF COHESIVE SEDIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joern V. PROCHNOW; C. SCHWEIM; Juergen KOENGETER

    2001-01-01

    Biogenic stabilization processes that result in the formation of biofilms and interparticle-networks can significantly alter the transport characteristics of finegrained sediment layers. The increase in the threshold of sediment motion can amount to up to several hundred percent. While planctic organisms are involved in the formation of depositing flocs and the early stages of consolidation, the secondary consolidation is controlled by microbial breakdown processes, leading to changes in the mechanical properties of cohesive sediments. While the primary stage of consolidation is completed in days, the secondary processes can last for decades. A preliminary series of erosion tests in an annular flume revealed demonstrated the biogenic impact in the early stages of sediment formation. Surrogate materials were used to simulate the governing properties of natural soft sediments.

  10. Bioaccumulation of manganese and its toxicity in feral pigeons (Columba livia) exposed to manganese oxide dust (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, P.; Chakrabarti, S.; Tounkara, R.; Loranger, S.; Kennedy, G.; Zayed, J. [Univ. of Montreal (Canada)

    1998-11-01

    Manganese tetroxide (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) is a product from the combustion of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl. Exposure to high levels of manganese can lead to serious health effects especially to the central nervous and respiratory systems. Very few studies on the effects of long-term low level exposure to Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} have been reported. The present study was therefore conducted to examine the bioaccumulation and toxicity of manganese in various organs of feral pigeons (Columba kivia) when exposed to low levels of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} via inhalation and hence to find any possible relationship between these two parameters. A total of 22 pigeons was exposed to 239 {micro}g/m{sup 3} of manganese for 7 h/day, 5 days/week for 5, 9, and 13 consecutive weeks. Manganese concentrations in various tissues, e.g., brain (mesencephalon), lung, liver, intestine, pancreas, kidney, muscle, bone, and whole blood, were measured by neutron activation analysis. Various biochemical parameters in blood, e.g., hematocrit, total proteins, glucose, uric acid, alinine aminotransferase, total iron, blood urea nitrogen and triglycerides, were also measured.

  11. Manganese-enhanced MRI predicts the histological grade of hepatocellular carcinoma in potential surgical candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, R.P. [Institute of Liver Studies, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Lewis, D.; Kane, P.A. [Department of Radiology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Portmann, B.C.; O' Grady, J.G. [Institute of Liver Studies, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Karani, J.B. [Department of Radiology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Rela, M. [Institute of Liver Studies, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Heaton, N.D., E-mail: Nigel.Heaton@kch.nhs.u [Institute of Liver Studies, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate the role of manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance (Mn-MRI) in predicting tumour differentiation prior to liver transplant or resection for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: The inclusion criteria were patients with HCC who underwent Mn-MRI prior to transplantation or resection from 2001-2008. T1-weighted MRI images were acquired at 0 and 24 h after manganese dipyridoxal diphosphate (MnDPDP) intravenous contrast medium and reviewed prospectively. Manganese retention at 24 h was correlated with tumour differentiation and disease-free survival. Results: Eighty-six patients underwent Mn-MRI (transplantation 60, resection 26); 114/125 lesions (91%) that were arterialised as evidenced at computed tomography (CT) and had manganese uptake on MRI were HCC. There were 11 false positives (9%) that were regenerative nodules. Ten of fourteen non-manganese-retaining HCC (71%) were poorly differentiated, compared with only 13/114 manganese-retaining HCC (11%) (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of non-retention of MnDPDP in predicting poorly differentiated tumours were 0.43, 0.96, 0.71 and 0.88. Median disease-free survival of patients with non-manganese-retaining HCC was less than for patients with manganese-retaining HCC (14 {+-} 5 months versus 39 {+-} 3 months, log rank p = 0.025). Conclusion: Non-manganese-retaining HCCs are likely to be poorly differentiated and have a poor prognosis. Manganese-enhanced MRI appears to have a role in preoperative assessment of HCC and warrants further evaluation.

  12. Manganese-lignin peroxidase hybrid from Bjerkandera adusta oxidizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons more actively in the absence of manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Pickard, M. A. [University of Alberta, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Vazquez-Duhalt, R. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, UNAM, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-11-01

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic. As such, they are considered priority pollutants and represent a public health risk. Manganese-lignin peroxidase (MnLiP) is a glycoprotein that normally requires manganese(II) for its activity. Enzymatic oxidation of PAHs has been reported with purified preparations of lignin peroxidase (LiP). In this study the oxidation of PAHs was examined in the presence and absence of manganese ions, using whole cells and a purified MnLiP hybrid isoenzyme derived from Bjerkandera adusta, a white rot fungi. The objective was to demonstrate the ability of the MnLiP hybrid enzyme to oxidize PAHs. Results showed a decrease in the rate of oxidation of PAHs in the presence of Mn. A clear correlation was found between the specific activity of MnLiP and the ionization potential (IP) of the PAH substrate. Aromatic substrates were oxidized by the purified enzyme with an IP lower than 7.43 eV; the lower the IP the faster the rate of oxidation. The PAH metabolites of the Mn-independent reaction were identified as the corresponding quinones. PAH oxidation with MnLiP showed a different pH profile according to the presence or absence of Mn: the Mn-dependent oxidation of PAHs showed a lower optimal pH profile than the Mn-independent oxidation. As reported in the case of other white rot fungi the metabolic degradation of PAHs by B. adusta appears to involve both intracellular enzymatic systems such as cytochrome P450, and extracellular oxidative enzymes. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  13. Incremental Reactivity Effects on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Urban Atmospheres with and without Biogenic Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacarab, Mary; Li, Lijie; Carter, William P. L.; Cocker, David R., III

    2016-04-01

    Two different surrogate mixtures of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were developed to study secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation at atmospheric reactivities similar to urban regions with varying biogenic influence levels. Environmental chamber simulations were designed to enable the study of the incremental aerosol formation from select anthropogenic (m-Xylene, 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene, and 1-Methylnaphthalene) and biogenic (α-pinene) precursors under the chemical reactivity set by the two different surrogate mixtures. The surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were based on that used to develop the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) factors for evaluation of O3 forming potential. Multiple incremental aerosol formation experiments were performed in the University of California Riverside (UCR) College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) dual 90m3 environmental chambers. Incremental aerosol yields were determined for each of the VOCs studied and compared to yields found from single precursor studies. Aerosol physical properties of density, volatility, and hygroscopicity were monitored throughout experiments. Bulk elemental chemical composition from high-resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) data will also be presented. Incremental yields and SOA chemical and physical characteristics will be compared with data from previous single VOC studies conducted for these aerosol precursors following traditional VOC/NOx chamber experiments. Evaluation of the incremental effects of VOCs on SOA formation and properties are paramount in evaluating how to best extrapolate environmental chamber observations to the ambient atmosphere and provides useful insights into current SOA formation models. Further, the comparison of incremental SOA from VOCs in varying surrogate urban atmospheres (with and without strong biogenic influence) allows for a unique perspective on the impacts

  14. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Biogenic Amine-binding Proteins in Soft Ticks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M.C.; Andersen, John F. (NIH)

    2008-08-19

    Two highly abundant lipocalins, monomine and monotonin, have been isolated from the salivary gland of the soft tick Argas monolakensis and shown to bind histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), respectively. The crystal structures of monomine and a paralog of monotonin were determined in the presence of ligands to compare the determinants of ligand binding. Both the structures and binding measurements indicate that the proteins have a single binding site rather than the two sites previously described for the female-specific histamine-binding protein (FS-HBP), the histamine-binding lipocalin of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding sites of monomine and monotonin are similar to the lower, low affinity site of FS-HBP. The interaction of the protein with the aliphatic amine group of the ligand is very similar for the all of the proteins, whereas specificity is determined by interactions with the aromatic portion of the ligand. Interestingly, protein interaction with the imidazole ring of histamine differs significantly between the low affinity binding site of FS-HBP and monomine, suggesting that histamine binding has evolved independently in the two lineages. From the conserved features of these proteins, a tick lipocalin biogenic amine-binding motif could be derived that was used to predict biogenic amine-binding function in other tick lipocalins. Heterologous expression of genes from salivary gland libraries led to the discovery of biogenic amine-binding proteins in soft (Ornithodoros) and hard (Ixodes) tick genera. The data generated were used to reconstruct the most probable evolutionary pathway for the evolution of biogenic amine-binding in tick lipocalins.

  15. Aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol via gas-phase OH radical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donahue, Neil M.; Henry, Kaytlin M.; Mentel, Thomas F.;

    2012-01-01

    The Multiple Chamber Aerosol Chemical Aging Study (MUCHACHAS) tested the hypothesis that hydroxyl radical (OH) aging significantly increases the concentration of first-generation biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). OH is the dominant atmospheric oxidant, and MUCHACHAS employed environmental...... with an existing gap between global SOA sources and those predicted in models, and can be described by a mechanism suitable for implementation in those models....

  16. Modelling approach to the assessment of biogenic fluxes at a selected Ross Sea site, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vichi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Several biogeochemical data have been collected in the last 10 years of Italian activity in Antarctica (ABIOCLEAR, ROSSMIZE, BIOSESO-I/II. A comprehensive 1-D biogeochemical model was implemented as a tool to link observations with processes and to investigate the mechanisms that regulate the flux of biogenic material through the water column. The model is ideally located at station B (175° E–74° S and was set up to reproduce the seasonal cycle of phytoplankton and organic matter fluxes as forced by the dominant water column physics over the period 1990–2001. Austral spring-summer bloom conditions are assessed by comparing simulated nutrient drawdown, primary production rates, bacterial respiration and biomass with the available observations. The simulated biogenic fluxes of carbon, nitrogen and silica have been compared with the fluxes derived from sediment traps data. The model reproduces the observed magnitude of the biogenic fluxes, especially those found in the bottom sediment trap, but the peaks are markedly delayed in time. Sensitivity experiments have shown that the characterization of detritus, the choice of the sinking velocity and the degradation rates are crucial for the timing and magnitude of the vertical fluxes. An increase of velocity leads to a shift towards observation but also to an overestimation of the deposition flux which can be counteracted by higher bacterial remineralization rates. Model results suggest that the timing of the observed fluxes depends first and foremost on the timing of surface production and on a combination of size-distribution and quality of the autochtonous biogenic material. It is hypothesized that the bottom sediment trap collects material originated from the rapid sinking of freshly-produced particles and also from the previous year's production period.

  17. A Review: Microbiological, Physicochemical and Health Impact of High Level of Biogenic Amines in Fish Sauce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Z. Zaman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Biogenic amines are basic nitrogenous compounds present in a wide variety of foods and beverages. Their formations were mainly due to the amino acids decarboxylase activity of certain microorganisms. Excessive intake of biogenic amines could induce many undesirable physiological effects determined by their psychoactive and vasoactive action. Fish sauce which is considered as a good source of dietary protein, amino acids, vitamins and minerals was a popular condiment in Southeast Asian countries. However, it has also been reported that fish sauce contain high amount of amines. Hence, attention should be given to ensure the safety of this product. Approach: A review study was conducted to deliver an overview on the presence of biogenic amines in fish sauce and to discuss the important factors affecting their accumulation. Impact of amines on human health and efforts to reduce their accumulation in fish sauce were also discussed to give a comprehensive view. Results: Histamine, putrescine and cadaverine is the most abundant amines in fish sauce with maximum reported value of 1220, 1257 and 1429 ppm, respectively. Tyramine present in a lesser amount with maximum reported value of 1178 ppm. Other amines such as tryptamine, phenylethylamine, spermine and spermidine were considered as minor amines. However, different profiles of amines were reported in different type of products. This was depended on microbial flora, availability of precursors and physicochemical factors such as temperature, pH, salt, oxygen and sugar concentration. In synergistically supporting physicochemical factors, several microorganisms such as Enterobacteriaceae, Micrococci and Lactobacilli were responsible for biogenic amines formation in fish sauce. Conclusion: Since the formation of amines in fish sauce was a result of many factors, it was almost virtually impossible to control each factor during fermentation. Addition of amines degrading bacteria into fish

  18. Developmental expression analysis and immunolocalization of a biogenic amine receptor in Schistosoma mansoni

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shehabi, Fouad; Vermeire, Jon J.; Yoshino, Timothy P.; Ribeiro, Paula

    2009-01-01

    A Schistosoma mansoni G-protein coupled receptor (SmGPCR) was previously cloned and shown to be activated by the biogenic amine, histamine. Here we report a first investigation of the receptor’s subunit organization, tissue distribution and expression levels in different stages of the parasite. A polyclonal antibody was produced in rabbits against the recombinant third intracellular loop (il3) of SmGPCR. Western blot studies of the native receptor and recombinant protein expressed in HEK293 c...

  19. PM10-biogenic fraction drives the seasonal variation of proinflammatory response in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camatini, Marina; Corvaja, Viviana; Pezzolato, Eleonora; Mantecca, Paride; Gualtieri, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    PM10 was collected in a Milan urban site, representative of the city air quality, during winter and summer 2006. Mean daily PM10 concentration was 48 μg m(-3) during summer and 148 μg m(-3) during winter. Particles collected on Teflon filters were chemically characterized and the endotoxin content determined by the LAL test. PM10-induced cell toxicity, assessed with MTT and LDH methods, and proinflammatory potential, monitored by IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines release, were investigated on the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 exposed to increasing doses of PM. Besides untreated cells, exposure to inert carbon particles (2-12 μm) was also used as additional control. Both cell toxicity and proinflammatory potency resulted to be higher for summer PM10 with respect of winter PM10, with IL-6 showing the highest dose-dependent release. The relevance of biogenic components adsorbed onto PM10 in eliciting the proinflammatory mediators release was investigated by inhibition experiments. Polymixin B (Poly) was used to inhibit particle-bind LPS while Toll-like receptor-2 antibody (a-TLR2) to specifically block the activation of this receptor. While cell viability was not modulated in cells coexposed to PM10 and Poly or a-TLR2 or both, inflammatory response did it, with IL-6 release being the most inhibited. In conclusion, Milan PM10-induced seasonal-dependent biological effects, with summer particles showing higher cytotoxic and proinflammatory potential. Cytotoxicity seemed to be unaffected by the PM biogenic components, while inflammation was significantly reduced after the inhibition of some biogenic activated pathways. Besides, the PM-associated biogenic activity does not entirely justify the PM-induced inflammatory effects. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 2012.

  20. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Bouvier-Brown

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments – a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS, a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG – and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4–68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72–10.2 μgCg−1 h−1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  1. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Bouvier-Brown

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments – a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS, a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG – and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4–68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72–10.2 μgCg−1h−1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  2. Quantitative laboratory measurements of biogeochemical processes controlling biogenic calcite carbon sequestration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zendejas, Frank; Lane, Todd W.; Lane, Pamela D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to generate data that could be used to populate and thereby reduce the uncertainty in global carbon cycle models. These efforts were focused on developing a system for determining the dissolution rate of biogenic calcite under oceanic pressure and temperature conditions and on carrying out a digital transcriptomic analysis of gene expression in response to changes in pCO2, and the consequent acidification of the growth medium.

  3. Absorption of Visible and Long-wave Radiation by Primary and Secondary Biogenic Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2008-12-01

    Field results for the 14C content of carbonaceous aerosols are presented that indicate significant biogenic sources of both primary and secondary aerosols in urban and regional environments. Samples collected in Mexico City and downwind of the urban area during the MILAGRO field study are compared with results reported previously in the literature indicating a significant amount of biogenic aerosols from both biomass burning and secondary photochemical production (e.g. terpene oxidations) are contributing to the overall carbonaceous aerosols in the optically active region of 0.1 to 1.0 micron. Samples in this size range collected on quartz fiber filters were also examined using an integrating sphere and FTIR diffuse reflectance techniques to obtain absorption spectra from 280 to the mid-IR. These data clearly indicate that the biogenic derived primary aerosols from agricultural and trash-burning, as well as secondary organic aerosols from isoprene and terpene oxidations will produce both UV-Visible (short-wave) absorbing substances as well as IR (long-wave) absorbing compounds including humic-like-substances (HULIS). With the anticipated increases in growing seasons (i.e. earlier springs and longer summers) the likely hood of increased fires (forest and grassland) as well as the continuing growth in agricultural burning activities, these primary sources are expected to increase and may play a role in heating of the atmosphere. The compound effects of these primary and secondary biogenic sources of absorbing aerosols to the total aerosol loading and regional climate will be discussed. This work was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64328 as part of the Atmospheric Science Program.

  4. Life Cycle Assessment of age-related environmental impact of biogenic hydraulic fluids; Life Cycle Assessment der alterungsbedingten Umweltvertraeglichkeit biogener Hydraulik-Schmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressling, Jana

    2012-07-01

    Biogenic hydraulic fluids, based on synthetic esters (category: HEES), have an excellent environmental profile in the unused state, so that they are typically classified into water hazard class 1 or as ''not hazardous to water''. During storage at room temperature and tribological application, occurring chemical and toxicological changes take no account in the classification of lubricants until now. However, the ageing and oxidation stability gets increasing importance, since it determines the service life of lubricants in tribological systems in addition to the storage time. Since it always comes to direct and uncontrolled entries into the environment in case of accidents or hydraulic leaks, it is essential to assess whether there is an environmental hazard by waste oils. With an increased use of biogenic hydraulic fluids in environmentally sensitive areas, thus the need for an appropriate monitoring and assessment approach as part of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The aquatic and miniaturised test procedures applied in this work with the Water Soluble Fraction (WSF) concept, allows a simple and quick screening of age-related ecotoxic potential of lubricants by oxidative processes and tribological application. For detection of genotoxic potential the umu-test is a suitable indicator test to detect geno- and cytotoxic effects by oxidative reactions. The determination of biodegradability is essential for the assessment of the environmental impact of hydraulic fluids. The optimised biodegradability test system ''O2/CO2-Headspace Test'' has proved itself as a suitable procedure for the investigation of biogenic lubricants within the scope of a LCA and shows therefore a comparable method of the required test procedures for the assignment of ecolabels. In addition, the combination of biological test procedures and chemical analysis allows a comprehensive investigation of effects and causes of age-related changes of hydraulic

  5. Biogenic Amine Degradation by Bacillus Species Isolated from Traditional Fermented Soybean Food and Detection of Decarboxylase-Related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Seo, Bo Young; Choi, Hye Sun

    2015-09-01

    Biogenic amines in some food products present considerable toxicological risks as potential human carcinogens when consumed in excess concentrations. In this study, we investigated the degradation of the biogenic amines histamine and tyramine and the presence of genes encoding histidine and tyrosine decarboxylases and amine oxidase in Bacillus species isolated from fermented soybean food. No expression of histidine and tyrosine decarboxylase genes (hdc and tydc) were detected in the Bacillus species isolated (B. subtilis HJ0-6, B. subtilis D'J53-4, and B. idriensis RD13-10), although substantial levels of amine oxidase gene (yobN) expression were observed. We also found that the three selected strains, as non-biogenic amineproducing bacteria, were significantly able to degrade the biogenic amines histamine and tyramine. These results indicated that the selected Bacillus species could be used as a starter culture for the control of biogenic amine accumulation and degradation in food. Our study findings also provided the basis for the development of potential biological control agents against these biogenic amines for use in the food preservation and food safety sectors.

  6. Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). Nature`s contribution to regional and global atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockow, D.; Hoffman, T. [Inst. of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Dortmund (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Terrestrial vegetation provides an important source of volatile hydrocarbons, especially isoprene, monoterpenes and in addition possibly sesquiterpenes as well as oxygenated compounds. Although there exist considerable uncertainties in the estimation of the magnitude of these biogenic NMHC emissions, it is generally accepted that the majority of global NMHC release is from natural and not from anthropogenic sources. Taking into consideration the high reactivity of the mostly unsaturated biogenic emissions, their impact on tropospheric processes can be assumed to be of great importance. Together with anthropogenic NO{sub x} emissions, the highly reactive natural alkenes can act as precursors in photochemical oxidant formation and contribute to regional-scale air pollution. Their oxidation in the atmosphere and the subsequent gas-to-particle conversion of the products lead to the formation of organic aerosols. Because of the formation of phytotoxic compounds, the interaction of the biogenic hydrocarbons with ozone inside or outside the leaves and needles of plants has been suggested to play a role in forest decline. (author)

  7. Neogene biogenic sediments of onshore Peru: part I, sedimentology and stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, R.C.; Dunbar, R.B.; Baker, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Sechura (approx.6/sup 0/S) and Pisco (approx.14/sup 0/S) Basins of onshore Peru contain Miocene diatom and phosphate rich sediments which sharply contrast with underlying clastics. In the Sechura Basin the Miocene clastic Mancora, Heath and Montera Formations are overlain by the Zapallal Formation which grades upwards from a weakly biogenic base into fairly pure diatomites (biogenic silica >20%) and ore grade phosphorite (P/sub 2/O/sub 5/>20%). Biogeneic content decreases in the eastern basin as clastic content increases. The base of the Zapallal Formation has been dated at between 12.2 and 14.0 mybp using radiolaria correlated to magnetic stratigraphy by Theyer, et al (1978), and the phosphatic section yields dates of between 8.0 and 11.2 my. In the Pisco Basin the Eocene clastic Paracas Formation is overlain unconformably by the Miocene Pisco Formation which contains a basal sequence of cross-bedded clastics, tuffs, and partially recrystallized diatomites; a phosphorite bearing middle sequence; and a diatom rich top. Current direction from the cross beds of the basal Pisco Formation indicate a generally southerly transport direction but with considerable directional variability. This may be related to the Peru under-current which shows highly variable strength and direction near 15/sup 0/S.

  8. The Functions of China Marginal Sea Sediments in the Cycle of Biogenic Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yunming; Song Jinming

    2002-01-01

    The contents of biogenic elements in China marginal sea sediments are related to their grain sizes, river transport, et al. In general, the finer the grain size is, the higher the contents of organic matter and OC, N, P are, the lower the contents of S and Si are. The biogeochemical environments of sediments are related to Eh, pH, temperature content of OC,Fe3+/Fe2+ radio, water dynamics condition, grain size of sediment, S system in sediment interstitial waters, et al., and they influence the early diageneses and cycle of biogenic elements in sediments. In most regions of China marginal sea, the flux directions of S2-, HS-,3- NH4+H4SiO4, PO4 , across the sediment-water interface are from sediment to the overlying seawater, the flux directions of SO42-, HCO3-, NO3-, NO2- across the sediment-water interface are from the overlying seawater to sediment. The irrigation of living things is important in the cycle of the biogenic elements across sediment-water interfaces.

  9. Biogen's portfolio and research efforts in multiple sclerosis: an interview with Dr Ralph Kern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Ralph Kern speaks to Laura Dormer, Commissioning Editor: Dr Ralph Kern is Senior Vice President and Head of Worldwide Medical at Biogen in Cambridge, MA, USA. In this role, he oversees Biogen's global therapeutic, regional and country medical teams, global medical operations, as well as medical research and scientific communications functions. Prior to joining Biogen, he was head of the Neuroscience Medical Unit at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation and held various medical and commercial leadership roles at Genzyme Corporation. Prior to joining industry, he was a consultant neurologist at Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network in Toronto, Ontario and was head of the neurology postgraduate academic program at the University of Toronto. Ralph completed neurology postgraduate training at McGill University and completed a masters of health administration from the Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He is a member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

  10. Model for The Diffusionof Biogenic Gases In Heterogeneous Reservoirs Undergoing Transient Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nmegbu, Chukwuma Godwin Jacob

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbially enhanced petroleum reservoirs confirms a recovery of about 30-40 % residual oil, with an integral composition of wide range of oil recovery mechanisms including wettability alteration by biosurfactant production, selective plugging of highly permeable channels by biopolymer production, creating fluid flow channels in carbonate reservoirs by rock dissolution attributed to bioacid formation, and a range of other exploitable recovery techniques. This study presents an investigation of biogenic gas produced in-situ and its concentration profile across the reservoir. An increasing concentration trend in the grids was observed and these increments were owed to the fact that diffusion of the biogenic occurred. It was also observed that after 40days of Desulfovibro injection, the produced CO2 across the reservoir was tending towards being even in values of concentration, implying that diffusion rate was approaching a zero value. Also, the distorting effect of reservoir heterogeneity on biogenic gas concentration profile was also resolved by adopting the method of averaging for permeability and porosity in the reservoir.

  11. Identification of the biogenic compounds responsible for size-dependent nanoparticle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Paul M.; Ortega, John; Karl, Thomas; Cappellin, Luca; Friedli, Hans R.; Barsanti, Kelley; McMurry, Peter H.; Smith, James N.

    2012-10-01

    The probability that freshly nucleated nanoparticles can survive to become cloud condensation nuclei is highly sensitive to particle growth rates. Much of the growth of newly formed ambient nanoparticles can be attributed to oxidized organic vapors originating from biogenic precursor gases. In this study we investigated the chemical composition of size-selected biogenic nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 40 nm. Particles were formed in a flow tube reactor by ozonolysis of α-pinene and analyzed with a Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer. While we found similar composition in 10 and 20 nm particles, the relative amounts of individual species varied significantly when compared to 40 nm particles. Smaller particles (10 and 20 nm) were characterized by enhancements in carboxylic acids and larger particles (40 nm) showed higher concentrations of carbonyl-containing compounds and low molecular weight organic acids. This composition change from smaller to larger size particles reflects a vapor pressure increase of the condensing vapors by 1-2 orders of magnitude indicating that the Kelvin effect plays a decisive role in the growth of biogenic nanoparticles.

  12. Estimates for biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons and nitric oxide emissions in the Valley of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Erik

    Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (methylbutenol or MBO) and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions were estimated for the Valley of Mexico developing a spatially and temporally resolved emission inventory for air quality models. The modeling domain includes all the Metropolitan Mexico City Area, the surrounding forests and agriculture fields. The estimates were based on several sources of land use and land cover data and a biogenic emission model; the biomass density and tree characteristics were obtained from reforestation program data. The biogenic emissions depend also on climatic conditions, mainly temperature and solar radiation. The temperature was obtained from a statistical revision of the last 10 yr data reported by the Mexico City Automatic Atmospheric Monitoring Network, while the solar radiation data were obtained from measurements performed in a typical oak forest in the Valley and from sources of total solar radiation data for Mexico City. The results indicated that 7% of total hydrocarbon emissions in Mexico Valley are due to vegetation and NO emissions from soil contribute with 1% to the total NO x emissions.

  13. BIOGENIC AMINE CONTENT AND CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL FEATURES OF ITALIAN FORMAGGIO DI FOSSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rea

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Formaggio di Fossa is an Italian traditional cheese of the Montefeltro area (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions characterized by a particular step of ripening that is carried out into pits (infossamento borne in the sandstone. Since the XIV century, the inhabitants were used to set food, especially cereals and cheese, into pits to preserve them during winter and to protect them from invaders. The aim of the present work is to study physical and chemical features of this product with particular reference to the presence of the most important biogenic amines ( -Phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine and spermidine, compared with a control cheese fully ripened in factory. Formaggio di Fossa showed higher values of Aw, pH, humidity, proteins, pH 4,6-soluble nitrogen (NCN and water soluble nitrogen (NPN and much lower amounts of fat. Much higher amounts of total biogenic amines were detected in Formaggio di Fossa than in control cheese, where their concentration was very low. Cadaverine, putrescine and tyramine were the most concentrated biogenic amines. Nevertheless, thyramine was present at levels suggested as compatible with GMPs. Histamine was detected at low amounts, far from potentially toxic levels.

  14. Biogenic iron mineralization at Iron Mountain, CA with implications for detection with the Mars Curiosity rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy J.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Alpers, Charles N.; Campbell, Kate M.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    (Introduction) Microbe-mineral interactions and biosignature preservation in oxidized sulfidic ore bodies (gossans) are prime candidates for astrobiological study. Such oxidized iron systems have been proposed as analogs for some Martian environments. Recent studies identified microbial fossils preserved as mineral-coated filaments. This study documents microbially-mediated mineral biosignatures in hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and ferric oxyhydroxysulfates (FOHS) in three environments at Iron Mountain, CA. We investigated microbial community preservation via HFO and FOHS precipitation and the formation of filamentous mineral biosignatures. These environments included 1) actively precipitating (1000's yrs), naturally weathered HFO from in situ gossan, and 3) remobilized iron deposits, which contained lithified clastics and zones of HFO precipitate. We used published biogenicity criteria as guidelines to characterize the biogenicity of mineral filaments. These criteria included A) an actively precipitating environment where microbes are known to be coated in minerals, B) presence of extant microbial communities with carbon signatures, C) structures observable as a part of the host rock, and D) biological morphology, including cellular lumina, multiple member population, numerous taxa, variable and 3-D preservation, biological size ranges, uniform diameter, and evidence of flexibility. This study explores the relevance and detection of these biosignatures to possible Martian biosignatures. Similar filamentous biosignatures are resolvable by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, and may be identifiable as biogenic if present on Mars.

  15. Role of biogenic amines in pathogenesis of dust induced respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talakin, Yu.N.; Deinega, V.G.; Gridneva, N.V.; Levitskaya, V.A.

    1987-06-01

    Studies metabolism of biogenic amines, catecholamine, histamine and serotonin and their part in pathophysiologic mechanisms of bronchial obstruction in chronic dust bronchitits of coal miners. Three groups of miners, 50 healthy controls, 200 with pneumoconiosis and 95 with chronic dust bronchitis were tested to determine content in blood of histamine, serotonin, activity of histaminase, monoaminoxidase (MAO), daily elimination in urine of 5-oxyindoleacetic acid, adrenalin, noradrelin, dopamine and dopa. Results processed statistically are shown in a table (changes of indices of metabolism of biogenic amines in blood of coal miners). Healthy miners show increased catabolism of serotonin. During stage 1 pneumoconiosis, evacuation of noradrenalin is increased and emission of dopamine with urine decreases, level of histamine in blood rises, activity of MOA and excretion of 5-oxyindoleacetic acid increase. In chronic dust bronchitis depression of mediator link of sympathetic adrenalin system is augmented, level of histamine of blood rises with lowered histaminopexia. Activity of MAO and evacuation of 5-oxyindoleacetic increase. To evaluate the condition of metabolism of biogenic amines, it is advisable in clinical practice to use informative biochemical criteria in combination with physiologic methods of investigation to conduct provocative and pharmacologic tests in order to approach differentially establishment of a basic curative treatment complex and improve effectiveness of therapy. 16 refs.

  16. Effects of biogenic amines on the testicular development in mud crabs Scylla serrata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Haihui; HUANG Huiyang; LI Shaojing; WANG Guizhong; LI Qifu

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of three biogenic amines over the reproductive neuroendocrine activity of the male Scylla serrata was investigated by in vivo injection and in vitro incubation. The testicular index, the ratio of the mature sections in testes, and the ratio of Type B cells in androgenic gland were taken as the quantitative indexes. The in vivo injections indicated that: 5-HT can significantly promote the testicular development and the secretion of the androgenic gland in S. serrata; DA can inhibit the testicular development, but no influence on the secretion of the androgenic gland was found; no significant difference was observed between the OA-injected group and the concurrent control group. In vitro incubations showed that: 5-HT can stimulate the secretion of the brain and the thoracic ganglia, thus accelerating that of the androgenic gland; however, neither OA nor DA showed any significant influence on the secretion of the brain and the thoracic ganglionic mass. As to the optic ganglia, the three biogenic amines hardly have any effect on its secretion. It is the first time to report the regulation of biogenic amines over the reproductive neuroendocrine of male crustaceans through vitro experiments.Results corroborate that 5-HT activates the brain and the thoracic ganglia to secret GSH first, then promote the testicular development through the activity of the androgenic gland.

  17. Organic aerosol formation from biogenic compounds over the Ponderosa pine forest in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Alma Hodzic; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Cui, Yuyan; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-05-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and regional growth from biogenic precursors is of particular interest given their abundance in the atmosphere, and has been investigated during the Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol field Study in 2011 in the pine forest canopy (dominated by terpene emissions) using both WRF/Chem 4km simulations and the GECKO-A explicit chemistry box-model runs. We have quantified the relative contribution of different biogenic precursors to SOA levels that were measured by the aerosol mass spectrometer at the site, and investigated the relative contribution of OH, O3 and NO3 chemistry to the formed SOA mass during day-and nighttime. Although, the local production and mass concentrations of submicron organic aerosols at the site seem relatively modest ˜1-2 ug/m3, we show that the optically active regional mass is increased as the SOA formation continues for several days in the background forest air. We investigate whether the simplified SOA parameterizations used in 3D models can capture this growth. In addition, preliminary comparisons of the number concentrations and the composition of ultrafine particles (8 - 30nm) from WRF/Chem simulations and TD-CIMS measurements are also discussed, and the contribution of organic aerosols to CCN formation is quantified.

  18. Seasonal variation in utilization of biogenic microhabitats by littorinid snails on tropical rocky shores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Stephen R; Williams, Gray A

    2012-01-01

    Mobile species may actively seek refuge from stressful conditions in biogenic habitats on rocky shores. In Hong Kong, the upper intertidal zone is extremely stressful, especially in summer when organisms are emersed for long periods in hot desiccating conditions. As a result, many species migrate downshore between winter and summer to reduce these stressful conditions. The littorinids Echinolittorina malaccana and E. vidua, for example, are found on open rock surfaces high on the shore in winter but the majority migrate downshore in summer to the same tidal height as a common barnacle, Tetraclita japonica. In the laboratory, where environmental conditions could be controlled to approximate those occurring on the shore, we tested whether the downshore migration allowed littorinids to select barnacles as biogenic habitats to reduce stress and if this behaviour varied between seasons. In summer, littorinids demonstrated a strong active preference for the barnacles, which was not observed in the cool winter conditions, when animals were found on open rock surfaces even when barnacles were present. Littorinids, therefore, only actively select biogenic habitats during the summer in Hong Kong when they migrate downshore, suggesting that such habitats may play an important, temporal, role in mitigating environmental stress on tropical shores.

  19. Lithium manganese spinel materials for high-rate electrochemical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna V. Potapenko; Sviatoslav A. Kirillov

    2014-01-01

    In order to successively compete with supercapacitors, an ability of fast discharge is a must for lithium-ion batteries. From this point of view, stoichiometric and substituted lithium manganese spinels as cathode materials are one of the most prospective candidates, especially in their nanosized form. In this article, an overview of the most recent data regarding physico-chemical and electrochemical properties of lithium manganese spinels, especially, LiMn2O4 and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, synthesized by means of various methods is presented, with special emphasis of their use in high-rate electrochemical applications. In particular, specific capacities and rate capabilities of spinel materials are analyzed. It is suggested that reduced specific capacity is determined primarily by the aggregation of material particles, whereas good high-rate capability is governed not only by the size of crystallites but also by the perfectness of crystals. The most technologically advantageous solutions are described, existing gaps in the knowledge of spinel materials are outlined, and the ways of their filling are suggested, in a hope to be helpful in keeping lithium batteries afloat in the struggle for a worthy place among electrochemical energy systems of the 21st century.

  20. Manganese in the world ocean: a first global model

    CERN Document Server

    van Hulten, M M P; Middag, R; de Baar, H J W; Roy-Barman, M; Gehlen, M; Tagliabue, A; Sterl, A

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved manganese (Mn) is a biologically essential element, and its oxidised form is involved in the removal of trace elements from ocean waters. Recently, a large number of highly accurate Mn measurements have been obtained in the Atlantic, Indian and Arctic Oceans as part of the GEOTRACES programme. The goal of this study is to combine these new observations with state-of-the-art modelling to give new insights into the main sources and redistribution of Mn throughout the ocean. To this end, we simulate the distribution of dissolved Mn using a global-scale circulation model. This first model includes simple parameterisations to account, realistically, for the sources, processes and sinks of Mn in the ocean. Whereas oxidation and (photo)reduction, as well as aggregation and settling are parameterised in the model, biological uptake is not yet taken into account by the model. Our model reproduces observations accurately and provides the following insights: - The high surface concentrations of manganese are c...

  1. Electromagnetic properties of manganese-zinc ferrite with lithium substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Fazio, E. [LAFMACEL, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bercoff, P.G., E-mail: bercoff@famaf.unc.edu.ar [FAMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, IFEG-Conicet, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Jacobo, S.E. [LAFMACEL, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-11-15

    Polycrystalline manganese-zinc ferrite with lithium substitution of composition Li{sub 0.5x}Mn{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6-x}Fe{sub 2+0.5x}O{sub 4} (0.0{<=}x{<=}0.4) was prepared by the usual ceramic method. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the samples have a spinel structure and are of single phase for some values of Li content. Lithium doping considerably modifies saturation magnetization since its value increases from 57.5 emu/g for x=0.0 to 82.9 emu/g for x=0.4. Lithium inclusion increases the real permeability (over 1 MHz) while the natural resonance frequency shifts to lower values as the fraction of Li increases. These ferrites show good electromagnetic properties as absorbers in the microwave range of 1 MHz - 1 GHz. - Highlights: > Li-doped manganese-zinc ferrites were successfully prepared by the usual ceramic method. > Lithium doping enhances saturation magnetization and increases real permeability (over 1 MHz). > Natural resonance frequency shifts to lower values as fraction of Li increases. > These ferrites show good electromagnetic properties as absorbers in the microwave range of 1 MHz-1 GHz.

  2. Manganese steel in impact wear testing; Manganhartstahl in Stossverschleisstest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patzelt, B.; Hemmann, U.; Deters, L. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Maschinenkonstruktion

    2000-12-01

    Beating arms in impact crushers show high wear. In order to simulate the process of the mainly occuring impact wear, experimental investigations with a special test device were carried out. With this 11 different charges of manganese steel differing in their chemical composition were tested. The different chemical composition of the charges led to different results concerning the wear resistance. A significant interrelationship between wear resistance and macro-hardness of the charges of the manganese steel could be detected. With a faster rotor speed a considerable increase of wear could be determined as well. Microscopical investigations on worn test pieces exhibit a typical embedding of small particles of concrete into the metal matrix. (orig.) [German] Die Schlagleisten in Prallbrechern unterliegen einen hohen Verschleiss. Um den Prozess des hauptsaechlich auftretenden Stossverschleisses zu simulieren, wurden Modelluntersuchungen mit einer speziellen Pruefeinrichtung durchgefuehrt. Dabei konnten 11 verschiedene Chargen von Manganhartstahl, die sich im wesentlichen in ihrer chemischen Zusammensetzung unterschieden, untersucht werden. Die unterschiedliche chemische Zusammensetzung der einzelnen Chargen fuehrte zu unterschiedlichen Ergebnissen hinsichtlich der Verschleissbestaendigkeit der einzelnen Modellschlagleisten. Hierbei ist ein signifikanter Zusammenhang zwischen der Verschleissbestaendigkeit und der Makrohaerte der Manganhartstaehle zu erkennen. Die Umfangsgeschwindigkeit des Rotors der Pruefeinrichtung beeinflusst ebenfalls das Verschleissverhalten, und zwar fuehrte eine hoehere Umfangsgeschwindigkeit zu hoeherem Verschleiss. Mikroskopische Untersuchungen an geschaedigten Probekoerpern zeigten ein Einbetten von kleinsten Partikeln aus Beton im oberflaechennahen Stoffbereich der Metallmatrix. (orig.)

  3. Chromium and manganese interactions in streptozocin-diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.L.; Jarrett, C.R.; Adeleye, B.O.; Stoecker, B.J. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Weanling male rats were fed casein-based diets low in chromium and manganese ({minus}Cr-MN) or supplemented with 1 ppm chromium as chromium chloride (+Cr) and/or 55 ppm manganese as manganous carbonate in a factorial design. After 7 weeks on the experimental diets, half of the rats in each group were injected on 2 consecutive days with 55 mg/kg streptozocin (STZ) in citrate buffer pH 4. Four weeks after injection, serum glucose in the diabetic group supplement with both Cr and Mn was not different from non-diabetic animals; however, diabetic animals in {minus}Cr groups or in the +Cr-Mn group had significantly elevated serum glucose. Serum insulin was reduced by STZ. A significant interaction between Mn and diabetes affected serum cortisol concentrations. More new tissue was formed on a polyvinyl sponge inserted under the skin in +Mn animals. In this study, the STZ animals were more sensitive than the control animals to dietary Cr and Mn concentrations.

  4. FORMATION OF MANGANESE SILICIDE THIN FILMS BY SOLID PHASE REACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.Q. Xie; W.W. Wang; N. Jiang; D.Y. He

    2002-01-01

    Manganese silicide MnSi2-x thin films have been prepared on n-type silicon substratesthrough solid phase reaction. The heterostructures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction,Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared transmittance spec-troscopy and the four-point probe technique. The results show that two manganese sili-cides have been formed sequentially via the reaction of thin layer Mn with Si substrateat different irradiation annealing stages, i.e., MnSi at 450℃ and MnSi1.73 at 550℃.MnSi1.73 phase exhibits preferred growth after irradiation with infrared. In situ four-point probe measurements of sheet resistance during infrared irradiation annealingshow that nucleation of MnSi and phase transformation of MnSi to MnSi1. 73 occur at410℃ and 530℃, respectively; the MnSi phase shows metallic behavior, while MnSi1.73exhibits semiconducting behavior. Characteristic phonon bands of MnSi2-x silicides,which can be used for phase identification along with conventional XRD techniques,have been observed by FTIR spectroscopy.

  5. Kinetics of oxytetracycline reaction with a hydrous manganese oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Kennedy F; Pedersen, Joel A

    2006-12-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics comprise a class of broad spectrum antimicrobial agents finding application in human therapy, animal husbandry, aquaculture, and fruit crop production. To better understand the processes affecting these antibiotics in soils and sediments, the kinetics of oxytetracycline transformation by a hydrous manganese oxide (MnO2) were investigated as a function of reactant concentration, pH, and temperature. Oxytetracycline was rapidly degraded by MnO2. Initial reaction rates exhibited pronounced pH-dependence, increasing as pH decreased. Reaction of oxytetracycline with MnO2 was accompanied by generation of Mn(II) ions, suggesting oxidative transformation of the antibiotic. At pH 5.6, apparent reaction orders for oxytetracycline and MnO2 were 0.7 and 0.8. Reaction order with respect to H+ was 0.6 between pH 4 and 9. Initial reaction rates increased by a factor of approximately 2.4 for 10 degrees C temperature increases; the apparent activation energy (60 kJ x mol(-1)) was consistent with a surface-controlled reaction. Reactivity of tetracycline antibiotics toward MnO2 increased in the following order: rolitetracyline oxytetracycline manganese oxides in soils and sediments are likely to promote appreciable degradation of tetracycline antibiotics, and that reaction rates are strongly dependent on reaction time scale and solution conditions.

  6. The impact of transport processes on rare earth element patterns in marine authigenic and biogenic phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Gerald; Reuter, Markus; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Piller, Werner E.

    2017-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are commonly used proxies to reconstruct water chemistry and oxygen saturation during the formation of authigenic and biogenic phosphates in marine environments. In the modern ocean REEs exhibit a distinct pattern with enrichment of heavy REEs and strong depletion in cerium (Ce). The wide range of REE enrichment patterns found in ancient marine phosphates lead to the proposition that water chemistry has been very different in the Earth's past. However, both early and late diagenesis are known to affect REE signatures in phosphates altering primary marine signals. Herein we present a dataset of REE signatures in 38 grain specific LA-ICP-MS measurements of isolated phosphate and carbonate grains in three discrete rock samples. The phosphates mainly consist of authigenic phosphates and phosphatized microfossils that formed in a microbially mediated micro-milieu. In addition, isolated biogenic and reworked phosphatic grains are also present. The phosphates are emplaced in bioclastic grain- to packstones deposited on a carbonate ramp setting in the central Mediterranean Sea during the middle Miocene Monterey event. The results reveal markedly different REE patterns (normalized to the Post Archean Australian Shale standard) in terms of total enrichment and pattern shape. Analyses of REE diagenesis proxies show that diagenetic alteration affected the samples only to a minor degree. Grain shape and REE patterns together indicate that authigenic, biogenic and reworked phosphates have distinct REE patterns irrespective of the sample. Our study shows that while REE patterns in phosphates do reflect water chemistry during authigenesis, they are often already heavily altered during reworking, a process, which can occur in geologically negligible timespans. REE patterns are therefore more likely to reflect complex enrichment processes after their formation. Similarities in the REE patterns of reworked and biogenic phosphate further suggest that the

  7. Comparative dissolution kinetics of biogenic and chemogenic uraninite under oxidizing conditions in the presence of carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Ilton, Eugene S.; Veeramani, Harish; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Bargar, John R.; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2009-10-01

    The long-term stability of biogenic uraninite with respect to oxidative dissolution is pivotal to the success of in situ bioreduction strategies for the subsurface remediation of uranium legacies. Batch and flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted along with spectroscopic analyses to compare biogenic uraninite nanoparticles obtained from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and chemogenic UO 2.00 with respect to their equilibrium solubility, dissolution mechanisms, and dissolution kinetics in water of varied oxygen and carbonate concentrations. Both materials exhibited a similar intrinsic solubility of ˜10 -8 M under reducing conditions. The two materials had comparable dissolution rates under anoxic as well as oxidizing conditions, consistent with structural bulk homology of biogenic and stoichiometric uraninite. Carbonate reversibly promoted uraninite dissolution under both moderately oxidizing and reducing conditions, and the biogenic material yielded higher surface area-normalized dissolution rates than the chemogenic. This difference is in accordance with the higher proportion of U(V) detected on the biogenic uraninite surface by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reasonable sources of a stable U(V)-bearing intermediate phase are discussed. The observed increase of the dissolution rates can be explained by carbonate complexation of U(V) facilitating the detachment of U(V) from the uraninite surface. The fraction of surface-associated U(VI) increased with dissolved oxygen concentration. Simultaneously, X-ray absorption spectra showed conversion of the bulk from UO 2.0 to UO 2+x. In equilibrium with air, combined spectroscopic results support the formation of a near-surface layer of approximate composition UO 2.25 (U 4O 9) coated by an outer layer of U(VI). This result is in accordance with flow-through dissolution experiments that indicate control of the dissolution rate of surface-oxidized uraninite by the solubility of metaschoepite under the tested

  8. Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) During AMAZE-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the AMazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. The presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 μm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as 'viable aerosols' or 'fluorescent bioparticles' (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. First data analyses show a pronounced peak of FBAP at diameters around 2-3 μm. In this size range the biogenic particle fraction was

  9. Oxide Nanostructures: Characterizations and Optical Bandgap Evaluations of Cobalt-Manganese and Nickel-Manganese at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Indulal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt-Manganese and Nickel-Manganese oxide (CoMnO and NiMnO nanoparticles were prepared by chemical co-precipitation method by decomposition of their respective metal sulfides and sodium carbonate using ethylene diamene tetra acetic acid as the capping agent. The samples were heated at 400, 600 and 800 °C. The average particle sizes were determined from the X-ray line broadening. The diffractograms were compared with JCPDS data to identify the crystallographic phase and cubic structure of the particles. The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR and UV analyses. The internal elastic micro strains were calculated and it was seen that as the particle size increases strain decreases. The FTIR studies have been used to confirm the metal oxide formation. The chemical compositions of the samples were verified using EDX spectra. The surface morphologies of the samples were studied from the SEM images. The absorption spectra of the materials in the UV-Vis-NIR range were recorded. From the analysis of the absorption spectra, the direct band gaps of the materials were calculated.

  10. Adsorption kinetic of arsenates as water pollutant on iron, manganese and iron-manganese-modified clinoptilolite-rich tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Cedillo, M.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica, A.P. 18-1027, Col, Escandon, Del, Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon y Paseo Tollocan s/n, Toluca (Mexico); Olguin, M.T. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica, A.P. 18-1027, Col, Escandon, Del, Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: mog@nuclear.inin.mx; Fall, Ch. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, CIRA, km 14.5 de la Carretera Toluca - Ixtlahuaca, Unidad San Cayetano, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-04-30

    Arsenate adsorption from aqueous solutions onto clinoptilolite-heulandite rich tuffs modified with iron or manganese or a mixture of both iron and manganese in this work was investigated. A kinetic model was considered to describe the arsenates adsorption on each zeolitic material. The modified clinoptilolite-heulandite rich tuffs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The elemental composition and the specific surface area of the zeolitic material were also determined. The arsenate adsorption by the modified zeolites was carried on in a batch system considering a contact time from 5 min to 24 h for the kinetic experimentation. The arsenic was detected by atomic absorption spectrometer using a hydride generator. The kinetics of the arsenate adsorption processes were described by the pseudo-second-order model and the obtained parameter k varies from 0.15 to 5.66 {mu}g/gh. In general, the results suggested that the kinetic adsorption of arsenates on the modified clinoptilolite-rich tuffs depend of the metallic specie that modified the surface characteristics of the zeolitic material, the chemical nature of the metal as well as the association between different metallic chemical species in the zeolitic surface.

  11. Prion infection in cells is abolished by a mutated manganese transporter but shows no relation to zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Rachel; Frudd, Karen; Barnett, James P; Blindauer, Claudia A; Brown, David R

    2015-09-01

    The cellular prion protein has been identified as a metalloprotein that binds copper. There have been some suggestions that prion protein also influences zinc and manganese homeostasis. In this study we used a series of cell lines to study the levels of zinc and manganese under different conditions. We overexpressed either the prion protein or known transporters for zinc and manganese to determine relations between the prion protein and both manganese and zinc homeostasis. Our observations supported neither a link between the prion protein and zinc metabolism nor any effect of altered zinc levels on prion protein expression or cellular infection with prions. In contrast we found that a gain of function mutant of a manganese transporter caused reduction of manganese levels in prion infected cells, loss of observable PrP(Sc) in cells and resistance to prion infection. These studies strengthen the link between manganese and prion disease.

  12. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E.; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y.; Simpson, Michael A.; Chong, W. K.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Woltjer, Randy L.; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M.; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R.; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A. M.; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C.; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Enns, Caroline A.; Hayflick, Susan J.; Clayton, Peter T.; Mills, Philippa B.; Kurian, Manju A.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates. PMID:27231142

  13. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism-dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y; Simpson, Michael A; Chong, W K; Jacques, Thomas S; Woltjer, Randy L; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A M; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A; Enns, Caroline A; Hayflick, Susan J; Clayton, Peter T; Mills, Philippa B; Kurian, Manju A; Wilson, Stephen W

    2016-05-27

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism-dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates.

  14. Nature and origin of the resistant carbonaceous polymorphs involved the fossilization of biogenic soil-aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, M.-A.

    2012-04-01

    The rare occurrence of organic-rich surface horizons in soil archives is widely accepted to resulting from their rapid degradation. We intend here to further elucidate how pedogenic signatures that initially formed at the soil surface could resist over long timescales to burial processes. We focus on the structural evolution of the biogenic soil aggregates that is controlled by the complex interaction of bioturbation, root colonization, microbial decomposition, chemical weathering and physical processes. The nature and origin of carbonaceous components that could possibly contribute to the long term preservation of biogenic soil-aggregates is particularly examined. The study is based on the comparison of pedogenic aggregated microfacies from present-day situations and the ones encountered in soil archives from contrasting edaphic conditions: Arctic Holocene soils from Spitsbergen, hyper-arid soils from the Moche valley (Peru), Holocene semi-arid Mediterranean soils from Northern Syria, late Pleistocene paleosols from lake Mungo (South Wales Australia) and late Pleistocene paleosols from the Ardeche valley (France). The assemblage and composition of biogenic soil-aggregated horizons has been characterized under the binocular microscope and in thin sections. The basic components have been separated by water sieving. A typology of carbonaceous polymorphs and associated composite materials has been established under the binocular. They have been characterized by SEM-EDS, Raman spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and TEM. The comparative study shows that all the biogenic soil-aggregates from the soil archives contain a high amount of similar exotic components that contrast from the parent materials by their fresh aspect and their hydrophobic properties. This exotic assemblage comprises various types of aliphatic carbonaceous polymorphs (filaments, agglutinates, spherules) and aromatic ones (vitrous char, graphite), carbon cenospheres, fine grained sandstones and rock clasts

  15. European Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound emissions estimate using MEGAN v2.10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoud, M.; Pozzoli, L.; Unal, A.; Kindap, T.; Poupkou, A.; Katragou, E.; Melas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic emissions estimations are essential to obtain a comprehensive understanding of both anthropogenic and biogenic contributions of the emissions. In this paper we have calculated the Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emissions from vegetation over Europe using the newly developed Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.10 (MEGAN2.10). We performed a simulation of the entire year 2008 for a domain covering all Europe at a resolution of 30 x 30 km. The meteorological fields needed to calculate the BVOC emissions (surface temperature and shortwave radiation) were provided by a WRFv3.3 simulation (driven by NCEP/FNL global reanalysis data at 1° x 1°) and interfaced to MEGAN with MCIPv3.6. We used the global dataset provided with the MEGAN2.10 model containing the Plant Functional Types (PFT, at 0.5° x 0.5°), Leaf Area Indices (LAI, at 30s resolution) and Emission Factors (EF, at 0.01° x 0.01°). The motivation behind this study is to quantify the biogenic emissions as calculated from the new version of MEGAN over Europe for the entire annual cycle, and in second step to quantify the impact of biogenic emissions on air quality, using the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ). Isoprene emissions comprise about half of the total global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) estimated using MEGAN2.10, while all Terpenes comprise about 18% of the estimated total global BVOC emissions. Our simulations showed that Isoprene emissions are ranging from 10.7 Gg/month in December to 6572.8 Gg/month over Europe in July, while Terpenes emissions range from 38 Gg/month in January and 1598.23 Gg/month in July. Around 15 Tg/year and 5 Tg/year are estimated as total annual emissions of Isoprene and Terpenes, respectively. In comparison with a previous study using the Natural Emission Model (NEMO), for the same period and the similar domain and resolution, for July we found 70% higher Isoprene emissions and 30% lower Terpenes emissions

  16. Reaction of Leaf Weevil Phyllobius arborator (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Manganese Content in Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinek, P; Kula, E; Hedbávný, J

    2016-12-27

    Reaction of leaf weevil (Phyllobius arborator (Herbst)) to increased concentration of manganese in diet was investigated in laboratory rearing with controlled temperature, humidity, and light conditions. Food for leaf weevils in rearing (leaves of birch Betula pendula Roth) was contaminated by soaking the leaves in solutions of MnCl24H2O with graded concentration of manganese. Direct influence of food was characterized by the consumed amount of leaves, period of feeding, and weight of P. arborator adults. At the same time, the levels of manganese in unconsumed food, excrement, and bodies of adults were determined.Even very high content of manganese in food did not cause significantly different reaction of P. arborator adults in comparison to individuals in control treatment. No significant difference in the quantity of the consumed food, weight of adults, and duration of their feeding period was found between the treatments within the experiment. The content of manganese found in food, excrement, and adult beetles indicate that P. arborator avoided manganese intoxication through food by both-voiding manganese through the feces and sequestering it at relatively high concentrations in unspecified parts of their body.

  17. [Ecological stability on biological removal of iron and manganese filter under poor nutritional conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Xiong, Xiao-Li; Duan, Xiao-Dong; Song, Li-Xin; Yu, Ping-Bo; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2010-01-01

    To supply necessary bacteria and available nutrients, a method of returning backwashing wastewater to the bio-filter for removal of iron and manganese was used. The ecological stability of bio-filter was investigated from 3 aspects: iron and manganese removal efficiency, micro-ecological characteristics and the quantity distribution of dominant bacteria. The results indicated that, the bio-filter held strong antishock loading capability, when the system was operated at high filtration rate (10-13.9 m/h) and high manganese concentration (3.5-4.5 mg/L), a removal rate more than 98.9% of iron and manganese was achieved. Iron and manganese oxidizing bacteria are the dominant microflora in biological filtering layer, they not only adhere on filter sand materials (4.3 x 10(6) MPN/mL) to form compact biofilm, but also exist among filter materials void (6.5 x 10(6) MPN/mL) to form suspended flocs, which is very important to complete removal of iron and manganese. In the past 5 years, the bio-filter realized a continuous and stable operation and kept a high removal efficiency of iron and manganese without adding any nutrients.

  18. Catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates with water as an oxygen source using manganese porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Mizuno, Takuya; Ojiri, Tetsuya

    2012-12-03

    Manganese(V)-oxo-porphyrins are produced by the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins with tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(III) ([Ru(bpy)(3)](3+); 2 equiv) in acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) containing water. The rate constants of the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins have been determined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer. Addition of [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to a solution of olefins (styrene and cyclohexene) in CH(3)CN containing water in the presence of a catalytic amount of manganese-porphyrins afforded epoxides, diols, and aldehydes efficiently. Epoxides were converted to the corresponding diols by hydrolysis, and were further oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes. The turnover numbers vary significantly depending on the type of manganese-porphyrin used owing to the difference in their oxidation potentials and the steric bulkiness of the ligand. Ethylbenzene was also oxidized to 1-phenylethanol using manganese-porphyrins as electron-transfer catalysts. The oxygen source in the substrate oxygenation was confirmed to be water by using (18)O-labeled water. The rate constant of the reaction of the manganese(V)-oxo species with cyclohexene was determined directly under single-turnover conditions by monitoring the increase in absorbance attributable to the manganese(III) species produced in the reaction with cyclohexene. It has been shown that the rate-determining step in the catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of cyclohexene is electron transfer from [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to the manganese-porphyrins.

  19. Water defluoridation by aluminium oxide-manganese oxide composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Sheta; Mulugeta, Eyobel; Zewge, Feleke; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, aluminium oxide-manganese oxide (AOMO) composite material was synthesized, characterized, and tested for fluoride removal in batch experiments. AOMO was prepared from manganese(II) chloride and aluminium hydroxide. The surface area of AOMO was found to be 30.7m2/g and its specific density was determined as 2.78 g/cm3. Detailed investigation of the adsorbent by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and ion chromatography (for sulphate only) showed that it is composed of Al, Mn, SO4, and Na as major components and Fe, Si, Ca, and Mg as minor components. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to study the thermal behaviour of AOMO. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the adsorbent is poorly crystalline. The point of zero charge was determined as 9.54. Batch experiments (by varying the proportion of MnO, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial F concentration, and raw water pH) showed that fluoride removal efficiency ofAOMO varied significantly with percentage of MnO with an optimum value of about I11% of manganese oxide in the adsorbent. The optimum dose of the adsorbent was 4 g/L which corresponds to the equilibrium adsorption capacity of 4.8 mg F-/g. Both the removal efficiency and adsorption capacity showed an increasing trend with an increase in initial fluoride concentration of the water. The pH for optimum fluoride removal was found to be in the range between 5 and 7. The adsorption data were analysed using the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinirn-Radushkevich models. The minimum adsorption capacity obtained from the non-linear Freundlich isotherm model was 4.94 mg F-/g and the maximum capacity from the Langmuir isotherm method was 19.2mg F-/g. The experimental data of fluoride adsorption on AOMO fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption is well described by a non-linear pseudo-second-order reaction model with an average rate constant of 3

  20. Electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes filled with manganese halogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamova, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were filled with manganese chloride and manganese bromide by a capillary filling method. The electronic properties of the filled SWCNTs were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the encapsulated manganese halogenides led to hole doping of the SWCNTs due to the charge transfer from the nanotubes to the encapsulated compounds. The embedded MnCl2 had stronger doping effect on the SWCNTs than MnBr2.

  1. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  2. Treatment of coking wastewater by using manganese and magnesium ores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianhu; Huang, Xiaoming; Pan, Min; Jin, Song; Peng, Suchuan; Fallgren, Paul H

    2009-09-15

    This study investigated a wastewater treatment technique based on natural minerals. A two-step process using manganese (Mn) and magnesium (Mg) containing ores were tested to remove typical contaminants from coking wastewater. Under acidic conditions, a reactor packed with Mn ore demonstrated strong oxidizing capability and destroyed volatile phenols, chemical oxygen demand (COD)(,) and sulfide from the coking wastewater. The effluent was further treated by using Mg ore to remove ammonium-nitrogen and phosphate in the form of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) precipitates. When pH of the wastewater was adjusted to 1.2, the removal efficiencies for COD, volatile phenol and sulfide reached 70%, 99% and 100%, respectively. During the second step of precipitation, up to 94% of ammonium was removed from the aqueous phase, and precipitated in the form of struvite with phosphorus. The struvite crystals showed a needle-like structure. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the crystallized products.

  3. Enhanced production of manganese peroxidase by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziye Ozturk Urek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Production of manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP by the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium BKM-F-1767 (ATCC 24725 was monitored during growth in different media and growth conditions. The effect of some activators of MnP production, Mn2+, Tween 80, phenylmethylsulphonylfloride (PMSF, oxygen, temperature, pH, glycerol and nitrogen was studied. Supplementing the cultures with Tween 80 (0.05 %, v/v and Mn2+ (174 µM resulted a maximum MnP activity of 356 U/L which was approximately two times higher than that obtained in the control culture (without Tween 80. Decolourisation of Direct Blue 15 and Direct Green 6 (50 mg/L was also achieved with MnP.

  4. Factors Affection Cr(Ⅲ) Oxidation by Manganese Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYINGXU; CHENYIYI; 等

    1997-01-01

    The high oxidation ability of manganese oxides or soils was used to study effects of PH and coating on Cr(Ⅲ) oxidation,The results indicated that Cr(Ⅲ) oxidation peaked in PH 4.0-6.5,The amount and rate of Cr(Ⅲ) being oxidized by uncoated δ-MnO2 were larger than those by Fe oxide- of CaCo3-coated one.Inorganic Cr(Ⅲ) wa more easily oxidzed by MnO2 than organic complex Cr(Ⅲ) due to different surface affinities. Precipitated Cr(Ⅲ) and adsorbed Cr(Ⅲ) might be transferred onto MnO2 surface and then oxidized to Cr(Ⅵ)

  5. Manganese Content Control in Weld Metal During MAG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the welding current and method of gas shielding in MAG welding on the content of manganese is considered in the paper. Results of study of the welded specimens of steels 45 when applying welding wire of different formulas and different types of gas shielding (traditional shielding and double-jet shielding) are given. It is found that in MAG welding the value of the welding current and the speed of the gas flow from the welding nozzle have a considerable impact on the chemical composition of the weld metal. The consumable electrode welding under double-jet gas shielding provides the directed gas-dynamics in the welding area and enables controlling the electrode metal transfer and the chemical composition of a weld.

  6. Manganese oxide microswitch for electronic memory based on neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, R.; Daud, T.; Moopenn, A.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1989-01-01

    A solid-state, resistance tailorable, programmable-once, binary, nonvolatile memory switch based on manganese oxide thin films is reported. MnO(x) exhibits irreversible memory switching from conducting (on) to insulating (off) state, with the off and on resistance ratio of greater than 10,000. The switching mechanism is current-triggered chemical transformation of a conductive MnO(2-Delta) to an insulating Mn2O3 state. The energy required for switching is of the order of 4-20 nJ/sq micron. The low switching energy, stability of the on and off states, and tailorability of the on state resistance make these microswitches well suited as programmable binary synapses in electronic associative memories based on neural network models.

  7. Gold-manganese nanoparticles for targeted diagnostic and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, Simona Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-10

    Imagine the possibility of non-invasive, non-radiation based Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combating cardiac disease. Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are developing a process that would use nanotechnology in a novel, targeted approach that would allow MRIs to be more descriptive and brighter, and to target specific organs. Researchers at SRNL have discovered a way to use multifunctional metallic gold-manganese nanoparticles to create a unique, targeted positive contrast agent. SRNL Senior Scientist Dr. Simona Hunyadi Murph says she first thought of using the nanoparticles for cardiac disease applications after learning that people who survive an infarct exhibit up to 15 times higher rate of developing chronic heart failure, arrhythmias and/or sudden death compared to the general population. Without question, nanotechnology will revolutionize the future of technology. The development of functional nanomaterials with multi-detection modalities opens up new avenues for creating multi-purpose technologies for biomedical applications.

  8. A magnetic route to measure the average oxidation state of mixed-valent manganese in manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiong-Fei; Ding, Yun-Shuang; Liu, Jia; Han, Zhao-Hui; Budnick, Joseph I; Hines, William A; Suib, Steven L

    2005-05-04

    A magnetic route has been applied for measurement of the average oxidation state (AOS) of mixed-valent manganese in manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS). The method gives AOS measurement results in good agreement with titration methods. A maximum analysis deviation error of +/-7% is obtained from 10 sample measurements. The magnetic method is able to (1) confirm the presence of mixed-valent manganese and (2) evaluate AOS and the spin states of d electrons of both single oxidation state and mixed-valent state Mn in manganese oxides. In addition, the magnetic method may be extended to (1) determine AOS of Mn in manganese oxide OMS with dopant "diamagnetic" ions, such as reducible V5+ (3d0) ions, which is inappropriate for the titration method due to interference of redox reactions between these dopant ions and titration reagents, such as KMnO4, (2) evaluate the dopant "paramagnetic" ions that are present as clusters or in the OMS framework, and (3) determine AOS of other mixed-valent/single oxidation state ion systems, such as Mo3+(3d3)-Mo4+(3d2) systems and Fe3+ in FeCl3.

  9. Synthesis and structural characterization of manganese olivine lithium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera Robles, Joel O. [Basic Science Department, IIT, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Av. del Charro 460 norte Cd. Juárez, Chih. C.P. 32310 (Mexico); Fuentes Cobas, Luis E. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, Complejo Industrial, M. Cervantes 120, Chihuahua C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Díaz de la Torre, Sebastián [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación e Innovación Tecnológica CIITEC, Azcapotzalco, México, D.F. C.P. 02250 (Mexico); Camacho Montes, Héctor, E-mail: hcamacho@uacj.mx [Basic Science Department, IIT, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Av. del Charro 460 norte Cd. Juárez, Chih. C.P. 32310 (Mexico); Elizalde Galindo, José T.; García Casillas, Perla E.; Rodríguez González, Claudia A. [Basic Science Department, IIT, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Av. del Charro 460 norte Cd. Juárez, Chih. C.P. 32310 (Mexico); Álvarez Contreras, Lorena [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, Complejo Industrial, M. Cervantes 120, Chihuahua C.P. 31109 (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • LiMnPO{sub 4} was obtained by sol gel method and crystallization in reducing atmosphere. • Magnetic and electric properties are reported for LiMnPO{sub 4}. • Electrochemical properties are also found and enhanced by adding carbon. • SEM and HRTEM show the submicron powder nature. • The multifunctional behavior of LiMnPO{sub 4} is experimentally demonstrated. - Abstract: The manganese olivine lithium phosphate is a multifunctional material. If carbon is added to form a composite LiMnPO{sub 4}–C, electrochemical properties can be enhanced, making this material a good candidate for battery cathode. High magnetic susceptibility is reported for this compound at room temperature. In this work, the magnetic response was measured through a Field Cooling/Zero Field Cooling technique at temperature below 100 K. Weak ferroelectric properties at room temperature were measured. Even though, the promising applications and the interesting properties of this system, the attention received in the literature is relatively low. The synthesis of this material is difficult because of the rapid manganese oxidation and the need of a reducing atmosphere. In fact, only few authors report the synthesis of the pure phase. In the present work, nanostructured LiMnPO{sub 4} is obtained by sol gel chemical method and according to X-ray diffraction patterns, pure LiMnPO{sub 4} is obtained after calcination in a reducing atmosphere (10% H{sub 2} – 90% Ar). Nanostructured LiMnPO{sub 4} is a material with very interesting properties that deserves attentions.

  10. Hair Manganese as an Exposure Biomarker among Welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Boris; Simpson, Christopher D; Baker, Marissa G; Stover, Bert; Sheppard, Lianne; Seixas, Noah S

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying exposure and dose to manganese (Mn) containing airborne particles in welding fume presents many challenges. Common biological markers such as Mn in blood or Mn in urine have not proven to be practical biomarkers even in studies where positive associations were observed. However, hair Mn (MnH) as a biomarker has the advantage over blood and urine that it is less influenced by short-term variability of Mn exposure levels because of its slow growth rate. The objective of this study was to determine whether hair can be used as a biomarker for welders exposed to manganese. Hair samples (1cm) were collected from 47 welding school students and individual air Mn (MnA) exposures were measured for each subject. MnA levels for all days were estimated with a linear mixed model using welding type as a predictor. A 30-day time-weighted average MnA (MnA30d) exposure level was calculated for each hair sample. The association between MnH and MnA30d levels was then assessed. A linear relationship was observed between log-transformed MnA30d and log-transformed MnH. Doubling MnA30d exposure levels yields a 20% (95% confidence interval: 11-29%) increase in MnH. The association was similar for hair washed following two different wash procedures designed to remove external contamination. Hair shows promise as a biomarker for inhaled Mn exposure given the presence of a significant linear association between MnH and MnA30d levels.

  11. VERTEX: Manganese transport with CaCO 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John H.; Knauer, George A.

    1983-04-01

    Manganese transport was studied off central California in August and September 1981 as part of the VERTEX (Vertica l Transport and Exchange) research program. Refractory, leachable, and dissolved Mn fractions associated with particles caught in traps set at 11 depths (50 to 2000 m) were analyzed. Through intentional and unintentional CaCO 3 dissolution 'experiments', it was learned that the weakly leachable Mn was originally in association with the carbonate phase. Adsorption on surfaces rather than absorption in CaCO 3 matrices was indicated by the finding that Mn was not released in proportion to the CaCo 3 dissolved, instead it appeared to keep readsorbing to the dissolving surface. Ultimately, Mn went into solution when the particulate CaCO 3 was essentially depleted, suggesting that sufficient sites for adsorption were no longer available. Manganese fluxes with CaCO 3 were low near the surface (0.1 mg cm -2 ky -1), but increased rapidly in the 50 to 200-m depth interval, and then became more or less constant (1.3 mg cm -2 ky -1 for the remainder of the water column (300 to 2000 m). Rate-of-change estimates indicate that Mn is rapidly scavenged in near-surface waters (-130 ng 1 -1 y -1) and slowly regenerated at depth (2.7 ng 1 -1 y -1) in our near-shore study area. Residence times for dissolved Mn were estimated at 1.2 y for surface waters and 17 y at depth. The implications of Mn transport with CaCO 3 in relation to open-ocean sediment excess Mn are discussed.

  12. Sub-chronic inhalation of high concentrations of manganese sulfate induces lower airway pathology in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Brian A

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotoxicity and pulmonary dysfunction are well-recognized problems associated with prolonged human exposure to high concentrations of airborne manganese. Surprisingly, histological characterization of pulmonary responses induced by manganese remains incomplete. The primary objective of this study was to characterize histologic changes in the monkey respiratory tract following manganese inhalation. Methods Subchronic (6 hr/day, 5 days/week inhalation exposure of young male rhesus monkeys to manganese sulfate was performed. One cohort of monkeys (n = 4–6 animals/exposure concentration was exposed to air or manganese sulfate at 0.06, 0.3, or 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for 65 exposure days. Another eight monkeys were exposed to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for 65 exposure days and held for 45 or 90 days before evaluation. A second cohort (n = 4 monkeys per time point was exposed to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 and evaluated after 15 or 33 exposure days. Evaluations included measurement of lung manganese concentrations and evaluation of respiratory histologic changes. Tissue manganese concentrations were compared for the exposure and control groups by tests for homogeneity of variance, analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's multiple comparison. Histopathological findings were evaluated using a Pearson's Chi-Square test. Results Animals exposed to manganese sulfate at ≥0.3 mg Mn/m3 for 65 days had increased lung manganese concentrations. Exposure to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for ≥15 exposure days resulted in increased lung manganese concentrations, mild subacute bronchiolitis, alveolar duct inflammation, and proliferation of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. Bronchiolitis and alveolar duct inflammatory changes were absent 45 days post-exposure, suggesting that these lesions are reversible upon cessation of subchronic high-dose manganese exposure. Conclusion High-dose subchronic manganese sulfate inhalation is

  13. Impact of biogenic amine molecular weight and structure on surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun

    2016-02-01

    The oligoamines, such as ethylenediamine to pentaethylenetetramine, and the aliphatic biogenic amines, such as putrescine, spermidine and spermine, strongly interact with anionic surfactants, such as sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS. It has been shown that this results in pronounced surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface and the transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption which depends upon solution pH and oligoamine structure. In the neutron reflectivity, NR, and surface tension, ST, results presented here the role of the oligoamine structure on the adsorption of SDS is investigated more fully using a range of different biogenic amines. The effect of the extent of the intra-molecular spacing between amine groups on the adsorption has been extended by comparing results for cadavarine with putrescine and ethylenediamine. The impact of more complex biogenic amine structures on the adsorption has been investigated with the aromatic phenethylamine, and the heterocyclic amines histamine and melamine. The results provide an important insight into how surfactant adsorption at interfaces can be manipulated by the addition of biogenic amines, and into the role of solution pH and oligoamine structure in modifying the interaction between the surfactant and oligoamine. The results impact greatly upon potential applications and in understanding some of the important biological functions of biogenic amines.

  14. CHANGES IN COUNTS OF MICROORGANISMS AND BIOGENIC AMINES PRODUCTION DURING THE MANUFACTURE OF FERMENTED SAUSAGES POLIČAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Kalhotka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Poličan is classic raw fermented sausage with low acidity. Dry fermented sausages Poličan were used for the analysis and drawn once a week during production from ripening chambers of meat-packing plants. Those sausages ripened for 35 days under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The aim of this article is to evaluate microorganisms accompanying ripening of fermented sausages Poličan and characterize relationships between activity of microorganisms and content of biogenic amines. Lactic acid bacteria are the most important group of microorganisms. Their counts are relatively high already at the beginning of ripening - about 106 CFU.g-1. During the first week of ripening, their numbers increased to 107 CFU.g-1 and has not changed much further. Due to the minimal counts of coliform bacteria and micromycetes at the end of ripening, both series of these products can be considered as good and safe. In freshly made sausages, the amount of biogenic amines was low. Spermidine, spermine and tyramine were quantitatively the most important. During ripening, the content of biogenic amines was increasing. Significant difference in biogenic amines between I. and II. series was found only for tyramine which was detected in difference exceeding 100 mg.kg-1 at the end of ripening. Sausages from II. series with high levels of tyramine may present a risk for sensitive individuals. Due to low levels of biogenic amines, other samples may be regarded as unproblematic.

  15. Manganese accumulates within golgi apparatus in dopaminergic cells as revealed by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence nanoimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Asunción; Devès, Guillaume; Roudeau, Stéphane; Cloetens, Peter; Bohic, Sylvain; Ortega, Richard

    2010-03-17

    Chronic exposure to manganese results in neurological symptoms referred to as manganism and is identified as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease. In vitro, manganese induces cell death in the dopaminergic cells, but the mechanisms of manganese cytotoxicity are still unexplained. In particular, the subcellular distribution of manganese and its interaction with other trace elements needed to be assessed. Applying synchrotron X-ray fluorescence nanoimaging, we found that manganese was located within the Golgi apparatus of PC12 dopaminergic cells at physiologic concentrations. At increasing concentrations, manganese accumulates within the Golgi apparatus until cytotoxic concentrations are reached resulting in a higher cytoplasmic content probably after the Golgi apparatus storage capacity is exceeded. Cell exposure to manganese and brefeldin A, a molecule known to specifically cause the collapse of the Golgi apparatus, results in the striking intracellular redistribution of manganese, which accumulates in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. These results indicate that the Golgi apparatus plays an important role in the cellular detoxification of manganese. In addition manganese exposure induces a decrease in total iron content, which could contribute to the overall neurotoxicity.

  16. Influence of distribution characteristics and associated seabed features on exploitation of cobalt-rich manganese deposits

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yamazaki, T.; Sharma, R.; Tsurusaki, K.

    Method of exploitation, selection of mine site and desing of mining system of cobalt-rich manganese deposits on seamounts would be greatly influenced by the distribution characteristics as well as the associated seabed features, wuch as the seabed...

  17. Cobalt promoted copper manganese oxide catalysts for ambient temperature carbon monoxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher; Taylor, Stuart H; Burrows, Andrew; Crudace, Mandy J; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2008-04-14

    Low levels of cobalt doping (1 wt%) of copper manganese oxide enhances its activity for carbon monoxide oxidation under ambient conditions and the doped catalyst can display higher activity than current commercial catalysts.

  18. The origin of ferro-manganese oxide coated pumice from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Pearce, N.J.G.; Parthiban, G.; Smith, V.C.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Rao, N.R.

    Pumice clasts, partially and fully coated with ferro-manganese oxide from the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) were analysed for major, trace and rare earth elements; and glass and mineral grain chemistry to assess their possible source...

  19. Bacterial contribution to mitigation of iron and manganese in mangrove sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnan, K.P.; Fernandes, S.O.; Chandan, G.S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    the non monsoon months is suggestive of the latter's contribution to regulation of the metal concentration in the sediment probably through anaerobic nitrification at the expense of manganese. The study therefore supports our hypothesis that both...

  20. Manganese: it turns iron into steel (and does so much more)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is a common ferrous metal with atomic weight of 25 and the chemical symbol Mn. It constitutes roughly 0.1 percent of the Earth’s crust, making it the 12th most abundant element. Its early uses were limited largely to pigments and oxidants in chemical processes and experiments, but the significance of manganese to human societies exploded with the development of modern steelmaking technology in the 1860s. U.S consumption of manganese is about 500,000 metric tons each year, predominantly by the steel industry. Because manganese is essential and irreplaceable in steelmaking and its global mining industry is dominated by just a few nations, it is considered one of the most critical mineral commodities for the United States.

  1. Distribution characteristics of co-rich manganese deposits on a seamount in the central Pacific Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yamazaki, T.; Sharma, R.

    Distribution characteristics of cobalt-rich manganese deposits were evaluated from stereo photographs and video data on a seamount in the central Pacific Ocean by image analysis, photogrammetric technique, and visual observations. The results show...

  2. Natural manganese oxides as catalysts for oxidative coupling of methane: a structural and degradation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioffe, L.M.; Bosch, P.; Viveros, T.; Sanchez, H.; Borodko, Y.G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico (Mexico). Dept. of Chem.

    1997-12-01

    Natural manganese oxides were evaluated as oxidative coupling catalysts to convert methane into C{sub 2}-hydrocarbons. Reactions were done in a cyclic redox mode in which the oxidized catalyst was reacted with methane at 850 C in the absence of oxygen. The bulk and surface analyses (XRD, XPS, FT-IR) indicate that the catalyst deactivation in the methane atmosphere is related to reduction of manganese ions, oxygen depletion of the catalyst surface and formation of manganese carbide species. It is proposed that the XPS line of O1s electrons, Eb=528.6 eV should be assigned to the surface oxygen bound to the reduced Mn{sup 2+} cation with close oxygen vacancies, and lines ofMn2p{sub 3/2} electrons, Eb=641 eV and C1s at 282.5 eV may be assigned to the surface manganese carbide. (orig.) 27 refs.

  3. Manganese dioxide graphite composite electrodes: application to the electroanalysis of hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid and nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Cathryn E; Sljukić, Biljana; Banks, Craig E; Compton, Richard G

    2007-02-01

    The modification of carbon powder with manganese dioxide using a wet impregnation procedure with electrochemical characterisation of the modified powder is described. The process involves saturation of the carbon powder with manganese(II) nitrate followed by thermal treatment at ca. 773 K leading to formation of manganese(IV) oxide on the surface of the carbon powder. The construction of composite electrodes based on manganese dioxide modified carbon powder and epoxy resin is also described, including optimisation of the percentage of the modified carbon powder. Composite electrodes showed attractive performances for electroanalytical applications, proving to be suitable for the electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid and nitrite ions with limits of detection comparable to the detection limits achieved by other analytical techniques. The results obtained for detection of these analytes, together with composite electrodes flexible design and low cost offers potential application of composite electrodes in biosensors.

  4. Associations of iron metabolism genes with blood manganese levels: a population-based study with validation data from animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Henn Birgit

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given mounting evidence for adverse effects from excess manganese exposure, it is critical to understand host factors, such as genetics, that affect manganese metabolism. Methods Archived blood samples, collected from 332 Mexican women at delivery, were analyzed for manganese. We evaluated associations of manganese with functional variants in three candidate iron metabolism genes: HFE [hemochromatosis], TF [transferrin], and ALAD [δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase]. We used a knockout mouse model to parallel our significant results as a novel method of validating the observed associations between genotype and blood manganese in our epidemiologic data. Results Percentage of participants carrying at least one copy of HFE C282Y, HFE H63D, TF P570S, and ALAD K59N variant alleles was 2.4%, 17.7%, 20.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Percentage carrying at least one copy of either C282Y or H63D allele in HFE gene was 19.6%. Geometric mean (geometric standard deviation manganese concentrations were 17.0 (1.5 μg/l. Women with any HFE variant allele had 12% lower blood manganese concentrations than women with no variant alleles (β = -0.12 [95% CI = -0.23 to -0.01]. TF and ALAD variants were not significant predictors of blood manganese. In animal models, Hfe-/- mice displayed a significant reduction in blood manganese compared with Hfe+/+ mice, replicating the altered manganese metabolism found in our human research. Conclusions Our study suggests that genetic variants in iron metabolism genes may contribute to variability in manganese exposure by affecting manganese absorption, distribution, or excretion. Genetic background may be critical to consider in studies that rely on environmental manganese measurements.

  5. Reaction of ozone with c5 and c6 biogenic volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Connor, M.; O Dwyer, M.; Wenger, J.

    2003-04-01

    REACTION OF OZONE WITH C5 AND C6 BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS M. O'Connor, M. O'Dwyer, J. Wenger CRAC-Centre for Research into Atmospheric Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University College Cork, Ireland. jwenger@chemistry.ucc.ie Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) account for around 90% of hydrocarbon emissionsinto the Earth's atmosphere. During the last ten years an increasing number of oxygenated BVOCs have also been detected in field measurement campaigns and plant emission studies. In particular a range of C5 and C6 oxygenates have been identifiedincluding compounds such as 1-penten-3-ol, E-2-hexenal and E-2-hexenyl acetate. The atmospheric impact of many of these compounds is largely unknown. The major atmospheric degradation processes for biogenic VOCs are gas-phase reaction with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, nitrate (NO3) radicals and ozone (O3). These reactions produce oxidized hydrocarbons, ozone and secondary organic aerosol and, as a result, exert a strong influence on the chemical compositionof the atmosphere. Although a number of studies have been made on the kinetics of the degradation of BVOCs, very few details are available concerning the reaction products and chemical mechanisms. In this work we have studied the reaction of O3 with a series of C5 unsaturated alcohols and C6 unsaturated aldehydes. Rate coefficients for these reactions have been studied using the relative rate method and gas-phase oxidation products have been identified using FTIR spectroscopy and PFBHA derivatisation coupled with GC-MS analysis. In addition secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has been studied as a function of humidity. The data obtained in this work will be used to further our knowledge of the atmospheric degradation of these naturally occurring compounds.

  6. Tethered balloon measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds at a Boreal forest site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spirig

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs were performed at Hyytiälä, a Boreal forest site in Southern Finland as part of the OSOA (origin and formation of secondary organic aerosol project in August 2001. At this site, frequent formation of new particles has been observed and the role of biogenic VOCs in this process is still unclear. Tethered balloons served as platforms to collect VOC samples within the planetary boundary layer at heights up to 1.2 km above ground during daytime. Mean mixed layer concentrations of total monoterpenes varied between 10 and 170 pptv, with a-pinene, limonene and D3-carene as major compounds, isoprene was detected at levels of 2-35 pptv. A mixed layer gradient technique and a budget approach are applied to derive surface fluxes representative for areas of tens to hundreds of square kilometres. Effects of spatial heterogeneity in surface emissions are examined with a footprint analysis. Depending on the source area considered, mean afternoon emissions of the sum of terpenes range between 180 and 300 mg m-2 h-1 for the period of 2-12 August 2001. Surface fluxes close to Hyytiälä were higher than the regional average, and agree well with mean emissions predicted by a biogenic VOC emission model. Total rates of monoterpene oxidation were calculated with a photochemical model. The rates did not correlate with the occurrence of new particle formation, but the ozone pathway was of more importance on days with particle formation. Condensable vapour production from the oxidation of monoterpenes throughout the mixed layer can only account for a fraction of the increase in aerosol mass observed at the surface.

  7. Chemistry of rain events in West Africa: evidence of dust and biogenic influence in convective systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Desboeufs

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the chemical composition of 7 rain events associated with mesoscale convective systems sampled at the supersite of Banizoumbou, Niger, during the first special observation periods (June–July 2006 of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA experiment. Time-resolved rain sampling was performed in order to discriminate the local dust scavenged at the beginning of rain event from the aerosol particles incorporated in the cloud at the end of the rain. The total elemental composition is dominated by Al, Si, Fe and Ca, indicating a high influence of dust and limited marine or anthropogenic contribution. After the aerosol wash-out, the elemental concentrations normalized to Al and the microscopic observations of diatoms, a tracer of the Bodélé depression, both indicate that the total elemental composition of rainwater is controlled by dust originating from North-eastern Saharan sources and probably incorporated in the convective cloud from the Harmattan layer. The low variability of the rain composition over the measurement period indicates a regional and temporal homogeneity of dust composition in the Harmattan layer. In the dissolved phase, the dominant anions are nitrate (NO3, sulphate (SO42− and chloride (Cl. However, between June and July we observe an increasing contribution of the organic anions (formate, acetate, oxalate associated with biogenic emissions to the total ion composition. These results confirm the large influence of biogenic emissions on the rain composition over Sahel during the wet season. The paper concludes on the capacity of mesoscale convective systems to carry simultaneously dust and biogenic compounds originating from different locations and depose them jointly. It also discusses the potential biogeochemical impact of such a phenomenon.

  8. Source of nutrient substrates for microbes in deep biosphere and characteristics of biogenic gas source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To understand the biogas formation in geological basins, the present work investigated the reactive organic matter in sediments of the Sanhu depression of Qaidam Basin, a prolific region of biogenic gases with a proved reserve of 300 bil steres. The ROC (reactive organic carbon) was obtained by ultrasonic extraction from sediment samples in the solution of 6 mol/L HCl and 5% K2SO4. To investigate the effect of early diagenesis, parts of the samples were heated at 80°C before extraction. The results showed that the ROC content at a constant temperature decreased with increasing burial depths, which should be attributed to the microbial consumption. For the same sample, the ROC content heated at 80°C was dramatically higher than the unheated. The increment of the ROC content for some samples was as high as 200% in the experiment. The dramatically increasing ROC by thermal action should be the major nutrient substrate for the deep biospheres in most geological basins. There is a positive correlation between the reactive organic carbon (ROC) and the traditional insoluble organic carbon (TOC), not only for its absolute content of the ROC, but also for the ’ROC’ produced in thermal action, all of these are clearly related with TOC. These data showed that higher abundance of organic matter can contribute more to the reactive organic matter, and is more favorable to the formation of biogenic gases. In the Sanhu depression of Qaidam Basin, more than 85% of the biogenic gas reserves occur in the lower layers (K5-K13) with a relatively high abundance of organic matter. The exploration has provided further evidence that deposits with higher abundance of organic matter are effective biogas source rocks.

  9. Soil biogenic emissions of nitric oxide from a semi-arid savanna in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, G. T.; Mamtimin, B.; Meixner, F. X.

    2008-12-01

    Soils of arid and semi-arid ecosystems are important biogenic sources of atmospheric nitric oxide (NO), however, there is still a shortage of measurements from these systems. Here we present the results of a laboratory study of the biogenic emission of NO from four different landscape positions of the Kruger National Park (KNP), a large conservation area in a semi-arid region of South Africa. Results show that the highest net potential NO fluxes come from the low lying (footslope) landscape regions, which have the largest nitrogen stocks and highest rates of nitrogen input into the soil. Net potential NO fluxes from midslope and crest regions were considerably lower. The maximum release of NO occurred at fairly low soil moisture contents of 10%-20% water filled pore space. Using soil moisture and temperature data obtained in situ at the Kruger National Park flux tower site, net potential NO fluxes obtained in the laboratory were converted to field fluxes for each of the four landscape positions for the period 2003 to 2005. The highest field NO flux is from footslope positions, during each of these years and emissions ranged from 1.5-8.5 kg ha a (in terms of mass of nitrogen). Remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems techniques were used to up-scale field NO fluxes on a regional basis indicating that the highest emissions occurred from the midslope positions, due to their large geographical extent in the considered research area. Emissions for the KNP Skukuza land type (56 000 ha) ranged from 20×103 kg in 2004 to 34×103 kg in 2003. The importance of landscape characteristics in the determination of regional biogenic NO soil emission is emphasized.

  10. Synthesis of manganese stearate for high density polyethylene (HDPE) and its biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aras, Neny Rasnyanti M., E-mail: neny.rasnyanti@gmail.com; Arcana, I Made, E-mail: arcana@chem.itb.ac.id [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    An oxidant additive is one type of additive used for oxo-biodegradable polymers. This additive was prepared by reaction multivalent transition metals and fatty acids to accelerate the degradation process of polymers by providing a thermal treatment or irradiation with light. This study focused on the synthesis of manganese stearate as an additive for application in High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), and the influence of manganese stearate on the characteristics of HDPE including their biodegradability. Manganese stearate was synthesized by the reaction of stearic acid with sodium hydroxide, and sodium stearate formed was reacted with manganese chloride tetrahydrate to form manganese stearate with a melting point of 100-110 °C. Based on the FTIR spectrum showed absorption peak at wave number around 1560 cm{sup −1} which is an asymmetric vibration of CO functional group that binds to the manganese. The films of oxo-biodegradable polymer were prepared by blending HDPE and manganese stearate additives at various concentrations with using the polymer melting method, followed heating at a temperature of 50°C and 70°C for 10 days. The characterizations of the oxo-biodegradable polymers were carried out by analysis the functional groups (FTIR and ATR),thermal properties (TGA), surface properties (SEM), as well as analysis of the biodegradability (the biodegradation test by using activated sludge, % weight loss). Based on COi indicate that the additive of manganese stearate is active in oxidizing polymer by heating treatment. Results of biodegradation by microorganisms from activated sludge showed that the percentage weight loss of polymers increase with the increasing incubation time and the concentration of manganese stearate in HDPE. Biodegradability of HDPE with the addition of manganese stearate and followed by heating at a higher temperature was better observed. The highest percentage weight loss was obtained at the polymer with concentration of 0.2% manganese

  11. Magnetic Dinner Salads: The Role of Biogenic Magnetite in Cryopreservation for Common Food Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, T. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenically-precipitated magnetite has been found in organisms ranging from Bacteria, single-celled protists, and many of the animal phyla, where its major function is navigation and magnetoreception. To date there is but a single report of biogenic magnetite in plants (essentially, magnetoferritin), and that is in common grass (Festuca species, from Gajdardziska-Josifovska et. al. doi:10.1127/0935-1221/2001/0013/0863). Recent developments in cryopreservation suggest that ~ 1 mT, ~ 10 Hz oscillating magnetic fields can drastically reduce ice nucleation during freezing, promote supercooling, and minimize cellular damage in living tissues (e.g., Kaku et al., doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2012.02.001). Kobayashi & Kirschvink (2014, doi:10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.12.002) suggest that biogenic magnetite crystals could be the nucleating site for damaging ice crystals, and that they would be driven magneto-mechanically to rotate in those oscillating fields which could inhibit the ice crystal nucleation process. This prompted our investigation into the magnetite content of ordinary fruit and vegetable food products, as knowledge of the natural levels of biogenic magnetite in the human food supply could guide the selection of which foods might work for this type of cryopreservation. Our study involved a range of common foods including avocados, bananas, garlic, and apples. Samples were prepared in a clean lab environment kept free of contaminant particles, and subjected to a variety of standard rock-magnetic tests including IRM and ARM acquisition, and the corresponding Af demagnetization, on a standard 2G™ SRM. Results are consistent with moderately interacting single-domain magnetite (see figure), with moderate inter-particle interaction effects. Typical magnetite concentrations in these samples are in the range of .1 to 1 ng/g for room temperature samples, increasing to the range of 1-10 ng/g when measured frozen (to inhibit thermal rotation of small particles and clumps). If

  12. Synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles for tracking of stem cells and dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Sebastian [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Fernandes, Fabiana [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Department of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Sanroman, Laura [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hodenius, Michael [Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Lang, Claus [Department of Microbiology, Ludwig-Maximillians-University of Munich, Maria-Ward-Str. 1a, 80638 Munich (Germany); Himmelreich, Uwe [In-vivo-NMR-Laboratory, Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleueler Str. 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Biomedical NMR Unit, MoSAIC, Faculty of Medicine, KU Leuven, Onderwijs en Navorsing 1, bus 505, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Schueler, Dirk [Department of Microbiology, Ludwig-Maximillians-University of Munich, Maria-Ward-Str. 1a, 80638 Munich (Germany); Hoehn, Mathias [In-vivo-NMR-Laboratory, Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleueler Str. 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Accurate delivery of cells to target organs is critical for success of cell-based therapies with stem cells or immune cells such as antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC). Labeling with contrast agents before implantation provides a powerful means for monitoring cellular migration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we investigated the uptake of fully synthesized or bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into hematopoietic Flt3{sup +} stem cells and DC from mouse bone marrow. We show that (i) uptake of both synthetic and biogenic nanoparticles into cells endow magnetic activity and (ii) low numbers of MNP-loaded cells are readily detected by MRI.

  13. Reduction of Biogenic Amines during Miso Fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum as a Starter Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chen; Kung, Hsien-Feng; Huang, Ya-Ling; Wu, Chien-Hui; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang

    2016-09-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum D-103 isolated from a miso product that possesses amine-degrading activity was used as a starter culture in miso fermentation (25°C for 120 days) in this study. The salt content in control samples (without starter culture) and inoculated samples (inoculated with L. plantarum D-103) remained constant at 10.4% of the original salt concentration throughout fermentation, whereas the pH value decreased from 6.2 to 4.6 during fermentation. The inoculated samples had significantly lower (P culture with amine-degrading activity in miso products was effective in reducing the accumulation of biogenic amines.

  14. Structural distortion of biogenic aragonite in strongly textured mollusc shell layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chateigner, D., E-mail: daniel.chateigner@ensicaen.f [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Ouhenia, S. [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Lab. De Physique, Faculte des Sciences Exactes, Bejaia 06000 (Algeria); Krauss, C. [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Belkhir, M. [Lab. De Physique, Faculte des Sciences Exactes, Bejaia 06000 (Algeria); Morales, M. [CIMAP-ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France)

    2010-02-15

    The stabilisation of strong textures in mollusc shells has for long been a strong drawback towards precise structural determinations of these natural biocomposites. We demonstrate here on several crossed lamellar and nacre layers from two gastropods (Charonia lampas lampas and Haliotis tuberculata tuberculata) and one bivalve (Pinctada maxima), that on real specimens (without grinding or specific preparation), the textural information can be used efficiently for precise structural determination of the biogenic aragonite. This is done through the combination of orientation distribution function and cyclic Rietveld refinements on several hundreds to thousands of diffractions diagrams.

  15. Elevated Glyoxal Concentrations over the Eastern Equatorial Pacific: A Direct Biogenic Source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, Y.; Lerot, C.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric glyoxal (CHOCHO) was observed over the eastern equatorial Pacific by satellite and ship measurements. We investigated the source contributions through inverse modeling using GOME-2 observations (2007-2012) and the GEOS-Chem model. The observed high glyoxal to HCHO column ratio over the region indicates the potential presence of a direct source of glyoxal rather than secondary production. A bimodal seasonal cycle of glyoxal concentrations was found, providing further evidence for a biogenic origin of glyoxal emission. The estimate of the primary glyoxal emission over the eastern equatorial Pacific is 20-40Tg/yr, which is comparable to the previous estimate of the global continential glyoxal emission.

  16. Synthesis of single crystal manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS) nanostructures with tunable tunnels and shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Na; Yuan, Jikang; Gomez-Mower, Sinue; Sithambaram, Shantakumar; Suib, Steven L

    2006-02-23

    A new and facile route is reported to manipulate the self-assembly synthesis of hierarchically ordered Rb-OMS-2 and pyrolusite with an interesting flowerlike morphology by a direct and mild reaction between rubidium chromateand manganese sulfate without any organic templates. The crystal forms, morphologies, and tunnel sizes of the obtained OMS materials can be controlled. A mechanism for the growth of manganese dioxides with flowerlike architectures was proposed. The obtained products exhibit potential for use in catalysis and other applications.

  17. The Mechanism on Biomass Reduction of Low-Grade Manganese Dioxide Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honglei; Zhu, Guocai; Yan, Hong; Li, Tiancheng; Zhao, Yuna

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism on biomass reduction of low-grade manganese dioxide ore was studied by investigating influence factors on manganese recovery degree, such as the reaction temperature, time, biomass/ore ratio, compositions of biomass, nitrogen flow rate, and particle size of raw materials, and it was further identified through analysis of gas composition in the outlet gas, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the reduced sample. The results show that the reduction process involved mainly two steps: (1) The biomass was first pyrolyzed to release reductive volatiles and (2) manganese oxide ore was reacted with the reductive volatiles. By an analysis of gas composition in the outlet gas, it was also found that the ratio of biomass/ore had an important effect on the reduction mechanism. With a low biomass/ore ratio of 0.5:10, the reducing reaction of the reductive volatiles with manganese dioxide ore proceeded mainly in two stages: (1) The condensable volatiles (tar) released from biomass pyrolysis reacted with manganese oxide ore to produce reductive noncondensable gases such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and some light hydrocarbons; and (2) the small molecule gases further participated in the reduction. XRD pattern analysis on the reduced manganese dioxide ore revealed that the process of biomass reduction of manganese ore underwent in phases (MnO2 → Mn3O4 → MnO). The kinetics study showed the reduction process was controlled by a gas-solid reaction between biomass volatiles and manganese oxide ore with activation energy E of 53.64 kJ mol-1 and frequency factor A of 5.45 × 103 minutes-1.

  18. Sorption of arsenic on manganese dioxide synthesized by solid state reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Aditi A; Ajith, Nicy; Swain, Kallola K; Verma, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic in groundwater is a major concern in many parts of the world and suitable sorbents are required for removal of arsenic from ground water. Removal of arsenic from groundwater has been studied using manganese dioxide, synthesized by solid state reaction of manganese acetate with potassium permanganate. Manganese dioxide was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), zeta potential, surface area, particle size measurements and thermal analysis. XRD measurement showed that the manganese dioxide had α-MnO2 structure. Sorption of As(III) and As(V) on manganese dioxide was studied by radiotracer technique using (76)As radio isotope. Arsenic removal efficiency for both As(III) and As(V) at concentration of 2 mg L(-1) was ∼99% in the pH range of 3-9. The sorption capacities for As(III) and As(V) were ∼60 mg g(-1). Kinetic studies showed that the equilibrium was reached within 30 s. Arsenic sorbed on manganese dioxide was present as As(V) irrespective of initial oxidation state. The presence of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cl(-) and SO4(2-) up to a concentration of 1000 mg L(-1) had no significant effect on arsenic sorption. The sorption of arsenic decreased significantly in the presence of phosphate and bicarbonate anions above 10 mg L(-1). Arsenic sorbed on manganese dioxide was desorbed by 0.1M NaOH. Arsenic was effectively removed by manganese dioxide from groundwater samples collected from arsenic contaminated areas of West Bengal, India.

  19. SPECTRAL-LUMINESCENT CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES ACTIVATED WITH MANGANESE AND CADMIUM SULPHIDE QUANTUM DOTS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanna O. Lipatova; Vladimir A. Aseev; Elena V. Kolobkova

    2014-01-01

    Research and development of phosphors based on quantum dots (QD) is a perspective problem of photonics. The main advantages of fluorophosphate glass with quantum dots are: high absorption coefficient, solid matrix and a broad band luminescence with high quantum efficiency of QD. Manganese ions have an intense band luminescence in the red region of the spectrum. Thus, the addition of manganese ions in the glass with quantum dots leads to a broadening of the spectrum in the long wav...

  20. A Manganese-rich Environment Supports Superoxide Dismutase Activity in a Lyme Disease Pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, J. Dafhne; Clark, Hillary M.; McIlvin, Matthew; Vazquez, Christine; Palmere, Shaina L.; Grab, Dennis J.; Seshu, J.; Hart, P. John; Saito, Mak; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2013-01-01

    The Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi represents a novel organism in which to study metalloprotein biology in that this spirochete has uniquely evolved with no requirement for iron. Not only is iron low, but we show here that B. burgdorferi has the capacity to accumulate remarkably high levels of manganese. This high manganese is necessary to activate the SodA superoxide dismutase (SOD) essential for virulence. Using a metalloproteomic approach, we demonstrate that a bulk of B. burgdorferi SodA directly associates with manganese, and a smaller pool of inactive enzyme accumulates as apoprotein. Other metalloproteins may have similarly adapted to using manganese as co-factor, including the BB0366 aminopeptidase. Whereas B. burgdorferi SodA has evolved in a manganese-rich, iron-poor environment, the opposite is true for Mn-SODs of organisms such as Escherichia coli and bakers' yeast. These Mn-SODs still capture manganese in an iron-rich cell, and we tested whether the same is true for Borrelia SodA. When expressed in the iron-rich mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, B. burgdorferi SodA was inactive. Activity was only possible when cells accumulated extremely high levels of manganese that exceeded cellular iron. Moreover, there was no evidence for iron inactivation of the SOD. B. burgdorferi SodA shows strong overall homology with other members of the Mn-SOD family, but computer-assisted modeling revealed some unusual features of the hydrogen bonding network near the enzyme's active site. The unique properties of B. burgdorferi SodA may represent adaptation to expression in the manganese-rich and iron-poor environment of the spirochete. PMID:23376276

  1. A manganese-rich environment supports superoxide dismutase activity in a Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, J Dafhne; Clark, Hillary M; McIlvin, Matthew; Vazquez, Christine; Palmere, Shaina L; Grab, Dennis J; Seshu, J; Hart, P John; Saito, Mak; Culotta, Valeria C

    2013-03-22

    The Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi represents a novel organism in which to study metalloprotein biology in that this spirochete has uniquely evolved with no requirement for iron. Not only is iron low, but we show here that B. burgdorferi has the capacity to accumulate remarkably high levels of manganese. This high manganese is necessary to activate the SodA superoxide dismutase (SOD) essential for virulence. Using a metalloproteomic approach, we demonstrate that a bulk of B. burgdorferi SodA directly associates with manganese, and a smaller pool of inactive enzyme accumulates as apoprotein. Other metalloproteins may have similarly adapted to using manganese as co-factor, including the BB0366 aminopeptidase. Whereas B. burgdorferi SodA has evolved in a manganese-rich, iron-poor environment, the opposite is true for Mn-SODs of organisms such as Escherichia coli and bakers' yeast. These Mn-SODs still capture manganese in an iron-rich cell, and we tested whether the same is true for Borrelia SodA. When expressed in the iron-rich mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, B. burgdorferi SodA was inactive. Activity was only possible when cells accumulated extremely high levels of manganese that exceeded cellular iron. Moreover, there was no evidence for iron inactivation of the SOD. B. burgdorferi SodA shows strong overall homology with other members of the Mn-SOD family, but computer-assisted modeling revealed some unusual features of the hydrogen bonding network near the enzyme's active site. The unique properties of B. burgdorferi SodA may represent adaptation to expression in the manganese-rich and iron-poor environment of the spirochete.

  2. Measurement of Trace Manganese (Ⅱ) by the Catalytic Kinetic Spectrophotometric Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Hongwei; SHA Yuanyuan; XIN Huizhen; QI Yanxia

    2009-01-01

    A new kinetic spectrophotometric method is developed for the measurement of manganese (Ⅱ) in water. The method is based on the catalytic effect of manganese (Ⅱ) with the oxidation of weak acid brilliant blue dye (RAWL) by KIO4 using the Nitrilo triacetic acid (NTA) as an activation reagent. The optimum conditions obtained are 40mgL-1 RAWL, 1×10-4molL-1 KIO4, 2×10-4molL-1 Nitrilo triacetic acid (NTA), pH = 5.8, the reaction time of 3.00 min and the temperature of 20.0 ℃. Under the optimum con-ditions, the proposed method allows the measurement of manganese (Ⅱ) in a range of 0-50.0ngmL-1 and with a detection limit of down to 0.158 ng mL-1. The recovery efficiency in measuring the standard manganese (Ⅱ) solution is in a range of 98.5%-102%, and the RSD is in a range of 0.76%-1.25%. The new method has been successfully applied to the measurement of manganese (Ⅱ) in both fresh water and seawater samples with satisfying results. Moreover, few cations and anions interfere with the measurement of man-ganese (Ⅱ). Compared with other kinetic catalytic methods and instrumental methods, the proposed method shows fairly good selec-tivity and sensitivity, low cost, cheapness, low detection limit and rapidity. It can be applied on boats easily.

  3. Manganese based materials for diesel exhaust SO{sub 2} traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhomirov, Kirill; Kroecher, Oliver; Elsener, Martin; Widmer, Markus; Wokaun, Alexander [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-10-05

    The storage of SO{sub 2} in manganese based materials was investigated in flow reactor experiments. Manganese oxide precipitated with ammonia and hydrogen peroxide stored about 76wt.% of SO{sub 2} at a high diffusion rate into the bulk. Doping with potassium increases the SO{sub 2} storage rate substantially at 200{sup o}C, but has an only minor effect at 400{sup o}C. Kinetic studies showed that the storage of SO{sub 2} in pure and potassium doped manganese oxide is controlled by the kinetics of the sulfate formation reaction on the catalyst surface up to complete sulfation, whereas the storage on manganese cerium mixed oxide is limited by internal diffusion of the formed sulfate. The sulfate formation reaction was found to be first order with respect to both SO{sub 2} and manganese oxide. For the potassium doped catalyst sulfur was found to be bound on manganese sites being transferred to potassium afterwards. (author)

  4. Simultaneous removal of ammonia nitrogen and manganese from wastewater using nitrite by electrochemical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Qiu, Jiang; Chen, Hongliang; Tao, Changyuan

    2017-02-01

    In this work, nitrite was developed to simultaneously remove manganese and ammonia nitrogen from wastewater by the electrochemical method. The characteristics of electrolytic reaction were observed via cyclic voltammograms. Moreover, the mole ratio of nitrite and ammonia nitrogen, voltage, and initial pH value, which affected the removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen and manganese, were investigated. The results showed that the concentration of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater could be reduced from 120.2 to 6.0 mg L(-1), and manganese could be simultaneously removed from 302.4 to 1.5 mg L(-1) at initial pH of 8.0, the mole ratios of nitrite and ammonia nitrogen of 1.5:1, and voltage of 20 V direct current electrolysis for 4.0 h. XRD analysis showed that manganese dioxide was deposited on the anode, and manganese was mainly removed in the form of manganese hydroxide precipitation in the cathode chamber.

  5. Exposure to manganese: health effects on the general population, a pilot study in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Burgoa, C; Rios, C; Mercado, L A; Arechiga-Serrano, R; Cano-Valle, F; Eden-Wynter, R A; Texcalac-Sangrador, J L; Villa-Barragan, J P; Rodriguez-Agudelo, Y; Montes, S

    2001-02-01

    To support a risk assessment of manganese exposure in two communities living within a manganese mining district a cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of the adult population of long-term residents. One community was exposed to a point source from an ore primary refining plant. Manganese is an essential mineral for human life. It is also the fourth in importance for industrial metal making. Data were collected on socioeconomic living conditions, emission sources, environmental media concentrations (air, water, soil, dust, food), respiratory symptomatology, and a neuropsychological examination (Mini-Mental Screening test, the Hooper Visual Organization test, the Ardila-Ostroski, and others). We examined 73 subjects (52 women), most of low socioeconomic status. Environmental air concentrations were 2 to 3 times higher than those in other urban concentrations. Manganese blood concentrations ranged from 7.5 to 88 microg/L, with a median concentration of 15, the upper quartile starting at 20 microg/L; the upper 10% was above 25 microg/L. Lead and manganese were highly correlated; there was an inverse relation to hemoglobin. Reduced levels of plasma lipid peroxidation were associated with blood manganese. Using multivariate logistic regression, we identified B-Mn as increasing the risk of deficient cognitive performance 12 times (Mini-Mental score of less than 17).

  6. Role of manganese in protection against oxidative stress under iron starvation in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Verma, Ekta; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was grown in presence and absence of iron to decipher the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress under iron starvation and growth, manganese uptake kinetics, antioxidative enzymes, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, thiol content, total peroxide, proline and NADH content was investigated. Manganese supported the growth of cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron deprived conditions where maximum uptake rate of manganese was observed with lower K(m) and higher V(max) values. Antioxidative enzymes were also found to be elevated in iron-starved conditions. Estimation of lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage depicted the role of manganese in stabilizing the integrity of the membrane which was considered as the prime target of oxygen free radicals in oxidative stress. The levels of total peroxide, thiol, proline and NADH content, which are the representative of oxidative stress response in Anabaena 7120, were also showed increasing trends in iron starvation. Hence, the results discerned, clearly suggested the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron starvation either due to its antioxidative properties or involvement as cofactor in a number of antioxidative enzymes.

  7. Environmental impact of manganese due to its leaching from coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bably; Mondal, Kajal K R

    2009-01-01

    In India, so far not much efforts have been made to use coal ash as backfill material in underground/ open cast mines and to predict its subsequent effect on ground water quality. One of the main problems in disposing of big quantities of coal ash is the possible leaching of different pollutants, including manganese. A thorough investigation regarding leaching of manganese from different fly ashes is required to know the impact of manganese due to its leaching from fly ash to ground water as well as surface water. In the present study, short term and long term leaching studies have been carried out on fly ash, bottom ash, pond ash and weathered ash of Chandrapura thermal power plant, Bokaro, Jharkhand and Ramagundam thermal power plant, Ramagundam, Andhra Pradesh. The amount of manganese released in different experiments has been evaluated. The leachate of Chandrapura fly ash has more manganese concentration (0.2001 mg/L) than the leachate of bottom ash, pond ash and weathered ash. A field investigation at Damoda abandoned open cast mine, filled with pond ash of Chandrapura thermal power plant revealed that concentration of manganese in ground water beneath the ash filled mine has been found very high (maximum up to 6.0 mg/L). But its migration to a long distance has not been seen. Remedial measures for coal ash disposal have also been formulated.

  8. Effect of Manganese Content on the Fabrication of Porous Anodic Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Voon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of manganese content on the formation of well-ordered porous anodic alumina was studied. Porous anodic alumina has been produced on aluminium substrate of different manganese content by single-step anodizing at 50 V in 0.3 M oxalic acid at 15°C for 60 minutes. The well-ordered pore and cell structure was revealed by subjecting the porous anodic alumina to oxide dissolution treatment in a mixture of chromic acid and phosphoric acid. It was found that the manganese content above 1 wt% impaired the regularity of the cell and pore structure significantly, which can be attributed to the presence of secondary phases in the starting material with manganese content above 1 wt%. The pore diameter and interpore distance decreased with the addition of manganese into the substrates. The time variation of current density and the thickness of porous anodic alumina also decreased as a function of the manganese content in the substrates.

  9. Elemental Composition and Geochemical Characteristics of Iron-Manganese Nodules in Main Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Wen-Feng; LIU Fan; LI Yong-Hua; HU Hong-Qing; HUANG Qiao-Yun

    2006-01-01

    Elemental composition and geochemical characteristics of iron-manganese nodules from nine main soils in China were studied by chemical and multivariate statistical analyses to better understand the reactions and functions of ironmanganese nodules in soils and sediment. Compared to the corresponding soils, Mn, Ba, Cd, Co and Pb had strong accumulation, Ni had moderate accumulation, while Ca, Cu, Fe, Na, P, Sr and Zn accumulated to a minor degree in the iron-manganese nodules. In contrast, Si, Al, K, Mg and Ti were reduced in the iron-manganese nodules. The contents of Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were positively and significantly correlated with that of MnO2 in the iron-manganese nodules, while the contents of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were positively and significantly correlated with that of Fe2O3 in soils. Based on a principle component analysis, the elements of iron-manganese nodules were divided into four groups: 1)Mn, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb and Zn that were associated with Mn oxides, 2) Fe, Cr and P that were associated with Fe oxides, 3) Si, K, and Mg that were included in the elemental composition of phyllosilicate, and 4) Ca, Na, Al and Ti that existed in todorokite, birnessite, lithiophorite and phyllosilicate. It was suggested that accumulation, mineralization and specific adsorption were involved in the formation processes of soil iron-manganese nodules.

  10. Effect of Manganese Incorporation Manner on an Iron-Based Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingzhen Li; Yong Yang; Chenghua Zhang; Zhichao Tao; Haijun Wan; Xia An; Hongwei Xiang; Yongwang Li

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the manganese incorporation manner on the textural properties,bulk and surface phase compositions,reduction/carburization behaviors,and surface basicity of an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalyst.The catalyst samples were characterized by N2 Physisorption,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS),H2(or CO) temperature-programmed reduction(TPR),CO2 temperature-programmed desorption(TPD),and Mossbauer spectroscopy.The FTS performance of the catalysts was studied in a slurry-phase continuously stirred tank reactor(CSTR).The characterization results indicated that the manganese promoter incor-porated by using the coprecipitation method could improve the dispersion of iron oxide,and decrease the size of the iron oxide crystallite.The manganese incorporated with the impregnation method is enriched on the catalyst's surface.The manganese promoter added with the impregnation method suppresses the reduction and carburization of the catalyst in H2,CO,and syngas because of the excessive enrichment of manganese on the catalyst surface.The catalyst added manganese using the coprecipitation method has the highest CO conversion (51.9%) and the lowest selectivity for heavy hydrocarbons(C12+).

  11. The effects of manganese phosphate coating wear resistance of chilled ductile iron camshafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarık Gün

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ductile iron camshafts are preferred due to high toughness and strength features in the automobile industry. Through the coolants used in the camshaft production high surface hardness is achieved. In this study, the wear resistance effects of ductile iron chill produced camshafts coated with manganese phosphate are researched. The camshaft surfaces produced as ductile iron chill are coated with manganese phosphate. The coating surfaces are observed with scanning electron microscope (SEM. The changes occurring on the cam profiles are measured with running the wear resistance of the manganese phosphate coating on the camshafts on the engine test rig with 30 minutes interval in 1000rpm. In order to compare the results of uncoated camshafts run on engines are checked against simultaneously. As result, the manganese phosphate coated cams were 2,8 times less worn up than the uncoated cams. The manganese phosphate coated ductile iron chill camshafts are less worn up according to uncoated camshafts because of the oil holding feature of manganese phosphate coating.

  12. Relative and combined effects of ethanol and protein deficiency on bone manganese and copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, José M; González-Reimers, Emilio; DeLaVega-Prieto, María José; Durán-Castellón, María del Carmen; Viña-Rodríguez, José; Galindo-Martín, Luis; Alvisa-Negrín, Julio; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco

    2012-06-01

    Both manganese and copper may affect bone synthesis. Bone content of both metals can be altered in alcoholics, although controversy exists regarding this matter. To analyse the relative and combined effects of ethanol and a low protein diet on bone copper and manganese, and their relationships with bone structure and metabolism, including trabecular bone mass (TBM), osteoid area (OA), osteocalcin (OCN), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), parathyroid hormone (PTH), urinary hydroxyproline (uHP) and vitamin D. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. The control rats received a 18% protein-containing diet; a second group, an isocaloric, 2% protein-containing diet; a third one, an isocaloric, 36% ethanol-containing diet and a fourth, an isocaloric diet containing 2% protein and 36% ethanol. After sacrifice, TBM and OA were histomorphometrically assessed; bone and serum manganese and copper were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and serum OCN, IGF-1, PTH, uHP and vitamin D by radioimmunoassay. Ethanol-fed rats showed decreased TBM and bone manganese. Significant relationships existed between bone manganese and TBM, serum IGF-1 and OCN. Ethanol leads to a decrease in bone manganese, related to decreased bone mass and bone synthesis. No alterations were found in bone copper.

  13. Biogenic amine formation and nitrite reactions in meat batter as affected by high-pressure processing and chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Aller-Guiote, P; Carballo, J; Colmenero, F Jiménez

    2006-12-27

    Changes in biogenic amine formation and nitrite depletion in meat batters as affected by pressure-temperature combinations (300 MPa/30 min/7, 20, and 40 degrees C), cooking process (70 degrees C/30 min), and storage (54 days/2 degrees C) were studied. Changes in residual nitrite concentration in raw meat batters were conditioned by the temperature and not by the pressure applied. Cooking process decreased (P batters. High-pressure processing conditions had no effect on the rate of residual nitrite loss throughout the storage. The application of high pressure decreased (P < 0.05) the concentration of some biogenic amines (tyramine, agmatine, and spermine). Irrespective of the high processing conditions, generally, throughout storage biogenic amine levels did not change or increased, although quantitatively this effect was not very important.

  14. Directed vapor deposition of lithium manganese oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Wan

    Electron beam evaporation and sputtering techniques are used to fabricate multilayered thin film structures. However, these techniques suffer several drawbacks resulting from (i) the complex chemistries of the lithiated oxide layers used for the cathode and electrolyte, (ii) the need for precise microstructure control in systems with many metastable phases, and (iii) the low deposition rate and poor material utilization efficiency, which slows the application of this energy storage approach. This dissertation has investigated the use of a novel electron-beam directed vapor deposition (EB-DVD) method for the synthesis of thin film batteries. The dissertation focuses upon the cathode layer of a representative Li-ion thin film battery system and investigates in detail the deposition of lithium manganese oxide films. Many phases with offering various electrochemical performance exist in the Li-Mn-O system and the thesis also investigates the use of processing conditions to control the structure and composition of these cathode layers. In the EB-DVD approach, a high voltage electron beam is used to evaporate a source material in the throat of a nozzle that forms a coaxial transonic gas jet around the vapor. The gas jet entrains and transports the vapor to a substrate where the deposition occurs. Directed simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) methods indicated that the vapor plume could be matched to a substrate diameter, and the deposition rate (and vapor utilization efficiency) therefore controlled by adjusting the pressure ratio up and downstream of the nozzle opening in the deposition chamber, and by varying the gas jet density and speed. The highest deposition rates were obtained with a high pressure ratio and the gas jet density. These observations are found to be consistent with the experimental results. Deposition rates up to 16 nm/s could be achieved using the most effective gas entrainment conditions identified by DSMC calculation. This was about a factor of ten

  15. Biogenic Fe(III) minerals lower the efficiency of iron-mineral-based commercial filter systems for arsenic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Susanne; Muehe, Eva M; Posth, Nicole R; Dippon, Urs; Daus, Birgit; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    Millions of people worldwide are affected by As (arsenic) contaminated groundwater. Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides sorb As efficiently and are therefore used in water purification filters. Commercial filters containing abiogenic Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides (GEH) showed varying As removal, and it was unclear whether Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria influenced filter efficiency. We found up to 10(7) Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria/g dry-weight in GEH-filters and determined the performance of filter material in the presence and absence of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. GEH-material sorbed 1.7 mmol As(V)/g Fe and was ~8 times more efficient than biogenic Fe(III) minerals that sorbed only 208.3 μmol As(V)/g Fe. This was also ~5 times more efficient than a 10:1-mixture of GEH-material and biogenic Fe(III) minerals that bound 322.6 μmol As(V)/g Fe. Coprecipitation of As(V) with biogenic Fe(III) minerals removed 343.0 μmol As(V)/g Fe, while As removal by coprecipitation with biogenic minerals in the presence of GEH-material was slightly less efficient as GEH-material only and yielded 1.5 mmol As(V)/g Fe. The present study thus suggests that the formation of biogenic Fe(III) minerals lowers rather than increases As removal efficiency of the filters probably due to the repulsion of the negatively charged arsenate by the negatively charged biogenic minerals. For this reason we recommend excluding microorganisms from filters (e.g., by activated carbon filters) to maintain their high As removal capacity.

  16. Influence of ripening time on the amount of certain biogenic amines in rind and core of cow milk Livno cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonela Marijan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining the levels of biogenic amines in cheese except that it has significance for determining the nutritional value and hygienic accuracy, cheese as food can be used as a parameter to evaluate the conditions of production and/or ripening of products, and particularly in the selection of bacterial cultures. The purpose of this paper was to determine the effect of the ripening process on the amount of biogenic amines in cheese. For this purpose were conducted physico-chemical analysis, determination of biogenic amines and microbiological analysis. During the process of ripening Livno cheese from three different batches was taken one cheese from prime day and 9th, 20th, 29th, 50th, 60th and 105th day. From each cheese two samples were taken, one from the middle and one from the cheese rind. During 105th day of ripening Livno cheese, the presence of triptamin, ß-feniletlamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine and spermidine were determinated. The maximum total values of searched biogenic amines were found 105th day, in the middle 184.13 mg/kg and 76.26 mg/kg in the rind of cheese. With an indication that the largest share of value rep¬resent histamine with 43.9 % and tyramine with 38.2 % in the middle, respectively histamine with 31.6 % and tyramine with 31.5 % in the rind of cheese. The values of putrescine and spermine were in small ranges and they are not identified in all samples. The values of histamine and tyramine are almost a third more at 105th than 60th day. There was a significant difference between the middle and the rind of cheese in the values of biogenic amines. Correlation between biogenic amines and microorganisms has not been determined.

  17. Insights into the optical and anti-bacterial properties of biogenic PbSe quantum rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Mary Jacob

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The detailed optical properties of lead selenide (PbSe quantum rods biosynthesized in marine Aspergillus terreus were apprehended theoretically using ab initio calculations based on the experimental absorption spectrum. These studies indicate that the absorption coefficient of the biosynthesized PbSe quantum rods increases linearly with incident photon energies. The variation of other optical constants like extinction coefficient, refractive index and reflectance was comparable to that of the chemically synthesized counterparts. Further, the high dielectric constant and remarkable fluorescence of the biogenic PbSe quantum rods pronounce their application in opto-electronic devices in the Near Infra-Red and Ultraviolet spectral regime. The biosynthesized PbSe quantum rods were also found to possess appreciable anti-bacterial activity against various gram positive and gram negative bacterial species thus enhancing the relevance of the same for practical utility. Based on these results it can be concluded that biogenic PbSe quantum rods can be envisaged as potential candidates for bio-imaging, bio-sensing and other photo-voltaic applications.

  18. Determination of biogenic amines in beer and wine by capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Daniela; Dos Santos, Vagner Bezerra; Vidal, Denis Tadeu Rajh; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2015-10-16

    A capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CE-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous assessment of nine biogenic amines (spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, tyramine, and urocanic acid) in commercial samples of beer and wine is introduced. The samples were submitted to a simple clean-up step with poly(vinylpolypyrrolidone) followed by filtration. Electrophoretic separation in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-coated capillary using 0.5 mol L(-1) acetic acid (pH 2.5) as background electrolyte and detection by electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry was employed. The range of the correlation coefficients of the calibration curves of the analyzed compounds was 0.996-0.999, and the limits of detection and limits of quantification were in the range of 1-2 μg L(-1) and 3-8 μg L(-1), respectively. The recovery values for samples spiked at three concentration levels (0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg L(-1)) ranged from 87 to 113% with standard deviation not greater than 5.8%. The use of a PVA-coated silica capillary allows suppressing the electroosmotic flow and, consequently, increasing of the separation efficiency. The method was successfully used to determine biogenic amines in commercial samples of beer and wine.

  19. Biogenic Aerosols Over the Amazon Basin: Optical Properties and Relationship With Elemental and Ionic Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Godoy, J. M.; Godoy, M. L.; Rizzo, L. V.; Paixao, M.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the optical properties of natural biogenic aerosol particles over the central Amazon Basin near Manaus during the wet season in February and March 2008. The measurements were conducted as part of the AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment) sampling campaign. Light absorption was determined with the use of an Aethalometer and an MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). Light scattering was measured with a 3 wavelength TSI nephelometer and an Ecotech nephelometer. The elemental composition was measured trough PIXE and IC. Single scattering albedo shows relatively low values varying from 0.86 to 0.95. Very low fine mode aerosol mass was measured, and coarse mode particles are responsible for a significant fraction of scattering and absorption. Sulfur was observed in very low concentrations, and most of the aerosol mass was organic. Long range transport of soil dust from Sahara were observed and reflected in the light scattering coefficient. Wavelength dependence of absorption indicates the strong influence of coarse mode aerosol. Aerosol optical thickness shows low values, but with significant single scattering albedo values, showing strong absorption properties of these biogenic aerosols. Size distribution measurements shows consistence with the scattering coefficients measured, if the coarse mode particles are taken into account.

  20. Validation of a Fluorescence Sensor Microtiterplate for Biogenic Amines in Meat and Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, Gasser M; Azab, Hassan A; El-Korashy, Sabry A; Steiner, Mark-Steven; Duerkop, Axel

    2016-09-01

    An optical sensor microtiterplate for quantitative analysis of the total content of biogenic amines (TAC) in meat and cheese was developed and validated for the first time. In the plate, a chameleon dye (Py-1) is embedded in a polymeric cocktail which is deposited on the bottom of the wells in a common microtiterplate. On reaction with biogenic amines (BAs), the fluorescence of Py-1 at 620 nm rapidly delivers a precise TAC. After 10 min incubation at 25 °C the determination of the TAC in various (real) samples is possible in high-throughput with a standard microplate reader. The optimized fluorescence method was validated for linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, precision (intraday and inter day repeatability) and recovery using histamine (HIS) as a representative BA. The sensor microtiterplate was successfully applied to quantitatively analyze the TAC in 10 real samples of cheese and meat obtained from various Egyptian markets. The TAC of these real samples obtained by the sensor microtiterplate was validated against the contents of BAs obtained by GC-MS at various times of storage. The data of the sensor microtiterplate agreed well with those of GC-MS. This demonstrates that the sensor microtiterplate is a reliable screening tool for the degradation status of food samples.

  1. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  2. Large increases in Arctic biogenic volatile emissions are a direct effect of warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramshøj, Magnus; Vedel-Petersen, Ida; Schollert, Michelle; Rinnan, Åsmund; Nymand, Josephine; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Rinnan, Riikka

    2016-05-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds are reactive gases that can contribute to atmospheric aerosol formation. Their emission from vegetation is dependent on temperature and light availability. Increasing temperature, changing cloud cover and shifting composition of vegetation communities can be expected to affect emissions in the Arctic, where the ongoing climate changes are particularly severe. Here we present biogenic volatile organic compound emission data from Arctic tundra exposed to six years of experimental warming or reduced sunlight treatment in a randomized block design. By separately assessing the emission response of the whole ecosystem, plant shoots and soil in four measurements covering the growing season, we have identified that warming increased the emissions directly rather than via a change in the plant biomass and species composition. Warming caused a 260% increase in total emission rate for the ecosystem and a 90% increase in emission rates for plants, while having no effect on soil emissions. Compared to the control, reduced sunlight decreased emissions by 69% for the ecosystem, 61-65% for plants and 78% for soil. The detected strong emission response is considerably higher than observed at more southern latitudes, emphasizing the high temperature sensitivity of ecosystem processes in the changing Arctic.

  3. Secondary aerosol formation from stress-induced biogenic emissions and possible climate feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. F. Mentel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols impact climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by acting as ice and cloud condensation nuclei. Biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOAs comprise an important component of atmospheric aerosols. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs emitted by vegetation are the source of BSOAs. Pathogens and insect attacks, heat waves and droughts can induce stress to plants that may impact their BVOC emissions, and hence the yield and type of formed BSOAs, and possibly their climatic effects. This raises questions of whether stress-induced changes in BSOA formation may attenuate or amplify effects of climate change. In this study we assess the potential impact of stress-induced BVOC emissions on BSOA formation for tree species typical for mixed deciduous and Boreal Eurasian forests. We studied the photochemical BSOA formation for plants infested by aphids in a laboratory setup under well-controlled conditions and applied in addition heat and drought stress. The results indicate that stress conditions substantially modify BSOA formation and yield. Stress-induced emissions of sesquiterpenes, methyl salicylate, and C17-BVOCs increase BSOA yields. Mixtures including these compounds exhibit BSOA yields between 17 and 33%, significantly higher than mixtures containing mainly monoterpenes (4–6% yield. Green leaf volatiles suppress SOA formation, presumably by scavenging OH, similar to isoprene. By classifying emission types, stressors and BSOA formation potential, we discuss possible climatic feedbacks regarding aerosol effects. We conclude that stress situations for plants due to climate change should be considered in climate–vegetation feedback mechanisms.

  4. Biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production: A novel approach in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy, E-mail: saravana732@gmail.com [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China); MubarakAli, Davoodbasha [Microbial Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering, College of Life Science and Bioengineering, Incheon National University, Songdo 406772, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Kathiresan, Kandasamy [Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu (India); Thajuddin, Nooruddin [Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, Naiyf S. [Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chen, Jie, E-mail: jiechen59@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Trichoderma sp., showed an abilities to synthesis of AgNPs and AuNPs with an excellent stability. • AuNPs significantly enhanced the bioelectricity production by MFC of anaerobic fermentation as catalyst. • Maximum bioelectricity production was optimized and obtained the voltage of 432.80 mA using RSM. - Abstract: The present work aimed to use the biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cell (MFC) approach under anaerobic condition. Silver and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using Trichoderma sp. Particle size and cystallinity were measured by X-ray diffraction revealed the crystalline structure with average size of 36.17 nm. Electron microscopic studies showed spherical shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and cubical shaped AuNPs with size ranges from 50 to 150 nm. The concentration of biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for enhanced bioelectricity generations and estimated by response surface methodology (RSM) and found at the greatest of 342.80 mA under optimized conditions are time interval, temperature, nanoparticles used as 63 h, 28 ± 2.0 °C, 22.54 mg l{sup −1} (AgNPs) and 25.62 mg l{sup −1} (AuNPs) in a batch reactor. AuNPs acted as an excellent catalyst to enhance the bioelectricity production. This novel technique could be used for eco-friendly, economically feasible and facile electricity production.

  5. Conjugation of biogenic and synthetic polyamines with serum proteins: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-11-01

    We have reviewed the conjugation of biogenic polyamines spermine (spm), spermidine (spmd) and synthetic polyamines 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333) and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333) with human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The results of multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were analysed here and correlations between polyamine binding mode and protein structural changes were estabilished. Polyamine-protein bindings are mainly via hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts. BSA forms more stable conjugates than HSA and b-LG. Biogenic polyamines form more stable complexes than synthetic polyamines except in the case of b-LG, where the protein shows more hydrophobic character than HSA and BSA. The loading efficacies were 40-52%. Modeling showed the presence of several H-bonding systems, which stabilized polyamine-protein conjugates. Polyamine conjugation induced major alterations of serum protein conformations. The potential application of serum proteins in delivery of polyamines is evaluated here.

  6. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, immune compatibility and antibacterial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Składanowski, M; Golinska, P; Rudnicka, K; Dahm, H; Rai, M

    2016-12-01

    The study was focused on assessment of antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity and immune compatibility of biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized from Streptomyces sp. NH28 strain. Nanoparticles were biosynthesized and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis system and zeta potential. Antibacterial activity was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; minimal inhibitory concentration was recorded. Cytotoxicity was estimated using L929 mouse fibroblasts via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Biocompatibility of AgNPs was performed using THP1-XBlue™ cells. Biogenic AgNPs presented high antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs against bacterial cells was found to be in range of 1.25-10 μg/mL. Silver nanoparticles did not show any harmful interaction to mouse fibroblast cell line, and no activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B (NF-κB) cells was observed at concentration below 10 µg/mL. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value was established at 64.5 μg/mL. Biological synthesis of silver can be used as an effective system for formation of metal nanoparticles. Biosynthesized AgNPs can be used as an antibacterial agent, which can be safe for eukaryotic cells.

  7. Skeletonema cf. costatum biogenic silica production rate determinated by PDMPO method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guicheng; Leng, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yuanyuan; Li, Xia; Sun, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Diatoms are the only ecological phytoplankton that require silicic acid for growth. They are also the dominant contributor of ocean's total primary productivity. Generation and circulation with silica walls, which the siliceous organisms form, is an important component of the marine biological pump. It is crucial to the study of the operational mechanisms of biological pump with different sea areas. Moreover, it is the key link to the study of global silicon cycle. This paper introduces the basic mechanism of the formation of diatom silica walls and a new way of researching silicic acid metabolism, namely the 2-(4-pyridyl)-5-((4-(2-dimethylaminoethylaminocarbamoyl)- methoxy)phenyl)oxazole (PDMPO) dyeing method. Under a fluorescence microscope after excitation with bright green fluorescence, it can combine with silicic acid to form a complex into the Si deposition within diatom cells. The advantage of this method is that it can monitor the metabolism of silicate after adding PDMPO. For experimentation and sample collection in each of the specified time points, samples were determinated through the unutilized silicic acid, silica dissoluble intracellular and Si deposition within diatom cells, not only using hot alkaline digestions method but also PDMPO dyeing method. Results showed a good linear relationship between PDMPO fluorescent value and biogenic silica concentration. It was also indicated that PDMPO had no deleterious impact on Skeletonema cf. costatum growth for 34 h and was useful for tracking newly-deposited biogenic silica in diatoms' frustules.

  8. Milankovitch-scale correlations between deeply buried microbial populations and biogenic ooze lithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, I.W.; Bekins, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    The recent discoveries of large, active populations of microbes in the subseafloor of the world's oceans supports the impact of the deep biosphere biota on global biogeochemical cycles and raises important questions concerning the functioning of these extreme environments for life. These investigations demonstrated that subseafloor microbes are unevenly distributed and that cell abundances and metabolic activities are often independent from sediment depths, with increased prokaryotic activity at geochemical and/or sedimentary interfaces. In this study we demonstrate that microbial populations vary at the scale of individual beds in the biogenic oozes of a drill site in the eastern equatorial Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201, Site 1226). We relate bedding-scale changes in biogenic ooze sediment composition to organic carbon (OC) and microbial cell concentrations using high-resolution color reflectance data as proxy for lithology. Our analyses demonstrate that microbial concentrations are an order of magnitude higher in the more organic-rich diatom oozes than in the nannofossil oozes. The variations mimic small-scale variations in diatom abundance and OC, indicating that the modern distribution of microbial biomass is ultimately controlled by Milankovitch-frequency variations in past oceanographic conditions. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  9. Forensic source differentiation of petrogenic, pyrogenic, and biogenic hydrocarbons in Canadian oil sands environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhendi; Yang, C; Parrott, J L; Frank, R A; Yang, Z; Brown, C E; Hollebone, B P; Landriault, M; Fieldhouse, B; Liu, Y; Zhang, G; Hewitt, L M

    2014-04-30

    To facilitate monitoring efforts, a forensic chemical fingerprinting methodology has been applied to characterize and differentiate pyrogenic (combustion derived) and biogenic (organism derived) hydrocarbons from petrogenic (petroleum derived) hydrocarbons in environmental samples from the Canadian oil sands region. Between 2009 and 2012, hundreds of oil sands environmental samples including water (snowmelt water, river water, and tailings pond water) and sediments (from river beds and tailings ponds) have been analyzed. These samples were taken from sites where assessments of wild fish health, invertebrate communities, toxicology and detailed chemistry are being conducted as part of the Canada-Alberta Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Plan (JOSMP). This study describes the distribution patterns and potential sources of PAHs from these integrated JOSMP study sites, and findings will be linked to responses in laboratory bioassays and in wild organisms collected from these same sites. It was determined that hydrocarbons in Athabasca River sediments and waters were most likely from four sources: (1) petrogenic heavy oil sands bitumen; (2) biogenic compounds; (3) petrogenic hydrocarbons of other lighter fuel oils; and (4) pyrogenic PAHs. PAHs and biomarkers detected in snowmelt water samples collected near mining operations imply that these materials are derived from oil sands particulates (from open pit mines, stacks and coke piles).

  10. Enzyme sensor array for the determination of biogenic amines in food samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Jana [University of Greifswald, Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry (Germany); Wittmann, Christine [Fachhochschule Neubrandenburg, Department of Technology (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    An enzyme sensor array for the simultaneous determination of the three biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine and putrescine) by pattern recognition using an artificial neural network and its application to different food samples is described. A combination of a monoamine oxidase, a tyramine oxidase and a diamine oxidase (with specific activities sufficient for rapid detection) are immobilised each on a separate screen-printed thick-film electrode via transglutaminase and glutaraldehyde to compare these cross-linking reagents with regard to their suitability. To calculate the amount of a specific biogenic amine, the raw data from multichannel software were transferred to a neural network. The sensor array takes 20 min to complete (excluding statistical data analysis) with only one extraction and subsequent neutralisation step required prior to sensor measurement. The lower detection limits with the enzyme sensor were 10 mg/kg for histamine and tyramine, and 5 mg/kg for putrescine with a linear range up to 200 mg/kg for histamine and tyramine and 100 mg/kg for putrescine. The application area of the enzyme sensor array was tested from fish to meat products, sauerkraut, beer, dairy products, wine and further fermented foods and compared with the data of conventional LC analyses (mean correlation coefficient: 0.854). (orig.)

  11. Ultra-performance convergence chromatography (UPC²) method for the analysis of biogenic amines in fermented foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiao; Qi, Ningli; Wang, Xiaoxi; Lin, Lijing; Li, Jihua

    2014-11-01

    A rapid ultra-performance convergence chromatography (UPC(2)) method for the determination of eight biogenic amines (spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, phenylethylamine, histamine and tyramine) in fermented foods was developed. The amines were pre-column derivatized with dansyl chloride and separated on UPC(2) system with a HSS C18 SB column (3.0 × 100 mm, 1.8 μm) using gradient elution with a binary system of CO2 and n-hexane:isopropanol:ammonium hydroxide (70:30:0.15, v/v/v), back pressure of 2,000 psi, flow rate of 2.0 ml/min and DAD detection at 254 nm. The result showed excellent linearity (r=0.9995-1.0000). Limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) were 21-67 ng/L and 72-224 ng/L, respectively. Relative standard deviations (RSD) for repeatability and reproducibility were 0.21-0.87% and 1.98-4.02%, respectively. Furthermore, this method was successfully applied to analysis of biogenic amines in Yulu and Sufu samples.

  12. The antibacterial and anti-biofouling performance of biogenic silver nanoparticles by Lactobacillus fermentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Manying; Zhang, Kaisong; De Gusseme, Bart; Verstraete, Willy; Field, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Biofouling is a major challenge in the water industry and public health. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have excellent antimicrobial properties and are considered to be a promising anti-biofouling agent. A modified method was used to produce small sized and well-dispersed biogenic silver nanoparticles with a mean size of ~6 nm (Bio-Ag0-6) using Lactobacillus fermentum. The morphology, size distribution, zeta potential and oxidation state of the silver were systematically characterized. Determination of minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentration results revealed that biogenic silver Bio-Ag(0-6) can effectively suppress the growth of the test bacteria. Additionally, the inhibition effects of Bio-Ag(0-6) on biofilm formation and on established biofilms were evaluated using P. aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) as the model bacterium. The results from microtiter plates and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that Bio-Ag(0-6) not only exhibited excellent antibacterial performance but also could control biofilm formation and induce detachment of the bulk of P. aeruginosa biofilms leaving a small residual matrix.

  13. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: constraints on the seasonality of biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Xiao, Y.; Razavi, A.; Clerbaux, C.

    2011-12-01

    Methanol is the most abundant non-methane organic compound in the atmosphere, and is an important precursor of atmospheric pollutants such as CO and formaldehyde. The recent development of methanol retrievals from nadir-viewing satellite-based platforms offers powerful new information for quantifying methanol emissions on a global scale. This study uses methanol observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Aura satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp-A satellite, in conjunction with aircraft data, to investigate methanol emissions from major plant functional types in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (driven with MEGAN biogenic emissions). We first evaluate the TES methanol retrievals by comparing to simulation results and flight observations from several North American field campaigns. Results show that the retrieval performs well when the degrees of freedom for signal are above 0.5. We analyze one full year of TES and IASI observations and find a persistent model underestimate in springtime, and make recommendations for an improved seasonal distribution of biogenic methanol emissions over temperate regions of the globe.

  14. Voluntary drinking of ethanol by the rat: biogenic amines and possible underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiha, F S

    1978-09-01

    The present study evaluates the possible relationship between certain biogenic amine metabolites-produced changes in voluntary drinking of ethyl alcohol (ET) solution by the rat and their in vivo effects on the enzymes primarily involved in the hepatic metabolism of ET, i.e., liver alcohol-(L-ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (L-ALDH). In experiments on voluntary intake of ET solution by the rat, compounds selected were injected, 0.5 mM/kg, IP. Administration of vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) markedly reduced ET drinking. Similar significant effects were seen after administration of the neutral metabolites of the biogenic amines tested, after injection of metanephrine or 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid. Threodihydroxyphenylserine but not L-dopa reduced ET intake by the rat. Treatment with peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors, i.e., carbidopa, 50 mg/kg, IP, significantly reduced ET drinking as contrasted with nonsignificant decline in ET consumption following benserazide, 500 mg/kg, IP. In the biochemical study, short-term administration of the compounds selected produced varied effects on L-ADH and L-ADH. It is suggested that alteration of hepatic ADH by the compounds tested might account for the observation reduced ET drinking thereby, indicating the contribution of peripheral sources rather than central factors in mediating the behavioral effects studied.

  15. Engineering biogenic magnetite for sustained Cr(VI) remediation in flow-through systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Daniel E; Coker, Victoria S; van der Laan, Gerrit; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2012-03-20

    In this work, we report a route to enhance the reactivity and longevity of biogenic magnetite in Cr(VI) remediation under continuous-flow conditions by combining functionalization of the biomagnetite surface with a precious metal catalyst, nanoscale palladium, and exposure to formate. Column influent conditions were varied to simulate oxic, anoxic, and nitrate cocontaminated environments. The addition of sodium formate as an electron donor for Pd-functionalized magnetite increased capacity and longevity allowing 80% removal of Cr(VI) after 300 h in anoxic conditions, whereas complete breakthrough occurred after 60 h in anoxic nonformate and nonfunctionalized systems. Removal of Cr(VI) was optimized under anoxic conditions, and the presence of oxidizing agents results in a modest loss in reductive capacity. Examination of reacted Pd-functionalized magnetite reveals close association of Fe with Cr, suggesting that Pd-coupled oxidation of formate serves to regenerate the reactive surface. XMCD studies revealed that Cr(III) is partially substituted for Fe in the magnetite structure, which serves to immobilize Cr. No evidence for a mechanistic interference by nitrate cocontamination was observed, suggesting that this novel system could provide robust, effective and sustained reduction of contaminants, even in the presence of common oxidizing cocontaminants, outperforming the reductive capacity of nonfunctionalized biogenic magnetite.

  16. Processing and characterization of glass reinforced biogenic hydroxyapatite composites with ferromagnetic additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Pinchuk

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic hydroxyapatite-glass composites, with addition of up to 2 wt.% of Fe or Fe3O4, were fabricated from biogenic hydroxyapatite powder and four types of reinforcing glasses by sintering under different conditions. It has been established that the relative density, mechanical and magnetic properties of the prepared composites depend on the composition and sintering conditions. The composites with 1 wt.% Fe or Fe3O4 sintered at 500°С in vacuum have a magnetic susceptibility of 2–3·10-3 cm3/g. This parameter decreases to 0.858·10-3 cm3/g for the specimens with 1 wt.% additives sintered at 800°С in vacuum and to 0.27–1.3·10-3cm3/g for the specimens with 2 wt.% additives sintered at 500°С under the usual atmospheric conditions. The magnetic susceptibility for the specimens with 2 wt.% additives sintered at 780°С under the same atmospheric conditions decreases to 0.24–1.25·10-6 cm3/g. These ferromagnetic additives influence the degradation rate in vitro within the first 40 min of the composite soaking. Short-term treatment of specimens by the magnetic field leads to an increase in the initial degradation rate, but insignificantly influences it within more prolonged soaking.

  17. Evidence for the presence of biogenic magnetic particles in the nocturnal migratory brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weidong; Wan, Guijun; Xu, Jingjing; Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Yuxin; Qi, Liping; Chen, Fajun

    2016-01-05

    Biogenic magnetic particles have been detected in some migratory insects, which implies the basis of magnetoreception mechanism for orientation and navigation. Here, the biogenic magnetic particles in the migratory brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens were qualitatively measured by SQUID magnetometry, and their characteristics were further determined by Prussian Blue staining, electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that there were remarkable magnetic materials in the abdomens and not in the head or thorax of the 3(rd)-5(th) instar nymphs, and in macropterous and brachypterous female and male adults of BPH. The size of magnetic particles was shown to be between 50-450 nm with a shape factor estimate of between 0.8-1.0 for all the tested BPHs. Moreover, the amount of magnetic particles was associated with the developmental stage (the 3(rd)-5(th) instar), wing form (macropterous vs. brachypterous) and sex. The macropterous female adults had the largest amount of magnetic particles. Although the existence of magnetic particles in the abdomens of BPH provides sound basis for the assumption of magnetic orientation, further behavioral studies and complementary physical characterization experiments should be conducted to determine whether the orientation behavior of BPH is associated with the magnetic particles detected in this study.

  18. 'Nano' Morphology and Element Signatures of Early Life on Earth: A New Tool for Assessing Biogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Mostefaoui, S.; Meibom, A.; Selo, M.; McKay, D. S.; Robert, F.

    2006-01-01

    The relatively young technology of NanoSIMS is unlocking an exciting new level of information from organic matter in ancient sediments. We are using this technique to characterize Proterozoic organic material that is clearly biogenic as a guide for interpreting controversial organic structures in either terrestrial or extraterrestrial samples. NanoSIMS is secondary ion mass spectrometry for trace element and isotope analysis at sub-micron resolution. In 2005, Robert et al. [1] combined NanoSIMS element maps with optical microscopic imagery in an effort to develop a new method for assessing biogenicity of Precambrian structures. The ability of NanoSIMS to map simultaneously the distribution of organic elements with a 50 nm spatial resolution provides new biologic markers that could help define the timing of life s development on Earth. The current study corroborates the work of Robert et al. and builds on their study by using NanoSIMS to map C, N (as CN), S, Si and O of both excellently preserved microfossils and less well preserved, non-descript organics in Proterozoic chert from the ca. 0.8 Ga Bitter Springs Formation of Australia.

  19. Effects of biogenic nitrate chemistry on the NOx lifetime in remote continental regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, E. C.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    We present an analysis of the NOx budget in conditions of low NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) and high biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) concentrations that are characteristic of most continental boundary layers. Using a steady-state model, we show that below 500 pptv of NOx, the NOx lifetime is extremely sensitive to organic nitrate (RONO2) formation rates. We find that even for RONO2 formation values that are an order of magnitude smaller than is typical for continental conditions significant reductions in NOx lifetime, and consequently ozone production efficiency, are caused by nitrate forming reactions. Comparison of the steady-state box model to a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) confirms that the concepts illustrated by the simpler model are a useful approximation of predictions provided by the full CTM. This implies that the regional and global budgets of NOx, OH, and ozone will be sensitive to assumptions regarding organic nitrate chemistry. Changes in the budgets of these species affect the representation of processes important to air quality and climate. Consequently, CTMs must include an accurate representation of organic nitrate chemistry in order to provide accurate assessments of past, present, and future air quality and climate. These findings suggest the need for further experimental constraints on the formation and fate of biogenic RONO2.

  20. The irony of iron -- biogenic iron oxides as an iron source to the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eEmerson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB that live by oxidizing iron and producing