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Sample records for biogenic manganese oxideproduction

  1. Spatially resolved characterization of biogenic manganese oxideproduction within a bacterial biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy; Fakra, Sirine; Villalobos, Mario; Warwick, Tony; Sposito, Garrison

    2004-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1, a biofilm forming bacteria, was used as a model for the study of bacterial Mn oxidation in freshwater and soil environments. The oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} by P. putida was characterized by spatially and temporally resolving the oxidation state of Mn in the presence of a bacterial biofilm using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combined with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the Mn-L{sub 2,3} absorption edges. Subsamples were collected from growth flasks containing 0.1 mM and 1 mM total Mn at 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours after inoculation. Immediately after collection, the unprocessed hydrated subsamples were imaged at 40 nm resolution. Manganese NEXAFS spectra were extracted from x-ray energy sequences of STXM images (stacks) and fit with linear combinations of well characterized reference spectra to obtain quantitative relative abundances of Mn(II), Mn(III) and Mn(IV). Careful consideration was given to uncertainty in the normalization of the reference spectra, choice of reference compounds, and chemical changes due to radiation damage. The STXM results confirm that Mn{sub (aq)}{sup +2} was removed from solution by P. putida and was concentrated as Mn(III) and Mn(IV) immediately adjacent to the bacterial cells. The Mn precipitates were completely enveloped by bacterial biofilm material. The distribution of Mn oxidation states was spatially heterogeneous within and between the clusters of bacterial cells. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is a promising tool to advance the study of hydrated interfaces between minerals and bacteria, particularly in cases where the structure of bacterial biofilms needs to be maintained.

  2. Manganese in biogenic magnetite crystals from magnetotactic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Carolina N; Lins, Ulysses; Farina, Marcos

    2009-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce either magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) or greigite (Fe(3)S(4)) crystals in cytoplasmic organelles called magnetosomes. Whereas greigite magnetosomes can contain up to 10 atom% copper, magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria was considered chemically pure for a long time and this characteristic was used to distinguish between biogenic and abiogenic crystals. Recently, it was shown that magnetosomes containing cobalt could be produced by three strains of Magnetospirillum. Here we show that magnetite crystals produced by uncultured magnetotactic bacteria can incorporate manganese up to 2.8 atom% of the total metal content (Fe+Mn) when manganese chloride is added to microcosms. Thus, chemical purity can no longer be taken as a strict prerequisite to consider magnetite crystals to be of biogenic origin. PMID:19187208

  3. Diclofenac and 2‐anilinophenylacetate degradation by combined activity of biogenic manganese oxides and silver

    OpenAIRE

    Meerburg, Francis; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Summary The occurrence of a range of recalcitrant organic micropollutants in our aquatic environment has led to the development of various tertiary wastewater treatment methods. In this study, biogenic manganese oxides (Bio‐MnOx), biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio‐Ag0) and ionic silver were used for the oxidative removal of the frequently encountered drug diclofenac and its dechlorinated form, 2‐anilinophenylacetate (APA). Diclofenac was rapidly degraded during ongoing manganese oxidation by...

  4. Crystal and fine structural transformation of Heat-treated biogenic manganese oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kimura, N.; Hashimoto, H.; Miyata, N.; Nishina, Y.; Kusano, Y.; Ikeda, Y.; Nakanishi, Y.; Fujii, T.; Šafařík, Ivo; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Takada, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2013), s. 92-98. ISSN 0532-8799 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11111 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : microorganisms * biogenic manganese oxides * phase transitions * nano -sheets * microstructures Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  5. Diclofenac and 2-anilinophenylacetate degradation by combined activity of biogenic manganese oxides and silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerburg, Francis; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence of a range of recalcitrant organic micropollutants in our aquatic environment has led to the development of various tertiary wastewater treatment methods. In this study, biogenic manganese oxides (Bio-MnOx), biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio-Ag(0)) and ionic silver were used for the oxidative removal of the frequently encountered drug diclofenac and its dechlorinated form, 2-anilinophenylacetate (APA). Diclofenac was rapidly degraded during ongoing manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB6. Furthermore, whereas preoxidized Bio-MnOx, Bio-Ag(0) and Ag(+) separately did not show any removal capacity for diclofenac, an enhanced removal occurred when Bio-MnOx and silver species were combined. Similar results were obtained for APA. Finally, a slow removal of diclofenac but more rapid APA degradation was observed when silver was added to manganese-free P. putida biomass. Combining these results, three mechanisms of diclofenac and APA removal could be distinguished: (i) a co-metabolic removal during active Mn(2+) oxidation by P. putida; (ii) a synergistic interaction between preoxidized Bio-MnOx and silver species; and (iii) a (bio)chemical process by biomass enriched with silver catalysts. This paper demonstrates the use of P. putida for water treatment purposes and is the first report of the application of silver combined with biogenic manganese for the removal of organic water contaminants. PMID:22221449

  6. Diclofenac and 2‐anilinophenylacetate degradation by combined activity of biogenic manganese oxides and silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerburg, Francis; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Summary The occurrence of a range of recalcitrant organic micropollutants in our aquatic environment has led to the development of various tertiary wastewater treatment methods. In this study, biogenic manganese oxides (Bio‐MnOx), biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio‐Ag0) and ionic silver were used for the oxidative removal of the frequently encountered drug diclofenac and its dechlorinated form, 2‐anilinophenylacetate (APA). Diclofenac was rapidly degraded during ongoing manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB6. Furthermore, whereas preoxidized Bio‐MnOx, Bio‐Ag0 and Ag+ separately did not show any removal capacity for diclofenac, an enhanced removal occurred when Bio‐MnOx and silver species were combined. Similar results were obtained for APA. Finally, a slow removal of diclofenac but more rapid APA degradation was observed when silver was added to manganese‐free P. putida biomass. Combining these results, three mechanisms of diclofenac and APA removal could be distinguished: (i) a co‐metabolic removal during active Mn2+ oxidation by P. putida; (ii) a synergistic interaction between preoxidized Bio‐MnOx and silver species; and (iii) a (bio)chemical process by biomass enriched with silver catalysts. This paper demonstrates the use of P. putida for water treatment purposes and is the first report of the application of silver combined with biogenic manganese for the removal of organic water contaminants. PMID:22221449

  7. Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

    2010-02-01

    Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

  8. Evidence for the biogenic origin of manganese-enriched layers in Lake Superior sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Christine; Dittrich, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe)-enriched sediment layers were discovered in Lake Superior within, above and below the oxic-anoxic interface. While the role of bacteria in redox reactions with Mn is known to be significant, little information exists about indigenous microbial communities in many freshwater environments. This study examined the bacterial communities of Mn-enriched layers in Lake Superior to identify the potential Mn(II) oxidizers responsible for the formation of Mn oxides. Anaerobic Mn(II) oxidation occurring in the Mn-enriched layers at the oxic-anoxic interface was investigated using Mn(II)-enriched cultures. High-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic investigations provided evidence of the biogenic formation of Mn oxides on cell surfaces. Spectroscopic mapping confirmed high levels of Mn in structures resembling biogenic Mn oxides. These structures were observed in enrichment cultures and in Mn-enriched layer sediment samples, indicating the significance of biogenic Mn oxidation occurring in situ. 16S ribosomal DNA pyrosequencing was used to identify the bacteria potentially responsible for Mnoxide formation in the enrichment cultures and Mn-enriched layers, revealing that the Mn-enriched layer contains classes with known Mn(II)-oxidizing members. Pyrosequencing of bacterial cultures suggested that these bacteria may be Bacillus strains, and that anaerobic microbial-mediated Mn(II) oxidation contributes to the formation of the layers. PMID:26636960

  9. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  10. Removal and recovery of toxic silver ion using deep-sea bacterial generated biogenic manganese oxides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjun Pei

    Full Text Available Products containing silver ion (Ag(+ are widely used, leading to a large amount of Ag(+-containing waste. The deep-sea manganese-oxidizing bacterium Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9 efficiently oxidizes Mn(2+ to generate biogenic Mn oxide (BMO. The potential of BMO for recovering metal ions by adsorption has been investigated for some ions but not for Ag(+. The main aim of this study was to develop effective methods for adsorbing and recovering Ag using BMO produced by Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9. In addition, the adsorption mechanism was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, specific surface area analysis, adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that BMO had a higher adsorption capacity for Ag(+ compared to the chemical synthesized MnO2 (CMO. The isothermal absorption curves of BMO and CMO both fit the Langmuir model well and the maximum adsorption capacities at 28°C were 8.097 mmol/g and 0.787 mmol/g, for BMO and CMO, respectively. The change in enthalpy (ΔH(θ for BMO was 59.69 kJ/mol indicating that it acts primarily by chemical adsorption. The change in free energy (ΔG(θ for BMO was negative, which suggests that the adsorption occurs spontaneously. Ag(+ adsorption by BMO was driven by entropy based on the positive ΔS(θ values. The Ag(+ adsorption kinetics by BMO fit the pseudo-second order model and the apparent activation energy of Ea is 21.72 kJ/mol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 15.29% Ag(+ adsorbed by BMO was transferred to Ag(0 and meant that redox reaction had happened during the adsorption. Desorption using nitric acid and Na2S completely recovered the Ag. The results show that BMO produced by strain MnI7-9 has potential for bioremediation and reutilization of Ag(+-containing waste.

  11. Removal and recovery of toxic silver ion using deep-sea bacterial generated biogenic manganese oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yuanjun; Chen, Xiao; Xiong, Dandan; Liao, Shuijiao; Wang, Gejiao

    2013-01-01

    Products containing silver ion (Ag(+)) are widely used, leading to a large amount of Ag(+)-containing waste. The deep-sea manganese-oxidizing bacterium Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9 efficiently oxidizes Mn(2+) to generate biogenic Mn oxide (BMO). The potential of BMO for recovering metal ions by adsorption has been investigated for some ions but not for Ag(+). The main aim of this study was to develop effective methods for adsorbing and recovering Ag using BMO produced by Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9. In addition, the adsorption mechanism was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, specific surface area analysis, adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that BMO had a higher adsorption capacity for Ag(+) compared to the chemical synthesized MnO2 (CMO). The isothermal absorption curves of BMO and CMO both fit the Langmuir model well and the maximum adsorption capacities at 28°C were 8.097 mmol/g and 0.787 mmol/g, for BMO and CMO, respectively. The change in enthalpy (ΔH(θ)) for BMO was 59.69 kJ/mol indicating that it acts primarily by chemical adsorption. The change in free energy (ΔG(θ)) for BMO was negative, which suggests that the adsorption occurs spontaneously. Ag(+) adsorption by BMO was driven by entropy based on the positive ΔS(θ) values. The Ag(+) adsorption kinetics by BMO fit the pseudo-second order model and the apparent activation energy of Ea is 21.72 kJ/mol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 15.29% Ag(+) adsorbed by BMO was transferred to Ag(0) and meant that redox reaction had happened during the adsorption. Desorption using nitric acid and Na2S completely recovered the Ag. The results show that BMO produced by strain MnI7-9 has potential for bioremediation and reutilization of Ag(+)-containing waste. PMID:24312566

  12. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics)Manganese can attach to quinolones in the stomach. This decreases the amount of quinolones that can be absorbed by the body. Taking manganese along with some antibiotics might ...

  13. Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osteoporosis). Taking manganese by mouth in combination with calcium, zinc, and copper seems to help reduce spinal bone ... research suggests that applying a dressing containing manganese, calcium, and zinc to chronic wounds for 12 weeks may improve ...

  14. Manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to manganese content in fluoride. The manganese content of some geologic deposits of Tajikistan was determined by means of chemical analysis. The mono mineral samples of fluorite of 5 geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was studied. The manganese content in fluorite of geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was defined.

  15. Plant extract-mediated biogenic synthesis of silver, manganese dioxide, silver-doped manganese dioxide nanoparticles and their antibacterial activity against food- and water-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaraj, Chandran; Ji, Byoung-Jun; Harper, Stacey L; Yun, Soon-Il

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO2NPs) and silver-doped manganese dioxide nanoparticles (Ag-doped MnO2NPs) were synthesized by simultaneous green chemistry reduction approach. Aqueous extract from the leaves of medicinally important plant Cucurbita pepo was used as reducing and capping agents. Various characterization techniques were carried out to affirm the formation of nanoparticles. HR-TEM analysis confirmed the size of nanoparticles in the range of 15-70 nm and also metal doping was confirmed through XRD and EDS analyses. FT-IR analysis confirmed that the presence of biomolecules in the aqueous leaves extract was responsible for nanoparticles synthesis. Further, the concentration of metals and their doping in the reaction mixture was achieved by ICP-MS. The growth curve and well diffusion study of synthesized nanoparticles were performed against food- and water-borne Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The mode of interaction of nanoparticles on bacterial cells was demonstrated through Bio-TEM analysis. Interestingly, AgNPs and Ag-doped MnO2 NPs showed better antibacterial activity against all the tested bacterial pathogens; however, MnO2NPs alone did not show any antibacterial properties. Hence, AgNPs and Ag-doped MnO2 NPs synthesized from aqueous plant leaves extract may have important role in controlling various food spoilage caused by bacteria. PMID:26857369

  16. Manganese Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sousa Galito

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cheickna Bounajim Cissé wrote an article in Mars 2013 in the Journal Les Afriques N. º 237, suggesting a new acronym, MANGANESE, for the nine African countries: Morocco, Angola, Namibia, Ghana, Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, South Africa and Ethiopia. According to Cissé, this group of African nations will be the fastest growing states in the region over the next few years. The purpose of this article is to test the pertinence of the acronym, discuss the credibility and reliability of the future prospects of these countries by comparing selected socioeconomic and sociopolitical indicators based on the latest global rankings and trends. Likewise, the potential of Cissé's claim will be assessed, especially in relationship to drug trafficking and terrorism that may put their recent sustainability in danger now and in the future.

  17. BIO-1211 (Biogen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, G T

    2000-05-01

    Biogen, in collaboration with Merck & Co, is developing late activator VLA-4 (alpha4beta1) integrin antagonists for the potential treatment of inflammatory conditions [271194]. Merck has begun phase II trials with the lead compound, BIO-1211, for asthma, Biogen is still conducting preclinical research for its designated indications [317648,319225]. Under the collaborative agreement, each company has worldwide rights to certain indications; Merck has rights for asthma and Biogen retains the rights to a number of smaller indications, including multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, renal indications and most diseases in which the US patient population is less than 200,000 [271194]. VLA-4 inhibitors show anti-inflammatory action by inhibition of binding between adhesion factors and leukocytes, but with no loss of basophil function, and they have the advantage of specificity not seen with existing drugs [273417]. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers predicted 40% probabilities that the compound would reach the US and ex-US markets for the asthma indication (Merck), and launch onto these markets by 2003. Peak annual sales of US dollar 500 million (US) and US dollar 500 million (outside US) are predicted, both in 2010 [319225]. PMID:16100687

  18. Biogenic Impact on Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Ina; Askew, Peter; Gorbushina, Anna; Grinda, Manfred; Hertel, Horst; Krumbein, Wolfgang; Müller, Rolf-Joachim; Pantke, Michael; Plarre, Rüdiger (Rudy); Schmitt, Guenter; Schwibbert, Karin

    Materials as constituents of products or components of technical systems rarely exist in isolation and many must cope with exposure in the natural world. This chapter describes methods that simulate how a material is influenced through contact with living systems such as microorganisms and arthropods. Both unwanted and desirable interactions are considered. This biogenic impact on materials is intimately associated with the environment to which the material is exposed (Materials-Environment Interaction, Chap. 15). Factors such as moisture, temperature and availability of food sources all have a significant influence on biological systems. Corrosion (Chap. 12) and wear (Chap. 13) can also be induced or enhanced in the presence of microorganisms. Section 14.1 introduces the categories between desired (biodegradation) and undesired (biodeterioration) biological effects on materials. It also introduces the role of biocides for the protection of materials. Section 14.2 describes the testing of wood as a building material especially against microorganisms and insects. Section 14.3 characterizes the test methodologies for two other groups of organic materials, namely polymers (Sect. 14.3.1) and paper and textiles (Sect. 14.3.2). Section 14.4 deals with the susceptibility of inorganic materials such as metals (Sect. 14.4.1), concrete (Sect. 14.4.2) and ceramics (Sect. 14.4.3) to biogenic impact. Section 14.5 treats the testing methodology concerned with the performance of coatings and coating materials. In many of these tests specific strains of organisms are employed. It is vital that these strains retain their ability to utilize/attack the substrate from which they were isolated, even when kept for many years in the laboratory. Section 14.6 therefore considers the importance of maintaining robust and representative test organisms that are as capable of utilizing a substrate as their counterparts in nature such that realistic predictions of performance can be made.

  19. Manganese laser using manganese chloride as lasant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    A manganese vapor laser utilizing manganese chloride as a lasant has been observed and investigated. Lasing is attained by means of two consecutive electrical discharges. The maximum laser output is obtained at a vapor pressure of about 3 torr, a temperature of 680 C, and a time delay between electrical discharges of 150 microsec. The maximum energy density is 1.3 microjoule per cu cm.

  20. The biogenic approach to cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Pamela

    2006-03-01

    After half a century of cognitive revolution we remain far from agreement about what cognition is and what cognition does. It was once thought that these questions could wait until the data were in. Today there is a mountain of data, but no way of making sense of it. The time for tackling the fundamental issues has arrived. The biogenic approach to cognition is introduced not as a solution but as a means of approaching the issues. The traditional, and still predominant, methodological stance in cognitive inquiry is what I call the anthropogenic approach: assume human cognition as the paradigm and work 'down' to a more general explanatory concept. The biogenic approach, on the other hand, starts with the facts of biology as the basis for theorizing and works 'up' to the human case by asking psychological questions as if they were biological questions. Biogenic explanations of cognition are currently clustered around two main frameworks for understanding biology: self-organizing complex systems and autopoiesis. The paper describes the frameworks and infers from them ten empirical principles--the biogenic 'family traits'--that constitute constraints on biogenic theorizing. Because the anthropogenic approach to cognition is not constrained empirically to the same degree, I argue that the biogenic approach is superior for approaching a general theory of cognition as a natural phenomenon. PMID:16628463

  1. Biogenic amines in dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Linares, Daniel M.; Martín, M. Cruz; Ladero Losada, Víctor Manuel; Álvarez González, Miguel Ángel; Fernández García, María

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BA) are organic, basic, nitrogenous compounds with biological activity, mainly formed by the decarboxylation of amino acids. BA are present in a wide range of foods, including dairy products, and can accumulate in high concentrations. In some cheeses more than 1000 mg of BA have been detected per kilogram of cheese. The consumption of food containing large amounts of these amines can have toxicological consequences. Although there is no specific legislation regarding the BA c...

  2. Process for producing manganese-52

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manganese is obtained by shooting at a target with He ions. Vanadium is suitable as target material. The reactions take place according to V(He,n)Mn, and V(He,2n)Mn. The isolation of the manganese is done by a chemical separation process. The manganese is used for radio pharmaceutical preparations. (orig./PW)

  3. Manganese biomining: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A P; Sukla, L B; Pradhan, N; Nayak, S

    2011-08-01

    Biomining comprises of processing and extraction of metal from their ores and concentrates using microbial techniques. Currently this is used by the mining industry to extract copper, uranium and gold from low grade ores but not for low grade manganese ore in industrial scale. The study of microbial genomes, metabolites and regulatory pathways provide novel insights to the metabolism of bioleaching microorganisms and their synergistic action during bioleaching operations. This will promote understanding of the universal regulatory responses that the biomining microbial community uses to adapt to their changing environment leading to high metal recovery. Possibility exists of findings ways to imitate the entire process during industrial manganese biomining endeavor. This paper reviews the current status of manganese biomining research operations around the world, identifies factors that drive the selection of biomining as a processing technology, describes challenges in exploiting these innovations, and concludes with a discussion of Mn biomining's future. PMID:21632238

  4. Biogenic amines in seafood: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biji, K B; Ravishankar, C N; Venkateswarlu, R; Mohan, C O; Gopal, T K Srinivasa

    2016-05-01

    The biogenic amines are low molecular weight organic bases present normally in the body with biological activity influencing important physiological functions. The physiological functions of these molecules are achieved by very low concentrations in the tissues. However, significantly high amounts of biogenic amines are produced during processing and storage of seafood as a result of microbial contamination and inadequate storage conditions. Microorganisms having decarboxylase enzyme activity convert amino acids to their respective biogenic amines. Biogenic amines in seafood have been implicated as a major causative agent of food borne illness, where intoxication results from the ingestion of foods containing higher amount of biogenic amines. Hence its identification, quantitation and awareness of this food borne toxin are important in relation to food safety and spoilage. The aim of this paper is to review the basic concepts of seafood quality and safety in relation to biogenic amines along with its control measures and future areas for research. PMID:27407186

  5. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN DIFFERENT WINE SAMPLES

    OpenAIRE

    Attila Kántor; Miroslava Kačániová; Vendula Pachlová

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-five samples of different Slovak wines before and after filtration were analysed in order to determine the content of eight biogenic amines (tryptamine, phenylalanine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine). The method involves extraction of biogenic amines from wine samples with used dansyl chloride. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) was used for determination of biogenic amines equipped with a Rapid Resolution High Definition (RRHD), ...

  6. Manganese in sintered steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the review of papers the results of the investigations of sintered manganese steels are presented. The effect of additional alloying elements such as copper, molybdenum and silicon on dimensional changes, density, tensile strength, hardness and elongation of such steels are also reported. (author)

  7. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  8. Manganese toxicity upon overexposure

    OpenAIRE

    Crossgrove, Janelle; Zheng, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a required element and a metabolic byproduct of the contrast agent mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP). The Mn released from MnDPDP is initially sequestered by the liver for first-pass elimination, which allows an enhanced contrast for diagnostic imaging. The administration of intravenous Mn impacts its homeostatic balance in the human body and can lead to toxicity. Human Mn deficiency has been reported in patients on parenteral nutrition and in micronutrient studies. Mn toxicit...

  9. Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H, Brurok; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; G, Hansson;

    1999-01-01

    Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate (MnDPDP) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Aims of the study were to examine if MnDPDP possesses superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity in vitro, and if antioxidant protection can be demonstrated in an ex vivo rat heart m...... is concluded that MnDPDP and MnPLED possess SOD mimetic activities and may thereby protect the heart in oxidative stress. (C) 1999 Academic Press....

  10. Process for producing 52manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 52manganese is obtained by shooting at a target with 3He ions. Vanadium is suitable as target material. The reactions take place according to 50V(3He,n)52Mn, and 51V(3He,2n)52Mn. The isolation of the 52manganese is done by a chemical separation process. The 52manganese is used for radio pharmaceutical preparations. (DG)

  11. MODIFICATION OF CARBONACEOUS ADSORBENTS WITH MANGANESE COMPOUNDS

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Ginsari; Larisa Postolachi; Vasile Rusu; Oleg Petuhov; Tatiana Goreacioc; Tudor Lupascu; Raisa Nastas

    2015-01-01

    Four series of samples containing manganese supported carbonaceous adsorbents were prepared. Obtained results reveal the importance of surface chemistry of carbonaceous adsorbents on the manganese loading.

  12. Manganese Neurotoxicity in Oreochromis niloticus

    OpenAIRE

    Annabelle Herrera; Elena Catap

    1992-01-01

    Manganese is not an acutely hazardous environmental contaminant at low levels, but increased dose produces serious degenerative disorders in Oreochromis niloticus. Sublethal exposure of fry to 2000 mg/L manganese chloride for eight days displays evidences of poisoning, and hard hit is the brain. Light microscopy shows appearance of gaps between brain layers and cell destruction. Electron microscopy shows damage to subcellular structures.

  13. SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN BIOGENIC EMISSIONS FOR LITHUANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ulevičius, Vidmantas; Byčenkien, Svetlana; Senuta, Kestas

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The numerical modelling of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) monoterpene and isoprene was carried out using three-dimensional (3D) mesoscale meteorological and photochemical atmospheric models. Emission factors, combined with land cover data represented by the appropriate 11 Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) vegetation categories, along with environmental correction factors were used to derive emission fluxes of isoprene, monoterpene and other VOCs for Lit...

  14. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    OpenAIRE

    Stolper, D. A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C. L.; Ferreira, A. A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A. M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yiel...

  15. Biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood

    OpenAIRE

    Pierina eVisciano; Maria eSchirone; Rosanna eTofalo; Giovanna eSuzzi

    2012-01-01

    The presence of biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood, associated with either time/temperature conditions or food technologies is discussed in the present paper from a safety and prevention point of view. In particular, storage temperature, handling practices, presence of microbial populations with decarboxylase activity and availability of free amino acids are considered the most important factors affecting the production of biogenic amines in raw seafood. On the other hand, some foo...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate (C12H22MnO14... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese sulfate. 184.1461 Section 184.1461 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... manganese compounds with sulfuric acid. It is also obtained as a byproduct in the manufacture...

  18. Manganese borohydride; synthesis and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Bo; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B.; Tumanov, Nikolay; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Jensen, Torben R.

    2015-01-01

    Solvent-based synthesis and characterization of α-Mn(BH4)2 and a new nanoporous polymorph of manganese borohydride, γ-Mn(BH4)2, via a new solvate precursor, Mn(BH4)2·1/2S(CH3)2, is presented. Manganese chloride is reacted with lithium borohydride in a toluene/dimethylsulfide mixture at room temperature, which yields halide and solvent-free manganese borohydride after extraction with dimethylsulfide (DMS) and subsequent removal of residual solvent. This work constitutes the first example of es...

  19. Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H, Brurok; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; G, Hansson; S, Skarra; K, Berg; Laursen, Ib; P, Jynge

    1999-01-01

    Manganese dipyridoxyl diphosphate (MnDPDP) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Aims of the study were to examine if MnDPDP possesses superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity in vitro, and if antioxidant protection can be demonstrated in an ex vivo rat heart...... model. Superoxide ((.)O(2)(-)) and hydroxyl radicals ((.)OH(-)) were generated in xanthine oxidase and Fenton reactions. Spin adducts with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide were detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Contractile function and enzyme release were monitored in rat hearts during...... is concluded that MnDPDP and MnPLED possess SOD mimetic activities and may thereby protect the heart in oxidative stress. (C) 1999 Academic Press....

  20. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN DIFFERENT WINE SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kántor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five samples of different Slovak wines before and after filtration were analysed in order to determine the content of eight biogenic amines (tryptamine, phenylalanine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine. The method involves extraction of biogenic amines from wine samples with used dansyl chloride. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC was used for determination of biogenic amines equipped with a Rapid Resolution High Definition (RRHD, DAD detectors and Extend-C18 LC column (50 mm x 3.0 mm ID, 1.8 μm particle size. In this study the highest level of biogenic amine in all wine samples represent tryptamine (TRM with the highest content 170.9±5.3 mg/L in Pinot Blanc wine. Phenylalanine (PHE cadaverine (CAD, histamine (HIS and spermidine (SPD were not detected in all wines; mainly SPD was not detected in 16 wines, HIS not detected in 14 wines, PHE and CAD not detected in 2 wines. Tyramine (TYR, spermine (SPN and putrescine (PUT were detected in all wines, but PUT and SPN in very low concentration. The worst wine samples with high biogenic amine content were Saint Laurent (BF, Pinot Blanc (S and Pinot Noir (AF.

  1. Biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierina eVisciano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of biogenic amines in raw and processed seafood, associated with either time/temperature conditions or food technologies is discussed in the present paper from a safety and prevention point of view. In particular, storage temperature, handling practices, presence of microbial populations with decarboxylase activity and availability of free amino acids are considered the most important factors affecting the production of biogenic amines in raw seafood. On the other hand, some food technological treatments such as salting, ripening, fermentation or marination can increase the levels of biogenic amines in processed seafood. The consumption of high amount of biogenic amines, above all histamine, can result in food borne poisoning which is a worldwide problem. The European Regulation established as maximum limits for histamine, in fishery products from fish species associated with high histidine amounts, values ranging from 100 to 200 mg/kg, while for products which have undergone enzyme maturation treatment in brine, the aforementioned limits rise to 200 and 400 mg/kg. Preventive measures and emerging methods aiming at controlling the production of biogenic amines are also reported for potential application in seafood industries.

  2. High manganese non magnetic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-manganese, non-magnetic steel is specified, having excellent weldability and machinability and suitable for use in the structural parts of electrical equipment or nuclear fusion equipment. (author)

  3. Biogenic crust dynamics on sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Kinast, Shai; Yizhaq, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2012-01-01

    Sand dunes are often covered by vegetation and biogenic crusts. Despite their significant role in dune stabilization, biogenic crusts have rarely been considered in studies of dune dynamics. Using a simple model, we study the existence and stability ranges of different dune-cover states along gradients of rainfall and wind power. Two ranges of alternative stable states are identified: fixed crusted dunes and fixed vegetated dunes at low wind power, and fixed vegetated dunes and active dunes at high wind power. These results suggest a cross-over between two different forms of desertification.

  4. Biogenic amines and radiosensitivity of solitary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different stability of cells to ionizing radiation is considered from a position of the ''elevated biochemical radioresistance background'' concept. Experimental evidence presented indicates an important role of endogenic amines (serotonin and histamine) possessing radioprotector properties in the cell radioresistance formation. The concept about their effect as being solely a result of circulatory hypoxia is critically discussed. The experimental results favor the existence of a ''cellular'' component, along with the ''hypoxic'' one, in the mechanism of action of biogenic amines. These compounds can affect the initial stages of peroxide oxidation of lipids, thereby favoring a less intensive oxidation induced by radiation. Biogenic amines can also exert influence on the cyclic nucleotide system

  5. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel M. eLinares; Beatriz edel Río; Victor eLadero; Noelia eMartínez; María eFernández; María Cruz eMartín; Miguel A. eAlvarez

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are within the food products more often complained of having caused biogenic amines poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain significant levels of biogenic amines, specially tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report about cheese elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting biogenic amine...

  6. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  7. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  8. Extraction of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by bioleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Baoping; Chen, Bing; Duan, Ning; Zhou, Changbo

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of manganese from electrolytic manganese residues using bioleaching was investigated in this paper. The maximum extraction efficiency of Mn was 93% by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at 4.0 g/l sulfur after bioleaching of 9days, while the maximum extraction efficiency of Mn was 81% by pyrite-leaching bacteria at 4.0 g/l pyrite. The series bioleaching first by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and followed by pyrite-leaching bacteria evidently promoted the extraction of manganese, witnessing the maximum extraction efficiency of 98.1%. In the case of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, the strong dissolution of bio-generated sulfuric acid resulted in extraction of soluble Mn2+, while both the Fe2+ catalyzed reduction of Mn4+ and weak acidic dissolution of Mn2+ accounted for the extraction of manganese with pyrite-leaching bacteria. The chemical simulation of bioleaching process further confirmed that the acid dissolution of Mn2+ and Fe2+ catalyzed reduction of Mn4+ were the bioleaching mechanisms involved for Mn extraction from electrolytic manganese residues. PMID:21050747

  9. A survey of biogenic amines in vinegars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, J L; Callejón, R M; Morales, M L; García-Parrilla, M C

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the determination of biogenic amines by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and fluorescence detection after derivatization with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) in balsamic, apple, and red, white, and Sherry wine vinegars. A solid-phase extraction (SPE) with mixed-mode resins method was used before analysis. The method was successfully validated obtaining adequate values of selectivity, response linearity, precision, accuracy, and low detection and quantification limits. The total content of biogenic amines in vinegars ranged from 23.35 to 1445.2 μg/L, being lower than those reported in wines. Putrescine was the amine that showed the highest concentrations in most samples. Methylamine and phenylethylamine were not determined in any vinegar. Balsamic and "Pedro Ximénez" Sherry vinegars reached the highest amounts of biogenic amines, while apple, white and Sherry wine vinegars had the lowest concentrations. Principal component analysis using the biogenic amines as variables, allowed to separate the different kind of vinegars, excepting red vinegars. PMID:23871015

  10. Determination of manganese content in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three analytical methods used in the hydrogen-to-manganese cross-section ratio measurement were: volumetric determination of manganese, gravimetric analysis of manganous sulfate; and densimetric determination of manganous sulfate

  11. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic Model of Manganese Carbonate Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝瑞霞; 彭省临

    1999-01-01

    Manganese carbonate can be converted to many kinds of manganese oxides when it is aerated in air and oxygen.Pure manganese carbonate can be changed into Mn3O4 and γ-MnOOH,and manganese carbonate ore can be converted to MnO2 under the air-aerating and oxygen-aerating circumstances.The oxidation process of manganese carbonate is a changing process of mineral association,and is also a converting process of valence of manganese itself.Not only equilibrium stat,but also nonequilibrium state are involved in this whole process,This process is an irreversible heterogeneous complex reaction,and oberys the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model,The oxidation rate of manganese cabonate is controlled by many factors,especially nonmanganese metallic ions which play an important role in the oxidation process of manganese carbonate.

  12. Biogenic UO2 Characterization and Surface Reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-scale biogenic UO2 is easier to oxidize and more reactive to aqueous metal ions than bulk UO2. In an attempt to understand these differences in properties, we have used a suite of bulk and surface characterization techniques to examine differences in the reactivity of biogenic UO2 versus bulk UO2 with respect to aqueous Zn(II). Precipitation of biogenic UO2 was mediated by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and the precipitates were washed using two protocols: (1) 5% NaOH, followed by 4 mM KHCO3/KCl (NA-wash; ''NAUO2'', to remove surface organic matter), and (2) 4 mM KHCO3-KCl (BI-wash; ''BIUO2'', to remove soluble uranyl species). BET surface areas of biogenic-UO2 prepared using the two protocols are 128.63 m2g-1 and 92.56 m2g-1, respectively; particle sizes range from 2-10 nm as determined by FEG-SEM. Surface composition was probed using XPS, which showed a strong carbon 1s signal for the BI-washed samples; surface uranium is > 90% U(IV) for both washing protocols. U LIII-edge XANES spectra also indicate that U(IV) is the dominant oxidation state in the biogenic UO2 samples. Fits of the EXAFS spectra of these samples yielded half the number of uranium second-shell neighbors relative to bulk UO2, and no detectable oxygen neighbors beyond the first shell. At pH 7, the sorption of Zn(II) onto both biogenic and bulk UO2 is independent of electrolyte concentration, suggesting that Zn(II) sorption complexes are dominantly inner-sphere. Fits of Zn K-edge EXAFS spectra for biogenic UO2 indicate that Zn(II) sorption is dependent on the washing protocol. Zn-U pair correlations are observed for the NA-washed samples, but not for the BI-washed ones, suggesting that Zn(II) sorbs directly to the UO2 surface in the first case, and possibly to organic matter in the latter. Further work is required to elucidate the binding mechanism of Zn(II) to bulk UO2

  13. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese violet. 73.2775 Section 73.2775 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2775 Manganese violet. (a) Identity. The color additive manganese violet is a violet pigment obtained by reacting phosphoric acid, ammonium...

  14. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 582.5449 Section 582.5449 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese sulfate. 582.5461 Section 582.5461 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 582.5452 Section 582.5452 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese hypophosphite. 582.5458 Section 582.5458 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  1. Noncollinear magnetism in manganese nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelený, Martin; Šob, Mojmír; Hafner, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 14 (2009), 144414/1-144414/19. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100920; GA MŠk OC09011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : magnetism of nanostructures * nanowires * noncollinear magnetism * manganese Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  2. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A.M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  3. Structural investigation of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural properties of biogenic ferrihydrite nanoparticles produced by bacteria Klebsiella oxytoca are investigated. Investigations of morphology and size of particles dispersed in water by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed. By model calculations followed by fitting procedure the structural parameters of a cylinder of radius R = (4.87 ± 0.02) nm and height L = (2.12 ± 0.04) nm are obtained

  4. Biogenic Amines in Raw and Processed Seafood

    OpenAIRE

    Visciano, Pierina; Schirone, Maria; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The presence of biogenic amines (BAs) in raw and processed seafood, associated with either time/temperature conditions or food technologies is discussed in the present paper from a safety and prevention point of view. In particular, storage temperature, handling practices, presence of microbial populations with decarboxylase activity and availability of free amino acids are considered the most important factors affecting the production of BAs in raw seafood. On the other hand, some food techn...

  5. Biogenic Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Bazylinski, Dennis; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Clemett, SImon J.; Bell, Mary Sue; Golden, D. C.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Fine-grained magnetite (Fe3O4) in martian meteorite ALH84001, generally less than 200 nm in size, is located primarily in the rims that surround the carbonate globules. There are two populations of ALH84001 magnetites, which are likely formed at low temperature by inorganic and biogenic processes. Nearly 27% of ALH84001 magnetite particles, also called elongated prisms, have characteristics which make them uniquely identifiable as biological precipitates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Discrimination of abiogenic and biogenic alkane gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We have combined the analytical data of the carbon isotope distribution pattern, R/Ra and CH4/3He values of abiogenic and biogenic (referring to the thermogenic and bacterial or microbial) alkane gases in China with those of alkane gases from USA, Russia, Germany, Australia and other countries. Four discrimination criteria are derived from this comparative study: 1) Carbon isotopic composition is generally greater than -30‰ for abiogenic methane and less than -30‰ for biogenic methane; 2) Abiogenic alkane gases have a carbon isotopic reversal trend (δ 13C1> δ 13C2> δ 13C3> δ 13C4) with δ 13C1>-30‰ in general; 3) Gases with R/Ra >0.5 and δ 13C11 δ 13C2>0 are of abiogenic origin; 4) Gases (meth- ane) with CH4/3He≤106 are of abiogenic origin, whereas gases with CH4/3He≥1011 are of biogenic origin.

  7. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R.; Feitosa, L. O.; Ballottin, D.; Marcato, P. D.; Tasic, L.; Durán, N.

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (- 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  8. Rett syndrome - Stimulation of endogenous biogenic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelligra, R.; Norton, R. D.; Wilkinson, R.; Leon, H. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient hypercapnic hyperoxemia was induced in two Rett syndrome children by the administration of a gaseous mixture of 80 percent O2 and 20 percent CO2. Time course studies of neurotransmitters and their metabolites showed an immediate and marked increase in central biogenic amine turnover following inhalation of the gas mixture. The increased turnover of biogenic amines was associated with improved clinical changes. This suggests a coupled relationship and provides further support for an etiological role of neurotransmitter dysfunction in Rett syndrome. In a complementary study, elevation of pulmonary CO2 by application of a simple rebreathing device resulted in improvement of abnormal blood gases and elimination of the Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern of the Rett syndrome. Near normalization of the EEG occurred when a normal respiratory pattern was imposed by means of a respirator. Taken together, these results lead to the preliminary conclusion that cerebral hypoxemia secondary to abnormal respiratory function may contribute to diminished production of biogenic amines in Rett syndrome.

  9. biogenic aerosol precursors: volatile amines from agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Uwe; Sintermann, Jörg; Spirig, Christoph; Ammann, Christof; Neftel, Albrecht

    2010-05-01

    Information on the occurrence of volatile biogenic amines in the atmosphere is marginal. This group of N-bearing organic compounds are assumed to be a small, though significant component of the atmospheric N-cycle, but are not accounted for in global assessments due to the scarceness of available data. There is increasing evidence for an important role of biogenic amines in the formation of new particulate matter, as well as for aerosol secondary growth. Volatile amines are ubiquitously formed by biodegradation of organic matter, and agriculture is assumed to dominantly contribute to their atmospheric burden. Here we show that the mixing ratios of volatile amines within livestock buildings scale about 2 orders of magnitude lower than NH3, confirming the few literature data available (e.g., Schade and Crutzen, J. Atm. Chem. 22, 319-346, 1995). Flux measurements after manure application in the field, mixing ratios in the headspace of manure storage pools, and concentrations in distilled manure all indicate major depletion of amines relative to NH3 during manure processing. We conclude that the agricultural source distribution of NH3 and amines is not similar. While for NH3 the spreading of manure in the field dominates agricultural emissions, the direct release from livestock buildings dominates the budget of volatile biogenic amines.

  10. Biogenic amine metabolism in juvenile neurocardiogenic syncope with dysautonomia

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Ian J.; Lankford, Jeremy E; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Numan, Mohammed T

    2014-01-01

    Objective Biogenic amine brain levels and their cerebral metabolism are frequently studied by quantitation of biogenic amine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared to age-matched controls. There is a paucity of studies in adolescents and young adults investigating the potential role of disordered cerebral biogenic amine metabolism in young patients who have dysautonomia based on abnormal head-up tilt table (HUTT). Methods In a cohort of juvenile patients with neurocardiogenic synco...

  11. Constraints on superoxide mediated formation of manganese oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deric R. Learman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn oxides are among the most reactive sorbents and oxidants within the environment, where they play a central role in the cycling of nutrients, metals, and carbon. Recent discoveries have identified superoxide (O2- (both of biogenic and abiogenic origin as an effective oxidant of Mn(II leading to the formation of Mn oxides. Here we examined the conditions under which abiotically produced superoxide led to oxidative precipitation of Mn and the solid-phases produced. Oxidized Mn, as both aqueous Mn(III and Mn(III/IV oxides, was only observed in the presence of active catalase, indicating that hydrogen peroxide, a product of the reaction of O2- with Mn(II, inhibits the oxidation process presumably through the reduction of Mn(III. Citrate and pyrophosphate increased the yield of oxidized Mn but decreased the amount of Mn oxide produced via formation of Mn(III-ligand complexes. While complexing ligands played a role in stabilizing Mn(III, they did not eliminate the inhibition of net Mn(III formation by H2O2. The Mn oxides precipitated were highly disordered colloidal hexagonal birnessite, similar to those produced by biotically generated superoxide. Yet, in contrast to the large particulate Mn oxides formed by biogenic superoxide, abiotic Mn oxides did not ripen to larger, more crystalline phases. This suggests that the deposition of crystalline Mn oxides within the environment requires a biological, or at least organic, influence. This work provides the first direct evidence that, under conditions relevant to natural waters, oxidation of Mn(II by superoxide can occur and lead to formation of Mn oxides. For organisms that oxidize Mn(II by producing superoxide, these findings may also point to other microbially mediated processes, in particular enzymatic hydrogen peroxide degradation and/or production of organic ligand metabolites, that allow for Mn oxide formation.

  12. Status of research on biogenic coalbed gas generation mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic coalbed gas,how it is generated and the geochemical characteristics of the gas are gaining global attention.The ways coalbed gas is generated,the status of research on the generation mechanism and the methods of differentiating between biogenic gasses are discussed.The generation of biogenic coalbed methane is consistent with anaerobic fermentation theory.Commercial biogenic coalbed gas reservoirs are mainly generated by the process of CO2 reduction.The substrates used by the microbes living in the...

  13. Manganese Inhalation as a Parkinson Disease Model

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Ordoñez-Librado; Verónica Anaya-Martínez; Ana Luisa Gutierrez-Valdez; Laura Colín-Barenque; Enrique Montiel-Flores; Maria Rosa Avila-Costa

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of divalent and trivalent Manganese (Mn2+/Mn3+) mixture inhalation on mice to obtain a novel animal model of Parkinson disease (PD) inducing bilateral and progressive dopaminergic cell death, correlate those alterations with motor disturbances, and determine whether L-DOPA treatment improves the behavior, to ensure that the alterations are of dopaminergic origin. CD-1 male mice inhaled a mixture of Manganese chloride and Manganese acetate, one hour twice...

  14. Manganese in long term paediatric parenteral nutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, A. P.; Kiely, E; Meadows, N

    1994-01-01

    The current practice of providing manganese supplementation to neonates on long term parenteral nutrition is leading to a high incidence of hypermanganesaemia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in adults on long term manganese parenteral nutrition have shown changes in TI weighted MRI images and similar findings in a neonate receiving trace element supplementation are reported here. Whole blood manganese concentration in the infant was 1740 nmol/l (or 8.3 times upper reference limit). ...

  15. SUICIDAL IDEATION AND BIOGENIC AMINES IN DEPRESSION*

    OpenAIRE

    Palaniappan, V.; V. Ramachandran; Somasundaram, O.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY This report is based on the study of 40 depressives in an attempt to explore the possible association between the suicidal ideas and the biogenic amines. The severity of suicidal ideas was measured on Hamilton Depressive Rating Scale and their amine metabolites were measured (MHFG, HVA and 5 HIAA) in urine and C.S.F. It was observed that the level of 5 HIAA, and Serotonin (5 HT) was more related to suicidal ideas and was inversely related. The probable associations between these are d...

  16. Manganese mineralogy and diagenesis in the sedimentary rock record

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jena E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Ma, Chi; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of manganese(II) to manganese(III,IV) demands oxidants with very high redox potentials; consequently, manganese oxides are both excellent proxies for molecular oxygen and highly favorable electron acceptors when oxygen is absent. The first of these features results in manganese-enriched sedimentary rocks (manganese deposits, commonly Mn ore deposits), which generally correspond to the availability of molecular oxygen in Earth surface environments. And yet because manganese reduction...

  17. Battles with Iron: Manganese in Oxidative Stress Protection*

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, J. Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2012-01-01

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton c...

  18. Determination of Biogenic Amines with HPLC-APCI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of biogenic amines in fish samples can be used as a quality attribute and are commonly performed using a derivatization step followed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV detection. Over estimation and misidentification of biogenic amines can occur when interfering comp...

  19. Biogenic amines in submicron marine aerosol (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, M.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonium salts of dimethyl and diethyl amine (DMA+ and DEA+) have been detected in size segregated marine samples collected in the North Atlantic over open ocean and at a coastal site. DMA+ and DEA+ peak in the accumulation mode range while very low concentration, close to detection limit, are observed in the coarse size fractions, as well as in sea spray aerosol artificially generated in the laboratory using sea water. These results indicate a secondary formation pathway. DMA+ and DEA+ represent up to 20% of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in our samples , and to our knowledge they are the most abundant organic species besides MSA ever detected in clean marine aerosol . Maximum concentrations have been observed during spring and summer when the biological activity is high and in clean marine air masses, thus indicating biogenic sources. Total organic nitrogen (ON) concentration also peaks in the accumulation mode range and represents in our samples a fraction from 32 to 54 % of the total SOA. Ammonium salt formation from biogenic amines might be an important source of marine SOA and atmospheric nitrogen at the global scale with a seasonal variation connected to the oceanic biological productivity and an atmospheric cycle parallel to that of the organosulfur species.

  20. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. eLinares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermented foods are within the food products more often complained of having caused biogenic amines poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain significant levels of biogenic amines, specially tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report about cheese elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting biogenic amines levels. Synthesis of biogenic amines is possible only when three conditions converge: i availability of the substrate amino acids; ii presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and iii environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxilation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization, use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH… which will be discussed in this chapter.

  1. Preparation of Manganese Oxide Nanobelts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jisen WANG; Jinquan SUN; Ying BAO; Xiufang BIAN

    2003-01-01

    Oriented nanobelts of manganese oxide have been firstly and successfully prepared by a microemulsion techniqueunder controlled circumstances. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronmicroscope (TEM). Influences of sodium chloride and annealed temperature on the synthesis of Mn3O4 nanobeltswere investigated. It was found that NaCl is the key factor to synthesize oriented Mn3O4 nanobelts and 827 K isoptimum temperature to produce fine nanobelts. Oriented growth mechanism of Mn3O4 nanobelts was discussed.

  2. Total balance of biogenic fuels for thermal uses; Ganzheitliche Bilanzierung verschiedener biogener Festbrennstoffe zur thermischen Nutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, S.; Kaltschmitt, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1996-12-31

    In this situation of unfavourable energy price levels, the use of biogenic fuels for power supply can be recommended only if it serves to reduce environmental pollution. Against this background and on the basis of a primary energy balance, the authors attempted a total balance of selected enfironmental effects (global heating and acidification potential) of biomass use as compared to fossil fuel combustion. (orig) [Deutsch] ie Nutzung biogener Festbrennstoffe zur Energienachfragedeckung ist bei dem gegenwaertigen unguenstigen Energiepreisniveau nur dann zu rechtfertigen, wenn es durch die Biomassenutzung zu einer Reduzierung der energiebedingten Umwelteffekte kommt. Vor disem Hintergrund werden ausgehend von der Primaerenergiebilanz ausgewaehlte Umwelteffekte (d.h. das Treibhaus- und das Versauerungspotential) einer Biomassenutzung im Vergleich zu einer Nutzung fossiler Energietraeger ganzheitlich bilanziert. Die wesentlichen Ergebnisse werden zusammengefasst und interpretiert. (orig)

  3. Biogenic magnetite in the nematode caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranfield, Charles G; Dawe, Adam; Karloukovski, Vassil; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; de Pomerai, David; Dobson, Jon

    2004-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model system in biological research. Recently, examination of the production of heat-shock proteins in this organism in response to mobile phone-type electromagnetic field exposure produced the most robust demonstration to date of a non-thermal, deleterious biological effect. Though these results appear to be a sound demonstration of non-thermal bioeffects, to our knowledge, no mechanism has been proposed to explain them. We show, apparently for the first time, that biogenic magnetite, a ferrimagnetic iron oxide, is present in C. elegans. Its presence may have confounding effects on experiments involving electromagnetic fields as well as implications for the use of this nematode as a model system for iron biomineralization in multi-cellular organisms. PMID:15801597

  4. 76 FR 80368 - Notification of Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... draft report and accounting framework. As noticed in 76 FR 61100-61101, the SAB Biogenic Carbon... AGENCY Notification of Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel... Biogenic Carbon Emissions Panel to review EPA's draft Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions...

  5. Deposition of manganese in a drinking water distribution system.

    OpenAIRE

    Sly, L I; M.C. Hodgkinson; Arunpairojana, V

    1990-01-01

    The deposition of manganese in a water distribution system with manganese-related "dirty water" problems was studied over a 1-year period. Four monitoring laboratories with Robbins biofilm sampling devices fitted to the water mains were used to correlate the relationship among manganese deposition, the level of manganese in the water, and the chlorination conditions. Manganese deposition occurred by both chemical and microbial processes. Chemical deposition occurred when Mn(II) not removed du...

  6. EFFECTS OF MANGANESE ON THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS: POTENTIAL LINKS

    OpenAIRE

    Soldin, OP; Aschner, M.

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace nutrient that is potentially toxic at high levels of exposure. As a constituent of numerous enzymes and a cofactor, manganese plays an important role in a number of physiologic processes in mammals. The manganese-containing enzyme, manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), is the principal antioxidant enzyme which neutralizes the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species. Other manganese-containing enzymes include oxidoreductases, transferases, hydrolases, l...

  7. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been investigated and modeled. Effect of manganese and iron loading on manganese removal and rate of oxidation of adsorbed iron and manganese have been studied. Aquamandix and IOCS demonstrated iron and mang...

  8. Manganese transport in Brevibacterium ammoniagenes ATCC 6872.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, J.; Auling, G

    1987-01-01

    Uptake of manganese by Brevibacterium ammoniagenes ATCC 6872 was energy dependent and obeyed saturation kinetics (Km = 0.65 microM; Vmax = 0.12 mumol/min per g [dry weight]). Uptake showed optima at 27 degrees C and pH 9.5. 54Mn2+ accumulated by the cells was released by treatment with toluene or by exchange for unlabeled manganese ions, via an energy-dependent process. Co2+, Fe2+, Cd2+, and Zn2+ inhibited manganese uptake. Inhibition by Cd2+ and Zn2+ was competitive (Ki = 0.15 microM Cd2+ an...

  9. Biogenic amines in meat and fermented meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Stadnik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends in food quality and safety promote an increasing search for trace compounds that can affect human health. Biogenic amines belong to this group of substances. They can cause distinctive pharmacological, physiological and toxic effects in organisms. Their amounts are usually increasing as a consequence of the use of poor quality raw materials, during controlled or spontaneous microbial fermentation or in the course of food spoilage. The origin of biogenic amines makes them suitable as chemical indicators of the hygienic quality and freshness of some foods being associated to the degree of food fermentation or degradation. The development of appropriate manufacturing technologies to obtain products free or nearly free from biogenic amines is a challenge for the meat industry. This review briefly summarises current knowledge on the biological implications of biogenic amines on human health and collects data on the factors affecting their formation in meat and fermented meat products.

  10. A molecular probe for the optical detection of biogenic amines

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Boram; Scopelliti, Rosario; Severin, Kay

    2011-01-01

    A coumarin derivative was employed for the detection of biogenic amines in buffered aqueous solution by UV-Vis or fluorescence spectroscopy. Incorporated in a polymeric matrix, the dye can also be used for the optical detection of gaseous amines.

  11. Biogenic silica in surficial sediments of Prydz Bay, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Chuanyu; Xue Bin; Yu Peisong; Pan Jianming

    2008-01-01

    The content and distribution of biogenic silica were investigated in sediment cores from Prydz Bay,Antarctica,during the CHINARE 18/21 cruise.The results show that the content of biogenic silica(BSiO 2 )is ranged from 4.89% to 85.41%,and the average content of biogenic silica is 30.90%,the highest valueoccurred at the IV 10 station.The profile of BSiO 2 in sediment is contrast to that of silicate in the interstitial water.The content of biogenic silica and organic carbon in the surface sediments in the central area of Prydz Bay gyre were much higher than those in other area,and closely related to the Chla content and primary productivity of phytoplankton in the surface water column.

  12. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W.; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the p...

  13. Manganese concentrate usage in steelmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhihina, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the research process of producing metalized products by solid-phase reduction of iron using solid carbonaceous reducing agents. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out on the model of the unit the Fe-C-O and system with iron ore and coal. As a result of modeling the thermodynamic boundary reducing, oxidizing, and transition areas and the value of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in the system. Simulation of real systems carried out with the gas phase obtained in the pyrolys of coal. The simulation results allow to determine the optimal cost of coal required for complete reduction of iron ore from a given composition. The kinetics of the processes of solid-phase reduction of iron using coal of various technological brands. The paper describes experiments on effects of metal deoxidizer composition, component proportion, pelletizing mixture, particle size distribution of basic materials and flux on manganese recovering from oxides under direct melting.

  14. Manganese-based Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Baker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant gap between the energy product, BH, where B is the magnetic flux density and H is the magnetic field strength, of both the traditional ferrite and AlNiCo permanent magnets of less than 10 MGOe and that of the rare earth magnets of greater than 30 MGOe. This is a gap that Mn-based magnets could potentially, inexpensively, fill. This Special Issue presents work on the development of both types of manganese permanent magnets. Some of the challenges involved in the development of these magnets include improving the compounds’ energy product, increasing the thermal stability of these metastable compounds, and producing them in quantity as a bulk material.[...

  15. Biogenic Silver for Disinfection of Water Contaminated with Viruses▿

    OpenAIRE

    De Gusseme, Bart; Sintubin, Liesje; Baert, Leen; Thibo, Ellen; Hennebel, Tom; Vermeulen, Griet; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The presence of enteric viruses in drinking water is a potential health risk. Growing interest has arisen in nanometals for water disinfection, in particular the use of silver-based nanotechnology. In this study, Lactobacillus fermentum served as a reducing agent and bacterial carrier matrix for zerovalent silver nanoparticles, referred to as biogenic Ag0. The antiviral action of biogenic Ag0 was examined in water spiked with an Enterobacter aerogenes-infecting bacteriophage (UZ1). Addition o...

  16. Factors Influencing Biogenic Amines Accumulation in Dairy Products

    OpenAIRE

    Linares, Daniel M.; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martínez, Noelia; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA bi...

  17. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA bi...

  18. Quantification of biogenic amines by microchip electrophoresis with chemiluminescence detection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Shulin; Yong HUANG; Shi, Ming; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    A highly sensitive microchip electrophoresis (MCE) method with chemiluminescence (CL) detection was developed for the determination of biogenic amines including agmatine, epinephrine, dopamine, tyramine, and histamine in human urine samples. To achieve a high assay sensitivity, the targeted analytes were pre-column labeled by a CL tagging reagent, N-(4-aminobutyl)-N-ethylisoluminol (ABEI). ABEI-tagged biogenic amines after MCE separation reacted with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of horse...

  19. Biogenic amines in meat and fermented meat products

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Stadnik; Zbigniew J. Dolatowski

    2010-01-01

    Recent trends in food quality and safety promote an increasing search for trace compounds that can affect human health. Biogenic amines belong to this group of substances. They can cause distinctive pharmacological, physiological and toxic effects in organisms. Their amounts are usually increasing as a consequence of the use of poor quality raw materials, during controlled or spontaneous microbial fermentation or in the course of food spoilage. The origin of biogenic amines makes them suitabl...

  20. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN SELECTED WINES DURING WINEMAKING

    OpenAIRE

    Radka Flasarová; Leona Buňková; Barbora Ivičičová; František Buňka; Stanislav Kráčmar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the development of selected biogenic amines (histamine; tyramine; phenylethylamine; putrescine; agmatine; and cadaverine) during the winemaking in 10 selected species grown in Central Europe in 2008. The analysis was performed using ion-exchange chromatography by the sodium-citrate buffers with the post-column ninhydrin derivatization and photometric detection. A comparison of the content of biogenic amines in red and wine varieties showed that red wines ...

  1. Biogenic silver for disinfection of water contaminated with viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gusseme, Bart; Sintubin, Liesje; Baert, Leen; Thibo, Ellen; Hennebel, Tom; Vermeulen, Griet; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2010-02-01

    The presence of enteric viruses in drinking water is a potential health risk. Growing interest has arisen in nanometals for water disinfection, in particular the use of silver-based nanotechnology. In this study, Lactobacillus fermentum served as a reducing agent and bacterial carrier matrix for zerovalent silver nanoparticles, referred to as biogenic Ag(0). The antiviral action of biogenic Ag(0) was examined in water spiked with an Enterobacter aerogenes-infecting bacteriophage (UZ1). Addition of 5.4 mg liter(-1) biogenic Ag(0) caused a 4.0-log decrease of the phage after 1 h, whereas the use of chemically produced silver nanoparticles (nAg(0)) showed no inactivation within the same time frame. A control experiment with 5.4 mg liter(-1) ionic Ag+ resulted in a similar inactivation after 5 h only. The antiviral properties of biogenic Ag(0) were also demonstrated on the murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a model organism for human noroviruses. Biogenic Ag(0) was applied to an electropositive cartridge filter (NanoCeram) to evaluate its capacity for continuous disinfection. Addition of 31.25 mg biogenic Ag(0) m(-2) on the filter (135 mg biogenic Ag(0) kg(-1) filter medium) caused a 3.8-log decline of the virus. In contrast, only a 1.5-log decrease could be obtained with the original filter. This is the first report to demonstrate the antiviral efficacy of extracellular biogenic Ag(0) and its promising opportunities for continuous water disinfection. PMID:20038697

  2. Biogenic Silver for Disinfection of Water Contaminated with Viruses▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gusseme, Bart; Sintubin, Liesje; Baert, Leen; Thibo, Ellen; Hennebel, Tom; Vermeulen, Griet; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2010-01-01

    The presence of enteric viruses in drinking water is a potential health risk. Growing interest has arisen in nanometals for water disinfection, in particular the use of silver-based nanotechnology. In this study, Lactobacillus fermentum served as a reducing agent and bacterial carrier matrix for zerovalent silver nanoparticles, referred to as biogenic Ag0. The antiviral action of biogenic Ag0 was examined in water spiked with an Enterobacter aerogenes-infecting bacteriophage (UZ1). Addition of 5.4 mg liter−1 biogenic Ag0 caused a 4.0-log decrease of the phage after 1 h, whereas the use of chemically produced silver nanoparticles (nAg0) showed no inactivation within the same time frame. A control experiment with 5.4 mg liter−1 ionic Ag+ resulted in a similar inactivation after 5 h only. The antiviral properties of biogenic Ag0 were also demonstrated on the murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a model organism for human noroviruses. Biogenic Ag0 was applied to an electropositive cartridge filter (NanoCeram) to evaluate its capacity for continuous disinfection. Addition of 31.25 mg biogenic Ag0 m−2 on the filter (135 mg biogenic Ag0 kg−1 filter medium) caused a 3.8-log decline of the virus. In contrast, only a 1.5-log decrease could be obtained with the original filter. This is the first report to demonstrate the antiviral efficacy of extracellular biogenic Ag0 and its promising opportunities for continuous water disinfection. PMID:20038697

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Manganese Carboxylates

    OpenAIRE

    Maryudi; R.M. Yunus; A.H. Nour; M.H. Abidin

    2009-01-01

    The explorations of prodegradant additives for plastics from trans-metals organic salts have been being conducted. This study reports a method of synthesis of manganese carboxylates and their characterization. The new method involves reaction between molten carboxylic acid with sodium hydroxide in alcoholic solution to produce sodium carboxylate and continued by reacting sodium carboxylate with chloride salt of manganese. First reaction and second reaction were conducted at 80-85°C and under ...

  4. Composition and recovery method for electrolytic manganese residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶长元; 李明艳; 刘作华; 杜军

    2009-01-01

    According to the statistic analysis,the reserve of manganese in electrolytic manganese residue deposit is over 780 kt. The average contents of available manganese and ammonium reach 3.90% and 1.68% (mass fraction),respectively. Large amount of manganese compounds and ammonium sulfate are detruded without any treatment or recovery. The compositions of the main elements in electrolytic manganese residue were analyzed comprehensively based on the extensive research data. According to the new development of electrolytic manganese residue comprehensively used in recent years,a water washing residue-twice precipitation process was also proposed. The experimental results indicate that manganese dioxide silicon dioxide and calcium sulfate are presented as amorphous state in the manganese residues. The recovery rates of manganese and nitrogen reach up to 99.5% and 94.5 %,respectively. The recovery process can be easily implemented,environment-friendly and fitting for industrial production.

  5. Manganese mineralogy and diagenesis in the sedimentary rock record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jena E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Ma, Chi; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of manganese (II) to manganese (III,IV) demands oxidants with very high redox potentials; consequently, manganese oxides are both excellent proxies for molecular oxygen and highly favorable electron acceptors when oxygen is absent. The first of these features results in manganese-enriched sedimentary rocks (manganese deposits, commonly Mn ore deposits), which generally correspond to the availability of molecular oxygen in Earth surface environments. And yet because manganese reduction is promoted by a variety of chemical species, these ancient manganese deposits are often significantly more reduced than modern environmental manganese-rich sediments. We document the impacts of manganese reduction and the mineral phases that form stable manganese deposits from seven sedimentary examples spanning from modern surface environments to rocks over 2 billion years old. Integrating redox and coordination information from synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microprobe imaging with scanning electron microscopy and energy and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, we find that unlike the Mn(IV)-dominated modern manganese deposits, three manganese minerals dominate these representative ancient deposits: kutnohorite (CaMn(CO3)2), rhodochrosite (MnCO3), and braunite (Mn(III)6Mn(II)O8SiO4). Pairing these mineral and textural observations with previous studies of manganese geochemistry, we develop a paragenetic model of post-depositional manganese mineralization with kutnohorite and calcian rhodochrosite as the earliest diagenetic mineral phases, rhodochrosite and braunite forming secondarily, and later alteration forming Mn-silicates.

  6. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future. PMID:26062467

  7. Manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen and scrap recycling workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, F; Kristiansen, J; Lauritsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Cast iron products are alloyed with small quantities of manganese, and foundry furnacemen are potentially exposed to manganese during tapping and handling of smelts. Manganese is a neurotoxic substance that accumulates in the central nervous system, where it may cause a neurological disorder that...... bears many similarities to Parkinson's disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in foundry furnacemen by a combined measuring of blood-manganese (B-Mn) and manganese in ambient air (air-Mn)....

  8. Biogenic and non-biogenic Si pools in terrestrial ecosystems: results from a novel analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Lucia; Vandevenne, Floor; Clymans, Wim; Meire, Patrick; Frings, Patrick; Conley, Daniel; Struyf, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Silicon (Si) is a chemical element frequently associated with highly abundant silicate minerals in the Earth crust. Over millions of years, the interaction of such minerals with the atmosphere and hydrosphere produces a myriad of processed compounds, and the mineral weathering consumes CO2 during the process. The weathering of minerals also triggers the export of dissolved Si (DSi) to coastal waters and the ocean. Here, DSi is deposited in diatom frustules, in an amorphous biogenic form (BSi). Diatoms account for 50% of the primary production and are crucial for the export of carbon into the deep sea. In recent years, it was acknowledged that terrestrial systems filter the Si transition from the terrestrial mineral to the marine and coastal biological pool, by the incorporation of DSi into plants. In this process, DSi is taken up by roots together with other nutrients and precipitates in plant cells in amorphous structures named phytoliths. After dead, plant tissues become mixed in the top soil, where BSi is available for dissolution and will control the DSi availability in short time scales. Additionally, Si originated from soil forming processes can also significantly interfere with the global cycle. The Si cycle in terrestrial ecosystems is a key factor to coastal ecology, plant ecology, biogeochemistry and agro-sciences, but the high variability of different biogenic and non-biogenic Si pools remains as an obstacle to obtain accurate measurements. The traditional methods, developed to isolate diatoms in ocean sediments, only account for simple mineral corrections. In this dissertation we have adapted a novel continuous analysis method (during alkaline extraction) that uses Si-Al ratios and reactivity to differ biogenic from non-biogenic fractions. The method was originally used in marine sediments, but we have developed it to be applicable in a wide range of terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We first focused on soils under strong human impact in

  9. Manganese-electrolysed slag treatment: bioleaching of manganese by Fusarium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian-Bing; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ouyang, Yu-Zhu; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Dong-Bo; Shen, Ting-Ting; Yue, Xiu; Yang, Qia

    2012-06-01

    A fungi strain named Fusarium sp. was isolated from manganese-electrolysed slag by using a gradient dilution spread plate method, identified by 26S RNA sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree analysis, and explored for the bioleaching capacity to manganese (II) from manganese-electrolysed slag in liquid mineral medium under different environmental conditions, including system temperature, incubator rotation speed and initial pH value. DNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated the name of this fungi strain, that is, Fusarium sp., and higher bioleaching efficiencies (71.6%) of manganese by this fungi were observed when the bioleaching was carried out under the optimized conditions as follows: contact time: 72 h; system temperature: 28 degrees C; inoculums concentration: 2% (v/v); incubator rotation speed: 150 rpm; pH 4.0. Because of its low cost, environment friendliness and better efficiency, the bioleaching technique will have a significant impact on manganese-electrolysed slag pollution mitigation. PMID:22856303

  10. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  11. Sorption properties of hydrous manganese oxide for the removal of radioactive manganese from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive manganese (54Mn) is formed in the structural and clad components of fast nuclear reactors due to the high energy neutron flux encountered in the core. It is a corrosion activation product having a half-life of 312.5 days and gamma energy of 835 keV. Hence, its removal from the waste which generates after washing the above mentioned components is very important. The removal properties of radioactive manganese, 54Mn, from an aqueous solution were studied here in a batch process using hydrous manganese oxide (HMO) coated with polyurethane foam as an inorganic sorbent. The HMO was synthesized by alkaline precipitation in air using manganese sulphate monohydrate and potassium permanganate. The synthesized material was found to be in powder form which took lot of time for settlement in solution; hence, it was coated with polyurethane foam, so that it can be easily used in a batch process. The removal of the radioisotope by the sorbent was studied by varying different experimental conditions such as solution pH, contact time, and effect of presence of other divalent ions. The studies carried out in our laboratory found that the sorption of manganese by hydrous manganese oxide followed pseudo-second order kinetics. On the other hand, with increasing pH of the solution (pH range studied: 1-8), the removal of manganese by the sorbent also increases until pH reaches 4.5, after that the sorption was almost same. The present studies confirmed that in the presence of other divalent ions, e.g. cobalt (ii) ions, the sorption was effected which may be due to the sorption of both the ions on hydrous manganese oxide. The sorption was very fast and more than 95% of manganese was removed within one hour of contact with hydrous manganese oxide. (author)

  12. Metal Inhibition of Growth and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J.; Sposito, G.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (MnO2) are ubiquitous nanoparticulate minerals that contribute to the adsorption of nutrient and toxicant metals, the oxidative degradation of various organic compounds, and the respiration of metal-reducing bacteria in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The formation of these minerals is catalyzed by a diverse and widely-distributed group of bacteria and fungi, often through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn(II) to Mn(IV). In metal-impacted ecosystems, toxicant metals may alter the viability and metabolic activity of Mn-oxidizing organisms, thereby limiting the conditions under which biogenic MnO2 can form and diminishing their potential as adsorbent materials. Pseudomonas putida GB-1 (P. putida GB-1) is a model Mn-oxidizing laboratory culture representative of freshwater and soil biofilm-forming bacteria. Manganese oxidation in P. putida GB-1 occurs via two single-electron-transfer reactions, involving a multicopper oxidase enzyme found on the bacterial outer membrane surface. Near the onset of the stationary phase of growth, dark brown MnO2 particles are deposited in a matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, thus forming heterogeneous biomineral assemblages. In this study, we assessed the influence of various transition metals on microbial growth and manganese oxidation capacity in a P. putida GB-1 culture propagated in a nutrient-rich growth medium. The concentration-response behavior of actively growing P. putida GB-1 cells was investigated for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at pH ≈ 6 in the presence and absence of 1 mM Mn. Toxicity parameters such as EC0, EC50 and Hillslope, and EC100 were obtained from the sigmoidal concentration-response curves. The extent of MnO2 formation in the presence of the various metal cations was documented 24, 50, 74 and 104 h after the metal-amended medium was inoculated. Toxicity values were compared to twelve physicochemical properties of the metals tested. Significant

  13. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    North, P; Jablonka, P; Hill, V; Shetrone, M; Letarte, B; Lemasle, B; Venn, K A; Battaglia, G; Tolstoy, E; Irwin, M J; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2012-01-01

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other elements in these galaxies, including alpha and iron-peak ones, which allowed us to build [Mn/Fe] and [Mn/alpha] versus [Fe/H] diagrams. The Mn abundances imply sub-solar [Mn/Fe] ratios for the stars in all four galaxies examined. In Sculptor, [Mn/Fe] stays roughly constant between [Fe/H]\\sim -1.8 and -1.4 and decreases at higher iron abundance. In Fornax, [Mn/Fe] does not vary in any significant way with [Fe/H]. The relation between [Mn/alpha] and [Fe/H] for the dSph galaxies is clearly systematically offset from that for the Milky Way, which reflects the different star formation histories of the respective galaxies. The [Mn/alpha] behavior can be interpreted as a result of the metal-dependent Mn yields of type II and ...

  14. An evaluation of pretreatment agents for the stimulation of secondary biogenic coalbed natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zaixing

    permanganate treated samples, which had a much lower TOC (5%), were more promising in terms of biological conversion potential. The biometer assay data indicated that up to 1.1% of the coal carbon was mineralized to carbon dioxide (CO2) within a period of two weeks. On this basis, permanganate treated samples were utilized in subsequent experiments to evaluate potential biogenic methane generation. For the permanganate treated samples, 5.4% of the coal carbon was solubilized/depolymerized, and 3.2% of the soluble carbon was converted to methane (CH4). The methane was rapidly generated and peaked at 40-days with a cumulative amount of 93.4 mumol/g coal (73.9 standard cubic feet (Scf)/ton coal equivalent using linear extrapolation). This compares very favorably to the 22-74 Scf/ton said to exist within the PBR coalbeds prior to resource exploitation. Our data also showed that a small fraction, 143 mumol/g coal, of the soluble carbon which was designated as the volatile fraction (i.e., the purgeable fraction removable by sparging with N2 gas) is essential to the generation of biogenic methane from coal derived constituents. Subsequent studies evaluating the influence of the chemical pretreatment agents (HNO3, NaOH, catalyzed H 2O2, KMnO4) on the subsequent enzymatic conversion of subbituminous coal using a fungal manganese peroxidase (MnP) produced by the agaric white-rot fungus Bjerkandera adusta have shown that chemical pretreatments can also enhance the coal solubilization performance of MnP.

  15. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); H.J. Kuijpers (Harold)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instabi

  16. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Kuijpers, H.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later,

  17. The catalytic oxidation of manganese in water treatment clarification processes

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, A.

    1982-01-01

    The removal of dissolved manganese in water treatment floc blanket clarifiers has been studied. The removal mechanisms may be broadly classed as adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of manganese (II) occurs rapidly and is completed in less than five minutes under conditions prevailing in a floe blanket clarifier. The extent of adsorption is determined by pH, iron and manganese concentrations. Manganese adsorption is relatively insensitive to the concentration of other cations and anions prese...

  18. Reductive Acid Leaching of Low Grade Manganese Ores

    OpenAIRE

    Alok Prasad Das; Sarpras Swain; Shriyanka Panda; Nilotpala Pradhan; Lala Behari Sukla

    2012-01-01

    Manganese recoveries from low-grade ores using organic acids as reducing agents were investigated in the present work. The acid leaching potential of both oxalic acid and citric acid were estimated. Manganese leaching amount were measured by using standard manganese curve and estimated by titration method. Effects of various acid concentrations on leaching efficiency were studied. The observed result suggested prominent manganese recovery of 66% by oxalic acid at 2 M concentration whereas cit...

  19. Technologies for the utilisation of biogenic waste in the bioeconomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    A brief review has been done of technologies involved in the exploitation of biogenic wastes, in order to provide an introduction to the subject from the technological perspective. Biogenic waste materials and biomass have historically been utilised for thousands of years, but a new conversation is emerging on the role of these materials in modern bioeconomies. Due to the nature of the products and commodities now required, a modern bioeconomy is not simply a rerun of former ones. This new dialogue needs to help us understand how technologies for managing and processing biogenic wastes--both established and novel--should be deployed and integrated (or not) to meet the requirements of the sustainability, closed-loop and resource-security agendas that evidently sit behind the bioeconomy aspirations now being voiced in many countries and regions of the world. PMID:26769498

  20. Measuring biogenic silica in marine sediments and suspended matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaster, David J.

    Measuring the biogenic silica content of marine sediments and suspended matter is essential for a variety of geochemical, biological, and sedimentological studies. Biota forming siliceous skeletal material account for as much as one third of the primary productivity in the ocean [Lisitzin, 1972] and a significant portion (2 to 70% by weight) of open-ocean sediments. Biogenic silica measurements reveal important information concerning the bulk chemistry of suspended material or sediment and are essential in any type of silica flux study in the water column or seabed. Analyses of this biogenic phase in marine plankton are useful in characterizing the basic types of biota present and in comparing the distributions of particulate and dissolved silicate when evaluating nutrient dynamics [Nelson and Smith, 1986]. In the marine environment, diatoms, radiolaria, sponges, and silicoflagellates are the common types of siliceous biota.

  1. Seasonal trends of biogenic terpene emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan Woodfin; Milford, Jana; Guenther, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from six coniferous tree species, i.e. Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine), Picea pungens (Blue Spruce), Pseudotsuga menziesii (Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir) and Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone Pine), as well as from two deciduous species, Quercus gambelii (Gamble Oak) and Betula occidentalis (Western River Birch) were studied over a full annual growing cycle. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions rates were quantified in a total of 1236 individual branch enclosure samples. MT dominated coniferous emissions, producing greater than 95% of BVOC emissions. MT and SQT demonstrated short-term emission dependence with temperature. Two oxygenated MT, 1,8-cineol and piperitone, were both light and temperature dependent. Basal emission rates (BER, normalized to 1000μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 30°C) were generally higher in spring and summer than in winter; MT seasonal BER from the coniferous trees maximized between 1.5 and 6.0μgg(-1)h(-1), while seasonal lows were near 0.1μgg(-1)h(-1). The fractional contribution of individual MT to total emissions was found to fluctuate with season. SQT BER measured from the coniferous trees ranged from <0.01 to 0.15μgg(-1)h(-1). BER of up to 1.2μgg(-1)h(-1) of the SQT germacrene B were found from Q. gambelii, peaking in late summer. The β-factor, used to define temperature dependence in emissions modeling, was not found to exhibit discernible growth season trends. A seasonal correction factor proposed by others in previous work to account for a sinusoidal shaped emission pattern was applied to the data. Varying levels of agreement were found between the data and model results for the different plant species seasonal data sets using this correction. Consequently, the analyses on this extensive data set suggest that it is not feasible to apply a universal seasonal correction factor across different vegetation species. A modeling exercise comparing two case scenarios, (1) without and (2

  2. Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Silvano; Gentner, Drew R.; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Ormeno, Elena; Karlik, John; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2011-09-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emitted from plants are the dominant source of reduced carbon chemicals to the atmosphere and are important precursors to the photochemical production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Considering the extensive land used for agriculture, cultivated Citrus plantations may play an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere especially in regions such as the Central Valley of California. Moreover, the BVOC emissions from Citrus species have not been characterized in detail and more species-specific inputs for regional models of BVOC emissions are needed. In this study, we measured the physiological parameters and emissions of the most relevant BVOC (oxygenated compounds, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes) for four predominant Citrus species planted in California ( Citrus sinensis var. 'Parent Navel', Citrus limon var. 'Meyer', Citrus reticulata var. 'W. Murcott' and 'Clementine'). We used two analytical techniques to measure a full range of BVOC emitted: Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Methanol, followed by acetone and acetaldehyde, were the dominant BVOC emitted from lemon and mandarin trees (basal emission rates up to 300 ng(C) g(DW) -1 h -1), while oxygenated monoterpenes, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes were the main BVOC emitted from orange trees (basal emission rates up to = 2500 ng(C) g(DW) -1 h -1). Light and temperature-dependent algorithms were better predictors of methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene and monoterpenes for all the Citrus species. Whereas, temperature-dependent algorithms were better predictors of oxygenated monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes. We observed that flowering increased emissions from orange trees by an order of magnitude with the bulk of BVOC emissions being comprised of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and oxygenated monoterpenes. Chemical speciation of BVOC emissions show that the various classes of terpene

  3. Biogenic amines in dry fermented sausages: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Gardini, Fausto

    2003-11-15

    Biogenic amines are compounds commonly present in living organisms in which they are responsible for many essential functions. They can be naturally present in many foods such as fruits and vegetables, meat, fish, chocolate and milk, but they can also be produced in high amounts by microorganisms through the activity of amino acid decarboxylases. Excessive consumption of these amines can be of health concern because their not equilibrate assumption in human organism can generate different degrees of diseases determined by their action on nervous, gastric and intestinal systems and blood pressure. High microbial counts, which characterise fermented foods, often unavoidably lead to considerable accumulation of biogenic amines, especially tyramine, 2-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, cadaverine, putrescine and histamine. However, great fluctuations of amine content are reported in the same type of product. These differences depend on many variables: the quali-quantitative composition of microbial microflora, the chemico-physical variables, the hygienic procedure adopted during production, and the availability of precursors. Dry fermented sausages are worldwide diffused fermented meat products that can be a source of biogenic amines. Even in the absence of specific rules and regulations regarding the presence of these compounds in sausages and other fermented products, an increasing attention is given to biogenic amines, especially in relation to the higher number of consumers with enhanced sensitivity to biogenic amines determined by the inhibition of the action of amino oxidases, the enzymes involved in the detoxification of these substances. The aim of this paper is to give an overview on the presence of these compounds in dry fermented sausages and to discuss the most important factors influencing their accumulation. These include process and implicit factors as well as the role of starter and nonstarter microflora growing in the different steps of sausage production

  4. Biogenic methane potential of marine sediments. Application of chemical thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arning, E.T.; Schulz, H.M. [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ, Potsdam (Germany); Berk, W. van [Technical Univ. of Clausthal (Germany). Dept. of Hydrogeology

    2013-08-01

    Accumulations of biogenic methane-dominated gas are widespread and occur in a variety of depositional settings and rock types. However, the potential of biogenic methane remains underexplored. This is mainly due to the fact that quantitative assessments applying numerical modeling techniques for exploration purposes are generally lacking to date. Biogenic methane formation starts in relatively shallow marine sediments below the sulfate reduction zone. When sulfate is exhausted, methanogenesis via the CO{sub 2} reduction pathway is often the dominant biogenic methane formation process in marine sediments (Claypool and Kaplan, 1974). The process can be simplified by the reaction: 2CH{sub 2}O + Ca{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O {yields} CH{sub 4} + CaCO{sub 3} + 2H{sup +}. The products of early diagenetic reactions initiate coupled equilibrium reactions that induce a new state of chemical equilibrium among minerals, pore water and gas. The driving force of the complex biogeochemical reactions in sedimentary environments during early diagenesis is the irreversible redox-conversion of organic matter. Early diagenetic formation of biogenic methane shortly after deposition ('early diagenesis') was retraced using PHREEQC computer code that is applied to calculate homogenous and heterogeneous mass-action equations in combination with one-dimensional diffusion driven transport (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). Our modeling approach incorporates interdependent diagenetic reactions evolving into a diffusive multi-component and multiphase system by means of thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of species distribution (Arning et al., 2011, 2012, 2013). Reaction kinetics of organic carbon conversion is integrated into the set of equilibrium reactions by defining type and amount of converted organic matter in a certain time step. It is the aim (1) to calculate quantitatively thermodynamic equilibrium conditions (composition of pore water, mineral phase and gas phase assemblage) in

  5. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  6. Studies on inorganic exchangers - manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of investigation of separation processes for long lived fission products from fuel reprocessing solution, manganese dioxide has been studied as an ion exchanger for cerium using 137Cs, 106Ru, 141Ce, sup(85,89)Sr, 95Zr and 95Nb as tracers. For different concentrations of HNO3, distribution ratios and breakthrough capacities were determined. Cerium was eluted by manganese sulphate and nitric acid. Results show that : (1) at all acidities cerium is adsorbed with almost no uptake of other rare earths, sodium, uranium and plutonium, (2) Ce (IV) gives better adsorption than Ce(III), (3) a combination of manganese sulphate (1 mg/ml) and 3M nitric acid elutes 99% cerium in 5-6 column volumes and (4) as for effect of absorption-elution cycles on MnO2 column, initially there is a decrease in capacity of cerium uptake but thereafter the capacity remains constant. (M.G.B.)

  7. Ratios of biogenic elements for distinguishing recent from fossil microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-09-01

    The ability to distinguish possible microfossils from recent biological contaminants is of great importance to Astrobiology. In this paper we discuss the application of the ratios of life critical biogenic elements (C/O; C/N; and C/S) as determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) to this problem. Biogenic element ratios are provided for a wide variety of living cyanobacteria and other microbial extremophiles, preserved herbarium materials, and ancient biota from the Antarctic Ice Cores and Siberian and Alaskan Permafrost for comparison with macrofossils and microfossils in ancient terrestrial rocks and carbonaceous meteorites.

  8. Ratios of Biogenic Elements for Distinguishing Recent from Fossil Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to distinguish possible microfossils from recent biological contaminants is of great importance to Astrobiology. In this paper we discuss the application of the ratios of life critical biogenic elements (C/O; C/N; and C/S) as determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) to this problem. Biogenic element ratios will be provided for a wide variety of living cyanobacteria and other microbial extremophiles, preserved herbarium materials, and ancient biota from the Antarctic Ice Cores and Siberian and Alaskan Permafrost for comparison with megafossils and microfossils in ancient terrestrial rocks and carbonaceous meteorites.

  9. Influence of beer storage for the selected biogenic amines content

    OpenAIRE

    Brýdlová, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    This thesis does not only changes in the content of biogenic amines during storage of bottled beer, but beer in general. The production of beer in the world is gradually increasing. In 2010, produced a 811,4 million hectoliters of beer. Czech Republic in 2010 produced 17,1 million hectoliters in 2011 and ceased production decline. Average consumption in the Czech Republic was in 2010, 144 liters/person/year. Another chapter is devoted to biogenic amines. They are nitrogen compounds, in which ...

  10. Determination of Biogenic Amines in Different Shrimp Species for Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is part of the project on the ''Quality Assurance of Different Shrimp Species for Export''. Local shrimp samples were collected from Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries and various private enterprises. Contents of biogenic amines were determined by using benzoyl chloride derivatization method with HPLC (reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography). Based on the biogenic amines, quality index of shrimps were correlated with freshness index so that the grade of shrimp samples can be classified as excellent, good, and acceptable. All sizes of shrimps such as extra large, large, medium were found to excceptable respectively

  11. Filling Narrow Trenches by Iodine-Catalyzed CVD of Copper and Manganese on Manganese Nitride Barrier/Adhesion Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Roy Gerald; Lin, Youbo; Au, Yeung Billy

    2011-01-01

    We present a process for the void-free filling of sub-100 nm trenches with copper or copper-manganese alloy by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Conformally deposited manganese nitride serves as an underlayer that initially chemisorbs iodine. CVD of copper or copper-manganese alloy releases the adsorbed iodine atoms from the surface of the manganese nitride, allowing iodine to act as a surfactant catalyst floating on the surface of the growing copper layer. The iodine increases the growth rate...

  12. Luminescence channels of manganese-doped spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two independent luminescence channels are observed from manganese-doped spinel Mn:MgAl2O4. The luminescence around 520 nm is assigned to transition from the lowest electronic excited state 4T1 to the ground state 6A1 of Mn2+ (3d)5 ion by analyzing the excitation spectrum and electron spin resonance measurement. The emission at 650 nm is triggered by the band edge excitation and is assigned similarly to the charge-transfer process associated with the manganese ion

  13. Kinetics of Nitrogen Diffusion in Granular Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-zhu; XU Chu-shao; ZHAO Yue-ping

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and the influence of time on granular manganese nitriding were studied by means of a vacuum resistance furnace, X-ray diffraction technique, and LECO TC-436 oxygen/nitrogen determinator. The longer the nitriding time, the more the nitrogen pickup. Except for a trace of oxide MnO that developed, the metal manganese could thoroughly be nitrided to form Mn4N and a little ζ-phase (the stoichiometric components as Mn2N) with the nitriding time lasting. A kinetic model is developed to reveal the nitriding situation and agrees well with the experimental results.

  14. Influence of the immobilized yeast cells technology on the presence of biogenic amines in wine

    OpenAIRE

    Miličević, Borislav; Šubarić, Drago; Babić, Jurislav; Ačkar, Đurđica; Jozinović, Antun; Petošić, Emil; Matijević, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic amines are basic nitrogenous low molecular weight compounds with biological activity. Biogenic amines are important because they contain a health risk for sensitive humans. Biogenic amines in the wine can be formed from their precursors by various microorganisms present in the wine, at any stage of production. The aim of the present work was to study the changes of the content of biogenic amines in wines made from grape variety Frankovka and Pinot noir (Vitis vinifera L.) from Kutjev...

  15. The Potential of the Yeast Debaryomyces hansenii H525 to Degrade Biogenic Amines in Food

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias Bäumlisberger; Urs Moellecken; Helmut König; Harald Claus

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-six yeasts from different genera were investigated for their ability to metabolize biogenic amines. About half of the yeast strains produced one or more different biogenic amines, but some strains of Debaryomyces hansenii and Yarrowia lipolytica were also able to degrade such compounds. The most effective strain D. hanseniii H525 metabolized a broad spectrum of biogenic amines by growing and resting cells. Degradation of biogenic amines by this yeast isolate could be attributed to a pe...

  16. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to pollination of flowers. Although bVOC emissions from soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species

  17. Biogenic gases in tropical floodplain river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victória Ramos Ballester

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the distribution of biogenic gases in the floodplain of the Mogi-Guaçu River (São Paulo, Brazil enabled the establishment of a "redox hierarchy", in which the main channel was the most oxidizing environment, followed by Diogo Lake, with Infernão Lake having the most reducing conditions of the subsystems evaluated. Diogo Lake exported about 853.4 g C.m-2.year-1, of which, 14.6% was generated from methanogenesis and 36.7% by aerobic respiration. For Infernão Lake, these values were 2016 g C.m-2.year-1, 1.8 % and 41.5 %, respectively. Carbon export by these systems was predominantly in the form of CO2, which was responsible for the release of 728.78 g C.m-2.year-1 at Diogo Lake and 1979.72 g C.m-2. year-1 at Infernão Lake. Such patterns may result from the nature of the hydrological conditions, the action of the hydroperiod, and morphological characteristics of the environment.A análise da distribuição de gases biogênicos na planície de inundação do Rio Mogi Guaçu (São Paulo, Brasil possibilitou o estabelecimento de um gradiente redox para os sistemas aquáticos avaliados, em que o canal principal do rio apresentou-se como o ambiente mais oxidado, seguido da Lagoa do Diogo, e a Lagoa do Infernão apresentando as condições mais redutoras entre os ambientes em questão. A Lagoa do Diogo exporta um total de 853,4 g C.m-2.ano-1, do qual 14,6% é produzido pela metanogênese e 36,7% pela respiração aeróbia. Para a Lagoa do Infernão estes valores foram respectivamente de 2.016 g C.m-2.ano-1, 1,8% e de 41,5%. A exportação de carbono por estes sistemas é realizada, predominantemente na forma de CO2, nos valores de 728,78 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Diogo e 1.979,72 g C.m-2.ano-1 para a Lagoa do Infernão. Estes padrões parecem estar relacionados com a natureza das condições hidrológicas, com a ação do hidroperíodo e com as características morfológicas do ambiente.

  18. Manganese regulation of manganese peroxidase expression and lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular manganese peroxidase and laccase activities were detected in cultures of Dichomitus squalens (Polyporus anceps) under conditions favoring lignin degradation. In contrast, neither extracellular lignin peroxidase nor aryl alcohol oxidase activity was detected in cultures grown under a wide variety of conditions. The mineralization of 14C-ring-, -side chain-, and -methoxy-labeled synthetic guaiacyl lignins by D. squalens and the expression of extracellular manganese peroxidase were dependent on the presence of Mn(II), suggesting that manganese peroxidase is an important component of this organism's lignin degradation system. The expression of laccase activity was independent of manganese. In contrast to previous findings with Phanero-chaete chrysosporium, lignin degradation by D. squalens proceeded in the cultures containing excess carbon and nitrogen

  19. Manganese regulation of manganese peroxidase expression and lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens.

    OpenAIRE

    Périé, F H; Gold, M H

    1991-01-01

    Extracellular manganese peroxidase and laccase activities were detected in cultures of Dichomitus squalens (Polyporus anceps) under conditions favoring lignin degradation. In contrast, neither extracellular lignin peroxidase nor aryl alcohol oxidase activity was detected in cultures grown under a wide variety of conditions. The mineralization of 14C-ring-, -side chain-, and -methoxy-labeled synthetic guaiacyl lignins by D. squalens and the expression of extracellular manganese peroxidase were...

  20. Competition for Manganese at the Host-Pathogen Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelliher, J L; Kehl-Fie, T E

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals such as manganese are essential nutrients for both pathogen and host. Vertebrates exploit this necessity to combat invading microbes by restricting access to these critical nutrients, a defense known as nutritional immunity. During infection, the host uses several mechanisms to impose manganese limitation. These include removal of manganese from the phagolysosome, sequestration of extracellular manganese, and utilization of other metals to prevent bacterial acquisition of manganese. In order to cause disease, pathogens employ a variety of mechanisms that enable them to adapt to and counter nutritional immunity. These adaptations include, but are likely not limited to, manganese-sensing regulators and high-affinity manganese transporters. Even though successful pathogens can overcome host-imposed manganese starvation, this defense inhibits manganese-dependent processes, reducing the ability of these microbes to cause disease. While the full impact of host-imposed manganese starvation on bacteria is unknown, critical bacterial virulence factors such as superoxide dismutases are inhibited. This chapter will review the factors involved in the competition for manganese at the host-pathogen interface and discuss the impact that limiting the availability of this metal has on invading bacteria. PMID:27571690

  1. Enzymatic Sensor of Biogenic Amines with Optical Oxygen Transducer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maixnerová, Lucie; Horvitz, Alexandar; Kuncová, Gabriela; Přibyl, M.; Šebela, M.; Koštejn, Martin

    Brno: Masarykova Universita, 2014, s. 173. ISBN 978-80-210-7159-9. [CEITEC Annual Conference. Brno (CZ), 21.10.2014-24.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA03010544 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : optical enzymatic biosensor * biogenic amines * mathematical model Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  2. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  3. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection

  4. Advances in Biochemical Screening for Phaeochromocytoma using Biogenic Amines

    OpenAIRE

    Whiting, Malcolm J; Doogue, Matthew P

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical testing for phaeochromocytoma is performed in diagnostic laboratories using a variety of tests with plasma, serum or 24-hour urine collections. These tests include catecholamines and their methylated metabolites - the metanephrines, either individually or in combination with their sulfated metabolites. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) continues to be the dominant analytical method for biogenic amine quantitation. Chromatographic techniques are changing, with improveme...

  5. Biogenic Isoprene Emission Mechanism from 13CO2 Exposure Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Biogenic isoprene emissions have been believed to be from only photosynthesis processes in plant. However nocturnal isoprene emission from pine is detected. And by feeding 13CO2 to plants, it is found that both photosynthesis pathway and light independent processes contribute to isoprene emissions.

  6. Emission of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindwall, Frida

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from arctic ecosystems are scarcely studied and the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions even less so. BVOCs are emitted from all living organisms and play a role for atmospheric chemistry. The major part of BVOCs derives from plants...

  7. Biogenic Magnetite Formation through Anaerobic Biooxidation of Fe(II)

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, Swades K.; Lack, Joseph G.; Coates, John D.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of isotopically light carbonates in association with fine-grained magnetite is considered to be primarily due to the reduction of Fe(III) by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the environment. Here, we report on magnetite formation by biooxidation of Fe(II) coupled to denitrification. This metabolism offers an alternative environmental source of biogenic magnetite.

  8. Crystallization and spectroscopic studies of manganese malonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varghese Mathew; Jochan Joseph; Sabu Jacob; K E Abraham

    2010-08-01

    The preparation of manganese malonate crystals by gel method and its spectroscopic studies are reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern reveals the crystalline nature. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the crystals are recorded and the vibrational assignments are given with possible explanations. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is used to measure the bandgap (g) of the material.

  9. Mesoporous manganese oxide for warfare agents degradation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Králová, Daniela; Opluštil, F.; Němec, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 156, JULY (2012), s. 224-232. ISSN 1387-1811 R&D Projects: GA MPO FI-IM5/231 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : homogeneous hydrolysis * chloroacetamide * manganese(IV) oxide * warfare agents Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.365, year: 2012

  10. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., and crystallized. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  11. Iron and manganese deposits in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the results of the study carried out for the United Nations expert which the main object was: the study of the information available about iron and manganese formation in Uruguay, as well as the main researching deposit to determinate economical possibilities in the exportation.

  12. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina-Maria Bordean

    Full Text Available Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  13. The Potential of the Yeast Debaryomyces hansenii H525 to Degrade Biogenic Amines in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Bäumlisberger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six yeasts from different genera were investigated for their ability to metabolize biogenic amines. About half of the yeast strains produced one or more different biogenic amines, but some strains of Debaryomyces hansenii and Yarrowia lipolytica were also able to degrade such compounds. The most effective strain D. hanseniii H525 metabolized a broad spectrum of biogenic amines by growing and resting cells. Degradation of biogenic amines by this yeast isolate could be attributed to a peroxisomal amine oxidase activity. Strain H525 may be useful as a starter culture to reduce biogenic amines in fermented food.

  14. Efficacies of stable manganese for enhancing the elimination of incorporated manganese-54 in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficacies of intraperitoneal injection of stable manganese for enhancing the elimination of incorporated 54Mn was studied in mice. At the start of the experiment, each mouse was given 37 kBq of 54Mn and initial whole-body radioactivities were measured. Forty-eight hours after the injection, mice were given intraperitoneally a single dose of stable manganese at 0.3, 1.0, 3.0 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. Then whole-body retentions and principal organ distributions were measured at suitable intervals. Whole-body retentions of 54Mn decreased markedly following the stable manganese injection, and the efficacies for elimination were estimated to be 45.3% for 0.3 mg/kg, 59.6% for 1.0 mg/kg, 71.4% for 3.0 mg/kg and 78.0% for 10 mg/kg. The substitution rates of incorporated 54Mn for the injected stable manganese were 61.5, 70.8, 79.5 and 83.7%, respectively, suggesting that most of the manganese exists in free or exchangeable state in the body. The concentrations of 54Mn in organs also decreased by stable manganese injection, however, the efficacies for elimination varied with organs. It was generally effective in the soft tissues, and it was ineffective in the bone. In conclusion, intraperitoneal injection of stable manganese was very effective to eliminate the incorporated 54Mn and it could reduce the risk of possible future biological effects. (author)

  15. Manganese binding proteins in human and cow's milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese nutrition in the neonatal period is poorly understood, due in part to a lack of information on the amount of manganese in infant foods and its bioavailability. Since the molecular localization of an element in foods is one determinant of its subsequent bioavailability, a study was made of the binding of manganese in human and cow's milk. An extrinsic label of 54Mn was shown to equilibrate isotopically with native manganese in milks and formulas. Milk samples were separated into fat, casein and whey by ultracentrifugation. In human milk, the major part (71%) of manganese was found in whey, 11% in casein and 18% in the lipid fraction. In contrast, in cow's milk, 32% of total manganese was in whey, 67% in casein and 1% in lipid. Within the human whey fraction, most of the manganese was bound to lactoferrin, while in cow's whey, manganese was mostly complexed to ligands with molecular weights less than 200. The distribution of manganese in formulas was closer to that of human milk than of cow's milk. The bioavailability of manganese associated with lactoferrin, casein and low molecular weight complexes needs to be assessed

  16. MANGANESE SPECIATION IN SELECTED AGRICULTURAL SOILS OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Habibah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese speciation in selected agricultural soils of Peninsular Malaysia is discussed in this study. Manganese concentration in the Easily Leacheable and Ion Exchangeable (ELFE, Acid Reducible (AR, Organic Oxidizable (OO and Resistant (RR fractions of soils developed on weathered rocks, soils of mixed nature, alluvium and peat deposits are described. The total manganese concentration in soils developed on weathered rocks was found to be higher than that in soils of mixed nature, alluvium and peat deposits because of the occurrence of resistant manganese oxide at the topsoils. Manganese speciation in paddy soils is influenced by the redox condition resulting from the alternate flooding and drying of the soils. Under reducing conditions, this metal tends to get dissolved and be available for plant uptake. Upon oxidation, manganese is precipitated into the acid reducible fraction as poorly crystalline manganese oxide and hydroxide and/or the resistant Fe-Mn mottles. In non-paddy cultivated alluvial soils, manganese speciation varies widely and is less understood. For the non-paddy cultivated peat soils, manganese is mainly associated with organic material, as indicated by the high manganese concentration in the OO fraction.

  17. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  18. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-quan; Gu, Guo-hua; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Ren-feng; Liu, You-cai; Fu, Jian-gang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leaching efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sulfuric acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respectively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  19. Biogenic emission measurement and inventories determination of biogenic emissions in the eastern United States and Texas and comparison with biogenic emission inventories

    OpenAIRE

    Warneke, C.; De Gouw, JA; Del Negro, L; J. Brioude; Mckeen, S.; H. Stark; Kuster, WC; Goldan, PD; Trainer, M.; Fehsenfeld, FC; Wiedinmyer, C.; Guenther, AB; Hansel, A.; A. Wisthaler; Atlas, E.

    2010-01-01

    During the NOAA Southern Oxidant Study 1999 (SOS1999), Texas Air Quality Study 2000 (TexAQS2000), International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT2004), and Texas Air Quality Study 2006 (TexAQS2006) campaigns, airborne measurements of isoprene and monoterpenes were made in the eastern United States and in Texas, and the results are used to evaluate the biogenic emission inventories BEIS3.12, BEIS3.13, MEGAN2, and WM2001. Two methods are used for the ev...

  20. Bioleaching of a manganese and silver Ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioleaching with a strain of Thiobacillus thiooxidans of the ore of Farallon Negro (Catamarca, Argentina) was studied in order to estimate its application to the solution and recovery of the manganese, and to improve the silver extraction. The State company which works the mine has not yet found an economical process to extract the manganese and has only reached a 30% efficiency in the recovery of silver by cianuration. The effects of pulp density variations and the addition of different quantities of FeS were analysed looking for the best working conditions. 74 μm (mesh Tyler 200) of ore particles were used because that is the size used in this plant for the cianuration process. (Author)

  1. Monitoring of natural radioactivity in manganese ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radionuclides (238U, 232Th, and 40K) contents of Manganese ore collected by Sinai Manganese Company in Egypt-Cairo have been determined by low background spectroscopy using hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detector. The mean activities due to the three radionuclides (238U, 232Th, and 40K) were found to be 3543 ± 106, 222 ± 6.6 and 3483 ± 104 Bq/kg, respectively. The absorbed dose rates due to the natural radioactivity in samples under investigation ranged from 1522 ± 45 to 1796 ± 53 nGy/h. The radium equivalent activity varied from 3807 ± 114 to 4446 ± 133 Bq/kg. Also, the representative external hazard index values for the corresponding samples were estimated.

  2. Biomass burning: Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter deals with two different, but related, aspects of biomass burning. The first part of the chapter deals with a technique to estimate the instantaneous emissions of trace gases produced by biomass burning using satellite imagery. The second part of the chapter concerns the recent discovery that burning results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of N2O, NO, and CH4. Hence, biomass burning has both an immediate and long-term impact on the production of trace gases to the atmosphere. The objective of this research is to better assess and quantify the role of this research is to better assess and quantify the role and impact of biomass as a driver for global change. It will be demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions and may in the future be used to estimate the long-term postburn biogenic emissions of trace gases to the atmosphere

  3. Gas formation. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D A; Lawson, M; Davis, C L; Ferreira, A A; Santos Neto, E V; Ellis, G S; Lewan, M D; Martini, A M; Tang, Y; Schoell, M; Sessions, A L; Eiler, J M

    2014-06-27

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a "clumped isotope" technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models. PMID:24970083

  4. Welding of high manganese- and carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology and conditions of welding of high manganese and carbon steel by a resistance welding technique using an intermediate part are developed. Austenitic chromium-nickel 12Kh18N10T steel is chosen as a material of the intermediate part. The recommended welding conditions insure a high quality of the weld joint in terms of metal structure and its mechanical properties. It is the basic metal of the joint that fractures under mechanical testing

  5. Incoherent Charge Dynamics in Perovskite Manganese Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    NAKANO, HIROKI; Motome, Yukitoshi; Imada, Masatoshi

    2000-01-01

    A minimal model is proposed for the perovskite manganese oxides showing the strongly incoherent charge dynamics with a suppressed Drude weight in the ferromagnetic and metallic phase near the insulator. We investigate a generalized double-exchange model including three elements; the orbital degeneracy of $e_g$ conduction bands, the Coulomb interaction and fluctuating Jahn-Teller distortions. We demonstrate that Lancz$\\ddot{\\rm o}$s diagonalization calculations combined with Monte Carlo sampli...

  6. Manganese concentration in human saliva using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewgoy, Hugo R., E-mail: hugorl@usp.br [Universidade Bandeirante Anhanguera (UNIBAN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B.; Medeiros, Ilca M.M.A.; Medeiros, Jose A.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this investigation the Manganese levels in human whole saliva were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering gender and lifestyle factors of Brazilian inhabitants (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure). The results emphasize that the indicative interval is statistically different by gender. These data are useful for identifying or preventing some diseases in the Brazilian population. (author)

  7. Manganese concentration in human saliva using NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this investigation the Manganese levels in human whole saliva were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering gender and lifestyle factors of Brazilian inhabitants (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure). The results emphasize that the indicative interval is statistically different by gender. These data are useful for identifying or preventing some diseases in the Brazilian population. (author)

  8. Pathophysiology of Manganese-Associated Neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Racette, Brad A.; Aschner, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Dydak, Ulrike; Criswell, Susan R; Zheng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a well established neurotoxin associated with specific damage to the basal ganglia in humans. The phenotype associated with Mn neurotoxicity was first described in two workers with occupational exposure to Mn oxide.(Couper, 1837) Although the description did not use modern clinical terminology, a parkinsonian illness characterized by slowness of movement (bradykinesia), masked facies, and gait impairment (postural instability) appears to have predominated. Nearly 100 years l...

  9. Hauterivian shallow marine calcareous biogenic mounds: S.E. Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Arias, Consuelo; Masse, Jean Pierre; Vilas Minondo, Lorenzo

    1995-01-01

    Hauterivian biogenic deposits from the Prebetic northern margin near Caudete (Albacete Province, southeastern Spain) are represented by low domed bodies, less than 10 m thick, surrounded by bioclastic sediments and capped by siliciclastics. They consist of a coral, stromatoporoid and microbial framework with cavities filled by mud, rapidly lithified. Intermound bioclastics, derived from the mound organic community, reflect high energy conditions and shallow water settings. Mound g...

  10. Biogenic amines in smear and mould-ripened cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Pleva; Leona Buňková; Eva Theimrová; Vendula Bartošáková; František Buňka; Khatantuul Purevdorj

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was the monitoring of six biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, tryptamine, putrescine, and cadaverine) and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine) in 30 samples of dairy products purchased in the Czech Republic, namely in 15 samples of mould-ripened cheeses and in 15 samples of smear-ripened cheeses. A further goal was the microbiological analysis of the individual samples of cheeses (total count of microorganisms, number of enterobacteria, enterococci...

  11. Analysis of Some Biogenic Amines by Micellar Liquid Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Malinowska; Katarzyna E. Stępnik

    2012-01-01

    Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) with the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine some physicochemical parameters of six biogenic amines: adrenaline, dopamine, octopamine, histamine, 2-phenylethylamine, and tyramine. In this paper, an influence of surfactant’s concentration and pH of the micellar mobile phase on the retention of the tested substances was examined. To determine the influence of surfactant’s concentration on the retention of the tested ami...

  12. Biogenic calcite structures in Green Lake, James Ross Island, Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elster, Josef; Nedbalová, Linda; Komárek, Jiří; Vodrážka, R.

    Brno: Masarykova Univerzita, 2009 - (Barták, M.; Hájek, J.; Váczi, P.), s. 38-40 ISBN 978-80-210-4987-1. [Electronic Conference on Interactions between Antarctic Life and Environmental Factors. Brno (CZ), 22.10.2009-23.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Green Lake * James Ross * Biogenic calcite structures Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  13. 40 CFR 424.60 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electrolytic manganese products subcategory. 424.60 Section 424.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Electrolytic Manganese Products Subcategory § 424.60 Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  14. Investigation of Wear Coefficient of Manganese Phosphate Coated Tool Steel

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ilaiyavel; Venkatesan, A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the properties of the coating in terms of wear resistance is of paramount importance in order to prevent the formation of severe damages. In this study, Wear coefficient of uncoated, Manganese Phosphate coated, Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant, Heat treated Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant on AISI D2 steels was investigated using Archard’s equation. The wear tests were performed in a pin on disk apparatus as per ASTM G-99 Standard. The volumetric wear...

  15. Widespread Distribution of Ability to Oxidize Manganese Among Freshwater Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Eileen; Staley, James T.

    1982-01-01

    Manganese-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria were found to comprise a significant proportion of the bacterial community of Lake Washington (Seattle, Wash.) and Lake Virginia (Winter Park, Fla.). Identification of these freshwater bacteria showed that members of a variety of genera are capable of oxidizing manganese. Isolates maintained in the laboratory spontaneously lost the ability to oxidize manganese. A direct correlation was found between the presence of plasmid DNA and the ability of the ...

  16. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

    OpenAIRE

    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-01-01

    Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and accele...

  17. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, Kenan

    2000-01-01

    Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli – Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and acce...

  18. MANGANESE SPECIATION IN SELECTED AGRICULTURAL SOILS OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    J. Habibah; J. Khairiah; Ismail, B. S.; M.D. Kadderi

    2014-01-01

    Manganese speciation in selected agricultural soils of Peninsular Malaysia is discussed in this study. Manganese concentration in the Easily Leacheable and Ion Exchangeable (ELFE), Acid Reducible (AR), Organic Oxidizable (OO) and Resistant (RR) fractions of soils developed on weathered rocks, soils of mixed nature, alluvium and peat deposits are described. The total manganese concentration in soils developed on weathered rocks was found to be higher than that in soils of mixed nature, alluviu...

  19. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suib, Steven Lawrence; Yuan, Jikang

    2011-02-15

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves and methods of making the same are disclosed. A method for forming nanowires includes hydrothermally treating a chemical precursor composition in a hydrothermal treating solvent to form the nanowires, wherein the chemical precursor composition comprises a source of manganese cations and a source of counter cations, and wherein the nanowires comprise ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves.

  20. Chromium-manganese steels of transition class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of nickel replacing by manganese and preparing the same level of mechanical properties as in chromium-nickel steels due to γ-α transformations taking place during property tests, are studied. Chromium-manganese steels with the composition of 0.05-0.1%C, 13-14%Cr, 5.0-6.5%Mn, 0.2-0.5%Si, 0.03-0.13%N, 0.05-0.01%Al and additionally alloyed 0.3-2.0%Cu, 0.05-0.6%V, 0.3-1.0%Mo, 0.02-0.05%Ca in various combinations have been melted. It is shown, that using alloying and heat treatment one can control the phase composition, austenite resistance to martensite transformation during loading and mechanical properties of chromium-manganese steels of the transition class. The use of the phase transformation in the process of testing determines the level of mechanical properties. The optimum development of the transformation accompanied by a sufficient development of processes of hardening and microstresses relaxation permits to obtain a high level of mechanical properties: σsub(B)=1500 MPa, σsub(0.2)-1130MPa, delta=15%, psi=37%, asub(H)=1000 kJ/msup(2) which exceeds the level for chromium-nickel steels. Steels have a lower cost and do not require any complecated heat treatment regime

  1. Manganese Inhalation as a Parkinson Disease Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ordoñez-Librado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the effects of divalent and trivalent Manganese (Mn2+/Mn3+ mixture inhalation on mice to obtain a novel animal model of Parkinson disease (PD inducing bilateral and progressive dopaminergic cell death, correlate those alterations with motor disturbances, and determine whether L-DOPA treatment improves the behavior, to ensure that the alterations are of dopaminergic origin. CD-1 male mice inhaled a mixture of Manganese chloride and Manganese acetate, one hour twice a week for five months. Before Mn exposure, animals were trained to perform motor function tests and were evaluated each week after the exposure. By the end of Mn exposure, 10 mice were orally treated with 7.5 mg/kg L-DOPA. After 5 months of Mn mixture inhalation, striatal dopamine content decreased 71%, the SNc showed important reduction in the number of TH-immunopositive neurons, mice developed akinesia, postural instability, and action tremor; these motor alterations were reverted with L-DOPA treatment. Our data provide evidence that Mn2+/Mn3+ mixture inhalation produces similar morphological, neurochemical, and behavioral alterations to those observed in PD providing a useful experimental model for the study of this neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Microporosity of heat-treated manganese dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnott, J.B.; Donne, S.W. [Discipline of Chemistry, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Williams, R.P. [Delta EMD Australia Pty Limited, McIntosh Drive, Mayfield West, NSW 2304 (Australia); Pandolfo, A.G. [CSIRO Division of Energy Technology, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3169 (Australia)

    2007-03-20

    A structural and micro-pore analysis of a series of heat treated electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) samples has been conducted. In terms of crystal structure, the original EMD with {gamma}-MnO{sub 2} structure (orthorhombic unit cell) was found to progressively convert to {beta}-MnO{sub 2} (tetragonal unit cell) at elevated temperatures. The structural transition was kinetically limited, with the higher temperatures leading to a greater degree of transformation. The orthorhombic {gamma}-MnO{sub 2} unit cell was found to contract along the a and b axes, while along the c axis an expansion was observed only at the highest heat treatment temperatures. These changes occur as a result of manganese ion diffusion leading to the formation of a denser, more defect free material. The porosity of these heat treated EMD samples was also examined by N{sub 2} gas adsorption combined with various interpretive techniques such as the Kelvin equation, MP method, Dubinin-Radushkevich method, Dubinin-Astakhov method and a more modern density functional theory based approach. Despite shortcomings associated with certain techniques, all clearly indicated that the EMD micro-pore volume decreased and the meso- and macro-pore volume increased as the heat treatment temperature was increased. This was justified as a result of manganese ion movement during the structural rearrangement causing the small pores to be progressively sintered shut, while the larger pores were formed as a result of stress-induced cracking in the denser final product. (author)

  3. Manganese and the II system in photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution during greening of some components of system II of photosynthesis has been followed in plastids extracted from Zea mays grown in the dark. Manganese studies were done by means of neutron activation, electron spin resonance (ESR) was also used in some experiments. Oxygen evolution of isolated plastids was followed by polarography (with a membrane electrode). The evolution of manganese/carotenoids ratio can be divided in three parts. During the first hour of greening, the increase shows an input of Mn in the plastids; then, whereas carotenoids content of those plastids presents no changes, Mn is released in the medium; at last, carotenoids synthesis is parallel to Mn fixation in the plastids, the ratio being constant after 24 hours of greening. From various measurements on chloroplastic manganese, it is shown that the development of system II can be divided in two main phases: during the first one (that is during the first day of light) the components are not yet bound together but the relations become more and more strong. Then, during the last period of the development, the organisation of system II is complete and the transformations of the plastids are parallel to the raise of their activity. (author)

  4. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  5. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petäjä, Tuukka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Moisseev, Dmitri [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Sinclair, Victoria [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); O' Connor, Ewan J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Manninen, Antti J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Levula, Janne [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Väänänen, Riikka [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Heikkinen, Liine [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Äijälä, Mikko [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Aalto, Juho [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Bäck, Jaana [University of Helsinki, Finland

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  6. Role of manganese in materials damage at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation was performed using six austenitic structural and welding materials with manganese concentration ranging from 0.5 to 5-7 mass.%. The tests were carried out under conditions of high-temperature power plants (vacuum, helium coolant, 750-900 deG C, 103-104 hours). Equilibrium manganese concentration on the surface is achieved after 100-200 h and in 2-2.5 times lower fraom fue initial one. Material loosening due to the loss of manganese in thinwall (1-2 mm) parts can be commensurable with 'plastic' loosening in the creep process which negatively affects the durability of high-manganese steels and alloys

  7. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sulfuric acid leaching of mechanically activated manganese carbonate ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidic leaching of mechanically activated manganese ore from Denizli – Tavas was investigated. The ore was activated mechanically in a planetary mill and the amorphisation in manganese structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction. The parameters in acidic leaching of the ore were milling time, acid concentration and time. All experiments were performed at 25°C with solid to liquid ratio: 1/10. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in manganese ore and accelerated the dissolution of manganese in acidic media.

  9. Methanogenesis from wastewater stimulated by addition of elemental manganese

    OpenAIRE

    Sen Qiao; Tian Tian; Benyu Qi; Jiti Zhou

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel procedure for accelerating methanogenesis from wastewater by adding elemental manganese into the anaerobic digestion system. The results indicated that elemental manganese effectively enhanced both the methane yield and the production rate. Compared to the control test without elemental manganese, the total methane yield and production rate with 4 g/L manganese addition increased 3.4-fold (from 0.89 ± 0.03 to 2.99 ± 0.37 M/gVSS within 120 h) and 4.4-fold (from 6.2 ...

  10. Manganese Reduction by Microbes from Oxic Regions of the Lake Vanda (Antarctica) Water Column

    OpenAIRE

    Bratina, Bonnie Jo; Stevenson, Bradley S.; Green, William J.; Schmidt, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    Depth profiles of metals in Lake Vanda, a permanently ice-covered, stratified Antarctic lake, suggest the importance of particulate manganese oxides in the scavenging, transport, and release of metals. Since manganese oxides can be solubilized by manganese-reducing bacteria, microbially mediated manganese reduction was investigated in Lake Vanda. Microbes concentrated from oxic regions of the water column, encompassing a peak of soluble manganese [Mn(II)], reduced synthetic manganese oxides (...

  11. Global Biogenic Emission of Carbon Dioxide from Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R.; Nolasco, D.; Meneses, W.; Salazar, J.; Hernández, P.; Pérez, N.

    2002-12-01

    Human-induced increases in the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gas components have been underway over the past century and are expected to drive climate change in the coming decades. Carbon dioxide was responsible for an estimated 55 % of the antropogenically driven radiactive forcing of the atmosphere in the 1980s and is predicted to have even greater importance over the next century (Houghton et al., 1990). A highly resolved understanding of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2, and how they are affected by climate and land use, is essential in the analysis of the global carbon cycle and how it may be impacted by human activities. Landfills are biochemical reactors that produce CH4 and CO2 emissions due to anaerobic digestion of solid urban wastes. Estimated global CH4 emission from landfills is about 44 millions tons per year and account for a 7.4 % of all CH4 sources (Whiticar, 1989). Observed CO2/CH4 molar ratios from landfill gases lie within the range of 0.7-1.0; therefore, an estimated global biogenic emission of CO2 from landfills could reach levels of 11.2-16 millions tons per year. Since biogas extraction systems are installed for extracting, purifying and burning the landfill gases, most of the biogenic gas emission to the atmosphere from landfills occurs through the surface environment in a diffuse and disperse form, also known as non-controlled biogenic emission. Several studies of non-controlled biogenic gas emission from landfills showed that CO2/CH4 weight ratios of surface landfill gases, which are directly injected into the atmosphere, are about 200-300 times higher than those observed in the landfill wells, which are usually collected and burned by gas extraction systems. This difference between surface and well landfill gases is mainly due to bacterial oxidation of the CH4 to CO2 inducing higher CO2/CH4 ratios for surface landfill gases than those well landfill gases. Taking into consideration this observation, the global biogenic

  12. Regional specificity of manganese accumulation and clearance in the mouse brain: implications for manganese-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünecker, B; Kaltwasser, S F; Zappe, A C; Bedenk, B T; Bicker, Y; Spoormaker, V I; Wotjak, C T; Czisch, M

    2013-05-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI has recently become a valuable tool for the assessment of in vivo functional cerebral activity in animal models. As a result of the toxicity of manganese at higher dosages, fractionated application schemes have been proposed to reduce the toxic side effects by using lower concentrations per injection. Here, we present data on regional-specific manganese accumulation during a fractionated application scheme over 8 days of 30 mg/kg MnCl2 , as well as on the clearance of manganese chloride over the course of several weeks after the termination of the whole application protocol supplying an accumulative dose of 240 mg/kg MnCl2 . Our data show most rapid accumulation in the superior and inferior colliculi, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, cornu ammonis of the hippocampus and globus pallidus. The data suggest that no ceiling effects occur in any region using the proposed application protocol. Therefore, a comparison of basal neuronal activity differences in different animal groups based on locally specific manganese accumulation is possible using fractionated application. Half-life times of manganese clearance varied between 5 and 7 days, and were longest in the periaqueductal gray, amygdala and entorhinal cortex. As the hippocampal formation shows one of the highest T1 -weighted signal intensities after manganese application, and manganese-induced memory impairment has been suggested, we assessed hippocampus-dependent learning as well as possible manganese-induced atrophy of the hippocampal volume. No interference of manganese application on learning was detected after 4 days of Mn(2+) application or 2 weeks after the application protocol. In addition, no volumetric changes induced by manganese application were found for the hippocampus at any of the measured time points. For longitudinal measurements (i.e. repeated manganese applications), a minimum of at least 8 weeks should be considered using the proposed protocol to allow for

  13. Manganese Catalyzed C-H Halogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C-H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon-halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds to C-Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L-Mn(V)═O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn-F fluorine source, effecting carbon-fluorine bond formation. Indeed, this idea

  14. 40K in the Black Sea: a proxy to estimate biogenic sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to estimate the rate of biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea using the naturally occurring radionuclide 40K has been considered. It allows assessment of the contribution of suspended matter of biological origin to the overall sediment accumulation in the Black Sea coastal, shelf and deep-water areas. Based upon this method, a relationship between the biogenic fraction of the seabed sediments and the water depth has been established with a view to differentiating the contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous suspended matter to the sedimentation rate. Overall, 40K can be considered as an easily applicable proxy to assess sedimentation rate of biogenic fraction of particulate matter in marine environments. - Highlights: • 40K-based approach was developed to assess biogenic sedimentation in the Black Sea. • 40K-derived relationship between biogenic sedimentation and water depth was traced. • 40K is an easily applicable proxy to estimate rate of biogenic sedimentation in sea

  15. Biogenic amines in commercially produced Yulu, a Chinese fermented fish sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Xu, Ying; Li, Chunsheng; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng

    2014-01-01

    Seven biogenic amines were determined in 35 commercially produced Yulu samples from three provinces of China by pre-column derivatisation with dansyl chloride (Dns-Cl) and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD). Putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine were the major biogenic amines (more than 100 mg kg(-1)), while tryptamine, spermidine and spermine were regarded as minor biogenic amines (less than 25 mg kg(-1)). Twenty samples contained more than 50 mg kg(-1) histamine (the limit for histamine in seafood products as suggested by the Food and Drug Administration). Twenty-one samples contained more than 100 mg kg(-1) tyramine and 10 contained more than 1000 mg kg(-1) total biogenic amines. This study provided data on biogenic amine levels in Chinese fermented fish sauce. The results suggested that biogenic amine content should be monitored in commercially produced Yulu. PMID:24779975

  16. Biogenic Mn oxides for effective adsorption of Cd from aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic Mn oxides exert important controls on trace metal cycling in aquatic and soil environments. A Mn-oxidizing bacterium Bacillus sp. WH4 was isolated from Fe-Mn nodules of an agrudalf in central China. The biogenic Mn oxides formed by mediation of this Mn oxidizing microorganism were identified as short-ranged and nano-sized Mn oxides. Cd adsorption isotherms, pH effect on adsorption and kinetics were investigated in comparison with an abiotic Mn oxide todorokite. Maximum adsorption of Cd to the biogenic Mn oxides and todorokite was 2.04 and 0.69 mmol g-1 sorbent, respectively. Thus, the biogenic Mn oxides were more effective Cd adsorbents than the abiotic Mn oxide in the aquatic environment. The findings could improve our knowledge of biogenic Mn oxides formation in the environment and their important roles in the biogeochemical cycles of heavy metals. - Biogenic Mn oxides effectively adsorb Cd from aquatic environments.

  17. Biogenic Mn oxides for effective adsorption of Cd from aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Youting [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zheng Yuanming; Zhang Limei [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); He Jizheng, E-mail: jzhe@rcees.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Biogenic Mn oxides exert important controls on trace metal cycling in aquatic and soil environments. A Mn-oxidizing bacterium Bacillus sp. WH4 was isolated from Fe-Mn nodules of an agrudalf in central China. The biogenic Mn oxides formed by mediation of this Mn oxidizing microorganism were identified as short-ranged and nano-sized Mn oxides. Cd adsorption isotherms, pH effect on adsorption and kinetics were investigated in comparison with an abiotic Mn oxide todorokite. Maximum adsorption of Cd to the biogenic Mn oxides and todorokite was 2.04 and 0.69 mmol g{sup -1} sorbent, respectively. Thus, the biogenic Mn oxides were more effective Cd adsorbents than the abiotic Mn oxide in the aquatic environment. The findings could improve our knowledge of biogenic Mn oxides formation in the environment and their important roles in the biogeochemical cycles of heavy metals. - Biogenic Mn oxides effectively adsorb Cd from aquatic environments.

  18. Role of Amorphous Manganese Oxide in Nitrogen Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LILIANG-MO; WUQI-TU

    1991-01-01

    Studies have been made,by 15N-tracer technique on nitrogen loss resulting from adding amorphous manganese oxide to NH4+-N medium under anaerobic conditions.The fact that the total nitrogen recovery was decreased and that 15NO2,15N2O,15N14NO,15NO,15N2 and 15N14N were emitted has proved that,like amorphous iron oxide,amorphous manganese oxide can also act as an electron acceptor in the oxidation of NH4+-N under anaerobic conditions and give rise to nitrogen loss.This once again illustrates another mechanism by which the loss of ammonium nitrogen in paddy soils is brought about by amorphous iron and manganese oxides.The quantity of nitrogen loss by amorphous manganese oxide increased with an increase in the amount of amorphous manganese oxide added and lessened with time of its aging.The nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss by cooperation of amorphous manganese oxide and microorganisms (soil suspension) was larger than that by amorphous manganese oxide alone.In the system,nitrogen loss was associated with the specific surface ares and oxidation-reduction of amorphous manganese oxide.However,their quantitative relationship and the exact reaction processes of nitrogen loss induced by amorphous manganese oxide remain to be further studied.

  19. Molecular methods for the detection of biogenic amine-producing bacteria on foods

    OpenAIRE

    Landete, José María; Rivas, Blanca de las; Marcobal, Angela; Muñoz, Rosario

    2007-01-01

    Biogenic amines are low molecular weight organic bases that can be detected in raw and processed foods. Several toxicological problems resulting from the ingestion of food containing biogenic amines have been described. Biogenic amines are mainly produced by the decarboxylation of certain amino acids by microbial action. Since the ability of microorganisms to decarboxylate amino acid is highly variable, being in most cases strain-specific, the detection of bacteria possessing amino a...

  20. Formation of biogenic amines and vitamin K contents in the Norwegian autochthonous cheese Gamalost during ripening

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Tahir; Vermeer, Cees; Vegarud, Gerd; Abrahamsen, Roger; Skeie, Siv

    2013-01-01

    Gamalost, a Norwegian mould (Mucor mucedo) ripened autochthonous cheese, is a potential functional food due to a high content of peptides that might reduce hypertension, however it has a high content of free amino acids which may be precursors for biogenic amines. This study aimed to investigate if Gamalost might have further health benefits or risks by determination of the formation of vitamin K and biogenic amines. The development of biogenic amines and vitamin K was analysed during ripenin...

  1. Improved multiplex-PCR method for the simultaneous detection of food bacteria producing biogenic amines

    OpenAIRE

    Marcobal, Ángela; Rivas, Blanca de las; Muñoz, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    The presence of biogenic amines in foods is of considerable public concern for the food industry and the regulatory agencies, since given the potential health hazard, there is a growing demand from consumers and control authorities to reduce the allowable limits of biogenic amines in foods and beverages. Rapid and simple methods are needed for the analysis of the ability to form biogenic amines by bacteria in order to evaluate the potential risk of bacterial occurring in ...

  2. Biogenic amines degradation by malolactic bacteria: towards a potential application in wine

    OpenAIRE

    GiuseppeSpano; VittorioCapozzi; Alvarez, Miguel A.; DanielaFiocco; FrancescoGrieco

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines in wine represent a toxicological risk for the health of the consumer, with several trade implications. In this study 26 strains of Lactobacillus plantarum were analysed for their ability to degrade biogenic amines commonly found during wine fermentation. Two strains of L. plantarum were selected in reason of their ability to degrade putrescine and tyramine. The degradation was assessed in vitro, both in presence of the biogenic amines and in presence of the specific chemical ...

  3. Biogenic amines degradation by Lactobacillus plantarum: toward a potential application in wine

    OpenAIRE

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Ladero, Victor; Fernández, María; Fiocco, Daniela; Alvarez, Miguel A.; Grieco, Francesco; Spano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines in wine represent a toxicological risk for the health of the consumer, with several trade implications. In this study 26 strains of Lactobacillus plantarum were analysed for their ability to degrade biogenic amines commonly found during wine fermentation. Two strains of L. plantarum were selected in reason of their ability to degrade putrescine and tyramine. The degradation was assessed in vitro, both in presence of the biogenic amines and in presence of the specific chemical ...

  4. Control of biogenic amines in fermented sausages: role of starter cultures

    OpenAIRE

    MariluzLatorre-Moratalla; SaraBover-Cid

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several ...

  5. Control of Biogenic Amines in Fermented Sausages: Role of Starter Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre-Moratalla, M.L.; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M.T.; Vidal-Carou, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several ...

  6. Significant Biogenic Silica Retention from Reverse Weathering in Non-deltaic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, J. W.; Larson, A. M.; Darrow, E. S.; Carmichael, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal biogeochemical processes exert important controls on the net delivery of silicon to the ocean. Reverse weathering of biogenic silica by authigenic transformation has been suggested to be an important processes for silicon retention in coastal sediments. Many reported sediment biogenic silica measurements may underestimate this authigenically-transformed fraction; for example, the incorporation of metal hydroxides with the biogenic silica matrix suppresses the ability to distinguish it from mineral silica when using a traditional alkaline leach. Most studies demonstrating the importance of reverse weathering on biogenic silica have examined deltaic sediments in river dominated systems (e.g. Mississippi, Amazon), but this has not been examined in sediments which lack strong fluvial input. Using sediment cores from the outside the Mississippi River plume, we adapted a method which lessens the interference of metal hydroxides on biogenic silica by using an initial acid leach. The addition of this step increased the measured biogenic silica up to five-fold above that detected using a traditional alkaline digestion method. The magnitude of authigenically-altered biogenic silica in these cores was significant, representing a majority of the sediment biogenic silica pool at most depths. These findings confirm the importance of reverse-weathered biogenic silica as a mechanism for silicon retention and suggest the significance of this process may be more widespread.

  7. Effect of radioprotective biogenic amines on peroxide oxidation of lipids in rat small intestine mucosa microsomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioprotective biogenic amines, dopamine, histamine, and serotonin inhibited lipid peroxidation in rat small intestine mucosal microsomes. Possible mechanisms of these inhibitory effects are discussed

  8. Distribution and accumulation of biogenic silica in the intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lijun; LIU Min; XU Shiyuan; YAN Huimin; OU Dongni; CHENG Shubo; LIN Xiao

    2008-01-01

    Sedimentary biogenic silica is known to be all important parameter to understand biogeochemical processes and paleoenviromental records in estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Consequently, it is of great significance to investigate accumulation and distribution of biogenic silica in sediments. The two-step mild acid-mild alkaline extraction procedure was used to leach biogenic silica and its early diagenetic products in intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The results showed that total biogenic silica(t-BSi)in the intertidal sediments varied from 237. 7-419. 4 μmol Si/g. while the mild acid leachable silica(Si-HCl)and the mild alkaline leachable silica(Si-Alk)were in the range of 25. 1-72. 9μmol Si/g and 208. 1-350. 4 μmol Si/g. respectively. Significant correlations were observed for the grain size distributions of sediments and different biogenic silica pools in intertidal sediments. This confirms that grain size distribution Can significantly affect biogenic silica contents in sediments. Close relationships of biogenic silica with organic carbon and nitrogen Were also found, reflecting that there is a strong coupling between biogenic silica and organic matter biogeochemical cycles in the intertidal system of the Yangtze Estuary. Additionally, the early diagenetic changes of biogenic silica in sediments are discussed in the present study.

  9. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in palaeomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a 2 yr long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first-order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multidomain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first-order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  10. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in paleomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a two year long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multi-domain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  11. Manganese Loading and Photosystem II Stability are Key Components of Manganese Efficiency in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency constitutes a major plant nutritional problem in commercial crop production of winter cereals. In plants, Mn has an indispensable role in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Hence, the consequences of Mn deficiency are reduced plant growth, and...

  12. Alternative irradiation system for efficiency manganese bath determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Manganese Sulphate Bath (MSB) is the main method used in most metrological laboratories to measure the neutron sources emission rate Q(t) . The MSB technique consists, basically, in dipping a neutron source in the center of a large tank (∼500 L) containing a concentrated aqueous solution of manganese sulphate. The neutron source emission rate is determined through the activity solution measurement produced by captured neutrons in manganese nuclei. In order to obtain the value of Q(t) it must be taken into account the detection system efficiency and still determine some corrections. The MSB system efficiency is usually determined by irradiating a solution sample from MSB system in a reactor or accelerator. This paper proposes an alternative irradiation system (Irradiation Bath), which works with a radionuclide neutron source and manganese sulphate solution volume for efficiency determination of MSB system. This irradiation system was designed by simulation with MCNP code, considering a californium neutron source in several manganese sulphate volumes and different neutron reflectors. The goal of this simulation was to determine the materials and dimensions of Irradiation Bath which will derive the maximum manganese neutron capture. Although the specific activated irradiated samples are less than those in reactors, the simulation results for optimized Irradiation Bath have showed a manganese neutron capture increase up to 100 times with dimensions less than 15 cm in diameter when it compared to manganese neutron capture in a MSB System whose diameter is about 100 cm . (author)

  13. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  14. Manganese encrustation of zygospores of a chlamydomonas (chlorophyta: volvocales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Baldes, M; Lewin, R A

    1975-06-13

    In media containing normal trace-element supplements, but not in manganese-deficient media, zygospores of a new species of Chlamydomonas (isolated from soil) become encrusted with a dark brown mineral coating. Staining with benzidine indicates that the encrustation is rich in manganese. This has been confirmed by x-ray analysis in combination with a scanning electron microscope. PMID:17798436

  15. Manganese encephalopathy: utility of early magnetic resonance imaging.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, K; Golnick, J; Korn, T; Angle, C

    1993-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides visual evidence of cerebral deposits of paramagnetic metals. The usefulness of MRI is described in connection with the manganese poisoning of a 44 year old arc welder who had been engaged in the repair and recycling of railroad track made of manganese steel alloy.

  16. Formation of manganese oxides by bacterially generated superoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learman, D. R.; Voelker, B. M.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A. I.; Hansel, C. M.

    2011-02-01

    Manganese oxide minerals are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in the environment. The formation of these minerals controls the fate of contaminants, the degradation of recalcitrant carbon, the cycling of nutrients and the activity of anaerobic-based metabolisms. Oxidation of soluble manganese(II) ions to manganese(III/IV) oxides has been primarily attributed to direct enzymatic oxidation by microorganisms. However, the physiological reason for this process remains unknown. Here we assess the ability of a common species of marine bacteria-Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b-to oxidize manganese(II) in the presence of chemical and biological inhibitors. We show that Roseobacter AzwK-3b oxidizes manganese(II) by producing the strong and versatile redox reactant superoxide. The oxidation of manganese(II), and concomitant production of manganese oxides, was inhibited in both the light and dark in the presence of enzymes and metals that scavenge superoxide. Oxidation was also inhibited by various proteases, enzymes that break down bacterial proteins, confirming that the superoxide was bacterially generated. We conclude that bacteria can oxidize manganese(II) indirectly, through the enzymatic generation of extracellular superoxide radicals. We suggest that dark bacterial production of superoxide may be a driving force in metal cycling and mineralization in the environment.

  17. Developments in austenitic steels containing manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two broad categories of austenitic steels are considered in this review: (a) alloys based on the Fe-Mn-C system, typified by austenitic wear resistant (Hadfield) steels and (b) alloys based on the Fe-Mn-Cr system, typified by austenitic corrosion resistant steels. Advances made in recent years in understanding and improving the relevant properties and manufacturing methods of these steels are critically appraised. The development of austenitic manganese bearing high technology steels for fusion reactor and other non-magnetic applications, as well as those that can be used in cryogenic structures, is also considered. (author)

  18. Redundancy among Manganese Peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus

    OpenAIRE

    Salame, Tomer M.; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-01-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn2+ amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn2+-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubat...

  19. [Characterization of manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Na-Na; Bai, Yao-Hui; Liang, Jin-Song; Luo, Jin-Ming; Liu, Rui-Ping; Hu, Cheng-Zhi; Yuan, Lin-Jiang

    2014-02-01

    A manganese-oxidizing bacteria (QJX-1) was isolated from the soil of a manganese mine. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1 by 16S rDNA sequencing. Experimental results showed that the Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1 has a multi-copper oxidase gene CumA, which is an essential component for manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas sp. Under the condition of low initial inoculum level (D600, 0.020), 5.05 mg x L(-1 Mn2+ could be oxidized by QJX-1 within 48 h with a conversion rate of as high as 99.4%. In comparison with the eutrophic conditions, the oligotrophic condition dramatically increased the biological manganese oxidation rate. Biofilm formation by employing the quartz sand could further improve the oxidation rate of Mn2+. Based on these results, it is speculated that biological manganese oxidation in underground water treatment is comparatively high. PMID:24812972

  20. Biogenic Emissions of Light Alkenes from a Coniferous Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, R. C.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Martinez, L.; Shen, S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Koss, A.; Lerner, B. M.; Miller, B. R.; Smith, J. N.; Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Alkenes are reactive hydrocarbons that play important roles in the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone and in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. The light alkenes (C2-C4) originate from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources and include C2H4 (ethene), C3H6 (propene) and C4H8 (1-butene, 2-butene, 2-methylpropene). Light alkenes are used widely as chemical feedstocks because their double bond makes them versatile for industrial reactions. Their biogenic sources are poorly characterized, with most global emissions estimates relying on laboratory-based studies; net ecosystem emissions have been measured at only one site thus far. Here we report net ecosystem fluxes of light alkenes and isoprene from a semi-arid ponderosa pine forest in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, USA. Canopy scale fluxes were measured using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) techniques on the 28-meter NCAR tower in the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory. Updrafts and downdrafts were determined by sonic anemometry and segregated into 'up' and 'down' reservoirs over the course of an hour. Samples were then measured on two separate automated gas chromatographs (GCs). The first GC measured light hydrocarbons (C2-C6 alkanes and C2-C5 alkenes) by flame ionization detection (FID). The second GC measured halocarbons (methyl chloride, CFC-12, and HCFC-22) by electron capture detection (ECD). Additional air measurements from the top of the tower included hydrocarbons and their oxidation products by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Three field intensives were conducted during the summer of 2014. The REA flux measurements showed that ethene, propene and the butene emissions have significant diurnal cycles, with maximum emissions at midday. The light alkenes contribute significantly to the overall biogenic source of reactive hydrocarbons and have a temporal variability that may be associated with physical and biological parameters. These ecosystem scale measurements

  1. Biogenic influence on cloud microphysics over the global ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols have a large potential to influence climate through their effects on the microphysics and optical properties of clouds and, hence, on the Earth's radiation budget. Aerosol-cloud interactions have been intensively studied in polluted air, but the possibility that the marine biosphere plays a role in regulating cloud brightness in the pristine oceanic atmosphere remains largely unexplored. We used 9 yr of global satellite data and ocean climatologies to derive parameterizations of (a production fluxes of sulfur aerosols formed by the oxidation of the biogenic gas dimethylsulfide emitted from the sea surface; (b production fluxes of secondary organic aerosols from biogenic organic volatiles; (c emission fluxes of biogenic primary organic aerosols ejected by wind action on sea surface; and (d emission fluxes of sea salt also lifted by the wind upon bubble bursting. Series of global weekly estimates of these fluxes were correlated to series of cloud droplet effective radius data derived from satellite (MODIS. Similar analyses were conducted in more detail at 6 locations spread among polluted and clean regions of the oceanic atmosphere. The outcome of the statistical analysis was that negative correlation was common at mid and high latitude for sulfur and organic secondary aerosols, indicating both might be important in seeding cloud droplet activation. Conversely, primary aerosols (organic and sea salt showed more variable, non-significant or positive correlations, indicating that, despite contributing to large shares of the marine aerosol mass, they are not major drivers of the variability of cloud microphysics. Uncertainties and synergisms are discussed, and recommendations of research needs are given.

  2. Post-speleogenetic biogenic modification of Gomantong Caves, Sabah, Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Joyce; McFarlane, Donald A.

    2012-07-01

    The Gomantong cave system of eastern Sabah, Malaysia, is well-known as an important site for harvesting edible bird-nests and, more recently, as a tourist attraction. Although the biology of the Gomantong system has been repeatedly studied, very little attention has been given to the geomorphology. Here, we report on the impact of geobiological modification in the development of the modern aspect of the cave, an important but little recognized feature of tropical caves. Basic modeling of the metabolic outputs from bats and birds (CO2, H2O, heat) reveals that post-speleogenetic biogenic corrosion can erode bedrock by between ~ 3.0 mm/ka (1 m/~300 ka) and ~ 4.6 mm/ka (1 m/~200 ka). Modeling at high densities of bats yields rates of corrosion of ~ 34 mm/ka (or 1 m/~30 ka). Sub-aerial corrosion creates a previously undescribed speleological feature, the apse-flute, which is semicircular in cross-section and ~ 80 cm wide. It is vertical regardless of rock properties, developing in parallel but apparently completely independently, and often unbroken from roof to floor. They end at a blind hemi-spherical top with no extraneous water source. Half-dome ceiling conch pockets are remnants of previous apse-fluting. Sub-cutaneous corrosion creates the floor-level guano notch formed by organic acid dissolution of bedrock in contact with guano. Speleogenetic assessment suggests that as much as 70-95% of the total volume of the modern cave may have been opened by direct subaerial biogenic dissolution and biogenically-induced collapse, and by sub-cutaneous removal of limestone, over a timescale of 1-2 Ma.

  3. Microwave sintering of biogenic hydroxyapatite ceramics for reconstructive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Tovstonoh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics based on biogenic hydroxyapatite have been produced via a microwave sintering at 1000 °C for 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. It was shown that all of the ceramics studied exhibit volumetric shrinkage (2.3–4.6 %, which increases with increasing sintering time at maximum temperature. It was established that the total porosity did not depend on sintering time at 1000 °C and was equal to 38–40 %. Moreover, in all of the materials an open porosity dominated. The ultimate compression strength was in the range 35–40 MPa.

  4. Diel Variation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindwall, Frida; Faubert, Patrick; Rinnan, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Many hours of sunlight in the midnight sun period suggest that significant amounts of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) may be released from arctic ecosystems during night-time. However, the emissions from these ecosystems are rarely studied and limited to point measurements during...... the same range as those during the day. These results warn against overlooking the night period when considering arctic emissions. During the day, the quantity of BVOCs and the number of different compounds emitted was higher under ambient light than in darkness. The monoterpenes α-fenchene, α...

  5. Magnetically modified natural biogenic iron oxides for organic xenobiotics removal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Filip, J.; Horská, Kateřina; Nowakova, M.; Tuček, J.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Hashimoto, H.; Takada, J.; Zbořil, R.

    Elsevier. Roč. 24, S1 (2013), S77-S77. ISSN 0958-1669. [European Biotechnology Congress. 16.05.2013-18.05.2013, Bratislava] Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : organic xenobiotics * biogenic iron * Magnetically modified Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0958166913003340/1-s2.0-S0958166913003340-main.pdf?_tid=55b04b50-cbc0-11e4-8cb5-00000aab0f6c&acdnat=1426498946_517d901283c9cd0d7b198ceb605f1435

  6. Studies in biogenic amine metabolism by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two areas of mass spectral study related to biogenic amine metabolism are presented: The use of electron capture negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry for the quantitation of melatonin and other indole amines, and general synthetic procedures useful for the synthesis of deuterated diazomethane and deuteromethylated catechols. The factors determining instrumental sensitivity in negative ion chemical ionization are discussed, and the enhancement of the primary ion beam using magnetic fields is described. Quantitation of human plasma melatonin at the parts per trillion or pg/ml level has been demonstrated and is routinely performed as a selected ion monitoring assay. (Auth.)

  7. Biogenic amines and acute thermal stress in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B. A.; Moberg, G. P.

    1975-01-01

    A study is summarized which demonstrates that depletion of the biogenic amines 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or norepinephrine (NE) alters the normal thermoregulatory responses to acute temperature stress. Specifically, NE depletion caused a significant depression in equilibrium rectal temperature at 22 C and a greater depression in rectal temperature than controls in response to cold (6 C) stress; NE depletion also resulted in a significantly higher rectal temperature response to acute heat (38 C) stress. Depletion of 5-HT had less severe effects. It remains unclear whether the primary site of action of these agents is central or peripheral.

  8. Pulmonary extraction of biogenic amines during septic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of live Escherichia coli on the pulmonary extraction of the biogenic amines 14C 5-hydroxytryptamine, (5-HT) and 3H-epinephrine was investigated. The labeled isotopes were injected into a central venous catheter and collected from an aortic catheter. One hundred per cent of the labeled epinephrine was recovered in the control and septic state. Only 32.8 +/- 3.6% SEM of the 5-hydroxytryptamine was recovered before sepsis and 42.5 +/- 4.9% SEM after sepsis. During sepsis, mean arterial pressure fell to 58 mm Hg from 121 mm Hg. Pulmonary shunt increased from .7 +/- .05 SEM to .33 +/- .09 SEM

  9. The influence of marine biogenic particles on ice phase initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol particles vary in composition with many being biogenic and of terrestrial or marine origin. Efficient ice forming biogenic particles are typically thought to be of terrestrial origin; however, recent data demonstrate that marine biogenic particles can act as ice nuclei (IN) in both immersion and deposition modes, with and without association of NaCl. These results are significant given that ocean derived particles including phytoplankton, microorganisms, transparent exopolymers, and colloidal gels become aerosolized from the sea surface microlayer through wave breaking and bubble bursting. Such particles typically include sea salt, but in situ observations of air masses associated with phytoplankton blooms have identified organic compounds as significant mass contributors to aerosol loading. Here we present results from experiments with Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nanochloris atomus, phytoplankton with distinctly different cell walls: silica, calcite, and cellulose fibrils, respectively, as efficient IN in immersion and deposition modes at typical tropospheric conditions. In a separate set of experiments, submicron size particles with and without organics are generated through bubble bursting in a custom built seawater tank. Subsequently collected, these particles are observed using a coupled cooling stage/optical microscope, for their ice nucleation potential as a function of particle temperature (T), water activity (aw), relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice), droplet volume, and particle surface area. In the immersion mode, fragmented and intact cells of T. pseudonana and N. atomus enhance ice nucleation in aqueous NaCl solution droplets by ~10-30 K and 10-20 K above the homogeneous freezing limit, and for a range of aw of 1.0-0.8, while E. huxleyi do not enhance freezing temperatures. In the deposition mode, all three species nucleate ice for RHice as low as ~120%, however, for each, different nucleation modes occur at warmer

  10. Carbon nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes recent advances in the use of carbon nanomaterials for electroanalytical detection of biogenic amines (BAs). It starts with a short introduction into carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamonds, carbon nanofibers, fullerenes, and their composites. Next, electrochemical sensing schemes are discussed for various BAs including dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Examples are then given for methods for simultaneous detection of various BAs. Finally, we discuss the current and future challenges of carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for BAs. The review contains 175 references. (author)

  11. Extracellular proteins limit the dispersal of biogenic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J.W.; Weber, P.K.; Martin, M.C.; Gilbert, B.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution secondary ion microprobe spectrometry, synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated the intimate association of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization. Experiments involving synthetic zinc sulfide nanoparticles and representative amino acids indicated a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticle aggregation. These findings suggest that microbially derived extracellular proteins can limit the dispersal of nanoparticulate metal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation, that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurface fluid flow.

  12. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  13. Diffusion abnormalities of the globi pallidi in manganese neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Alexander M.; Filice, Ross W.; Teksam, Mehmet; Casey, Sean; Truwit, Charles; Clark, H. Brent; Woon, Carolyn; Liu, Hai Ying [Department of Radiology, Medical School, Box 292, 420 Delaware Street S.E., 55455, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Manganese is an essential trace metal required for normal central nervous system function, which is toxic when in excess amounts in serum. Manganese neurotoxicity has been demonstrated in patients with chronic liver/biliary failure where an inability to excrete manganese via the biliary system causes increased serum levels, and in patients on total parenteral nutrition (TPN), occupational/inhalational exposure, or other source of excess exogenous manganese. Manganese has been well described in the literature to deposit selectively in the globi pallidi and to induce focal neurotoxicity. We present a case of a 53-year-old woman who presented for a brain MR 3 weeks after liver transplant due to progressively decreasing level of consciousness. The patient had severe liver failure by liver function tests and bilirubin levels, and had also been receiving TPN since the transplant. The MR demonstrated symmetric hyperintensity on T1-weighted images in the globi pallidi. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map indicated restricted diffusion in the globi pallidi bilaterally. The patient eventually succumbed to systemic aspergillosis 3 days after the MR. The serum manganese level was 195 mcg/l (micrograms per liter) on postmortem exam (over 20 times the upper limits of normal). The patient was presumed to have suffered from manganese neurotoxicity since elevated serum manganese levels have been shown in the literature to correlate with hyperintensity on T1-weighted images, neurotoxicity symptoms, and focal concentration of manganese in the globi pallidi. Neuropathologic sectioning of the globi pallidi at autopsy was also consistent with manganese neurotoxicity. (orig.)

  14. Reduction of ripening time of full-scale manganese removal filters with manganese oxide-coated media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, J.H.; Petrusevski, B.; Slokar, Y.M.; Huysman, K.; Joris, K.; Kruithof, J.C.; Kennedy, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Effective manganese removal by conventional aeration-filtration with virgin filter media requires a long ripening time. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of manganese oxide-coated media to shorten the ripening time of filters with virgin media, under practical conditions. A full scal

  15. Biological removal of iron and manganese in rapid sand filters - Process understanding of iron and manganese removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Katie

    biological processes and the interaction between them. Some studies have indicated a direct competition between iron and ammonium removal when oxygen is limited, and both processes may have a negative effect on the manganese removal (de Vet et al., 2009; Tekerlekopoulou et al., 2008). However the reasons for.......g. flocculation) and physical (e.g. membrane filtration) based technologies. The removal of dissolved manganese and iron is important. If manganese and iron enter the distribution system, the water will become coloured and have a metallic taste, and it may cause problems in the distribution network due to...... precipitation and corrosion. Manganese and iron can either be removed physico-chemically or biologically or combined. The physico-chemical oxidation and precipitation of manganese can theoretically be achieved by aeration, but this process is slow unless pH is raised far above neutral, making the removal of...

  16. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a regional dynamical model (WRF) is used to drive biogenic emission models to calculate high resolution (10 x 10 km) biogenic emissions of isoprene (C5H8), monoterpenes (C1H16), and nitric oxide (NO) in China. This high resolution biogenic inventory will be available for the community to study the effect of biogenic emissions on photochemical oxidants in China. The biogenic emissions are compared to anthropogenic emissions to gain insight on the potential impact of the biogenic emissions on tropospheric chemistry, especially ozone production in this region. The results show that the biogenic emissions in China exhibit strongly diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. The isoprenoid (including both isoprene and monoterpenes) emissions are closely correlated to tree density and strongly vary with season and local time. During winter (January), the biogenic isoprenoid emissions are the lowest, resulting from lower temperature and solar radiation, and highest in summer (July) due to higher temperature and solar radiation. The biogenic NO emissions are also higher during summer and lower during winter, but the magnitude of the seasonal variation is smaller than the emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. The biogenic emissions of NO are widely spread out in the northern, eastern, and southern China regions, where high-density agricultural soil lands are located. Both biogenic NO and isoprenoid emissions are very small in western China. The calculated total biogenic emission budget is smaller than the total anthropogenic VOC emission budget in China. The biogenic isoprenoid and anthropogenic VOC emissions are 10.9 and 15.1 Tg year-1, respectively. The total biogenic and anthropogenic emissions of NO are 5.9 and 11.5 Tg(NO) year-1, respectively. The study shows that in central eastern China, the estimated biogenic emissions of isoprenoids are very small, and the anthropogenic emissions of VOCs are dominant in this region. However, in northeastern and

  17. Iron and manganese removal from drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Elena Pascu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to find a suitable method for removal of iron and manganese from ground water, considering bothlocal economical and environmental aspects. Ground water is a highly important source of drinking water in Romania. Ground water is naturally pure from bacteria at a 25 m depth or more. However, solved metals may occur and if the levels are too high, the water is not drinkable. Different processes, such as electrochemical and combined electrochemical-adsorption methods have been applied to determine metals content in accordance to reports of National Water Agency from Romania (ANAR. Every water source contains dissolved or particulate compounds. The concentrations of these compounds can affect health, productivity, compliance requirements, or serviceability and cannot be economically removed by conventional filtration means. In this study, we made a comparison between the electrochemical and adsorption methods (using membranes. Both methods have been used to evaluate the efficiency of iron and manganese removal at various times and temperatures. We used two membrane types: composite and cellulose, respectively. Different approaches, including lowering the initial current density and increasing the initial pH were applied. Reaction kinetics was achieved using mathematical models: Jura and Temkin.

  18. LOCA analysis for manganese-stabilized steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese-stabilized steels have been proposed as candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, because they have been perceived as ''low-activation'' materials. Depending on the neutron spectra and the neutron fluence, the decay heat in Mn-stabilized steels is about 3--7 times larger than that in the Ni-stabilized steels. This large amount of decay heat could have serious impact in the case of loss of coolant accident (LOCA). A two-dimensional LOCA model has been used to examine the LOCA temperature response of the manganese steel when utilized in an earlier US design of ITER. The results show that the Mn-steel has approached its melting temperature by less than 100 degree C after about 7 hours from the onset of LOCA. On the other hand, the results for the nickel stabilized steel alloy 316SS show that the maximum temperature reached is 532 degree C in about the same time. 14 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Thermoelectric performance of higher manganese silicide nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleemi, M. [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Stockholm (Sweden); Famengo, A.; Fiameni, S.; Boldrini, S.; Battiston, S. [CNR, Institute for Energetics and Interphases (IENI-CNR), Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padua (Italy); Johnsson, M. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Muhammed, M.; Toprak, M.S. [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Fabrication of p-type higher manganese silicide by mechanical alloying. • Different concentrations Ytterbium (Yb) was used to form HMS nanocomposites. • HMS nanostructures were preserved by using spark plasma sintering (SPS). • HMS–Yb nanocomposites showed improved electrical performance. - Abstract: Higher manganese silicides (HMS) are proven to be promising candidates as p-type thermoelectric material in the temperature range of 400–700 K. In this work, a series of nanostructured (NS) bulk MnSi{sub 1.73} with different levels of Ytterbium inclusions were fabricated via ball milling and the solid state reaction was completed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Nanopowders and SPS consolidated Yb–HMS nanocomposites (NC) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to reveal the crystal structure and morphology respectively. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to investigate the material composition in bulk grains. Yb was observed to stay as nanoinclusions at the grain boundaries. TE transport properties, including Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, and thermal diffusivity as well as charge carrier concentrations were evaluated. Thermal conductivity decreased with increasing Yb content, while the electrical conductivity improved for the highest Yb content. A highest figure of merit (ZT) of 0.42 at 600 °C was achieved for 1% Yb–HMS NC sample.

  20. The cosmic origin of carbon and manganese

    CERN Document Server

    Bensby, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    [ABRIDGED] We have determined carbon abundances for 51 dwarf stars and manganese abundances for 95 dwarf stars in two distinct and well defined stellar populations - the Galactic thin and thick disks. As these two populations have different chemical histories we have been able to, through a differential abundance analysis using high-resolution spectra, constrain the formation sites for carbon and manganese in the Galactic disk(s). The analysis of carbon is based on the forbidden [C I] line at 872.7 nm which is an abundance indicator that is insensitive to errors in the stellar atmosphere parameters. Combining these data with our previously published oxygen abundances, based on the forbidden [O I] line at 630.0 nm, we can form very robust [C/O] ratios that we then used to investigate the origin of carbon and the chemical evolution of the Galactic thin and thick disks..... Our interpretation of our abundance trends is that the sources that are responsible for the carbon enrichment in the Galactic thin and thick...

  1. Stabilisation of carbonyl free amidinato-manganese(II) hydride complexes: "masked" sources of manganese(I) in organometallic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlmeister, Lea; Jones, Cameron

    2016-01-28

    Reaction of the amidinato-manganese(ii) bromide complex, [{(κ(2)-N,N'-Piso)Mn(μ-Br)}3(THF)2] (Piso = [(DipN)2CBu(t)](-), Dip = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl), with K[BHEt3] affords the first example of a structurally authenticated amidinato-manganese(ii) hydride complex, [{(N-,η(3)-arene-Piso)Mn(μ-H)2}2], via a process which involves a change in the amidinate coordination mode. Treatment of the bulkier precursor complex, [{(Piso'')Mn(μ-Br)}n] (Piso'' = [(Dip''N)2CBu(t)](-), Dip'' = C6H2Pr(i)2(CPh3)-2,6,4), with K[BHEt3] did not lead to an isolable manganese hydride complex, but its reaction with the magnesium(i) complex, [{((Mes)Nacnac)Mg}2] ((Mes)Nacnac = [(MesNCMe)2CH](-), Mes = mesityl), did. This reaction presumably proceeds via a reactive manganese(i) intermediate, which abstracts hydrogen from a reaction component to give [{(κ(2)-N,N'-Piso'')Mn(μ-H)}3]. A comparison of the reactivities of [{(N-,η(3)-arene-Piso)Mn(μ-H)2}2] and the isomorphous manganese(i) complex, [{(N-,η(3)-arene-Piso)Mn}2], toward CO, O2 and N2O was carried out. Reactions with the manganese(i) and manganese(ii) species gave identical results, namely the formation of the manganese(i) carbonyl complex, [(κ(2)-N,N'-Piso)Mn(CO)4] (reactions with CO), and the manganese(iii)-μ-oxo complex, [{(κ(2)-N,N'-Piso)Mn(μ-O)}2] (reactions with O2 and N2O). These results indicate that [{(N-,η(3)-arene-Piso)Mn(μ-H)2}2] can act as a "masked" source of an amidinato-manganese(i) fragment in synthetic transformations. PMID:26674008

  2. 78 FR 50135 - Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Soil Biogenics Ltd., File No. 500-1; Order of Suspension of Trading August 14, 2013. It appears to... concerning the securities of Soil Biogenics Ltd. because it has not filed ] any periodic reports since...

  3. Concentration of Biogenic Amines in ‘Pinot Noir’ Wines Produced in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Jeromel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The origins of biogenic amines are sound grapes, alcoholic fermentations, malolactic fermentation and microbial activities during wine storage. These biologically produced amines are essential at low concentrations for optimal metabolic and physiological functions in animals, plants and micro-organisms. During alcoholic fermentation the degree of maceration is the first factor that affects the extraction of compounds present in the grape skin, among them aminoacids, precursors of biogenic amines. The aim of the present work was to study the changes of the concentration of biogenic amines in wines made from Vitis vinifera ‘Pinot noir’ from Plešivica (vintage 2009 produced with classical maceration, cold maceration and use of sur lie method. Biogenic amines were quantified using a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with fluorescence detection after pre-column derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA. In ‘Pinot noir’ wines tested, histamine was the most abundant biogenic amine followed by tryptamine and 2-Phenylethylamine. Total amount of biogenic amines ranged from 8.72 mg/L in wines made with classical maceration up to 9.34 mg/L in sur lie wines. In summary, from the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that sur lie technology can influence the formation of biogenic acids since the release of amino acids is probably more pronounced in wines aged with lees and stirred weekly. No significant differences were found in the concentration of biogenic amines in relation to the used maceration process.

  4. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Biogenic Amine-Degrading Strain Lactobacillus casei 5b

    OpenAIRE

    Ladero Losada, Víctor Manuel; Herrero, Ana; Martínez Álvarez, Noelia; Río Lagar, Beatriz del; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernández García, María; Martín, M. Cruz; Álvarez González, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    We here report a 3.02-Mbp annotated draft assembly of the Lactobacillus casei 5b genome. The sequence of this biogenic amine-degrading dairy isolate may help identify the mechanisms involved in the catabolism of biogenic amines and perhaps shed light on ways to reduce the presence of these toxic compounds in food.

  5. Concentration of Biogenic Amines in ‘Pinot Noir’ Wines Produced in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Jeromel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The origins of biogenic amines are sound grapes, alcoholic fermentations, malolactic fermentation and microbial activities during wine storage. These biologically produced amines are essential at low concentrations for optimal metabolic and physiological functions in animals, plants and micro-organisms. During alcoholic fermentation the degree of maceration is the first factor that affects the extraction of compounds present in the grape skin, among them aminoacids, precursors of biogenic amines. The aim of the present work was to study the changes of the concentration of biogenic amines in wines made from Vitis vinifera ‘Pinot noir’ from Plešivica (vintage 2009 produced with classical maceration, cold maceration and use of sur lie method. Biogenic amines were quantified using a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with fluorescence detection after pre-column derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA. In ‘Pinot noir’ wines tested, histamine was the most abundant biogenic amine followed by tryptamine and 2-Phenylethylamine. Total amount of biogenic amines ranged from 8.72 mg/L in wines made with classical maceration up to 9.34 mg/L in sur lie wines. In summary, from the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that sur lie technology can influence the formation of biogenic acids since the release of amino acids is probably more pronounced in wines aged with lees and stirred weekly. No significant differences were found in the concentration of biogenic amines in relation to the used maceration process.

  6. A biogenic volatile organic compounds emission inventory for Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-hui; BAI Yu-hua; ZHANG Shu-yu

    2005-01-01

    The first detailed inventory for volatile organic compounds(VOC) emissions from vegetation over Yunnan Province, China was presented. The spatially and temporally resolved inventory was developed based on a geographic information system (GIS), remote sensing(RS) data and field measurement data, such as digitized land-use data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVl) and temperature data from direct real-time measurement. The inventory has a spatial resolution of 5 km × 5 km and a time resolution of 1 h.Urban, agriculture, and natural land-use distributions in Yunnan Province were combined with biomass factors for each land-use category to produce a spatially resolved biomass inventory. A biogenic emission inventory was developed by combining the biomass inventory with hourly emission rates for tree, shrub and ground cover species of the study area. Correcting for environmental factors, including light intensity and temperature, a value of 1.1 × 1012 gC for total annual biogenic VOC emissions from Yunnan Province, including 6.1 × 1011 gCfor isoprene, 2.1 × 1011 gC for monoterpenes, and 2.6 × 1011 gC for OVOC was obtained. The highest VOC emissions occurred in the northwestern, southwestern and north region of Yunnan Province. Some uncertainties were also discussed in this study.

  7. Factors influencing biogenic amines accumulation in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martínez, Noelia; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA biosynthesis and accumulation in dairy foods. Improved knowledge of the factors involved in the synthesis and accumulation of BA should lead to a reduction in their incidence in milk products. Synthesis of BA is possible only when three conditions converge: (i) availability of the substrate amino acids; (ii) presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and (iii) environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxylation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization), use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time, and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH, temperature, or post-ripening technological processes, which will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:22783233

  8. Analysis of biogenic amines using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Z; Mardihallaj, A; Khayamian, T

    2010-05-15

    A new method based on corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was developed for the analysis of biogenic amines including spermidine, spermine, putrescine, and cadaverine. The ion mobility spectra of the compounds were obtained with and without n-Nonylamine used as the reagent gas. The high proton affinity of n-Nonylamine prevented ion formation from compounds with a proton affinity lower than that of n-Nonylamine and, therefore, enhanced its selectivity. It was also realized that the ion mobility spectrum of n-Nonylamine varied with its concentration. A sample injection port of a gas chromatograph was modified and used as the sample introduction system into the CD-IMS. The detection limits, dynamic ranges, and analytical parameters of the compounds with and without using the reagent gas were obtained. The detection limits and dynamic ranges of the compounds were about 2ng and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively. The wide dynamic range of CD-IMS originates from the high current of the corona discharge. The results revealed the high capability of the CD-IMS for the analysis of biogenic amines. PMID:20298897

  9. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition and generation pathway of biogenic gas in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ping; WANG Xiaofeng; XU Yin; SHI Baoguang; XU Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    The carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic gas is of great importance for the study of its generation pathway and reservoiring characteristics. In this paper, the formation pathways and reservoiring characteristics of biogenic gas reservoirs in China are described in terms of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of 31 gas samples from 10 biogenic gas reservoirs. The study shows that the hydrogen isotopic compositions of these biogenic gas reservoirs can be divided into three intervals:δDCH4>-200‰,-250‰<δDCH4<-200‰ and δDCH4<-250‰. The forerunners believed that the main generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of continental fresh water is acetic fermentation. Our research results showed that the generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of marine facies is typical CO2- reduction, the biogenic gas has heavy hydrogen isotopic composition: its δDCH4 values are higher than -200‰; that the biogenic gas under the condition of continental facies also was generated by the same way, but its hydrogen isotopic composition is lighter than that of biogenetic gas generated under typical marine facies condition: -250‰<δDCH4<-200‰, the δDCH4 values may be related to the salinity of the water medium in ancient lakes. From the relevant data of the Qaidam Basin, it can be seen that the hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic methane has the same variation trend with increasing salinity of water medium. There are biogenic gas reservoirs formed in transitional regions under the condition of continental facies. These gas reservoirs resulted from both CO2- reduction and acetic fermentation, the formation of which may be related to the non-variant salinity of ancient water medium and the relatively high geothermal gradient, as is the case encountered in the Baoshan Basin. The biogenic gas generating in these regions has light hydrogen isotopic composition: δDCH4<-250‰, and relatively heavy carbon isotopic

  10. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  11. Critical Aspects of Alloying of Sintered Steels with Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryha, Eduard; Dudrova, Eva; Nyborg, Lars

    2010-11-01

    This study examines the sintering behavior and properties of Fe-0.8Mn-0.5C manganese powder metallurgy steels. The study focuses on the influence of mode of alloying—admixing using either high-purity electrolytic manganese or medium carbon ferromanganese as well as the fully prealloying of water-atomized powder. Three main aspects were studied during the whole sintering process—microstructure development, interparticle necks evolution, and changes in the behavior of manganese carrier particles during both heating and sintering stages. The prealloyed powder shows considerable improvement in carbon homogenization and interparticle neck development in comparison with admixed materials. The first indication of pearlite for the fully prealloyed material was registered at ~1013 K (740 °C) in comparison with ~1098 K (825 °C) in the case of the admixed systems. The negative effect of the oxidized residuals of manganese carrier particles and high microstructure inhomogeneity, which is a characteristic feature of admixed systems, is reflected in the lower values of the mechanical properties. The worst results in this respect were obtained for the system admixed with electrolytic manganese because of more intensive manganese sublimation and resulting oxidation at lower temperatures. According to the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses, the observed high brittleness of admixed materials is connected with intergranular decohesion failure associated with manganese oxide formation on the grain boundaries.

  12. Selection and Use of Manganese Dioxide by Neanderthals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Peter J.; Anastasakis, Konstantinos; de Jong, Wiebren; van Hoesel, Annelies; Roebroeks, Wil; Soressi, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these ‘manganese oxides’ were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they needed black material for decoration, soot and charcoal were readily available, whereas obtaining manganese oxides would have incurred considerably higher costs. Compositional analyses lead us to infer that late Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I were deliberately selecting manganese dioxide. Combustion experiments and thermo-gravimetric measurements demonstrate that manganese dioxide reduces wood’s auto-ignition temperature and substantially increases the rate of char combustion, leading us to conclude that the most beneficial use for manganese dioxide was in fire-making. With archaeological evidence for fire places and the conversion of the manganese dioxide to powder, we argue that Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I used manganese dioxide in fire-making and produced fire on demand.

  13. Impact of speciation on removal of manganese and organic matter by nanofiltration

    OpenAIRE

    De Munari, Annalisa; Schäfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The removal of manganese and humic acid (HA) by two nanofiltration membranes, TFC-SR2 and TFC-SR3, was investigated in order to highlight the influence of speciation on manganese and HA retention. Manganese speciation and complexation with HA were modelled to understand how speciation could affect NF removal mechanisms. The behaviour of the two membranes was drastically different for manganese retention. Manganese retention for TFC-SR3 was higher and dominated by size exclusion...

  14. Manganese cycles and the origin of manganese nodules, Oneida Lake, New York, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, W.E.; Moore, W.S.; Nealson, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    Oneida Lake is a large shallow lake in central New York that is characterized by high algal productivity and concentrated deposits of freshwater manganese nodules. Budgets for Mn in the lake and its tributaries show a net loss of 23 metric tons of manganese within the lake per year with ???95% deposited in manganese nodules and the rest incorporated in the sediments. Erosion of nodules in the shallow well-oxygenated central part of the lake produces fragments of nodules as well as Mn-coated sand grains that are transported to adjacent deeper, more reducing parts of the lake where they sink into the anoxic sediments and MnO2 is reduced to Mn2+. This produces a high concentration of Mn2+ in the pore waters of these sediments and Mn2+ diffuses back into the water column. Growth of manganese nodules in Oneida Lake is characterized by periods of rapid accretion (> 1 mm 100 yr.) alternating with periods of no-growth or erosion. Rapid growth of nodules may be aided by the stripping of Mn from the water column by algae and bacteria. In addition, the high algal productivity of Oneida Lake produces a high-pH high-oxygen environment during the summer months that is maintained throughout the water column in the central part of the lake by almost continuous wind mixing. Thus, the cycle of Mn within the lake involves an interaction of the weather, the biota, the sediments, the nodules, and Mn dissolved in the lake and interstitial waters. ?? 1981.

  15. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, Wojciech; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper-manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  16. Influence of manganese ions on recombination luminescence in potassium phospate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of recombination luminescence was carried out for crystal KDP doped by manganese ions after full and partial dehydration. It was established that manganese ions bring about increase the velocities of radiation defects accumulation in matrix. It was expected the appearance of two new TL peaks are connected with influence radiation defects thermal stability in matrix by impurity ions. The TL peal 100 K is connected with defect PO32-. The manganese ions become ion replacement after full dehydration. The radiation induced impurity defects are a centers of recombination. (author)

  17. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  18. Low carbon manganese-nickel-niobium steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental heats of a low carbon-manganese-0.5% nickel-0.15% niobium steel have been rolled to plates between 13.5 and 50 mm thickness and to a 16 mm hot strip. Various combinations of soaking temperatures form 11000C to 13000C and of finish rolling temperatures between 7100C and 9300C have been investigated. From mechanical properties obtained, one can conclude that the investigated steel composition provides very good properties e.g. for pipe steels X65 to X75. In particular, the toughness at low temperature is outstanding despite relaxed rolling conditions. Metalographic and special investigations such as electron microscopy, texture evaluation and chemical extraction, correlated with applied rolling schedules and the mechanical properties obtained resulted in a comprehensive understanding about the benefits of high niobium metallurgy combined with nickel addition. All practically applied welding processes generated mechanical properties, in particular toughness of the weldment, that meet arctic specifications.(Author)

  19. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast......-metastatic breast cancer from 1990-2001, received adjuvant Cyclo, and were registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 118 patients with BCR and 213 matched breast cancer controls. We genotyped SOD2 and used conditional logistic regression to compute the odds ratio (OR) and associated 95...... cancer recurrence (BCR) among patients treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy (Cyclo). We compared our findings with published studies using meta-analyses. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of BCR among women in Jutland, Denmark. Subjects were diagnosed with non...

  20. Double manganese(III) cesium triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double triphosphates have been identified in research on interactions in the P2O5-M2O3-Cs2O-H2O system, where M(III) = Al, Ga, Cr, Fe, at 570-770K, which have the M(III)Cs2 - P3O10 composition; here we report the identification of a new phase made under analogous conditions in a system containing Mn(III) together with some of its physicochemical properties. The product was analyzed for phosphorus by a colorimetric method, for manganese by titration with EDTA, and for cesium by atomic absorption. The x-ray phase analysis was performed with a DRON-3.0 diffractometer. The IR spectra were recorded. Thermogravimetry indicates that the product is MnCs2P3O10·H2O

  1. Untangling the Manganese-α-Synuclein Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Parmalee, Nancy L.; Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect a significant portion of the aging population. Several lines of evidence suggest a positive association between environmental exposures, which are common and cumulative in a lifetime, and development of neurodegenerative diseases. Environmental or occupational exposure to manganese (Mn) has been implicated in neurodegeneration due to its ability to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and α-synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation. The role of the α-Syn protein vis-a-vis Mn is controversial, as it seemingly plays a duplicitous role in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. α-Syn has low affinity for Mn, however an indirect interaction cannot be ruled out. In this review we will examine the current knowledge surrounding the interaction of α-Syn and Mn in neurodegenerative process. PMID:27540354

  2. Mechanical properties of two manganese steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cagala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on thermomechanical and plastic properties of two high-manganese TRIPLEX type steels with an internal marking 1043 and 1045. Tensile tests at ambient temperature and at a temperature interval 600°C to 1100°C were performed for these heats with a different chemical composition. After the samples having been ruptured, ductility was observed which was expressed by reduction of material after the tensile test. Then the stacking fault energy was calculated and dilatation of both high-manganese steels was measured. At ambient temperature (20°C, 1043 heat featured higher tensile strength by 66MPa than 1045 heat. Microhardness was higher by 8HV0,2 for 1045 steel than for 1043 steel (203HV0,2. At 20°C, ductility only differed by 3% for the both heats. Decrease of tensile properties occurred at higher temperatures of 600 up to 1100°C. This tensile properties decrease at high temperatures is evident for most of metals. The strength level difference of the both heats in the temperature range 20°C up to 1100°C corresponded to 83 MPa, while between 600°C and 1100°C the difference was only 18 MPa. In the temperature range 600°C to 800°C, a decrease in ductility values down to 14 % (1045 heat, or 22 % (1043 heat, was noticed.This decrease was accompanied with occurrence of complex Aluminium oxides in a superposition with detected AlN particles. Further ductility decrease was only noted for 1043 heat where higher occurrence of shrinkage porosity was observed which might have contributed to a slight decrease in reduction of area values in the temperature range 900°C to 1100°C, in contrast to 1045 heat matrix.

  3. Phase transformations in Higher Manganese Silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allam, A. [MADIREL, UMR 7246 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); IM2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Boulet, P. [MADIREL, UMR 7246 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Nunes, C.A. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais (DEMAR), Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Caixa Postal 116, 12600-970 Lorena, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sopousek, J.; Broz, P. [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kolarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Masaryk University, Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Record, M.-C., E-mail: m-c.record@univ-cezanne.fr [IM2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2013-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transitions of the Higher Manganese Silicides were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were characterised by XRD, DTA and DSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is the stable phase at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At around 800 Degree-Sign C, Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is transformed into Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transition is of a second order. - Abstract: This work is an investigation of the phase transformations of the Higher Manganese Silicides in the temperature range [100-1200 Degree-Sign C]. Several complementary experimental techniques were used, namely in situ X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The evolution of both the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficients was determined from in situ XRD measurements. The stability of the samples was investigated by thermal analysis (DTA) and Cp measurements (DSC). This study shows that Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} which is the stable phase at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure undergoes a phase transformation at around 800 Degree-Sign C. Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is transformed into Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26}. This phase transformation seems to be of a second order one. Indeed it was not evidenced by DTA and by contrast it appears on the Cp curve.

  4. Monitoring biogenic volatile compounds emitted by Eucalyptus citriodora using SPME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, C A; Augusto, F; Christensen, T E; Smith, B P; Caramão, E B; Pawliszy, J

    2001-10-01

    A procedure to monitor BVOC emitted by living plants using SPME technique is presented. For this purpose, a glass sampling chamber was designed. This device was employed for the characterization of biogenic volatile compounds emitted by leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora. After extraction with SPME fibers coated with PDMS/ DVB, it was possible to identify or detect 33 compounds emitted by this plant. A semiquantitative approach was applied to monitor the behavior of the emitted BVOC during 9 days. Circadian profiles of the variation in the concentration of isoprene were plotted. Using diffusion-based SPME quantitation, a recently introduced analytical approach, with extraction times as short as 15 s, it was possible to quantify subparts-per-billion amounts of isoprene emitted by this plant. PMID:11605854

  5. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of $\\alpha$-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported...

  6. Fungal spores overwhelm biogenic organic aerosols in a midlatitudinal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunmao; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Fukuda, Yasuro; Mochida, Michihiro; Iwamoto, Yoko

    2016-06-01

    Both primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) and oxidation products of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) contribute significantly to organic aerosols (OAs) in forested regions. However, little is known about their relative importance in diurnal timescales. Here, we report biomarkers of PBAP and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) for their diurnal variability in a temperate coniferous forest in Wakayama, Japan. Tracers of fungal spores, trehalose, arabitol and mannitol, showed significantly higher levels in nighttime than daytime (p SOA formation. Using tracer-based methods, we estimated that fungal spores account for 45 % of organic carbon (OC) in nighttime and 22 % in daytime, whereas BVOC oxidation products account for 15 and 19 %, respectively. To our knowledge, we present for the first time highly time-resolved results that fungal spores overwhelmed BVOC oxidation products in contributing to OA especially in nighttime. This study emphasizes the importance of both PBAPs and SOAs in forming forest organic aerosols.

  7. Investigation of Wear Coefficient of Manganese Phosphate Coated Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ilaiyavel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the properties of the coating in terms of wear resistance is of paramount importance in order to prevent the formation of severe damages. In this study, Wear coefficient of uncoated, Manganese Phosphate coated, Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant, Heat treated Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant on AISI D2 steels was investigated using Archard’s equation. The wear tests were performed in a pin on disk apparatus as per ASTM G-99 Standard. The volumetric wear loss and wear coefficient were evaluated through pin on disc test using a sliding velocity of 3.0 m/s under normal load of 40 N and controlled condition of temperature and humidity. Based on the results of the wear test, the Heat treated Manganese Phosphate with oil lubricant exhibited the lowest average wear coefficient and the lowest wear loss under 40 N load.

  8. Electrospun Manganese Oxides Nanofibers Electrode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Ke,LU Hai-Wei,LI Da,ZENG Wei,LI Yue-Sheng,FU Zheng-Wen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Manganese oxides nanofibers were successfully fabricated by an electrospinning method and its electrochemical behavior was investigated as three-dimensional (3D architecture of cathodic materials. Scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and the discharge/charge curves were used to characterize their structures and electrochemical properties. Manganese oxides nanofibers are achieved after calcination at 450¡䬠The high reversible discharge capacity reaches 160mAh/g and the discharge capacity is about 132.5mAh/g with capacity loss less than 1.0% per cycle in 50 cycling. SEM observations show that the structure of manganese oxides nanofibers is stable without the mechanical destruction of nanofibers during the Li+ ion intercalation and deintercalation. The results demonstrate that manganese oxides nanofibers are promising cathodic materials for 3D lithium batteries.

  9. India's manganese nodule mine site in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.

    This commentary highlights the activities of massive exploration programme for manganese nodule deposits in the Central Indian Basin located 5 km below the ocean surface and India's claim for mine site development and registration with UNCLOS...

  10. Manganese nodules in the Exclusive Economic Zone of Mauritius

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; ShyamPrasad, M.

    The distribution of manganese nodules in the Exclusive Economic Zone of the island nation Mauritius was delineated during cruise SK-35 of ORV Sagar Kanya in 1987. The areas surveyed included Saya de Malha and Nazareth Banks, the Cargados Carajos...

  11. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  12. By lithology Zbruch deposits (Lower Sarmatian Nikopol manganese ore Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanovich V.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on lithologic-paleogeographic study Zbruch layers of Nikopol manganese ore Basin sediments described lithological and genetic types of rocks and facies conditions of formation of deposits.

  13. Analysis for blood manganese used to assess environmental exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hams, G.A.; Fabri, J.K.

    1988-06-01

    In this graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometric method for measuring manganese in whole blood, we use a pyrolytic platform to minimize interference by sample matrix. For optimal sample ashing we denature the sample within the furnace with nitric acid and use oxygen as the purge gas at low temperatures. The mean manganese concentration found in blood from 15 unexposed city dwellers was 215 (2 SD 135) nmol/L. By comparison, the range of manganese concentrations in blood sampled from a group of Australian aborigines living near a surface manganese ore deposit on Groote Eylandt, Northern Territory, was much higher (median 405 nmol/L, range 175 to 990 nmol/L).

  14. Beneficiation studies of Bajaur manganese ore by different processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manganese ore of Bajaur Agency of Pakistan was subjected to flotation, heavy medium separation, gravity concentration and magnetic separation techniques for beneficiation. The original composition of the manganese ore was 45.56% Mn , 4% Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 40% SiO/sub 2/. The Mn content was raised to a maximum 48.76 % in the concentrate with the recovery of 67.78 % through flotation technique. Other techniques rendered marginal increase in Mn concentration against the theoretical possibility of substantial enrichment by rejecting the 20 % gangue minerals. The separation of manganese minerals from associated gangue was difficult, due to mineralogical complexity of the ore, extreme fineness of the particle size, texture and minerals intergrowth. High Mn/Fe ratio, phosphorus, and silica contents were within tolerable limits for utilisation of the ore in ferro-manganese production. (author)

  15. Rapid Detection and Identification of Biogenic Aerosol Releases and Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J.; Macher, J.; Ghosal, S.; Ahmed, K.; Hemati, K.; Wall, S.; Kumagai, K.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols can be important contributors to aerosol chemistry, cloud droplet and ice nucleation, absorption and scattering of radiation, human health and comfort, and plant, animal, and microbial ecology. Many types of bioaerosols, e.g., fungal spores, are released into the atmosphere in response to specific climatological and meteorological conditions. The rapid identification of bioaerosol releases is thus important for better characterization of the above phenomena, as well as enabling public officials to respond quickly and appropriately to releases of infectious agents or biological toxins. One approach to rapid and accurate bioaerosol detection is to employ sequential, automated samples that can be fed directly into an image acquisition and data analysis device. Raman spectroscopy-based identification of bioaerosols, automated analysis of microscopy images, and automated detection of near-monodisperse peaks in aerosol size-distribution data were investigated as complementary approaches to traditional, manual methods for the identification and counting of fungal and actinomycete spores. Manual light microscopy is a widely used analytical technique that is compatible with a number of air sample formats and requires minimal sample preparation. However, a major drawback is its dependence on a human analyst's ability to distinguish particles and accurately count, size, and identify them. Therefore, automated methods, such as those evaluated in this study, have the potential to provide cost-effective and rapid alternatives if demonstrated to be accurate and reliable. An exploratory examination of individual spores for several macro- and microfungi (those with and without large fruiting bodies) by Raman microspectroscopy found unique spectral features that were used to identify fungi to the genus level. Automated analyses of digital spore images accurately recognized and counted single fungal spores and clusters. An automated procedure to discriminate near

  16. CO2 Biogenic vs Anthropogenic Sectoral Contribution for INFLUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Coto, I.; Prasad, K.; Hu, H.; Whetstone, J. R.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Davis, K. J.; Turnbull, J. C.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Brewer, A.; Hardesty, M.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Shepson, P. B.; Patarasuk, R.; Gurney, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims to use a top-down inversion methodology to quantify sources of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions over an urban domain with high spatial and temporal resolution. This project is an experimental test bed which is intended to establish reliable methods for quantifying and validating GHG emissions independently of the inventory methods typically used for Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) of pollution sources. Analyzing the contribution of different source types or sectors is a fundamental step in order to achieve an accuracy level desired for such MRV applications. This is especially challenging when attempting to determine anthropogenic emissions during the growing season since biological GHG fluxes reach a maximum at this time. To this end, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF-ARW) version 3.5.1 was used along with a modified version of the Green House Gases chemistry module for simulating the CO2 mole fraction transport during September and October 2013. Sectoral anthropogenic CO2 emissions were obtained from Hestia 2012 and from Vulcan 2002 beyond the spatial coverage of Hestia. Biogenic CO2 emissions were simulated by using an augmented version of the "Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model" (VPRM) included in WRF-CHEM. An implementation of the unconstrained nonlinear global optimization method of Nelder and Mead was employed to find the optimum values for the VPRM parameters for each vegetation category by using data from Ameriflux eddy covariance flux towers. Here we present a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of biological vs sectoral anthropogenic CO2 fluxes on the INFLUX measurements network. The simulations are compared to tower and aircraft measurements that include trace gases with the capacity to distinguish observationally anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 sources and sinks. In addition, an evaluation of the sensitivity of the sectoral attribution to meteorological

  17. Anthropogenic impact on biogenic Si pools in temperate soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clymans, W.; Struyf, E.; Govers, G.; Vandevenne, F.; Conley, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Human land use changes directly affect silica (Si) mobilisation and Si storage in terrestrial ecosystems and influence Si export from the continents, although the magnitudes of the impact are unknown. Yet biogenic silica (BSi) in soils is an understudied aspect. We have quantified and compared total biogenic (PSia) and easily soluble (PSie) Si pools at four sites along a gradient of disturbance in southern Sweden. An estimate of the magnitude of change in temperate continental BSi pools due to human disturbance is provided. Land use clearly affects BSi pools and their distribution. Total PSia and PSie for a continuous forested site at Siggaboda Nature Reserve (66 900 ± 22 800 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 952 ± 16 kg SiO2 ha-1) are significantly higher than disturbed land use types from the Råshult Culture Reserve including arable land (28 800 ± 7200 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 239 ± 91 kg SiO2 ha-1), pasture sites (27 300 ± 5980 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 370 ± 129 kg SiO2 ha-1) and grazed forest (23 600 ± 6370 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 346 ± 123 kg SiO2 ha-1). Vertical PSia and PSie profiles show significant (pexport of 1.1 ± 0.8 Tmol Si yr-1, leading to an annual contribution of ca. 20 % to the global land-ocean Si flux carried by rivers. Human activities clearly exert a long-term influence on Si cycling in soils and contribute significantly to the land-ocean Si flux.

  18. Occupational neurotoxicology due to heavy metals-especially manganese poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most hazardous manganese exposures occur in mining and smelting of ore. Recently, the poisoning has been frequently reported to be associated with welding. In occupational exposure, manganese is absorbed mainly by inhalation. Manganese preferentially accumulates in tissues rich in mitochondria. It also penetrates the blood brain barrior and accumulate in the basal ganglia, especially the globus pallidus, but also the striatum. Manganese poisoning is clinically characterized by the central nervous system involvement including psychiatric symptomes, extrapyramidal signs, and less frequently other neurological manifestations. Psychiatric symptomes are well described in the manganese miners and incrude sleep disturbance, disorientation, emotional lability, compulsive acts, hallucinations, illusions, and delusions. The main characteristic manifestations usually begin shortly after the appearance of these psychiatric symptomes. The latter neurological signs are progressive bradykinesia, dystonia, and disturbance of gait. Bradykinesia is one of the most important findings. There is a remarkable slowing of both active and passive movements of the extremities. Micrographia is frequently observed and a characteristic finding. The patients may show some symmetrical tremor, which usually not so marked. The dystonic posture of the limbs is often accompanied by painfull cramps. This attitudal hypertonia has a tendency to decrease or disappear in the supine position and to increase in orthostation. Cog-wheel rigidity is also elisited on the passive movement of all extremities. Gait disturbance is also characteristic in this poisoning. In the severe cases, cook gait has been reported. The patient uses small steps, but has a tendency to elevate the heels and to rotate them outward. He progress without pressing on the flat of his feet, but only upon the metatarsophalangeal articulations, mainly of the fourth and fifth toes. Increased signal in T1-weighted image in the basal

  19. Role of mesoscale eddies on the variability of biogenic flux in the northern and central Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vidya, P.J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    15 m with spatial resolution of 1o x 1o [Bonjean and Lagerloef, 2002]. 3 Results 3.1 Biogenic flux The time-series of biogenic flux at NBBT during the period 1994 February to 1998 November is presented in Figure 2a (black line). Biogenic flux... with low SSHA (Figure 2, black line). Interestingly, at both the locations, all the peaks in the biogenic flux showed an inverse relation with SSHA (negative). This indicates that biogenic flux at both the locations is someway related to negative SSHA...

  20. Perinatal Manganese Exposure and Hydroxyl Radical Formation in Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Bałasz, Michał; Szkilnik, Ryszard; Brus, Ryszard; Malinowska-Borowska, Jolanta; Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Nowak, Damian; Kostrzewa, Richard M.; Nowak, Przemysław

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of pre- and postnatal manganese (Mn) exposure on hydroxyl radical (HO•) formation in the brains of dopamine (DA) partially denervated rats (Parkinsonian rats). Wistar rats were given tap water containing 10,000 ppm manganese chloride during the duration of pregnancy and until the time of weaning. Control rat dams consumed tap water without added Mn. Three days after birth, rats of both groups were treated with 6-hydroxydopamine at one of ...

  1. Arsenic species in weathering mine tailings and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada City, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A realistic estimation of the health risk of human exposure to solid-phase arsenic (As) derived from historic mining operations is a major challenge to redevelopment of California's famed "Mother Lode" region. Arsenic, a known carcinogen, occurs in multiple solid forms that vary in bioaccessibility. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) was used to identify and quantify the forms of As in mine wastes and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund (LCMS) site, a historic "Mother Lode" gold mine. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to assess variance within water chemistry, solids chemistry, and XAFS spectral datasets. Linear combination, least-squares fits constrained in part by PCA results were then used to quantify arsenic speciation in XAFS spectra of tailings and biogenic solids. Results The highest dissolved arsenic concentrations were found in Lost Lake porewater and in a groundwater-fed pond in the tailings deposition area. Iron, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, specific conductivity, and As were the major variables in the water chemistry PCA. Arsenic was, on average, 14 times more concentrated in biologically-produced iron (hydr)oxide than in mine tailings. Phosphorous, manganese, calcium, aluminum, and As were the major variables in the solids chemistry PCA. Linear combination fits to XAFS spectra indicate that arsenopyrite (FeAsS), the dominant form of As in ore material, remains abundant (average: 65%) in minimally-weathered ore samples and water-saturated tailings at the bottom of Lost Lake. However, tailings that underwent drying and wetting cycles contain an average of only 30% arsenopyrite. The predominant products of arsenopyrite weathering were identified by XAFS to be As-bearing Fe (hydr)oxide and arseniosiderite (Ca2Fe(AsO4)3O3•3H2O). Existence of the former species is not in question, but the presence of the latter species was not confirmed by additional measurements, so its identification is less certain. The

  2. Arsenic species in weathering mine tailings and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada City, CA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A realistic estimation of the health risk of human exposure to solid-phase arsenic (As derived from historic mining operations is a major challenge to redevelopment of California's famed "Mother Lode" region. Arsenic, a known carcinogen, occurs in multiple solid forms that vary in bioaccessibility. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS was used to identify and quantify the forms of As in mine wastes and biogenic solids at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund (LCMS site, a historic "Mother Lode" gold mine. Principal component analysis (PCA was used to assess variance within water chemistry, solids chemistry, and XAFS spectral datasets. Linear combination, least-squares fits constrained in part by PCA results were then used to quantify arsenic speciation in XAFS spectra of tailings and biogenic solids. Results The highest dissolved arsenic concentrations were found in Lost Lake porewater and in a groundwater-fed pond in the tailings deposition area. Iron, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, specific conductivity, and As were the major variables in the water chemistry PCA. Arsenic was, on average, 14 times more concentrated in biologically-produced iron (hydroxide than in mine tailings. Phosphorous, manganese, calcium, aluminum, and As were the major variables in the solids chemistry PCA. Linear combination fits to XAFS spectra indicate that arsenopyrite (FeAsS, the dominant form of As in ore material, remains abundant (average: 65% in minimally-weathered ore samples and water-saturated tailings at the bottom of Lost Lake. However, tailings that underwent drying and wetting cycles contain an average of only 30% arsenopyrite. The predominant products of arsenopyrite weathering were identified by XAFS to be As-bearing Fe (hydroxide and arseniosiderite (Ca2Fe(AsO43O3•3H2O. Existence of the former species is not in question, but the presence of the latter species was not confirmed by additional measurements, so its identification is

  3. Low copper and high manganese levels in prion protein plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.; Abrecth, Mike; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Russell, Robin E.; Pedersen, Joel A.; McKenzie, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregates rich in an abnormally folded form of the prion protein characterize the neurodegeneration caused by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The molecular triggers of plaque formation and neurodegeneration remain unknown, but analyses of TSE-infected brain homogenates and preparations enriched for abnormal prion protein suggest that reduced levels of copper and increased levels of manganese are associated with disease. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess copper and manganese levels in healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamster brain homogenates; (2) determine if the distribution of these metals can be mapped in TSE-infected brain tissue using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) with synchrotron radiation; and (3) use X-PEEM to assess the relative amounts of copper and manganese in prion plaques in situ. In agreement with studies of other TSEs and species, we found reduced brain levels of copper and increased levels of manganese associated with disease in our hamster model. We also found that the in situ levels of these metals in brainstem were sufficient to image by X-PEEM. Using immunolabeled prion plaques in directly adjacent tissue sections to identify regions to image by X-PEEM, we found a statistically significant relationship of copper-manganese dysregulation in prion plaques: copper was depleted whereas manganese was enriched. These data provide evidence for prion plaques altering local transition metal distribution in the TSE-infected central nervous system.

  4. Operation of Marine Diesel Engines on Biogenic Fuels: Modification of Emissions and Resulting Climate Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Lauer, P.; Fritsche, U.; Hasselbach, J.; M. Lichtenstern; Schlager, H.; Fleischer, F.

    2011-01-01

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO2, NOx, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fue...

  5. [Study on the bioleaching mechanism of manganse (II) from manganese-electrolytic residue by manganese-resistant strain Fusarium sp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Xia; Cao, Jian-Bing; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Huang, Hua-Jun; Liu, Xian; Yang, Hui

    2011-09-01

    The manganse bioleaching mechanism by a manganese-resistant strain Fusarium sp. was investigated, through analyzing the bioleaching rate and manganese-electrolytic residue characterizations with the presence of Fusarium sp. and with the addition of organic acids. Special attention was paid to explore the relationship among the manganese's leaching rate, pH, and organic acid concentration during Fusarium sp. bioleaching process. The research results showed that, with the addition of Fusarium sp., some looser and more porous manganese-electrolytic residues could be obtained. And after 47 hours, the leaching rate reached to 84% which was 2.30 times higher than that leached by individual organic acid even after 130 hours; the leaching rate of manganese and the concentrations of organic acids increased at the initial stage and then decreased, while pH was the reversed. Additionally, the concentration of Succinic acid and L-Malic acid reached their crest value (11.12 g/L and 10.23 g/L) at 57 and 62 hours respectively. Yet the pH reached the lowest (4.09) at 29 h, which implied that, Fusarium sp. and organic acid produced played an important role in the leaching of manganese, leading to a high-efficiency and time-saving process. However, due to the high density of manganese-electrolytic residue and the concurrence of the produce and consumption of organic acid together with the adsorption and complexation, the relationship among the extraction rate for manganese ion, pH, and the concentration of organic acid produced could not be described by simple linear correlation and the leaching rate decreased significantly in the later stage. PMID:22165242

  6. Six-coordinate manganese(3+) in catalysis by yeast manganese superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Yuewei; Gralla, Edith Butler; Schumacher, Mikhail; Cascio, Duilio; Cabelli, Diane E.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone (EWHA); (UCLA); (BNL)

    2012-10-10

    Reduction of superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}) by manganese-containing superoxide dismutase occurs through either a 'prompt protonation' pathway, or an 'inner-sphere' pathway, with the latter leading to formation of an observable Mn-peroxo complex. We recently reported that wild-type (WT) manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans are more gated toward the 'prompt protonation' pathway than human and bacterial MnSODs and suggested that this could result from small structural changes in the second coordination sphere of manganese. We report here that substitution of a second-sphere residue, Tyr34, by phenylalanine (Y34F) causes the MnSOD from S. cerevisiae to react exclusively through the 'inner-sphere' pathway. At neutral pH, we have a surprising observation that protonation of the Mn-peroxo complex in the mutant yeast enzyme occurs through a fast pathway, leading to a putative six-coordinate Mn3+ species, which actively oxidizes O{sub 2}{sup -} in the catalytic cycle. Upon increasing pH, the fast pathway is gradually replaced by a slow proton-transfer pathway, leading to the well-characterized five-coordinate Mn{sup 3+}. We here propose and compare two hypothetical mechanisms for the mutant yeast enzyme, diffeeing in the structure of the Mn-peroxo complex yet both involving formation of the active six-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} and proton transfer from a second-sphere water molecule, which has substituted for the -OH of Tyr34, to the Mn-peroxo complex. Because WT and the mutant yeast MnSOD both rest in the 2+ state and become six-coordinate when oxidized up from Mn{sup 2+}, six-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} species could also actively function in the mechanism of WT yeast MnSODs.

  7. Synthesis of Derivatives of Biogenic Amines Labelled with Radioactive Tracers for Brain Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo A. Vitale

    2000-01-01

    Endogenous derivatives of biogenic amines, such as phenethylamines, indolalkylamines and harmines, have been extensively studied as usual constituents of body fluids. Methylated derivatives of indolalkylamines have been also related to mental disorders, e.g. schizophrenia and hallucination.

  8. Applications of Satellite Remote Sensing Data for Biogenic Emission Estimates in Southeastern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, M. S.; Howard, T.; Mullins, G.; McDonald-Buller, E.; Allen, D. T.

    2007-12-01

    Biogenic hydrocarbons, including isoprene, monoterpenes, and oxygenated compounds, are emitted in substantial quantities by vegetation and dominate the overall volatile organic compound emission inventory in Southeastern Texas. Spatial distributions of biogenic emissions in Texas are heterogeneous, and biogenic emission processes are affected by the characterization of land cover, leaf area index, drought stress, and surface temperatures. On a regional scale, biogenic emissions, particularly isoprene, in the presence of high levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx), will produce elevated ground-level ozone concentrations. The sensitivity of biogenic emission estimates and air quality model predictions to the characterization of land use/land cover (LULC) in southeastern Texas is examined. A LULC database has been developed for the region based on source imagery collected by the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper-Plus sensor between 1999 and 2003, and data from field studies used for species identification and quantification of biomass densities. This database and the LULC database currently used in regulatory air quality models by the State of Texas are compared. Effects of the LULC data on biogenic emission estimates and modeled ozone concentrations are examined using the Global Biosphere Emissions and Interactions System and the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions during an August 22-September 6, 2000 episode developed for the Houston/Galveston area. These results are also compared to biogenic emission estimates from the recently created Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), which includes a global vegetation map compiled from recent satellite data and ecosystem inventories. Biogenic emissions estimated from the new LULC dataset showed good general spatial agreement with those from the currently used LULC dataset but significantly lower emissions (~40% less hourly emissions across the modeling domain), primarily due to differences in

  9. Validation of an HPLC Analytical Method for Determination of Biogenic Amines in Agricultural Products and Monitoring of Biogenic Amines in Korean Fermented Agricultural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyeock; Park, Jung Hyuck; Choi, Ari; Hwang, Han-Joon; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2015-09-01

    An HPLC analytical method was validated for the quantitative determination of biogenic amines in agricultural products. Four agricultural foods, including apple juice, Juk, corn oil and peanut butter, were selected as food matrices based on their water and fat contents (i.e., non-fatty liquid, non-fatty solid, fatty liquid and fatty solid, respectively). The precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were determined to test the validity of an HPLC procedure for the determination of biogenic amines, including tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine and spermine, in each matrix. The LODs and LOQs for the biogenic amines were within the range of 0.01~0.10 mg/kg and 0.02~0.31 mg/kg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of intraday for biogenic amine concentrations ranged from 1.86 to 5.95%, whereas the RSD of interday ranged from 2.08 to 5.96%. Of the matrices spiked with biogenic amines, corn oil with tyramine and Juk with putrescine exhibited the least accuracy of 84.85% and recovery rate of 89.63%, respectively, at the lowest concentration (10 mg/kg). Therefore, the validation results fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations. Subsequently, the method was applied to the analysis of biogenic amines in fermented agricultural products for a total dietary survey in Korea. Although the results revealed that Korean traditional soy sauce and Doenjang contained relatively high levels of histamine, the amounts are of no concern if these fermented agricultural products serve as condiments. PMID:26483889

  10. Evolution of cyclonic eddies and biogenic fluxes in the northern Bay of Bengal

    OpenAIRE

    M. Nuncio; Prasanna Kumar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Bay of Bengal has been traditionally known for its low primary productivity and varied reasons were attributed to it. The data analysis from the sediment traps deployed in the northern Bay of Bengal during the 5 yr from 1994 show episodic events of enhanced downward biogenic flux every year which was not related to monsoon-driven seasonal cycle. Satellite-derived sea level anomaly suggests that the episodic increase in the biogenic flu...

  11. Cocaine affects foraging behaviour and biogenic amine modulated behavioural reflexes in honey bees

    OpenAIRE

    Eirik Søvik; Naïla Even; Radford, Catherine W.; Barron, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    In humans and other mammals, drugs of abuse alter the function of biogenic amine pathways in the brain leading to the subjective experience of reward and euphoria. Biogenic amine pathways are involved in reward processing across diverse animal phyla, however whether cocaine acts on these neurochemical pathways to cause similar rewarding behavioural effects in animal phyla other than mammals is unclear. Previously, it has been shown that bees are more likely to dance (a signal of perceived rew...

  12. Administration of biogenic amines to Saanen kids: effects on growth performance and meat quality

    OpenAIRE

    E. Fusi; R. Rebucci; C. Pecorini; Rossi, L.; F. Cheli

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines are low molecular weight organic bases present in all organisms. The most common are putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, spermidine, histamine, tryptamine and β- phenylethylamine. In low concentrations they are essential for the normal growth and differentiation of cells (Bardócz et al., 1995), but in larger quantities are harmful to humans and livestock. Biogenic amines are naturally present in silage; however their presence in high concentrations may be a sign of u...

  13. Managing your wine fermentation to reduce the risk of biogenic amine formation

    OpenAIRE

    MaretDu Toit

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines are nitrogenous organic compounds produced in wine from amino acid precursors mainly by microbial decarboxylation. The concentration of biogenic amines that can potentially be produced is dependent on the amount of amino acid precursors in the medium, the presence of decarboxylase positive microorganisms and conditions that enable microbial or biochemical activity such as the addition of nutrients to support the alcoholic and malolactic fermentation (MLF) inoculated starter cu...

  14. A Review: Microbiological, Physicochemical and Health Impact of High Level of Biogenic Amines in Fish Sauce

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Z. Zaman; A. S. Abdulamir; Fatimah A. Bakar; Jinap Selamat; Jamilah Bakar

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Biogenic amines are basic nitrogenous compounds present in a wide variety of foods and beverages. Their formations were mainly due to the amino acids decarboxylase activity of certain microorganisms. Excessive intake of biogenic amines could induce many undesirable physiological effects determined by their psychoactive and vasoactive action. Fish sauce which is considered as a good source of dietary protein, amino acids, vitamins and minerals was a popular condiment in Sout...

  15. Analysis of Biogenic Amines by GC/FID and GC/MS

    OpenAIRE

    Nakovich, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Low levels of biogenic amines occur naturally, but high levels (FDA sets 50 ppm of histamine in fish as the maximum allowable level) can lead to scombroid poisoning. Amines in general are difficult to analyze by Gas Chromatography (GC) due to their lack of volatility and their interaction with the GC column, often leading to significant tailing and poor reproducibility. Biogenic amines need to be derivatized before both GC and HPLC analyses. The objective of this research was to devel...

  16. Changes of the content of biogenic amines during winemaking of Sauvignon wines

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačević Ganić, Karin; Gracin, L.; Komes, Draženka; Ćurko, Natka; Lovrić, T.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the changes of the content of biogenic amines during winemaking and maturation processes of wines made from Vitis vinifera cv Sauvignon grapes from Slavonia region (vintage 2008). Biogenic amines were quantified using a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection after pre-column derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA). Samples used in this study were obtained during production of Sauvignon wines in three...

  17. Control of Biogenic Amines in Food—Existing and Emerging Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Naila, Aishath; Flint, Steve; Fletcher, Graham; Bremer, Phil; Meerdink, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic amines have been reported in a variety of foods, such as fish, meat, cheese, vegetables, and wines. They are described as low molecular weight organic bases with aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic structures. The most common biogenic amines found in foods are histamine, tyramine, cadaverine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine, putrescine, tryptamine, and agmatine. In addition octopamine and dopamine have been found in meat and meat products and fish. The formation of biogeni...

  18. Managing Your Wine Fermentation to Reduce the Risk of Biogenic Amine Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, Anita Yolandi; Engelbrecht, Lynn; du Toit, Maret

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines are nitrogenous organic compounds produced in wine from amino acid precursors mainly by microbial decarboxylation. The concentration of biogenic amines that can potentially be produced is dependent on the amount of amino acid precursors in the medium, the presence of decarboxylase positive microorganisms and conditions that enable microbial or biochemical activity such as the addition of nutrients to support the inoculated starter cultures for alcoholic and malolactic fermenta...

  19. Levels of histamine and other biogenic amines in high quality red wines.

    OpenAIRE

    Konakovsky, Viktor; Focke, Margarete; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Schmid, Rainer,; Scheiner, Otto; Moser, Peter; Jarisch, Reinhart; Hemmer, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Biogenic amines in wine may impair sensory wine quality and cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. In this study, histamine and other biogenic amines were determined by HPLC after amine derivatization to dansyl chloride conjugates in 100 selected high quality red wines made from seven different cultivars. Amine levels varied considerably between different wines. The most abundant amines were putrescine (median 19.4 mg/L, range 2.9-122), histamine (7.2, 0....

  20. Metabolism of biogenic amines in acute cerebral ischemia: Influence of systemic hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are biogenic amines which are transmitters of the central nervous system. The effects of ischemia on the brain parenchyma depends on many factors, such is the mechanism of blood flow interruption, velocity of the occurring blood flow interruption, duration of an ischemic episode, organization of anatomical structures of the brain blood vessels etc., which all influence the final outcome. During interruption of the brain circulation in experimental or clinical conditions, neurotransmitter metabolism, primarily of biogenic amines, is disturbed. Many researches with various experimental models of complete ischemia reported a decrease in the content of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the CNS tissue. It was proven that hyperglycemia can drastically increase cerebral injury followed by short-term cerebral ischemia. Considering the fact that biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin influence the size of neurologic damage, as well as the fact that in hyperglycemic conditions infarct size (from the morphological aspect is larger relative to normoglycemic status, the intention was to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in occurrence of damage in conditions of hyperglycemia, i.e. in the case of brain apoplexia in diabetics. Analysis of biogenic amines metabolism in states of acute hyperglycemia, as well as analysis of the effects of reversible and irreversible brain ischemia on metabolism of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, showed that acute hyperglycemia slows down serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine metabolism in the cerebral cortex and n. caudatus. Brain ischemia in normoglycemic animals by itself has no influence on biogenic amines metabolism, but the effect of ischemia becomes apparent during reperfusion. In recirculation, which corresponds to the occurrences in penumbra, release of biogenic amines is uncontrolled and increased. Brain ischemia in acute hyperglycemic animals

  1. Relationship Between Biogenic Amines and Free Amino Acid Contents of Winesand Musts from Alentejo (Portugal)

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, Paulo; Cabrita, Maria Joao; Ratola, Nuno; Laureano, Olga; Alves, Arminda

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of biogenic amines and free amino acids was studied in 102 Portuguese wines and 18 musts from Alentejo demarcated (D.O.C.) regions. Most wines were commercial, except for 38 monovarietals obtained by micro vinification. Musts from the varieties used to produce the latter wines were also studied. Both biogenic amines and free amino acids were analyzed by HPLC using fluorescence detection for their o-phthalaldehyde/fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (OPA/FMOC) deriva...

  2. Ligand-gated chloride channels are receptors for biogenic amines in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Ringstad, Niels; Abe, Namiko; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic amines such as serotonin and dopamine are intercellular signaling molecules that function widely as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. We have identified in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans three ligand-gated chloride channels that are receptors for biogenic amines: LGC-53 is a high-affinity dopamine receptor, LGC-55 is a high-affinity tyramine receptor, and LGC-40 is a low-affinity serotonin receptor that is also gated by choline and acetylcholine. lgc-55 mutants are defectiv...

  3. PCR methods for the detection of biogenic amine-producing bacteria on wine

    OpenAIRE

    Landete, José María; Rivas, Blanca de las; Marcobal, Ángela; Muñoz, Rosario

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines are low molecular weight organic bases frequently found in wine. Several toxicological problems resulting from the ingestion of wine containing biogenic amines have been described. In wine, histamine, tyramine, and putrescine are mainly produced by the decarboxylation of the amino acid histidine, tyrosine, and ornithine, respectively, by lactic acid bacteria action. The bacterial ability to decarboxylate amino acids is highly variable, and therefore the...

  4. Studio della formazione di ammine biogene e di altri composti azotati negli alimenti

    OpenAIRE

    Congiu, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the qualitative and quantitative determination of biogenic amines (BA) and amino acids (AA), in particular the essential AA, in different food matrices typical of Sardinia (Italy). The study was focused on wines and table olives, which are potential source of biogenic amines due to their fermentation processes involved in their production. The decision to follow this research field is based on the importance of having updated information to assess the actual r...

  5. Screening of biogenic amine production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from grape musts and wine

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Arribas, M. Victoria; Polo, María Carmen; Jorganes, Felisa; Muñoz, Rosario

    2003-01-01

    The potential to produce the biogenic amines tyramine, histamine and putrescine, was investigated for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) of various origin, including commercial malolactic starter cultures, type strains and 78 strains isolated from Spanish grape must and wine. The presence of biogenic amines in a decarboxylase synthetic broth was determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Tyramine was the main amine formed by the LAB strains investigated. ...

  6. Biogenic caliches in Texas: The role of organisms and effect of climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Chafetz, Henry S.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic constituents are ubiquitous and abundant in the caliches of Texas. Investigation of 51 caliche profiles on various host strata (alluvium, limestone, igneous rocks, etc.) across approximately 900 km of Texas from subhumid east to arid west has shown that 43 of these profiles exhibit prominent biogenic constituents. These profiles exhibit significant differences in thickness (varying from centimeters to meters) and maturity (varying from I to VI). All of the different caliche facies are composed of low-Mg calcite. Biogenic features generally occur in the upper part of the profiles, including the uppermost portion of massive caliche horizons, platy horizons, laminar crusts, and pisoids. The main biogenic caliche facies include rhizoliths (calcified root structures), stromatolite-like laminar crusts, and coated grains. Compared to the abiogenic massive micritic to microsparitic calcite groundmass, biogenic constituents are morphologically distinct. These biogenic constituents are composed of several microscopic mineral components, including calcified filaments, needle fiber calcite (e.g., single crystalline needles and needle pairs, triangular crystals, and polycrystalline chains of rhombohedrons), spherulites, micro-rods, and nano-spheres. A large number of calcified root cellular structures and micro-organisms, e.g., fungal filaments, actinomycetes, and rod-like bacteria, are also present. Plant roots as well as soil biota produce distinctive structures and also enhance lithification by inducing calcite precipitation in the caliches, i.e., biologically controlled or influenced processes. Host strata did not significantly influence the abundance nor type of biogenic features in the caliches. In contrast, climate had an evident effect on the development of biogenic constituents in these caliches in terms of the amount as well as type. The thickness of laminar crusts and grain coatings and the abundance of biotic constituents within those facies decrease as the

  7. Über den Einfluss biogener Amine auf unkonditionierten und konditionierten Stimulus

    OpenAIRE

    Buckemüller, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic amines play an important role in the modulation of behavior in vertebrates and invertebrates. Octopamine, a biogenic amine, exclusively for invertebrates is an important neurotransmitter and neuromodulator and has a considerable role as stress hormone. Octopamine plays a central role in learning and behavior in insects. The precise role in such behavior has been discussed over the last years. The signaling pathways of octopamine, tyramine and dopamine interact. Therefore, it is di...

  8. Biogenic hardparts: Difficult archives of the geological past (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Schone, B. R.; Hoffmann, R.; Niedermayr, A.

    2013-12-01

    Biomineralized exo- or endoskeletons of fossil marine invertebrates are widespread and diverse components of the Phanerozoic rock record of Earth's past and present oceans. Exoskeletons serve as protection against environmental pressure or predators, whilst endoskeletons can act as support or serve as an attachment for muscles and ligaments and hence as a mechanism for transmitting muscular forces. Biogenic hard parts represent sophisticated products resulting from the hierarchical interaction of inorganic minerals (95%) and macromolecular organic matrices, forming commonly less than 5%. The significance of many biogenic carbonate archives lies in the time-resolved growth patterns and their ability to record ambient environmental conditions in the form of multiple geochemical properties (multi-proxy archives) that have been widely used to assess past oceanic seawater properties. Here, we compile and review published work dealing with crystallization pathways of skeletal hard parts secreted by mollusks (i.e., bivalves and cephalopods) as well as brachiopods as widely used archives of ancient neritic epeiric settings. Bivalves and cephalopods (e.g., extinct ammonoids and belemnites and extant Sepia, Nautilus and Spirula) all form accretionary calcitic, aragonitic or vateritic skeletal hard parts. Despite the fact that mollusks and brachiopods form part of very different branches of the animal phylogenetic tree, their biomineralization strategies are surprisingly similar. Our main focus lies in a critical assessment of the complex pathways of ions and aquo-complexes from their source (seawater) to the final product (biomineral). We do this as an attempt to critically test the commonly held hypothesis that many fossil hard parts precipitated (under favorable conditions and pending subsequent diagenetic alteration) in equilibrium with seawater. Two main observations stand out: (1) the present knowledge on pathways and mechanisms (e.g., ion channel trans-membrane or

  9. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: significant contributions from biogenic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, was 21% non-sea salt sulfate 2% nitrate, 7% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea salt signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA profiles could be isolated: an amino acids/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass, a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%, a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 40%, a sea salt OA fraction (SS-OA, 7% and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%. The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (C : N ratio = 0.13, has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea salt aerosol was identified (SS-OA. However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not

  10. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: dominant contributions from biogenic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, was 21% non-sea-salt sulfate, 2% nitrate, 8% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea spray signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA profiles could be isolated: an amino acid/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass, a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%, a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 41%, a sea spray OA fraction (SS-OA, 7% and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%. The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (N : C ratio = 0.13, has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea spray aerosol was identified (SS-OA. However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not

  11. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: significant contributions from biogenic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, J.; Schneider, J.; Nemitz, E.; Tang, Y. S.; Dragosits, U.; Blackall, T. D.; Trathan, P. N.; Phillips, G. J.; Sutton, M.; Braban, C. F.

    2013-03-01

    Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W) in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), was 21% non-sea salt sulfate 2% nitrate, 7% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea salt signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA) profiles could be isolated: an amino acids/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass), a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%), a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 40%), a sea salt OA fraction (SS-OA, 7%) and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%). The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (C : N ratio = 0.13), has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea salt aerosol was identified (SS-OA). However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not associated to sea

  12. Sub-Antarctic marine aerosol: dominant contributions from biogenic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, J.; Schneider, J.; Nemitz, E.; Tang, Y. S.; Dragosits, U.; Blackall, T. D.; Trathan, P. N.; Phillips, G. J.; Sutton, M.; Braban, C. F.

    2013-09-01

    Biogenic influences on the composition and characteristics of aerosol were investigated on Bird Island (54°00' S, 38°03' W) in the South Atlantic during November and December 2010. This remote marine environment is characterised by large seabird and seal colonies. The chemical composition of the submicron particles, measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), was 21% non-sea-salt sulfate, 2% nitrate, 8% ammonium, 22% organics and 47% sea salt including sea salt sulfate. A new method to isolate the sea spray signature from the high-resolution AMS data was applied. Generally, the aerosol was found to be less acidic than in other marine environments due to the high availability of ammonia, from local fauna emissions. By positive matrix factorisation five different organic aerosol (OA) profiles could be isolated: an amino acid/amine factor (AA-OA, 18% of OA mass), a methanesulfonic acid OA factor (MSA-OA, 25%), a marine oxygenated OA factor (M-OOA, 41%), a sea spray OA fraction (SS-OA, 7%) and locally produced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 9%). The AA-OA was dominant during the first two weeks of November and found to be related with the hatching of penguins in a nearby colony. This factor, rich in nitrogen (N : C ratio = 0.13), has implications for the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in the area as particulate matter is often transported over longer distances than gaseous N-rich compounds. The MSA-OA was mainly transported from more southerly latitudes where phytoplankton bloomed. The bloom was identified as one of three sources for particulate sulfate on Bird Island, next to sea salt sulfate and sulfate transported from South America. M-OOA was the dominant organic factor and found to be similar to marine OA observed at Mace Head, Ireland. An additional OA factor highly correlated with sea spray aerosol was identified (SS-OA). However, based on the available data the type of mixture, internal or external, could not be determined. Potassium was not associated

  13. Magnesium stable isotope fractionation in marine biogenic calcite and aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wombacher, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Böhm, F.; Gussone, N.; Regenberg, M.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Rüggeberg, A.

    2011-10-01

    This survey of magnesium stable isotope compositions in marine biogenic aragonite and calcite includes samples from corals, sclerosponges, benthic porcelaneous and planktonic perforate foraminifera, coccolith oozes, red algae, and an echinoid and brachiopod test. The analyses were carried out using MC-ICP-MS with an external repeatability of ±0.22‰ (2SD for δ 26Mg; n = 37), obtained from a coral reference sample (JCp-1). Magnesium isotope fractionation in calcitic corals and sclerosponges agrees with published data for calcitic speleothems with an average Δ 26Mg calcite-seawater = -2.6 ± 0.3‰ that appears to be weakly related to temperature. With one exception ( Vaceletia spp.), aragonitic corals and sclerosponges also display uniform Mg isotope fractionations relative to seawater with Δ 26Mg biogenic aragonite-seawater = -0.9 ± 0.2. Magnesium isotopes in high-Mg calcites from red algae, echinoids and perhaps some porcelaneous foraminifera as well as in all low-Mg calcites (perforate foraminifera, coccoliths and brachiopods) display significant biological influences. For planktonic foraminifera, the Mg isotope data is consistent with the fixation of Mg by organic material under equilibrium conditions, but appears to be inconsistent with Mg removal from vacuoles. Our preferred model, however, suggests that planktonic foraminifera synthesize biomolecules that increase the energetic barrier for Mg incorporation. In this model, the need to remove large quantities of Mg from vacuole solutions is avoided. For the high-Mg calcites from echinoids, the precipitation of amorphous calcium carbonate may be responsible for their weaker Mg isotope fractionation. Disregarding superimposed biological effects, it appears that cation light isotope enrichments in CaCO 3 principally result from a chemical kinetic isotope effect, related to the incorporation of cations at kink sites. In this model, the systematics of cation isotope fractionations in CaCO 3 relate to the

  14. Characteristics of aerosolized ice forming marine biogenic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Peter A.

    atomus and Emiliania huxleyi, cells and cell fragments efficiently nucleate ice in the deposition mode, however, only T. pseudonana and N. atomus form ice in the immersion mode, presumably due to different cell wall compositions. This further corroborates the role of phytoplanktonic species for aerosolization of marine biogenic cloud active particles. Experimental data are used to parameterize marine biogenic particle fluxes and heterogeneous ice nucleation as a function of biological activity. The atmospheric implications of the results and their implementation into cloud and climate models are discussed.

  15. Anthropogenic impact on biogenic Si pools in temperate soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Clymans

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Human land use changes directly affect silica (Si mobilisation and Si storage in terrestrial ecosystems and influence Si export from the continents, although the magnitudes of the impact are unknown. Yet biogenic silica (BSi in soils is an understudied aspect. We have quantified and compared total biogenic (PSia and easily soluble (PSie Si pools at four sites along a gradient of disturbance in southern Sweden. An estimate of the magnitude of change in temperate continental BSi pools due to human disturbance is provided. Land use clearly affects BSi pools and their distribution. Total PSia and PSie for a continuous forested site at Siggaboda Nature Reserve (66 900 ± 22 800 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 952 ± 16 kg SiO2 ha−1 are significantly higher than disturbed land use types from the Råshult Culture Reserve including arable land (28 800 ± 7200 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 239 ± 91 kg SiO2 ha−1, pasture sites (27 300 ± 5980 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 370 ± 129 kg SiO2 ha−1 and grazed forest (23 600 ± 6370 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 346 ± 123 kg SiO2 ha−1. Vertical PSia and PSie profiles show significant (p<0.05 variation among the sites. These differences in size and distribution are interpreted as the long-term effect of reduced BSi replenishment and increased mobilisation of the PSia in disturbed soils. In temperate regions, total PSia showed a 10 % decline since agricultural development (3000BCE. Recent agricultural expansion (after 1700CE has resulted in an average export of 1.1 ± 0.8 Tmol Si yr−1, leading to an annual contribution of ca. 20 % to the global land-ocean Si flux carried by rivers. Human activities clearly exert a long-term influence on Si cycling in soils and

  16. Injection of manganese ore in liquid steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical and experimental analysis is carried out to estimate the rate of MnO5 reduction when manganese ore is injected into liquid steel with three carbon contents, 0,5, 1.0 and 2.0 mass % at 1600 degree centigrade. It is assumed that there are two reaction zones along the flux injection operation: a transitory reaction between the rising particles and the bulk metal, and the permanent reaction between the metal and the top slag. The experiments were carried out in an open 10 kg induction furnace using Al2O3 refractory. The results show that the transitory reaction plays a more important role in the powder injection process than the permanent reaction. The reduction of MnO with silicon is more important when the basicity of the slag is high; this is because the a SiO2 decreases as the slag basicity is increased. However, when the slag basicity is low and the initial carbon content in steel is high the reduction of MnO with silicon becomes less efficient, although silicon still remains better reducing agent than carbon. (Author) 15 refs

  17. Impact wear behaviors of Hadfield manganese steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XU Yun-hua; CEN Qi-hong; ZHU Jin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Impact wear behaviors of Hadfield manganese steel at different impact angles were investigated. The results of impact wear tests show that there exists a critical impact load for Hadfield steel. The wear rate suddenly turns down after some impact cycles when the impact load is greater than the critical load. The critical impact load is smaller than 8.2 J in this research because the nano-sized austenitic grains embedded in amorphous delay the crack propagation in subsurface. From high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) examination of subsurface microstructure, it is found that a large amount of nano-sized grains embedded in bulk amorphous matrix are fully developed and no martensitic transformation occurs during the impact wear process. The analytical results of worn surface morphology and debris indicate that the initiation of crack, propagation and spalling are restricted in the amorphous phase, resulting in the size distribution of debris in nano-sizes, which is the reason why the wear rate of Hadfield steel is greatly decreased at high impact load.

  18. Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dworetsky, M M; Patel, K

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic...

  19. Submicron Features in Higher Manganese Silicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatir Sadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world energy crisis had increased the demand for alternative energy sources and as such is one of the topics at the forefront of research. One way for reducing energy consumption is by thermoelectricity. Thermoelectric effects enable direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy. Higher manganese silicide (HMS, MnSi1.75 is one of the promising materials for applications in the field of thermoelectricity. The abundance and low cost of the elements, combined with good thermoelectric properties and high mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, make it very attractive for thermoelectric applications. Recent studies have shown that Si-rich HMS has improved thermoelectric properties. The most interesting of which is the unusual reduction in thermal conductivity. In the current research, transmission (TEM and scanning (SEM electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction methods were applied for investigation of the govern mechanisms resulting in very low thermal conductivity values of an Si-rich HMS composition, following arc melting and hot-pressing procedures. In this paper, it is shown that there is a presence of sub-micron dislocations walls, stacking faults, and silicon and HMS precipitates inside each other apparent in the matrix, following a high temperature (0.9 Tm hot pressing for an hour. These are not just responsible for the low thermal conductivity values observed but also indicate the ability to create complicate nano-structures that will last during the production process and possibly during the application.

  20. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase: Guardian of the Powerhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daret K. St. Clair

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrion is vital for many metabolic pathways in the cell, contributing all or important constituent enzymes for diverse functions such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, the urea cycle, the citric acid cycle, and ATP synthesis. The mitochondrion is also a major site of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in the cell. Aberrant production of mitochondrial ROS can have dramatic effects on cellular function, in part, due to oxidative modification of key metabolic proteins localized in the mitochondrion. The cell is equipped with myriad antioxidant enzyme systems to combat deleterious ROS production in mitochondria, with the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD acting as the chief ROS scavenging enzyme in the cell. Factors that affect the expression and/or the activity of MnSOD, resulting in diminished antioxidant capacity of the cell, can have extraordinary consequences on the overall health of the cell by altering mitochondrial metabolic function, leading to the development and progression of numerous diseases. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which MnSOD protects cells from the harmful effects of overproduction of ROS, in particular, the effects of ROS on mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, may contribute to the development of novel treatments for various diseases in which ROS are an important component.

  1. Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration grass species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration plants have not been established. As a result, ecological risk assessments rely on toxicity thresholds for agronomic species, which may differ from those of restoration species. Our objective was to provide Mn toxicity thresholds for grasses commonly used in restoration. We used a greenhouse screening study where seedlings of redtop, slender wheatgrass, tufted hairgrass, big bluegrass, basin wildrye, and common wheat were grown in sand culture and exposed to increasing concentrations of Mn. The LC50, EC50-plant, EC50-shoot, EC50-root, PT50-shoot, and the PT50-root were then determined. Phytotoxicity thresholds and effective concentrations for the restoration species were generally higher than values reported for agronomic species. Our estimates of PT50-shoot for the five restoration grasses range from 41,528 to 120,082 mg Mn kg-1. Measures of EC50-plant for these restoration grasses ranged from 877 to >6,000 mg Mn l-1. These thresholds might be more useful for risk assessors than those based on crop plants that are widely used. - Mn phytotoxicity thresholds for restoration grasses should be useful for risk assessments of metal-contaminated lands

  2. Study on biogenic amines in various dry salted fish consumed in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanyan; Chen, Yufeng; Li, Laihao; Yang, Xianqing; Yang, Shaoling; Lin, Wanling; Zhao, Yongqiang; Deng, Jianchao

    2016-05-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the biogenic amines (BAs), physicochemical property and microorganisms in dry salted fish, a traditional aquatic food consumed in China. Forty three samples of dry salted fish were gathered from retail and wholesale markets and manufacturers, which had been produced in various regions in China. Cadaverine (CAD) and putrescine (PUT) were quantitatively the most common biogenic amines. About 14% of the samples exceeded the histamine content standards established by the FDA and/or EU. The highest histamine content was found in Silver pomfret (Pampus argenteus) (347.79 mg kg-1). Five of forty three samples exceeded the acceptable content of TYR (100 mg kg-1), and 23.26% of dried-salted fish contained high contents of biogenic amines (above 600 mg kg-1). In addition, species, regions, pickling processes and drying methods made the physicochemical property, microorganisms and biogenic amines in dry salted fish to be different to some extents. The total plate count (TPC) was much higher than that of total halophilic bacteria in all samples. The biogenic amines, physicochemical property and microbiological counts exhibited large variations among samples. Furthermore, no significant correlation between biogenic amines and physicochemical property and TPC was observed. This study indicated that dry salted fish may still present healthy risk for BAs, depending on the processing methods, storage conditions among others.

  3. Study on biogenic amines in various dry salted fish consumed in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanyan; Chen, Yufeng; Li, Laihao; Yang, Xianqing; Yang, Shaoling; Lin, Wanling; Zhao, Yongqiang; Deng, Jianchao

    2016-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the biogenic amines (BAs), physicochemical property and microorganisms in dry salted fish, a traditional aquatic food consumed in China. Forty three samples of dry salted fish were gathered from retail and wholesale markets and manufacturers, which had been produced in various regions in China. Cadaverine (CAD) and putrescine (PUT) were quantitatively the most common biogenic amines. About 14% of the samples exceeded the histamine content standards established by the FDA and/or EU. The highest histamine content was found in Silver pomfret ( Pampus argenteus) (347.79 mg kg-1). Five of forty three samples exceeded the acceptable content of TYR (100 mg kg-1), and 23.26% of dried-salted fish contained high contents of biogenic amines (above 600 mg kg-1). In addition, species, regions, pickling processes and drying methods made the physicochemical property, microorganisms and biogenic amines in dry salted fish to be different to some extents. The total plate count (TPC) was much higher than that of total halophilic bacteria in all samples. The biogenic amines, physicochemical property and microbiological counts exhibited large variations among samples. Furthermore, no significant correlation between biogenic amines and physicochemical property and TPC was observed. This study indicated that dry salted fish may still present healthy risk for BAs, depending on the processing methods, storage conditions among others.

  4. Operation of marine diesel engines on biogenic fuels: modification of emissions and resulting climate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Lauer, Peter; Fritsche, Uwe; Hasselbach, Jan; Lichtenstern, Michael; Schlager, Hans; Fleischer, Fritz

    2011-12-15

    The modification of emissions of climate-sensitive exhaust compounds such as CO(2), NO(x), hydrocarbons, and particulate matter from medium-speed marine diesel engines was studied for a set of fossil and biogenic fuels. Applied fossil fuels were the reference heavy fuel oil (HFO) and the low-sulfur marine gas oil (MGO); biogenic fuels were palm oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, and animal fat. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the production of biogenic fuels were treated by means of a fuel life cycle analysis which included land use changes associated with the growth of energy plants. Emissions of CO(2) and NO(x) per kWh were found to be similar for fossil fuels and biogenic fuels. PM mass emission was reduced to 10-15% of HFO emissions for all low-sulfur fuels including MGO as a fossil fuel. Black carbon emissions were reduced significantly to 13-30% of HFO. Changes in emissions were predominantly related to particulate sulfate, while differences between low-sulfur fossil fuels and low-sulfur biogenic fuels were of minor significance. GHG emissions from the biogenic fuel life cycle (FLC) depend crucially on energy plant production conditions and have the potential of shifting the overall GHG budget from positive to negative compared to fossil fuels. PMID:22044020

  5. Effects of manganese on the microstructures of Chenopodium ambrosioides L., A manganese tolerant plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shengguo; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Chuan; Lei, Jie; Hartley, William; Pan, Weisong

    2016-07-01

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. can tolerate high concentrations of manganese and has potential for its use in the revegetation of manganese mine tailings. Following a hydroponic investigation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) was used to study microstructure changes and the possible accumulation of Mn in leaf cells of C. ambrosioides in different Mn treatments (200, 1000, 10000 μmol·L(-1)). At 200 μmol·L(-1), the ultrastructure of C. ambrosioides was clearly visible without any obvious damage. At 1000 μmol·L(-1), the root, stem and leaf cells remained intact, and the organelles were clearly visible without any obvious damage. However, when the Mn concentration exceeded 1000 μmol·L(-1) the number of mitochondria in root cells decreased and the chloroplasts in stem cells showed a decrease in grana lamellae and osmiophilic granules. Compared to controls, treatment with 1000 μmol·L(-1) or 10000 μmol·L(-1) Mn over 30 days, gave rise to black agglomerations in the cells. At 10000 μmol·L(-1), Mn was observed to form acicular structures in leaf cells and intercellular spaces, which may be a form of tolerance and accumulation of Mn in C. ambrosioides. This study has furthered the understanding of Mn tolerance mechanisms in plants, and is potential for the revegetation of Mn-polluted soils. PMID:26696389

  6. Cerium, manganese and cerium/manganese ceramic monolithic catalysts. Study of VOCs and PM removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    COLMAN-LERNER Esteban; PELUSO Miguel Andrs; SAMBETH Jorge; THOMAS Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic supported cerium, manganese and cerium-manganese catalysts were prepared by direct impregnation of aqueous precursor, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method (BET), temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) acidity measurements and electrical conductivity. The catalytic activity was evaluated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) (ethanol, methyl ethyl ketone and toluene) oxidation. Additionally, catalysts were tested in particulate matter (PM) combustion. The characterization results indicated that Ce was in the form of Ce4+ and Ce3+, and Mn existed in the form of Mn4+and Mn3+on the surface of the Mn/AC sample and in the form of Mn4+ in the Ce/Mn/AC monolith. VOC oxidation results revealed that the Ce/Mn/AC sample showed an excellent performance compared with ceramic supported CeO2 (Ce/AC) and MnOx (Mn/AC) samples. The PM combustion was also higher on Ce/Mn/AC monoliths. The enhanced catalytic activity was mainly attributed to the Ce and Mn interaction which enhanced the acidity, conductiv-ity and the reducibility of the oxides.

  7. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egger Jos I

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later, several organ systems may be affected and, due to neurotoxicity, an atypical parkinsonian syndrome may emerge. With regard to neuropsychiatry, an array of symptoms may develop up to 30 years after intoxication, of which gait and speech abnormalities, cognitive and motor slowing, mood changes and hallucinations are the most common. Psychotic phenomena are rarely reported. Case presentation We describe the case of a 49-year-old Caucasian man working as a welder who was referred to our facility for evaluation of acute paranoid psychotic behavior. Our patient's medical history made no mention of any somatic complaints or psychiatric symptoms, and he had been involved in a professional career as a metalworker. On magnetic resonance imaging scanning of his brain, a bilateral hyperdensity of the globus pallidus, suggestive for manganese intoxication, was found. His manganese serum level was 52 to 97 nmol/L (range: 7 to 20 nmol/L. A diagnosis of organic psychotic disorder due to manganese overexposure was made. His psychotic symptoms disappeared within two weeks of treatment with low-dose risperidone. At three months later, serum manganese was decreased to slightly elevated levels and the magnetic resonance imaging T1 signal intensity was reduced. No signs of Parkinsonism were found and a definite diagnosis of manganese-induced apathy syndrome was made. Conclusion Although neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms caused by (chronic manganese exposure have been reported frequently in the past, in the present day the disorder is rarely diagnosed. In this report we stress that manganese intoxication can still occur, in our case in a confined

  8. Solvent extractions applications to hydrometallurgy. Pt.III: Nickel, cobalt, manganese and ocean nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main applications of solvent extraction to the hydrometallurgy of nickel, cobalt, manganese and manganese rich ocean nodules, which also contain nickel, cooper and cobalt, are exposed. A short description of the processes with commercial applications is made. (author)

  9. Co-sprayed manganese doped zinc sulfide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese doped zinc sulfide thin films were deposited on glass substrates using co-spray method. Different characterization techniques such as XRD, FESEM, AFM, UV–vis and PL have been used in order to investigate the structural, morphological and optical properties of these films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that pure and Mn-doped films showed only hexagonal polycrystalline wurtzite structure with [0 0 1] vertical preferential direction. SEM images revealed that manganese inclusion has a significant effect on the morphological structure; films have nano-sized grains with a size of approximately 100 nm. All films have high transmittance of about 82% in the visible region. Manganese inclusion has been shown to decrease overall optical gap from 3.69 to 3.63 eV. The photoluminescence intensity was found to reach a maximum and decline at higher manganese content, assisting to the well-known concentration quenching effect. The critical doping level of Mn ions has been determined to be 2%. - Highlights: • Manganese doped ZnS films were deposited at 380 °C by co-spray method. • Effect of Mn doping on structural and optical properties of ZnS films were investigated. • XRD data show that pure and doped films exhibited hexagonal wurtzite structure. • 2% is the appropriate amount of Mn exhibiting the highest photoluminescence intensity

  10. Chronic manganese toxicity due to substance abuse in Turkish patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan Koksal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Manganese toxicity may lead to a levodopa-resistant akinetic-rigid syndrome. Pathological changes occur mostly in the pallidium and stratium. Materials and Methods: We report seven patients with a new form of chronic manganese toxicity due to long-term intravenous use of a solution consisting of ephedrine, acetylsalicylic acid and potassium permanganate as a psycho-stimulant, popularly known as "Russian Cocktail". Results: The age of the patients ranged between 19 and 31 years, and the duration of substance abuse was between nine and 106 months. The onset of symptoms from first use ranged seven to 35 months. The initial symptom was impaired speech followed by gait disturbance and bradykinesia. In addition to these symptoms, choreic movements, ataxia presenting as backward falls and dystonia were also seen. Serum and urine samples revealed high levels of manganese. Hyperintense lesions on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were seen in bilateral basal ganglia and brainstem, dentate nuclei, features consistent with manganese intoxication. Conclusion: Manganese toxicity, which may cause a distinctive irreversible neurodegenerative disorder, can be seen frequently with "Russian Cocktail" abuse, a substance which can be accessed very easily and at a low cost.

  11. Chimie Douce Synthesis of Chalcogen-Doped Manganese Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalcogen-doped manganese oxides have been prepared by Chimie Douce redox reaction between permanganate and chalcogen element fine powder under acidic condition (pH = 1). According to powder X-ray diffraction analyses, the S- and Se-doped manganese oxides are crystallized with layered birnessite and tunnel-type α-MnO2 structures, respectively. On the contrary, Te-doped compound was found to be X-ray amorphous. According to EDS analyses, these compounds contain chalcogen dopants with the ratio of chalcogen/manganese = 4-7%. We have investigated the chemical bonding character of these materials with X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) analysis. Mn K-edge XAS results clearly demonstrated that the manganese ions are stabilized in octahedral symmetry with the mixed oxidation states of +3/+4. On the other hand, according to Se K- and Te L1-edge XAS results, selenium and tellurium elements have the high oxidation states of +6, which is surely due to the oxidation of neutral chalcogen element by the strong oxidant permanganate ion. Taking into account their crystal structures and Mn oxidation states, the obtained manganese oxides are expected to be applicable as electrode materials for lithium secondary batteries

  12. Emission and role of biogenic volatile organic compounds in biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants are an essential part of the biosphere. Under the influence of climate change, plants respond in multiple ways within the ecosystem. One such way is the release of assimilated carbon back to the atmosphere in form of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which are produced by plants and are involved in plant growth, reproduction, defense and other . These compounds are emitted from vegetation into the atmosphere under different environmental situations. Plants produce an extensive range of BVOCs, including isoprenoids, sequisterpenes, aldehydes, alcohols and terpenes in different tissues above and below the ground. The emission rates vary with various environmental conditions and the plant growth stage in its life span.BVOCs are released under biotic and abiotic stress changes, like heat, drought, land-use changes, higher atmospheric CO concentrations, increased UV radiation and insect or disease attack. Plants emit BVOCs in atmosphere in order to avoid stress, and adapt to harsh circumstances. These compounds also have a significant role in plant-plant interaction, communication and competition. BVOCs have the ability to alter atmospheric chemistry; they readily react with atmospheric pollutant gases under high temperature and form tropospheric ozone, which is a potent air pollutant for global warming and disease occurrence. BVOCs may be a cause of photochemical smog and increase the stay of other GHGs in the atmosphere. Therefore, further study is required to assess the behavior of BVOCs in the biosphere as well as the atmosphere. (author)

  13. Analysis of Some Biogenic Amines by Micellar Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Malinowska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC with the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to determine some physicochemical parameters of six biogenic amines: adrenaline, dopamine, octopamine, histamine, 2-phenylethylamine, and tyramine. In this paper, an influence of surfactant’s concentration and pH of the micellar mobile phase on the retention of the tested substances was examined. To determine the influence of surfactant’s concentration on the retention of the tested amines, buffered solutions (at pH 7.4 of ionic surfactant—sodium dodecyl sulfate SDS (at different concentrations with acetonitrile as an organic modifier (0.8/0.2 v/v were used as the micellar mobile phases. To determine the influence of pH of the micellar mobile phase on the retention, mobile phases contained buffered solutions (at different pH values of sodium dodecyl sulfate SDS (at 0.1 M with acetonitrile (0.8/0.2 v/v. The inverse of value of retention factor (1/ versus concentration of micelles ( relationships were examined. Other physicochemical parameters of solutes such as an association constant analyte—micelle (ma—and partition coefficient of analyte between stationary phase and water (hydrophobicity descriptor (swΦ were determined by the use of Foley’s equation.

  14. XENOBIOTICS AND BIOGENIC ELEMENTS IN RAW COW'S MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Greń

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE This paper presents the concentration some toxic and biogenic elements in milk from Nitra region. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate 30 samples of raw milk with fat contents 3.8% obtained from milk machine in the Nitra region. Samples were analyzed for metal contents using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS. In comparison with maximum acceptable concentration for milk in the food codex of the Slovak republic, the level of contamination with cadmium was exceeded and reached the value 0.221 µg.ml-1. The copper content ranged from 1.201 µg.ml-1 to 5.810 µg.ml-1 and the average concentration reached 3.793 µg.ml-1.  Iron had an average of 1.824 µg.ml-1. Overall in all milk samples high correlations were found. Between positive correlation (0.7019 and negative correlation between of nickel and potassium concentration in raw milk (-0.72 was found. doi:10.5219/246

  15. Biogenic Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds by Urban Forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CENTRITTOMauro; LIUShirong; LORETOFrancesco

    2005-01-01

    All plants emit a wide range of volatile compounds, the so-called biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). BVOC emissions have received increased scientific attention in the last two decades because they may profoundly influence the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere, and may modulate plant tolerance to heat, pollutants, oxidative stress and abiotic stresses, and affect plant-plant and plant-insect interactions. Urban forestry may have a high impact on atmospheric composition, air quality, environment,and quality of life in urban areas. However, few studies have been carried out where the emission of BVOC could have important consequence for the quality of air and contribute to pollution episodes. A screening of BVOC emission by the mixed stand constituting urban forests is therefore required if emissions are to be reliably predicted. Monitoring the emission rates simultaneously with measurements of air quality, plant physiology and micrometeorology on selected urban forests, will allow detailed quantitative information on the inventory of BVOC emissions by urban vegetation to be compiled. This information will make it possible to propose an innovative management of urban vegetation in cities characterised by heavy emissions of anthropogenic pollutants, aiming at the abatement of BVOC emissions through the introduction or selection of non-BVOC emitting species in urban areas subjected to pollution episodes and in the new afforestation areas covering peri-urban parks, green belts and green corridors between peri-urban rural areas and the conurbations.

  16. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  17. Biogenic aldehyde determination by reactive paper spray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Soumabha; Hendricks, P.I. [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Reynolds, J.C. [Centre for Analytical Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Cooks, R.G., E-mail: cooks@purdue.edu [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • In-situ derivatization and simultaneous ionization used to detect aldehydes. • Biogenic aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes reacted with 4-aminophenol. • Derivatized products yield structurally characteristic fragment ions. • This measurement demonstrated using a miniaturized portable mass spectrometer. - Abstract: Ionization of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes is improved by performing simultaneous chemical derivatization using 4-aminophenol to produce charged iminium ions during paper spray ionization. Accelerated reactions occur in the microdroplets generated during the paper spray ionization event for the tested aldehydes (formaldehyde, n-pentanaldehyde, n-nonanaldehyde, n-decanaldehyde, n-dodecanaldehyde, benzaldehyde, m-anisaldehyde, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the iminium ions using collision-induced dissociation demonstrated that straight chain aldehydes give a characteristic fragment at m/z 122 (shown to correspond to protonated 4-(methyleneamino)phenol), while the aromatic aldehyde iminium ions fragment to give a characteristic product ion at m/z 120. These features allow straightforward identification of linear and aromatic aldehydes. Quantitative analysis of n-nonaldehyde using a benchtop mass spectrometer demonstrated a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude from 2.5 ng to 5 μg of aldehyde loaded on the filter paper emitter. The limit of detection was determined to be 2.2 ng for this aldehyde. The method had a precision of 22%, relative standard deviation. The experiment was also implemented using a portable ion trap mass spectrometer.

  18. Biogenic aldehyde determination by reactive paper spray ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In-situ derivatization and simultaneous ionization used to detect aldehydes. • Biogenic aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes reacted with 4-aminophenol. • Derivatized products yield structurally characteristic fragment ions. • This measurement demonstrated using a miniaturized portable mass spectrometer. - Abstract: Ionization of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes is improved by performing simultaneous chemical derivatization using 4-aminophenol to produce charged iminium ions during paper spray ionization. Accelerated reactions occur in the microdroplets generated during the paper spray ionization event for the tested aldehydes (formaldehyde, n-pentanaldehyde, n-nonanaldehyde, n-decanaldehyde, n-dodecanaldehyde, benzaldehyde, m-anisaldehyde, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the iminium ions using collision-induced dissociation demonstrated that straight chain aldehydes give a characteristic fragment at m/z 122 (shown to correspond to protonated 4-(methyleneamino)phenol), while the aromatic aldehyde iminium ions fragment to give a characteristic product ion at m/z 120. These features allow straightforward identification of linear and aromatic aldehydes. Quantitative analysis of n-nonaldehyde using a benchtop mass spectrometer demonstrated a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude from 2.5 ng to 5 μg of aldehyde loaded on the filter paper emitter. The limit of detection was determined to be 2.2 ng for this aldehyde. The method had a precision of 22%, relative standard deviation. The experiment was also implemented using a portable ion trap mass spectrometer

  19. Technological Factors Affecting Biogenic Amine Content in Foods: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, Fausto; Özogul, Yesim; Suzzi, Giovanna; Tabanelli, Giulia; Özogul, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BAs) are molecules, which can be present in foods and, due to their toxicity, can cause adverse effects on the consumers. BAs are generally produced by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids in food products. The most significant BAs occurring in foods are histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine, spermidine, and agmatine. The importance of preventing the excessive accumulation of BAs in foods is related to their impact on human health and food quality. Quality criteria in connection with the presence of BAs in food and food products are necessary from a toxicological point of view. This is particularly important in fermented foods in which the massive microbial proliferation required for obtaining specific products is often relater with BAs accumulation. In this review, up-to-date information and recent discoveries about technological factors affecting BA content in foods are reviewed. Specifically, BA forming-microorganism and decarboxylation activity, genetic and metabolic organization of decarboxylases, risk associated to BAs (histamine, tyramine toxicity, and other BAs), environmental factors influencing BA formation (temperature, salt concentration, and pH). In addition, the technological factors for controlling BA production (use of starter culture, technological additives, effects of packaging, other non-thermal treatments, metabolizing BA by microorganisms, effects of pressure treatments on BA formation and antimicrobial substances) are addressed. PMID:27570519

  20. Analysis of irradiated biogenic amines by computational chemistry and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic Amines (B A) are nitrogenous compounds able to cause food poisoning. In this work, we studied the tyramine, one of the most common BA present in foods by combining experimental measured IR (Infrared) and GC/MS (Gas Chromatograph / Mass Spectrometry) spectra and computational quantum chemistry. Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Deformed Atoms in Molecules (DMA) method was used to compute the partition the electronic densities in a chemically-intuitive way and electrostatic potentials of molecule to identify the acid and basic sites. Trading pattern was irradiated using a Cs 137 radiator, and each sample was identified by IR and GC/MS. Calculated and experimental IR spectra were compared. We observed that ionizing gamma irradiation was very effective in decreasing the population of standard amine, resulting in fragments that could be rationalized through the quantum chemistry calculations. In particular, we could locate the acid and basic sites of both molecules and identify possible sites of structural weaknesses, which allowed to propose mechanistic schemes for the breaking of chemical bonds by the irradiation. Moreover, from this work we hope it will be also possible to properly choose the dose of gamma irradiation which should be provided to eliminate each type of contamination. (author)

  1. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L.; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  2. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-26

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution. PMID:27225125

  3. Bio-templated synthesis of lithium manganese oxide microtubes and their application in Li{sup +} recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qianqian, E-mail: qianqianyu09@gmail.com; Sasaki, Keiko; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Biogenic birnessite was used to synthesize microtube-type Li{sup +} ion sieve. • The biomineral facilitates LMO formation at a lower temperature. • HMO-MT with high Li{sup +} uptake capacity was obtained. • Temperature effects on properties of HMO-MTs were studied. -- Abstract: Microbial transformations, a primary pathway for the Mn oxides formation in nature, provide potential for material-oriented researchers to fabricate new materials. Using Mn oxidizing fungus Paraconiothyrium sp. WL-2 as a bio-oxidizer as well as a bio-template, a special lithium ion sieve with microtube morphology was prepared through a solid-state transformation. Varying the calcination temperature from 300 to 700 °C was found to influence sample properties and consequently, the adsorption of Li{sup +}. Lithium manganese oxide microtube (LMO-MTs) calcined at different temperatures as well as their delithiated products (HMO-MTs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Calcination temperatures affect not only the content but also the crystal structure of LMO spinel, which is important in Li{sup +} adsorption. The optimized sample was obtained after calcination at 500 °C for 4 h, which shows higher Li{sup +} adsorption capacity than particulate materials.

  4. Intellectual Impairment in School-Age Children Exposed to Manganese from Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, Maryse F.; Sauvé, Sébastien; Barbeau, Benoit; Legrand, Melissa; Brodeur, Marie-Ève; Bouffard, Thérèse; Limoges, Elyse; Bellinger, David C.; Mergler, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Background Manganese is an essential nutrient, but in excess it can be a potent neurotoxicant. Despite the common occurrence of manganese in groundwater, the risks associated with this source of exposure are largely unknown. Objectives Our first aim was to assess the relations between exposure to manganese from drinking water and children’s intelligence quotient (IQ). Second, we examined the relations between manganese exposures from water consumption and from the diet with children’s hair ma...

  5. Preparation of Baking-Free Brick from Manganese Residue and Its Mechanical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Wang; Dong-yan Liu

    2013-01-01

    The increasing amount of waste residue produced during the electrolytic preparation process of manganese has nowadays brought about serious environmental problems. The research on utilization of manganese slag has been a hot spot around the world. The utilization of manganese slag is not only environment friendly, but also economically feasible. In the current work, a summarization of the main methods to produced building materials from manganese slag materials was given. Baking-free brick, a...

  6. Analysis of numerical simulations and influencing factors of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Xilai; Chen, Lei; Wei, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal manganese pollution has become an increasingly pressing water quality issue for water supply reservoirs in recent years. Manganese is a redox-sensitive element and is released from sediment under anoxic conditions near the sediment-water interface during summer and autumn, when water temperature stratification occurs. The reservoir water temperature and water dynamic conditions directly influence the formation of manganese pollution. Numerical models are useful tools to quantitatively evaluate manganese pollution and its influencing factors. This paper presents a reservoir manganese pollution model by adding a manganese biogeochemical module to a water quality model-CE-QUAL-W2. The model is applied to the Wangjuan reservoir (Qingdao, China), which experiences manganese pollution during summer and autumn. Field data are used to verify the model, and the results show that the model can reproduce the main features of the thermal stratification and manganese distribution. The model is used to evaluate the manganese pollution process and its four influencing factors, including air temperature, water level, wind speed, and wind directions, through different simulation scenarios. The results show that all four factors can influence manganese pollution. High air temperature, high water level, and low wind speed aggravate manganese pollution, while low air temperature, low water level, and high wind speed reduce manganese pollution. Wind that travels in the opposite direction of the flow aggravates manganese pollution, while wind in the same direction as the flow reduces manganese pollution. This study provides useful information to improve our understanding of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs, which is important for reservoir manganese pollution warnings and control. PMID:27068892

  7. Photoinduced oxidation of a water-soluble manganese(III) porphyrin

    OpenAIRE

    Maliyackel, Anthony C.; Otvos, John W.; Spreer, Larry O.; Calvin, Melvin

    1986-01-01

    The photoinduced oxidation of tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrinmanganese(III) has been achieved in homogeneous solution. The manganese porphyrin was used as an electron donor in a three-component system with tris-(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) as the photosensitizer and chloropentaamminecobalt(III) as the electron acceptor. The photooxidized manganese porphyrin is unstable in aqueous solution, reverting to the starting manganese(III) porphyrin. The oxidation of manganese(III) porphyrin and t...

  8. Effects of Chronic Manganese Exposure on Cognitive and Motor Functioning in Non-Human Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Jay S.; Decamp, Emmanuel; Koser, Amy Jo; Fritz, Stephanie; Gonczi, Heather; Syversen, Tore; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure to manganese is associated with complex behavioral/psychiatric signs that may include Parkinsonian motor features. However, little is known about the behavioral consequences of chronic manganese exposures. In this study, cynomolgus macaque monkeys were exposed to manganese sulfate (10 –15 mg/kg/week) over an exposure period lasting 272 ± 17 days. Prior to manganese exposure, animals were trained to perform tests of cognitive and motor functioning and overall behavior was assess...

  9. The Overlapping Roles of Manganese and Cu/Zn SOD in Oxidative Stress Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Reddi, Amit R.; Jensen, Laran T.; Naranuntarat, Amornrat; Rosenfeld, Leah; Leung, Edison; Shah, Rishita; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2008-01-01

    In various organisms, high intracellular manganese provides protection against oxidative damage through unknown pathways. Herein we use a genetic approach in S. cerevisiae to analyze factors that promote manganese as an anti-oxidant in cells lacking Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (sod1Δ). Unlike certain bacterial systems [1], oxygen resistance in yeast correlates with high intracellular manganese without a lowering of iron. This manganese for anti-oxidant protection is provided by the Nramp trans...

  10. Manganese Exposure is Cytotoxic and Alters Dopaminergic and GABAergic Neurons within the Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Stanwood, Gregg D.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Savchenko, Valentina; Wu, Jane; Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Anderson, Douglas J.; Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Aschner, Michael; McLaughlin, BethAnn

    2009-01-01

    Manganese is an essential nutrient, integral to proper metabolism of amino acids, proteins and lipids. Excessive environmental exposure to manganese can produce extrapyramidal symptoms similar to those observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We used in vivo and in vitro models to examine cellular and circuitry alterations induced by manganese exposure. Primary mesencephalic cultures were treated with 10–00µM manganese chloride (MnCl2) which resulted in dramatic changes in the neuronal cytoskele...

  11. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet—it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn2+, and ultimately water.

  12. Determination of semi-empirical correlation between hydrogen and manganese atomic ratio and manganese sulphate concentration in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Manganese Bath (MB) is a widely used technique for measuring the emission rate of the neutrons source. In a measurement the source is placed in the center of an aqueous solution of manganese sulfate (MnSO4), large enough to ensure that only a very small fraction of neutrons emitted by the source escape of the system. Why not be the only single core manganese to absorb the neutrons from the source and any other losses, the MB uses several parameters arranged in the form of four key terms that make algebraic form of the final value neutron emission from a source: saturation activity A(t), the sensitivity (ε) of Standardization System, the fraction of thermal neutrons (F) caught by 55Mn which in particular the ratio between hydrogen atoms and manganese, and the correction parameter K related to the escape of neutrons from the solution, the capture of neutrons by the source material and the capture of fast neutrons in the solution is determined by mathematical simulation of MB. The purpose of this study is to establish a functional relationship, using the gravimetric method, between the physical density, concentration and atoms ratio of hydrogen and manganese in the solution of the MB and with forecasts that do stop these values so that different concentrations for MB may be held, with the objective to reduce uncertainties in the parameters of the correction of K and F, therefore reducing the uncertainty in the emission rate source. (author)

  13. Hyperspectral characteristics of Celosia argentea which lived in manganese stress environment and inversion model for concentration effect of manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sanming; Lin, Gang; Yin, Xianyang; Sun, Xiaolin; Xu, Jiasheng; Liu, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary manganese deposits widely distribute in North Guangxi with the characteristic existing Celosia argentea. Celosia argentea is a kind of plant which has a strong ability to enrich manganese. In order to study the relationship between the hyperspectral characteristics of Celosia argentea and the concentration effect of manganese in the soil, we used soil of B layer in mining area, background soil and the soil adding reagent of MnCl4 to make up experimental sample soil with 10 levels Manganese content for the same batch Celosia argentea. The levels are 0mg/kg, 4500mg/kg, 9000mg/kg, 13500mg/kg, 18000mg/kg, 18020mg/kg, 18040mg/kg, 18080mg/kg, 18160mg/kg. ASD FieldSpec-4 has been used to measure the abnormal spectrums of these Celosia argentea through a whole growth cycle. After pretreating the spectral data, we used Successive Projections Algorithm (SPA) to extract the characteristic variables for extracting 1603 bands into 8 bands. Finally, the relationship between the spectral variables and the concentration of manganese was predicted by the Model of Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). The results show that the correlation coefficient-r2 are 0.8714 and 0.9141 in two sets of data. The prediction results are satisfactory, but the front 5 groups are closer to the regression line than the last 5 groups.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  15. Distribution of U and Th in Growth Zones of Manganese Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Friedrich, G. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    Growth zones and individual sublayers from one manganese nodule and three manganese crusts from an area south of Hawaii were analysed for U and Th by the delayed-neutron counting technique. The concentrations of uranium and thorium in the manganese nodule are highest in the outermost zone on top ...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. Coordination compounds of manganese(2) and cadmium(2) with α-ketoacid thiosemicarbazones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese (2) and cadmium (2) coordination compounds with gluoxalic, pyroacemic and benzoyl formic acid thiosemicarbazones are synthesized. ESR spectra of polycrystalline samples of manganese compounds and cadmium compounds activated with manganese at T=113 295 deg K allow to suppose that Mn2+ takes the position of Cd2+ ion which is in a weakly distorted octahedron crystal field

  1. MODULATED STRUCTURES AND ORDERING STRUCTURES IN ALLOYING AUSTENITIC MANGANESE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. He; Z.H. Jin; J.D. Lu

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of Fe-10Mn-2Cr-1.5C alloy has been investigated with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. The superlattice diffraction spots and satellite reflection pattrens have been observed in the present alloy, which means the appearence of the ordering structure and modulated structure in the alloy. It is also proved by X-ray diffraction analysis that the austenite in the alloy is more stable than that in traditional austenitic manganese steel. On the basis of this investigation,it is suggested that the C-Mn ordering clusters exist in austenitic manganese steel and the chromium can strengthen this effect by linking the weaker C-Mn couples together,which may play an important role in work hardening of austenitic manganese steel.

  2. Dimensional changes during sintering of manganese-carbon steel compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sintering behaviour in high purity hydrogen of Hoeganaes Nc 100.24 iron powder with carbon and two different types of ferromanganese additions was investigated. The influence of different manganese contents (3.0 and 4.0 wt. %), type of ferromanganese used (low and high carbon) and isothermal sintering temperature (1120, 1240 and 1300 oC) on dimensional changes was investigated by dilatometry. It is shown that the dimensional changes occurring during heating and isothermal sintering and the final density of sintered compacts are influenced by manganese and carbon through their interactions with the base iron. The results assist in the choice of industrial sintering conditions when the requirement is very small dimensional changes of compacts for s range of manganese and carbon contents. (author)

  3. Lichens as a Monitor for Atmospheric Manganese Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Affum

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents results obtained after lichens, parmelia sulcata, was used to investigate manganese concentrations near roadside environments. It was observed that the average manganese concentration in the study area, 540.032±19.896 mg/kg, exceeded the background concentration by a factor of about 1.03. The manganese concentration on the eastern and western sides of the road exceeded the background by factors of 1.05 and 1.01, respectively. P4 ranked first in Mn levels in the zone with a concentration of 1561.763±10.754 mg/kg, exceeding the background concentration by a factor of 2.97. Other observations showed that an inverse relationship exists between the suspected source of Mn emission and the proximity to the road. Traffic studies conducted in the study area also revealed that Mn emission could be directly proportional to the traffic volume.

  4. Supported lipid bilayers as templates to design manganese oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Maheshkumar; B Sreedhar; B U Nair; A Dhathathreyan

    2012-09-01

    This work reports on the preparation of nanoclusters of manganese oxide using biotemplating techniques. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on quartz using cationic lipid [Dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DOMA)] and mixed systems with neutral phospholipids dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) have been used as templates to synthesize these nanoparticles in a waterbased medium at room temperature. The Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show manganese oxide nanostructures that are composed of crystals or small clusters in the size range of 20-50 nm in diameter. Small angle XRD showed that template removal through calcining process results in nanostructures of the manganese oxide in sizes from 30 to 50 nm. Using these organized assemblies it is possible to control the nano and mesoscopic morphologies of particles and both rod-like and spherical particles can be synthesized.

  5. Investigation of manganese in salt- and freshwater pearls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trace element distribution in natural and cultured pearls is analysed by micro-PIXE, cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy and spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to develop a new method to distinguish cultured from natural pearls. These different kinds of pearls can be identified by their manganese content and its distribution in aragonite and calcite structure, respectively. Manganese content of natural freshwater pearls from Persian Gulf was compared to that of natural freshwater pearls from the Mississippi river (USA). Moreover manganese content of tissue-graft freshwater pearls from Chansu (China) was compared to that of natural freshwater pearls from the Mississippi river (USA). It was proved that the Chinese freshwater tissue-graft cultured pearls generally contain domains of calcite, emitting orange Mn2+-activated CL which are almost absent in the natural freshwater pearls from the Mississippi river. Freshwater pearls showing much higher Mn concentrations build in calcitic and aragonitic parts compared to saltwater pearls

  6. High manganese concentrations in rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Nina L.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Wiens, Roger C.; Grotzinger, John; Ollila, Ann M.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Clark, Benton C.; Gellert, Ralf; Mangold, Nicolas; Maurice, Sylvestre; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Nachon, Marion; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Berger, Jeffrey; Clegg, Samuel M.; Forni, Olivier; Hardgrove, Craig; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton E.; Sautter, Violaine

    2014-01-01

    The surface of Mars has long been considered a relatively oxidizing environment, an idea supported by the abundance of ferric iron phases observed there. However, compared to iron, manganese is sensitive only to high redox potential oxidants, and when concentrated in rocks, it provides a more specific redox indicator of aqueous environments. Observations from the ChemCam instrument on the Curiosity rover indicate abundances of manganese in and on some rock targets that are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than previously observed on Mars, suggesting the presence of an as-yet unidentified manganese-rich phase. These results show that the Martian surface has at some point in time hosted much more highly oxidizing conditions than has previously been recognized.

  7. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  8. Manganese oxidation state mediates toxicity in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the manganese (Mn) oxidation state on cellular Mn uptake and toxicity is not well understood. Therefore, undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to 0-200 μM Mn(II)-chloride or Mn(III)-pyrophosphate for 24 h, after which cellular manganese levels were measured along with measures of cell viability, function, and cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion, medium lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 8-isoprostanes, cellular ATP, dopamine, serotonin, H-ferritin, transferrin receptor (TfR), Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein levels). Exposures to Mn(III) >10 μM produced 2- to 5-fold higher cellular manganese levels than equimolar exposures to Mn(II). Cell viability and ATP levels both decreased at the highest Mn(II) and Mn(III) exposures (150-200 μM), while Mn(III) exposures produced increases in LDH activity at lower exposures (≥50 μM) than did Mn(II) (200 μM only). Mn(II) reduced cellular dopamine levels more than Mn(III), especially at the highest exposures (50% reduced at 200 μM Mn(II)). In contrast, Mn(III) produced a >70% reduction in cellular serotonin at all exposures compared to Mn(II). Different cellular responses to Mn(II) exposures compared to Mn(III) were also observed for H-ferritin, TfR, and MnSOD protein levels. Notably, these differential effects of Mn(II) versus Mn(III) exposures on cellular toxicity could not simply be accounted for by the different cellular levels of manganese. These results suggest that the oxidation state of manganese exposures plays an important role in mediating manganese cytotoxicity

  9. Distinguishing and understanding thermogenic and biogenic sources of methane using multiply substituted isotopologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D. A.; Martini, A. M.; Clog, M.; Douglas, P. M.; Shusta, S. S.; Valentine, D. L.; Sessions, A. L.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    Sources of methane to sedimentary environments are commonly identified and quantified using the stable isotopic compositions of methane. The methane "clumped-isotope geothermometer", based on the measurement of multiply substituted methane isotopologues (13CH3D and 12CH2D2), shows promise in adding new constraints to the sources and formational environments of both biogenic and thermogenic methane. However, questions remain about how this geothermometer behaves in systems with mixtures of biogenic and thermogenic gases and different biogenic environments. We have applied the methane clumped-isotope thermometer to a mixed biogenic-thermogenic system (Antrim Shale, USA) and to biogenic gas from gas seeps (Santa Barbara and Santa Monica Basin, USA), a pond on the Caltech campus, and methanogens grown in pure culture. We demonstrate that clumped-isotope based temperatures add new quantitative constraints to the relative amounts of biogenic vs. thermogenic gases in the Antrim Shale indicating a larger proportion (∼50%) of thermogenic gas in the system than previously thought. Additionally, we find that the clumped-isotope temperature of biogenic methane appears related to the environmental settings in which the gas forms. In systems where methane generation rates appear to be slow (e.g., the Antrim Shale and gas seeps), microbial methane forms in or near both internal isotopic equilibrium and hydrogen-isotope equilibrium with environmental waters. In systems where methane forms rapidly, microbial methane is neither in internal isotopic equilibrium nor hydrogen-isotope equilibrium with environmental waters. A quantitative model of microbial methanogenesis that incorporates isotopes is proposed to explain these results.

  10. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO2 concentration data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Furthermore, verifying biogenic fluxes provides a check on estimated emissions associated with managing lands for carbon sequestration and other activities, which often have large uncertainties. We report here on the challenges and results associated with a case study using atmospheric measurements of CO2 concentrations and inverse modeling to verify nationally-reported biogenic CO2 emissions. The biogenic CO2 emissions inventory was compiled for the Mid-Continent region of United States based on methods and data used by the US government for reporting to the UNFCCC, along with additional sources and sinks to produce a full carbon balance. The biogenic emissions inventory produced an estimated flux of −408 ± 136 Tg CO2 for the entire study region, which was not statistically different from the biogenic flux of −478 ± 146 Tg CO2 that was estimated using the atmospheric CO2 concentration data. At sub-regional scales, the spatial density of atmospheric observations did not appear sufficient to verify emissions in general. However, a difference between the inventory and inversion results was found in one isolated area of West-central Wisconsin. This part of the region is dominated by forestlands, suggesting that further investigation may be warranted into the forest C stock or harvested wood product data from this portion of the study area. The results suggest that observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration data and inverse modeling could be used to verify biogenic emissions, and provide more confidence in biogenic GHG emissions reporting to the UNFCCC. (letter)

  11. Biogenic influence on the growth of ferromanganese micronodules in the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    on the biological debris. They are also present in different crystal forms in vugs and cavities in the micronodules. Electron microprobe spot analyses indicate that the micronodules are particularly high in manganese and iron in the upper and lower levels...

  12. Kinetic study of manganese behavior in the Scheldt Estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Herzl, V.; Roevros, N.

    1998-01-01

    Combination of radiochemistry with simultaneous determination of corresponding stable isotope concentration allows the study of the biogeochemical behavior of manganese in an estuarine system which is not at equilibrium. A bacterial uptake in the dark of 0.40 µM in 50 hours at 6 °C, corresponding to an uptake rate of 8 nM.h-1, was measured for the sample collected in winter. However, this biological uptake represents only 60% of the decrease in stable dissolved manganese concentration after 5...

  13. Facile Routes to Manganese(II) Triflate Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Riedel, Paul J.; Arulsamy, Navamoney; Mehn, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Manganese(II) chloride reacts with trimethylsilyl triflate (TMS(OTf) where OTf = -OSO2CF3) in a 1:1 mixture of acetonitrile and tetrahydrofuran, and after recrystallization affords the linear coordination polymer [MnII(CH3CN)2(OTf)2]n. Each distorted octahedral manganese(II) center in the polymeric chain has trans-acetonitriles and the remaining equatorial coordination positions are occupied by the bridging triflate anions. Dissolving [MnII(CH3CN)2(OTf)2]n in equal volumes of acetonitrile and...

  14. Structure and electronic properties of porous manganese oxides.

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Manganese oxides with varying pore sizes from ~2 to ~7 have been prepared by standard solid-state techniques and by low temperature hydrothermal methods. These materials have an open framework composed exclusively of manganese oxide, which in simple tunnel and layered structures is built up exclusively of edge and corner shared MnO6 octahedra. In more complex structures, such as that exhibited by Na0.44MnO2, this framework is built up of MnO6 octahedra and MnO5 square pyramids, where Mn3+ and...

  15. Manganese-Induced Parkinsonism due to Ephedrone Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sikk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, a syndrome of hypokinesia, dysarthria, dystonia, and postural impairment, related to intravenous use of a “designer” psychostimulant derived from pseudoephedrine using potassium permanganate as the oxidant, has been observed in drug addicts in several countries in Eastern Europe with some cases also in Western countries. A levodopa unresponsive Parkinsonian syndrome occurs within a few months of abusing the homemade drug mixture containing ephedrone (methcathinone and manganese. The development of this neurological syndrome has been attributed to toxic effects of manganese, but the role of the psychostimulant ephedrone is unclear. This paper describes the clinical syndrome, results of neuroimaging, and therapeutic attempts.

  16. Geochemical barriers of manganese distribution in edaphotopes of Dnieper Prysamarye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Tsvetkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microelement composition is an important condition of edaphotopes as the major, summarizing parts of any biogeocenosis. Microelements in ultra-microquantity are necessary for vital functions of all organisms, but their anthropogenic accumulation and transformation in soil environment represents a real threat for living organisms’ health and stability of the biosphere as a whole. Geochemical barriers are local zones where the conditions of elemental migration are significantly different, resulting in accumulation of some chemical elements. The relevance of geochemical barriers’ study consists in the prospective possibility of artificial limitation of the migration of polluting elements in the environment. The aim of this research is to determine the role of geochemical barriers in distribution and migration of manganese in edaphotopes of Dnieper Prysamarye. Content of manganese in soils, regularity of its distribution and relationship between a number of physical and chemical properties of soils were considered in the course of investigation. Besides, this paper summarizes the main features and regularities of the different geochemical barriers’ formation. Manganese content in soils was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The objects of the research are edaphotopes of the biogeocenoses of Dnieper Prisamarye situated in steppe zone of Ukraine, subzone of forb-fescue-stipa steppe. According to our data, the average concentrations of manganese in the horizons of 0–50 cm of ordinary chernozem, alkaline-saline meadow-forest soil, floodplain meadow-forest and sod upland soils are 495 ± 24, 610 ± 223, 810 ± 220, 51 ± 11 mg/kg of ovendry weight soil, respectively. Furthermore, the authors investigated the correlation between the content of manganese and absorption capacity, humus content, composition of exchange cations, pH and dry residue of soils under study. The results obtained demonstrate that specific soil horizons can be

  17. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Julie; West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Collatz, George; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate comprehensive bottom-up estimates of net carbon exchange for global and regional carbon monitoring. We estimated global agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual crop net primary production (NPP), harvested biomass, and consumption of biomass by humans and livestock. These estimates were combined for a single estimate of net carbon exchange (NCE) and spatially distributed to 0.05 degree resolution using MODIS satellite land cover data. Global crop NPP in 2011 was estimated at 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.05 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 was harvested and 0.54 Pg C yr-1 was collected from crop residues for livestock fodder. Total livestock feed intake in 2011 was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CO2, 0.07 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CH4, and 0.04 Pg C yr-1 was contained within milk and egg production. Livestock grazed an estimated 1.27 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, which constituted 52.4% of total feed intake. Global human food intake was 0.57 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, the majority of which is respired as CO2. Completed global cropland carbon budgets accounted for the ultimate use of ca. 80% of harvested biomass. The spatial distribution of these fluxes may be used for global carbon monitoring, estimation of regional uncertainty, and for use as input to Earth system models.

  18. Historical anthropogenic radiative forcing of changes in biogenic secondary aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta Navarro, Juan; D'Andrea, Stephen; Pierce, Jeffrey; Ekman, Annica; Struthers, Hamish; Zorita, Eduardo; Guenther, Alex; Arneth, Almut; Smolander, Sampo; Kaplan, Jed; Farina, Salvatore; Scott, Catherine; Rap, Alexandru; Farmer, Delphine; Spracklen, Domink; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Human activities have lead to changes in the energy balance of the Earth and the global climate. Changes in atmospheric aerosols are the second largest contributor to climate change after greenhouse gases since 1750 A.D. Land-use practices and other environmental drivers have caused changes in the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) well before 1750 A.D, possibly causing climate effects through aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions. Two numerical emission models LPJ-GUESS and MEGAN were used to quantify the changes in aerosol forming BVOC emissions in the past millennium. A chemical transport model of the atmosphere (GEOS-Chem-TOMAS) was driven with those BVOC emissions to quantify the effects on radiation caused by millennial changes in SOA. We found that global isoprene emissions decreased after 1800 A.D. by about 12% - 15%. This decrease was dominated by losses of natural vegetation, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions increased by about 2% - 10%, driven mostly by rising surface air temperatures. From 1000 A.D. to 1800 A.D, isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions decline by 3% - 8% driven by both, natural vegetation losses, and the moderate global cooling between the medieval climate anomaly and the little ice age. The millennial reduction in BVOC emissions lead to a 0.5% to 2% reduction in climatically relevant aerosol particles (> 80 nm) and cause a direct radiative forcing between +0.02 W/m² and +0.07 W/m², and an indirect radiative forcing between -0.02 W/m² and +0.02 W/m².

  19. Biosafety of the application of biogenic nanometal powders in husbandry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatolievna Nazarova, Anna; Dmitrievna Polischuk, Svetlana; Anatolievna Stepanova, Irina; Ivanovich Churilov, Gennady; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Buu Ngo, Quoc

    2014-03-01

    Effects of iron and copper nanopowders (particle size of 20-40 nm) were investigated on rabbits of 1 month age and heifers of 6 months. For introduction of nanometals into the animal's ration, the mixed fodder was treated with the nanometal powder suspension in such a way: 0.08 mg of nanoiron per kg of animal's body weight and 0.04 mg kg-1 for nanocopper. The weight gain of the heifers who received nanoiron and nanocopper after 8 months was 22.4 and 10.7% higher than that of the control, respectively. For the rabbits who received nano Fe and Cu after 3 months, the weight gain was 11.7 and 7.3% compared to the control, respectively. Under the action of metal nanopowders morphological indices of blood were changed in comparison with the control: after 8 months the quantity of erythrocytes increased by 19.6%, hemoglobin by 17.1% and leukocytes by 7.6%. There was a realignment in leukocytic formula: the quantity of lymphocytes increased by 9% compared to the control. Biogenic metals in superdispersive state were able to stimulate immune, enzymatic and humoral systems of the animal's organism, promoting metabolism. Adding Co and Cu metal nanopowders to the bull-calves’ fodder rations increased content of Ca by 31.8 and 0%, Fe by 38.8 and 37.5%, K by 19.2 and 15.3%, Mg by 17.6 and 23.5%, Mn by 9.8 and 45% and Na by 20.5 and 8.8%, respectively, compared to control. Metal nanopowders improved the quality indices and meat productivity of black-white bull-calves, expressed in intensive growth of muscle, tissue and more nutritious meat. The conducted veterinary-sanitary expertise showed that the supplements based on iron, cobalt and copper nanopowders can be used as safe bioactive supplements in animal husbandry.

  20. Biogenic Carbon on Mars: A Subsurface Chauvinistic Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, T. C.; Lau, C. Y. M.; Magnabosco, C.; Harris, R.; Chen, Y.; Slater, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Kieft, T. L.; van Heerden, E.; Borgonie, G.; Dong, H.

    2015-12-01

    A review of 150 publications on the subsurface microbiology of the continental subsurface provides ~1,400 measurements of cellular abundances down to 4,800 meter depth. These data suggest that the continental subsurface biomass is comprised of ~1016-17 grams of carbon, which is higher than the most recent estimates of ~1015 grams of carbon (1 Gt) for the marine deep biosphere. If life developed early in Martian history and Mars sustained an active hydrological cycle during its first 500 million years, then is it possible that Mars could have developed a subsurface biomass of comparable size to that of Earth? Such a biomass would comprise a much larger fraction of the total known Martian carbon budget than does the subsurface biomass on Earth. More importantly could a remnant of this subsurface biosphere survive to the present day? To determine how sustainable subsurface life could be in isolation from the surface we have been studying subsurface fracture fluids from the Precambrian Shields in South Africa and Canada. In these environments the energetically efficient and deeply rooted acetyl-CoA pathway for carbon fixation plays a central role for chemolithoautotrophic primary producers that form the base of the biomass pyramid. These primary producers appear to be sustained indefinitely by H2 generated through serpentinization and radiolytic reactions. Carbon isotope data suggest that in some subsurface locations a much larger population of secondary consumers are sustained by the primary production of biogenic CH4 from a much smaller population of methanogens. These inverted biomass and energy pyramids sustained by the cycling of CH4 could have been and could still be active on Mars. The C and H isotopic signatures of Martian CH4 remain key tools in identifying potential signatures of an extant Martian biosphere. Based upon our results to date cavity ring-down spectroscopic technologies provide an option for making these measurements on future rover missions.

  1. Biogenic silver nanoparticles: efficient and effective antifungal agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netala, Vasudeva Reddy; Kotakadi, Venkata Subbaiah; Domdi, Latha; Gaddam, Susmila Aparna; Bobbu, Pushpalatha; Venkata, Sucharitha K.; Ghosh, Sukhendu Bikash; Tartte, Vijaya

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by exploiting various plant materials is an emerging field and considered green nanotechnology as it involves simple, cost effective and ecofriendly procedure. In the present study AgNPs were successfully synthesized using aqueous callus extract of Gymnema sylvestre. The aqueous callus extract treated with 1nM silver nitrate solution resulted in the formation of AgNPs and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the formed AgNPs showed a peak at 437 nm in the UV Visible spectrum. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). FTIR spectra showed the peaks at 3333, 2928, 2361, 1600, 1357 and 1028 cm-1 which revealed the role of different functional groups possibly involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. TEM micrograph clearly revealed the size of the AgNPs to be in the range of 3-30 nm with spherical shape and poly-dispersed nature; it is further confirmed by Particle size analysis that the stability of AgNPs is due its high negative Zeta potential (-36.1 mV). XRD pattern revealed the crystal nature of the AgNPs by showing the braggs peaks corresponding to (111), (200), (220) and (311) planes of face-centered cubic crystal phase of silver. Selected area electron diffraction pattern showed diffraction rings and confirmed the crystalline nature of synthesized AgNPs. The synthesized AgNPs exhibited effective antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida nonalbicans and Candida tropicalis.

  2. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds & their photochemical transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhujun; Hohaus, Thorsten; Tillmann, Ralf; Andres, Stefanie; Kuhn, Uwe; Rohrer, Franz; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic activities emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) into the atmosphere. While it is known that land vegetation accounts for 90% of the global VOC emissions, only a few molecules' emission factors are understood. Through VOCs atmospheric oxidation intermediate products are formed. The detailed chemical mechanisms involved are insufficiently known to date and need to be understood for air quality management and climate change predictions. In an experiment using a PTR-ToF-MS with the new-built plant chamber SAPHIR-PLUS in Forschungszentrum Juelich, biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from Quercus ilex trees were measured. The BVOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes, minor emissions of isoprene and methanol were also observed with the overall emission pattern typical for Quercus ilex trees in the growing season. Monoterpenes and isoprene emissions showed to be triggered by light. Additionally, their emissions showed clear exponential temperature dependence under constant light condition as reported in literature. As a tracer for leaf growth, methanol emission showed an abrupt increase at the beginning of light exposure. This is explained as instantaneous release of methanol produced during the night once stomata of leaves open upon light exposure. Emission of methanol showed a near linear increase with temperature in the range of 10 to 35 °C. BVOC were transferred from the plant chamber PLUS to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR, where their oxidation products from O3 oxidation were measured with PTR-ToF-MS. Gas phase oxidation products such as acetone and acetaldehyde were detected. A quantitative analysis of the data will be presented, including comparison of observations to the Master Chemical Mechanism model.

  3. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  4. Manganese deficiency and toxicity: are high or low dietary amounts of manganese cause for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, J W; Davis, C D

    1999-01-01

    Manganese is an essential trace element that is required for the activity of several enzymes. Manganese is also quite toxic when ingested in large amounts, such as the inhalation of Mn-laden dust by miners. This review examines Mn intake by way of the food supply and poses the question: Is there reason to be concerned with Mn toxicity or deficiency in free-living populations in North America? Although much remains to be learned of the functions of Mn, at present there are only a few vaguely described cases of Mn deficiency in the medical literature. Given the heterogeneity of the North American food supply, it is difficult to see the possibility of more than greatly isolated and unique instances of Mn deficiency. However, low Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase activity may be associated with cancer susceptibility, and deserves further study. There may be reasons, however, to be concerned about Mn toxicity under some very specialized conditions. Increasing numbers of young people are adopting a vegetarian lifestyle which may greatly increase Mn intake. Iron deficiency may increase Mn absorption and further increase the body-burden of Mn, especially in vegetarians. Mn is eliminated primarily through the bile, and hepatic dysfunction could depress Mn excretion and further contribute to the body burden. Would such a combination of events predispose substantial numbers of people to chronic Mn toxicity? At present, there is no definite proof of this occurring, but given the state of knowledge at the present time, more studies with longer time-frames and more sensitive methods of analysis are needed. PMID:10475586

  5. Cavitation Erosion Corrosion Behaviour of Manganese-nickel -aluminum Bronze in Comparison with Manganese-brass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Yu; Yugui Zheng; Zhiming Yao

    2009-01-01

    The cavitation erosion corrosion behaviour of ZQMn 12-8-3-2 manganese-nickel-aluminum bronze and ZHMn55-3-1 manganese-brass was investigated by mass loss, electrochemical measurements (polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and the cavitation damaged surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that ZQMn 12-8-3-2 had better cavitation erosion resistance than ZHMn55-3-l. After the cavitation erosion for 6 h, the cumulative mass loss of ZQMnl2-8-3-2 was about 1/3 that of ZHMn55-3-l. The corrosion current density of ZQMnl2-8-3-2 was less than that of ZHMn55-3-l under both static and cavitaiton condition. The free-corrosion potentials of ZQMnl2-8-3-2 and ZHMn55-3-l were all shifted in positive direction under cavitation condition compared to static condition. In the total cu-mulative mass loss under cavitation condition, the pure erosion played a key role for the two tested materials (74% for ZHMn55-3-l and 60% for ZQMnl2-8-3-2), and the total synergism between corrosion and erosion of ZQMnl2-8-3-2 (39%) was larger than that of ZHMn55-3-l (23%). The high cavitation erosion resistance of ZQMnl2-8-3-2 was mainly attributed to its lower stacking fault energy (SFE), the higher microhardness and work-hardening ability as well as the favorable propagation of cavitation cracks for ZQMn 12-8-3-2, i.e., parallel to the surface rather than perpendicular to the surface for ZHMn55-3-l.

  6. Manganese removal from mine waters - investigating the occurrence and importance of manganese carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese is a common contaminant of mine water and other waste waters. Due to its high solubility over a wide pH range, it is notoriously difficult to remove from contaminated waters. Previous systems that effectively remove Mn from mine waters have involved oxidising the soluble Mn(II) species at an elevated pH using substrates such as limestone and dolomites. However it is currently unclear what effect the substrate type has upon abiotic Mn removal compared to biotic removal by in situ micro-organisms (biofilms). In order to investigate the relationship between substrate type, Mn precipitation and the biofilm community, net-alkaline Mn-contaminated mine water was treated in reactors containing one of the pure materials: dolomite, limestone, magnesite and quartzite. Mine water chemistry and Mn removal rates were monitored over a 3-month period in continuous-flow reactors. For all substrates except quartzite, Mn was removed from the mine water during this period, and Mn minerals precipitated in all cases. In addition, the plastic from which the reactor was made played a role in Mn removal. Manganese oxyhydroxides were formed in all the reactors; however, Mn carbonates (specifically kutnahorite) were only identified in the reactors containing quartzite and on the reactor plastic. Magnesium-rich calcites were identified in the dolomite and magnesite reactors, suggesting that the Mg from the substrate minerals may have inhibited Mn carbonate formation. Biofilm community development and composition on all the substrates was also monitored over the 3-month period using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DGGE profiles in all reactors showed no change with time and no difference between substrate types, suggesting that any microbiological effects are independent of mineral substrate. The identification of Mn carbonates in these systems has important implications for the design of Mn treatment systems in that the provision of a carbonate-rich substrate

  7. Temperature-dependent accumulation mode particle and cloud nuclei concentrations from biogenic sources during WACS 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ahlm

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Submicron aerosol particles collected simultaneously at the mountain peak (2182 m a.s.l. and at a forested mid-mountain site (1300 m a.s.l. on Whistler Mountain, British Columbia, Canada, during June and July 2010 were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy for quantification of organic functional groups. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to the FTIR spectra. Three PMF factors associated with (1 combustion, (2 biogenics, and (3 vegetative detritus, were identified at both sites. The biogenic factor was correlated with both temperature and several volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The combustion factor dominated the submicron particle mass during the beginning of the campaign when the temperature was lower and advection was from the Vancouver area, but as the temperature started to rise in early July the biogenic factor came to dominate as a result of increased emissions of biogenic VOCs and thereby increased formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. On average, the biogenic factor represented 69% and 49% of the submicron organic particle mass at Whistler Peak and at the mid-mountain site, respectively. The lower fraction at the mid-mountain site was a result of more vegetative detritus there, and also higher influence from local combustion sources.

    The biogenic factor was strongly correlated (r ~ 0.9 to number concentration of particles with diameter (Dp> 100 nm, whereas the combustion factor was better correlated to number concentration of particles with Dp < 100 nm (r~ 0.4. The number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN was correlated (r ~ 0.7 to the biogenic factor for supersaturations (S of 0.2% or higher, which indicates that particle condensational growth from biogenic vapors was an important factor in controlling the CCN concentration for clouds where S≥0.2%. Both the number concentration of particles with

  8. Temperature-dependent accumulation mode particle and cloud nuclei concentrations from biogenic sources during WACS 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ahlm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Submicron aerosol particles collected simultaneously at the mountain peak (2182 m a.s.l. and at a forested mid-mountain site (1300 m a.s.l. on Whistler Mountain, British Columbia, Canada, during June and July 2010 were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy for quantification of organic functional groups. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to the FTIR spectra. Three PMF factors associated with (1 combustion, (2 biogenics, and (3 vegetative detritus were identified at both sites. The biogenic factor was correlated with both temperature and several volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The combustion factor dominated the submicron particle mass during the beginning of the campaign, when the temperature was lower and advection was from the Vancouver area, but as the temperature started to rise in early July, the biogenic factor came to dominate as a result of increased emissions of biogenic VOCs, and thereby increased formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. On average, the biogenic factor represented 69% and 49% of the submicron organic particle mass at Whistler Peak and at the mid-mountain site, respectively. The lower fraction at the mid-mountain site was a result of more vegetative detritus there, and also higher influence from local combustion sources. The biogenic factor was strongly correlated (r~0.9 to number concentration of particles with diameter (Dp> 100 nm, whereas the combustion factor was better correlated to number concentration of particles with Dpr~0.4. The number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN was correlated (r~0.7 to the biogenic factor for supersaturations (S of 0.2% or higher, which indicates that particle condensational growth from biogenic vapors was an important factor in controlling the CCN concentration for clouds where S≥0.2%. Both the number concentration of particles with Dp>100 nm and numbers of CCN for S≥0.2% were correlated to temperature. Considering the biogenic

  9. Down-Regulation of a Manganese Transporter in the Face of Metal Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Laran T.; Carroll, Mark C.; Hall, Matthew D.; Harvey, Christopher J.; Beese, Sara E.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast Smf1p Nramp manganese transporter is posttranslationally regulated by environmental manganese. Smf1p is stabilized at the cell surface with manganese starvation, but is largely degraded in the vacuole with physiological manganese through a mechanism involving the Rsp5p adaptor complex Bsd2p/Tre1p/Tre2p. We now describe an additional level of Smf1p regulation that occurs with toxicity from manganese, but not other essential metals. This regulation is largely Smf1p-specific. As with p...

  10. Pathophysiology of Manganese-Associated Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Brad A.; Aschner, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Dydak, Ulrike; Criswell, Susan R.; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Conference Summary Manganese (Mn) is a well established neurotoxin associated with specific damage to the basal ganglia in humans. The phenotype associated with Mn neurotoxicity was first described in two workers with occupational exposure to Mn oxide.(Couper, 1837) Although the description did not use modern clinical terminology, a parkinsonian illness characterized by slowness of movement (bradykinesia), masked facies, and gait impairment (postural instability) appears to have predominated. Nearly 100 years later an outbreak of an atypical parkinsonian illness in a Chilean Mn mine provided a phenotypic description of a fulminant neurologic disorder with parkinsonism, dystonia, and neuropsychiatric symptoms.(Rodier J, 1955) Exposures associated with this syndrome were massive and an order of magnitude greater than modern exposures.(Rodier J, 1955; Hobson et al., 2011) The clinical syndrome associated with Mn neurotoxicity has been called manganism. Modern exposures to Mn occur primarily through occupations in the steel industry and welding. These exposures are often chronic and varied, occurring over decades in the healthy workforce. Although the severe neurologic disorder described by Rodier and Couper are no longer seen, several reports have suggested a possible increased risk of neurotoxicity in these workers.(Racette et al., 2005b; Bowler et al., 2007; Harris et al., 2011) Based upon limited prior imaging and pathologic investigations into the pathophysiology of neurotoxicity in Mn exposed workers,(Huang et al., 2003) many investigators have concluded that the syndrome spares the dopamine system distinguishing manganism from Parkinson disease (PD), the most common cause of parkinsonism in the general population, and a disease with characteristic degenerative changes in the dopaminergic system.(Jankovic, 2005) The purpose of this symposium was to highlight recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of Mn associated neurotoxicity from C. elegans

  11. Characterization of Highly Oxidized Molecules in Fresh and Aged Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Peijun; Hall, Wiley A; Johnston, Murray V

    2016-04-19

    In this work, highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOMs) in fresh and aged secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from biogenic precursors are characterized with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Fresh SOA was generated by mixing ozone with a biogenic precursor (β-pinene, limonene, α-pinene) in a flow tube reactor. Aging was performed by passing the fresh SOA through a photochemical reactor where it reacted with hydroxyl radicals. Although these aerosols were as a whole not highly oxidized, molecular analysis identified a significant number of HOMs embedded within it. HOMs in fresh SOA consisted mostly of monomers and dimers, which is consistent with condensation of extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs) that have been detected in the gas phase in previous studies and linked to SOA particle formation. Aging caused an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of the HOMs, which is consistent with particle phase oxidation of (less oxidized) oligomers already existing in fresh SOA. HOMs having different combinations of oxygen-to-carbon ratio, hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and average carbon oxidation state are discussed and compared to low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA), which has been identified in ambient aerosol based on average elemental composition but not fully understood at a molecular level. For the biogenic precursors and experimental conditions studied, HOMs in fresh biogenic SOA have molecular formulas more closely resembling LVOOA than HOMs in aged SOA, suggesting that aging of biogenic SOA is not a good surrogate for ambient LVOOA. PMID:27000653

  12. Evolution of cyclonic eddies and biogenic fluxes in the northern Bay of Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nuncio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Bay of Bengal has been traditionally known for its low primary productivity and varied reasons were attributed to it. The data analysis from the sediment traps deployed in the northern Bay of Bengal during the 5 yr from 1994 show episodic events of enhanced downward biogenic flux every year which was not related to monsoon-driven seasonal cycle. Satellite-derived sea level anomaly suggests that the episodic increase in the biogenic flux was associated with the presence of cyclonic eddies in the sediment trap location. Cyclonic eddy-induced down ward biogenic flux in the sediment trap location was larger than the amplitude, ∼40 mg m−2 d−1, of the seasonal cycle. The magnitude of the peak episodic fluxes were one-and-half to two-and-half times the annual mean flux, while the anomaly of peak episodic fluxes was at least equal to or greater than the magnitude of the seasonal flux value. Cyclonic eddies responsible for high biogenic flux during 1994 and 1996 were formed in the northern Bay of Bengal during February–March of respective years due to the interaction of northward flowing western boundary current and coastally trapped Kelvin wave. In contrast, cyclonic eddies during 1997 and 1998 were formed from the breaking of westward propagating Rossby waves. The sediment trap data provided the observational evidence that eddy-induced biological productivity is an important mechanism in the Bay of Bengal that contributes significantly to the mid-depth biogenic flux.

  13. Cocaine affects foraging behaviour and biogenic amine modulated behavioural reflexes in honey bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Søvik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In humans and other mammals, drugs of abuse alter the function of biogenic amine pathways in the brain leading to the subjective experience of reward and euphoria. Biogenic amine pathways are involved in reward processing across diverse animal phyla, however whether cocaine acts on these neurochemical pathways to cause similar rewarding behavioural effects in animal phyla other than mammals is unclear. Previously, it has been shown that bees are more likely to dance (a signal of perceived reward when returning from a sucrose feeder after cocaine treatment. Here we examined more broadly whether cocaine altered reward-related behaviour, and biogenic amine modulated behavioural responses in bees. Bees developed a preference for locations at which they received cocaine, and when foraging at low quality sucrose feeders increase their foraging rate in response to cocaine treatment. Cocaine also increased reflexive proboscis extension to sucrose, and sting extension to electric shock. Both of these simple reflexes are modulated by biogenic amines. This shows that systemic cocaine treatment alters behavioural responses that are modulated by biogenic amines in insects. Since insect reward responses involve both octopamine and dopamine signalling, we conclude that cocaine treatment altered diverse reward-related aspects of behaviour in bees. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the ecology of cocaine as a plant defence compound. Our findings further validate the honey bee as a model system for understanding the behavioural impacts of cocaine, and potentially other drugs of abuse.

  14. Managing your wine fermentation to reduce the risk of biogenic amine formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Yolandi Smit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines are nitrogenous organic compounds produced in wine from amino acid precursors mainly by microbial decarboxylation. The concentration of biogenic amines that can potentially be produced is dependent on the amount of amino acid precursors in the medium, the presence of decarboxylase positive microorganisms and conditions that enable microbial or biochemical activity such as the addition of nutrients to support the alcoholic and malolactic fermentation (MLF inoculated starter cultures. MLF can be conducted using co-inoculation or inoculated after the completion of alcoholic fermentation (AF that may also affect the level of biogenic amine in the wine. This study focussed on the impact the addition of complex commercial yeast and bacterial nutrients and the use of different MLF inoculation scenarios could have on the production of biogenic amine in the wine. Results obtained with wine showed that in this study the amine that was influenced by nutrient addition was histamine. In the synthetic winemaking using 12 different treatments no clear tendencies were observed. It was shown that in certain conditions co-inoculation could reduce the amount of biogenic amines produced.

  15. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods. PMID:25029555

  16. Characterization of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using statistical methods; Charakterisierung Biogener Sekundaerer Organischer Aerosole mit Statistischen Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have important influence on the radiation balance of the Earth, on visibility and human health. Secondary organic aerosol is formed from gas-to-particle conversion of oxidized volatile organic compounds. A dominant fraction of the gases originates from plant emissions, making biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) an especially important constituent of the atmosphere. Knowing the chemical composition of BSOA particles is crucial for a thorough understanding of aerosol processes in the environment. In this work, the chemical composition of BSOA particles was measured with aerosol mass spectrometry and analyzed with statistical methods. The experimental part of the work comprises process studies of the formation and aging of biogenic aerosols in simulation chambers. Using a plant chamber, real tree emissions were used to produce particles in a way close to conditions in forest environments. In the outdoor chamber SAPHIR, OH-radicals were produced from the photooxidation of ozone under illumination with natural sunlight. Here, BSOA was produced from defined mixtures of mono- and sesquiterpenes that represent boreal forest emissions. A third kind of experiments was performed in the indoor chamber AIDA. Here, particles were produced from ozonolysis of single monoterpenes and aged by condensing OH-oxidation products. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to measure the chemical composition of the particles. One of the instruments is equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer providing unit mass resolution. The second instrument contains a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and provides mass resolution sufficient to distinguish different fragments with the same nominal mass. Aerosol mass spectra obtained with these instruments are strongly fragmented due to electron impact ionization of the evaporated molecules. In addition, typical BSOA mass spectra are very similar to each other. In order to get a more detailed knowledge about the mass

  17. Reductive leaching of low-grade manganese ore with pre-processed cornstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ai-fei; Wu, Meng-ni; Liu, Peng-wei; Feng, Ya-li; Li, Hao-ran

    2015-12-01

    Cornstalk is usually directly used as a reductant in reductive leaching manganese. However, low utilization of cornstalk makes low manganese dissolution ratio. In the research, pretreatment for cornstalk was proposed to improve manganese dissolution ratio. Cornstalk was preprocessed by a heated sulfuric acid solution (1.2 M of sulfuric acid concentration) for 10 min at 80°C. Thereafter, both the pretreated solution and the residue were used as a reductant for manganese leaching. This method not only exhibited superior activity for hydrolyzing cornstalk but also enhanced manganese dissolution. These effects were attributed to an increase in the amount of reductive sugars resulting from lignin hydrolysis. Through acid pretreatment for cornstalk, the manganese dissolution ratio was improved from 50.14% to 83.46%. The present work demonstrates for the first time the effective acid pretreatment of cornstalk to provide a cost-effective reductant for manganese leaching.

  18. Reductive leaching of low-grade manganese ore with pre-processed cornstalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-fei Yi; Meng-ni Wu; Peng-wei Liu; Ya-li Feng; Hao-ran Li

    2015-01-01

    Cornstalk is usually directly used as a reductant in reductive leaching manganese. However, low utilization of cornstalk makes low manganese dissolution ratio. In the research, pretreatment for cornstalk was proposed to improve manganese dissolution ratio. Cornstalk was preprocessed by a heated sulfuric acid solution (1.2 M of sulfuric acid concentration) for 10 min at 80°C. Thereafter, both the pretreated solu-tion and the residue were used as a reductant for manganese leaching. This method not only exhibited superior activity for hydrolyzing corn-stalk but also enhanced manganese dissolution. These effects were attributed to an increase in the amount of reductive sugars resulting from lignin hydrolysis. Through acid pretreatment for cornstalk, the manganese dissolution ratio was improved from 50.14%to 83.46%. The pre-sent work demonstrates for the first time the effective acid pretreatment of cornstalk to provide a cost-effective reductant for manganese leaching.

  19. Selective Synthesis of Manganese/Silicon Complexes in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of manganese salts (Mn(NO32, MnCl2, MnSO4, and Mn(Ac2 and silicon materials (silica sand, silica sol, and tetraethyl orthosilicate were used to synthesize Mn/Si complexes in supercritical water using a tube reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were employed to characterize the structure and morphology of the solid products. It was found that MnO2, Mn2O3, and Mn2SiO4 could be obtained in supercritical water at 673 K in 5 minutes. The roles of both anions of manganese salts and silicon species in the formation of manganese silicon complexes were discussed. The inorganic manganese salt with the oxyacid radical could be easily decomposed to produce MnO2/SiO2 and Mn2O3/SiO2. It is interesting to found that Mn(Ac2 can react with various types of silicon to produce Mn2SiO4. The hydroxyl groups of the SiO2 surface from different silicon sources enhance the reactivity of SiO2.

  20. Paramagnetic defects in manganese-doped lead tungstate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asatryan, G.R.; Nikl, Martin; Vazhenin, V.A.; Potapov, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2013), s. 116-122. ISSN 1063-7834 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : PbWO 4 * electron paramagnetic resonance * manganese Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.782, year: 2013

  1. Plastic deformation wear in modified medium manganese steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUAN Hai-lun

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A medium manganese steel with high wear-resistance, strength and toughness has been produced with addition of a complex modifier (or refining agent containing Nb, N, RE and Si-Ca. The results showed that the wear resistance, strength and toughness of the modified medium manganese steel are respectively 1.92 times, 1.45 times and 3.63 times as high as that of the referenced unmodified medium manganese steel. The plastic deformation characteristic involved in the wear mechanism of the modified medium manganese steel was investigated by means of plastic-elasticity calculation and TEM electro-microscopy. The relationship between wear resistance and yield strength of the steel was established. Since the wear volume W is proportional to the square of the loading and to the numbers of the abrasives, and inversely proportional to the square of the yield strength of the materials, the wear resistance can be substantially improved by the enhancement of yield strength of the materials. The calculation results generally agreed with the experimental results.

  2. Cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcoholic patients have been known to have brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction. However, recent studies have reported bilateral signal hyperintensities of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in liver failure, findings that are typically associated with manganese intoxication. The present study compared brain atrophy on T1-weighted MRI, signal intensity ratios of the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MRI, whole blood manganese levels, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) IQ parameters between alcoholics with and without liver cirrhosis, to investigate cognitive dysfunction, MRI findings and manganese levels in alcoholics. Pallidal hyperintensity was visually identified in 80% of alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. In addition, a significant correlation was seen between pallidal signal intensity (P.S.I.) ratio and blood manganese level. However, no significant correlations were found between pallidal signal intensity ratio and any of the WAIS-R parameters. These findings suggest that no direct connection exists between cognitive dysfunction and pallidal hyperintensity in alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis. We confirmed that brain MRI in alcoholics could detect pallidal signal hyperintensity, suggesting severe liver dysfunction. In addition to diagnosis, brain MRI is useful for therapeutic psychoeducation to alcoholic patients with liver cirrhosis, visualizing the severe liver dysfunction. (author)

  3. Ratio of the hydrogen and manganese cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the results of measurements of hydrogen to manganese cross section ratios are tabulated using weighted fits to the experimental data. Comparison of results using volumetric, gravimetric, and densimetric concentration measurements with and without contaminant corrections indicates that the methods are capable of equal accuracy

  4. Neutron activation analysis of manganese in human hair and serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective and method of manganese determination in human hair and serum in toxicology are presented considering the occupational exposure of welders. The results are discussed in detail with regard to the frequency distribution and to the reliability of identification of welders and non-welders. (author)

  5. Manganese oxidation by bacterial isolates from the Indian Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Krishnan, K.P.; Khedekar, V.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    . Two representative strains CR35 and CR48 (CR-Carlsberg Ridge) isolated on manganese-supplemented media were tested for their ability to tolerate a range of Mn amendments from 1 nM to 100 mM in terms of growth and respiration. CR35 represents 66%of...

  6. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Bastida, C. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Paseo Colón y Tollocan s/n, C.P. 50000, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Martínez-Miranda, V.; Vázquez-Mejía, G. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Solache-Ríos, M., E-mail: marcos.solache@inin.gob.mx [Departamento de Química, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Col. Escandón, Delegación Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 México, D.F. (Mexico); Fonseca-Montes de Oca, G. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca, Km. 14.5, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Trujillo-Flores, E. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Cerro de Coatepec s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 50130, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems. - Highlights: ► Corrosion of distribution systems affects the quality of drinking water. ► Corrosion in water distribution systems is related to acidity and carbon dioxide. ► Pipes are corroded and manganese is deposited on pipes and dissolved in water. ► The deterioration of the pipes and the corrosion products were determined. ► Nitrate ions increase the acidity of water in the wells.

  7. Uranium in Pacific Deep-Sea Sediments and Manganese Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Pluger, W. L.; Friedrich, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A total of 1344 manganese nodules and 187 pelagic sediments from 9 areas in the North and the South Pacific were analyzed for U by the delayed-neutron counting technique. A strong positive correlation between U and Fe in nodules and sediments suggests a co-precipitative removal from sea water int...

  8. Neutron activation analysis: nuclear interference from iron in manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, the contribution of iron was verified in the analysis of manganese through the reaction of interference by fast neutron. The irradiation of the samples was accomplished in the channel IC-40 of the rotary rack of the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 research reactor, located at Nuclear Technology Development Centre/Brazilian Commission for Nuclear Energy, CDTN/CNEN. In this irradiation device, the average thermal neutron flux is 6.69 x 1011 neutron cm-2 s-1 and fast neutron flux is 7.37 x 1010 neutron cm-2 s-1. Manganese was determined through 56Mn induced by thermal neutron flux according to the reaction 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn. In the analysis of manganese, the contribution of iron was investigated according to the reaction of interference 56Fe(n, p)56Mn produced by the fast neutron. It was verified that the contribution of 1 g of iron is 20 μg of manganese. (author)

  9. Preparation of manganese perovskite magnetic nanoparticles and their mechanical treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědourková, T.; Veverka, Miroslav; Veverka, Pavel; Zelenka, J.; Svoboda, L.

    Dresden: Technische Universität, 2014. s. 69-69. [International Conference on the Scientific and Clinical Applications of Magnetic Carriers /10./. 10.06.2014-14.06.2014, Dresden] R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI3/521 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : manganese perovskite * magnetic nanoparticles * mechanical treatment Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. The corrosive nature of manganese in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion problems having to do with drinking water distribution systems are related to many processes and factors and two of them are ionic acidity and carbon dioxide, which were considered in this work. The corrosion character of water is determined by the corrosion indexes of Langelier, Ryznar, Larson, and Mojmir. The results show that pipes made of different materials, such as plastics or metals, are affected by corrosion, causing manganese to be deposited on materials and dissolved in water. The deterioration of the materials, the degree of corrosion, and the deposited corrosion products were determined by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. High levels of manganese and nitrate ions in water may cause serious damage to the health of consumers of water. Three wells were examined, one of them presented a high content of manganese; the others had high levels of nitrate ions, which increased the acidity of the water and, therefore, the amount of corrosion of the materials in the distribution systems. - Highlights: ► Corrosion of distribution systems affects the quality of drinking water. ► Corrosion in water distribution systems is related to acidity and carbon dioxide. ► Pipes are corroded and manganese is deposited on pipes and dissolved in water. ► The deterioration of the pipes and the corrosion products were determined. ► Nitrate ions increase the acidity of water in the wells

  11. Manganese Biogeochemistry in a Central Czech Republic Catchment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Shanley, J. B.; Krám, P.; Mihaljevič, M.; Drahota, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 186, 1-4 (2007), s. 149-165. ISSN 0049-6979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/0060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : manganese * catchment * weathering * biogeochemistry * biotite weathering * forest ecosystem * mass balance Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2007

  12. Discovery of Chromium, Manganese, Nickel, and Copper Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Garofali, K.; Robinson, R; Thoennessen, M

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-seven chromium, twenty-five manganese, thirty-one nickel and twenty-six copper isotopes have so far been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  13. Elements of the iron and manganese cycles in Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granina, L.Z.; Callender, E.

    2007-01-01

    Using data obtained in recent years, we considered the external mass balance and characteristics of internal iron and manganese cycles in Lake Baikal (biological uptake, remineralization, sedimentary and diffusive fluxes, accumulation in sediments, time of renewal, etc.). Some previous results and common concepts were critically reevaluated. ?? Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2007.

  14. Manganese uptake and its redistribution in sugar cane settlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation was conducted to study manganese uptake and partitioning after 2 hr of feeding and its redistribution in settlings after 30 days of growth in two cultivars of sugar cane which differed in their yield, maturity and nutritional and physiological characteristics. (author). 6 refs

  15. CORM-EDE1: A Highly Water-Soluble and Nontoxic Manganese-Based photoCORM with a Biogenic Ligand Sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mede, Ralf; Klein, Moritz; Claus, Ralf A; Krieck, Sven; Quickert, Stefanie; Görls, Helmar; Neugebauer, Ute; Schmitt, Michael; Gessner, Guido; Heinemann, Stefan H; Popp, Jürgen; Bauer, Michael; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    [Mn(CO)5Br] reacts with cysteamine and 4-amino-thiophenyl with a ratio of 2:3 in refluxing tetrahydrofuran to the complexes of the type [{(OC)3Mn}2(μ-SCH2CH2NH3)3]Br2 (1, CORM-EDE1) and [{(OC)3Mn}2(μ-SC6H4-4-NH3)3]Br2 (2, CORM-EDE2). Compound 2 precipitates during refluxing of the tetrahydrofuran solution as a yellow solid whereas 1 forms a red oil that slowly solidifies. Recrystallization of 2 from water yields the HBr-free complex [{(OC)3Mn}2(μ-S-C6H4-4-NH2)2(μ-SC6H4-4-NH3)] (3). The n-propylthiolate ligand (which is isoelectronic to the bridging thiolate of 1) leads to the formation of the di- and tetranuclear complexes [(OC)4Mn(μ-S-nPr)2]2 and [(OC)3Mn(μ-S-nPr)]4. CORM-EDE1 possesses ideal properties to administer carbon monoxide to biological and medicinal tissues upon irradiation (photoCORM). Isolated crystalline CORM-EDE1 can be handled at ambient and aerobic conditions. This complex is nontoxic, highly soluble in water, and indefinitely stable therein in the absence of air and phosphate buffer. CORM-EDE1 is stable as frozen stock in aqueous solution without any limitations, and these stock solutions maintain their CO release properties. The reducing dithionite does not interact with CORM-EDE1, and therefore, the myoglobin assay represents a valuable tool to study the release kinetics of this photoCORM. After CO liberation, the formation of MnHPO4 in aqueous buffer solution can be verified. PMID:26672620

  16. Manganese Accumulates within Golgi Apparatus in Dopaminergic Cells as Revealed by Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Nanoimaging

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona, Asuncion; Devès, Guillaume; Roudeau, Stéphane; Cloetens, Peter; Bohic, Sylvain; Ortega, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese results in neurological symptoms referred to as manganism and is identified as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease. In vitro, manganese induces cell death in the dopaminergic cells, but the mechanisms of manganese cytotoxicity are still unexplained. In particular, the subcellular distribution of manganese and its interaction with other trace elements needed to be assessed. Applying synchrotron X-ray fluorescence nanoimaging, we found that manganese was located ...

  17. Improved dewatering of CEPT sludge by biogenic flocculant from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jonathan W C; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Yu, Shuk Man; Kurade, Mayur B; Selvam, Ammaiyappan

    2016-01-01

    Bioleaching using an iron-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, and its biogenic flocculants was evaluated to improve the dewaterability of chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) sewage sludge. CEPT sludge in flasks was inoculated with A. ferrooxidans culture, medium-free cells and the cell-free culture filtrate with and without the energy substance Fe(2+), and periodically the sludge samples were analysed for the dewaterability. This investigation proves that bioleaching effectively improved the sludge dewaterability as evidenced from drastic reduction in capillary suction time (≤20 seconds) and specific resistance to filtration (≥90%); however, it requires an adaptability period of 1-2 days. On the other hand, the biogenic flocculant produced by A. ferrooxidans greatly decreased the time-to-filtration and facilitated the dewaterability within 4 h. Results indicate that rapid dewatering of CEPT sludge by biogenic flocculants provides an opportunity to replace the synthetic organic polymer for dewatering. PMID:26901727

  18. Biogenic carbon in combustible waste: Waste composition, variability and measurement uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Fuglsang, Karsten; Pedersen, Niels H.;

    2013-01-01

    described in the literature. This study addressed the variability of biogenic and fossil carbon in combustible waste received at a municipal solid waste incinerator. Two approaches were compared: (1) radiocarbon dating (14C analysis) of carbon dioxide sampled from the flue gas, and (2) mass and energy......Obtaining accurate data for the contents of biogenic and fossil carbon in thermally-treated waste is essential for determination of the environmental profile of waste technologies. Relations between the variability of waste chemistry and the biogenic and fossil carbon emissions are not well...... balance calculations using the balance method. The ability of the two approaches to accurately describe short-term day-to-day variations in carbon emissions, and to which extent these short-term variations could be explained by controlled changes in waste input composition, was evaluated. Finally, the...

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on the activity of some microorganisms producing biogenic amines in some foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the proximate chemical composition ( moisture content , protein , fat, ash) chemical freshness tests (TBA, TVB-N, TMA, FAN, ph) and microbiological changes (total bacterial count, proteolytic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, moulds and yeasts counts) occurred in sardine fish and pastirma during cold storage at (4 ± 1 degree C) were fully investigated. Furthermore, the bacterial activity causing the formation of biogenic amines were also studied. In addition, the determination of biogenic amines in sardine fish and pastirma produced by these bacteria were explored. The effects of irradiation doses (1, 3 and 5 kGy) which were applied as a trial to reduce biogenic amines formation in sardine fish and pastirma were also investigated. In addition, the effect of the tested irradiation doses (1, 3 and 5 kGy) on organoleptic properties of the treated sardine fish and pastirma were determined.

  20. Simultaneous determination of selected biogenic amines in alcoholic beverage samples by isotachophoretic and chromatographic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska, Aneta; Piasta, Anna; Szłyk, Edward

    2014-01-01

    A simple and useful method for the determination of biogenic amines in beverage samples based on isotachophoretic separation is described. The proposed procedure permitted simultaneous analysis of histamine, tyramine, cadaverine, putrescine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine and spermidine. The data presented demonstrate the utility, simplicity, flexibility, sensitivity and environmentally friendly character of the proposed method. The precision of the method expressed as coefficient of variations varied from 0.1% to 5.9% for beverage samples, whereas recoveries varied from 91% to 101%. The results for the determination of biogenic amines were compared with an HPLC procedure based on a pre-column derivatisation reaction of biogenic amines with dansyl chloride. Furthermore, the derivatisation procedure was optimised by verification of concentration and pH of the buffer, the addition of organic solvents, reaction time and temperature. PMID:24350674

  1. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefczak, A.; Leszczyński, B.; Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency.

  2. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  3. Triple oxygen isotopes in biogenic and sedimentary carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Hu, Huanting; Ji, Haoyuan; Montanari, Shaena; Li, Shuning; Henkes, Gregory A.; Levin, Naomi E.

    2014-09-01

    The 17O anomaly (Δ17O) of natural waters has been shown to be sensitive to evaporation in a way analogous to deuterium excess, with evaporated bodies of water (e.g., leaf waters, lake waters, animal body waters) tending to have lower Δ17O than primary meteoric waters. In animal body water, Δ17O relates to the intake of evaporated waters, evaporative effluxes of water, and the Δ17O value of atmospheric O2, which itself carries signatures of global carbon cycling and photochemical reactions in the stratosphere. Carbonates have the potential to record the triple oxygen isotope compositions of parent waters, allowing reconstruction of past water compositions, but such investigations have awaited development of methods for high-precision measurement of Δ17O of carbonate. We describe optimized methods based on a sequential acid digestion/reduction/fluorination approach that yield Δ17O data with the high precision (∼0.010‰, 1σ) needed to resolve subtle environmental signals. We report the first high-precision Δ17O dataset for terrestrial carbonates, focusing on vertebrate biogenic carbonates and soil carbonates, but also including marine invertebrates and high-temperature carbonates. We determine apparent three-isotope fractionation factors between the O2 analyte derived from carbonate and the parent waters of the carbonate. These in combination with appropriate temperature estimates (from clumped isotope thermometry, or known or estimated body temperatures) are used to calculate the δ18O and Δ17O of parent waters. The clearest pattern to emerge is the strong 17O-depletion in avian, dinosaurian, and mammalian body water (from analyses of eggshell and tooth enamel) relative to meteoric waters, following expected influences of evaporated water (e.g., leaf water) and atmospheric O2 on vertebrate body water. Parent waters of the soil carbonates studied here have Δ17O values that are similar to or slightly lower than global precipitation. Our results suggest

  4. Ferromagnetic order in silicon-manganese alloys with phase separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phenomenological model of high-temperature ferromagnetism in silicon-manganese alloys has been proposed taking into account phase separation in these alloys, where manganese-rich particles of the secondary phase (precipitate MnSi2−z with z ≈ 0.25–0.30) are formed inside a manganese-depleted matrix of almost pure silicon. Precipitate MnSi2−z is considered as the silicide MnSi1.7 containing a certain number of magnetic defects whose origin is due to the presence of weakly hybridized 3d orbitals of manganese. The silicide MnSi1.7 is a weak band ferromagnet in which strong fluctuations of the spin density (paramagnons) are present at a temperature much higher than its Curie temperature. It has been shown that the ferromagnetic exchange interactions between the magnetic moments of defects in precipitate exists due to thermal excitations of the spin density and the ferromagnetic order can appear at a temperature much higher than the Curie temperature of the silicide. The spatial structures and characteristics of this order have been described in the framework of the proposed approach for both homogeneous bulk precipitate and precipitate particles of various shapes and sizes. The short-range magnetic order near the bulk phase transition has been analyzed taking into account inhomogeneities in the distribution of magnetic defects in precipitate. The experimental data on the magnetic properties of silicon-manganese alloys have been interpreted in terms of the theoretical results obtained in this work.

  5. Insights into Methane Formation Temperatures, Biogenic Methanogenesis, and Natural Methane Emissions from Clumped Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Dallimore, S.; Paull, C. K.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Winterdahl, M.; Smith, D. A.; Luhmann, A. J.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Eiler, J. M.; Ponton, C.; Sessions, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiply substituted isotopologues of methane are a valuable new tool for characterizing and understanding the source of methane in different Earth environments. Here we present methane clumped isotope results from natural gas wells, hydrothermal vents, marine and lacustrine methane seeps, and culture experiments. We observe a wide range of formation temperatures for thermogenic methane. Methane samples from low-maturity reservoirs indicate formation temperatures between 102-144° C, high-maturity conventional and shale gasses indicate temperatures between 158-246 °C, and thermogenic coal gases indicate temperatures between 174-267 °C. Methane formation temperatures generally correlate positively with δ13C, and negatively with gas wetness indices. Methane samples from a set of marine hydrothermal vents indicate a formation temperature of 290-350 °C. Methane sampled from subsurface and marine biogenic sources typically indicate temperatures consistent with the formation environment (0-64° C). In contrast, freshwater biogenic methane samples, and cultures of hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens, express low levels of isotopic clumping inconsistent with their formation temperature. These data and complementary models suggest that kinetic isotope effects, likely modulated by rates and pathways of methanogenesis, affect biogenic methane in cultures and freshwater environments. Alternatively, non-equilibrium signatures may result from mixing of methane with widely differing δD and δ13C values. Analyses of biogenic methane emissions from lakes indicate a correlation between methane flux and non-equilibrium clumped isotope fractionations in a given lake. Results from large methane seeps in Alaskan lakes confirm that some seeps emit thermogenic methane, but also indicate that other seeps emit subsurface biogenic methane or variable mixtures of biogenic and thermogenic methane. These results point to diverse sources for large Arctic methane seeps.

  6. Biogenic contribution to PM-2.5 ambient aerosol from radiocarbon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C.; Klouda, G.; Ellenson, W.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide a means to quantify the biogenic fraction of any carbon-containing sample of ambient aerosol. In the absence of an impact from biomass burning (e.g., during summertime) such measurements can provide an estimate of the contribution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol, from biogenic volatile organic compound precursors. Radiocarbon results for 11.5-h PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, during summer 1999 will be presented. On average the measured biogenic fraction was surprisingly large (more than half), with the average biogenic fraction for night samples being only slightly smaller than for day samples. Discussion will include (a) description of the radiocarbon methodology, (b) use of radiocarbon measurements on local vegetation and fuel samples as calibration data, (c) concurrent measurements of organic carbon and elemental carbon ambient concentrations, (d) assessment of organic aerosol sampling artifact through use of organic vapor denuders, variable face velocities, and filter extraction, and (e) comparison with published radiocarbon results obtained in Houston, Texas in a similar study. Disclaimer: This work has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Interagency Agreement No. 13937923 to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Contract No. 68-D5-0049 to ManTech Environmental Tecnology, Inc. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

  7. Formation and destruction of biogenic amines in Chunjang (a black soybean paste) and Jajang (a black soybean sauce).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xuezhi; Byun, Bo Young; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2013-11-15

    Chunjang and Jajang samples were analysed for biogenic amine contents by using HPLC equipped with a UV-Vis detector. Chunjang samples contained relatively large amounts of histamine (up to 273mg/kg) and tyramine (up to 131mg/kg), whereas Jajang samples had relatively small amounts of biogenic amines (mostly less than 40mg/kg). There appeared to be a strong relationship between biogenic amine contents in Chunjang and Jajang, and the biogenic amines in Chunjang were found to be pyrolysed during frying thereof to prepare Jajang. Meanwhile, the total plate counts of Chunjang samples ranged from 5 to 8logcfu/g, and most strains that were isolated from Chunjang samples were identified to be Bacillus subtilis (91.0%). The strains isolated from a sample in which relatively small amounts of biogenic amines were detected showed significantly weak abilities to produce biogenic amines. This indicates that biogenic amine contents in Chunjang are primarily attributed to bacterial abilities to produce biogenic amines. PMID:23790882

  8. BIOGENIC AMINES CONTENT IN SELECTED COMMERCIAL FERMENTED PRODUCTS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    OpenAIRE

    Vendula Pachlová; Radka Flasarová; Ludmila Zálešáková; František Buňka; Pavel Budinský; Leona Buňková

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor of biogenic amines contents in commercial fermented products, especially various type of ripening cheeses and fermented meat products (15 cheese samples and nine dry fermented meat products obtained from Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, Poland, and Germany). Furthermore, the changes in samples during storage were also observed. The samples were stored at 6±1°C. The samples were taken the first day of storage and the last day of shelf-life. The biogenic ami...

  9. Evaluation of N-nitrosopiperidine formation from biogenic amines during the production of dry fermented sausages

    OpenAIRE

    De Mey, Eveline; De Maere, Hannelore; Goemaere, Olivier; Steen, Liselot; Peeters, Christine; Derdelinckx, Guy; Paelinck, Hubert; Fraeye, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the precursors cadaverine and piperidine in the N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) formation during the production of dry fermented sausages. The influences of pH (4.9 and 5.3), sodium nitrite (0 and 150 mg/kg) and ascorbate (0 and 500 mg/kg) were investigated by the use of a dry fermented sausage model. The biogenic amines and volatile N-nitrosamines were analyzed by HPLC-UV and GC-TEA. The major biogenic amines were tyramine (TYR), putrescine (PUT)...

  10. Biogenic amine content, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration of pork in tuna sausage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chang, Shih-Chih; Hong, Tang-Yao

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-five tuna sausage products were purchased from retail markets in Taiwan. The rates of occurrence of biogenic amines, histamine-forming bacteria, and adulteration by pork and poultry were determined. The average content of various biogenic amines in all tested samples was less than 2.0 mg/100 g (Thunnus albacares for 22 samples (88%), Thunnus alalunga for 1 sample (4%), and Thunnus thynnus for 1 sample (4%), whereas the remaining sample was identified as Makaira nigricans (blue marlin). PMID:23043830

  11. Manganese content records seasonal upwelling in Lake Tanganyika mussels

    OpenAIRE

    D. Langlet; Alleman, L. Y.; Plisnier, P.-D.; Hughes, H; André, L.

    2007-01-01

    International audience Biogenic productivity of Lake Tanganyika is highly dependent on seasonal upwellings of cold, oxygen-depleted, nutrient-rich deep waters. We investigated the shell of freshwater bivalve Pleiodon spekii as a geochemical archive of these periodic hydrological changes tuned by the monsoon regime. The results of a three-year-long limnological and geochemical survey of the coastal waters performed on the dissolved and particulate fractions were compared to LA-ICP-MS profil...

  12. Biogenic amines content in Spanish and French natural ciders: Application of qPCR for quantitative detection of biogenic amine-producers

    OpenAIRE

    Ladero Losada, Víctor Manuel; Coton, M.; Fernández García, María; Burón, Nicolás; Martín, M. Cruz; Guichard, Hugues; Coton, E.; Álvarez González, Miguel Ángel

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BA) are low molecular weight nitrogenous bases commonly found in fermented foods and beverages and their consumption can induce undesirable reactions. In this work, the BA content in natural cider from Spain and France was determined. Samples from commercially available cider or obtained during the elaboration process were analyzed. A different profile and BA concentration was observed depending on cider origin. qPCR tools developed for the quantitative detection of BA produc...

  13. Validation of an HPLC Analytical Method for Determination of Biogenic Amines in Agricultural Products and Monitoring of Biogenic Amines in Korean Fermented Agricultural Products

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Hyeock; Park, Jung Hyuck; Choi, Ari; Hwang, Han-Joon; Mah, Jae-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    An HPLC analytical method was validated for the quantitative determination of biogenic amines in agricultural products. Four agricultural foods, including apple juice, Juk, corn oil and peanut butter, were selected as food matrices based on their water and fat contents (i.e., non-fatty liquid, non-fatty solid, fatty liquid and fatty solid, respectively). The precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were determined to test the validity of an HPLC procedu...

  14. Natural biogenic solid fuels - environmentally relevant characteristics and possible influences. Final report; Naturbelassene biogene Festbrennstoffe - umweltrelevante Eigenschaften und Einflussmoeglichkeiten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, H.; Boehm, T.; Maier, L. [Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Landtechnik, Friesing-Weihenstephan (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Festbrennstoffe

    2000-09-01

    , Weizenstroh und Weizenganzpflanzen. Eine Datenbank fuer naturbelassene biogene Festbrennstoffe wurde errichtet. Hierfuer wurde ein relationales Datenbankmodell gewaehlt. Dessen Struktur wurde so angelegt, dass neben den eigentlichen Messgroessen auch eine Vielzahl weiterer Eigenschaften und Informationen zum Brennstoff sowie seine Herkunftsmerkmale und die verwendeten Analyseverfahren festgehalten werden konnten. Die in den eigenen Versuchsserien zustande gekommenen Analyseergebnisse wurden durch weitere Daten aus einer umfangreichen Recherche (Befragung) sowie aus Literaturangaben ergaenzt, so dass insgesamt ca. 1.238 Datensaetze (Stand April 1999) zusammengetragen werden konnten. (orig.)

  15. Comparative evaluation of oxidative stress status and manganese availability in plants growing on manganese mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boojar, Massod Mashhadi Akbar; Goodarzi, Faranak

    2008-11-01

    This study pioneered an approach that determined the effects of excess manganese (Mn) on three species; Datura stramonium, Alhagi camelthorn and Chenopodium ambrosioides. We investigated their levels of Mn, antioxidative enzymes and oxidative damage biomarkers in plants (zone 1) in and outside (zone 2) the Mn mine. The results showed that total and available Mn were at toxic levels for plants growing on zone 1. The Mn levels in each plant species were higher in leaves, stems and roots. Mn was only accumulated significantly in leaf vacuoles of A. camelthorn. Antioxidative enzyme activities of C. ambrosioides and/or D. stramonium in zone 1 were higher in leaves, stems and then in their roots. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and dityrosine levels were insignificantly higher in tissues of the studied plants in zone 1 with respect to zone 2. The roots of studied plants showed significantly higher levels of these biomarkers in comparison with their leaves in zone 1. Accordingly, antioxidative enzymatic response to Mn-stress in D. stramonium and C. ambrosioides and possibly accumulation of Mn in leaf vacuoles of A. camelthorn, protected them from oxidative damages and involved in their tolerance in Mn mine. PMID:18068229

  16. Biogenic arsenic volatilisation from an acidic wetland soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Gunter; Huang, Jen-How; Lu, Shipeng; Tian, Liyan; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic arsenic (As) volatilisation was budgeted at 26000 t yr-1as the largest input of the global As release into the atmosphere, thereby playing an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of As in the surface environment. In order to quantify As volatilisation from wetland soils and to elucidate the geochemical and microbiological factors governing As volatilisation, a series of incubations with an acidic wetland soil collected in NE-Bavaria in Germany were performed at 15oC for 4 months with addition of NaN3, arsenite (As(III)), FeCl3, NaSO4 and NaOAc with N2 and air in the headspace. Speciation of gaseous As in the headspace using GC-ICP-MS/ ESI-MS coupling showed the predominance of either arsine (AsH3) or trimethylarsine ((CH3)3As) in all treatments during the time course of incubation. Monomethylarsine ((CH3)AsH2) and dimethylarsine ((CH3)2AsH) could be only detected in trace amounts. Arsenic speciation in porewater with HPLC-ICP-MS revealed the predominance of As(III) and methylated As was never detectable. Arsenic volatilisation summed to 2.3 ng As (88% as AsH3) in the control incubations, which accounted for ~0.25 % of the total As storage in the wetland soil. Treatments with 10 mM NaN3 resulted in emission of only 0.03 ng As. In contrast, addition of 10 mM NaOAc stimulated microbial activities in wetland soils and subsequently rose As volatilisation to 8.5 ng As. It could be therefore concluded that As volatilisation from the wetland soils was mainly biological. Spiking 67 μM As(III) increased 10 times of As volatilisation and the proportion of methylated arsines increased to 66%, which is supposed to be caused by the largely enhanced As availability in porewater for microbes (480 ppb, ~65 times higher than those in the controls). Adding 10 mM FeCl3 stimulated microbial Fe(III) reducing activities but suppressed other microbial activities by lowering soil pH from 5 to 3.6, decreasing consequently As volatilisation to 0.3 ng As. The much lower redox

  17. Observations of continental biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, M. M.; Sorooshian, A.; Wang, Z.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-06-01

    During the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) and 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) field campaigns, a predominantly organic aerosol (> 85% by mass) was observed in the free troposphere over marine stratocumulus off the coast of California. These particles originated from a densely forested region in the Northwestern United States. The organic mass spectrum resolved by positive matrix factorization is consistent with the mass spectra of previously measured biogenic organic aerosol. Particulate organic mass exhibits a latitudinal gradient that corresponds to the geographical distribution of vegetation density and composition, with the highest concentration over regions impacted by densely populated monoterpene sources. Due to meteorological conditions during summer months, cloud-clearing events transport aerosol from the Northwestern United States into the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. Based on the variation of meteorological variables with altitude, dry air containing enhanced biogenic organic aerosol is shown to entrain into the marine boundary layer. Fresh impacts on cloud water composition are observed north of San Francisco, CA which is consistent with fresh continental impacts on the marine atmosphere at higher latitudes. Continental aerosol size distributions are bimodal. Particles in the 100 nm mode are impacted by biogenic sources, while particles in the ˜ 30 nm mode may originate from fresh biogenic emissions. Continental aerosol in the 100 nm mode is cloud condensation nuclei active and may play a role in modulating marine stratocumulus microphysics.

  18. Sediment waves with a biogenic twist in Pleistocene cool water carbonates, Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn; Huuse, Mads;

    2010-01-01

    contours immediately off the shelf–slope break. They are asymmetrical, showing up-slope migration, and mainly occur in trains. The sediment waves were drilled during ODP leg 182 in 1998, and were interpreted as biogenic reef mounds. New high-quality seismic and multibeam bathymetry data were acquired on...

  19. Discrimination of biogenic and detrital magnetite through a double Verwey transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Liao; Heslop, David; Roberts, Andrew P.; Rey, Daniel; Mohamed, Kais J.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite occurs widely in natural environments in both inorganic and biogenic forms. Discrimination of the origin of magnetite has important implications, from searching for past microbial activity to interpreting paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic records in a wide range of settings. In this study, we present rock magnetic and electron microscopic analyses of marine sediments from the continental margin of Oman. Low-temperature magnetic data reveal two distinct Verwey transition (Tv) temperatures that are associated with the presence of biogenic and inorganic magnetite. This interpretation is consistent with room temperature magnetic properties and is confirmed by electron microscopic analyses. Our study justifies the use of two distinct Tv temperatures as a diagnostic signature for discriminating inorganic and biogenic magnetite. Simple low-temperature magnetic measurements, therefore, provide a tool to recognize rapidly the origin of magnetite within natural samples. In addition, our analyses reveal progressive down-core dissolution of detrital and biogenic magnetite, but with preservation of significant amounts of fine-grained magnetite within sediments that have been subjected to severe diagenetic alteration. We demonstrate that preservation of magnetite in such environments is due to protection of fine-grained magnetite inclusions within silicate hosts. Our results, therefore, also provide new insights into diagenetic processes in marine sediments.

  20. Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jin

    2007-05-31

    Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

  1. Molecular- and Nano-Scale Structure and Reactivity of Biogenic Uranium(IV) Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, E. J.; Bargar, J. R.; Veeramani, H.; Sharp, J. O.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Survova, E.; Giammar, D. E.; Ulrich, K.; Mehta, A.; Webb, S. M.; Conradson, S. D.; Clark, D. L.; Ilton, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    Bioremediation has been proposed and extensively researched as an in-situ immobilization strategy for uranium contamination in the subsurface with nanoparticulate uraninite (UO2) being the commonly reported product. Little detail is known about the structure and reactivity of this material, but based on comparison to its closest abiotic analog, UO2+x (0 powder diffraction and TEM. The lattice parameter of the nanoparticulate phase is seen to be consistent with bulk UO2. There is no evidence for hyperstoichiometry or strain of the UO2 particles, the latter indicating that surface energy is relatively modest. Similar results were obtained for biogenic UO2 particles produced by other metal reducing bacteria indicating that biological variability may play a minimal role in structure. In agreement with the structural analysis, the surface area-normalized dissolution rate of the biogenic UO2 was found to be comparable to that of coarser, synthetic UO2.00. Mn2+ was found to attenuate the particle size of biogenic UO2+xand to be structurally incorporated. This finding suggests that groundwater composition can have a pronounced impact on the structure and properties of biogenic uraninite.

  2. Inhibitory Effects of Spices on Biogenic Amine Accumulation during Fish Sauce Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuxia; Qiu, Mengting; Zhao, Dandan; Lu, Fei; Ding, Yuting

    2016-04-01

    The presence of high levels of biogenic amines is detrimental to the quality and safety of fish sauce. This study investigated the effects of ethanol extracts of spices, including garlic, ginger, cinnamon, and star anise extracts, in reducing the accumulation of biogenic amines during fish sauce fermentation. The concentrations of biogenic amines, which include histamine, putrescine, tyramine, and spermidine, all increased during fish sauce fermentation. When compared with the samples without spices, the garlic and star anise extracts significantly reduced these increases. The greatest inhibitory effect was observed for the garlic ethanolic extracts. When compared with controls, the histamine, putrescine, tyramine, and spermidine contents and the overall biogenic amine levels of the garlic extract-treated samples were reduced by 30.49%, 17.65%, 26.03%, 37.20%, and 27.17%, respectively. The garlic, cinnamon, and star anise extracts showed significant inhibitory effects on aerobic bacteria counts. Furthermore, the garlic and star anise extracts showed antimicrobial activity against amine producers. These findings may be helpful for enhancing the safety of fish sauce. PMID:26953496

  3. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Worton, D. R.; Matross, D. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Cahill, T. M.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-03-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments - a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG) - and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4-68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72-10.2 μgCg-1 h-1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde) in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  4. Biogenic silica in tidal freshwater marsh sediments and vegetation (Schelde estuary, Belgium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; van Damme, S.; Gribsholt, B.; Middelburg, J.J.; Meire, P.

    2005-01-01

    To date, estuarine ecosystem research has mostly neglected silica cycling in freshwater intertidal marshes. However, tidal marshes can store large amounts of biogenic silica (BSi) in vegetation and sediment. BSi content of the typical freshwater marsh plants Phragmites australis, Impatiens glandulif

  5. Biogenic silica in space and time in sediments of Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Gupta, S.M.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Parthiban, G.

    silica (30-35%) in the surface sediments from 11 degrees to 13 degrees S, may be due to higher productivity and better preservation of siliceous tests. The lowest biogenic silica at approximately 100 to 140 x 10 sup(3) y BP is suppressed with higher...

  6. Distinguishing black carbon from biogenic humic substances in soil clay fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, D.A.; Chappell, M.A.; Martens, D.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thompson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most models of soil humic substances include a substantial component of aromatic C either as the backbone of humic heteropolymers or as a significant component of supramolecular aggregates of degraded biopolymers. We physically separated coarse (0.2-2.0????m e.s.d.), medium (0.02-0.2????m e.s.d.), and fine (> 0.02????m e.s.d.) clay subfractions from three Midwestern soils and characterized the organic material associated with these subfractions using 13C-CPMAS-NMR, DTG, SEM-EDX, incubations, and radiocarbon age. Most of the C in the coarse clay subfraction was present as discrete particles (0.2-5????m as seen in SEM images) of black carbon (BC) and consisted of approximately 60% aromatic C, with the remainder being a mixture of aliphatic, anomeric and carboxylic C. We hypothesize that BC particles were originally charcoal formed during prairie fires. As the BC particles aged in soil their surfaces were oxidized to form carboxylic groups and anomeric and aliphatic C accumulated in the BC particles either by adsorption of dissolved biogenic compounds from the soil solution or by direct deposition of biogenic materials from microbes living within the BC particles. The biogenic soil organic matter was physically separated with the medium and fine clay subfractions and was dominated by aliphatic, anomeric, and carboxylic C. The results indicate that the biogenic humic materials in our soils have little aromatic C, which is inconsistent with the traditional heteropolymer model of humic substances.

  7. Biogenic amines determination in some traditional cheeses in West Azerbaijan province of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi Rohani, Seyed Mehdi; Aliakbarlu, Javad; Ehsani, Ali; Hassanzadazar, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amines (BA) are nitrogenous compounds that possess biological activity. The source of production is the microbial decarboxylation of amino acids. This compounds are found in various types of cheese. The aim of this work was to evaluate the BA content of some traditional cheeses in West Azerbaijan province Iran. For this purpose, 70 samples of Koopeh, 10 samples of Lighvan and 5 samples of Red Salmas cheeses were obtained from local supermarkets of different cities of West Azerbaijan province. After preparation of samples, biogenic amines content was evaluated by modified HPLC method. The presence of histamine, cadaverine, putrescine and tyramine in tested cheeses were observed. Total amount of biogenic amines was highest in Red Salmas cheese with 1426.91 ppm. It followed by Lighvan cheese and Koopeh cheese with 1008.98 and 517.71 ppm, respectively. Putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine were detected in Koopeh cheese at levels up to 156.09, 282.34, 70.80, 8.48 ppm respectively. These amines were detected also in Lighvan cheese at levels up to 277.53, 342.74, 37.58, 351.12 ppm and in Red Salmas cheese samples at levels up to 438.03, 701.05, 105.21, 182.62 ppm, respectively. Large amounts of biogenic amines can indicate non hygienic conditions and contamination of used milk for cheese production. PMID:25653782

  8. Magnetically-modified natural biogenic iron oxides for organic xenobiotics removal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Filip, J.; Horská, Kateřina; Nowakova, M.; Tuček, J.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Hashimoto, H.; Takada, J.; Zbořil, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2015), s. 673-682. ISSN 1735-1472 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11111; GA MŠk LH12190 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Biogenic iron oxides * Leptothrix ochracea * Magnetic fluid * Magnetic adsorbents * Xenobiotics Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.190, year: 2014

  9. Age and Gender-Related Changes in Biogenic Amine Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Szymańska, Krystyna; Rokicki, Dariusz; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Mierzewska, Hanna; Szczepanik, Elzbieta; Pronicka, Ewa; Demkow, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites of cerebrospinal biogenic amines (dopamine and serotonin)are an important tool in clinical research and diagnosis of children with neurotransmitter disorders. In this article we focused on finding relationships between the concentration of biogenic amine metabolites, age, and gender. We analyzed 148 samples from children with drug resistant seizures of unknown etiology and children with mild stable encephalopathy aged 0-18 years. A normal profile of biogenic amineswas found in 107 children and those children were enrolled to the study group. The CSF samples were analyzed by HPLC with an electrochemical detector. The concentrations of the dopamine and serotonin metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), respectively, were high at birth, gradually decreasing afterward until the 18 years of age. Nevertheless, the HVA/5-HIAA ratio did not vary with age, except in the children below 1 year of age. In the youngest group we observed a strong relationship between the HVA/5-HIAA ratio and age (r = 0.69, p biogenic amine metabolites is age and sex dependent. PMID:26453071

  10. Differential behavioral responses of two plant-parasitic nematodes to biogenic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatching and infective juvenile (J2) behavior in two species of plant-parasitic nematodes, Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita, were affected by in vitro treatment with the biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. While the overall responses of each species to amine exposures w...

  11. Synthesis of Derivatives of Biogenic Amines Labelled with Radioactive Tracers for Brain Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo A. Vitale

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous derivatives of biogenic amines, such as phenethylamines, indolalkylamines and harmines, have been extensively studied as usual constituents of body fluids. Methylated derivatives of indolalkylamines have been also related to mental disorders, e.g. schizophrenia and hallucination.

  12. Effect of biogenic amines on the mating and egg-laying behaviors in the stable fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stable fly Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is one of the most significant biting fly pests affecting livestock.The annual economic damage to the U.S. cattle industry is estimated at over one billion US dollars. Biogenic amines are known to play critical roles in feeding and reprodu...

  13. A ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of biogenic primary amines with nanomolar sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Suman; Chandra, Falguni; Koner, Apurba L

    2016-02-01

    An ultrasensitive ratiometric fluorescent sensor made of an N,N-dimethylaminonaphthalene anhydride moiety for detection of aliphatic primary amines is reported. Biogenic amines at nanomolar concentration is detected with the additional ability to discriminate between primary, secondary and tertiary amines by using both UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:26734688

  14. Biogenic amines determination in some traditional cheeses in West Azerbaijan province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mehdi Razavi Rohani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BA are nitrogenous compounds that possess biological activity. The source of production is the microbial decarboxylation of amino acids. This compounds are found in various types of cheese. The aim of this work was to evaluate the BA content of some traditional cheeses in West Azerbaijan province Iran. For this purpose, 70 samples of Koopeh, 10 samples of Lighvan and 5 samples of Red Salmas cheeses were obtained from local supermarkets of different cities of West Azerbaijan province. After preparation of samples, biogenic amines content was evaluated by modified HPLC method. The presence of histamine, cadaverine, putrescine and tyramine in tested cheeses were observed. Total amount of biogenic amines was highest in Red Salmas cheese with 1426.91 ppm. It followed by Lighvan cheese and Koopeh cheese with 1008.98 and 517.71 ppm, respectively. Putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine were detected in Koopeh cheese at levels up to 156.09, 282.34, 70.80, 8.48 ppm respectively. These amines were detected also in Lighvan cheese at levels up to 277.53, 342.74, 37.58, 351.12 ppm and in Red Salmas cheese samples at levels up to 438.03, 701.05, 105.21, 182.62 ppm, respectively. Large amounts of biogenic amines can indicate non hygienic conditions and contamination of used milk for cheese production.

  15. Importance of particle formation to reconstructed water column biogenic silica fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moriceau, B.; Gallinari, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Ragueneau, O.

    2007-01-01

    The particles sinking out of the ocean's surface layer are made up of a mixture of living and dead algal cells, fecal pellets, and aggregates, while the parameters used to describe the behavior of biogenic silica (bSiO2) in today's models are experimentally determined on freely suspended diatoms (FC

  16. 77 FR 21772 - Notification of Two Public Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... of Air and Radiation requested SAB review of EPA's draft accounting framework. As noticed in 76 FR... Stationary Sources (September 2011). As noticed in 76 FR 80368-80369, the Panel discussed its draft reports... AGENCY Notification of Two Public Teleconferences of the Science Advisory Board Biogenic Carbon...

  17. Radiocarbon AMS determination of the biogenic component in CO{sub 2} emitted from waste incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagnile, L., E-mail: lucio.calcagnile@unisalento.it [CEDAD-Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Quarta, G., E-mail: gianluca.quarta@unisalento.it [CEDAD-Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); D' Elia, M., E-mail: marisa.delia@unisalento.it [CEDAD-Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Ciceri, G., E-mail: giovanni.ciceri@erse-web.it [Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico-RSE spa, Dipartimento Ambiente e Sviluppo Sostenibile, Via R. Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano (Italy); Martinotti, V., E-mail: valter.Martinotti@erse-web.it [Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico-RSE spa, Dipartimento Ambiente e Sviluppo Sostenibile, Via R. Rubattino, 54, 20134 Milano (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The thermal utilization of waste for energy production is gaining importance in European countries. Nevertheless, the combustion of waste leads to significant CO{sub 2} emissions in the atmosphere which, depending on the fraction of biogenic and fossil materials, have to be only partially accounted for the national greenhouse gas inventory. For this reason the development of proper methodologies for the measurement of the biogenic fraction in the combusted waste is an active research field. In fact the determination of the radiocarbon concentration in the carbon dioxide stack emissions allows to have a direct indication of the biogenic component in the burned fuel. We present the results of the AMS radiocarbon analyses carried out on carbon dioxide sampled at the stack of three power plants located in Northern Italy burning natural gas, landfill biogas and SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) derived from MSW (Municipal Solid Waste). The sampling apparatus and the applied processing protocols are described together with the calculation procedures used to determine, from the measured radiocarbon concentrations, the proportion of biogenic and fossil component in the flue gas and in the combusted fuel. The results confirm the high potentialities of this approach in the analysis of industrial CO{sub 2} emissions.

  18. Radiocarbon AMS determination of the biogenic component in CO 2 emitted from waste incineration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagnile, L.; Quarta, G.; D'Elia, M.; Ciceri, G.; Martinotti, V.

    2011-12-01

    The thermal utilization of waste for energy production is gaining importance in European countries. Nevertheless, the combustion of waste leads to significant CO 2 emissions in the atmosphere which, depending on the fraction of biogenic and fossil materials, have to be only partially accounted for the national greenhouse gas inventory. For this reason the development of proper methodologies for the measurement of the biogenic fraction in the combusted waste is an active research field. In fact the determination of the radiocarbon concentration in the carbon dioxide stack emissions allows to have a direct indication of the biogenic component in the burned fuel. We present the results of the AMS radiocarbon analyses carried out on carbon dioxide sampled at the stack of three power plants located in Northern Italy burning natural gas, landfill biogas and SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) derived from MSW (Municipal Solid Waste). The sampling apparatus and the applied processing protocols are described together with the calculation procedures used to determine, from the measured radiocarbon concentrations, the proportion of biogenic and fossil component in the flue gas and in the combusted fuel. The results confirm the high potentialities of this approach in the analysis of industrial CO 2 emissions.

  19. Carbon-14 based determination of the biogenic fraction of industrial CO2 emissions : Application and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, S. W. L.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The C-14 method is a very reliable and sensitive method for industrial plants, emission authorities and emission inventories to verify data estimations of biogenic fractions of CO2 emissions. The applicability of the method is shown for flue gas CO2 samples that have been sampled in I-h intervals at

  20. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120°C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. PMID:25492167

  1. Biogenic acids produced on epoxy linings installed in sewer crown and tidal zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valix, M; Shanmugarajah, K

    2015-09-01

    In this study the biogenic acids generated by microbes on the surface of Bisphenol A epoxy mortar coupons were investigated for up to 30 months. The epoxy coupons were installed in six sewers in three city locations, Sydney, Melbourne and Perth. Coupons were installed in both the crown and the tidal zones of the sewers to capture the effect of location within the pipe on acid production. The coupons were retrieved approximately every 6 months to provide a dynamic analysis of the biogenic acid production. Our results reveal the colonisation of epoxy mortar by the more aggressive acidophilic bacteria occurred within six months to two years of their installation in the sewer pipes. Biogenic acid generation appear to occur homogeneously from the tidal zone to the crown of the sewer pipes. The reduction in the surface pH of the epoxy lining was supported by the successive growth of microbes beginning with fungi followed be neutrophilic and heterotrophic bacteria and finally by the acidophilic bacteria and the corresponding accumulation of organic and sulphuric acids attributed to these organisms. This study also revealed the potential inhibiting effects on the microbes induced by the accumulation of metabolic products on the epoxy surface. The accumulation of organic acids and H2S coincided with the growth and metabolism inhibition of fungi and acidophilic bacteria. These results provide insights into the microbial interaction and biogenic acids production that contribute to lining degradation and corrosion of concrete in sewer pipes. PMID:26005783

  2. Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), plant uptake and effects on metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.R.; Lytle, C.M.; Stone, R.L.; Smith, B.N [Department of Botany and Range Science, Brigham Young University, Provo (United States); Hansen, L.D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo (United States)

    2000-04-01

    In the USA and Canada, methylcyclopentadienyl manganese (MMT) is currently added to gasoline to replace tetraethyl lead as an antiknock fuel additive. Manganese concentrations in roadside soil and plants are increasing and correlated with distance from the roadway, traffic volume, plant type, and microhabitat. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings were treated for either five or thirty-five days with different levels of manganous chloride (0-1000ppm). Metabolic heat rates (q) and respiration rates (R{sub CO{sub 2}}), measured calorimetrically, indicated severe stress at Mn concentrations between 10 and 100ppm and at temperatures above 20C. Predicted growth rates (R{sub SG}) also decreased in these circumstances.

  3. Compositions containing nucleosides and manganese and their uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Levine, Rodney L.; Wehr, Nancy B.

    2015-11-17

    This invention encompasses methods of preserving protein function by contacting a protein with a composition comprising one or more purine or pyrimidine nucleosides (such as e.g., adenosine or uridine) and an antioxidant (such as e.g., manganese). In addition, the invention encompasses methods of treating and/or preventing a side effect of radiation exposure and methods of preventing a side effect of radiotherapy comprising administration of a pharmaceutically effective amount of a composition comprising one or more purine or pyrimidine nucleosides (such as e.g., adenosine or uridine) and an antioxidant (such as e.g., manganese) to a subject in need thereof. The compositions may comprise D. radiodurans extracts.

  4. Radiative capture of polarized neutrons by aluminium and manganese nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The angular distribution of the intensity is calculated for primary and secondary gamma-rays emitted after polarized neutron capture in a polarized target. Also the circular polarization is derived for capture of polarized neutrons by unoriented nuclei. Interference between the reaction channels and all possible dipole/quadrupole mixing is taken into account. Some aspects of p-wave and s-p interference are discussed. The results of these calculations are applied to the experiments on aluminium and manganese. In the nuclear orientation experiment with aluminium a 'brute force' polarized target was used. For five levels in 28Al the spin value could be determined uniquely. No evidence for significant M2/E1 mixing is found. A ferromagnetic MnSb sample was used to polarize the manganese nuclei. Unique spin values are assigned to 13 states in 56Mn. The magnetic hyperfine field on the Mn nuclei is determined to be negative

  5. Manganese-Mediated Lignin Degradation by Pleurotus pulmonarius

    OpenAIRE

    Camarero, S.; Bockle, B.; Martinez, M. J.; Martinez, A.T.

    1996-01-01

    Pleurotus pulmonarius produced the strongest degradation of lignin during solid-state fermentation of [(sup14)C]lignin wheat straw with different fungi. A manganese-oxidizing peroxidase seemed to be involved in lignin attack, since the addition of Mn(sup2+) to the culture increased lignin mineralization by ca. 125%. This enzyme was purified and characterized from both solid-state fermentation and liquid cultures.

  6. Hot-working of advanced high-manganese austenitic steels

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; W. Borek

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The work consisted in investigation of newly elaborated high-manganese austenitic steels with Nb and Ti microadditions in variable conditions of hot-working.Design/methodology/approach: The force-energetic parameters of hot-working were determined in continuous and multi-stage compression test performed in temperature range of 850 to 1100°C using the Gleeble 3800 thermomechanical simulator. Evaluation of processes controlling work-hardening were identified by microstructure observati...

  7. Hot-working behaviour of high-manganese austenitic steels

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; A. Grajcar; W. Borek

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The work consisted in investigation of newly elaborated high-manganese austenitic steels with Nb and Ti microadditions in variable conditions of hot-working.Design/methodology/approach: Determination of processes controlling strain hardening was carried out in continuous compression test using Gleeble 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator.Findings: It was found that they have austenite microstructure with numerous annealing twins in the initial state. Continuous compression tests ...

  8. Pair breaking of manganese in superconducting Pd-H alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the low-temperature hydrogen implantation and subsequent investigation of superconductivity for dilute alloys of Mn in palladium. A simple Abrikosov-Gorkov-type pair breaking is observed. Our resistivity determination of T/sub c/ is compared with an existing study in which hydrogen charging was carried out electrolytically and partial superconductivity, as resolved by susceptibility measurements, persisted to larger manganese concentrations

  9. Estimation of Particulate Mass and Manganese Exposure Levels among Welders

    OpenAIRE

    Hobson, Angela; Seixas, Noah; Sterling, David; Racette, Brad A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Welders are frequently exposed to Manganese (Mn), which may increase the risk of neurological impairment. Historical exposure estimates for welding-exposed workers are needed for epidemiological studies evaluating the relationship between welding and neurological or other health outcomes. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a multivariate model to estimate quantitative levels of welding fume exposures based on welding particulate mass and Mn concentrations repo...

  10. Purification of arsenic contaminated ground water using hydrated manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical methodology has been developed for the separation of arsenic from ground water using inorganic material in neutral medium. The separation procedure involves the quantitative retention of arsenic on hydrated manganese dioxide, in neutral medium. The validity of the separation procedure has been checked by a standard addition method and radiotracer studies. Neutron activation analysis (NAA), a powerful measurement technique, has been used for the quantitative determination of arsenic. (author)

  11. The separation of trace elements in manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separations from manganese are discribed for (a)Al(III), Mo(VI), V(V), and Ti(IV), and (b)trace elements in general. In the first separation, a combined anion-cation exchange, the oxalate complexes are absorbed onto the anionic BIO.RAD 1-X8 resin. V(V) and Al(III) are then eluted into a cation-exchange column from which they are eluted successively, Mo(VI) and Ti(IV) then being eluted from the anionic resin. In the second separation, up to 2g of manganese is absorbed onto BIO.RAD AG 50W-X8 resin, from which V(V) is eluted with dilute hydrochloric acid prior to the elution of Co(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), As(III), Sb(III), Mo(VI), W(VI), and Sn(II) with a mixture of 1 M hydrochloric acid, 80 per cent acetone, and 0,1 per cent hydrogen peroxide. Mn(11) is eluted next with a mixture of 0,75M hydrochloric acid and 90 per cent acetone, after which the remaining cations are eluted with 4M hydrochloric acid. Satisfactory recoveries ranging from 0,8 to 60 mg/l were obtained for 18 of the 21 elements tested. After concentration by evaporation, final measurements were made by the use of atomic-absorption spectrophotometry, or direct-reading spectrometry with excitation from an inductively coupled plasma source. Comparative results were obtained with atomic-absorption procedures where the manganese was not separated. However, the separation procedure can reduce the time required for analysis by the direct method because it limits the number of dilutions necessary and eliminates the need for the use of the method of additions to compensate for interferences from manganese

  12. Preparation of Silicon and Germanium Layers Highly Doped with Manganese.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koštejn, Martin; Fajgar, Radek

    Ozarow Mazowiecki: Nobell Compressing sp. z o.o, 2015 - (Kosinsky, K.; Urbanczyk, M.; Žerko, S.), s. 46 ISBN N. [Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience International Conference ANNIC 2015. Paris (FR), 05.11.2015-07.11.2015] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : pulsed laser deposition * semiconductor * manganese Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry http://www.premc.org/doc/ANNIC_2015_Book_Of_Absracts.pdf

  13. Manganese-Mediated Coupling Reaction of Vinylarenes and Aliphatic Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Nai-Xing; Bai, Cui-Bing; Wang, Yan-Jing; Lan, Xing-Wang; Xing, Yalan; Li, Yi-He; Wen, Jia-Long

    2015-10-01

    Alcohols and alkenes are the most abundant and commonly used organic building blocks in the large-scale chemical synthesis. Herein, this is the first time to report a novel and operationally simple coupling reaction of vinylarenes and aliphatic alcohols catalyzed by manganese in the presence of TBHP (tert-butyl hydroperoxide). This coupling reaction provides the oxyalkylated products of vinylarenes with good regioselectivity and accomplishes with the principles of step-economies. A possible reaction mechanism has also been proposed.

  14. Manganese: Brain Species and Mechanisms of Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Neth, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Manganism is a Parkinson-related disease, which can arise by accumulation of the essential trace element manganese (Mn) in the brain by overexposure. Versatile Mn-species and imbalances of trace elements in serum and brain tissue of Mn-exposed rats were analyzed by methods of metallomics. Additionally, non-targeted metabolomics of brain tissue served for analysis of the multilateral mechanisms, which can lead to the neuronal injury. Finally, results from metallomics were correlated to the fin...

  15. Distribution and forms of manganese in vertisols of Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    JELENA Ž. MILIVOJEVIĆ; IVICA G. ĐALOVIĆ; MIODRAG Ž. JELIĆ; SREĆKO R. TRIFUNOVIĆ; DARINKA M. BOGDANOVIĆ; DRAGIŠA S. MILOŠEV; BRANISLAV D. NEDELJKOVIĆ; DRAGANA Đ. BJELIĆ

    2011-01-01

    Soil samples taken from the Ap horizont of arable land and meadows at ten different localities were analyzed for different forms of manganese, including total (HF), pseudo-total (HNO3), 0.1 M HCl-extractable and DTPA-extractable. A sequential fractional procedure was used for Mn portioning into fractions: water soluble and exchangeable Mn (I), specifically adsorbed Mn with carbonates (II), reductant releasable Mn in oxides (III), Mn bonded with organic matter (IV) and Mn structurally bonded i...

  16. Manganese speciation of laboratory-generated welding fumes

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, Ronnee N.; Keane, Michael; Hanley, Kevin W.; Feng, H. Amy; Ashley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) fractions in chamber-generated welding fumes (WF) and to evaluate and compare the results from a sequential extraction procedure for Mn fractions with that of an acid digestion procedure for measurement of total, elemental Mn. To prepare Mn-containing particulate matter from representative welding processes, a welding system was operated in short circuit gas metal arc welding (GMAW) mode using both stainless ste...

  17. Preparation of Silicon and Germanium Layers Highly Doped with Manganese.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koštejn, Martin; Fajgar, Radek

    Ozarow Mazowiecki : Nobell Compressing sp. z o.o, 2015 - (Kosinsky, K.; Urbanczyk, M.; Žerko, S.), s. 46 ISBN N. [Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience International Conference ANNIC 2015. Paris (FR), 05.11.2015-07.11.2015] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : pulsed laser deposition * semiconductor * manganese Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry http://www.premc.org/doc/ANNIC_2015_Book_Of_Absracts.pdf

  18. Neutron activation analysis of copper, zinc and manganese in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast method for simultaneous quantitative determination of microscopic quantities of copper, zinc and manganese in plant tissue through neutron activation analysis is suggested. The measurements are carried out after removal of the 24Na and 42K interference. Optimum conditions for detention of the microscopic quantities of Cu, Zn and Mn by the chelating resin Chelex-100 using the batch procedure are determined. (author)

  19. Prevention of Dealloying in Manganese Aluminium Bronze Propeller: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Napachat Tareelap; Kaysinee Sriraksasin; Nakorn Srisukhumbowornchai; Swieng Thuanboon; Choochat Nitipanyawong

    2014-01-01

    Due to the failure of manganese aluminium bronze (MAB) propeller caused by dealloying corrosion as described in Part I [1], this work aims to study the prevention of dealloying corrosion using aluminium and zinc sacrificial anodes. The results indicated that both of the sacrificial anodes could prevent the propeller from dealloying. Moreover, the dealloying in seawater was less than that found in brackish water. It was possible that hydroxide ions, from cathodic reaction, reacted with calcium...

  20. Photocatalytic oxidation of chloroform using immobilized-biogenic TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Cho, Y.; Yoo, H.

    2011-12-01

    Although commercial titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles as a suspension in water are one of the most popular photocatalysts for treatment of chlorinated organic compounds, the reuse and recovery of the nanoscale phtocatalyst is a practical challenge for application in water and groundwater treatment system. As part of efforts to overcome this practical limitation, development of immobilized TiO2 is needed. Diatom Pinnularia sp. were found to be capable of producing nanoscale TiO2 in their microscale silica shells. In order to obtain biogenic TiO2 nanoparticles from Pinnularia sp., soluble Ti was fed to the silicon-starved cells, resulting in deposition of titanium on the microscale features of the silica shells. After thermal treatment at 720 oC for 2 hr, the titanium was eventually converted to nanoscale TiO2. In order to determine the physical and chemical properties of the immobilized TiO2, material characterization such as TEM, STEM-EDS, BET and XRD analysis was carried out. In this study, a novel type of immobilized photocatalytic nanoparticles, biogenic TiO2 on silica shells was used for the mineralization of chloroform in water. Batch tests were conducted to evaluate the chloroform removal efficiency of biogenic and commercial TiO2 nanoparticles. Also, the amount of Cl- ions in water during the mineralization was measured to check mineralization of chloroform by biogenic TiO2 nanoparticles. Kinetic models were used to determine the rate of chloroform mineralization. In addition, the effect of UVA (ultraviolet-A) intensity on chloroform mineralization was investigated. The results obtained from this study could provide useful information for practical application of biogenic TiO2 in the groundwater treatment contaminated with some chlorinated organic compounds.

  1. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshatwi, Ali A., E-mail: alshatwi@ksu.edu.sa; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica.

  2. New procedure of selected biogenic amines determination in wine samples by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piasta, Anna M.; Jastrzębska, Aneta, E-mail: aj@chem.uni.torun.pl; Krzemiński, Marek P.; Muzioł, Tadeusz M.; Szłyk, Edward

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • We proposed new procedure for derivatization of biogenic amines. • The NMR and XRD analysis confirmed the purity and uniqueness of derivatives. • Concentration of biogenic amines in wine samples were analyzed by RP-HPLC. • Sample contamination and derivatization reactions interferences were minimized. - Abstract: A new procedure for determination of biogenic amines (BA): histamine, phenethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine, based on the derivatization reaction with 2-chloro-1,3-dinitro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-benzene (CNBF), is proposed. The amines derivatives with CNBF were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy in solution. The novelty of the procedure is based on the pure and well-characterized products of the amines derivatization reaction. The method was applied for the simultaneous analysis of the above mentioned biogenic amines in wine samples by the reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The procedure revealed correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) between 0.9997 and 0.9999, and linear range: 0.10–9.00 mg L{sup −1} (histamine); 0.10–9.36 mg L{sup -1} (tyramine); 0.09–8.64 mg L{sup −1} (tryptamine) and 0.10–8.64 mg L{sup −1} (phenethylamine), whereas accuracy was 97%–102% (recovery test). Detection limit of biogenic amines in wine samples was 0.02–0.03 mg L{sup −1}, whereas quantification limit ranged 0.05–0.10 mg L{sup −1}. The variation coefficients for the analyzed amines ranged between 0.49% and 3.92%. Obtained BA derivatives enhanced separation the analytes on chromatograms due to the inhibition of hydrolysis reaction and the reduction of by-products formation.

  3. Arsenite Removal from Simulated Groundwater by Biogenic Schwertmannite: A Column Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yue; ZHOU Li-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of biogenic schwertmannite to act as a sorbent for removing arsenite from groundwater,a series of biogenic schwertmannite-packed column adsorption experiments were conducted on simulated As(Ⅲ)-containing groundwater.Empty bed contact time (EBCT),As(Ⅲ) concentration in effluent,and the removal efficiency of As(Ⅲ) through the column were investigated at pH 8.0 and temperature 25 ± 0.5 ℃.The results showed that the breakthrough curves were mainly dependent on EBCT values when the influent As(Ⅲ) concentration was 500 μg L-1 and the optimum EBCT was 4.0 min.When the effluent As(Ⅲ) concentration reached 10 and 50 μg L-1,the breakthrough volumes for the schwertmannite adsorption column were 4200 and 5600 bed volume (BV),with As(Ⅲ) adsorption capacity of 2.1 and 2.8 mg g-1,respectively.Biogenic schwertmannite could be regenerated by 1.0 mol L-1 NaOH solution,and more than 80% of As(Ⅲ) adsorbed on the surface of schwertmannite could be released after 3 successive regenerations.The breakthrough volume for the regenerated schwertmannite-packed column still maintained 4 000-4 200 BV when the As(Ⅲ) concentration in effluent was below 10 μg L-1.Compared with other sorbents for As(Ⅲ) removal,the biogenic schwertmannitepacked column had a higher breakthrough volume and a much higher adsorption capacity,implying that biogenic schwertmannite was a highly efficient and potential sorbent to purify As(Ⅲ)-contaminated groundwater.

  4. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO2 nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica

  5. New procedure of selected biogenic amines determination in wine samples by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We proposed new procedure for derivatization of biogenic amines. • The NMR and XRD analysis confirmed the purity and uniqueness of derivatives. • Concentration of biogenic amines in wine samples were analyzed by RP-HPLC. • Sample contamination and derivatization reactions interferences were minimized. - Abstract: A new procedure for determination of biogenic amines (BA): histamine, phenethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine, based on the derivatization reaction with 2-chloro-1,3-dinitro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-benzene (CNBF), is proposed. The amines derivatives with CNBF were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and 1H, 13C, 19F NMR spectroscopy in solution. The novelty of the procedure is based on the pure and well-characterized products of the amines derivatization reaction. The method was applied for the simultaneous analysis of the above mentioned biogenic amines in wine samples by the reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The procedure revealed correlation coefficients (R2) between 0.9997 and 0.9999, and linear range: 0.10–9.00 mg L−1 (histamine); 0.10–9.36 mg L-1 (tyramine); 0.09–8.64 mg L−1 (tryptamine) and 0.10–8.64 mg L−1 (phenethylamine), whereas accuracy was 97%–102% (recovery test). Detection limit of biogenic amines in wine samples was 0.02–0.03 mg L−1, whereas quantification limit ranged 0.05–0.10 mg L−1. The variation coefficients for the analyzed amines ranged between 0.49% and 3.92%. Obtained BA derivatives enhanced separation the analytes on chromatograms due to the inhibition of hydrolysis reaction and the reduction of by-products formation

  6. Neurobehavioral Function in School-Age Children Exposed to Manganese in Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Oulhote, Youssef; Mergler, Donna; Barbeau, Benoit; Bellinger, David C.; Bouffard, Thérèse; Brodeur, Marie-Ève; Saint-Amour, Dave; Legrand, Melissa; Sauvé, Sébastien; Bouchard, Maryse F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Manganese neurotoxicity is well documented in individuals occupationally exposed to airborne particulates, but few data are available on risks from drinking-water exposure. Objective: We examined associations of exposure from concentrations of manganese in water and hair with memory, attention, motor function, and parent- and teacher-reported hyperactive behaviors. Methods: We recruited 375 children and measured manganese in home tap water (MnW) and hair (MnH). We estimated mangan...

  7. Manganese(III) Porphyrin-based Potentiometric Sensors for Diclofenac Assay in Pharmaceutical Preparations

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenia Fagadar-Cosma; Vlad Chiriac; Elena Maria Pica; Luminita Nica; Liviu Calin Bolundut; Vasile Ostafe; Stela Pruneanu; Florina Pogacean; Liliana Olenic; Dana Vlascici

    2010-01-01

    Two manganese(III) porphyrins: manganese(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride and manganese(III)-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin chloride were tested as ionophores for the construction of new diclofenac−selective electrodes. The electroactive material was incorporated either in PVC or a sol−gel matrix. The effect of different plasticizers and additives (anionic and cationic) on the potentiometric response was studied. The best results were obtained for the PVC membrane plasticized with dioct...

  8. Equilibrium studies of manganese removal from aqueous solution by adsorption on natural zeolite

    OpenAIRE

    Zendelska, Afrodita; Golomeova, Mirjana; Blažev, Krsto; Krstev, Boris; Golomeov, Blagoj; Krstev, Aleksandar; Jakupi, Shaban

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of manganese ions from synthetic aqueous solutions was performed by using natural zeolite (clinoptilolite). In order to determine the manganese uptake at equilibrium a series of experiments were performed under batch conditions from single ion solutions. Experiments were carried out at different initial concentration of manganese ions and at different initial pH values at 20±1̊ C. Increase in initial concentration not only results in an increase in the amount adsorbed (qe) but ...

  9. Taurine improves the spatial learning and memory ability impaired by sub-chronic manganese exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Cai-Ling; Tang, Shen; Meng, Zhi-Juan; He, Yi-Yuan; Song, Ling-Yong; Liu, Yin-Pin; Ma, Ning; Li, Xi-Yi; Guo, Song-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive manganese exposure induced cognitive deficit. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that taurine improves cognitive impairment induced by numerous neurotoxins. However, the role of taurine on manganese-induced damages in learning and memory is still elusive. This goal of this study was to investigate the beneficial effect of taurine on learning and memory capacity impairment by manganese exposure in an animal model. Results The escape latency in the Morris Water Maz...

  10. Improvement in Wear Properties of a Hypereutectic Aluminium Silicon Alloy with Manganese

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhkiran Kaur; D.K. Dwivedi; P.M. Pathak; Sunil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in wear properties of rare earth Cerium base hypereutectic Aluminium-Silicon alloy with Manganese modification has been reported in this paper. Wear studies were carried out on cast samples of hypereutectic Aluminium-Silicon alloy (Al-Si) with rare earth Cerium oxide (CeO2) and Manganese (Mn) modification. Final wear properties of rare earth Cerium oxide and Manganese modified hypereutectic Aluminium Silicon alloy were compared with the values of author?s previous work on rare ear...

  11. Wettability, surface tension and reactivity ofthe molten manganese/zirconia-yttria ceramic system

    OpenAIRE

    Shinozaki, N; Sonoda, M; Mukai, K.

    1998-01-01

    A basic research for improvement of plasma sprayed zirconia coatings has been conducted. Contact angle and surface tension of molten manganese/zirconia-yttria ceramic system weremeasured at 1573K by the sessile drop method, suggesting that molten manganese would spontaneously infiltrate open pores inzirconia coatings. Structure and elementary composition development of ZirCOnIa ceramICs caused by reaction with manganese were examined by using SEM(Scanning Electron Microscopy), EPMA(Electron P...

  12. Ceruloplasmin Alters the Tissue Disposition and Neurotoxicity of Manganese, but not its Loading onto Transferrin

    OpenAIRE

    Jursa, Thomas; Smith, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a redox-active element, and whereas its uptake, disposition, and toxicity in mammals may depend in part on its oxidation state, the proteins affecting manganese oxidation state and speciation in vivo are not well known. Studies have suggested that the oxidase protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) mediates iron and manganese oxidation and loading onto plasma transferrin (Tf), as well as cellular iron efflux. We hypothesized that ceruloplasmin may also affect the tissue distribution and ...

  13. Role of the manganese efflux system mntE for signalling and pathogenesis in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Rosch, Jason W.; Gao, Geli; Ridout, Granger; Wang, Yong-Dong; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to sense and respond to both environmental and intracellular metal concentrations plays an important role in pathogenesis. The acquisition of manganese is vital for the virulence of several bacterial species. Although manganese uptake systems have been well studied in bacteria, no manganese efflux system has yet been identified. In this study we have identified a cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) protein (Sp1552) of unknown substrate specificity that functions as a ma...

  14. THE INDIRECT ANALYSIS OF MANGANESE FROM ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES OF MINES AND RIVERS

    OpenAIRE

    村田, 勝夫; MLOMBO, Moses

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on an indirect analysis of manganese from environmental samples of an old copper mine and its neighboring river. Sediment and surface water were analyzed for the presence of manganese. Manganese was extracted, in the case of sediment, using aqua regia, followed by oxidation to the violet permanganate complex (MnO_4^-) with potassium periodate, in a hot acid solution. Analysis of the permanganate complex, by colorimetric and spectrophotometric analytical methods, shows that ...

  15. HDM model magnet mechanical behavior with high manganese steel collars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC) is presently under contract to the SSCL to design, develop, fabricate, and deliver superconducting dipole magnets for the High Energy Booster (HEB). As a first step toward these objectives SSCL supplied a design for short model magnets of 1.8 m in length (DSB). This design was used as a developmental tool for all phases of engineering and fabrication. Mechanical analysis of the HDM (High Energy Booster Dipole Magnets) model magnet design as specified by SSCL was performed with the following objectives: (1) to develop a thorough understanding of the design; (2) to review and verify through analytical and numerical analyses the SSCL model magnet design; (3) to identify any deficiencies that would violate design parameters specified in the HDM Design Requirements Document. A detailed analysis of the model magnet mechanical behavior was pursued by constructing a quarter section finite element model and solving with the ANSYS finite element code. Collar materials of Nitronic-40 and High-Manganese steel were both considered for the HEB model magnet program with the High-Manganese being the final selection. The primary mechanical difference in the two materials is the much lower thermal contraction of the High-Manganese steel. With this material the collars will contract less than the enclosing yoke producing an increased collar yoke interference during cooldown

  16. Manganese oxalate nanorods as ballistic modifier for composite solid propellants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Manganese oxalate nanorods were prepared using mild thermal precipitation and aging. • The nanorods were found to be efficient ballistic modifier for solid propellants. • The nanorods sensitized the thermolysis of ammonium perchlorate. • Controlled thermal decomposition of nanorods yielded manganese oxide nanoparticles. • MnO nanoparticles formed insitu in the condensed phase enhance the burning rates. - Abstract: Rod-shaped nanostructures of manganese oxalate (MnC2O4) were synthesized via mild thermal precipitation and aging process. Chemical composition of the MnC2O4 nanorods was confirmed using Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) studies revealed the crystal structure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) imaging and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were employed to study the structural features of the nanorods. The MnC2O4 nanorods were found to be efficient ballistic modifier for the burning rate enhancement of composite solid propellants (CSPs). Thermal analysis using TGA-DSC showed that MnC2O4 nanorods sensitized the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and the CSPs. Controlled thermal decomposition of the MnC2O4 nanorods resulted in the formation of managanese oxide nanoparticles with mesoporosity. A plausible mechanism for the burning rate enhancement using MnC2O4 nanorods was proposed

  17. Microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel by manganese oxidizing microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linhardt, P. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Technische Versuchs- und Forschungsanstalt (TVFA), Karlsplatz 13, 1040 Wien (Austria)

    2004-03-01

    Based on the corrosion behaviour of stainless steels in fresh water and on the electrochemical properties of higher manganese oxides, the mechanism ''Microbially influenced corrosion by manganese oxidizing microorganisms'' (MIC by MOMOs) is presented as the consequence of biomineralized manganese oxides in contact with the metal. Localized corrosion may develop at elevated but normally undercritical chloride concentration in the water. The mechanism was found useful in the analysis of certain cases of unexpected failure of stainless steel in fresh water. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Ausgehend vom Korrosionsverhalten nichtrostender Staehle in Suesswasser und den elektrochemischen Eigenschaften hoeherer Manganoxide wird der Mechanismus ''Mikrobiell beeinflusste Korrosion durch manganoxidierende Mikroorganismen'' als die Folge des Kontaktes von biomineralisiertem Braunstein mit dem metallischen Werkstoff beschrieben. Unter diesen Bedingungen kann Lokalkorrosion bei Chloridkonzentrationen im Wasser entstehen, die normalerweise als unkritisch angesehen werden. Der Mechanismus hat sich bei der Schadensanalyse bestimmter, unerwarteter Korrosionsfaelle bewaehrt. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Electrical characterization of a laminar manganese oxide type birnessite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper records the characterization of a manganese oxide synthesized by solid state routes which is analogous to natural mineral called birnessite. The analysis of X-ray diffraction and average oxidation state of manganese show that the material has a lamellar structure containing manganese in oxidation states (+4) and (+3). The results of electron microscopy along with surface area and pore size measurements reveal the presence of micro and meso pores in the material. Impedance spectroscopy suggests that high frequency electrical conduction occurs in the volume and on the border of the aggregates; in contrast, ionic conductivity at low frequencies was associated with potassium ions located in the interlaminar region. Ac conductivity values at low frequencies were 1.599 x 10-6 Ω-1 cm-1 and 6.416 x 10-5 Ω-1 cm-1 at high frequencies. These values are associated with an increased probability of electron jumping as frequency increases. These findings contribute to the understanding of electrical conduction processes and provides important information about its potential applications. As a result, this research will prove relevant in the field of batteries, super capacitors and heterogeneous catalysis, among others. (Author)

  19. The Escherichia coli Small Protein MntS and Exporter MntP Optimize the Intracellular Concentration of Manganese

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Julia E.; Waters, Lauren S.; Storz, Gisela; Imlay, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli does not routinely import manganese, but it will do so when iron is unavailable, so that manganese can substitute for iron as an enzyme cofactor. When intracellular manganese levels are low, the cell induces the MntH manganese importer plus MntS, a small protein of unknown function; when manganese levels are high, the cell induces the MntP manganese exporter and reduces expression of MntH and MntS. The role of MntS has not been clear. Previous work showed that forced MntS syn...

  20. Thermodynamic Calculation Study on Effect of Manganese on Stability of Austenite in High Nitrogen Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2016-05-01

    A series of high nitrogen steels were studied by using thermodynamic calculations to investigate the effect of manganese on the stability of austenite. Surprisingly, it was found that the austenite stabilizing ability of manganese was strongly weakened by chromium, but it was strengthened by molybdenum. In addition, with an increase of manganese content, the ferrite stabilizing ability of chromium significantly increased, but that of molybdenum decreased. Therefore, strong interactions exist between manganese and the other alloying elements, which should be the main reason for the difference among different constituent diagrams.