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Sample records for biofilm forming capacity

  1. In vitro biofilm forming capacity on abiotic contact surfaces by outbreak-associated Vibrio harveyi strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pallaval Veera Bramha Chari; Kuchipudi Viswadeepika; Bottu Anand Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the in vitro biofilm forming capacity on abiotic food contact surfaces by Vibrio harveyi (V. harveyi) strains. Methods:Thirty six Gram-negative V. harveyi strains were isolated from various street vended seafood outlets in a food processing line and evaluated for their ability to produce mucoid biofilms on food contact surfaces using a microplate assay. Phenotypic characterization of mucoid biofilm producing V. harveyi strains were screened on Congo red agar, thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar and tryptic soy agar, respectively. Results: Only five V. harveyi strains (14%) were mucoid biofilm producers characterized by formation of black colonies, whereas the remaining 31 strains (86%) were not capable of producing biofilm characterized by formation of red colonies or pinkish-red colonies with darkening at the centre. The morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics of these isolates were studied using standard protocols. Strain identification was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction targeted to species-specific polymerase chain reaction primers VH-1 and VH-2 corresponding to variable regions of V. harveyi 16S rRNA sequence. All the biofilm-forming strains showed resistance to at least three antimicrobial compounds tested. V. harveyi strains isolated from various seafood were able to form biofilms of different capacity, and the strains VB267, VB238 and VB166 isolated from cat fish, shrimp and eel fish exhibited significantly greater biofilm forming ability compared to other isolates. Conclusions: It can be concluded from the present study that the strain VB166 was able to better attach and form subsequent biofilms on glass and stainless steel compared to high density polyethylene. These properties allow these bacteria to survive, proliferate and persist in street vended seafood outlets.

  2. In vitro biofilm forming capacity on abiotic contact surfaces by outbreak-associated Vibrio harveyi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallaval Veera Bramha Chari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vitro biofilm forming capacity on abiotic food contact surfaces by Vibrio harveyi (V. harveyi strains. Methods: Thirty six Gram-negative V. harveyi strains were isolated from various street vended seafood outlets in a food processing line and evaluated for their ability to produce mucoid biofilms on food contact surfaces using a microplate assay. Phenotypic characterization of mucoid biofilm producing V. harveyi strains were screened on Congo red agar, thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar and tryptic soy agar, respectively. Results: Only five V. harveyi strains (14% were mucoid biofilm producers characterized by formation of black colonies, whereas the remaining 31 strains (86% were not capable of producing biofilm characterized by formation of red colonies or pinkish-red colonies with darkening at the centre. The morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics of these isolates were studied using standard protocols. Strain identification was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction targeted to species-specific polymerase chain reaction primers VH-1 and VH-2 corresponding to variable regions of V. harveyi 16S rRNA sequence. All the biofilm-forming strains showed resistance to at least three antimicrobial compounds tested. V. harveyi strains isolated from various seafood were able to form biofilms of different capacity, and the strains VB267, VB238 and VB166 isolated from cat fish, shrimp and eel fish exhibited significantly greater biofilm forming ability compared to other isolates. Conclusions: It can be concluded from the present study that the strain VB166 was able to better attach and form subsequent biofilms on glass and stainless steel compared to high density polyethylene. These properties allow these bacteria to survive, proliferate and persist in street vended seafood outlets.

  3. Biofilm-forming capacity in biogenic amine-producing bacteria isolated from dairy products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eDiaz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms on the surface of food industry equipment are reservoirs of potentially food-contaminating bacteria - both spoilage and pathogenic. However, the capacity of biogenic amine (BA-producers to form biofilms has remained largely unexamined. BAs are low molecular weight, biologically active compounds that in food can reach concentrations high enough to be a toxicological hazard. Fermented foods, especially some types of cheese, accumulate the highest BA concentrations of all. The present work examines the biofilm-forming capacity of 56 BA-producing strains belonging to three genera and 10 species (12 Enterococcus faecalis, 6 Enterococcus faecium, 6 Enterococcus durans, 1 Enterococcus hirae, 12 Lactococcus lactis, 7 Lactobacillus vaginalis, 2 Lactobacillus curvatus, 2 Lactobacillus brevis, 1 Lactobacillus reuteri and 7 Lactobacillus parabuchneri, all isolated from dairy products. Strains of all the tested species - except for L. vaginalis - were able to produce biofilms on polystyrene and adhered to stainless steel. However, the biomass produced in biofilms was strain-dependent. These results suggest that biofilms may provide a route via which fermented foods can become contaminated by BA-producing microorganisms.

  4. Biofilm-Forming Capacity in Biogenic Amine-Producing Bacteria Isolated from Dairy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maria; Ladero, Victor; del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Fernández, María; Martin, M. Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms on the surface of food industry equipment are reservoirs of potentially food-contaminating bacteria—both spoilage and pathogenic. However, the capacity of biogenic amine (BA)-producers to form biofilms has remained largely unexamined. BAs are low molecular weight, biologically active compounds that in food can reach concentrations high enough to be a toxicological hazard. Fermented foods, especially some types of cheese, accumulate the highest BA concentrations of all. The present work examines the biofilm-forming capacity of 56 BA-producing strains belonging to three genera and 10 species (12 Enterococcus faecalis, 6 Enterococcus faecium, 6 Enterococcus durans, 1 Enterococcus hirae, 12 Lactococcus lactis, 7 Lactobacillus vaginalis, 2 Lactobacillus curvatus, 2 Lactobacillus brevis, 1 Lactobacillus reuteri, and 7 Lactobacillus parabuchneri), all isolated from dairy products. Strains of all the tested species - except for L. vaginalis—were able to produce biofilms on polystyrene and adhered to stainless steel. However, the biomass produced in biofilms was strain-dependent. These results suggest that biofilms may provide a route via which fermented foods can become contaminated by BA-producing microorganisms. PMID:27242675

  5. Retention capacity of bio-films formed on the surface of nuclear and basaltic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The role of the bacteria in the various compartments of a repository site was still not extensively studied. It is likely that most known bacteria cannot develop on the surface of radioactive materials but one must consider that 10% only of the bacteria species are known. As an example, a research group has recently discovered an isolated community of bacteria nearly two miles underground that derives all of its energy from the decay of radioactive rocks (LIN et al., 2006). It is generally accepted that alterations of rocks and anthropogenic products are not exclusively driven by the interaction with water or mineral aqueous solutions. Organic compounds as well as microorganisms are important in mineral degradation processes, and secondary mineralization. However, the exact role of bio-films in these processes remains unclear. The study of (AOUAD, 2006) will be presented as an example. Two materials were tested: the reference French nuclear glass SON68 17 LIDC2A2Z1 and a tholeiitic basaltic glass (natural analogue). Experiments were carried out for 19 weeks at 25 deg. C. A specific growth medium were developed which allows both the growth of Pseudomonas bacterium and a precise measurement, using ICP-MS, of trace elements solubilized from both glasses (AOUAD et al., 2005) The thickness of bio-films, analyzed by confocal laser microscopy was 40 μm for both materials. These bio-films are able to efficiently trap most of the glass constituents. They also form a protective barrier at the solid/solution interface. (authors)

  6. The capacity of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette transporters to form biofilms and comparison with the wild type

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    Marina Ceruso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is a food-borne pathogen responsible for human listeriosis, an invasive infection with high mortality rates. Lm has developed efficient strategies for survival under stress conditions such as starvation and wide variations in temperature, pH, and osmolarity. Therefore, Lm can survive in food under multiple stress conditions. Detailed studies to determine the mode of action of this pathogen for survival under stress conditions are important to control Lm in food. It has been shown that genes encoding for ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are induced in Lm in food, in particular under stress conditions. Previous studies showed that these genes are involved in sensitivity to nisin, acids, and salt. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of some ABC transporters in biofilm formation. Therefore, deletion mutants of ABC transporter genes (LMOf2365_1875 and LMOf2365_1877 were created in Lm F2365, and then were compared to the wild type for their capacity to form biofilms. Lm strain F2365 was chosen as reference since the genome is fully sequenced and furthermore this strain is particularly involved in food-borne outbreaks of listeriosis. Our results showed that DLMOf2365_1875 had an increased capacity to form biofilms compared to the wild type, indicating that LMOf2365_1875 negatively regulates biofilm formation. A deeper knowledge on the ability to form biofilms in these mutants may help in the development of intervention strategies to control Lm in food and in the environment.

  7. STUDY OF ULTRASOUND RADIATION INFLUENCE ON ABILITY TO FORM BIOFILMS AND FORMED BIOFILMS OF KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    OpenAIRE

    Mozgova Yu.A.

    2013-01-01

    With aim to detect ability to form biofilms in K.pneumoniae and to study effects of low-intensity ultrasound radiation on formed biofilms and their aggregation microbiological research of material frompatients with pyoinflammatory diseases was performed. It was found that low-intensity ultrasound radiation could destroy formed biofilms of K. pneumoniae and decrease ability of this pathogen to form secondary biofilms.

  8. Biofilms: an emergent form of bacterial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Steinberg, Peter; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2016-08-11

    Bacterial biofilms are formed by communities that are embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Importantly, bacteria in biofilms exhibit a set of 'emergent properties' that differ substantially from free-living bacterial cells. In this Review, we consider the fundamental role of the biofilm matrix in establishing the emergent properties of biofilms, describing how the characteristic features of biofilms - such as social cooperation, resource capture and enhanced survival of exposure to antimicrobials - all rely on the structural and functional properties of the matrix. Finally, we highlight the value of an ecological perspective in the study of the emergent properties of biofilms, which enables an appreciation of the ecological success of biofilms as habitat formers and, more generally, as a bacterial lifestyle. PMID:27510863

  9. Characterisation of biofilms formed by Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 and food spoilage isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández Ramírez, M.D.; Smid, E.J.; Abee, T.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum has been associated with food spoilage in a wide range of products and the biofilm growth mode has been implicated as a possible source of contamination. In this study we analysed the biofilm forming capacity of L. plantarum WCFS1 and six food spoilage isolates. Biofilm forma

  10. Interaction between biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin.

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuda, H; Ajiki, Y; Koga, T.; Kawada, H; Yokota, T.

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between bacterial biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and clarithromycin, a macrolide having no anti-P. aeruginosa activity, were investigated. P. aeruginosa incubated for 10 days on membrane filters formed biofilms on the surfaces of the filters. The biofilms were characterized by dense colonizations of bacteria and thick membranous structures that covered the colonies. Treatment of the biofilms with a relatively low concentration of clarithromycin for 5 days resulted in a...

  11. Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and ...

  12. Antimicrobial activities against biofilm formed by Proteus mirabilis isolates from wound and urinary tract infections

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    R Wasfi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial species are capable of living as biofilm and/or planktonic forms. There is increasing evidence for the role of bacterial biofilm in various wound and urinary tract infections (UTIs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the bacteria, isolated from urinary tract infections (UTIs and wound infections, to form biofilm and correlate the role of biofilm with their antimicrobial resistance. Materials and Methods: All the isolated bacteria were screened for their ability to form biofilm using the microtitre plate method. Results: Wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter sp. had more biofilm forming capacity than the UTI isolates. Proteus mirabilis isolates were among the strongest biofilm forming bacteria and were chosen for antimicrobial study. In sub-MIC concentrations of antimicrobial agents used, ciprofloxacin was found to be the most effective in decreasing biofilm formation. On the other hand, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin were effective in partial removal of preformed biofilm biomass. Conclusion: Ciprofloxacin was more effective in killing bacterial cells especially at high antimicrobial concentrations that could be reached in urine levels and can be used in impregenating catheters.

  13. Hibiscus sabdariffa extract inhibits in vitro biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans isolated from recurrent urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Issam Alshami; Alharbi, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the prevention of recurrent candiduria using natural based approaches and to study the antimicrobial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) extract and the biofilm forming capacity of Candida albicans strains in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract. Methods: In this particular study, six strains of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolated from recurrent candiduria were used. The susceptibility of fungal isolates, time-kill curves and biofilm forming ...

  14. Ultrastructure of Biofilms Formed by Bacteria from Industrial Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Raulio, Mari

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms exist predominantly as sessile multispecies communities in natural habitats. Most bacterial species can form these matrix-enclosed microbial communities called biofilms. Biofilms occur in a wide range of environments, on every surface with sufficient moisture and nutrients, also on surfaces in industrial settings and engineered water systems. This unwanted biofilm formation on equipment surfaces is called biofouling. Biofouling can significantly decrease equipment performance a...

  15. EFFECT OF ULTRASOUND RADIATION ON FORMED BIOFILMS AND ABILITY TO THEIR FORMATION IN S.AUREUS

    OpenAIRE

    Mishina M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological research of the clinical material receivedfrom with inflammatory processes was carried on that todetect ability to form biofilms and to study effect of low-intensity ultrasound radiation on formed biofilms and theiraggregation ability. Performed research showed that ultrasound radiation of low intensity could destroy biofilms and inhibit ability of microorganisms to form secondary biofilms.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  17. Anti-Biofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Peptides That Inhibit Biofilms Formed by Pathogens Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

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    César de la Fuente-Núñez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF patients often acquire chronic respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc species. In the CF lung, these bacteria grow as multicellular aggregates termed biofilms. Biofilms demonstrate increased (adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotics, and there are currently no available biofilm-specific therapies. Using plastic adherent, hydroxyapatite and flow cell biofilm models coupled with confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that an anti-biofilm peptide 1018 prevented biofilm formation, eradicated mature biofilms and killed biofilms formed by a wide range of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia clinical isolates. New peptide derivatives were designed that, compared to their parent peptide 1018, showed similar or decreased anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased activity against biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, some of these new peptide derivatives retained the immunomodulatory activity of 1018 since they induced the production of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and were non-toxic towards these cells. Peptide 1018 and its derivatives provide promising leads for the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and hyperinflammatory lung disease in CF patients.

  18. Helicobacter pylori-coccoid forms and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Rasmussen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori occurs in three stages: spiral forms, coccoid forms and degenerative forms. The spiral forms are viable, culturable, virulent and can colonize experimental animals and induce inflammation. The coccoid forms may also be viable but are....... Helicobacter pylori does not seem to take part in biofilm formation in the oral cavity even though the bacterium may be detected....... nonculturable, less virulent and are less likely to colonize and induce inflammation in experimental animals than the spiral forms. The degenerative forms are pyknotic, nonculturable, coccoid forms of dead H. pylori. These forms cannot be cultured and the cell membrane has disintegrated but gene material can be...

  19. Hibiscus sabdariffa extract inhibits in vitro biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans isolated from recurrent urinary tract infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Issam Alshami; Ahmed E Alharbi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the prevention of recurrent candiduria using natural based approaches and to study the antimicrobial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) extract and the biofilm forming capacity of Candida albicans strains in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract.Methods:In this particular study, six strains of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolated from recurrent candiduria were used. The susceptibility of fungal isolates, time-kill curves and biofilm forming capacity in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract were determined. Results: Various levels minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract were observed against all the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mL. Time-kill experiment demonstrated that the effect was fungistatic. The biofilm inhibition assay results showed that H. sabdariffa extract inhibited biofilm production of all the isolates. Conclusions: The results of the study support the potential effect of H. sabdariffa extract for preventing recurrent candiduria and emphasize the significance of the plant extract approach as a potential antifungal agent.

  20. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

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    Hebert F. Culler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4% of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence. This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Forms Biofilms in Acute Infection Independent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 h of infection in thermally injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections as well. Using light, electron, and confocal scanning laser microscopy, P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burn...

  2. Identification and Localization of Extraradicular Biofilm-Forming Bacteria Associated with Refractory Endodontic Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Nobuo; Noiri, Yuichiro; Narimatsu, Masahiro; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been found to develop on root surfaces outside the apical foramen and be associated with refractory periapical periodontitis. However, it is unknown which bacterial species form extraradicular biofilms. The present study aimed to investigate the identity and localization of bacteria in human extraradicular biofilms. Twenty extraradicular biofilms, used to identify bacteria using a PCR-based 16S rRNA gene assay, and seven root-tips, used to observe immunohistochemical l...

  3. Hyperspectral Biofilm Classification Analysis for Carrying Capacity of Migratory Birds in the South Bay Salt Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Chen; Kuss, Amber Jean; Ketron, Tyler; Nguyen, Andrew; Remar, Alex Covello; Newcomer, Michelle; Fleming, Erich; Debout, Leslie; Debout, Brad; Detweiler, Angela; Skiles, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Tidal marshes are highly productive ecosystems that support migratory birds as roosting and over-wintering habitats on the Pacific Flyway. Microphytobenthos, or more commonly 'biofilms' contribute significantly to the primary productivity of wetland ecosystems, and provide a substantial food source for macroinvertebrates and avian communities. In this study, biofilms were characterized based on taxonomic classification, density differences, and spectral signatures. These techniques were then applied to remotely sensed images to map biofilm densities and distributions in the South Bay Salt Ponds and predict the carrying capacity of these newly restored ponds for migratory birds. The GER-1500 spectroradiometer was used to obtain in situ spectral signatures for each density-class of biofilm. The spectral variation and taxonomic classification between high, medium, and low density biofilm cover types was mapped using in-situ spectral measurements and classification of EO-1 Hyperion and Landsat TM 5 images. Biofilm samples were also collected in the field to perform laboratory analyses including chlorophyll-a, taxonomic classification, and energy content. Comparison of the spectral signatures between the three density groups shows distinct variations useful for classification. Also, analysis of chlorophyll-a concentrations show statistically significant differences between each density group, using the Tukey-Kramer test at an alpha level of 0.05. The potential carrying capacity in South Bay Salt Ponds is estimated to be 250,000 birds.

  4. In vivo cell aggregations of a recent swine biofilm-forming isolate of Leptospira interrogans strain from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brihuega, Bibiana; Samartino, Luis; Auteri, Carmelo; Venzano, Agustín; Caimi, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis of ubiquitous distribution caused by spirochetes. Leptospires exist either as saprophytic water-associated organisms or as animal pathogens that can survive in water. Previous works have demonstrated that both saprophytic and pathogenic leptospires are able to produce functional biofilms, which consist of a community of bacteria embedded in an extracellular matrix attached to a surface. This structure is believed to provide protection from environmental aggressiveness. In the present study, we analyzed the capacity of biofilm formation both of a a recent field isolate of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona obtained from an aborted swine fetus and of the saprophytic Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc. We used light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and scanning electron microscopic examinations on glass and polystyrene plate models to evaluate the process in vitro. The ability to form bacterial aggregations in vivo was tested using pregnant guinea pigs infected with both strains. We obtained biofilms both on glass and plastic surfaces. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed differences in the biofilm structure formed by both strains. L. interrogans serovar Pomona cell aggregations were observed in placental tissues by light microscopy. Biofilms and cell aggregations are consistent with the life of saprophytic strains in water and could help pathogenic strains to colonize the host and lead to abortion in pregnant animals. PMID:23102459

  5. Behaviour of biofilms formed by Pseudomonas fluorescens under different flow regimes when exposed to surfactants : role of the biofilm mechanical stability

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, M; Pereira, M. O.; Vieira, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The effectiveness of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to control biofilms formed by Pseudomonas fluorescens on stainless steel slides under laminar and turbulent conditions, using a flow cell reactor, is compared in this study. The antimicrobial action of the surfactants was evaluated in terms of the activity of the biofilm, the biofilm mass that remained on the surface after treatment and the biofilm morphological characteristics. The mec...

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis isolates of similar RAPD genotype exhibit diversity in biofilm forming ability in vitro

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    Elborn Stuart J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is considered to grow in a biofilm in cystic fibrosis (CF chronic lung infections. Bacterial cell motility is one of the main factors that have been connected with P. aeruginosa adherence to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. In this investigation, we employed molecular and microscopic methods to determine the presence or absence of motility in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, and statistically correlated this with their biofilm forming ability in vitro. Results Our investigations revealed a wide diversity in the production, architecture and control of biofilm formation. Of 96 isolates, 49% possessed swimming motility, 27% twitching and 52% swarming motility, while 47% were non-motile. Microtitre plate assays for biofilm formation showed a range of biofilm formation ability from biofilm deficient phenotypes to those that formed very thick biofilms. A comparison of the motility and adherence properties of individual strains demonstrated that the presence of swimming and twitching motility positively affected biofilm biomass. Crucially, however, motility was not an absolute requirement for biofilm formation, as 30 non-motile isolates actually formed thick biofilms, and three motile isolates that had both flagella and type IV pili attached only weakly. In addition, CLSM analysis showed that biofilm-forming strains of P. aeruginosa were in fact capable of entrapping non-biofilm forming strains, such that these 'non-biofilm forming' cells could be observed as part of the mature biofilm architecture. Conclusions Clinical isolates that do not produce biofilms in the laboratory must have the ability to survive in the patient lung. We propose that a synergy exists between isolates in vivo, which allows "non biofilm-forming" isolates to be incorporated into the biofilm. Therefore, there is the potential for strains that are apparently non-biofilm forming in vitro to participate in biofilm-mediated pathogenesis in the CF

  7. In vitro biofilm forming potential of Streptococcus suis isolated from human and swine in China

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    Guo Dawei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a swine pathogen and also a zoonotic agent. The formation of biofilms allows S. suis to become persistent colonizers and resist clearance by the host immune system and antibiotics. In this study, biofilm forming potentials of various S. suis strains were characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and tissue culture plates stained with crystal violet. In addition, the effects of five antimicrobial agents on biofilm formation were assayed in this study. S. suis produced biofilms on smooth and rough surface. The nutritional contents including glucose and NaCl in the growth medium modulated biofilm formation. There was a significant difference in their biofilm-forming ability among all 46 S. suis strains. The biofilm-forming potential of S. suis serotype 9 was stronger than type 2 and all other types. However, biofilm formation was inhibited by five commonly used antimicrobial agents, penicillin, erythromycin, azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin at subinhibitory concentrations, among which inhibition of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was stronger than that of other three antimicrobial agents.Our study provides a detailed analysis of biofilm formation potential in S. suis, which is a step towards understanding its role in pathogenesis, and eventually lead to a better understanding of how to eradicate S. suis growing as biofilms with antibiotic therapy.

  8. ENTEROCOCCI AND THEIR ABILITY TO FORM A BIOFILM

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    Jana Bezeková

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE Number of enterococci determined in raw milk cistern samples was in range of 2.95 to 4.18 log CFU.ml-1 and raw milk samples obtained from storage tanks contained enterococci count in the range of 3.04 to 4.51 log CFU.ml-1. Results of microbiological quality evaluation showed, that count of enterococci increased during cold storage of raw milk. Portion of enterococci from the total microflora of raw milk taken from cistern samples was 0.44 %, otherwise in raw milk samples taken from storage tanks portion of enterococci decreased to 0.38 %. Among enterococci isolates  E. faecalis was the predominat species in tested samples of raw milk from both cistern – 58.1 % and storage tank – 71.7 %. The following species were identified E. faecium, E. group III., E. mundtii, E. casseliflavus. It was found that 38 % E. faecalis isolates were able to form a biofilm.doi:10.5219/200 800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

  9. Marine bacteria from the French Atlantic coast displaying high forming-biofilm abilities and different biofilm 3D architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Doghri, Ibtissem; Rodrigues, Sophie; Bazire, Alexis; Dufour, Alain; Akbar, David; Sopena, Valérie; Sablé, Sophie; Lanneluc, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported the species composition of bacterial communities in marine biofilms formed on natural or on man-made existing structures. In particular, the roles and surface specificities of primary colonizers are largely unknown for most surface types. The aim of this study was to obtain potentially pioneering bacterial strains with high forming-biofilm abilities from two kinds of marine biofilms, collected from two different surfaces of the French Atlantic coast: an in...

  10. Effect of Amylase, Papaein and Pepsin enzyme solutions on Candida biofilm formed on acrylic resin plates

    OpenAIRE

    AA jafari_nodoushan; FalahTafti A; Emmami P; Ashouri

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Denture stomatitis results from colonization of oral Candida on the surface of denture acrylic base. To control this infection,Candida biofilm formation must be prevented using mechanical and chemical decontamination. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Amylase, Papaein and Pepsin solutions on removal of Candida Albicans plaques formed on acrylic resin plates. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study Candida biofilm was formed on 220 ...

  11. Salmonella enterica isolates from layer farm environments are able to form biofilm on eggshell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Vivek V; McWhorter, Andrea R; Chousalkar, Kapil K

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the eggshell biofilm forming ability of Salmonella enterica isolates recovered from egg farms. Multicellular behaviour and biofilm production were examined at 22 and 37°C by Congo red morphology and the crystal violet staining assay. The results indicated that the biofilm forming behaviour of Salmonella isolates was dependent on temperature and associated with serovars. Significantly greater biofilm production was observed at 22°C compared with 37°C. The number of viable biofilm cells attached to eggshells after incubation for 48 h at 22°C was significantly influenced by serovar. Scanning electron microscopic examination revealed firm attachment of bacterial cells to the eggshell surface. The relative expression of csgD and adrA gene was significantly higher in eggshell biofilm cells of S. Mbandaka and S. Oranienburg. These findings demonstrate that Salmonella isolates are capable of forming biofilm on the eggshell surface and that this behaviour is influenced by temperature and serovar. PMID:27268931

  12. Biofilm forming abilities of Salmonella are correlated with persistence in fish meal- and feed factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heir Even

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feed contaminated with Salmonella spp. constitutes a risk of Salmonella infections in animals, and subsequently in the consumers of animal products. Salmonella are occasionally isolated from the feed factory environment and some clones of Salmonella persist in the factory environment for several years. One hypothesis is that biofilm formation facilitates persistence by protecting bacteria against environmental stress, e.g. disinfection. The aim of this study was to investigate the biofilm forming potential of Salmonella strains from feed- and fishmeal factories. The study included 111 Salmonella strains isolated from Norwegian feed and fish meal factories in the period 1991–2006 of serovar Agona, serovar Montevideo, serovar Senftenberg and serovar Typhimurium. Results Significant differences were found between serovars regarding the abilities to form biofilm on polystyrene (microtiter plate assay and in the air-liquid interface of nutrient broth (pellicle assay. Strains of serovar Agona and serovar Montevideo were good biofilm producers. In Norwegian factories, clones of these serovars have been observed to persist for several years. Most serovar Senftenberg clones appear to persist for a shorter period, and strains of this serovar were medium biofilm producers in our test systems. Strains of the serovar Typhimurium were relatively poor biofilm producers. Salmonella ser. Typhimurium clones have not been observed to persist even though this serovar is resident in Norwegian wild life. When classifying strains according to persistence or presumed non-persistence, persistent strains produced more biofilm than presumed non-persisting strains. Conclusion The results indicate a correlation between persistence and biofilm formation which suggests that biofilm forming ability may be an important factor for persistence of Salmonella in the factory environment.

  13. Functional analysis of stress protein data in a flor yeast subjected to a biofilm forming condition

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-García, Jaime; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan; García-Martínez, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In this data article, an OFFGEL fractionator coupled to LTQ Orbitrap XL MS equipment and a SGD filtering were used to detect in a biofilm-forming flor yeast strain, the maximum possible number of stress proteins under the first stage of a biofilm formation conditions (BFC) and under an initial stage of fermentation used as reference, so-called non-biofilm formation condition (NBFC). Protein functional analysis – based on cellular components and biological process GO terms – was performed for ...

  14. Characterizing Pilus-Mediated Adhesion of Biofilm-Forming E. coli to Chemically Diverse Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, He; Murdaugh, Anne E.; Chen, Wei; Aidala, Katherine E.; Ferguson, Megan A.; Spain, Eileen M.; Núñez, Megan E.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms living together at an interface. Because biofilms are often associated with contamination and infection, it is critical to understand how bacterial cells adhere to surfaces in the early stages of biofilm formation. Even harmless commensal Escherichia coli naturally forms biofilms in the human digestive tract by adhering to epithelial cells, a trait that presents major concerns in the case of pathogenic E. coli strains. The laboratory strain E...

  15. Effect of Amylase, Papaein and Pepsin enzyme solutions on Candida biofilm formed on acrylic resin plates

    OpenAIRE

    A Jafari Nodoushan; A Fallah Tafti; Emami, P; H Ashoori

    2013-01-01

    Abstract:     Background and Aim: Denture stomatitis results from colonization of oral Candida on the surface of denture acrylic base. To control this infection,Candida biofilm formation must be prevented using mechanical and chemical decontamination. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Amylase, Papaein and Pepsin solutions on removal of Candida Albicans plaques formed on acrylic resin plates.   Materials and Methods : In this experimental study Candida biofilm was ...

  16. Characterization of biofilm-forming microorganisms isolated from vaginal exudate in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, P.; Castro, J.; Cereija, Tatiana Barros Reis; Henriques, Ana Filipa Frutuoso Mendes; Cerca, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of the most common gynaecological conditions affecting women in the reproductive age, and can lead to increase risk gynaecological infections and pre-term labour. The aetiology of this pathology is still poorly understood, but recent reports referring to the presence of anaerobic biofilms both in the healthy and BV vagina (with different microbial compositions) have led to the theory that the microorganisms that form biofilms may be relevant for the aetiology o...

  17. The Role of Biofilms in the Sedimentology of Actively Forming Gypsum Deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Marilyn B.; Des Marais, David J.; Turk, Kendra A.; Parenteau, Mary N.; Jahnke, Linda L.; Kubo, Michael D. Y.

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of

  18. Functional analysis of stress protein data in a flor yeast subjected to a biofilm forming condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Jaime; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan; García-Martínez, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In this data article, an OFFGEL fractionator coupled to LTQ Orbitrap XL MS equipment and a SGD filtering were used to detect in a biofilm-forming flor yeast strain, the maximum possible number of stress proteins under the first stage of a biofilm formation conditions (BFC) and under an initial stage of fermentation used as reference, so-called non-biofilm formation condition (NBFC). Protein functional analysis – based on cellular components and biological process GO terms – was performed for these proteins through the SGD Gene Ontology Slim Mapper tool. A detailed analysis and interpretation of the data can be found in “Stress responsive proteins of a flor yeast strain during the early stages of biofilm formation” [1]. PMID:27104213

  19. Biofilm forming and leaching mechanism during bioleaching chalcopyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅建华; 胡岳华; 邱冠周; 柳建设; 徐竞

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of attachment and leaching of thiobacillus ferrooxcidans (T. f. ) on chalcopyrite were studied. The shaking flasks with bacteria were observed by SEM. The process of T. f attached to the surface of the mineral sample and the biofilm forming were described. The promoting role of the biofilm for bioleaching was discussed. The existence of Fe2+ in the exopolysaccharide layer of T. f was demonstrated by EM(electronic microscope)cell-chemistry analysis. These results show that under the proper growth condition of bacteria, bioleaching of chalcopyrite results in the formation of complete biofilm after 2 - 3 weeks. There are iron ions in the outer layer polymer of T. f. , which provides the micro-environment for themselves, and can guaruntee the energy needed for the bacteria growth in the biofilm. At the same time, Fe3+ ions produced oxidize sulfide which brings about the increase of both growth rate of the bacterial and leaching rate of sulfide minerals.

  20. Biofilm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvíderová, Jana

    Berlin: Springer, 2015 - (Amils, R.; Gargaud, M.; Cernicharo Quintanilla, J.; James Claves, H.; Irvine, W.; Pinti, D.; Viso, M.), s. 1-3 ISBN 978-3-642-27833-4 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : biofilm * microbial mat * astrobiology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  1. The In Vitro Susceptibility of Biofilm Forming Medical Device Related Pathogens to Conventional Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC, and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC and kill kinetics were established for vancomycin, rifampicin, trimethoprim, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin against the biofilm forming bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984, Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213, Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA (ATCC 43300, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1, and Escherichia coli (NCTC 8196. MICs and MBCs were determined via broth microdilution in 96-well plates. MBECs were studied using the Calgary Biofilm Device. Values obtained were used to investigate the kill kinetics of conventional antimicrobials against a range of planktonic and biofilm microorganisms over a period of 24 hours. Planktonic kill kinetics were determined at 4xMIC and biofilm kill kinetics at relative MBECs. Susceptibility of microorganisms varied depending on antibiotic selected and phenotypic form of bacteria. Gram-positive planktonic isolates were extremely susceptible to vancomycin (highest MBC: 7.81 mg L−1: methicillin sensitive and resistant S. aureus but no MBEC value was obtained against all biofilm pathogens tested (up to 1000 mg L−1. Both gentamicin and ciprofloxacin displayed the broadest spectrum of activity with MIC and MBCs in the mg L−1 range against all planktonic isolates tested and MBEC values obtained against all but S. epidermidis (ATCC 35984 and MRSA (ATCC 43300.

  2. Antibacterial activity of Espand (Peganum harmala alcoholic extracts against six pathogenic bacteria in planktonic and biofilm forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinab Mohsenipour

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microbial biofilms have attracted interest in recent years because they have become the most important cause of nosocomial infections. This study was aimed to examine the antibacterial activities of Peganum harmala extracts on the development of microbial biofilms and planktonic form of six pathogenic bacteria which include Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the crude extracts against the planktonic form of bacteria were evaluated by using disc diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values were determined by a macrobroth dilution technique. Anti- biofilm effects of the extracts were assessed by microtiter plate method. Results: According to the results, P. harmala extracts could inhibit test bacteria in planktonic form. To inhibit biofilm formation, biofilm metabolic activity and eradication of established biofilms, efficiency of the extracts depended on concentration. The highest inhibitory effects of P. harmala extracts were observed on biofilm formation of S. aureus (90.28% also, the greatest demolish were observed on S. pneumonia biofilm (77.76%. These extracts cause dramatically decrease the metabolic activity of bacteria in biofilm structures, in this case the decrement of B. cereus were highest (69.98% compared to other tested bacteria. Discussion and conclusion: Therefore, it can be suggested that P.harmala extracts applied as antimicrobial agents against testing bacteria particularly in biofilm forms

  3. Reductive capacity measurement of waste forms for secondary radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Wooyong; Yang, Jung-Seok; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-12-01

    The reductive capacities of dry ingredients and final solid waste forms were measured using both the Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) methods and the results were compared. Blast furnace slag (BFS), sodium sulfide, SnF2, and SnCl2 used as dry ingredients to make various waste forms showed significantly higher reductive capacities compared to other ingredients regardless of which method was used. Although the BFS exhibits appreciable reductive capacity, it requires greater amounts of time to fully react. In almost all cases, the Ce(IV) method yielded larger reductive capacity values than those from the Cr(VI) method and can be used as an upper bound for the reductive capacity of the dry ingredients and waste forms, because the Ce(IV) method subjects the solids to a strong acid (low pH) condition that dissolves much more of the solids. Because the Cr(VI) method relies on a neutral pH condition, the Cr(VI) method can be used to estimate primarily the waste form surface-related and readily dissolvable reductive capacity. However, the Cr(VI) method does not measure the total reductive capacity of the waste form, the long-term reductive capacity afforded by very slowly dissolving solids, or the reductive capacity present in the interior pores and internal locations of the solids.

  4. Reductive Capacity Measurement of Waste Forms for Secondary Radioactive Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Yang, Jungseok; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-09-28

    The reductive capacities of dry ingredients and final solid waste forms were measured using both the Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) methods and the results were compared. Blast furnace slag (BFS), sodium sulfide, SnF2, and SnCl2 used as dry ingredients to make various waste forms showed significantly higher reductive capacities compared to other ingredients regardless of which method was used. Although the BFS exhibits appreciable reductive capacity, it requires greater amounts of time to fully react. In almost all cases, the Ce(IV) method yielded larger reductive capacity values than those from the Cr(VI) method and can be used as an upper bound for the reductive capacity of the dry ingredients and waste forms, because the Ce(IV) method subjects the solids to a strong acid (low pH) condition that dissolves much more of the solids. Because the Cr(VI) method relies on a neutral pH condition, the Cr(VI) method can be used to estimate primarily the waste form surface-related and readily dissolvable reductive capacity. However, the Cr(VI) method does not measure the total reductive capacity of the waste form, the long-term reductive capacity afforded by very slowly dissolving solids, or the reductive capacity present in the interior pores and internal locations of the solids.

  5. Proteomic analysis of matrix of dental biofilm formed under dietary carbohydrate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, G P; Cury, J A; Dombroski, T C D; Pauletti, B A; Paes Leme, A F

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether protein changes in extracellular matrix of dental biofilm are a unique property of sucrose, this in situ study was conducted using as active control glucose and fructose, the sucrose monosaccharide constituents. Proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS after trypsin digestion. Absence or lower abundance of calcium-binding proteins and higher abundance of prolactin-induced proteins were found in biofilm formed in the presence of sucrose or its monosaccharide constituents compared with water, the negative control group. The data suggest that besides sucrose, other dietary carbohydrates may also provoke a change in the protein profile of extracellular matrix of dental biofilm formed. PMID:22614073

  6. Chemical sanitizers to control biofilms formed by two Pseudomonas species on stainless steel surface

    OpenAIRE

    Danila Soares Caixeta; Thiago Henrique Scarpa; Danilo Florisvaldo Brugnera; Dieyckson Osvani Freire; Eduardo Alves; Luiz Ronaldo de Abreu; Roberta Hilsdorf Piccoli

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens on AISI 304 stainless steel in the presence of reconstituted skim milk under different temperatures was conducted, and the potential of three chemical sanitizers in removing the mono-species biofilms formed was compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivated in skim milk at 28 °C presented better growth rate (10.4 log CFU.mL-1) when compared with 3.7 and 4.2 log CFU.mL-1 for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens cultivated at ...

  7. Polysaccharides serve as scaffold of biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lung infection by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major pathologic features in patients with cystic fibrosis. Mucoid P. aeruginosa is notorious for its biofilm forming capability and resistance to immune attacks. In this study, the roles of extracellular polymeric substances f...

  8. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmir; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip

    2015-05-01

    A method for in vitro identification of individual bacterial cells is presented. The method is based on a combination of optical tweezers for spatial trapping of individual bacterial cells and Raman microspectroscopy for acquisition of spectral "Raman fingerprints" obtained from the trapped cell. Here, Raman spectra were taken from the biofilm-forming cells without the influence of an extracellular matrix and were compared with biofilm-negative cells. Results of principal component analyses of Raman spectra enabled us to distinguish between the two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, we propose that Raman tweezers can become the technique of choice for a clearer understanding of the processes involved in bacterial biofilms which constitute a highly privileged way of life for bacteria, protected from the external environment.

  9. Role of biofilm in protection of the replicative form of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Di Cesare, Andrea; Sabatini, Luigia; Chessa, Elisa; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco; Citterio, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    The dual nature of Legionella pneumophila enables its survival in free and intracellular environments and underpins its infection and spread mechanisms. Experiments using bacterial cultures and improved RTqPCR protocols were devised to gain fresh insights into the role of biofilm in protecting the replicative form of L. pneumophila. mip gene expression was used as a marker of virulence in sessile (biofilm-bound) and planktonic (free-floating) cells of L. pneumophila serotype 1 ATCC 33152. The ratio of mip gene expression to transcriptionally active Legionella cells increased both in sessile and free-floating cells demonstrating an up-regulation of mip gene under nutrient depletion. However, a different trend was observed between the two forms, in planktonic cells the mip gene expression/transcriptionally active Legionella cells increased until the end of the experiment, while in the biofilm such increase was observed at the end of the experiment. These findings suggest a possible association between the switch to the transmissive phase of Legionella and a mip up-regulation and a role for biofilm in preserving Legionella cells in replicative form. Moreover, it has been shown that improved RTqPCR protocols are valuable tools to explore bacterial virulence. PMID:25023637

  10. Chemical sanitizers to control biofilms formed by two Pseudomonas species on stainless steel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Soares Caixeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens on AISI 304 stainless steel in the presence of reconstituted skim milk under different temperatures was conducted, and the potential of three chemical sanitizers in removing the mono-species biofilms formed was compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivated in skim milk at 28 °C presented better growth rate (10.4 log CFU.mL-1 when compared with 3.7 and 4.2 log CFU.mL-1 for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens cultivated at 7 °C, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed biofilm when cultivated at 28 °C. However, only the adhesion of P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens was observed when incubated at 7 °C. The sodium dichloroisocyanurate was the most efficient sanitizer in the reduction of the adhered P. aeruginosa cells at 7 and 28 °C and those on the biofilm, respectively. The hydrogen peroxide was more effective in the reduction of adhered cells of P. fluorescens at 7 °C.

  11. Bisphosphocins: novel antimicrobials for enhanced killing of drug-resistant and biofilm-forming bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jonathan P; DiTullio, Paul; Parkinson, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of antibiotic resistance and the threat posed by drug-resistant superbugs are a leading challenge confronting modern medicine in the 21st century. However, the progress on the development of novel antibiotics to combat this problem is severely lagging. A more concerted effort to develop novel therapeutic agents with robust activity and unique mechanisms of action will be needed to overcome the problem of drug resistance. Furthermore, biofilm forming bacteria are known to be increasingly resistant to the actions of antibiotics and are a leading cause of mortality or morbidity in nosocomial infections. Bisphosphocins (also scientifically known as nubiotics) are novel small protonated deoxynucleotide molecules, and exert their antibacterial activity by depolarization of the bacterial cell membrane, causing bacterial cell death. Bisphosphocins may represent an effective weapon against antibiotic-resistant and biofilm-forming pathogenic bacteria. Preclinical efficacy studies in animals have shown that the compounds are safe and, efficacious against various bacterial infections, including drug-resistant pathogens. In vitro biochemical analysis confirmed that the bactericidal activity of bisphosphocins is mediated by depolarization of the bacterial cell membrane, and these compounds are better able to penetrate through bacterial biofilm and kill the biofilm encased bacteria. This article will cover the structure, mode of action, safety, efficacy and the current state of development of bisphosphocins. Together, the information presented here will present a strong case for bisphosphocins to be considered for use as new weapons to complement the existing arsenal of antimicrobial drugs and as a first line defence against drug-resistant and biofilm-forming bacteria. PMID:26597426

  12. A novel model of chronic wounds: importance of redox imbalance and biofilm-forming bacteria for establishment of chronicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Dhall

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ∼6.5 M people and costing ∼$25B/year in the US alone. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies.

  13. [Investigation of the correlation between biofilm forming ability of urinary Candida isolates with the use of urinary catheters and change of antifungal susceptibility in the presence of biofilm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Hacer; Gülmez, Dolunay

    2016-04-01

    Frequency of Candida species causing urinary tract infections is increasing, and this increase is outstanding in nosocomial urinary tract infections especially in intensive care units. The ability of biofilm formation that is contributed to the virulence of the yeast, plays a role in the pathogenesis of biomaterial-related infections and also constitutes a risk for treatment failure. The aims of this study were to compare biofilm forming abilities of Candida strains isolated from urine cultures of patients with and without urinary catheters, and to investigate the change of antifungal susceptibility in the presence of biofilm. A total of 50 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures of 25 patients with urinary catheters (10 C.tropicalis, 6 C.glabrata, 4 C.albicans, 4 C.parapsilosis, 1 C.krusei) and 25 without urinary catheters (8 C.tropicalis, 6 C.albicans, 4 C.krusei, 3 C.parapsilosis, 2 C.kefyr, 1 C.glabrata, 1 C.lusitaniae) were included in the study. Biofilm forming ability was tested by Congo red agar (CRA) and microplate XTT [2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction methods. Fluconazole (FLU) and amphotericin B (AMP-B) susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by reference microdilution method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for planktonic cells and by XTT reduction assay in case of biofilm presence. Biofilm formation was detected in 12 (24%) by CRA and 50 (100%) of the isolates by XTT reduction method. None of the C.albicans (n= 10) and C.tropicalis (n= 18) strains were detected as biofilm positive by CRA, however, these strains were strongly positive by XTT reduction method. No statistically significant correlation was detected between the presence of urinary catheter and biofilm forming ability of the isolate (p> 0.05). This might be caused by the advantage of biofilm forming strains in adhesion to bladder mucosa at the initial stages of infection. For all of the isolates in

  14. Application of bacteriophages to reduce biofilms formed by hydrogen sulfide producing bacteria on surfaces in a rendering plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide producing bacteria (SPB) in raw animal by-products are likely to grow and form biofilms in the rendering processing environments, resulting in the release of harmful hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas. The objective of this study was to reduce SPB biofilms formed on different surfaces typically found in rendering plants by applying a bacteriophage cocktail. Using a 96-well microplate method, we determined that 3 SPB strains of Citrobacter freundii and Hafnia alvei are strong biofilm formers. Application of 9 bacteriophages (10(7) PFU/mL) from families of Siphoviridae and Myoviridae resulted in a 33%-70% reduction of biofilm formation by each SPB strain. On stainless steel and plastic templates, phage treatment (10(8) PFU/mL) reduced the attached cells of a mixed SPB culture (no biofilm) by 2.3 and 2.7 log CFU/cm(2) within 6 h at 30 °C, respectively, as compared with 2 and 1.5 log CFU/cm(2) reductions of SPB biofilms within 6 h at 30 °C. Phage treatment was also applied to indigenous SPB biofilms formed on the environmental surface, stainless steel, high-density polyethylene plastic, and rubber templates in a rendering plant. With phage treatment (10(9) PFU/mL), SPB biofilms were reduced by 0.7-1.4, 0.3-0.6, and 0.2-0.6 log CFU/cm(2) in spring, summer, and fall trials, respectively. Our study demonstrated that bacteriophages could effectively reduce the selected SPB strains either attached to or in formed biofilms on various surfaces and could to some extent reduce the indigenous SPB biofilms on the surfaces in the rendering environment. PMID:26102989

  15. Efficiency of different sanitation methods on Listeria monocytogenes biofilms formed under various environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belessi, Charalambia-Eirini A; Gounadaki, Antonia S; Psomas, Antonios N; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2011-03-01

    The resistance of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms formed under food processing conditions, against various sanitizing agents and disinfection procedures was evaluated in the present study. The first sanitation procedure included biofilm formation on stainless steel coupons (SS) placed in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSBYE) of various concentrations of NaCl (0.5, 7.5 and 9.5%) at different temperatures (5 and 20 °C). The biofilms formed were exposed to warm (60 °C) water for 20 min, or to peroxyacetic acid (2% PAA) for 1, 2, 3 and 6 min. Treatment with warm water caused no significant (P ≥ 0.05) reductions in the attached populations. Conversely, surviving bacteria on SS coupons decreased as the exposure time to 2% PAA increased and could not be detected by culture after 6 min of exposure. Biofilms formed at 20°C were more resistant to PAA than biofilms formed at 5 °C. Salt concentration in the growth medium had no marked impact on the resistance to PAA. The second sanitation procedure included biofilm formation of nonadapted (NA) and acid-adapted (AA) cells in TSBYE of pH 5.0 and 7.0 (i.e., NA-5.0, NA-7.0 and AA-5.0, AA-7.0) at 4 °C. Coupons bearing attached cells of L. monocytogenes were periodically exposed to chlorine (0.465% Cl(-)), quaternary ammonium compound (1% QAC) and 2% PAA. The resistance of attached cells to QAC, PAA and Cl(-) followed the order: AA-5.0>NA-7.0 ≥ AA-7.0>NA-5.0. The most effective sanitizer was QAC followed by PAA and Cl(-). The results can lead to the development of efficient sanitation strategies in order to eliminate L. monocytogenes from the processing environment. Furthermore, such results may explain the presence of L. monocytogenes after sanitation as a result of cell attachment history. PMID:21093085

  16. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuto Oyama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA. MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF and low-biofilm formers (L-BF. These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections.

  17. Photodynamic therapy for the eradication of biofilms formed by catheter associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Teresa Orlandi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a major opportunistic pathogen causing catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs associated with high mortality and morbidity. In this study 18 P. aeruginosa isolates from urine of catheterized patients were evaluated for in vitro biofilm formation.All the tested strains showed the ability to form biofilm more thicker than those formed by a cohort of 29 blood culture strains belonging to the same species. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT is a novel antimicrobial treatment that exploits a photosensitizer (PS and visible light to induce lethal oxidative damages in bacterial cells and could be used as local antimicrobial approach in CA-UTIs. Here we tested the susceptibility of planktonic and sessile cultures of P. aeruginosa strains, the model strain PAO1 and CA-UTI isolates, to photodynamic inactivation with a di cationic porphyrinic photosensitizer, the 5, 15-di (N-benzyl-4-pyridynium-porphyrin di chloride.Although Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regarded as a difficult target for antimicrobial chemotherapy, satisfactory bactericidal activities on both planktonic and biofilm cultures were observed.

  18. Antimicrobial flavonoids isolated from Indian medicinal plant Scutellaria oblonga inhibit biofilms formed by common food pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Narendran; Subramaniam, Shankar; Christena, Lowrence Rene; Muthuraman, Meenakshi Sundaram; Subramanian, Nagarajan Sai; Pemiah, Brindha; Sivasubramanian, Aravind

    2016-09-01

    Scutellaria oblonga Benth., a hitherto phytochemically unexplored Indian medicinal folklore plant was extracted with acetone and subjected to chromatography to yield nine flavonoids, for the first time from this plant. Antimicrobial assays were performed against 11 foodborne pathogens, and three molecules (Techtochrysin, Negletein and Quercitin-3-glucoside) depicted significant activity. These molecules were assessed for their rate of antibacterial action using time-kill curves which depicted complete inhibition of most of the bacteria within 12-16 h. The significant biofilm-reducing capability exhibited by these three molecules formed a significant finding of the current study. In most of the experiments, a 90-95% reduction in biofilms was observed. Thus, flavonoids as natural molecules from S. oblonga could be further researched to be used as potent antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents. PMID:26508034

  19. Characterization of Newly-Formed Manganese (Hydr)oxides in Biofilms in Pinal Creek, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, H.; Conklin, M.; O'Day, P.

    2003-12-01

    Active, biologically mediated precipitation of manganese (hydr)oxides (Mn-oxides) in Pinal Creek, Arizona, a stream with a history of high manganese levels due to historic mining practices, was studied to determine the identity of newly formed phases and their ability to sequester other metals. Packages of crushed grains of eight clean mineral substrates, quartz, ilmenite, microcline, rutile, magnetite, hematite and labradorite, were placed in Pinal Creek for one to three months. Glass slides were set out as well in order to characterize biofilm formation. After retrieval and drying, the coating distributions were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Morphologically, coating material developed on the different substrates after one month appeared similar to those developed after two and three months. Overall, the SEM images indicate poorly crystalline, aggregated particles that are small (less than a few microns in general) and lack geometric regularity, although size estimates are somewhat hindered by particle aggregation. The coatings that formed on the microscope slides are characterized as biofilms, as numerous microorganisms were observed using microscopy, both confocal and SEM. Samples were further characterized using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) on coatings that had been separated from mineral substrates. EXAFS spectra of material from rutile and quartz substrates and the biofilm were analyzed and fit, using a natural and synthetic birnessite compounds as reference spectra. This analysis suggests that the rutile, quartz, and biofilm samples are composed of a disordered Mn-oxide that is similar in local structure to a natural birnessite of low symmetry. The formation of disordered, poorly crystalline birnessite is important, as it is an extremely efficient metal scavenger and the interlayer vacancies in the birnessite structure aids in metal

  20. Characterizing pilus-mediated adhesion of biofilm-forming E. coli to chemically diverse surfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He; Murdaugh, Anne E; Chen, Wei; Aidala, Katherine E; Ferguson, Megan A; Spain, Eileen M; Núñez, Megan E

    2013-03-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms living together at an interface. Because biofilms are often associated with contamination and infection, it is critical to understand how bacterial cells adhere to surfaces in the early stages of biofilm formation. Even harmless commensal Escherichia coli naturally forms biofilms in the human digestive tract by adhering to epithelial cells, a trait that presents major concerns in the case of pathogenic E. coli strains. The laboratory strain E. coli ZK1056 provides an intriguing model system for pathogenic E. coli strains because it forms biofilms robustly on a wide range of surfaces.E. coli ZK1056 cells spontaneously form living biofilms on polylysine-coated AFM cantilevers, allowing us to measure quantitatively by AFM the adhesion between native biofilm cells and substrates of our choice. We use these biofilm-covered cantilevers to probe E. coli ZK1056 adhesion to five substrates with distinct and well-characterized surface chemistries, including fluorinated, amine-terminated, and PEG-like monolayers, as well as unmodified silicon wafer and mica. Notably, after only 0-10 s of contact time, the biofilms adhere strongly to fluorinated and amine-terminated monolayers as well as to mica and weakly to "antifouling" PEG monolayers, despite the wide variation in hydrophobicity and charge of these substrates. In each case the AFM retraction curves display distinct adhesion profiles in terms of both force and distance, highlighting the cells' ability to adapt their adhesive properties to disparate surfaces. Specific inhibition of the pilus protein FimH by a nonhydrolyzable mannose analogue leads to diminished adhesion in all cases, demonstrating the critical role of type I pili in adhesion by this strain to surfaces bearing widely different functional groups. The strong and adaptable binding of FimH to diverse surfaces has unexpected implications for the design of antifouling surfaces and antiadhesion therapies. PMID

  1. Long-Term Succession of Structure and Diversity of a Biofilm Formed in a Model Drinking Water Distribution System

    OpenAIRE

    A. C. Martiny; T. M. Jorgensen; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E; Molin, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we examined the long-term development of the overall structural morphology and community composition of a biofilm formed in a model drinking water distribution system with biofilms from 1 day to 3 years old. Visualization and subsequent quantification showed how the biofilm developed from an initial attachment of single cells through the formation of independent microcolonies reaching 30 μm in thickness to a final looser structure with an average thickness of 14.1 μm and coveri...

  2. Characterization of biofilm-like structures formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a synthetic mucus medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley Cecily L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accumulation of thick stagnant mucus provides a suitable environment for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus within the lung alveoli of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. These infections cause significant lung damage, leading to respiratory failure and death. In an artificial mucin containing medium ASM+, P. aeruginosa forms structures that resemble typical biofilms but are not attached to any surface. We refer to these structures as biofilm like structures (BLS. Using ASM+ in a static microtiter plate culture system, we examined the roles of mucin, extracellular DNA, environmental oxygen (EO2, and quorum sensing (QS in the development of biofilm-like structures (BLS by P. aeruginosa; and the effect of EO2 and P. aeruginosa on S. aureus BLS. Results Under 20% EO2, P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 produced BLS that resemble typical biofilms but are confined to the ASM+ and not attached to the surface. Levels of mucin and extracellular DNA within the ASM+ were optimized to produce robust well developed BLS. At 10% EO2, PAO1 produced thicker, more developed BLS, while under 0% EO2, BLS production was diminished. In contrast, the S. aureus strain AH133 produced well-developed BLS only under 20% EO2. In PAO1, loss of the QS system genes rhlI and rhlR affected the formation of BLS in ASM+ in terms of both structure and architecture. Whether co-inoculated into ASM+ with AH133, or added to established AH133 BLS, PAO1 eliminated AH133 within 48–56 h. Conclusions The thick, viscous ASM+, which contains mucin and extracellular DNA levels similar to those found in the CF lung, supports the formation of biofilm-like structures similar to the aggregates described within CF airways. Alterations in environmental conditions or in the QS genes of P. aeruginosa, as occurs naturally during the progression of CF lung infection, affect the architecture and quantitative structural features of these BLS. Thus, ASM+ provides an

  3. Diarrhea-associated biofilm formed by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and aggregative Citrobacter freundii: a consortium mediated by putative F pili

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Ana CG

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC are enteropathogenic strains identified by the aggregative adhesion (AA pattern that share the capability to form biofilms. Citrobacter freundii is classically considered as an indigenous intestinal species that is sporadically associated with diarrhea. Results During an epidemiologic study focusing on infantile diarrhea, aggregative C. freundii (EACF and EAEC strains were concomitantly recovered from a severe case of mucous diarrhea. Thereby, the occurrence of synergic events involving these strains was investigated. Coinfection of HeLa cells with EACF and EAEC strains showed an 8-fold increase in the overall bacterial adhesion compared with single infections (P traA were capable of forming bacterial aggregates only in the presence of EACF. Scanning electronic microscopy analyses revealed that bacterial aggregates as well as enhanced biofilms formed by EACF and traA-positive EAEC were mediated by non-bundle forming, flexible pili. Moreover, mixed biofilms formed by EACF and traA-positive EAEC strains were significantly reduced using nonlethal concentration of zinc, a specific inhibitor of F pili. In addition, EAEC strains isolated from diarrheic children frequently produced single biofilms sensitive to zinc. Conclusions Putative F pili expressed by EAEC strains boosted mixed biofilm formation when in the presence of aggregative C. freundii.

  4. Dual-species biofilms formation by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and environmental bacteria isolated from fresh-cut processing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilm formation is a mechanism adapted by many microorganisms that enhances the survival in stressful environments. In food processing facilities, bacterial strains with strong biofilm forming capacities are more likely to survive the daily cleaning and disinfection. Foodborne bacterial pathogens,...

  5. Control of the Biofilms Formed by Curli- and Cellulose-Expressing Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Using Treatments with Organic Acids and Commercial Sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoen Ju; Chen, Jinru

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms are a mixture of bacteria and extracellular products secreted by bacterial cells and are of great concern to the food industry because they offer physical, mechanical, and biological protection to bacterial cells. This study was conducted to quantify biofilms formed by different Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces and to determine the effectiveness of sanitizing treatments in control of these biofilms. STEC producing various amounts of cellulose (n = 6) or curli (n = 6) were allowed to develop biofilms on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces at 28°C for 7 days. The biofilms were treated with 2% acetic or lactic acid and manufacturer-recommended concentrations of acidic or alkaline sanitizers, and residual biofilms were quantified. Treatments with the acidic and alkaline sanitizers were more effective than those with the organic acids for removing the biofilms. Compared with their counterparts, cells expressing a greater amount of cellulose or curli formed more biofilm mass and had greater residual mass after sanitizing treatments on polystyrene than on stainless steel. Research suggests that the organic acids and sanitizers used in the present study differed in their ability to control biofilms. Bacterial surface components and cell contact surfaces can influence both biofilm formation and the efficacy of sanitizing treatments. These results provide additional information on control of biofilms formed by STEC. PMID:25951395

  6. Inhibitory effects of Tamarix hispida extracts on planktonic form and biofilm formation of six pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zianab Mohsenipour; Mehdi Hassanshahian

    2015-01-01

     Introduction: Biofilms are communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. Bacterial cells are protected from antimicrobial agents in biofilm structure. Biofilms formation cause many problems in industry, medicine and microbial drug resistance; thus it is essential to find new techniques for removing and inhibiting biofilms. This study aimed to examine the antimicrobial effect of Tamarix hispida alcoholic extracts against six path...

  7. Biofilm formation by asymptomatic and virulent urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ferrieres, Lionel; Klemm, Per

    2007-01-01

    have investigated the biofilm-forming capacity on abiotic surfaces of groups of ABU strains and UPEC strains in human urine. We found that there is a strong bias; ABU strains were significantly better biofilm formers than UPEC strains. Our data suggest that biofilm formation in urinary tract infectious...

  8. The effect of Streptococcus mutans and Candida glabrata on Candida albicans biofilms formed on different surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Pereira-Cenci; D.M. Deng; E.A. Kraneveld; E.M.M. Manders; A.A. Del Bel Cury; J.M. ten Cate; W. Crielaard

    2008-01-01

    Although Candida containing biofilms contribute to the development of oral candidosis, the characteristics of multi-species Candida biofilms and how oral bacteria modulate these biofilms is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between Candida albicans and either C

  9. Heated scallop-shell powder treatment for deactivation and removal of Listeria sp. biofilm formed at a low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Nobumitsu; Irie, Fumio; Yamakawa, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Mikio; Sawai, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The ability of heated scallop-shell powder (HSSP) to work against Listeria sp. biofilm formed at a low temperature was investigated. A biofilm of L. innocua ATCC 33090 was grown on a glass plate at 15˚C for 15 days, then immersed in HSSP slurry. Following treatment, the disinfection ability of the HSSP against the biofilm was non-destructively quantified by conductimetric assay. The biofilm grown at 15˚C was less sensitive than that grown at 37˚C to HSSP treatment and alkaline treatment. The biofilm grown at 15˚C was completely deactivated by 30 min of HSSP treatment (10 mg/mL, pH 12.5). In contrast, after 30 min treatment with alkaline solution at pH 12.5 or sodium hypochlorite (100 ppm), the activity was reduced by only one order of magnitude. The disinfection efficacy of HSSP (10 mg/mL) against L. innocua is similar to or higher than that of sodium hypochlorite (200 ppm). Fluorescence microscopy validated the results of the conductimetric assay. Therefore, HSSP treatment is a potentially powerful alternative control agent against Listeria sp. biofilms that present hazards in the food industry. PMID:26133513

  10. Histamine-producing Lactobacillus parabuchneri strains isolated from grated cheese can form biofilms on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maria; Del Rio, Beatriz; Sanchez-Llana, Esther; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Fernández, María; Martin, M Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    The consumption of food containing large amounts of histamine can lead to histamine poisoning. Cheese is one of the most frequently involved foods. Histamine, one of the biogenic amines (BAs) exhibiting the highest safety risk, accumulates in food contaminated by microorganisms with histidine decarboxylase activity. The origin of these microorganisms may be very diverse with contamination likely occurring during post-ripening processing, but the microorganisms involved during this manufacturing step have never been identified. The present work reports the isolation of 21 histamine-producing Lactobacillus parabuchneri strains from a histamine-containing grated cheese. PCR revealed that every isolate carried the histidine decarboxylase gene (hdcA). Eight lineages were identified based on the results of genome PFGE restriction analysis plus endonuclease restriction profile analysis of the carried plasmids. Members of all lineages were able to form biofilms on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces. L. parabuchneri is therefore an undesirable species in the dairy industry; the biofilms it can produce on food processing equipment represent a reservoir of histamine-producing bacteria and thus a source of contamination of post-ripening-processed cheeses. PMID:27375247

  11. Effect of peracetic acid on biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes isolated from dairy plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S H I; Cappato, L P; Corassin, C H; Cruz, A G; Oliveira, C A F

    2016-03-01

    This research investigated the removal of adherent cells of 4 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and 1 Listeria monocytogenes strain (previously isolated from dairy plants) from polystyrene microtiter plates using peracetic acid (PAA, 0.5%) for 15, 30, 60, and 120 s, and the inactivation of biofilms formed by those strains on stainless steel coupons using the same treatment times. In the microtiter plates, PAA removed all S. aureus at 15 s compared with control (no PAA treatment). However, L. monocytogenes biofilm was not affected by any PAA treatment. On the stainless steel surface, epifluorescence microscopy using LIVE/DEAD staining (BacLight, Molecular Probes/Thermo Fisher Scientific, Eugene, OR) showed that all strains were damaged within 15 s, with almost 100% of cells inactivated after 30 s. Results of this trial indicate that, although PAA was able to inactivate both S. aureus and L. monocytogenes monospecies biofilms on stainless steel, it was only able to remove adherent cells of S. aureus from polystyrene microplates. The correct use of PAA is critical for eliminating biofilms formed by S. aureus strains found in dairy plants, although further studies are necessary to determine the optimal PAA treatment for removing biofilms of L. monocytogenes. PMID:26723125

  12. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    E. S. Vorobey; O. S. Voronkova; A. I. Vinnikov

    2012-01-01

    Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molec...

  13. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Vorobey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molecules of the Quorum sensing system. Coordination of bacterial cells activity in the biofilms gives them significant advantages: in the biofilms bacteria are protected from the influence of the host protective factors and the antibacterial drugs.

  14. Bactericidal Compounds Controlling Growth of the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, Which Forms Biofilms Composed of a Novel Exopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, Shirin; Sims, Ian M.; Moradali, M. Fata

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is the major cause of bacterial canker and is a severe threat to kiwifruit production worldwide. Many aspects of the disease caused by P. syringae pv. actinidiae, such as the pathogenicity-relevant formation of a biofilm composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), are still unknown. Here, a highly virulent strain of P. syringae pv. actinidiae, NZ V-13, was studied with respect to biofilm formation and architecture using a flow cell system combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The biofilm formed by P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 was heterogeneous, consisting of a thin cellular base layer 5 μm thick and microcolonies with irregular structures. The major component of the EPSs produced by P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 bacteria was isolated and identified to be an exopolysaccharide. Extensive compositional and structural analysis showed that rhamnose, fucose, and glucose were the major constituents, present at a ratio of 5:1.5:2. Experimental evidence that P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 produces two polysaccharides, a branched α-d-rhamnan with side chains of terminal α-d-Fucf and an α-d-1,4-linked glucan, was obtained. The susceptibility of the cells in biofilms to kasugamycin and chlorine dioxide was assessed. About 64 and 73% of P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 cells in biofilms were killed when kasugamycin and chlorine dioxide were used at 5 and 10 ppm, respectively. Kasugamycin inhibited the attachment of P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 to solid surfaces at concentrations of 80 and 100 ppm. Kasugamycin was bacteriostatic against P. syringae pv. actinidiae NZ V-13 growth in the planktonic mode, with the MIC being 40 to 60 ppm and a bactericidal effect being found at 100 ppm. Here we studied the formation, architecture, and composition of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biofilms as well as used the biofilm as a model to assess the efficacies of bactericidal compounds. PMID:25841017

  15. Adaptive response of single and binary biofilms formed in the presence of benzalkonium chloride

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Maria Olívia; Machado, Idalina; Lopes, Susana Patrícia; H. Costa

    2009-01-01

    In actual situations bacteria can live nicely in hostile environments in part due to its ability to live in biofilms and to regulate gene expression as an adaptive response to a variety of stresses. This altered profile, compared to planktonic counterparts, as well as the interactions amongst the several strains existing within the biofilm seems to be responsible for the gradual loss of susceptibility to antimicrobials. The presence of biofilms on the surfaces of various types of medical surf...

  16. Detection of bacteria bearing resistant biofilm forms, by using the universal and specific PCR is still unhelpful in the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infections(PJI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StylianosChatzipanagiotou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative conventional bacteriological cultures were compared with different polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods in patients with total joint arthroplasties. The isolated bacteria were investigated for biofilm formation, and the biofilm forming strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, were further tested for their antimicrobial resistance against several clinically important antimicrobials. Forty four bone and joint samples were included and classified as infected or non-infected according to standard criteria for periprosthetic hip and knee infections. For the bacteriological diagnosis, conventional culture, two types of universal PCR and species specific PCR for three selected pathogens (S. aureus, S. epidermidis, P. aeruginosa were applied. Biofilm formation determination was performed by the tissue culture plate method. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the planktonic bacteria was performed by the minimal inhibitory concentration determination and, of the biofilm forms, by the minimal inhibitory concentration for bacterial regrowth from the biofilm. Twenty samples were culture positive, with S. epidermidis, S. aureus or P. aeruginosa. All PCR methods were very ineffective in detecting only one pathogen. All isolates were biofilm positive and their biofilm forms, were highly resistant. In this study, compared to PCR, culture remains the “gold standard”. The biofilm formation by the causative bacteria and the concomitant manifold increased antimicrobial resistance may explain the clinical failure of treatment in some cases and should be considered in the future for therapeutic planning.

  17. Isolation and identification of bacteria able to form biofilms from deep subsurface environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration radionuclides in an underground environment are one of the major concerns in the safety assessment of a geological repository. Biofilms can have an impact on the transport of radionuclides in several ways: (1) by acting as a barrier to radionuclide sorption onto geological surfaces, or (2) by providing a sorption site for radionuclides, or (3) by trapping many things, including radionuclides. Little is known about bacterial effects on the biofilm formation deep underground. In this study, we isolated bacterial strains from deep groundwater and evaluated the biofilm formation abilities of these strains by crystal violet assay. Bacterial strains were isolated from ground-water collected at -140 m in the 07-V140-M01 borehole at the Horonobe Underground Research Center, Japan. The crystal violet assay showed that 98% of the isolated strains had biofilm formation abilities under tested conditions. This result suggested that biofilm formation must not be neglected in the study of migration radionuclides in nuclear waste repositories. The isolated strains produced differential amounts of biofilm, although they were identified as the same Pseudomonas species, suggesting that biofilm formation abilities varied at different strain levels. These results support the conclusion that the assessment of biofilm impact on the transport of radionuclides in a geological repository must consider the variation in biofilm formation as a function of strain level. (author)

  18. Water-limiting conditions alter the structure and biofilm-forming ability of bacterial multispecies communities in the alfalfa rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Bogino

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities that adhere to biotic or abiotic surfaces and are enclosed in a protective matrix of extracellular compounds. An important advantage of the biofilm lifestyle for soil bacteria (rhizobacteria is protection against water deprivation (desiccation or osmotic effect. The rhizosphere is a crucial microhabitat for ecological, interactive, and agricultural production processes. The composition and functions of bacterial biofilms in soil microniches are poorly understood. We studied multibacterial communities established as biofilm-like structures in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa (alfalfa exposed to 3 experimental conditions of water limitation. The whole biofilm-forming ability (WBFA for rhizospheric communities exposed to desiccation was higher than that of communities exposed to saline or nonstressful conditions. A culture-dependent ribotyping analysis indicated that communities exposed to desiccation or saline conditions were more diverse than those under the nonstressful condition. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected strains showed that the rhizospheric communities consisted primarily of members of the Actinobacteria and α- and γ-Proteobacteria, regardless of the water-limiting condition. Our findings contribute to improved understanding of the effects of environmental stress factors on plant-bacteria interaction processes and have potential application to agricultural management practices.

  19. Long-term succession of structure and diversity of a biofilm formed in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, A.C.; Jørgensen, T.M.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen;

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we examined the long-term development of the overall structural morphology and community composition of a biofilm formed in a model drinking water distribution system with biofilms from 1 day to 3 years old. Visualization and subsequent quantification showed how the biofilm developed...... from an initial attachment of single cells through the formation of independent microcolonies reaching 30 mum in thickness to a final looser structure with an average thickness of 14.1 mum and covering 76% of the surface. An analysis of the community composition by use of terminal restriction fragment...... of 16S rRNA fragments illustrated how a wide variety of cells recruited from the bulk water initially attached and resulted in a species richness comparable to that in the water phase. This step was followed by the growth of a bacterium which was related to Nitrospira, which constituted 78% of the...

  20. Electrical spiking in bacterial biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Masi, Elisa; Ciszak, Marzena; Santopolo, Luisa; Frascella, Arcangela; Giovannetti, Luciana; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Mancuso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In nature, biofilms are the most common form of bacterial growth. In biofilms, bacteria display coordinated behaviour to perform specific functions. Here, we investigated electrical signalling as a possible driver in biofilm sociobiology. Using a multi-electrode array system that enables high spatio-temporal resolution, we studied the electrical activity in two biofilm-forming strains and one non-biofilm-forming strain. The action potential rates monitored during biofilm-forming bacterial gro...

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates: Antibiotic Susceptibility, Molecular Characteristics, and Ability to Form Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Indrawattana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodic monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus characteristics in a locality is imperative as their drug-resistant variants cause treatment problem. In this study, antibiograms, prevalence of toxin genes (sea-see, seg-ser, seu, tsst-1, eta, etb, and etd, PFGE types, accessory gene regulator (agr groups, and ability to form biofilm of 92 S. aureus Thailand clinical isolates were investigated. They were classified into 10 drug groups: groups 1–7 (56 isolates were methicillin resistant (MRSA and 8–10 (36 isolates were methicillin sensitive (MSSA. One isolate did not have any toxin gene, 4 isolates carried one toxin gene (seq, and 87 isolates had two or more toxin genes. No isolate had see, etb, or tsst-1; six isolates had eta or etd. Combined seg-sei-sem-sen-seo of the highly prevalent egc locus was 26.1%. The seb, sec, sel, seu, and eta associated significantly with MSSA; sek was more in MRSA. The sek-seq association was 52.17% while combined sed-sej was not found. Twenty-three PFGE types were revealed, no association of toxin genes with PFGE types. All four agr groups were present; agr group 1 was predominant (58.70% but agr group 2 strains carried more toxin genes and were more frequent toxin producers. Biofilm formation was found in 72.83% of the isolates but there was no association with antibiograms. This study provides insight information on molecular and phenotypic markers of Thailand S. aureus clinical isolates which should be useful for future active surveillance that aimed to control a spread of existing antimicrobial resistant bacteria and early recognition of a newly emerged variant.

  2. Film forming capacity of chemically modified corn starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Olivia V; García, María A; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-09-01

    Native starch can be chemically modified to improve its functionality and to expand its uses. Modified starches were characterized and the rheological behavior of filmogenic suspensions was analyzed. The film forming capacity of different chemical modified corn starches was evaluated. Acetylated starch was selected by the characteristics of the resulted films; its optimum concentration was 5% w/w since their films exhibited the lowest water vapor permeability (WVP, 1.26×10(-10)g/msPa). The effect of glycerol as plasticizer on film properties depend on its concentration, being 1.5% w/w those that allows to obtain the lowest WVP value (1.64×10(-11)g/msPa), low film solubility in water and a more compact structure than those of unplasticized films. Mechanical behavior of plasticized acetylated starch films depends on glycerol concentration, being rigid and brittle the unplasticized ones, ductile those containing 1.5% w/w of glycerol and very flexible those with a higher plasticizer content. PMID:26048223

  3. Unsaturated fatty acid, cis-2-decenoic acid, in combination with disinfectants or antibiotics removes pre-established biofilms formed by food-related bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh Sepehr

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by food-related bacteria and food-related pathogenesis are significant problems in the food industry. Even though much disinfection and mechanical procedure exist for removal of biofilms, they may fail to eliminate pre-established biofilms. cis-2 decenoic acid (CDA, an unsaturated fatty acid messenger produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is reportedly capable of inducing the dispersion of established biofilms by multiple types of microorganisms. However, whether CDA has potential to boost the actions of certain antimicrobials is unknown. Here, the activity of CDA as an inducer of pre-established biofilms dispersal, formed by four main food pathogens; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica and E. coli, was measured using both semi-batch and continuous cultures bioassays. To assess the ability of CDA combined biocides treatments to remove pre-established biofilms formed on stainless steel discs, CFU counts were performed for both treated and untreated cultures. Eradication of the biofilms by CDA combined antibiotics was evaluated using crystal violet staining. The effect of CDA combined treatments (antibiotics and disinfectants on biofilm surface area and bacteria viability was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy, digital image analysis and LIVE/DEAD staining. MICs were also determined to assess the probable inhibitory effects of CDA combined treatments on the growth of tested microorganisms' planktonic cells. Treatment of pre-established biofilms with only 310 nM CDA resulted in at least two-fold increase in the number of planktonic cells in all cultures. While antibiotics or disinfectants alone exerted a trivial effect on CFU counts and percentage of surface area covered by the biofilms, combinational treatments with both 310 nM CDA and antibiotics or disinfectants led to approximate 80% reduction in biofilm biomass. These data suggests that combined treatments with CDA would pave the way toward

  4. Isolation of biofilm-forming bacteria from a fresh-cut processing plant and co-culturing with E. coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    In produce processing plants, biofilms can theoretically provide a supporting environment for pathogenic bacteria that is resistant to cleaning and sanitizing efforts. The objective of this study was to recover bacteria from a commercial produce processing plant that have the ability to form biofilm...

  5. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jin, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Many diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with biofilm formation. However, the ability of S. aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections to form biofilms has not yet been investigated. We tested 160 isolates from patients with various skin infections for biofilm-forming capacity in different growth media. All the isolates formed biofilms, the extent of which depended on the type of growth medium. The thickest biofilms were formed when both plasma and glucose were present in the broth; in this case, S. aureus incorporated host fibrin into the biofilm's matrix. There were no differences in the biofilm formation between isolates from different types of skin infections, except for a particularly good biofilm formation by isolates from diabetic wounds and a weaker biofilm formation by isolates from impetigo. In conclusion, biofilm formation is a universal behavior of S. aureus isolates from skin infections. In some cases, such as in diabetic wounds, a particularly strong biofilm formation most likely contributes to the chronic and recurrent character of the infection. Additionally, as S. aureus apparently uses host fibrin as part of the biofilm structure, we suggest that plasma should be included more frequently in in vitro biofilm studies. PMID:25586078

  6. Biofilm forming cyanobacteria, algae and fungi on two historic monuments in Belgrade, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljaljević-Grbić Milica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm on the sandstone substrata of the bridge 'Brankov most' and on the granite substrata of the 'Monument of the Unknown Hero' contains a complex consortia of cyanobacteria, algae, and fungi. Coccoid and filamentous cyanobacteria, green algae and diatoms make up the photosynthetic part of the biofilm while hyphal fragments, chlamydospores, fruiting bodies and spores take part as fungal components. These structures make a dense layer by intertwining and overlapping the stone surface. Five cyanobacterial, 11 algal and 23 fungal taxa were found. The interaction of the biofilm's constituents results in the bioweathering of the stone substrata through mechanical penetration, acid corrosion and the production of secondary mycogenic biominerals. .

  7. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Bigot

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  8. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Frere, Jacques; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent. PMID:24205008

  9. Pattern differentiation in co-culture biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Markussen, Trine;

    2011-01-01

    -culture biofilms. By growing co-culture biofilms of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa mutants in a flow-chamber system and observing them using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 facilitates S. aureus microcolony formation. In contrast, P. aeruginosa mucA and rpoN mutants do...... not facilitate S. aureus microcolony formation and tend to outcompete S. aureus in co-culture biofilms. Further investigations reveal that extracellular DNA (eDNA) plays an important role in S. aureus microcolony formation and that P. aeruginosa type IV pili are required for this process, probably through...... their ability to bind to eDNA. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa is able to protect S. aureus against Dictyostelium discoideum phagocytosis in co-culture biofilms....

  10. Molecular Studies of Filamentous and Biofilm-Forming Hyperthermophilic Communities in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Bradley, A. S.; Dibbell, A. K.; Fredricks, H. F.; Hinrichs, K.; Jahnke, L. L.; Shock, E.; Amend, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    The Aquificales, the most deeply-branching order of Bacteria in the phylogenetic tree of life, comprises eight recognized thermophilic genera, including Aquifex, Hydrogenobacter, and Thermocrinis. The common metabolism for these Bacteria, when grown in culture, is the oxidation of hydrogen with molecular oxygen (Knallgas reaction). Aquificales have been identified by molecular techniques (16S rRNA gene surveys, fluorescent in situ hybridization) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), sea vent chimneys and fluids, and many other terrestrial and marine locations. In situ, Aquificales can reside as biofilms on vent sinters but they also commonly form filamentous communities, otherwise known as pink streamers, which attach to solid substrates. Initial 16S rRNA gene surveys conducted on streamer communities from Octopus Spring YNP indicated that these were low diversity ecosystems dominated by a few phylotypes including Thermocrinis sp., Thermotoga sp. and one other bacterial clade (Reysenbach et al 1994). Archaea were notable for their absence. In one of the first geobiological studies of pink streamers and vent biofilms in Yellowstone National Park, Jahnke and coworkers (2001) used classical lipidological techniques to compare Aquificales cultures with environmental samples to show that YNP pink filaments were more phylogenetically diverse and physiologically more complex than the early genomic studies indicated. The presence of archaeol, the range and structures of other lipids and a wide dispersion in the carbon isotopic signatures of biomass and individual lipids (-15 to -27%) showed that Archaea were present in pink filament communities and that there was, at least, one additional bacterial group besides the dominant Aquificales component. New molecular studies that comprise analyses of 16S rRNA genes and total lipid extracts by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry and chemical degradation with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry now show that Crenarchaea

  11. In vitro antimicrobial activity of mouth washes and herbal products against dental biofilm-forming bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiana B Da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate in vitro, the antimicrobial effect of Cymbopogon citrates (lemon grass, Plectranthusamboinicus (Mexican mint and Conyzabonariensis (hairy fleabane tinctures as well as pure and diluted commercial mouth washes (Malvatricin® , Periogard® and Listerine® on wild isolates of Streptococcusmutans and reference strains of S. mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus oralis and Lactobacillus casei by determination of minimum inhibitory dilution (MID. Materials and Methods: 0.12% chlorhexidine and 70% corn alcohol were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Saliva samples were collected from 3 volunteers and seeded in MSB broth to obtain Streptococcus isolates after 72-hour incubation. Using the agar diffusion method, susceptibility tests were performed with overnight incubation in microaerophilia at 37°C. All tests were performed in duplicate. Results: The bacterial species were resistant to the tinctures and Listerine® , but were susceptible to 0.12% chlorhexidine, Malvatricin® and Periogard® , with MIDs ranging from 12.5% to 1.56%. Conclusions: Plectrantusamboinicus, Conyzabonariensis and Cymbopongoncitratus tinctures and Listerine® did not show inhibitory action against the tested biofilm-forming bacteria.

  12. Bioactive glass combined with bisphosphonates provides protection against biofilms formed by the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Anna K; Skogman, Malena E; Rosenqvist, Kirsi; Juvonen, Helka; Ihalainen, Petri; Peltonen, Jouko; Juppo, Anne; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-03-30

    Biofilms play a pivotal role in the progression of periodontitis and they can be treated with antiseptics (i.e. chlorhexidine) or antibiotics, but these therapeutic alternatives are unable of ameliorating periodontal alveolar bone loss, which has been, on the other hand, successfully treated with bone-preserving agents. The improved bone formation achieved in animal models by the combination of two such agents: bioactive glass (BAG) and bisphosphonates has attracted the interest for further exploring dental applications. However, the antimicrobial effects that may result from combining them have not been yet investigated. Here, our aim was to explore the anti-biofilm effects that could result from combining BAG with bisphosphonates, particularly in a dental biofilm model. The experiments were performed with an oral cavity single-specie (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) biofilm assay, which was optimized in this contribution. Risedronate displayed an intrinsic anti-biofilm effect, and all bisphosphonates, except clodronate, reduced biofilm formation when combined with BAG. In particular, the anti-biofilm activity of risedronate was significantly increased by the combination with BAG. Since it has been proposed that some of the antimicrobial effects of BAG are caused by local pH changes, studies of pH variations were performed to gain a mechanistic understanding. However, the observed anti-biofilm effects could not be explained with lowered pHs. Overall, these results do provide further support for the promising use of bisphosphonate-BAG combinations in dental applications. These findings are particularly relevant for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, or osteoporotic patients, which are known to be more vulnerable to periodontitis. In such cases, bisphosphonate treatment could play a double positive effect: local treatment of periodontitis (in combination with BAG) and systemic treatment of osteoporosis, prevention of hypercalcemia and metastases. PMID

  13. Low power gas discharge plasma mediated inactivation and removal of biofilms formed on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2013-03-20

    The antibacterial activity of gas discharge plasma has been studied for quiet some time. However, high biofilm inactivation activity of plasma was only recently reported. Studies indicate that the etching effect associated with plasmas generated represent an undesired effect, which may cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. Meanwhile, the strong etching effects from these high power plasmas may also alter the surface chemistry and affect the biocompatibility of biomaterials. In this study, we examined the efficiency and effectiveness of low power gas discharge plasma for biofilm inactivation and removal. Among the three tested gases, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon, discharge oxygen demonstrated the best anti-biofilm activity because of its excellent ability in killing bacteria in biofilms and mild etching effects. Low power discharge oxygen completely killed and then removed the dead bacteria from attached surface but had negligible effects on the biocompatibility of materials. DNA left on the regenerated surface after removal of biofilms did not have any negative impact on tissue cell growth. On the contrary, dramatically increased growth was found for these cells seeded on regenerated surfaces. These results demonstrate the potential applications of low power discharge oxygen in biofilm treatments of biomaterials and indwelling device decontaminations. PMID:23894232

  14. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements. PMID:27150429

  15. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The concept of biofilms has emerged in the clinical setting during the last decade. Infections involving biofilms have been documented in all parts of the human body, and it is currently believed that the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria is equivalent to chronic infection. A quick Pubmed search...... reveals the significance of biofilms, as evidenced by a dramatic increase in scientific publications on the topic, as well as in publications concerning wounds with biofilms, which reached 600 publications in 2013. Judged from the number of publications, it appears that biofilms play a significant role in...... wounds. However, the impact of biofilms is often debated, because infected wounds were also treated before the concept of biofilms was coined. In this short review, we will address the significance of biofilms and their role in wounds, and discuss the future tasks of the biofilm challenge....

  16. Relationship between Antibiotic Resistance, Biofilm Formation, and Biofilm-Specific Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lihua; Li, Hao; Zhang, Chuanfu; Liang, Beibei; Li, Jie; Wang, Ligui; Du, Xinying; Liu, Xuelin; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to examine the relationships between antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation, and biofilm-specific resistance in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii. The tested 272 isolates were collected from several hospitals in China during 2010-2013. Biofilm-forming capacities were evaluated using the crystal violet staining method. Antibiotic resistance/susceptibility profiles to 21 antibiotics were assessed using VITEK 2 system, broth microdilution method or the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) to cefotaxime, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin were evaluated using micro dilution assays. Genetic relatedness of the isolates was also analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and plasmid profile. Among all the 272 isolates, 31 were multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 166 were extensively drug-resistant (XDR). PFGE typing revealed 167 pattern types and 103 clusters with a similarity of 80%. MDR and XDR isolates built up the main prevalent genotypes. Most of the non-MDR isolates were distributed in a scattered pattern. Additionally, 249 isolates exhibited biofilm formation, among which 63 were stronger biofilm formers than type strain ATCC19606. Population that exhibited more robust biofilm formation likely contained larger proportion of non-MDR isolates. Isolates with higher level of resistance tended to form weaker biofilms. The MBECs for cefotaxime, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin showed a positive correlation with corresponding MICs, while the enhancement in resistance occurred independent of the quantity of biofilm biomass produced. Results from this study imply that biofilm acts as a mechanism for bacteria to get a better survival, especially in isolates with resistance level not high enough. Moreover, even though biofilms formed by isolates with high level of resistance are always weak, they could still provide similar level of protection for the

  17. Influence of papain in biofilm formed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna Lara da Cruz Dinéas de Oliveira; Maria Emília de Castro Kling Fleming; Patrícia Vollu Silva; Geraldo Renato de Paula; Débora Omena Futuro; Guillermo Coca Velarde; Luciana Maria Ramires Esper; Lenise Arneiro Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus (MRSHa) are important coagulase-negative staphylococci. They are often isolated from bacteremia in humans mainly due to their ability to form biofilm on the surfaces of medical devices. Papain is a complex mixture of proteolytic enzymes and peroxidases extracted from the latex of Carica papaya and it is recognized by accelerating the healing process of wounds. This study aimed to eval...

  18. Evaluation of antimicrobial efficacy of Triphala (an Indian Ayurvedic herbal formulation and 0.2% chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans biofilm formed on tooth substrate: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Prabhakar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Triphala showed statistically significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans biofilm formed on tooth substrate. The incorporation of Triphala in mouth rinse could prove to be effective in reducing S. mutans count in the oral cavity.

  19. Effectiveness of Chitosan against Mature Biofilms Formed by Food Related Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen San Jose

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan has proven antimicrobial properties against planktonic cell growth. Little is known, however, about its effects on already established biofilms. Oriented for application in food industry disinfection, the effectiveness of both medium molecular weight (MMW chitosan and its enzymatically hydrolyzed product was tested against mature biofilms of four pathogenic strains, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica, and a food spoilage species, Pseudomonas fluorescens. Unexpectedly, log reductions were in some cases higher for biofilm than for planktonic cells. One hour exposure to MMW chitosan (1% w/v caused a 6 log viable cell reduction on L. monocytogenes monospecies mature biofilms and reduced significantly (3–5 log reductions the attached population of the other organisms tested, except S. aureus. Pronase-treated chitosan was more effective than MMW chitosan on all tested microorganisms, also with the exception of S. aureus, offering best results (8 log units against the attached cells of B. cereus. These treatments open a new possibility to fight against mature biofilms in the food industry.

  20. Efficacy of Various Chemical Disinfectants on Biofilms Formed in Spacecraft Potable Water System Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Willy; Garcia, Veronica; Castro, Victoria; Ott, Mark; Duane

    2009-01-01

    As the provision of potable water is critical for successful habitation of the International Space Station (ISS), life support systems were installed in December 2008 to recycle both humidity from the atmosphere and urine to conserve available water in the vehicle. Pre-consumption testing from the dispensing needle at the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) indicated that bacterial concentrations exceeded the current ISS specifications of 50 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Subsequent investigations revealed that a corrugated stainless steel flex hose upstream of the dispensing needle in the PWD was filled with non-sterile water and left at room temperature for over one month before launch. To simulate biofilm formation that was suspected in the flight system, sterile flex hoses were seeded with a consortium of bacterial isolates previously recovered from other ISS water systems, which included Ralstonia pickettii, Burkholderia multivorans, Caulobacter vibrioides., and Cupriavidus pauculus. After 5 days of incubation, these hoses were challenged with various chemical disinfectants including hydrogen peroxide, colloidal silver, and buffered pH solutions to determine the ability of the disinfectants to decrease and maintain bacterial concentrations below ISS specifications. Disinfection efficacy over time was measured by collecting daily heterotrophic plate counts following exposure to the disinfectants. A single flush with either 6% hydrogen peroxide solution or a mixture of 3% hydrogen peroxide and 400 ppb colloidal silver effectively reduced the bacterial concentrations to less than 1 CFU/ml for a period of up to 2 months. Testing results indicated that hydrogen peroxide and mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and colloidal silver have tremendous potential as alternative disinfectants for ISS water systems.

  1. Investigations of Biofilm-Forming Bacterial Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy Prior to and Following Treatment from Gas Discharge Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, K. G.; Joaquin, J. C.; Kwan, C.; Bray, J. D.; Torrico, R.; Abramzon, N.; Brelles-Marino, G.

    2007-03-01

    We present investigations of biofilm-forming bacteria before and after treatment from gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve bacteria in biofilm communities, where cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard killing methods. Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In addition, cell wall elasticity was studied by measuring force distance curves as the AFM tip was pressed into the cell surface. Results for cell surface morphology and micromechanical properties for plasma treatments lasting from 5 to 60 minutes were obtained and will be presented.

  2. Heterogeneity of biofilms formed by nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baoleri; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Ciofu, O.; Andersen, Jens Bo; Hoiby, N.; Molin, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Biofilms are thought to play a key role in the occurrence of lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, 20 nonmucoid P. aeruginosa isolates collected during different periods of chronic infection from eight CF patients were assessed with respect...

  3. Microbial Diversity in the Early In Vivo-Formed Dental Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, D; Helmerhorst, E J; Gower, A C; Siqueira, W L; Paster, B J; Oppenheim, F G

    2016-03-01

    Although the mature dental biofilm composition is well studied, there is very little information on the earliest phase of in vivo tooth colonization. Progress in dental biofilm collection methodologies and techniques of large-scale microbial identification have made new studies in this field of oral biology feasible. The aim of this study was to characterize the temporal changes and diversity of the cultivable and noncultivable microbes in the early dental biofilm. Samples of early dental biofilm were collected from 11 healthy subjects at 0, 2, 4, and 6 h after removal of plaque and pellicle from tooth surfaces. With the semiquantitative Human Oral Microbiome Identification Microarray (HOMIM) technique, which is based on 16S rRNA sequence hybridizations, plaque samples were analyzed with the currently available 407 HOMIM microbial probes. This led to the identification of at least 92 species, with streptococci being the most abundant bacteria across all time points in all subjects. High-frequency detection was also made with Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Gemella haemolysans, Slackia exigua, and Rothia species. Abundance changes over time were noted for Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus intermedius (P = 0.02), Streptococcus mitis bv. 2 (P = 0.0002), Streptococcus oralis (P = 0.0002), Streptococcus cluster I (P = 0.003), G. haemolysans (P = 0.0005), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (P = 0.02). Among the currently uncultivable microbiota, eight phylotypes were detected in the early stages of biofilm formation, one belonging to the candidate bacterial division TM7, which has attracted attention due to its potential association with periodontal disease. PMID:26746720

  4. Development of short form questionnaires for the assessment of work capacity in cardiovascular rehabilitation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Haschke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Prevention of job loss is an essential objective of cardiovascular rehabilitation. However, comprehensive and economic diagnostic instruments on work limitations are missing. The present study describes development of short form questionnaires from 2 domains of the WCIB-Cardio item banks for the assessment of work capacity in cardiovascular rehabilitation patients. Materials and Methods: 283 cardiovascular rehabilitation patients were recruited from 14 German rehabilitation clinics. Based on the WCIB-Cardio with the domains of cognitive and physical work capacity, we developed a short form for both domains. Item selection criteria were content coverage, content appropriateness, internal consistency reliability (≥ 0.8. We used correlation of person location scores of the short forms with person location scores of the full item banks to examine the extent of measurement precision. Results: For each domain of the WCIB-Cardio a short form was developed (cognitive work capacity - 14 items; physical work capacity 7 - items. In both domains psychometric properties were good (person separation index: cognitive work capacity - 0.80; physical work capacity - 0.80. Correlation measures of the short form with the full item banks showed a high accordance of person locations for both domains (cognitive work capacity: r = 0.97; physical work capacity: r = 0.95. Conclusions: The calibrated instrument WCIB-Cardio provides the possibility to develop short form questionnaires with high psychometric quality. These short forms make it possible to monitor patient's work capacity in cardiovascular rehabilitation settings in a more economical way.

  5. Lipopeptide surfactants: Production, recovery and pore forming capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inès, Mnif; Dhouha, Ghribi

    2015-09-01

    Lipopeptides are microbial surface active compounds produced by a wide variety of bacteria, fungi and yeast. They are characterized by highly structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface, respectively. Surfactin, iturin and fengycin of Bacillus subtilis are among the most studied lipopeptides. This review will present the main factors encountering lipopeptides production along with the techniques developed for their extraction and purification. Moreover, we will discuss their ability to form pores and destabilize biological membrane permitting their use as antimicrobial, hemolytic and antitumor agents. These open great potential applications in biomediacal, pharmaceutic and agriculture fields. PMID:26189973

  6. Biofilm-Forming Ability of Candida albicans Is Unlikely To Contribute to High Levels of Oral Yeast Carriage in Cases of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Y.; Yip, H K; Samaranayake, Y. H.; Yau, J. Y.; Samaranayake, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    An increased prevalence of candidal carriage and oral candidiasis is common in cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the reasons for this may include the enhanced ability of colonizing yeasts to produce biofilms on mucosal surfaces. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine the differences, if any, in the biofilm-forming abilities of 26 Candida albicans yeast isolates from HIV-infected individuals and 20 isolates from HIV-free individuals, as this attribute of...

  7. The lipopeptide 6-2 produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens anti-CA has potent activity against the biofilm-forming organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhen; Wang, Guang-Yuan; Liu, Guang-Lei; Li, Wan-Zhong; Yan, Fang

    2016-07-15

    Both the whole cells and protoplasts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Bacillus cereus, two biofilm-forming bacteria, were disrupted by the lipopeptide 6-2 produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens anti-CA. The lipopeptide 6-2 could also effectively inhibit the formation of biofilms and disperse pre-formed biofilms. Live/dead staining of the biofilms grown in the absence or presence of the lipopeptide 6-2 showed that more dead bacterial cells in the presence of the lipopeptide than those in the absence of the lipopeptide and biofilm formation was greatly reduced by the lipopeptide 6-2. Expression of the PslC gene related to exopolysaccharides in P. aeruginosa PAO1 was also inhibited. All these results demonstrated that the lipopeptide 6-2 produced by B. amyloliquefaciens anti-CA had a high activity against biofilm-forming bacteria. The lipopeptide 6-2 also killed the larvae of Balanus amphitrite and inhibit the germination of Laminaria japonica spore and growth of protozoa, all of which were the fouling organisms in marine environments. PMID:27184127

  8. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, Karen F; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24h. Gro-1α, IL1α, IL-6, IL-8, TGFα, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1α. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1α, TGFα, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria. PMID:22266273

  9. Flo11p, drug efflux pumps, and the extracellular matrix cooperate to form biofilm yeast colonies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Váchová, Libuše; Šťovíček, V.; Hlaváček, Otakar; Chernyavskiy, Oleksandr; Štěpánek, L.; Kubínová, Lucie; Palková, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 194, č. 5 (2011), s. 679-687. ISSN 0021-9525 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/0718; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : CANDIDA-ALBICANS BIOFILMS * SACCHAROMYCES - CEREVISIAE * ABC TRANSPORTERS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 10.264, year: 2011

  10. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmír; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, V.; Růžička, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2015), 051038:1-6. ISSN 1083-3668 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/1687; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman tweezers * Staphylococcus epidermidis * biofilm Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.859, year: 2014

  11. Low power gas discharge plasma mediated inactivation and removal of biofilms formed on biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F.

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of gas discharge plasma has been studied for quiet some time. However, high biofilm inactivation activity of plasma was only recently reported. Studies indicate that the etching effect associated with plasmas generated represent an undesired effect, which may cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. Meanwhile, the strong etching effects from these high power plasmas may also alter the surface chemistry and affect the biocompatibility of bioma...

  12. Comparative Study of Antibiofilm Activity of Copper Oxide and Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Against Multidrug Resistant Biofilm Forming Uropathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwala, Munin; Choudhury, Bula; Yadav, R. N. S.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of the metal oxide nanoparticles viz. CuO and Fe2O3 as antibacterial agents against multidrug resistant biofilm forming bacteria was evaluated. CuO nanoparticles were also experimented for antibiofilm and time kill assay. The CuO displayed maximum antibacterial activity with zone of inhibition of (22 ± 1) mm against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) followed by Escherichia coli (18 ± 1) mm. The Fe2O3 showed the zone of inhibition against MRSA of (14 ± 1) mm ...

  13. Influence of Limonia acidissima L. against the biofilm forming Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from fresh water fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Ponnuraj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Limonia acidissima is a medicinal plant commonly used for multitude of ailments. In this context, the validation of traditionally used medicinal plant that the fruit extracts of L. acidissima exhibit antibiofilm activity against the predominant fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila was assessed. Among ten isolates of Aeromonas spp, KUAH1 showed strong biofilm formation and was studied further. The methanol (LA-M and ethyl acetate (LA-EA fraction of Limonia fruit extract clearly demonstrated significant (p ≤ 0.005 antibiofilm activity of 58 to 94% and 54 to 77% respectively. Furthermore, the potential of Limonia fruit extracts against some of the biofilm associated factors were tested by swimming and swarming motility assay, XTT and anti-haemolytic activity assay. Extracellular protein analysis revealed differential protein expression at molecular weight corresponding to 30-60 kDa. This is the first report on antibiofilm activity of L. acidissima fruit extracts, signifying the scope for development of complementary medicine to treat Aeromonas biofilm-associated infections.

  14. Rheology of biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Winston, M.; Rupp, C.J.; Vinogradov, A.; Towler, B.W.; Adams, H; Stoodley, P

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes an experimental study concerning the mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms formed from the early dental plaque colonizer Streptoccocus mutans and pond water biofilms. Experiments reported in this paper demonstrate that both types of biofilms exhibit mechanical behavior similar to that of rheological fluids. The time-dependent properties of both biofilms have been modeled using the principles of viscoelasticity theory. The Burger model has been found to accurately re...

  15. Probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 outcompetes intestinal pathogens during biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Dahl, M.; Klemm, Per

    2010-01-01

    Nissle 1917 has been used for many decades as a probiotic against a variety of intestinal disorders and is probably the best field-tested E. coil strain in the world. Here we have investigated the biofilm-forming capacity of Nissle 1917. We found that the strain was a good biofilm former. Not only was it...

  16. Design of a Simple Model of Candida albicans Biofilms Formed under Conditions of Flow: Development, Architecture and Drug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Uppuluri, Priya; Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Ribot, Jose Lopez

    2009-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilms on most medical devices are exposed to a flow of body fluids that provide water and nutrients to the fungal cells. While C. albicans biofilms grown in vitro under static conditions have been exhaustively studied, the same is not true for biofilms developed under continuous flow of replenishing nutrients. Here, we describe a simple flow biofilm (FB) model that can be built easily with materials commonly available in most microbiological laboratories. We demonstrate th...

  17. Comparative efficacy of antibiotics in biofilms eradication formed by ESBL and non ESBL producing micro-organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Manu Chaudhary; Anurag Payasi

    2012-01-01

    Growth of bacterial cells within a biofilm complicate the treatment of infections. Therefore, in the present study biofilm eradication efficacy of (ceftriaxone and sulbactam plus EDTA; CSE1034) was compared with ceftriaxone alone, ceftriaxone plus EDTA and ceftriaxone plus sulbactam against biofilms of ESBL producing Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhi. Susceptibility testing of each drug was performed on planktonic and biofilm cells in non ESBL producing and ESBL pro...

  18. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Gentile

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron restriction on A. baumannii growth and biofilm formation using different iron chelators and culture conditions. We report substantial inter-strain variability and growth medium-dependence for biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Neither planktonic nor biofilm growth of A. baumannii was affected by exogenous chelators. Biofilm formation was either stimulated by iron or not responsive to iron in the majority of isolates tested, indicating that iron starvation is not sensed as an overall biofilm-inducing stimulus by A. baumannii. The impressive iron withholding capacity of this bacterium should be taken into account for future development of chelation-based antimicrobial and anti-biofilm therapies.

  19. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis are able to incorporate and enhance a pre-formed Gardnerella vaginalis biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Joana; Machado, Daniela; Cerca, Nuno

    2016-04-01

    Gardnerella vaginalis is the most frequent microorganism found in bacterial vaginosis (BV), while Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis are amongst the most frequent pathogens found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). This study aimed to evaluate possible interactions between UTIs pathogens and G. vaginalis using an in vitro dual-species biofilm model. Our results showed that dual-species biofilms reached significantly higher bacterial concentration than monospecies biofilms. Moreover, visualization of dual-populations species in the biofilms, using the epifluorescence microscopy, revealed that all of the urogenital pathogens coexisted with G. vaginalis. In conclusion, our work demonstrates that uropathogens can incorporate into mature BV biofilms. PMID:26782142

  20. Microalgal biofilms for wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Boelee, N.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the possibilities of using microalgal biofilms for the treatment of municipal wastewater, with a focus on the post-treatment of municipal wastewater effluent. The potential of microalgal biofilms for wastewater treatment was first investigated using a scenario analysis. Then biofilms were grown on wastewater treatment plant effluent in horizontal flow cells under different nutrient loads to determine the maximum uptake capacity of the biofilms for N...

  1. The role of bacterial biofilms in chronic infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    research into bacterial pathogenesis has focused on acute infections, but these diseases have now been supplemented by a new category of chronic infections caused by bacteria growing in slime-enclosed aggregates known as biofilms. Biofilm infections, such as pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients, chronic...... treatment depends on accurate and fast diagnosis. However, in cases where the bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often turns out to be untreatable and will develop into a chronic state. The important hallmarks of chronic biofilm-based infections are extreme resistance...... to antibiotics and many other conventional antimicrobial agents, and an extreme capacity for evading the host defences. In this thesis, I will assemble the current knowledge on biofilms with an emphasis on chronic infections, guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of these infections, before relating...

  2. Role of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Lappann, Martin; Knøchel, S;

    2010-01-01

    (eDNA) may be the only central component of the biofilm matrix and that it is necessary for both initial attachment and early biofilm formation for 41 L. monocytogenes strains that were tested. DNase I treatment resulted in dispersal of biofilms, not only in microtiter tray assays but also in flow......Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that is capable of living in harsh environments. It is believed to do this by forming biofilms, which are surface-associated multicellular structures encased in a self-produced matrix. In this paper we show that in L. monocytogenes extracellular DNA...... cell biofilm assays. However, it was also demonstrated that in a culture without eDNA, neither Listeria genomic DNA nor salmon sperm DNA by itself could restore the capacity to adhere. A search for additional necessary components revealed that peptidoglycan (PG), specifically N-acetylglucosamine (NAG...

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Pomegranate-Containing Mouthwash Against Oral-Biofilm Forming Organisms: An Invitro Microbial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabholkar, Charuta Sadanand; Shah, Mona; Bajaj, Monika; Doshi, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pomegranate is considered “A pharmacy unto itself”. Hydrolysable tannins called punicalagins which have free scavenging properties are the most abundant polyphenols found in pomegranate-containing mouthwash. Aim To evaluate antimicrobial effect of pomegranate- containing mouthwash on oral biofilm-forming bacteria. Materials and Methods The mouthwashes used were divided into three groups- Group A: Chlorhexidine mouthwash (Hexidine); Group B: Herbal Mouthwash (Hiora) and Group C: Pomegranate-containing Mouthwash (Life-extension). Each mouthwash was diluted to five different concentrations. Reference strains of Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans) (ATCC 25175), Streptococcus salivarius (S.salivarius) (ATCC 7073), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a) (NCTC 9710) were selected as being colonizers in dental biofilm formation. On each culture plate, five wells of 5mm were prepared and mouthwashes with different concentrations were added, followed by incubation in a CO2 jar for 24 hours at 37°C. Inhibition zone diameters were measured using a digital caliper. Results Chlorhexidine (0.12%) presented a zone of inhibition between 38.46% to 96.15% for all the three organisms, while Hiora presented zone of inhibition ranging from 33.33% to 69.23% but was resistant at <10 ml of dilution. Pomegranate mouthwash presented a zone of inhibition ranging from 38.48 to 57.69%, but was resistant at <10ml for S.mutans, and <25ml for A.a and S.salivarius. ANOVA test was done to compare the dilution of mouthwashes for a particular organism and Tukey’s multiple comparison tests were done to find the exact difference. A significant difference was seen between all the three groups at 50ml and 75 ml of dilution. At 75 ml concentration, a statistical difference was found between Groups B & C and Groups A & B; and at 50 ml between Groups A&C. Conclusion All the three types of mouthwash exhibit anti-microbial activity against biofilm forming organisms but at varying

  4. Biofilm formation on tympanostomy tubes depends on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genetic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotić, Ana; Božić, Dragana D; Milovanović, Jovica; Pavlović, Bojan; Ješić, Snežana; Pelemiš, Mijomir; Novaković, Marko; Ćirković, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation has been implicated in the high incidence of persistent otorrhoea after tympanostomy tube insertion. The aim of the study was to investigate whether biofilm formation on tympanostomy tubes depends on the genetic profile of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Capacity of biofilm formation on fluoroplastic tympanostomy tubes (TTs) was tested on 30 MRSA strains. Identification and methicillin resistance were confirmed by PCR for nuc and mecA genes. Strains were genotypically characterised (SCCmec, agr and spa typing). Biofilm formation was tested in microtiter plate and on TTs. Tested MRSA strains were classified into SCCmec type I (36.7 %), III (23.3 %), IV (26.7 %) and V (13.3 %), agr type I (50 %), II (36.7 %) and III (13.3 %), and 5 clonal complexes (CCs). All tested MRSA strains showed ability to form biofilm on microtiter plate. Capacity of biofilm formation on TTs was as following: 13.3 % of strains belonged to the category of no biofilm producers, 50 % to the category of weak biofilm producers and 36.7 % to moderate biofilm producers. There was a statistically significant difference between CC, SCCmec and agr types and the category of biofilm production on TTs tubes (p tube otorrhea. PMID:25796207

  5. Biofilm-Exclusion of Uropathogenic Bacteria by Selected Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia Coli Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferriéres, L.; Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2007-01-01

    Many bacterial infections are associated with biofilm formation. In the urinary tract bacterial biofilms develop on both living surfaces and artificial implants, producing chronic and often intractable infections. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with urinary tract infections....... In contrast to uropathogenic E coli (UPEC), which cause symptomatic urinary tract infection, asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) strains are associated with essentially symptom-free infections. Here the biofilm-forming capacity on abiotic surfaces of selected E coli ABU strains and UPEC strains in human...... biofilm formation. The results support the notion of bacterial prophylaxis employing selected ABU strains to eliminate UPEC strains and other pathogens in patients prone to recalcitrant infections....

  6. Effects of Chlorine Stress on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm and Analysis of Related Gene Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekeç, Özge; Gökalsın, Barış; Karaltı, İskender; Kayhan, Figen Esin; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine is deployed worldwide to clean waters and prevent water-originated illnesses. However, chlorine has a limited disinfection capacity against biofilms. Microorganisms form biofilms to protect themselves from biological threats such as disinfectant chemicals. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and its biofilm form attaches to surfaces, living buried into exopolysaccharides, can be present in all watery environments including tap water and drinking water. This research aimed to study the biofilm trigger mechanism of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain, which is known to form biofilm in water supply systems and human body, under chlorine stress levels. In addition to biofilm staining, certain genes that are relevant to the stress condition were selected for gene expression analysis. The bacteria cultures were grown under chlorine stress with concentrations of 0.5, 0.7 and 1 mg/l. Six gene regions were determined related to biofilm and stress response: rpoS, bifA, migA, katB, soxR, and algC. Biofilm formation was analyzed by basic fuchsin staining, and gene expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR. According to the results, highest biofilm production was observed in P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild strain under no stress conditions. Higher biofilm amounts were observed for bacteria under 0.5 and 0.7 mg/l chlorine stress compared to 1 mg/l chlorine stress. PMID:27146505

  7. Patterns of virulence gene expression differ between biofilm and tissue communities of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu Hong; Caparon, Michael G

    2005-09-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pyogenes to form biofilm-like bacterial communities during infection of soft tissue has suggested that the capacity to produce biofilm may be important for pathogenesis. To examine this relationship, a panel of mutants was evaluated for their ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces in several assays. Several established virulence factors were crucial for biofilm formation, including the M protein, required for initial cell-surface interactions, and the hyaluronic acid capsule, required for subsequent maturation into a three-dimensional structure. Mutants lacking the transcription regulators Mga and CovR (CsrR) also failed to form biofilm. Comparison of transcriptional profiles revealed differential regulation of approximately 25% of the genome upon adaptation to biofilm. During infection of zebrafish, several virulence factors (notably cysteine protease and streptokinase) were regulated in a biofilm-like manner. However, the overall profile of virulence factor expression indicated that tissue communities have a pattern of gene expression different from biofilm. Taken together, these data show that while biofilm and tissue communities have many characteristics in common, that biofilm reproduces only a subset of the myriad cues used by tissue communities for regulation of virulence. PMID:16135223

  8. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis are able to incorporate and enhance a pre-formed Gardnerella vaginalis biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Joana; Machado, D; Cerca, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Gardnerella vaginalis is the most frequent microorganism found in bacterial vaginosis (BV), while Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis are amongst the most frequent pathogens found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). This study aimed to evaluate possible interactions between UTIs pathogens and G. vaginalis using an in vitro dual-species biofilm model. Our results showed that dual-species biofilms reached significantly higher bacterial concentration than mono-species biofilms. Moreover, ...

  9. Closed Form Secrecy Capacity of MIMO Wiretap Channels with Two Transmit Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jiangyuan

    2011-01-01

    A Gaussian multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) wiretap channel model is considered. The input is a two-antenna transmitter, while the outputs are the legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper, both equipped with multiple antennas. All channels are assumed to be known. The problem of obtaining the optimal input covariance matrix that achieves secrecy capacity subject to a power constraint is addressed, and a closed-form expression for the secrecy capacity is obtained.

  10. An Extreme form of Superactivation for Quantum Zero-Error Capacities

    OpenAIRE

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Smith, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    The zero-error capacity of a channel is the rate at which it can send information perfectly, with zero probability of error, and has long been studied in classical information theory. We show that the zero-error capacity of quantum channels exhibits an extreme form of non-additivity, one which is not possible for classical channels, or even for the usual capacities of quantum channels. By combining probabilistic arguments with algebraic geometry, we prove that there exist channels E1 and E2 w...

  11. Sodium dodecyl sulfate allows the persistence and recovery of biofilms of Pseudomonas fluorescens formed under different hydrodynamic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, M.; Simões, Lúcia C.; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Vieira, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms was investigated using flow cell reactors with stainless steel substrata, under turbulent (Re=5200) and laminar (Re=2000) flow. Steady-state biofilms were exposed to SDS in single doses (0.5, 1, 3 and 7 mM) and biofilm respiratory activity and mass measured at 0, 3, 7 and 12 h after the SDS application. The effect of SDS on biofilm mechanical stability was assessed using a rotatin...

  12. 3′,5′-Cyclic Diguanylic Acid Reduces the Virulence of Biofilm-Forming Staphylococcus aureus Strains in a Mouse Model of Mastitis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Brouillette, Eric; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Karaolis, David K.R.; Malouin, François

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic dinucleotide 3′,5′-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) is a naturally occurring small molecule that regulates important signaling systems in bacteria. We have recently shown that c-di-GMP inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in vitro and its adherence to HeLa cells. We now report that c-di-GMP treatment has an antimicrobial and antipathogenic activity in vivo and reduces, in a dose-dependent manner, bacterial colonization by biofilm-forming S. aureus strains in a mouse mo...

  13. Antibiotic pressure mediated selection of non-biofilm forming strain of Elizabethkingia meningosepticum causing fatal nosocomial meningitis in a term infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a fatal case of hospital acquired meningitis in a term infant due to the antibiotic pressure mediated selection of Elizabethkingia meningosepticum. The antibiotics were administered for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection. The strain was also phenotypically characterized for beta lactamase production, biofilm forming capability and resistance to in use disinfectants.

  14. Comparative pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial community change in biofilm formed on seawater reverse osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In S; Lee, Jinwook; Kima, Sung-Jo; Yu, Hye-Weon; Jang, Am

    2014-01-01

    The change in bacterial community structure induced by bacterial competition and succession was investigated during seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) in order to elucidate a possible link between the bacterial consortium on SWRO membranes and biofouling. To date, there has been no definitive characterization of the microbial diversity in SWRO in terms of distinguishing time-dependent changes in the richness or abundance of bacterial species. For bacterial succession within biofilms on the membrane surface, SWRO using a cross-flow filtration membrane test unit was operated for 5 and 100h, respectively. As results of the pyrosequencing analysis, bacterial communities differed considerably among seawater and the 5 and 100 h samples. From a total of 33,876 pyrosequences (using a 95% sequence similarity), there were less than 1% of shared species, confirming the influence of the operational time factor and lack of similarity of these communities. During SWRO operation, the abundance of Pseudomonas stutzeri BBSPN3 (GU594474) belonging to gamma-Proteobacteria suggest that biofouling of SWRO membrane might be driven by the dominant influence of a specific species. In addition, among the bacterial competition of five bacterial species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus sp., Rhodobacter sp., Flavobacterium sp., and Mycobacterium sp.) competing for bacterial colonization on the SWRO membrane surfaces, it was exhibited that Bacillus sp. was the most dominant. The dominant influences ofPseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. on biofouling during actual SWRO is decisive depending on higher removal efficiency of the seawater pretreatment. PMID:24600849

  15. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of...

  16. Characterization of structures in biofilms formed by a Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from soil

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Siva; McDonald Kent; Pandita Ragini; O'Keeffe Teresa; Kainović Aleksandra; Baum Marc M; Webster Paul

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Microbial biofilms represent an incompletely understood, but fundamental mode of bacterial growth. These sessile communities typically consist of stratified, morphologically-distinct layers of extracellular material, where numerous metabolic processes occur simultaneously in close proximity. Limited reports on environmental isolates have revealed highly ordered, three-dimensional organization of the extracellular matrix, which may hold important implications for biofilm ph...

  17. Closed-Form Expressions for Secrecy Capacity over Correlated Rayleigh Fading Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiaojun; Jiang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the secure communications over correlated wiretap Rayleigh fading channels assuming the full channel state information (CSI) available. Based on the information theoretic formulation, we derive closed-form expressions for the average secrecy capacity and the outage probability. Simulation results confirm our analytical expressions.

  18. Crude fatty acid extracts of Streptomyces sps inhibits the biofilm forming Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalakshm Manickam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Crude fatty acid extract of soil Streptomyces sps on the biofilm formation by Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615 was investigated. Totally, 25 Streptomyces sps were isolated identified from the soil samples collected from Nilgiris hill station. All the isolates were subjected to hydrogen peroxide assay, fatty acid extraction and antibiofilm assay. The fatty acid extracts of S8, S9, and S15 inhibited S. pyogenes at MIC 10 µg/ml. The BIC was observed as 84.6% , 96.41%, 80.5% at 50 µg/ml concentration. Streptolysin S assay showed that the crude lipid extracts have the capability of inhibiting the Streptolysin S activity. There were changes in extracellular protein of the pathogen exposed to the S8, S9 and S15 crude fatty acid extracts (50 µg/ml at the range of 100-120 kDa which elucidates that the fatty acid extracts have a significant role in altering the extracellular protein which might be responsible for virulence of the pathogen. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  19. Wild Mushroom Extracts as Inhibitors of Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms can colonize a wide variety of medical devices, putting patients in risk for local and systemic infectious complications, including local-site infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and endocarditis. These microorganisms are able to grow adhered to almost every surface, forming architecturally complex communities termed biofilms. The use of natural products has been extremely successful in the discovery of new medicine, and mushrooms could be a source of natural antimicrobials. The present study reports the capacity of wild mushroom extracts to inhibit in vitro biofilm formation by multi-resistant bacteria. Four Gram-negative bacteria biofilm producers (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from urine were used to verify the activity of Russula delica, Fistulina hepatica, Mycena rosea, Leucopaxilus giganteus, and Lepista nuda extracts. The results obtained showed that all tested mushroom extracts presented some extent of inhibition of biofilm production. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism with the highest capacity of biofilm production, being also the most susceptible to the extracts inhibition capacity (equal or higher than 50%. Among the five tested extracts against E. coli, Leucopaxillus giganteus (47.8% and Mycenas rosea (44.8% presented the highest inhibition of biofilm formation. The extracts exhibiting the highest inhibitory effect upon P. mirabilis biofilm formation were Sarcodon imbricatus (45.4% and Russula delica (53.1%. Acinetobacter baumannii was the microorganism with the lowest susceptibility to mushroom extracts inhibitory effect on biofilm production (highest inhibition—almost 29%, by Russula delica extract. This is a pioneer study since, as far as we know, there are no reports on the inhibition of biofilm production by the studied mushroom extracts and in particular against multi-resistant clinical isolates; nevertheless, other

  20. Characterization of Mucosal Candida albicans Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Kashleva, Helena; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Diaz, Patricia; Vasilakos, John

    2009-01-01

    C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the alimentary tract mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Although the ability of C. albicans to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces has been well documented in recent years, no information exists on biofilms that form directly on mucosal surfaces. The objectives of this study were to characterize the structure and composition of Candida biofilms forming on the oral mucosa. We found that oral Candida biofilms consist of yeast, hyphae, and commens...

  1. Penetration barrier contributes to bacterial biofilm-associated resistance against only select antibiotics, and exhibits genus-, strain- and antibiotic-specific differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rachna; Sahore, Simmi; Kaur, Preetinder; Rani, Alka; Ray, Pallab

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are implicated in a wide range of implant-based and chronic infections. These infections are often associated with adverse therapeutic outcomes, owing to the decreased antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms compared with their planktonic counterparts. This altered biofilm susceptibility has been attributed to multiple factors, including a reduced antibiotic penetration. Although several studies have addressed the role of penetration barrier in biofilm-associated drug resistance, it remains inconclusive. This study was done to elucidate antibiotic penetration through biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, using an agar disk diffusion assay. Penetration capacity of six antimicrobial drugs from different classes (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, phenicols, fluoroquinolones and glycopeptides) through biofilms formed by standard strains and clinical isolates from catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) was elucidated by measuring their growth-inhibition zones in lawn cultures on Mueller-Hinton agar, following diffusion of an antibiotic from an overlying disk through their biofilm to the agar medium. Penetration of only select antimicrobials (vancomycin and chloramphenicol) was hindered through biofilms. There was considerable variation in biofilm-permeating capacity depending upon the genus, strain/CRBSI isolate and antibiotic tested. Furthermore, antibiotics failed to kill the biofilm cells independent of penetration, indicating that other factors contributed substantially to biofilm resistance. PMID:27402781

  2. Comparative efficacy of antibiotics in biofilms eradication formed by ESBL and non ESBL producing micro-organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Chaudhary

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth of bacterial cells within a biofilm complicate the treatment of infections. Therefore, in the present study biofilm eradication efficacy of (ceftriaxone and sulbactam plus EDTA; CSE1034 was compared with ceftriaxone alone, ceftriaxone plus EDTA and ceftriaxone plus sulbactam against biofilms of ESBL producing Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhi. Susceptibility testing of each drug was performed on planktonic and biofilm cells in non ESBL producing and ESBL producing strains according to the recommendations of clinical and laboratory standards institutes guidelines. CSE1034 inhibited the growth of planktonic cells of non ESBL producing strains with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC from 0.25 to 1.0 μg/ml; the minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC values ranged from 8 to 32 μg/ml where as ESBL producing strains MIC values were 2 to 4 times higher and corresponding MBEC values were higher by 4 to 8 times. When biofilms of ESBL producing organisms were treated with the half MBEC of drugs, CSE1034 decreased 3 log of bacteria present in biofilm when compared with ceftriaxone, ceftriaxone plus EDTA and ceftriaxone plus sulbactam. In conclusion, combination of CSE1034 acts synergistically and reduces the MIC and MBEC values, significantly. One dimensional polyacrlamide gel elctrophoresis of extracellular proteins revealed distinct difference in protein expression of the group treated with CSE1034. Hence, CSE1034 at low concentration showed greater efficacy in the eradication of biofilm as compared to other two drugs and could be one of the best choices to eradicate the biofilm infections caused by these organisms as compared to other drugs.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display a...... remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because the...... use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  4. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life is...... believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  5. Proteome changes during yeast-like and pseudohyphal growth in the biofilm-forming yeast Pichia fermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserti, Biancaelena; Podda, Alessandra; Giorgetti, Lucia; Del Carratore, Renata; Chevret, Didier; Migheli, Quirico

    2015-06-01

    The Pichia fermentans strain DISAABA 726 is a biofilm-forming yeast that has been proposed as biocontrol agent to control brown rot on apple. How ever, when inoculated on peach, strain 726 shows yeast-like to pseudohyphal transition coupled to a pathogenic behaviour. To identify the proteins potentially involved in such transition process, a comparative proteome analysis of P. fermentans 726 developed on peach (filamentous growth) vs apple (yeast-like growth) was carried out using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. The proteome comparison was also performed between the two different cell morphologies induced in a liquid medium amended with urea (yeast-like cells) or methionine (filamentous cells) to exclude fruit tissue impact on the transition. Seventy-three protein spots showed significant variations in abundance (±twofold, p < 0.01, confidence intervals 99 %) between pseudohyphal vs yeast-like morphology produced on fruits. Among them, 30 proteins changed their levels when the two morphologies were developed in liquid medium. The identified proteins belong to several pathways and functions, such as glycolysis, amino acid synthesis, chaperones, and signalling transduction. The possible role of a group of proteins belonging to the carbohydrate pathway in the metabolic re-organisation during P. fermentans dimorphic transition is discussed. PMID:25743163

  6. Effect of Mono and Di-rhamnolipids on Biofilms Pre-formed by Bacillus subtilis BBK006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rienzo, Mayri A Díaz; Martin, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Different microbial inhibition strategies based on the planktonic bacterial physiology have been known to have limited efficacy on the growth of biofilms communities. This problem can be exacerbated by the emergence of increasingly resistant clinical strains. Biosurfactants have merited renewed interest in both clinical and hygienic sectors due to their potential to disperse microbial biofilms. In this work, we explore the aspects of Bacillus subtilis BBK006 biofilms and examine the contribution of biologically derived surface-active agents (rhamnolipids) to the disruption or inhibition of microbial biofilms produced by Bacillus subtilis BBK006. The ability of mono-rhamnolipids (Rha-C10-C10) produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 and the di-rhamnolipids (Rha-Rha-C14-C14) produced by Burkholderia thailandensis E264, and phosphate-buffered saline to disrupt biofilm of Bacillus subtilis BBK006 was evaluated. The biofilm produced by Bacillus subtilis BBK006 was more sensitive to the di-rhamnolipids (0.4 g/L) produced by Burkholderia thailandensis than the mono-rhamnolipids (0.4 g/L) produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027. Rhamnolipids are biologically produced compounds safe for human use. This makes them ideal candidates for use in new generations of bacterial dispersal agents and useful for use as adjuvants for existing microbial suppression or eradication strategies. PMID:27113589

  7. Candida tropicalis Biofilms: Biomass, Metabolic Activity and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Melyssa; Silva, Sónia; Capoci, Isis Regina Grenier; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    According to epidemiological data, Candida tropicalis has been related to urinary tract infections and haematological malignancy. Several virulence factors seem to be responsible for C. tropicalis infections, for example: their ability to adhere and to form biofilms onto different indwelling medical devices; their capacity to adhere, invade and damage host human tissues due to enzymes production such as proteinases. The main aim of this work was to study the behaviour of C. tropicalis biofilms of different ages (24-120 h) formed in artificial urine (AU) and their ability to express aspartyl proteinase (SAPT) genes. The reference strain C. tropicalis ATCC 750 and two C. tropicalis isolates from urine were used. Biofilms were evaluated in terms of culturable cells by colony-forming units enumeration; total biofilm biomass was evaluated using the crystal violet staining method; metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT assay; and SAPT gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. All strains of C. tropicalis were able to form biofilms in AU, although with differences between strains. Candida tropicalis biofilms showed a decrease in terms of the number of culturable cells from 48 to 72 h. Generally, SAPT3 was highly expressed. C. tropicalis strains assayed were able to form biofilms in the presence of AU although in a strain- and time-dependent way, and SAPT genes are expressed during C. tropicalis biofilm formation. PMID:26572148

  8. Development of short form questionnaires for the assessment of work capacity in cardiovascular rehabilitation patients

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Haschke; Birgit Abberger; Markus Wirtz; Jürgen Bengel; Harald Baumeister

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Prevention of job loss is an essential objective of cardiovascular rehabilitation. However, comprehensive and economic diagnostic instruments on work limitations are missing. The present study describes development of short form questionnaires from 2 domains of the WCIB-Cardio item banks for the assessment of work capacity in cardiovascular rehabilitation patients. Materials and Methods: 283 cardiovascular rehabilitation patients were recruited from 14 German rehabilitation clinic...

  9. Modern Technologies of Bacterial Biofilm Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebotar I.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to estimate the availability of new biomedical technologies to identify bacterial biofilms and evaluate them on a staphylococcal biofilm model. Materials and Methods. We studied staphylococcal biofilms by mass spectrometry, laser scanning (confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, enzymatic and oxidative destruction of extracellular biofilm matrix. Results. We demonstrated the capabilities of new biomedical technologies in identification of generic specificity of biofilm-forming staphylococcus, and in detection of the necessary characteristics of staphylococcal biofilm. Mass spectrometry enabled to identify the type of biofilm-forming staphylococcus (Staphylococcus aureus. Microscopic study using laser scanning confocal microscopic technique revealed 3-demensional organization typical of S. aureus biofilms. Scanning electron microscopy enabled to visualize the structures of extracellular S. aureus biofilm matrix. The extracellular matrix of the test biofilm was found to be formed of DNA-protein complexes.

  10. Investigating the Effectiveness of Centaureacyanus Extracts on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Structures of Six Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Mohsenipour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, the treatments of infectious disease are regarded difficult due to increasing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria, which the reason may be placing of microorganisms in a structure named biofilm. Biofilms are complex structures consisting of surface-attached bacteria. Therefore, it is essential to find new compounds in order to remove and inhibit biofilms. This study aimed to examine the antibacterial activities of alcoholic extracts of Centaurea cyanus on the biofilm structures and planktonic form of six pathogen bacteria(Staphylococcusaureus, Bacilluscereus, Streptococcuspneumoniae, Pseudomonasaeruginosa, Escherichiacoli and Klebsiellapneumonia. Methods: Antimicrobial activities of the alcoholic plant extracts against the planktonic form of bacteria were assessed via using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were determined by a macrobroth dilution technique and anti-biofilm effects were scrutinized by microtiter plate method. Results: The results of this study confirmed high ability of C.cyanus extracts against the biofilm of the tested bacteria as well as their free-living forms. To inhibit bacterial growth, ethanolic extracts proved to be more effective than methanolic extracts. Anti-biofilm effects of plant extracts were associated with the solvent type and extract concentration. C.cyanus extracts were reported to be most efficient to inhibit biofilm formation of E. coli (84/26% and S. pneumoniae(83/14%. The greatest eradication of biofilm structures were observed on S. pneumonia biofilm (75.66%, and the highest decrease in metabolic activity was reported in S.aureus biofilms (71/85%. Conclusion: In this study the high capacity of C. cyanus extracts to encounter with whit biofilm was emphasized. Moreover, it was demonstrated that these extracts possess an appropriate potential to become active principles of new drugs.

  11. Bacterial biofilms formed in vitro and in vivo on orthodontic appliances. Effect of antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Cortizo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los procesos cariogénicos y las infecciones gingivales y en la vecindad de los implantes pueden ocurrir como una consecuencia de la formación de biopelículas. A fin de prevenir estos procesos, se utilizan productos profilácticos tales como fluoruro de sodio (F, clorhexidina (C y xilitol (X. El objetivo de este trabajo fue estudiar el efecto de las mezclas F + X y C + X sobre las biopelículas orales formadas en dispositivos para Ortodoncia. En los experimentos in vitro se utilizó un consorcio de estreptococos y como medio de cultivo Agar Mitis Salivarius o su composición modificada para cultivos líquidos líquido. Se sumergieron bandas de acero inoxidable en los medios inoculados durante 7 d y se siguió el crecimiento de la biopelícula a través de microscopia óptica realizada in situ. Las bacterias sésiles adheridas a las bandas fueron observadas después de teñirlas con naranja de acridina. Después de los períodos establecidos las bandas con las biopelículas fueron retiradas de los medios de cultivo y se transfirieron a tres frascos diferentes con: i disolución reguladora de fosfatos, ii un colutorio que contenía F (0,05 % + X (10 % y iii un colutorio que contenía X (10 % + C (0,12 %. Los resultados demostraron que es difícil predecir la eficacia de los agentes antimicrobianos (AA contra las biopelículas orales basado en experiencias realizadas con células planctónicas. Los AA ensayados fueron capaces de difundir dentro de la biopelícula, modificar su microestructura, haciéndola más compacta, reducir el crecimiento de las bacterias sésiles y promover el desprendimiento de células. Sin embargo, el recrecimiento de la biopelícula podría ocurrir bajo mejores condiciones ambientales cuando finaliza el tratamiento.

  12. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.;

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation...... PilX alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  13. Identification of the genes involved in Riemerella anatipestifer biofilm formation by random transposon mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghai Hu

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer causes epizootics of infectious disease in poultry that result in serious economic losses to the duck industry. Our previous studies have shown that some strains of R. anatipestifer can form a biofilm, and this may explain the intriguing persistence of R. anatipestifer on duck farms post infection. In this study we used strain CH3, a strong producer of biofilm, to construct a library of random Tn4351 transposon mutants in order to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation by R. anatipestifer on abiotic surfaces. A total of 2,520 mutants were obtained and 39 of them showed a reduction in biofilm formation of 47%-98% using crystal violet staining. Genetic characterization of the mutants led to the identification of 33 genes. Of these, 29 genes are associated with information storage and processing, as well as basic cellular processes and metabolism; the function of the other four genes is currently unknown. In addition, a mutant strain BF19, in which biofilm formation was reduced by 98% following insertion of the Tn4351 transposon at the dihydrodipicolinate synthase (dhdps gene, was complemented with a shuttle plasmid pCP-dhdps. The complemented mutant strain was restored to give 92.6% of the biofilm formation of the wild-type strain CH3, which indicates that the dhdp gene is associated with biofilm formation. It is inferred that such complementation applies also to other mutant strains. Furthermore, some biological characteristics of biofilm-defective mutants were investigated, indicating that the genes deleted in the mutant strains function in the biofilm formation of R. anatipestifer. Deletion of either gene will stall the biofilm formation at a specific stage thus preventing further biofilm development. In addition, the tested biofilm-defective mutants had different adherence capacity to Vero cells. This study will help us to understand the molecular mechanisms of biofilm development by R. anatipestifer and to

  14. Effect Of Oxidation On Chromium Leaching And Redox Capacity Of Slag-Containing Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO4- in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases [Shuh, et al., 1994, Shuh, et al., 2000, Shuh, et al., 2003]. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O4-, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in simulated waste form samples. Depth discrete subsamples were cut from material exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) ''field cured'' conditions. The subsamples were prepared and analyzed for both reduction capacity and chromium leachability. Results from field-cured samples indicate that the depth at which leachable chromium was detected advanced further into the sample exposed for 302 days compared to the sample exposed to air for 118 days (at least 50 mm compared to at least 20 mm). Data for only two exposure time intervals is currently available. Data for additional exposure times are required to develop an equation for the oxidation front progression. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method, which is a measurement of the ability of a material to chemically reduce Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in solution) performed on depth

  15. Effect Of Oxidation On Chromium Leaching And Redox Capacity Of Slag-Containing Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stefanko, D. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-03-01

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO4- in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases [Shuh, et al., 1994, Shuh, et al., 2000, Shuh, et al., 2003]. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O4-, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in simulated waste form samples. Depth discrete subsamples were cut from material exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) field cured conditions. The subsamples were prepared and analyzed for both reduction capacity and chromium leachability. Results from field-cured samples indicate that the depth at which leachable chromium was detected advanced further into the sample exposed for 302 days compared to the sample exposed to air for 118 days (at least 50 mm compared to at least 20 mm). Data for only two exposure time intervals is currently available. Data for additional exposure times are required to develop an equation for the oxidation front progression. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method, which is a measurement of the ability of a material to chemically reduce Ce(IV) to Ce

  16. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  17. Manipulatiaon of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Palmer, R.J.; Smith, C.A.; Whitaker, K.W.; White, D.C.; Zinn, M.; kirkegaard, R.

    1998-08-09

    The Biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms by generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desquamation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in the distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  18. Biofilm photobioreactors for the treatment of industrial wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flat plate and a tubular packed-bed photobioreactor with an algal-bacterial biofilm attached onto Poraver beads carriers, a flat plate and a tubular photobioreactor with the biofilm attached onto the reactor walls, and an algal-turf reactor were compared in terms of BOD removal efficiencies, elimination capacities, and stability. A control column photobioreactor with suspended algal-bacterial biomass was also tested to compare the performance of biofilm photobioreactors with conventional algal-based processes. When the algal-bacterial biomass was immobilized onto Poraver the process never reached a steady state due to a poor homogenization in the bioreactor. When the biofilm was formed onto the reactor wall (or reactor base) the process was stable. A maximum degradation rate of 295 mg BOD l-1 h-1 was achieved in the algal-turf reactor although control experiments performed in the dark showed atmospheric O2 diffusion represented 55% of the oxygenation capacity in this system. BOD removal rates of 108, and 92 mg BOD l-1 h-1 were achieved in the tubular and flat plate biofilm reactors, respectively, compared to 77 mg BOD l-1 h-1 in the control suspended bioreactor. In addition, all biofilm photobioreactors produced an easily settleable biomass. Evidence was found that biomass attachment to the reactor's wall improved stability

  19. Characterization of starvation-induced dispersion in Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Sternberg, Claus;

    2005-01-01

    that they must be able to regulate their ability to form biofilm and to dissolve biofilm. We present an investigation of a biofilm dissolution process occurring in flow-chamber-grown Pseudomonas putida biofilms. Local starvation-induced biofilm dissolution appears to be an integrated part of P. putida...

  20. Phenotypic Characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Development

    OpenAIRE

    Allegrucci, Magee; Hu, F.Z.; Shen, K.; J. Hayes; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Post, J Christopher; Sauer, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is among the most common pathogens associated with chronic otitis media with effusion, which has been hypothesized to be a biofilm disease. S. pneumoniae has been shown to form biofilms, however, little is known about the developmental process, the architecture, and the changes that occur upon biofilm development. In the current study we made use of a continuous-culture biofilm system to characterize biofilm development of 14 different S. pneumoniae strains representi...

  1. Phosphorus removal coupled to bioenergy production by three cyanobacterial isolates in a biofilm dynamic growth system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gismondi, Alessandra; Pippo, Francesca Di; Bruno, Laura; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Congestri, Roberta

    2016-09-01

    In the present study a closed incubator, designed for biofilm growth on artificial substrata, was used to grow three isolates of biofilm-forming heterocytous cyanobacteria using an artificial wastewater secondary effluent as the culture medium. We evaluated biofilm efficiency in removing phosphorus, by simulating biofilm-based tertiary wastewater treatment and coupled this process with biodiesel production from the developed biomass. The three strains were able to grow in the synthetic medium and remove phosphorus in percentages, between 6 and 43%, which varied between strains and also among each strain according to the biofilm growth phase. Calothrix sp. biofilm turned out to be a good candidate for tertiary treatment, showing phosphorus reducing capacity (during the exponential biofilm growth) at the regulatory level for the treated effluent water being discharged into natural water systems. Besides phosphorus removal, the three cyanobacterial biofilms produced high quality lipids, whose profile showed promising chemical stability and combustion behavior. Further integration of the proposed processes could include the integration of oil extracted from these cyanobacterial biofilms with microalgal oil known for high monounsaturated fatty acids content, in order to enhance biodiesel cold flow characteristics. PMID:26939844

  2. Co-occurence of filamentation defects and impaired biofilms in Candida albicans protein kinase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidou, Nina; Morrissey, John Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Pathogenicity of Candida albicans is linked with its developmental stages, notably the capacity switch from yeast-like to hyphal growth, and to form biofilms on surfaces. To better understand the cellular processes involved in C. albicans development, a collection of 63 C. albicans protein kinase mutants was screened for biofilm formation in a microtitre plate assay. Thirty-eight mutants displayed some degree of biofilm impairment, with 20 categorised as poor biofilm formers. All the poor biofilm formers were also defective in the switch from yeast to hyphae, establishing it as a primary defect. Five genes, VPS15, IME2, PKH3, PGA43 and CEX1, encode proteins not previously reported to influence hyphal development or biofilm formation. Network analysis established that individual components of some processes, most interestingly MAP kinase pathways, are not required for biofilm formation, most likely indicating functional redundancy. Mutants were also screened for their response to bacterial supernatants and it was found that Pseudomonas aeruginosa supernatants inhibited biofilm formation in all mutants, regardless of the presence of homoserine lactones (HSLs). In contrast, Candida morphology was only affected by supernatant containing HSLs. This confirms the distinct HSL-dependent inhibition of filamentation and the HSL-independent impairment of biofilm development by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26472756

  3. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. One hypothesis to explain the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. To invest...

  4. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Triclosan Promote Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Oral Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Grignon, Louis; Spolidorio, Denise Palomari; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range...

  5. Mouse lung contains endothelial progenitors with high capacity to form blood and lymphatic vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barleon Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs have been successfully isolated from whole bone marrow, blood and the walls of conduit vessels. They can, therefore, be classified into circulating and resident progenitor cells. The differentiation capacity of resident lung endothelial progenitor cells from mouse has not been evaluated. Results In an attempt to isolate differentiated mature endothelial cells from mouse lung we found that the lung contains EPCs with a high vasculogenic capacity and capability of de novo vasculogenesis for blood and lymph vessels. Mouse lung microvascular endothelial cells (MLMVECs were isolated by selection of CD31+ cells. Whereas the majority of the CD31+ cells did not divide, some scattered cells started to proliferate giving rise to large colonies (> 3000 cells/colony. These highly dividing cells possess the capacity to integrate into various types of vessels including blood and lymph vessels unveiling the existence of local microvascular endothelial progenitor cells (LMEPCs in adult mouse lung. EPCs could be amplified > passage 30 and still expressed panendothelial markers as well as the progenitor cell antigens, but not antigens for immune cells and hematopoietic stem cells. A high percentage of these cells are also positive for Lyve1, Prox1, podoplanin and VEGFR-3 indicating that a considerabe fraction of the cells are committed to develop lymphatic endothelium. Clonogenic highly proliferating cells from limiting dilution assays were also bipotent. Combined in vitro and in vivo spheroid and matrigel assays revealed that these EPCs exhibit vasculogenic capacity by forming functional blood and lymph vessels. Conclusion The lung contains large numbers of EPCs that display commitment for both types of vessels, suggesting that lung blood and lymphatic endothelial cells are derived from a single progenitor cell.

  6. Analysis of meticillin-susceptible and meticillin-resistant biofilm-forming Staphylococcus aureus from catheter infections isolated in a large Italian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Dezemona; Repetto, Antonella; D'Ercole, Stefania; Rombini, Silvia; Ripa, Sandro; Prenna, Manuela; Vitali, Luca Agostino

    2008-03-01

    Several characteristics were analysed in 37 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from nosocomial catheter infections: the PFGE profile after SmaI digestion of chromosomal DNA, the ability to form a biofilm on a polystyrene surface, antibiotic susceptibility patterns (penicillin, oxacillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, clindamycin, telithromycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, rifampicin, vancomycin and linezolid), and the presence of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. All strains but three (92 %) were able to grow on a plastic surface as a biofilm. An almost complete association was found between phenotypes and genotypic traits of antibiotic resistance, whilst PFGE profiling showed the highly polyclonal composition of the set of strains under study. Sixteen isolates (43 %) were meticillin-resistant and were subjected to staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) complex type determination by multiplex PCR. Only a subgroup of six strains belonged to the archaic clone PFGE type and bore the SCCmec/ccrAB type I structure. Among the remaining strains some presented small rearrangements of the SCCmec/ccrAB genetic locus, whilst others could barely be traced back to a known structural type. These observations suggest that, at the local level and at a particular site of infection, S. aureus may show great genetic variability and escape the general rule of expansion of the S. aureus pandemic clones. PMID:18287301

  7. Exercise-induced norepinephrine decreases circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell colony-forming capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröpfl, Julia M; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/-4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  8. Exercise-induced norepinephrine decreases circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell colony-forming capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M Kröpfl

    Full Text Available A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/-4.4 yrs before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15. The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI, cortisol (Co and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6 in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality.

  9. Bacterial biofilms with emphasis on coagulase-negative staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their capacity to attach to surfaces, various groups of microorganisms also produce an extracellular polymeric substance known as "slime". This slime forms a thin layer around cells known as biofilm. Thus, biofilm structure comprises bacterial cells and an extracellular polymeric substance. It also presents a defined architecture, providing the microorganisms with an excellent protective environment and favoring the exchange of genetic material between cells as well as intercellular communication. The ability to produce biofilm is observed in a large group of bacteria, including coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS which are the predominant microorganisms of normal skin flora and have been implicated as the causative agents of hospital infections. Bacteremia caused by these agents is common in immunodepressed persons, in patients with cancer, in adult and neonatal intensive care units (ICU and in patients using catheters or other prosthetic devices. The pathogenicity of CNS infections is probably related to the production of slime, which adheres preferentially to plastic and smooth surfaces, forming a biofilm that protects against attacks from the immune system and against antibiotic treatment, a fact hindering the eradication of these infections. The main objective of the present review was to describe basic and genetic aspects of biofilm formation and methods for its detection, with emphasis on biofilm creation by CNS and its relationship with diseases caused by these microorganisms which are becoming increasingly more frequent in the hospital environment.

  10. Biofilms: a developing microscopic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Sandra Patricia

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities composed by different microbiota embebbed in a special adaptive environment. These communities show different characteristics such as heterogeneity, diversity in microenvironments, capacity to resist antimicrobial therapy and ability to allow bacterial communication. These characteristics convert them in complex organizations that are difficult to eradicate in their own environment. In the man, biofilms are associated to a great number of slow-development infectious processes which greatly difficulties their eradication. In the industry and environment, biofilms are centered in processes known as biofouling and bioremediation. The former is the contamination of a system due to the microbial activity of a biofilm. The latter uses biofilms to improve the conditions of a contaminated system. The study of biofilms is a new and exciting field which is constantly evolving and whose implications in medicine and industry would have important repercussions for the humankind.

  11. Biofilm Formation by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis R; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses a polysaccharide capsule and can form biofilms on medical devices. The increasing use of ventriculoperitoneal shunts to manage intracranial hypertension associated with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis highlights the importance of investigating the biofilm-forming properties of this organism. Like other microbe-forming biofilms, C. neoformans biofilms are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms, causing significant morbidity and mortality. This chapter discusses the recent advances in the understanding of cryptococcal biofilms, including the role of its polysaccharide capsule in adherence, gene expression, and quorum sensing in biofilm formation. We describe novel strategies for the prevention or eradication of cryptococcal colonization of medical prosthetic devices. Finally, we provide fresh thoughts on the diverse but interesting directions of research in this field that may result in new insights into C. neoformans biology. PMID:26185073

  12. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  13. Permeabilizing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  14. Factors contributing to the biofilm-deficient phenotype of Staphylococcus aureus sarA mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura H Tsang

    Full Text Available Mutation of sarA in Staphylococcus aureus results in a reduced capacity to form a biofilm, but the mechanistic basis for this remains unknown. Previous transcriptional profiling experiments identified a number of genes that are differentially expressed both in a biofilm and in a sarA mutant. This included genes involved in acid tolerance and the production of nucleolytic and proteolytic exoenzymes. Based on this we generated mutations in alsSD, nuc and sspA in the S. aureus clinical isolate UAMS-1 and its isogenic sarA mutant and assessed the impact on biofilm formation. Because expression of alsSD was increased in a biofilm but decreased in a sarA mutant, we also generated a plasmid construct that allowed expression of alsSD in a sarA mutant. Mutation of alsSD limited biofilm formation, but not to the degree observed with the corresponding sarA mutant, and restoration of alsSD expression did not restore the ability to form a biofilm. In contrast, concomitant mutation of sarA and nuc significantly enhanced biofilm formation by comparison to the sarA mutant. Although mutation of sspA had no significant impact on the ability of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm, a combination of protease inhibitors (E-64, 1-10-phenanthroline, and dichloroisocoumarin that was shown to inhibit the production of multiple extracellular proteases without inhibiting growth was also shown to enhance the ability of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm. This effect was evident only when all three inhibitors were used concurrently. This suggests that the reduced capacity of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm involves extracellular proteases of all three classes (serine, cysteine and metalloproteases. Inclusion of protease inhibitors also enhanced biofilm formation in a sarA/nuc mutant, with the combined effect of mutating nuc and adding protease inhibitors resulting in a level of biofilm formation with the sarA mutant that approached that of the UAMS-1 parent strain. These results

  15. Identifying A Molecular Phenotype for Bone Marrow Stromal Cells With In Vivo Bone Forming Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kenneth H; Frederiksen, Casper M; Burns, Jorge S;

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The ability of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to differentiate into osteoblasts is being exploited in cell-based therapy for repair of bone defects. However, the phenotype of ex vivo cultured BMSCs predicting their bone forming capacity is not known. Thus, we employed DNA microarrays...... comparing two human bone marrow stromal cell (hBMSC) populations: one is capable of in vivo heterotopic bone formation (hBMSC-TERT(+Bone)) and the other is not (hBMSC-TERT(-Bone)). Compared to hBMSC-TERT(-Bone), the hBMSC-TERT(+Bone) cells had an increased over-representation of extracellular matrix genes...... (17% versus 5%) and a larger percentage of genes with predicted SP3 transcription factor binding sites in their promoter region (21% versus 8%). On the other hand, hBMSC-TERT(-Bone) cells expressed a larger number of immune-response related genes (26% versus 8%). In order to test for the predictive...

  16. Influence of flow on the structure of bacterial biofilms.

    OpenAIRE

    Stoodley, Paul; Boyle, John D.; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteria attached to surfaces in biofilms are responsible for the contamination of industrial processes and many types of microbial infections and disease. Once established, biofilms are notoriously difficult to eradicate. A more complete understanding of how biofilms form and behave is crucial if we are to predict, and ultimately control, biofilm processes. A major breakthrough in biofilm research came in the early 1990’s when confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed that biofilms fo...

  17. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu,Hong; Høiby, Niels; Molin, Søren; Zhi-jun SONG

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actually formed by multiple bacterial species. Conventional methods for bacterial cleaning, such as applications of antibiotics and/or disinfectants are often ineffective for biofilm populations due to their...

  18. Beneficial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara R Robertson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface-adherent biofilm growth is a common trait of bacteria and other microorganisms in nature. Within biofilms, organisms are present in high density and are enmeshed in an organic matrix containing polysaccharides and other molecules. The close proximity of organisms within biofilms facilitates microbial interactions and signaling, including many metabolic processes in which consortia rather than individual organisms participate. Biofilm growth also enables microorganisms to withstand chemical and biological stresses. Here, we review some current literature and document representative beneficial aspects of biofilms using examples from wastewater treatment, microbial fuel cells, biological repair (biocementation of stonework, and biofilm protection against Candida albicans infections. Finally, we address a chemical ecology strategy whereby desired microbial succession and beneficial biofilm formation can be encouraged via manipulation of culture conditions and bacterial signaling.

  19. Surface-attached cells, biofilms and biocide susceptibility: implications for hospital cleaning and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; Vickery, K; Walker, J T; deLancey Pulcini, E; Stoodley, P; Goldenberg, S D; Salkeld, J A G; Chewins, J; Yezli, S; Edgeworth, J D

    2015-01-01

    Microbes tend to attach to available surfaces and readily form biofilms, which is problematic in healthcare settings. Biofilms are traditionally associated with wet or damp surfaces such as indwelling medical devices and tubing on medical equipment. However, microbes can survive for extended periods in a desiccated state on dry hospital surfaces, and biofilms have recently been discovered on dry hospital surfaces. Microbes attached to surfaces and in biofilms are less susceptible to biocides, antibiotics and physical stress. Thus, surface attachment and/or biofilm formation may explain how vegetative bacteria can survive on surfaces for weeks to months (or more), interfere with attempts to recover microbes through environmental sampling, and provide a mixed bacterial population for the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. The capacity of existing detergent formulations and disinfectants to disrupt biofilms may have an important and previously unrecognized role in determining their effectiveness in the field, which should be reflected in testing standards. There is a need for further research to elucidate the nature and physiology of microbes on dry hospital surfaces, specifically the prevalence and composition of biofilms. This will inform new approaches to hospital cleaning and disinfection, including novel surfaces that reduce microbial attachment and improve microbial detachment, and methods to augment the activity of biocides against surface-attached microbes such as bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides. Future strategies to address environmental contamination on hospital surfaces should consider the presence of microbes attached to surfaces, including biofilms. PMID:25447198

  20. Hydroxychalcone inhibitors of Streptococcus mutans glucosyl transferases and biofilms as potential anticaries agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Casals, Luke; Zheng, Ruowen; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans has been implicated as the major etiological agent in the initiation and the development of dental caries due to its robust capacity to form tenacious biofilms. Ideal therapeutics for this disease will aim to selectively inhibit the biofilm formation process while preserving the natural bacterial flora of the mouth. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacies of flavonols on S. mutans biofilms and have suggested the mechanism of action through their effect on S. mutans glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). These enzymes metabolize sucrose into water insoluble and soluble glucans, which are an integral measure of the dental caries pathogenesis. Numerous studies have shown that flavonols and polyphenols can inhibit Gtf and biofilm formation at millimolar concentrations. We have screened a group of 14 hydroxychalcones, synthetic precursors of flavonols, in an S. mutans biofilm assay. Several of these compounds emerged to be biofilm inhibitors at low micro-molar concentrations. Chalcones that contained a 3-OH group on ring A exhibited selectivity for biofilm inhibition. Moreover, we synthesized 6 additional analogs of the lead compound and evaluated their potential activity and selectivity against S. mutans biofilms. The most active compound identified from these studies had an IC50 value of 44μM against biofilm and MIC50 value of 468μM against growth displaying >10-fold selectivity inhibition towards biofilm. The lead compound displayed a dose dependent inhibition of S. mutans Gtfs. The lead compound also did not affect the growth of two commensal species (Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii) at least up to 200μM, indicating that it can selectively inhibit cariogenic biofilms, while leaving commensal and/or beneficial microbes intact. Thus non-toxic compounds have the potential utility in public oral health regimes. PMID:27371109

  1. Microbial Biofilms in Endodontic Infections: An Update Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahed Mohammadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms and microbial aggregates are the common mechanisms for the survival of bacteria in nature. In other words, the ability to form biofilms has been regarded as a virulence factor. Microbial biofilms play an essential role in several infectious diseases such as pulp and periradicular pathosis. The aim of this article was to review the adaptation mechanisms of biofilms, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, factors influencing biofilm formation, mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, models developed to create biofilms, observation techniques of endodontic biofilms, and the effects of root canal irrigants and medicaments as well as lasers on endodontic biofilms. The search was performed from 1982 to December 2010, and was limited to papers in English language. The keywords searched on Medline were "biofilms and endodontics," "biofilms and root canal irrigation," "biofilms and intra-canal medicament," and "biofilms and lasers." The reference section of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information.

  2. Biofilm formation among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from patients with urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ando E

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci have been confirmed to form biofilms on various biomaterials. The purpose of this study was to investigate biofilm formation among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI and to assess the relationship between biofilm-forming capacities and virulence determinants/clinical background. Over a 12-year period from 1990 through 2001, a total of 109 MRSA isolates were collected from patients (one isolate per patient with UTI at the urology ward of Okayama University Hospital. We used the in vitro microtiter plate assay to quantify biofilm formation. We then investigated the presence of several virulence determinants by polymerase chain reaction assay and found eight determinants (tst, sec, hla, hlb, fnbA, clfA, icaA, and agrII to be predominant among these isolates. Enhanced biofilm formation was confirmed in hla-, hlb-, and fnbA-positive MRSA isolates, both individually and in combination. Upon review of the associated medical records, we concluded that the biofilm-forming capacities of MRSA isolates from catheter-related cases were significantly greater than those from catheter-unrelated cases. The percentage of hla-, hlb-, and fnbA-positive isolates was higher among MRSA isolates from catheter-related cases than those from catheter-unrelated cases. Our studies suggest that MRSA colonization and infection of the urinary tract may be promoted by hla, hlb, and fnbA gene products.

  3. Atomic force microscopy study of the structure function relationships of the biofilm-forming bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Kreth, Jens; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Fengxia; Pelling, Andrew E.; Shi, Wenyuan; Gimzewski, James K.

    2006-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest in recent years for its ability to probe the structure, function and cellular nanomechanics inherent to specific biological cells. In particular, we have used AFM to probe the important structure-function relationships of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans is the primary aetiological agent in human dental caries (tooth decay), and is of medical importance due to the virulence properties of these cells in biofilm initiation and formation, leading to increased tolerance to antibiotics. We have used AFM to characterize the unique surface structures of distinct mutants of S. mutans. These mutations are located in specific genes that encode surface proteins, thus using AFM we have resolved characteristic surface features for mutant strains compared to the wild type. Ultimately, our characterization of surface morphology has shown distinct differences in the local properties displayed by various S. mutans strains on the nanoscale, which is imperative for understanding the collective properties of these cells in biofilm formation.

  4. D-amino acids trigger biofilm disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Romero, Diego; Cao, Shugeng; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-04-30

    Bacteria form communities known as biofilms, which disassemble over time. In our studies outlined here, we found that, before biofilm disassembly, Bacillus subtilis produced a factor that prevented biofilm formation and could break down existing biofilms. The factor was shown to be a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tyrosine, and D-tryptophan that could act at nanomolar concentrations. D-amino acid treatment caused the release of amyloid fibers that linked cells in the biofilm together. Mutants able to form biofilms in the presence of D-amino acids contained alterations in a protein (YqxM) required for the formation and anchoring of the fibers to the cell. D-amino acids also prevented biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-amino acids are produced by many bacteria and, thus, may be a widespread signal for biofilm disassembly. PMID:20431016

  5. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized as...... being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections such as...... diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well as...

  6. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst; Høiby, Niels

    being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections such as......A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized as...... diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well as...

  7. Multiparameter Assessments To Determine the Effects of Sugars and Antimicrobials on a Polymicrobial Oral Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ying; Sreenivasan, Prem K; Subramanyam, Ravi; Cummins, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate relationships between dental plaque, a naturally formed biofilm, and oral diseases. The crucial role of nonmicrobial biofilm constituents in maintaining biofilm structure and biofilm-specific attributes, such as resistance to shear and viscoelasticity, is increasingly recognized. Concurrent analyses of the diverse nonmicrobial biofilm components for multiparameter assessments formed the focus of this investigation. Comparable numbers of Actinomyces viscosus, Streptoc...

  8. Microfluidic Approaches to Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hee-Deung Park; Junghyun Kim; Seok Chung

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms—aggregations of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substrates (EPS)—are an important subject of research in the fields of biology and medical science. Under aquatic conditions, bacterial cells form biofilms as a mechanism for improving survival and dispersion. In this review, we discuss bacterial biofilm development as a structurally and dynamically complex biological system and propose microfluidic approaches for the study of bacterial biofilms. Biofilms develop t...

  9. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produ...

  10. From Agricultural Extension to Capacity Development: Exploring the Foundations of an Emergent Form of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Al

    2013-01-01

    This essay argues that capacity development is a response to changes in the organization and practice of agricultural extension as these changes have excluded small resource farmers. In this essay I trace the changes in the organization of agricultural extension through to the emergence of the concept and practice of capacity development. The idea…

  11. A closed-form expression for the optimal capacity of CHP

    OpenAIRE

    Arie ten Cate

    2009-01-01

    In this memorandum the optimal capacity of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is derived, using a simple model with an analytical solution. The solution is expressed as the fraction of the time during which the heat demand exceeds the optimal CHP heat production capacity.

  12. Oral Streptococci Biofilm Formation on Different Implant Surface Topographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Cardoso Pita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the subgingival microbiota is dependent on successive colonization of the implant surface by bacterial species. Different implant surface topographies could influence the bacterial adsorption and therefore jeopardize the implant survival. This study evaluated the biofilm formation capacity of five oral streptococci species on two titanium surface topographies. In vitro biofilm formation was induced on 30 titanium discs divided in two groups: sandblasted acid-etched (SAE- n=15 and as-machined (M- n=15 surface. The specimens were immersed in sterilized whole human unstimulated saliva and then in fresh bacterial culture with five oral streptococci species: Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, and Streptococcus cricetus. The specimens were fixed and stained and the adsorbed dye was measured. Surface characterization was performed by atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. Surface and microbiologic data were analyzed by Student’s t-test and two-way ANOVA, respectively (P0.05. S. sanguinis exhibited similar behavior to form biofilm on both implant surface topographies, while S. salivarius showed the lowest ability to form biofilm. It was concluded that biofilm formation on titanium surfaces depends on surface topography and species involved.

  13. The ability of S.aureus to form biofilm on the Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting and subjected to the different types of surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczyk, Patrycja; Junka, Adam; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Smutnicka, Danuta; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive coccus, Staphylococcus aureus, is the leading etiologic agent of limb and life-threatening biofilm-related infections in the patients following the orthopaedic implantations. The aim of the present paper is to estimate the ability of S. aureus to form biofilm on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-7Nb) scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and subjected to the different types of surface modifications, including ultrasonic cleaning and chemical polishing. The results obtained indicate significantly the decreased ability of S.aureus to form biofilm on the surface of scaffolds subjected to the chemical polishing in comparison to the scaffolds cleaned ultrasonically. The data provided can be useful for future applications of the SLM technology in production of Ti-6Al-7Nb medical implants. PMID:23957680

  14. Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

  15. A Subinhibitory Concentration of Clarithromycin Inhibits Mycobacterium avium Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, George; Young, Lowell S.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes disseminated infection in immunosuppressed individuals and lung infection in patients with chronic lung diseases. M. avium forms biofilm in the environment and possibly in human airways. Antibiotics with activity against the bacterium could inhibit biofilm formation. Clarithromycin inhibits biofilm formation but has no activity against established biofilm.

  16. D-Amino Acids Trigger Biofilm Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodkin-Gal, Illana; Romero, Diego; Cao, Shugeng; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria form communities known as biofilms, which disassemble over time. Here we found that prior to biofilm disassembly Bacillus subtilis produced a factor that prevented biofilm formation and could break down existing biofilms. The factor was shown to be a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tyrosine and D-tryptophan that could act at nanomolar concentrations. D-amino acid treatment caused the release of amyloid fibers that linked cells in the biofilm together. Mutants able to form biofi...

  17. Medical Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Bryers, James D.

    2008-01-01

    For more than two decades, Biotechnology and Bioengineering has documented research focused on natural and engineered microbial biofilms within aquatic and subterranean ecosystems, wastewater and waste-gas treatment systems, marine vessels and structures, and industrial bioprocesses. Compared to suspended culture systems, intentionally engineered biofilms are heterogeneous reaction systems that can increase reactor productivity, system stability, and provide inherent cell: product separation....

  18. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm formation. A collectio

  19. Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    , and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  20. Biofilm Formation and Sloughing in Serratia marcescens Are Controlled by Quorum Sensing and Nutrient Cues

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, S A; Koh, K. S.; Queck, S. Y.; Labbate, M.; Lam, K W; Kjelleberg, S

    2005-01-01

    We describe here a role for quorum sensing in the detachment, or sloughing, of Serratia marcescens filamentous biofilms, and we show that nutrient conditions affect the biofilm morphotype. Under reduced carbon or nitrogen conditions, S. marcescens formed a classical biofilm consisting of microcolonies. The filamentous biofilm could be converted to a microcolony-type biofilm by switching the medium after establishment of the biofilm. Similarly, when initially grown as a microcolony biofilm, S....

  1. Sequencing of IncX-plasmids suggests ubiquity of mobile forms of a biofilm-promoting gene cassette recruited from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Burmølle

    Full Text Available Plasmids are a highly effective means with which genetic traits that influence human health, such as virulence and antibiotic resistance, are disseminated through bacterial populations. The IncX-family is a hitherto sparsely populated group of plasmids that are able to thrive within Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, a replicon-centric screening method was used to locate strains from wastewater sludge containing plasmids belonging to the IncX-family. A transposon aided plasmid capture method was then employed to transport IncX-plasmids from their original hosts (and co-hosted plasmids into a laboratory strain (Escherichia coli Genehogs® for further study. The nucleotide sequences of the three newly isolated IncX-plasmids (pLN126_33, pMO17_54, pMO440_54 and the hitherto un-sequenced type-plasmid R485 revealed a remarkable occurrence of whole or partial gene cassettes that promote biofilm-formation in Klebsiella pneumonia or E. coli, in all four instances. Two of the plasmids (R485 and pLN126_33 were shown to directly induce biofilm formation in a crystal violet retention assay in E. coli. Sequence comparison revealed that all plasmid-borne forms of the type 3 fimbriae encoding gene cassette mrkABCDF were variations of a composite transposon Tn6011 first described in the E. coli IncX plasmid pOLA52. In conclusion, IncX-plasmids isolated from Enterobacteriaceae over almost 40 years and on three different continents have all been shown to carry a type 3 fimbriae gene cassette mrkABCDF stemming from pathogenic K. pneumoniae. Apart from contributing general knowledge about IncX-plasmids, this study also suggests an apparent ubiquity of a mobile form of an important virulence factor and is an illuminating example of the recruitment, evolution and dissemination of genetic traits through plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  2. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisia J Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  3. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun; Gregory, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria. PMID:21778817

  4. Disruption of urogenital biofilms by lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Amy; Dell, Melissa; Zellar, Michelle P; Cribby, Sarah; Martz, Sarah; Hong, Emilio; Fu, Jennifer; Abbas, Ahmed; Dang, Thien; Miller, Wayne; Reid, Gregor

    2011-08-01

    The process that changes a relatively sparse vaginal microbiota of healthy women into a dense biofilm of pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria is poorly understood. Likewise, the reverse step whereby an aberrant biofilm is displaced and returns to a healthy lactobacilli dominated microbiota is unclear. In order to study these phenomena, in vitro experiments were performed to examine the structure of biofilms associated with aerobic vaginosis, urinary tract infections, and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Uropathogenic Escherichia coli were able to form relatively thin biofilms within five days (6 μm height), while Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis formed thicker biofilms 12 μm in height within two days. Challenge of E. coli biofilms with lactobacilli did not result in pathogen displacement. However, the resulting thicker lactobacilli infused biofilms, caused significant E. coli killing. E. coli biofilms challenged with secreted products of L. rhamnosus GR-1 caused a marked decrease in cell density, and increased cell death. Similarly challenge of BV biofilms with lactobacilli infiltrated BV biofilms and caused bacterial cell death. Metronidazole produced holes in the biofilm but did not eradicate the organisms. The findings provide some evidence of how lactobacilli probiotics might interfere with an aberrant vaginal microbiota, and strengthen the position that combining probiotics with antimicrobials could better eradicate pathogenic biofilms. PMID:21497071

  5. Chemical sanitizers to control biofilms formed by two Pseudomonas species on stainless steel surface Sanificantes químicos no controle de biofilmes formados por duas espécies de Pseudomonas em superfície de aço inoxidável

    OpenAIRE

    Danila Soares Caixeta; Thiago Henrique Scarpa; Danilo Florisvaldo Brugnera; Dieyckson Osvani Freire; Eduardo Alves; Luiz Ronaldo de Abreu; Roberta Hilsdorf Piccoli

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens on AISI 304 stainless steel in the presence of reconstituted skim milk under different temperatures was conducted, and the potential of three chemical sanitizers in removing the mono-species biofilms formed was compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivated in skim milk at 28 °C presented better growth rate (10.4 log CFU.mL-1) when compared with 3.7 and 4.2 log CFU.mL-1 for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens cultivated at ...

  6. Studies on Correlation between E.coli Virulence Factor agn43 and Biofilm-forming Ability%大肠杆菌毒力因子agn43与生物被膜表型相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈朝喜; 杨金福; 陈伟明

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the correlation between biofilm-forming ability and virulence factors, improved crystal violet semi-quantitative method and common PCR were used for biofilm-forming ability quantitative analysis and phase variation antigen 43 detection in 180 pet-brone E. coli respectively; the results revealed that 30. 1% (55/180) of the strains detected agn43 and 96. 4%(53/55)of the agn43 positive strains performed biofilm-forming ability, showing significant difference from non-biofilm forming group(P<0. 01).%分别采用改良结晶紫半定量方法和常规PCR方法对180株宠物源性大肠杆菌进行生物被膜形成能力定量研究和相变抗原agn43检测,以分析大肠杆菌毒力因子agn43与生物被膜表型相关性.试验结果表明,30.1%(55/180)的菌株能够检测到agn43基因,96.4%(53/55)agn43阳性菌株具有不同程度的成膜能力,与无成膜能力组差异极显著(P<0.01).

  7. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-05-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  8. Biofilm establishment and heavy metal removal capacity of an indigenous mining algal-microbial consortium in a photo-rotating biological contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orandi, S; Lewis, D M; Moheimani, N R

    2012-09-01

    An indigenous mining algal-microbial consortium was immobilised within a laboratory-scale photo-rotating biological contactor (PRBC) that was used to investigate the potential for heavy metal removal from acid mine drainage (AMD). The microbial consortium, dominated by Ulothrix sp., was collected from the AMD at the Sar Cheshmeh copper mine in Iran. This paper discusses the parameters required to establish an algal-microbial biofilm used for heavy metal removal, including nutrient requirements and rotational speed. The PRBC was tested using synthesised AMD with the multi-ion and acidic composition of wastewater (containing 18 elements, and with a pH of 3.5 ± 0.5), from which the microbial consortium was collected. The biofilm was successfully developed on the PRBC's disc consortium over 60 days of batch-mode operation. The PRBC was then run continuously with a 24 h hydraulic residence time (HRT) over a ten-week period. Water analysis, performed on a weekly basis, demonstrated the ability of the algal-microbial biofilm to remove 20-50 % of the various metals in the order Cu > Ni > Mn > Zn > Sb > Se > Co > Al. These results clearly indicate the significant potential for indigenous AMD microorganisms to be exploited within a PRBC for AMD treatment. PMID:22644382

  9. Biofilm formation by multidrug resistant Escherichia coli ST131 is dependent on type 1 fimbriae and assay conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sohinee; Vagenas, Dimitrios; Schembri, Mark A; Totsika, Makrina

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) has emerged as a pandemic lineage of important multidrug resistant pathogens worldwide. Despite many studies examining the epidemiology of ST131, only a few studies to date have investigated the capacity of ST131 strains to form biofilms. Some of these studies have reported contrasting findings, with no specific ST131 biofilm-promoting factors identified. Here, we examined a diverse collection of ST131 isolates for in vitro biofilm formation in different media and assay conditions, including urine from healthy adult women. We found significant differences among strains and assay conditions, which offers an explanation for the contrasting findings reported by previous studies using a single condition. Importantly, we showed that expression of type 1 fimbriae is a critical determinant for biofilm formation by ST131 strains and that inhibition of the FimH adhesin significantly reduces biofilm formation. We also offer direct genetic evidence for the contribution of type 1 fimbriae in biofilm formation by the reference ST131 strain EC958, a representative of the clinically dominant H30-Rx ST131 subgroup. This is the first study of ST131 biofilm formation in biologically relevant conditions and paves the way for the application of FimH inhibitors in treating drug resistant ST131 biofilm infections. PMID:26940589

  10. Biofilm induced tolerance towards antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Folkesson

    Full Text Available Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms.

  11. Microbial Biofilms in Endodontic Infections: An Update Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zahed Mohammadi; Flavio Palazzi; Luciano Giardino; Sousan Shalavi

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms and microbial aggregates are the common mechanisms for the survival of bacteria in nature. In other words, the ability to form biofilms has been regarded as a virulence factor. Microbial biofilms play an essential role in several infectious diseases such as pulp and periradicular pathosis. The aim of this article was to review the adaptation mechanisms of biofilms, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, factors influencing biofilm formation, mechanisms of their antimicrobial ...

  12. Dependence of the initial adhesion of biofilm forming Pseudomonas putida mt2 on physico-chemical material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Dominik; Frant, Marion; Horn, Harald; Liefeith, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is strongly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of materials and plays a fundamental role in the development of a growing biofilm. Selected materials were characterized with respect to their physico-chemical surface properties. The different materials, glass and several polymer foils, showed a stepwise range of surface tensions (γ(s)) between 10.3 and 44.7 mN m(-1). Measured zeta potential values were in the range between -74.8 and -28.3 mV. The initial bacterial adhesion parameter q(max) was found to vary between 6.6 × 10(6) and 28.1 × 10(6) cm(-2). By correlation of the initial adhesions kinetic parameters with the surface tension data, the optimal conditions for the immobilization of Pseudomonas putida mt2 were found to be at a surface tension of 24.7 mN m(-1). Both higher and lower surface tensions lead to a smaller number of adherent cells per unit surface area. Higher energy surfaces, commonly termed hydrophilic, could constrain bacterial adhesion because of their more highly ordered water structure (exclusion zone) close to the surface. At low energy surfaces, commonly referred to as hydrophobic, cell adhesion is inhibited due to a thin, less dense zone (depletion layer or clathrate structure) close to the surface. Correlation of q (max) with zeta potential results in a linear relationship. Since P. putida carries weak negative charges, a measurable repulsive effect can be assumed on negative surfaces. PMID:22452391

  13. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules and the...... production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  14. Chemical sanitizers to control biofilms formed by two Pseudomonas species on stainless steel surface Sanificantes químicos no controle de biofilmes formados por duas espécies de Pseudomonas em superfície de aço inoxidável

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Soares Caixeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens on AISI 304 stainless steel in the presence of reconstituted skim milk under different temperatures was conducted, and the potential of three chemical sanitizers in removing the mono-species biofilms formed was compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivated in skim milk at 28 °C presented better growth rate (10.4 log CFU.mL-1 when compared with 3.7 and 4.2 log CFU.mL-1 for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens cultivated at 7 °C, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed biofilm when cultivated at 28 °C. However, only the adhesion of P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens was observed when incubated at 7 °C. The sodium dichloroisocyanurate was the most efficient sanitizer in the reduction of the adhered P. aeruginosa cells at 7 and 28 °C and those on the biofilm, respectively. The hydrogen peroxide was more effective in the reduction of adhered cells of P. fluorescens at 7 °C.A capacidade de adesão e formação de biofilme por Pseudomonas aeruginosa e Pseudomonas fluorescens em aço inoxidável AISI 304, na presença de leite desnatado resconstituído sobre diferentes temperaturas foi conduzido e o potencial de três sanificantes químicos na remoção de biofilmes monoespécies foi comparado. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivada em leite desnatado a 28 °C apresentou melhor crescimento (10,4 log UFC.mL-1 quando comparado com 3,7 and 4,2 log UFC.mL-1 para P. aeruginosa e P. fluorescens cultivadas a 7 °C, respectivamente. Pseudomonas aeruginosa formou biofilme quando cultivada a 28 °C. Contudo foi observado somente adesão de P. aeruginosa e P. fluorescens quando incubada a 7 °C. O dicloroisocianurato de sódio foi o sanificante mais eficiente na redução de células aderidas e em biofilme de P. aeruginosa a 7 e 28 °C, respectivamente. O peróxido de hidrogênio foi o mais eficiente na redução de células aderidas de P. fluorescens a 7 °C.

  15. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk-Jan Prins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that each time can differ in the potential to form in vivo bone. A parameter that predicts for in vivo bone forming capacity is thus far lacking. We employed single colony-derived BMSC cultures to identify such predictive parameters. Using limiting dilution, we have produced sixteen single CFU-F derived BMSC cultures from human bone marrow and found that only five of these formed bone in vivo. The single colony-derived BMSC strains were tested for proliferation, osteogenic-, adipogenic- and chondrogenic differentiation capacity and the expression of a variety of associated markers. The only robust predictors of in vivo bone forming capacity were the induction of alkaline phosphatase, (ALP mRNA levels and ALP activity during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. The predictive value of in vitro ALP induction was confirmed by analyzing “bulk-cultured” BMSCs from various bone marrow biopsies. Our findings show that in BMSCs, the additional increase in ALP levels over basal levels during in vitro osteogenic differentiation is predictive of in vivo performance.

  16. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relati...

  17. The biofilm matrix destabilizers, EDTA and DNaseI, enhance the susceptibility of nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae biofilms to treatment with ampicillin and ciprofloxacin

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ball, Jessica L; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes chronic biofilm infections of the ears and airways. The biofilm matrix provides structural integrity to the biofilm and protects biofilm cells from antibiotic exposure by reducing penetration of antimicrobial compounds into the biofilm. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major matrix component of biofilms formed by many species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including NTHi. In...

  18. Comparison of antimicrobial efficacy of propolis, Morinda citrifolia, Azadirachta indica (Neem and 5% sodium hypochlorite on Candida albicans biofilm formed on tooth substrate: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prabha Tyagi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Endodontic infections are polymicrobial in nature. Candida albicans is the most common fungus isolated from failed endodontic cases. The constant increase in antibiotic resistant strains and side-effects caused by synthetic drugs has prompted researchers to look for herbal alternatives such as propolis, Morinda citrifolia and Azadirachta indica (Neem etc., since, the gold standard for irrigation, i.e., sodium hypochlorite has many disadvantages. Materials and Methods: Extracted human mandibular premolars were biomechanically prepared, vertically sectioned, placed in tissue culture wells exposing the root canal surface to C. albicans grown on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar to form a biofilm. At the end of 2 days, all groups were treated with test solutions and control for 10 min and evaluated for Candida growth and number of colony forming units. The readings were subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey tests. Results: Sodium hypochlorite and propolis groups exhibited highest antimicrobial efficacy against C. albicans with no statistically significant difference. It was followed by the A. indica (Neem group. M. citrifolia had limited antifungal action followed by the negative control group of saline. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, propolis can be used as an effective antifungal agent similar to that of sodium hypochlorite, although long-term in vivo studies are warranted.

  19. Specific involvement of pilus type 2a in biofilm formation in group B Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cira Daniela Rinaudo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae is the primary colonizer of the anogenital mucosa of up to 30% of healthy women and can infect newborns during delivery and cause severe sepsis and meningitis. Persistent colonization usually involves the formation of biofilm and increasing evidences indicate that in pathogenic streptococci biofilm formation is mediated by pili. Recently, we have characterized pili distribution and conservation in 289 GBS clinical isolates and we have shown that GBS has three pilus types, 1, 2a and 2b encoded by three corresponding pilus islands, and that each strain carries one or two islands. Here we have investigated the capacity of these strains to form biofilms. We have found that most of the biofilm-formers carry pilus 2a, and using insertion and deletion mutants we have confirmed that pilus type 2a, but not pilus types 1 and 2b, confers biofilm-forming phenotype. We also show that deletion of the major ancillary protein of type 2a did not impair biofilm formation while the inactivation of the other ancillary protein and of the backbone protein completely abolished this phenotype. Furthermore, antibodies raised against pilus components inhibited bacterial adherence to solid surfaces, offering new strategies to prevent GBS infection by targeting bacteria during their initial attachment to host epithelial cells.

  20. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.;

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular polymers can facilitate the non-specific attachment of bacteria to surfaces and hold together developing biofilms. This study was undertaken to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the architecture of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 and its alginate...... biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...... that the production of alginate is not critical for biofilm formation. Observation over a period of 5 days indicated a three-stage development pattern consisting of initiation, establishment and maturation. Furthermore, this study showed that phenotypically distinguishable biofilms can be...

  1. Iron and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, Ehud; Vasil, Michael L.; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2005-01-01

    Iron serves as a signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development. We examined the influence of mutations in known and putative iron acquisition-signaling genes on biofilm morphology. In iron-sufficient medium, mutants that cannot obtain iron through the high-affinity pyoverdine iron acquisition system form thin biofilms similar to those formed by the parent under low iron conditions. If an iron source for a different iron acquisition system is provided to a pyoverdine mutant, normal biof...

  2. Characteristics of hydrogen evolution and oxidation catalyzed by Desulfovibrio caledoniensis biofilm on pyrolytic graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the ability to catalyze the hydrogen evolution and oxidation on pyrolytic graphite electrode. → The SRB biofilm decreases the overpotential and electron transfer resistance by the CV and EIS detection. → The SRB biofilm can transfer electrons to the 0.24 V polarized pyrolytic graphite electrode and the maximum current is 0.035 mA, which is attributed to SRB catalyzed hydrogen oxidation. → The SRB biofilm also can obtain electron from the -0.61 V polarized PGE to catalyze the hydrogen evolution. - Abstract: Hydrogenase, an important electroactive enzyme of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), has been discovered having the capacity to connect its activity to solid electrodes by catalyzing hydrogen evolution and oxidation. However, little attention has been paid to similar electroactive characteristics of SRB. In this study, the electroactivities of pyrolytic graphite electrode (PGE) coated with SRB biofilm were investigated. Two corresponding redox peaks were observed by cyclic voltammetry detection, which were related to the hydrogen evolution and oxidation. Moreover, the overpotential for the reactions decreased by about 0.2 V in the presence of the SRB biofilm. When the PGE coated with the SRB biofilm was polarized at 0.24 V (vs. SHE), an oxidation current related to the hydrogen oxidation was found. The SRB biofilm was able to obtain electrons from the -0.61 V (vs. SHE) polarized PGE to form hydrogen, and the electron transfer resistance also decreased with the formation of SRB biofilm, as measured by the non-destructive electrochemical impendence spectroscopy detection. It was concluded that the hydrogen evolution and oxidation was an important way for the electron transfer between SRB biofilm and solid electrode in anaerobic environment.

  3. Ontogeny of the antigen-reactive lymph follicle-forming capacity of the popliteal lymph node in neonatal mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hiramoto, M; Aizawa, S; Horie, K; Nagata, H; Hoshi, H

    2005-01-01

    The ontogenetic development of the reactive lymph follicle-forming capacity of the popliteal lymph node was investigated immunohistochemically in young mice which had received a single injection of hemocyanin (KLH) in a rear footpad at a predetermined age (between 1 and 21 days). The mice were sacrificed at various intervals after injection. In non-stimulated young mice, primary lymph follicles first appeared in the popliteal node at 11 days of age. When KLH wa...

  4. Modelling the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, J.-P.; Arvin, E.

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses the growth of methanotrophic biofilms. Several independent biofilm growths scenarios involving different inocula were examined. Biofilm growth, substrate removal and product formation were monitored throughout the experiments. Based on the oxygen consumption it was concluded...... that heterotrophs and nitrifiers co-existed with methanotrophs in the biofilm. Heterotrophic biomass grew on soluble polymers formed by the hydrolysis of dead biomass entrapped in the biofilm. Nitrifier populations developed because of the presence of ammonia in the mineral medium. Based on these...... analysis was performed on this model. It indicated that the most influential parameters were those related to the biofilm (i.e. density; solid-volume fraction; thickness). This suggests that in order to improve the model, further research regarding the biofilm structure and composition is needed....

  5. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lemire, Joe A.; Marc A Demeter; Iain George; Howard Ceri; Turner, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers (biofilm support materials), allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that ...

  6. LuxS mediates iron-dependent biofilm formation, competence, and fratricide in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappetti, Claudia; Potter, Adam J; Paton, Adrienne W; Oggioni, Marco R; Paton, James C

    2011-11-01

    During infection, Streptococcus pneumoniae exists mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. The capacity to form biofilms is believed to be important for nasopharyngeal colonization as well as disease pathogenesis, but relatively little is known about the regulation of this process. Here, we investigated the effect of exogenous iron [Fe(III)] as well as the role of luxS (encoding S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase) on biofilm formation by S. pneumoniae D39. Fe(III) strongly enhanced biofilm formation at concentrations of ≥50 μM, while Fe(III) chelation with deferoxamine was inhibitory. Importantly, Fe(III) also upregulated the expression of luxS in wild-type D39. A luxS-deficient mutant (D39luxS) failed to form a biofilm, even with Fe(III) supplementation, whereas a derivative overexpressing luxS (D39luxS+) exhibited enhanced biofilm formation capacity and could form a biofilm without added Fe(III). D39luxS exhibited reduced expression of the major Fe(III) transporter PiuA, and the cellular [Fe(III)] was significantly lower than that in D39; in contrast, D39luxS+ had a significantly higher cellular [Fe(III)] than the wild type. The release of extracellular DNA, which is an important component of the biofilm matrix, also was directly related to luxS expression. Similarly, genetic competence, as measured by transformation frequency as well as the expression of competence genes comD, comX, comW, cglA, and dltA and the murein hydrolase cbpD, which is associated with fratricide-dependent DNA release, all were directly related to luxS expression levels and were further upregulated by Fe(III). Moreover, mutagenesis of cbpD blocked biofilm formation. We propose that competence, fratricide, and biofilm formation are closely linked in pneumococci, and that luxS is a central regulator of these processes. We also propose that the stimulatory effects of Fe(III) on all of these parameters are due to the upregulation of luxS expression, and that

  7. LuxS Mediates Iron-Dependent Biofilm Formation, Competence, and Fratricide in Streptococcus pneumoniae ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappetti, Claudia; Potter, Adam J.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Oggioni, Marco R.; Paton, James C.

    2011-01-01

    During infection, Streptococcus pneumoniae exists mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. The capacity to form biofilms is believed to be important for nasopharyngeal colonization as well as disease pathogenesis, but relatively little is known about the regulation of this process. Here, we investigated the effect of exogenous iron [Fe(III)] as well as the role of luxS (encoding S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase) on biofilm formation by S. pneumoniae D39. Fe(III) strongly enhanced biofilm formation at concentrations of ≥50 μM, while Fe(III) chelation with deferoxamine was inhibitory. Importantly, Fe(III) also upregulated the expression of luxS in wild-type D39. A luxS-deficient mutant (D39luxS) failed to form a biofilm, even with Fe(III) supplementation, whereas a derivative overexpressing luxS (D39luxS+) exhibited enhanced biofilm formation capacity and could form a biofilm without added Fe(III). D39luxS exhibited reduced expression of the major Fe(III) transporter PiuA, and the cellular [Fe(III)] was significantly lower than that in D39; in contrast, D39luxS+ had a significantly higher cellular [Fe(III)] than the wild type. The release of extracellular DNA, which is an important component of the biofilm matrix, also was directly related to luxS expression. Similarly, genetic competence, as measured by transformation frequency as well as the expression of competence genes comD, comX, comW, cglA, and dltA and the murein hydrolase cbpD, which is associated with fratricide-dependent DNA release, all were directly related to luxS expression levels and were further upregulated by Fe(III). Moreover, mutagenesis of cbpD blocked biofilm formation. We propose that competence, fratricide, and biofilm formation are closely linked in pneumococci, and that luxS is a central regulator of these processes. We also propose that the stimulatory effects of Fe(III) on all of these parameters are due to the upregulation of luxS expression, and that

  8. Age and education corrected older adult normative data for a short form version of the Financial Capacity Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Eakin, Amanda; Triebel, Kristen; Martin, Roy; Swenson-Dravis, Dana; Petersen, Ronald C; Marson, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Financial capacity is an instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) that comprises multiple abilities and is critical to independence and autonomy in older adults. Because of its cognitive complexity, financial capacity is often the first IADL to show decline in prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. Despite its importance, few standardized assessment measures of financial capacity exist and there is little, if any, normative data available to evaluate financial skills in the elderly. The Financial Capacity Instrument-Short Form (FCI-SF) is a brief measure of financial skills designed to evaluate financial skills in older adults with cognitive impairment. In the current study, we present age- and education-adjusted normative data for FCI-SF variables in a sample of 1344 cognitively normal, community-dwelling older adults participating in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Individual FCI-SF raw scores were first converted to age-corrected scaled scores based on position within a cumulative frequency distribution and then grouped within 4 empirically supported and overlapping age ranges. These age-corrected scaled scores were then converted to age- and education-corrected scaled scores using the same methodology. This study has the potential to substantially enhance financial capacity evaluations of older adults through the introduction of age- and education-corrected normative data for the FCI-SF by allowing clinicians to: (a) compare an individual's performance to that of a sample of similar age and education peers, (b) interpret various aspects of financial capacity relative to a normative sample, and (c) make comparisons between these aspects. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26168311

  9. The spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine enhances anti-biofilm efficiency through an effective releasing mode and close microbial interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Wong, Chi-Hin; Ng, Tsz-Wing; Zhang, Cheng-Fei; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    We reported two forms (sphere and wire) of newly fabricated chlorhexidine (CHX)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and investigated their releasing capacities and anti-biofilm efficiencies. The interactions of the blank MSNs with planktonic oral microorganisms were assessed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The anti-biofilm effects of the two forms of nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX were examined by 2,3-bis (2-methoxy- 4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide. The profiles of biofilm penetration were analyzed by fluorescent-labeled MSNs using confocal microscopy and ImageJ. The spherical MSNs with an average diameter of 265 nm exhibited a larger surface area and faster CHX-releasing rate than the MSN wires. The field emission scanning electron microscopy images showed that both shaped MSNs enabled to attach and further fuse with the surfaces of testing microbes. Meanwhile, the nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX could enhance the anti-biofilm efficiency with reference to its free form. Notably, the spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX presented with a greater anti-biofilm capacity than the wire nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX, partly due to their difference in physical property. Furthermore, the relatively even distribution and homogeneous dispersion of spherical MSNs observed in confocal images may account for the enhanced penetration of spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX into the microbial biofilms and resultant anti-biofilm effects. These findings reveal that the spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX could preferably enhance its anti-biofilm efficiency through an effective releasing mode and close interactions with microbes. PMID:27330290

  10. 乳酸菌在不同食品包装材料生物膜形成特性%Spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscopy study of lactic acid bacteria biofilm forming on different materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宝威; 许佳晶; 刘彦兰; 郑添信; 吴金玉; 谢丽斯; 张宏梅

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the lactic acid bacteria forming on different materials. Methods, Plastics Packaging Materials(HDPE) ,aluminum composite inner carton packaging,composite metal materials and glass were added into liquid mediums respectively. Strains grow at the same temperature and time for 6d.Spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscopy were used for testing the biofilm formation. Results. Lactic acid bacteria had weak biofilm formation ability.Strains showed the best biofilm formation ability on composite plastic packaging materials (HDPE)than on the other materials.The second level biofilm formation ability was on the glass, and the most difficult biofilm formation was on the aluminum composite metal. Similar result could be observed by scanning electron microscopy. Conclusion. The lactic acid bacteria biofilm could form easier on the plastic packaging material than on the other materials,the most difficult bacteria biofilm formation was on metal.%目的:研究乳酸茵在不同材料成膜情况。方法:用液体培养基在同一温度、时间,分别加入复合塑料包装材料(HDPE)、纸盒包装内层的复合铝膜、复合金属铝包装材料、玻璃4种不同包装材料上进行培养,6d后分别用分光光度计法和扫描电镜法检测成膜情况。结果:实验菌株乳酸菌有相对较弱的戚膜能力:用分光光度法测得复合塑料包装材料(HDPE)上的茵膜吸光度相对较大,玻璃次之,复合金属铝包装材料数值最小;通过扫描电镜观察得出相似结果。结论:乳酸茵在复合塑料包装材料上成膜最好;在金属铝上成膜最差。

  11. Influence of the Diversity of Bacterial Isolates from Drinking Water on Resistance of Biofilms to Disinfection ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Lúcia C; Simões, M; Vieira, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Single- and multispecies biofilms formed by six drinking water-isolated bacterial species were used to assess their susceptibilities to sodium hypochlorite (SHC). In general, multispecies biofilms were more resistant to inactivation and removal than single biofilms. Total biofilm inactivation was achieved only for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus single-species biofilms and for those multispecies biofilms without A. calcoaceticus. Biofilms with all bacteria had the highest resistance t...

  12. Biofilm diatom community structure: Influence of temporal and substratum variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    occasions, the influence of planktonic blooms was also seen on the biofilm community. A comparative study of biofilms formed on the two substrata revealed significant differences in density and diversity. However species composition was almost constant...

  13. The Antistaphylococcal Activity of Citropin 1.1 and Temporin A against Planktonic Cells and Biofilms Formed by Isolates from Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: An Assessment of Their Potential to Induce Microbial Resistance Compared to Conventional Antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Dawgul

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (SA colonizes the vast majority of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD. Its resistance to antibiotics and ability to form biofilms are the main origins of therapeutic complications. Endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs exhibit strong activity against SA, including antibiotic resistant strains as well as bacteria existing in biofilm form. The purpose of the present work was to determine the antistaphylococcal activity of two amphibian peptides against SA isolated from patients with AD. The AMPs demonstrated permanent activity towards strains exposed to sublethal concentrations of the compounds and significantly stronger antibiofilm activity in comparison to that of conventional antimicrobials. The results suggest the potential application of amphibian AMPs as promising antistaphylococcal agents for the management of skin infections.

  14. Biofilm Formation by Hyperpiliated Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Poney; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Under static growth conditions, hyperpiliated, nontwitching pilT and pilU mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed dense biofilms, showing that adhesion, not twitching motility, is necessary for biofilm initiation. Under flow conditions, the pilT mutant formed mushroom-like structures larger than those of the wild type but the pilU mutant was defective in biofilm formation. Therefore, twitching motility affects the development of biofilm structure, possibly through modulation of detachment.

  15. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong;

    2011-01-01

    Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actually...... formed by multiple bacterial species. Conventional methods for bacterial cleaning, such as applications of antibiotics and/or disinfectants are often ineffective for biofilm populations due to their special physiology and physical matrix barrier. It has been estimated that billions of dollars are spent...... every year worldwide to deal with damage to equipment, contaminations of products, energy losses, and infections in human beings resulted from microbial biofilms. Microorganisms compete, cooperate, and communicate with each other in multi-species biofilms. Understanding the mechanisms of multi...

  16. Efficiency of vanilla, patchouli and ylang ylang essential oils stabilized by iron oxide@C14 nanostructures against bacterial adherence and biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcu, Maxim; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mogoșanu, George Dan; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A; Mihailescu, Dan Florin; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14) in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h) and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties. PMID:25375335

  17. Efficiency of Vanilla, Patchouli and Ylang Ylang Essential Oils Stabilized by Iron Oxide@C14 Nanostructures against Bacterial Adherence and Biofilms Formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Bilcu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14 in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  18. Drug resistance mechanisms of fungal biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Seneviratne, CJ; Samaranayake, LP

    2011-01-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in nature and exist in soil, water, plants, and in animals and humans. Similar to bacteria, fungi also form confluent biofilms either singly (mono-species) or with other microbial species (mixed-species). Fungal biofilms are known to be highly resistant to the adverse environmental conditions including antimicrobials and biocide compared to its planktonic (free-floating) counterparts. Although bacterial biofilms have been studied in detail, relatively little is known of f...

  19. Enzymatic Detachment of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Ragunath, Chandran; Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Fine, Daniel H.; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2004-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most common cause of infections associated with catheters and other indwelling medical devices. S. epidermidis produces an extracellular slime that enables it to form adherent biofilms on plastic surfaces. We found that a biofilm-releasing enzyme produced by the gram-negative periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans rapidly and efficiently removed S. epidermidis biofilms from plastic surfaces. The enzyme worked by ...

  20. Analysis of the role of the LH92_11085 gene of a biofilm hyper-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain on biofilm formation and attachment to eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Fraga, Laura; Pérez, Astrid; Rumbo-Feal, Soraya; Merino, María; Vallejo, Juan Andrés; Ohneck, Emily J; Edelmann, Richard E; Beceiro, Alejandro; Vázquez-Ucha, Juan C; Valle, Jaione; Actis, Luis A; Bou, Germán; Poza, Margarita

    2016-05-18

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen that has a considerable ability to survive in the hospital environment partly due to its capacity to form biofilms. The first step in the process of establishing an infection is adherence of the bacteria to target cells. Chaperone-usher pili assembly systems are involved in pilus biogenesis pathways that play an important role in adhesion to host cells and tissues as well as medically relevant surfaces. After screening a collection of strains, a biofilm hyper-producing A. baumannii strain (MAR002) was selected to describe potential targets involved in pathogenicity. MAR002 showed a remarkable ability to form biofilm and attach to A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. Analysis of MAR002 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a significant presence of pili on the bacterial surface. Putative protein-coding genes involved in pili formation were identified based on the newly sequenced genome of MAR002 strain (JRHB01000001/2 or NZ_JRHB01000001/2). As assessed by qRT-PCR, the gene LH92_11085, belonging to the operon LH92_11070-11085, is overexpressed (ca. 25-fold more) in biofilm-associated cells compared to exponential planktonic cells. In the present work we investigate the role of this gene on the MAR002 biofilm phenotype. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and biofilm assays showed that inactivation of LH92_11085 gene significantly reduced bacterial attachment to A549 cells and biofilm formation on plastic, respectively. TEM analysis of the LH92_11085 mutant showed the absence of long pili formations normally present in the wild-type. These observations indicate the potential role this LH92_11085 gene could play in the pathobiology of A baumannii. PMID:26854744

  1. Enhanced Biofilm Formation and Increased Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents and Bacterial Invasion Are Caused by Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Webb, J.S.; Rao, D.;

    2006-01-01

    Most biofilms in their natural environments are likely to consist of consortia of species that influence each other in synergistic and antagonistic manners. However, few reports specifically address interactions within multispecies biofilms. In this study, 17 epiphytic bacterial strains, isolated...... specific interactions. In summary, our data strongly indicate that synergistic effects promote biofilm biomass and resistance of the biofilm to antimicrobial agents and bacterial invasion in multispecies biofilms.......Most biofilms in their natural environments are likely to consist of consortia of species that influence each other in synergistic and antagonistic manners. However, few reports specifically address interactions within multispecies biofilms. In this study, 17 epiphytic bacterial strains, isolated......-species biofilms resisted invasion to a greater extent than did the biofilms formed by the single species. Replacement of each strain by its cell-free culture supernatant suggested that synergy was dependent both on species-specific physical interactions between cells and on extracellular secreted factors or less...

  2. Impact of Irgarol 1051 on the larval development and metamorphosis of Balanus amphitirite Darwin, diatom, Amphora coffeaformis and natural biofilm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.

    The effect of Irgarol 1051 on the biofilm-forming diatom, Amphora coffeaformis, and on natural biofilm was assessed. A reduction in the number of A. coffeaformis cells within a biofilm was observed after treatment with Irgarol 1051, confirming its...

  3. Nanotechnology: Role in dental biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are surface- adherent populations of microorganisms consisting of cells, water and extracellular matrix material Nanotechnology is promising field of science which can guide our understanding of the role of interspecies interaction in the development of biofilm. Streptococcus mutans with other species of bacteria has been known to form dental biofilm. The correlation between genetically modified bacteria Streptococcus mutans and nanoscale morphology has been assessed using AFMi.e atomic force microscopy. Nanotechnology application includes 16 O/ 18 O reverse proteolytic labeling,use of quantum dots for labeling of bacterial cells, selective removal of cariogenic bacteria while preserving the normal oral flora and silver antimicrobial nanotechnology against pathogens associated with biofilms. The future comprises a mouthwash full of smart nanomachines which can allow the harmless flora of mouth to flourish in a healthy ecosystem

  4. Physics of biofilms: the initial stages of biofilm formation and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the physiological responses of bacteria to external stress is to assemble into a biofilm. The formation of a biofilm greatly increases a bacterial population's resistance to a hostile environment by shielding cells, for example, from antibiotics. In this paper, we describe the conditions necessary for the emergence of biofilms in natural environments and relate them to the emergence of biofilm formation inside microfluidic devices. We show that competing species of Escherichia coli bacteria form biofilms to spatially segregate themselves in response to starvation stress, and use in situ methods to characterize the physical properties of the biofilms. Finally, we develop a microfluidic platform to study the inter-species interactions and show how biofilm-mediated genetic interactions can improve a species’ resistance to external stress. (paper)

  5. Aged human bone marrow stromal cells maintaining bone forming capacity in vivo evaluated using an improved method of visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Justesen, J;

    2004-01-01

    weeks, the implants were removed and embedded un-decalcified in methyl methacrylate (MMA). Sections were stained histochemically with Goldner's Trichrome stain and immuno-histochemically using human-specific antibodies against known osteogenic markers. Implanted human marrow stromal cells (hMSC) were...... able to form bone in vivo. The donor origin of bone was verified using several human-specific antibodies. Dose-response experiments demonstrated that 5 x 10(5) hMSC per implant gave the maximal bone formation after 8 weeks. No difference in BFC was observed between cells obtained from young (24...... vivo assay for quantifying the bone forming capacity (BFC) and we compared the BFC of osteoblastic cells obtained from young and old donors. Osteoblasts were obtained from human bone marrow stromal cell cultures and implanted subcutaneously in immuno-deficient mice (NOD/LtSz- Prkdc(scid)). After 8...

  6. Spatial structure, cooperation and competition in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria often live within matrix-embedded communities, termed biofilms, which are now understood to be a major mode of microbial life. The study of biofilms has revealed their vast complexity both in terms of resident species composition and phenotypic diversity. Despite this complexity, theoretical and experimental work in the past decade has identified common principles for understanding microbial biofilms. In this Review, we discuss how the spatial arrangement of genotypes within a community influences the cooperative and competitive cell-cell interactions that define biofilm form and function. Furthermore, we argue that a perspective rooted in ecology and evolution is fundamental to progress in microbiology. PMID:27452230

  7. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m-2 that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces

  8. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enz...

  9. The salmochelin receptor IroN itself, but not salmochelin-mediated iron uptake promotes biofilm formation in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistro, Giuseppe; Hoffmann, Christiane; Schubert, Sören

    2015-01-01

    The key to success of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) to colonize niches outside the intestinal tract and to establish infection is the coordinated action of numerous virulence and fitness factors. Intense research revealed not only an arsenal of unique virulence determinants with specific action, but also the multi-functionality of single elements. Especially iron uptake systems of ExPEC proved to be of prime importance. Apart from iron acquisition they optimize certain virulence properties. Here we analyzed the contribution of the salmochelin siderophore system to the ability of ExPEC to form biofilms. In the same iron limited environment, ExPEC displayed a distinct transcriptional profile of siderophore systems. During biofilm formation the iroN gene coding for the specific receptors of the siderophore salmochelin was highly upregulated. Almost no induction was observed during planctonic growth. Disruption of iroN resulted in a reduction of almost 50% in biofilm production. Efficient biofilm formation was not affected in a salmochelin synthesis mutant. Thus, the contribution of IroN is independent from the ability to produce salmochelin. Enhanced expression of IroN did not increase significantly the capacity to form biofilms in ExPEC. Interestingly, the additional expression of IroN or even the acquisition of the entire salmochelin system was not able to improve biofilm formation in a poor biofilm producer like a laboratory E. coli K12 strain. However, complementation with only IroN in an ExPEC iroA deletion mutant was able to restore biofilm formation. The contribution of IroN to biofilm formation appears to require a certain background found in ExPEC, but not in E. coli K12. This study identified the contribution of IroN to biofilm formation and highlights the multi-functional role of iron uptake systems in ExPEC. PMID:25921426

  10. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. PMID:25687923

  11. Focus on the physics of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Stocker, Roman; Rusconi, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria are the smallest and most abundant form of life. They have traditionally been considered as primarily planktonic organisms, swimming or floating in a liquid medium, and this view has shaped many of the approaches to microbial processes, including for example the design of most antibiotics. However, over the last few decades it has become clear that many bacteria often adopt a sessile, surface-associated lifestyle, forming complex multicellular communities called biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are found in a vast range of environments and have major consequences on human health and industrial processes, from biofouling of surfaces to the spread of diseases. Although the study of biofilms has been biologists’ territory for a long time, a multitude of phenomena in the formation and development of biofilms hinges on physical processes. We are pleased to present a collection of research papers that discuss some of the latest developments in many of the areas to which physicists can contribute a deeper understanding of biofilms, both experimentally and theoretically. The topics covered range from the influence of physical environmental parameters on cell attachment and subsequent biofilm growth, to the use of local probes and imaging techniques to investigate biofilm structure, to the development of biofilms in complex environments and the modeling of colony morphogenesis. The results presented contribute to addressing some of the major challenges in microbiology today, including the prevention of surface contamination, the optimization of biofilm disruption methods and the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments.

  12. Resistance of Candida albicans biofilms to antifungal agents in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawser, S. P.; Douglas, L J

    1995-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida albicans on small discs of catheter material were resistant to the action of five clinically important antifungal agents as determined by [3H]leucine incorporation and tetrazolium reduction assays. Fluconazole showed the greatest activity, and amphotericin B showed the least activity against biofilm cells. These findings were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy of the biofilms.

  13. Influence of Streptococcus mutans on Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Dong Mei; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Exterkate, Rob A. M.; Jiang, Lei Meng; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; Crielaard, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: An important virulence factor of Enterococcus faecalis is its ability to form biofilms. Most studies on biofilm formation have been carried out by using E. faecalis monocultures. Given the polymicrobial nature of root canal infections, it is important to understand biofilm formation of

  14. Effects of P22 bacteriophage on salmonella Enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DMC4 strain biofilm formation and eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaca Basar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, several antimicrobial agents have been made available. Due to increasing antimicrobial resistance, bacteriophages were rediscovered for their potential applications against bacterial infections. In the present study, biofilm inhibition and eradication of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DMC4 strain (S. Typhimurium was evaluated with respect to different incubation periods at different P22 phage titrations. The efficacy of P22 phage on biofilm formation and eradication of S. Typhimurium DMC4 strain was screened in vitro on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces. The biofilm forming capacity of S. Typhimurium was significantly reduced at higher phage titrations (106 pfu/mL ≤. All phage titers (104-108 pfu/mL were found to be effective at the end of the 24 h-incubation period whereas higher phage titrations were found to be effective at the end of the 48 h and 72 h of incubation. P22 phage has less efficacy on already formed, especially mature biofilms (72 h-old biofilm. Notable results of P22 phage treatment on S. Typhimurium biofilm suggest that P22 phage has potential uses in food systems.

  15. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  16. Role of biofilm in catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2004-01-01

    The predominant form of life for the majority of microorganisms in any hydrated biologic system is a cooperative community termed a “biofilm.” A biofilm on an indwelling urinary catheter consists of adherent microorganisms, their extracellular products, and host components deposited on the catheter. The biofilm mode of life conveys a survival advantage to the microorganisms associated with it and, thus, biofilm on urinary catheters results in persistent infections that are resistant to antimi...

  17. Penetration of Rifampin through Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zhilan; Philip S. Stewart

    2002-01-01

    Rifampin penetrated biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis but failed to effectively kill the bacteria. Penetration was demonstrated by a simple diffusion cell bioassay and by transmission electron microscopic observation of antibiotic-affected cells at the distal edge of the biofilm.

  18. Biofilm Induced Tolerance Towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Zampaloni, Claudia;

    2008-01-01

    presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of...

  19. [Biofilm on a metal surface as a factor of microbial corrosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borets'ka, M O; Kozlova, I P

    2010-01-01

    Main attention was given in the present review to the research methods, phases of biofilm's forming, exopolymer compounds of bacteria as main biofilm forming factor. A microbial corrosion as a result of interaction between the biofilm and metal surface was considered. The interaction was displayed in biomineralization. The future trends of biofilms study were bound with research of their architecture. That architecture was determined by the structure and function of biofilms compounds: biopolymers and biominerals. PMID:20695231

  20. Dogs leaving the ICU carry a very large multi-drug resistant enterococcal population with capacity for biofilm formation and horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anuradha; Dowd, Scot E; Zurek, Ludek

    2011-01-01

    The enterococcal community from feces of seven dogs treated with antibiotics for 2-9 days in the veterinary intensive care unit (ICU) was characterized. Both, culture-based approach and culture-independent 16S rDNA amplicon 454 pyrosequencing, revealed an abnormally large enterococcal community: 1.4±0.8×10(8) CFU gram(-1) of feces and 48.9±11.5% of the total 16,228 sequences, respectively. The diversity of the overall microbial community was very low which likely reflects a high selective antibiotic pressure. The enterococcal diversity based on 210 isolates was also low as represented by Enterococcus faecium (54.6%) and Enterococcus faecalis (45.4%). E. faecium was frequently resistant to enrofloxacin (97.3%), ampicillin (96.5%), tetracycline (84.1%), doxycycline (60.2%), erythromycin (53.1%), gentamicin (48.7%), streptomycin (42.5%), and nitrofurantoin (26.5%). In E. faecalis, resistance was common to tetracycline (59.6%), erythromycin (56.4%), doxycycline (53.2%), and enrofloxacin (31.9%). No resistance was detected to vancomycin, tigecycline, linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin in either species. Many isolates carried virulence traits including gelatinase, aggregation substance, cytolysin, and enterococcal surface protein. All E. faecalis strains were biofilm formers in vitro and this phenotype correlated with the presence of gelE and/or esp. In vitro intra-species conjugation assays demonstrated that E. faecium were capable of transferring tetracycline, doxycycline, streptomycin, gentamicin, and erythromycin resistance traits to human clinical strains. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of E. faecium strains showed very low genotypic diversity. Interestingly, three E. faecium clones were shared among four dogs suggesting their nosocomial origin. Furthermore, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of nine representative MLVA types revealed that six sequence types (STs) originating from five

  1. Lucilia sericata Chymotrypsin Disrupts Protein Adhesin-Mediated Staphylococcal Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Llinos G.; Nigam, Yamni; Sawyer, James; Mack, Dietrich; Pritchard, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms cause chronic infections due to their ability to form biofilms. The excretions/secretions of Lucilia sericata larvae (maggots) have effective activity for debridement and disruption of bacterial biofilms. In this paper, we demonstrate how chymotrypsin derived from maggot excretions/secretions disrupts protein-dependent bacterial biofilm formation mechanisms.

  2. 1. modification of the proliferative capacity of transplanted bone marrow colony forming units by changes in the host environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulation of the proliferation of transplanted colony forming units (CFUs) was investigated in lethally irradiated mice, pretreated by methods known to accelerate hemopoietic recovery after sublethal irradiation. Prospective recipients were exposed to either hypoxia, vinblastine or priming irradiation and at different intervals thereafter lethally irradiated and transplanted with bone marrow. Repopulation of CFUs was determined by counting the number of splenic colonies in primary recipients or by retransplantation. Regeneration of grafted CFUs was greatly accelerated and their self-renewal capacity increased in mice grafted within 2 days after hypoxia. Also the number of splenic colonies formed by grafted syngeneic CFUs as well as by C57B1 parent CFUs growing in BC3F1 hosts was significantly increased. The effect was not dependent on the seeding efficiency of CFUs and apparently resulted from hypoxia induced changes in the hosts' physiological environment. Proliferative capacity of grafted CFUs increased remarkably in hosts receiving vinblastine 2 or 4 days prior to irradiation. Priming irradiation given 6 days before main irradiation accelerated, given 2 days before impaired regeneration of CFUs. The increased rate of regeneration was not related to the cellularity of hemopoietic organs at the time of transplantation. The growth of CFUs in diffusion chambers implanted into posthypoxic mice was only slightly improved which does indicate that the accelerated regeneration of CFUs in posthypoxic mice is mainly due to the changes in the hemopoietic microenvironment. A short conditioning of transplanted CFUs by host factor(s) was sufficient to improve regeneration. The results might suggest that the speed of hemopoietic regeneration depends on the number of CFUs being induced to proliferate shortly after irradiation, rather than on the absolute numbers of CFUs available to the organism. (author)

  3. Streptococcus gordonii glucosyltransferase promotes biofilm interactions with Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Ricker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida albicans co-aggregates with Streptococcus gordonii to form biofilms and their interactions in mucosal biofilms may lead to pathogenic synergy. Although the functions of glucosyltransferases (Gtf of Mutans streptococci have been well characterized, the biological roles of these enzymes in commensal oral streptococci, such as S. gordonii, in oral biofilm communities are less clear. Objective: The objective of this work was to explore the role of GtfG, the single Gtf enzyme of S. gordonii, in biofilm interactions with C. albicans. Design: Biofilms were grown under salivary flow in flow cells in vitro, or under static conditions in 96 well plates. A panel of isogenic S. gordonii CH1 gtfG mutants and complemented strains were co-inoculated with C. albicans strain SC5314 to form mixed biofilms. Biofilm accretion and binding interactions between the two organisms were tested. Biofilms were quantified using confocal microscopy or the crystal violet assay. Results: The presence of GtfG enhanced dual biofilm accretion, and sucrose supplementation further augmented dual biofilm formation, pointing to a role of newly synthesized glucans. GtfG also promoted binding to C. albicans preformed biofilms. Soluble α-1,6-glucans played a role in these interactions since: 1 a strain producing only soluble glucans (CH107 formed robust dual biofilms under conditions of salivary flow; and 2 the dual biofilm was susceptible to enzymatic breakdown by dextranase which specifically degrades soluble α-1,6-glucans. Conclusion: Our work identified a novel molecular mechanism for C. albicans and S. gordonii biofilm interactions, mediated by GtfG. This protein promotes early biofilm binding of S. gordonii to C. albicans which leads to increased accretion of streptococcal cells in mixed biofilms. We also showed that soluble glucans, with α-1,6-linkages, promoted inter-generic adhesive interactions.

  4. Biofilm Exopolysaccharides of Pathogenic Fungi: Lessons from Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Donald C; Howell, P Lynne

    2016-06-10

    Exopolysaccharides play an important structural and functional role in the development and maintenance of microbial biofilms. Although the majority of research to date has focused on the exopolysaccharide systems of biofilm-forming bacteria, recent studies have demonstrated that medically relevant fungi such as Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus also form biofilms during infection. These fungal biofilms share many similarities with those of bacteria, including the presence of secreted exopolysaccharides as core components of the extracellular matrix. This review will highlight our current understanding of fungal biofilm exopolysaccharides, as well as the parallels that can be drawn with those of their bacterial counterparts. PMID:27129222

  5. Gene Transfer Efficiency in Gonococcal Biofilms: Role of Biofilm Age, Architecture, and Pilin Antigenic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Kouzel, Nadzeya; Oldewurtel, Enno R.; Maier, Berenike

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular DNA is an important structural component of many bacterial biofilms. It is unknown, however, to which extent external DNA is used to transfer genes by means of transformation. Here, we quantified the acquisition of multidrug resistance and visualized its spread under selective and nonselective conditions in biofilms formed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The density and architecture of the biofilms were controlled by microstructuring the substratum for bacterial adhesion. Horizontal t...

  6. Combining Biofilm-Controlling Compounds and Antibiotics as a Promising New Way to Control Biofilm Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Andréia Bergamo Estrela; Wolf-Rainer Abraham

    2010-01-01

    Many bacteria grow on surfaces forming biofilms. In this structure, they are well protected and often high dosages of antibiotics cannot clear infectious biofilms. The formation and stabilization of biofilms are mediated by diffusible autoinducers (e.g. N-acyl homoserine lactones, small peptides, furanosyl borate diester). Metabolites interfering with this process have been identified in plants, animals and microbes, and synthetic analogues are known. Additionally, this seems to be not the on...

  7. Extracellular DNA formation during biofilm development by freshwater bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter;

    2011-01-01

    a transient peak at 6 hours, and in Rheinheimera the concentration peaked at 12 hours and remained high. Interestingly, the Rheinheimera biofilm dispersed immediately after the eDNA concentration peaked. The antimicrobial effect of eDNA was tested in growth experiments, and Rheinheimera was strongly......Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been shown to be important for biofilm formation, both in the initial step of biofilm formation (attachment), and for securing the structural stability of the mature biofilm. It is unclear whether a general consensus exists for when in biofilm formation the presence of...... eDNA is most important. In this study, we investigated the significance of eDNA during biofilm formation in four freshwater isolates. The aim was to relate the quantity and timing of eDNA production to the isolates’ ability to form biofilms. eDNA and biofilm biomass was quantified over time during...

  8. Poly (Acetyl, Arginyl) Glucosamine as a Biofilm-reducing Water Line Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria can attach and form biofilms on a surface hindering removal by common disinfectants. Some bacteria are better than others at forming this biofilm but once it is formed many pathogens can reside in the matrix. Salmonella spp. have been shown to have some biofilm forming capabilities but will...

  9. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Novak, Karen F.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfect...

  10. Comparison of the extracellular polymeric substances of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Mariana; M.C. Fernandes; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis live as benign commensal organisms in the oral cavity of both healthy and unhealthy individuals behaving, under certain conditions, as opportunistic pathogens, causing candidiasis. These two Candida species have been mismatched for years, but recently Candida dubliniensis was recovered from the mouth of imunnosupressed patients and identified as a different species. Candidiasis is usually related with the Candida capacity of forming biofilms on inert ...

  11. Effect of nitrofurans and NO generators on biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Julia; Granik, Vladimir; Belik, Alexandr; Koksharova, Olga; Khmel, Inessa

    2009-06-01

    Antibacterial drugs in the nitrofuran series, such as nitrofurazone, furazidin, nitrofurantoin and nifuroxazide, as well as the nitric oxide generators sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate in concentrations that do not suppress bacterial growth, were shown to increase the capacity of pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370 to form biofilms. At 25-100microg/ml, nitrofurans 2-2.5-fold enhanced biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, and NO donors 3-6-fold. For B. cenocepacia 370, the enhancement was 2-5-fold (nitrofurans) and 4.5-fold (sodium nitroprusside), respectively. PMID:19460431

  12. The Composition and Metabolic Phenotype of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Apicella

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available N. gonorrhoeae has been shown to form biofilms during cervical infection. Thus, biofilm formation may play an important role in the infection of women. The ability of N. gonorrhoeae to form membrane blebs is crucial to biofilm formation. Blebs contain DNA and outer membrane structures, which have been shown to be major constituents of the biofilm matrix. The organism expresses a DNA thermonuclease that is involved in remodeling of the biofilm matrix. Comparison of the transcriptional profiles of gonococcal biofilms and planktonic runoff indicate that genes involved in anaerobic metabolism and oxidative stress tolerance are more highly expressed in biofilm. The expression of aniA, ccp, and norB, which encode nitrite reductase, cytochrome c peroxidase, and nitric oxide reductase respectively, is required for mature biofilm formation over glass and human cervical cells. In addition, anaerobic respiration occurs in the substratum of gonococcal biofilms and disruption of the norB gene required for anaerobic respiration, results in a severe biofilm attenuation phenotype. It has been demonstrated that accumulation of nitric oxide (NO contributes to the phenotype of a norB mutant and can retard biofilm formation. However, NO can also enhance biofilm formation, and this is largely dependent on the concentration and donation rate or steady state kinetics of NO. The majority of the genes involved in gonococcal oxidative stress tolerance are also required for normal biofilm formation, as mutations in the following genes result in attenuated biofilm formation over cervical cells and/or glass: oxyR, gor, prx, mntABC, trxB, and estD. Overall, biofilm formation appears to be an adaptation for coping with the environmental stresses present in the female genitourinary tract. Therefore, this review will discuss the studies, which describe the composition and metabolic phenotype of gonococcal biofilms.

  13. Introduction to Biofilms Thematic Minireview Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allewell, Norma M

    2016-06-10

    The biofilms that many bacteria and fungi produce enable them to form communities, adhere tightly to surfaces, evade host immunity, and resist antibiotics. Pathogenic microorganisms that form biofilms are very difficult to eradicate and thus are a frequent source of life-threatening, hospital-acquired infections. This series of five minireviews from the Journal of Biological Chemistry provides a broad overview of our current understanding of biofilms and the challenges that remain. The structure, biosynthesis, and biological function of the biofilms produced by pathogenic fungi are the subject of the first article, by Sheppard and Howell. Gunn, Bakaletz, and Wozniak focus on the biochemistry and structure of bacterial biofilms, how these structures enable bacteria to evade host immunity, and current and developing strategies for overcoming this resistance. The third and fourth articles present two of the best understood cell signaling pathways involved in biofilm formation. Valentini and Filloux focus on cyclic di-GMP, while Kavanaugh and Horswill discuss the quorum-sensing (agr) system and the relationship between quorum sensing and biofilm formation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, particularly the role of efflux pumps and the development of persister cells, are the topics of the final article by Van Acker and Coenye. The advances described in this series guarantee that ongoing interdisciplinary and international efforts will lead to new insights into the basic biology of biofilm formation, as well as new strategies for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27129220

  14. Effect of plant phenolic compounds on biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Zaitseva, Julia; Lobakova, Elena; Zagoskina, Natalia; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Khmel, Inessa

    2013-11-01

    In the natural environment, bacteria predominantly exist in matrix-enclosed multicellular communities associated with various surfaces, referred to as biofilms. Bacteria in biofilms are extremely resistant to antibacterial agents thus causing serious problems for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we showed that different plant phenolic compounds, at concentrations that did not or weakly suppressed bacterial growth, increased the capacity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to form biofilms. Biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was enhanced 3- to 7-fold under the action of vanillin and epicatechin, and 2- to 2.5-fold in the presence of 4-hydroxybenzoic, gallic, cinnamic, sinapic, ferulic, and chlorogenic acids. At higher concentrations, these compounds displayed an inhibiting effect. Similar experiments carried out for comparison with Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 showed the same pattern. Vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzoic, and gallic acids at concentrations within the range of 40 to 400 μg/mL increased the production of N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone in P. aeruginosa PAO1 which suggests a possible relationship between stimulation of biofilm formation and Las Quorum Sensing system of this bacterium. Using biosensors to detect N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL), we demonstrated that the plant phenolics studied did not mimic AHLs. PMID:23594262

  15. Effects of nutritional and environmental conditions on Sinorhizobium meliloti biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Fujishige, Nancy A; Hirsch, Ann M; Banchio, Erika; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Giordano, Walter

    2006-11-01

    Rhizobia are non-spore-forming soil bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia in a symbiosis with legume roots. However, in the absence of a legume host, rhizobia manage to survive and hence must have evolved strategies to adapt to diverse environmental conditions. The capacity to respond to variations in nutrient availability enables the persistence of rhizobial species in soil, and consequently improves their ability to colonize and to survive in the host plant. Rhizobia, like many other soil bacteria, persist in nature most likely in sessile communities known as biofilms, which are most often composed of multiple microbial species. We have been employing in vitro assays to study environmental parameters that might influence biofilm formation in the Medicago symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These parameters include carbon source, amount of nitrate, phosphate, calcium and magnesium as well as the effects of osmolarity and pH. The microtiter plate assay facilitates the detection of subtle differences in rhizobial biofilms in response to these parameters, thereby providing insight into how environmental stress or nutritional status influences rhizobial survival. Nutrients such as sucrose, phosphate and calcium enhance biofilm formation as their concentrations increase, whereas extreme temperatures and pH negatively affect biofilm formation. PMID:16887339

  16. Osteopontin reduces biofilm formation in a multi-species model of dental biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schlafer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combating dental biofilm formation is the most effective means for the prevention of caries, one of the most widespread human diseases. Among the chemical supplements to mechanical tooth cleaning procedures, non-bactericidal adjuncts that target the mechanisms of bacterial biofilm formation have gained increasing interest in recent years. Milk proteins, such as lactoferrin, have been shown to interfere with bacterial colonization of saliva-coated surfaces. We here study the effect of bovine milk osteopontin (OPN, a highly phosphorylated whey glycoprotein, on a multispecies in vitro model of dental biofilm. While considerable research effort focuses on the interaction of OPN with mammalian cells, there are no data investigating the influence of OPN on bacterial biofilms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biofilms consisting of Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus downei and Streptococcus sanguinis were grown in a flow cell system that permitted in situ microscopic analysis. Crystal violet staining showed significantly less biofilm formation in the presence of OPN, as compared to biofilms grown without OPN or biofilms grown in the presence of caseinoglycomacropeptide, another phosphorylated milk protein. Confocal microscopy revealed that OPN bound to the surface of bacterial cells and reduced mechanical stability of the biofilms without affecting cell viability. The bacterial composition of the biofilms, determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization, changed considerably in the presence of OPN. In particular, colonization of S. mitis, the best biofilm former in the model, was reduced dramatically. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: OPN strongly reduces the amount of biofilm formed in a well-defined laboratory model of acidogenic dental biofilm. If a similar effect can be observed in vivo, OPN might serve as a valuable adjunct to mechanical tooth cleaning procedures.

  17. Biophysics of biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Philip S

    2014-04-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could (1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, (2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, (3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and (4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  18. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food contact surfaces in a meat-based broth and sensitivity to sanitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Leite de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the capacity of adhesion, the detachment kinetic and the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food services on stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces (2 x 2 cm when cultivated in a meat-based broth at 28 and 7 ºC. It was also to study the efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/L and peracetic acid (30 mg/L in inactivating the bacterial cells in the preformed biofilm. S. aureus strains adhered in high numbers regardless the assayed surface kind and incubation temperature over 72 h. Cells detachment of surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. Number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted at all experimental systems already after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacity to adhere and form biofilm on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under different growth conditions. Moreover, the cells in biofilm matrix were resistant for total removal when submitted to the exposure to sanitizers.

  19. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food contact surfaces in a meat-based broth and sensitivity to sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Evandro Leite; Meira, Quênia Gramile Silva; de Medeiros Barbosa, Isabella; Athayde, Ana Júlia Alves Aguiar; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; de Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the capacity of adhesion, the detachment kinetic and the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food services on stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces (2 × 2 cm) when cultivated in a meat-based broth at 28 and 7 °C. It was also to study the efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/L) and peracetic acid (30 mg/L) in inactivating the bacterial cells in the preformed biofilm. S. aureus strains adhered in high numbers regardless the assayed surface kind and incubation temperature over 72 h. Cells detachment of surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. Number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted at all experimental systems already after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacity to adhere and form biofilm on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under different growth conditions. Moreover, the cells in biofilm matrix were resistant for total removal when submitted to the exposure to sanitizers. PMID:24948915

  20. Genetic Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Liquid Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Gro Rejkjær Sørensen, Laura; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Lisby, Michael; Folkesson, Sven Anders; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm-forming microorganisms switch between two forms: free-living planktonic and sessile multicellular. Sessile communities of yeast biofilms in liquid medium provide a primitive example of multicellularity and are clinically important because biofilms tend to have other growth characteristics...... than free-living cells. We investigated the genetic basis for yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, biofilm on solid surfaces in liquid medium by screening a comprehensive deletion mutant collection in the S1278b background and found 71 genes that were essential for biofilm development. Quantitative...... functioned specifically in biofilm and mat formation. In a tpk3 mutant, transcription of FLO11 was induced three-fold compared with wild-type, but biofilm development and cell–cell adhesion was absent, suggesting that Tpk3p regulates FLO11 positive posttranscriptionally and negative transcriptionally. The...

  1. Diversity and functions of bacterial community in drinking water biofilms revealed by high-throughput sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Yuanqing; Mao, Yanping; Wang, Zhiping,; Tong ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water (DW) systems may cause various problems to water quality. To investigate the community structure of biofilms on different pipe materials and the global/specific metabolic functions of DW biofilms, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing data for 16S rRNA genes and Illumina metagenomic data were generated and analysed. Considerable differences in bacterial diversity and taxonomic structure were identified between biofilms formed on stainless steel and biofilm...

  2. The marine bacteria Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB400 upregulates the type VI secretion system during early biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Denis; Jean, Natacha; Van Overtvelt, Perrine; Ouidir, Tassadit; Hardouin, Julie; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2016-02-01

    Shewanella sp. are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, extensively studied for their electron transfer ability. Shewanella frigidimarina has been detected and isolated from marine environments, and in particular, from biofilms. However, its ability to adhere to surfaces and form a biofilm is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the ability to adhere and to form a biofilm of S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 is significantly higher than that of Shewanella oneidensis in our conditions. We also show that this strain forms a biofilm in artificial seawater, whereas in Luria-Bertani, this capacity is reduced. To identify proteins involved in early biofilm formation, a proteomic analysis of sessile versus planktonic membrane-enriched fractions allowed the identification of several components of the same type VI secretion system gene cluster: putative Hcp1 and ImpB proteins as well as a forkhead-associated domain-containing protein. The upregulation of Hcp1 a marker of active translocation has been confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our data demonstrated the presence of a single and complete type VI secretion system in S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 genome, upregulated in sessile compared with planktonic conditions. The fact that three proteins including the secreted protein Hcp1 have been identified may suggest that this type VI secretion system is functional. PMID:26617163

  3. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe A. Lemire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR carriers (biofilm support materials, allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that mixed-species biofilms can be harvested from an industrial wastewater inoculum [oil sands process water (OSPW] using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD. Moreover, the resultant biofilm communities had the capacity to degrade organic toxins (naphthenic acids—NAs that are found in OSPW. Therefore, we hypothesized that harnessing microbial communities from industrial wastewater, as biofilms, on MBBR carriers may be an effective method to bioremediate industrial wastewater.Here, we detail our methodology adapting the workflow employed for using the CBD, to generate inoculant carriers to seed an MBBR.In this study, OSPW-derived biofilm communities were successfully grown, and their efficacy evaluated, on commercially available MBBR carriers affixed within a modified CBD system. The resultant biofilms demonstrated the capacity to transfer biomass to recipient carriers within a scaled MBBR. Moreover, MBBR systems inoculated in this manner were fully active 2 days post-inoculation, and readily degraded a select population of NAs. Together, these findings suggest that harnessing microbial communities on carriers affixed within a modified CBD system may represent a facile and rapid method for obtaining functional inoculants for use in wastewater MBBR treatment systems.

  4. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davit, Y; Byrne, H; Osborne, J; Pitt-Francis, J; Gavaghan, D; Quintard, M

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. PMID:23410370

  5. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeso, D. R.; Carpio, A.; Einarsson, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste, and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Föppl-Von Kármán equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to reproduce wrinkled structures often formed by biofilms on air-agar interfaces, as well as spatial distributions of differentiated cells commonly observed with B. subtilis.

  6. Screening of Compounds against Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Gottschick

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is a common infection in reproductive age woman and is characterized by dysbiosis of the healthy vaginal flora which is dominated by Lactobacilli, followed by growth of bacteria like Gardnerella vaginalis. The ability of G. vaginalis to form biofilms contributes to the high rates of recurrence that are typical for BV and which unfortunately make repeated antibiotic therapy inevitable. Here we developed a biofilm model for G. vaginalis and screened a large spectrum of compounds for their ability to prevent biofilm formation and to resolve an existing G. vaginalis biofilm. The antibiotics metronidazole and tobramycin were highly effective in preventing biofilm formation, but had no effect on an established biofilm. The application of the amphoteric tenside sodium cocoamphoacetate (SCAA led to disintegration of existing biofilms, reducing biomass by 51% and viability by 61% and it was able to increase the effect of metronidazole by 40% (biomass and 61% (viability. Our data show that attacking the biofilm and the bacterial cells by the combination of an amphoteric tenside with the antibiotic metronidazole might be a useful strategy against BV.

  7. Screening of Compounds against Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschick, Cornelia; Szafranski, Szymon P; Kunze, Brigitte; Sztajer, Helena; Masur, Clarissa; Abels, Christoph; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common infection in reproductive age woman and is characterized by dysbiosis of the healthy vaginal flora which is dominated by Lactobacilli, followed by growth of bacteria like Gardnerella vaginalis. The ability of G. vaginalis to form biofilms contributes to the high rates of recurrence that are typical for BV and which unfortunately make repeated antibiotic therapy inevitable. Here we developed a biofilm model for G. vaginalis and screened a large spectrum of compounds for their ability to prevent biofilm formation and to resolve an existing G. vaginalis biofilm. The antibiotics metronidazole and tobramycin were highly effective in preventing biofilm formation, but had no effect on an established biofilm. The application of the amphoteric tenside sodium cocoamphoacetate (SCAA) led to disintegration of existing biofilms, reducing biomass by 51% and viability by 61% and it was able to increase the effect of metronidazole by 40% (biomass) and 61% (viability). Our data show that attacking the biofilm and the bacterial cells by the combination of an amphoteric tenside with the antibiotic metronidazole might be a useful strategy against BV. PMID:27111438

  8. Screening of Compounds against Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschick, Cornelia; Szafranski, Szymon P.; Kunze, Brigitte; Sztajer, Helena; Masur, Clarissa; Abels, Christoph; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common infection in reproductive age woman and is characterized by dysbiosis of the healthy vaginal flora which is dominated by Lactobacilli, followed by growth of bacteria like Gardnerella vaginalis. The ability of G. vaginalis to form biofilms contributes to the high rates of recurrence that are typical for BV and which unfortunately make repeated antibiotic therapy inevitable. Here we developed a biofilm model for G. vaginalis and screened a large spectrum of compounds for their ability to prevent biofilm formation and to resolve an existing G. vaginalis biofilm. The antibiotics metronidazole and tobramycin were highly effective in preventing biofilm formation, but had no effect on an established biofilm. The application of the amphoteric tenside sodium cocoamphoacetate (SCAA) led to disintegration of existing biofilms, reducing biomass by 51% and viability by 61% and it was able to increase the effect of metronidazole by 40% (biomass) and 61% (viability). Our data show that attacking the biofilm and the bacterial cells by the combination of an amphoteric tenside with the antibiotic metronidazole might be a useful strategy against BV. PMID:27111438

  9. Biofilm-producing ability and efficiency of sanitizing agents against Prototheca zopfii isolates from bovine subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Juliano Leonel; Lee, Sarah Hwa In; de Paula Arruda, Eurico; Pedroso Galles, Débora; Camargo Caetano, Vinícius; Fernandes de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto; Fernandes, Andrezza Maria; Veiga dos Santos, Marcos

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate (1) the capacity of the microalga Prototheca zopfii isolated from subclinical bovine mastitis cases to form biofilms; and (2) the resistance of these isolates to sanitizing agents. Ten isolates of P. zopfii from cows with subclinical mastitis (somatic cell count>200×10(3) cells/mL), distributed in 5 dairy farms, were evaluated for their capacity to form biofilms in polystyrene microplate assays and stainless steel coupons, at 25°C and 37°C±1°C. Prototheca zopfii were isolated from milk samples via microbiological culture and analyzed by 18S rRNA gene sequencing. Biofilm formation on the coupons was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The resistance to sanitizing agents was assessed using the biofilm-forming P. zopfii isolates in stainless steel coupon assays, which were subjected to 3 sanitizers: peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and iodine solution. To evaluate resistance to the sanitizers, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) technique was performed using decreasing concentrations of the sanitizing agents (20, 10, 5, 2.5, 1.25, 0.625, 0.312, 0.156, 0.078, 0.039, and 0.019 g/L). After inoculating the isolates, all concentrations were evaluated at 3 distinct incubation periods (24, 48, and 72 h) to assess the effect of incubation time on the MIC. Using the polystyrene microplate assays, 1 isolate showed weak biofilm production, 5 moderate, and 4 strong, when incubated at 25°C±1. For isolates incubated at 37°C±1, 6 showed weak biofilm production and 4 moderate. All P. zopfii isolates (n=10) had the capacity to form biofilms on stainless steel coupons. The longer the incubation period of the P. zopfii isolates at different dilutions, the greater the concentrations of sanitizer needed to prevent growth of the microalgae under the tested conditions. We detected a significant effect of sanitizer and time of incubation (24, 48, and 72 h) on MIC values against P. zopfii isolates. The isolates

  10. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  11. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...... the cocultivation of 403 undomesticated E. coli strains with a characterized E. coli K-12 strain was detected at a significant frequency. The survey suggests that different mechanisms underlie the observed stimulation, yet synergistic development of biofilm within the subset of E. coli isolates (n...... = 56) exhibiting the strongest effects was most often linked to conjugative transmission of natural plasmids carried by the E. coli isolates (70%). Thus, the capacity of an isolate to promote the biofilm through cocultivation was (i) transferable to the K-12 strain, (ii) was linked with the acquisition...

  12. Capillary isoelectric focusing--useful tool for detection of the biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Filip; Horka, Marie; Hola, Veronika; Votava, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    The biofilm formation is an important factor of S. epidermidis virulence. Biofilm-positive strains might be clinically more important than biofilm-negative ones. Unlike biofilm-negative staphylococci, biofilm-positive staphylococci are surrounded with an extracellular polysaccharide substance. The presence of this substance on the surface can affect physico-chemical properties of the bacterial cell, including surface charge. 73 S. epidermidis strains were examined for the presence of ica operon, for the ability to form biofilm by Christensen test tube method and for the production of slime by Congo red agar method. Isoelectric points (pI) of these strains were determined by means of Capillary Isoelectric Focusing. The biofilm negative strains focused near pI value 2.3, while the pI values of the biofilm positive strains were near 2.6. Isoelectric point is a useful criterion for the differentiation between biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative S. epidermidis strains. PMID:17157942

  13. Influence of substrate micropatterning on biofilm growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Stephan; Li, Yiwei; Liu, Bi-Feng Liu; Weitz, David

    2015-11-01

    We culture triple reporter Bacillus Subtilis biofilm on micropatterned agar substrates. We track the biofilm development in terms of size, thickness, shape, and phenotype expression. For a tiling composed of elevated rectangles, we observe the biofilm develops an oval shape or triangular shape depending on the rectangle's aspect ratio and orientation. The motile cells are primarily located in the valleys between the rectangles and the matrix producing cells are mostly located on the rectangles. Wrinkles form at the edges of the elevated surfaces, and upon merging form channels centered on the elevated surface. After a few days, the spore-forming cells appear at the periphery. Since biofilms in nature grow on irregular surfaces, our work may provide insight into the complex patterns observed.

  14. Denitrifying activity of activated sludge in suspension and in biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Cortez, Susana; Teixeira, P.; Oliveira, Rosário; Mota, M.

    2008-01-01

    A method based on measuring substrate depletion rate was developed to evaluate the denitrifying activity of activated sludge in suspension and in biofilm form in anoxic serum flasks. The adapted activated sludge inoculum was grown as biofilm in an anoxic rotating biological contactor (RBC). Acetate was used as external carbon source to obtain a carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 2. The results showed that the specific activity of cells in biofilm form was higher than in planktonic for...

  15. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    OpenAIRE

    Luyan Ma; Matthew Conover; Haiping Lu; Parsek, Matthew R.; Kenneth Bayles; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organis...

  16. Microtiter Plate Assay for Assessment of Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Djordjevic, D.; Wiedmann, M.; McLandsborough, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has the ability to form biofilms on food-processing surfaces, potentially leading to food product contamination. The objective of this research was to standardize a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) microtiter plate assay to compare the ability of L. monocytogenes strains to form biofilms. A total of 31 coded L. monocytogenes strains were grown in defined medium (modified Welshimer's broth) at 32°C for 20 and 40 h in PVC microtiter plate wells. Biofilm formation was indirectly a...

  17. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    to various persistent infections in humans and animals, and to a variety of complications in industry, where solid–water interfaces occur. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation is necessary for creating strategies to control biofilms. Recent studies have shown that......Bacteria in nature primarily live in surface-associated communities commonly known as biofilms. Because bacteria in biofilms, in many cases, display tolerance to host immune systems, antibiotics, and biocides, they are often difficult or impossible to eradicate. Biofilm formation, therefore, leads...... extracellular DNA is an important component of the extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms. The present chapter is focussed on extracellular DNA as matrix component in biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an example from the Gram-negative bacteria, and Streptococcus and Staphylococcus as examples...

  18. Removal of Dental Biofilms with an Ultrasonically Activated Water Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, R P; Fabbri, S; Offin, D G; Symonds, N; Kiang, K S; Knee, R J; Yoganantham, D C; Webb, J S; Birkin, P R; Leighton, T G; Stoodley, P

    2015-09-01

    Acidogenic bacteria within dental plaque biofilms are the causative agents of caries. Consequently, maintenance of a healthy oral environment with efficient biofilm removal strategies is important to limit caries, as well as halt progression to gingivitis and periodontitis. Recently, a novel cleaning device has been described using an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS) to generate a cavitation cloud of bubbles in a freely flowing water stream that has demonstrated the capacity to be effective at biofilm removal. In this study, UAS was evaluated for its ability to remove biofilms of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans UA159, as well as Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811, grown on machine-etched glass slides to generate a reproducible complex surface and artificial teeth from a typodont training model. Biofilm removal was assessed both visually and microscopically using high-speed videography, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by CSLM demonstrated a statistically significant 99.9% removal of S. mutans biofilms exposed to the UAS for 10 s, relative to both untreated control biofilms and biofilms exposed to the water stream alone without ultrasonic activation (P naeslundii, and S. oralis biofilm removal from machine-etched glass and S. mutans from typodont surfaces with complex topography. Consequently, UAS technology represents a potentially effective method for biofilm removal and improved oral hygiene. PMID:26056055

  19. Biofilms in Infections of the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo J. M. Bispo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to form biofilms in a variety of environments is a common trait of bacteria, and may represent one of the earliest defenses against predation. Biofilms are multicellular communities usually held together by a polymeric matrix, ranging from capsular material to cell lysate. In a structure that imposes diffusion limits, environmental microgradients arise to which individual bacteria adapt their physiologies, resulting in the gamut of physiological diversity. Additionally, the proximity of cells within the biofilm creates the opportunity for coordinated behaviors through cell–cell communication using diffusible signals, the most well documented being quorum sensing. Biofilms form on abiotic or biotic surfaces, and because of that are associated with a large proportion of human infections. Biofilm formation imposes a limitation on the uses and design of ocular devices, such as intraocular lenses, posterior contact lenses, scleral buckles, conjunctival plugs, lacrimal intubation devices and orbital implants. In the absence of abiotic materials, biofilms have been observed on the capsule, and in the corneal stroma. As the evidence for the involvement of microbial biofilms in many ocular infections has become compelling, developing new strategies to prevent their formation or to eradicate them at the site of infection, has become a priority.

  20. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Bacterial Aggregates in Biofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Melaugh, Gavin; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Steve P; Gordon, Vernita; Allen, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase meaning it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the role of aggregate shape, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play a key role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the...

  1. Essential factors of an integrated moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor: Adhesion characteristics and microbial community of the biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bing; Yu, Chunfei; Bin, Liying; Zhao, Yiliang; Feng, Xianfeng; Huang, Shaosong; Fu, Fenglian; Ding, Jiewei; Chen, Cuiqun; Li, Ping; Chen, Qianyu

    2016-07-01

    This work aims at revealing the adhesion characteristics and microbial community of the biofilm in an integrated moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor, and further evaluating their variations over time. With multiple methods, the adhesion characteristics and microbial community of the biofilm on the carriers were comprehensively illuminated, which showed their dynamic variation along with the operational time. Results indicated that: (1) the roughness of biofilm on the carriers increased very quickly to a maximum value at the start-up stage, then, decreased to become a flat curve, which indicated a layer of smooth biofilm formed on the surface; (2) the tightly-bound protein and polysaccharide was the most important factor influencing the stability of biofilm; (3) the development of biofilm could be divided into three stages, and Gammaproteobacteria were the most dominant microbial species in class level at the last stage, which occupied the largest ratio (51.48%) among all microbes. PMID:27038266

  2. Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms subjected to phage phiIBB-PF7A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens is an important food spoilage organism, usually found in the form of biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are inherently resistant to a variety of antimicrobial agents, therefore alternative methods to biofilm control, such as bacteriophages (phages have been suggested. Phage behavior on biofilms is still poorly investigated and needs further understanding. Here we describe the application of phage ϕIBB-PF7, a newly isolated phage, to control P. fluorescens biofilms. The biofilms were formed under static or dynamic conditions and with or without renewal of medium. Results Conditions for biofilm formation influenced the feature of the biofilm and the morphology of P. fluorescens. Biomass removal due to phage activity varied between 63 and 91% depending on the biofilm age and the conditions under which the biofilm had been formed and phages applied. Removal of the biofilm by phage treatment was faster in younger biofilms, but the same number of surviving cells was detected in all tested biofilms, after only 4 h of treatment, even in older biofilms. Under static conditions, a 3 log higher number of phage progeny remained either inside the biofilm matrix or attached to the substratum surface than under dynamic conditions, pointing to the importance of experimental conditions for the efficacy of phage entrapment into the biofilm. Conclusion Phage ϕIBB-PF7A is highly efficient in removing P. fluorescens biofilms within a short time interval. The conditions of biofilm formation and applied during phage infection are critical for the efficacy of the sanitation process. The integration of phages into the biofilm matrix and their entrapment to the surface may be further beneficial factors when phage treatment is considered alone or in addition to chemical biocides in industrial environments where P. fluorescens causes serious spoilage.

  3. A Novel Computerized Cell Count Algorithm for Biofilm Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Suesse, Herbert; Fischer, Dagmar; Pletz, Mathias W; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are the preferred sessile and matrix-embedded life form of most microorganisms on surfaces. In the medical field, biofilms are a frequent cause of treatment failure because they protect the bacteria from antibiotics and immune cells. Antibiotics are selected according to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) based on the planktonic form of bacteria. Determination of the minimal biofilm eradicating concentration (MBEC), which can be up to 1,000-fold greater than the MIC, is not currently conducted as routine diagnostic testing, primarily because of the methodical hurdles of available biofilm assessing protocols that are time- and cost-consuming. Comparative analysis of biofilms is also limited as most quantitative methods such as crystal violet staining are indirect and highly imprecise. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for assessing biofilm resistance to antibiotics that overcomes several of the limitations of alternative methods. This algorithm aims for a computer-based analysis of confocal microscope 3D images of biofilms after live/dead stains providing various biofilm parameters such as numbers of viable and dead cells and their vertical distributions within the biofilm, or biofilm thickness. The performance of this algorithm was evaluated using computer-simulated 2D and 3D images of coccal and rodent cells varying different parameters such as cell density, shading or cell size. Finally, genuine biofilms that were untreated or treated with nitroxoline or colistin were analyzed and the results were compared with quantitative microbiological standard methods. This novel algorithm allows a direct, fast and reproducible analysis of biofilms after live/dead staining. It performed well in biofilms of moderate cell densities in a 2D set-up however the 3D analysis remains still imperfect and difficult to evaluate. Nevertheless, this is a first try to develop an easy but conclusive tool that eventually might be implemented into routine

  4. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dipesh Das; Yung-Tse Hung; Charles Moretti; Hasibul Hasan; Harvey Gullicks

    2011-01-01

    The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, r...

  5. Biophysics of Biofilm Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofi...

  6. Evaluation of the Inhibition of Culturable Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, or Aeromonas hydrophilia by an Existing Drinking Water Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were conducted to determine if an existing biofilm could act as a inhibitor to introduced microorganisms, preventing them from being incorporated into the existing biofilm or forming a biofilm. Biofilm sampling coupons were challenged by a solution of a single indica...

  7. The role of biofilms in onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditya K; Daigle, Deanne; Carviel, Jessie L

    2016-06-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of nails primarily caused by dermatophyte fungi. Fungi are traditionally understood as existing in the environment as planktonic organisms; however, recent advancements in microbiology suggest that fungi form biofilms-complex sessile microbial communities irreversibly attached to epithelial surfaces by means of an extracellular matrix. The extracellular matrix also acts as a protective barrier to the organisms within the biofilm. The biofilm is surprisingly resistant to injury and may act as a persistent source of infection possibly accounting for antifungal resistance in onychomycosis. PMID:27012826

  8. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates...

  9. Anti-Staphylococcal Biofilm Effects of Human Cathelicidin Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Biswajit; Golla, Radha M; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Wang, Guangshun

    2016-01-14

    Staphylococcus aureus can live together in the form of biofilms to avoid elimination by the host. Thus, a useful strategy to counteract bacterial biofilms is to re-engineer human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 so that it can be used as a remedy for preventing and removing biofilms. This study reports antibiofilm effects of four human cathelicidin LL-37 peptides against community-associated and hospital isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Although the intact molecule LL-37 inhibited biofilm formation at low concentrations, it did not inhibit bacterial attachment nor disrupt preformed biofilms. However, two 17-residue peptides, GF-17 and 17BIPHE2, inhibited bacterial attachment, biofilm growth, and disrupted established biofilms. An inactive peptide RI-10 was used as a negative control. Our results obtained using the S. aureus mutants in a static biofilm model are consistent with the literature obtained in a flow cell biofilm model. Because 17BIPHE2 is the most effective biofilm disruptor with desired stability to proteases, it is a promising lead for developing new anti-MRSA biofilm agents. PMID:26819677

  10. Biofilms: A microbial home

    OpenAIRE

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  12. Understanding, preventing and eradicating Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Suzana Meira; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Cândido, Elizabete de Souza; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2016-04-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to aggregate and form biofilm represents a great problem for public health, since they present extracellular components that encase these micro-organisms, making them more resistant to antibiotics and host immune attack. This may become worse when antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains form biofilms. However, antibiofilm screens with different compounds may reveal potential therapies to prevent/treat biofilm infections. Here, we focused on Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic bacterium that causes different types of infections, including in the bloodstream, meninges, lungs, urinary system and at surgical sites. We also highlight aspects involved in the formation and maintenance of K. pneumoniae biofilms, as well as resistance and the emergence of new trends to combat this health challenge. PMID:27064296

  13. Biofilm producing multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species from a tertiary care hospital: a therapeutic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Bala

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates the ability of Acinetobacter isolates to form biofilm and biofilm production has strong association with multiple drug resistance. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 3024-3026

  14. Inhibitors of biofilm formation by biofuel fermentation contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuel fermentation contaminants such as Lactobacillus sp. may persist in production facilities by forming recalcitrant biofilms. In this study, biofilm-forming strains of Lactobacillus brevis, L. fermentum, and L. plantarum were isolated and characterized from a dry-grind fuel ethanol plant. A var...

  15. On the chemical and processing stability of pharmaceutical solids : Solid form dependent water presenting capacity and process induced solid form transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Heidarian Höckerfelt, Mina

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for improving our knowledge and understanding about formation mechanisms and nature of amorphous state in order to prevent the unintended presence of disorder in solid pharmaceutical products and reduce the related stability issues. The suggested theory that water binding capacity of amorphous cellulose affects the chemical stability of hydrolysis sensitive drugs in formulations with cellulose based excipients needs a clarification and water-cellulose interaction profiles need...

  16. Frequency of biofilm formation in toothbrushes and wash basin junks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulazeez A Abubakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are known to be resistant to several antibiotics once they are allowed to form on any surface. Aim: To investigate the biofilm forming ability of some bacterial isolates in toothbrushes and wash basin junks. Materials and Methods: A total of 606 students of Federal University of Technology, Yola were provided with new toothbrushes, which were collected after 1 month of usage and screened for biofilm formation. Another 620 swabs were collected from the wash basins of Federal Medical Centre, Specialist Hospital, Federal University of Technology, and students′ hostels in Yola and from some residence in Jimeta, Yola Metropolis; they were all screened for biofilm formation. Results: A total of 38.3% biofilm formation rate was recorded. Three types of bacterial isolates were identified in the biofilms of toothbrushes and wash basin junks, namely Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the prevalence rate of 48.0%, 29.1%, and 22.6%, respectively. Overall, 83.3% of the toothbrush biofilm were identified from female students, while 16.7% were from their male counterparts. Statistically, the frequency of biofilm formation showed a significant difference by gender (X 2 = 10.242, P 0.05. Conclusion: This study identified three microorganisms namely S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa that were involved in wash basin junk biofilm formation. The findings also showed that occurrence of biofilm in females′ toothbrushes were significantly higher than in males′ (X 2 = 10.242, P < 0.05.

  17. Prospects for Anti-Biofilm Pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    This commentary highlights several avenues currently being pursued in research labs to the development of new anti-biofilm pharmaceuticals. There is a real need for alternative therapeutic modalities for treating the persistent infections that sometimes form on implanted medical devices or compromised niches within the body. Strategies being researched include discovering new antimicrobial agents that kill microorganisms in biofilms more effectively than do existing antibiotics, designing dru...

  18. Screening of Compounds against Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms.

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschick, Cornelia; Szymon P Szafranski; Kunze, Brigitte; Sztajer, Helena; Masur, Clarissa; Abels, Christoph; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common infection in reproductive age woman and is characterized by dysbiosis of the healthy vaginal flora which is dominated by Lactobacilli, followed by growth of bacteria like Gardnerella vaginalis. The ability of G. vaginalis to form biofilms contributes to the high rates of recurrence that are typical for BV and which unfortunately make repeated antibiotic therapy inevitable. Here we developed a biofilm model for G. vaginalis and screened a large spectrum of ...

  19. Screening of Compounds against Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschick, Cornelia; Szymon P Szafranski; Kunze, Brigitte; Sztajer, Helena; Masur, Clarissa; Abels, Christoph; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common infection in reproductive age woman and is characterized by dysbiosis of the healthy vaginal flora which is dominated by Lactobacilli, followed by growth of bacteria like Gardnerella vaginalis. The ability of G. vaginalis to form biofilms contributes to the high rates of recurrence that are typical for BV and which unfortunately make repeated antibiotic therapy inevitable. Here we developed a biofilm model for G. vaginalis and screened a large spectrum of ...

  20. Biofilm monitoring using complex permittivity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Susan Jeanne; McGrath, Lucas K.; Dolan, Patricia L.; Yelton, William Graham

    2008-10-01

    There is strong interest in the detection and monitoring of bio-fouling. Bio-fouling problems are common in numerous water treatments systems, medical and dental apparatus and food processing equipment. Current bio-fouling control protocols are time consuming and costly. New early detection techniques to monitor bio-forming contaminates are means to enhanced efficiency. Understanding the unique dielectric properties of biofilm development, colony forming bacteria and nutrient background will provide a basis to the effectiveness of controlling or preventing biofilm growth. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements provide values of complex permittivity, {var_epsilon}*, of biofilm formation by applying a weak alternating electric field at various frequencies. The dielectric characteristic of the biofilm, {var_epsilon}{prime}, is the real component of {var_epsilon}* and measures the biofilm's unique ability to store energy. Graphically observed dependencies of {var_epsilon}{prime} to frequency indicate dielectric relaxation or dielectric dispersion behaviors that mark the particular stage of progression during the development of biofilms. In contrast, any frequency dependency of the imaginary component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime} the loss factor, is expressed as dielectric losses from the biofilm due to dipole relaxation. The tangent angle of these two component vectors is the ratio of the imaginary component to the real component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime}/{var_epsilon}{prime} and is referred to as the loss angle tangent (tan {delta}) or dielectric loss. Changes in tan {delta} are characteristic of changes in dielectric losses during various developmental stages of the films. Permittivity scans in the above figure are of biofilm growth from P. Fluorescens (10e7 CFU's at the start). Three trends are apparent from these scans, the first being a small drop in the imaginary permittivity over a 7 hours period, best seen in the Cole-Cole plot (a). The second trend

  1. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Simmonds, Iona; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D

    2015-12-31

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC) and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon(®), bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in the iglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums. PMID:26507830

  2. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Wimmonds, Iona; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC)and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon®, bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in theiglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums.

  3. Removal of Burkholderia cepacia biofilms with oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, D. W.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect the water system aboard US space shuttles and is the anticipated biocide for the international space station. Water quality on spacecraft must be maintained at the highest possible levels for the safety of the crew. Furthermore, the treatment process used to maintain the quality of water on research must be robust and operate for long periods with minimal crew intervention. Biofilms are recalcitrant and pose a major threat with regard to chronic contamination of spacecraft water systems. We measured the effectiveness of oxidizing biocides on the removal and regrowth of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia biofilms. B. cepacia, isolated from the water distribution system of the space shuttle Discovery, was grown in continuous culture to produce a bacterial contamination source for biofilm formation and removal studies. A 10(7) CFU ml-1 B. cepacia suspension, in distilled water, was used to form biofilms on 3000 micrometers2 glass surfaces. Rates of attachment were measured directly with image analysis and were found to be 7.8, 15.2, and 22.8 attachment events h-1 for flow rates of 20.7, 15.2, and 9.8 ml min-1, respectively. After 18 h of formation, the B. cepacia biofilms were challenged with oxidants (ozone, chlorine, and iodine) and the rates of biofilm removal determined by image analysis. Fifty percent of the biofilm material was removed in the first hour of continous treatment with 24 mg l-1 chlorine or 2 mg l-1 ozone. Iodine (48 mg l-1) did not remove any measurable cellular material after 6 h continuous contact. After this first removal of biofilms by the oxidants, the surface was allowed to refoul and was again treated with the biocide. Iodine was the only compound that was unable to remove cellular debris from either primary or secondary biofilms. Moreover, treating primary biofilms with iodine increased the rate of formation of secondary biofilms, from 4.4 to 5.8 attachment events h-1. All the oxidants tested inactivated the B

  4. Biofilm reactors for industrial bioconversion processes: employing potential of enhanced reaction rates

    OpenAIRE

    Karcher Patrick; Ezeji Thaddeus C; Annous Bassam A; Qureshi Nasib; Maddox Ian S

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This article describes the use of biofilm reactors for the production of various chemicals by fermentation and wastewater treatment. Biofilm formation is a natural process where microbial cells attach to the support (adsorbent) or form flocs/aggregates (also called granules) without use of chemicals and form thick layers of cells known as "biofilms." As a result of biofilm formation, cell densities in the reactor increase and cell concentrations as high as 74 gL-1 can be achieved. Th...

  5. An electrochemical impedance model for integrated bacterial biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial cells attachment onto solid surfaces and the following growth into mature microbial biofilms may result in highly antibiotic resistant biofilms. Such biofilms may be incidentally formed on tissues or implanted devices, or intentionally formed by directed deposition of microbial sensors on whole-cell bio-chip surface. A new method for electrical characterization of the later on-chip microbial biofilm buildup is presented in this paper. Measurement of impedance vs. frequency in the range of 100 mHz to 400 kHz of Escherichia coli cells attachment to indium-tin-oxide-coated electrodes was carried out while using optical microscopy estimating the electrode area coverage. We show that impedance spectroscopy measurements can be interpreted by a simple electrical equivalent model characterizing both attachment and growth of the biofilm. The correlation of extracted equivalent electrical lumped components with the visual biofilm parameters and their dependence on the attachment and growth phases is confirmed.

  6. Biofilm-based central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Ammar; Jamal, Mohamed A; Raad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Different types of central venous catheters (CVCs) have been used in clinical practice to improve the quality of life of chronically and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, indwelling devices are usually associated with microbial biofilms and eventually lead to catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).An estimated 250,000-400,000 CLABSIs occur every year in the United States, at a rate of 1.5 per 1,000 CVC days and a mortality rate of 12-25 %. The annual cost of caring for patients with CLABSIs ranges from 296 million to 2.3 billion dollars.Biofilm formation occurs on biotic and abiotic surfaces in the clinical setting. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand biofilm formation, including different biofilm developmental stages, biofilm matrix compositions, quorum-sensing regulated biofilm formation, biofilm dispersal (and its clinical implications), and multi-species biofilms that are relevant to polymicrobial infections.When microbes form a matured biofilm within human hosts through medical devices such as CVCs, the infection becomes resistant to antibiotic treatment and can develop into a chronic condition. For that reason, many techniques have been used to prevent the formation of biofilm by targeting different stages of biofilm maturation. Other methods have been used to diagnose and treat established cases of CLABSI.Catheter removal is the conventional management of catheter associated bacteremia; however, the procedure itself carries a relatively high risk of mechanical complications. Salvaging the catheter can help to minimize these complications.In this article, we provide an overview of microbial biofilm formation; describe the involvement of various genetic determinants, adhesion proteins, organelles, mechanism(s) of biofilm formation, polymicrobial infections, and biofilm-associated infections on indwelling intravascular catheters; and describe the diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

  7. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda

  8. Influence of culture conditions on Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities that are resistant against attacks by bacteriophages and removal by drugs and chemicals. In this study, biofilms of Escherichia coli O157:H7, a bacterial pathogen, were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in terms of the dynamic transition of morphology and surface properties of bacterial cells over the development of biofilms. The physical and topographical properties of biofilms are different, depending on nutrient availability. Compared to biofilms formed in a high nutrient medium, biofilms form faster and a higher number of bacterial cells were recovered on glass surface in a low nutrient medium. We demonstrate that AFM can obtain high-resolution images and the elastic information about biofilms. As E. coli biofilm becomes mature, the magnitude of the force between a tip and the surface of the biofilm gets stronger, suggesting that extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), sticky components of biofilms, accumulate over the surface of cells upon the initial attachment of bacterial cells to surfaces

  9. Effect of glucose on Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation, and assessment of the biofilm's sanitation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoui, Daisuke; Hirokawa, Eri; Takahashi, Hajime; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important cause of human foodborne infections and its ability to form biofilms is a serious concern to the food industry. To reveal the effect of glucose conditions on biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes, 20 strains were investigated under three glucose conditions (0.1, 1.0, and 2.0% w v(-1)) by quantifying the number of cells in the biofilm and observing the biofilm structure after incubation for 24, 72, and 168 h. In addition, the biofilms were examined for their sensitivity to sodium hypochlorite. It was found that high concentrations of glucose reduced the number of viable cells in the biofilms and increased extracellular polymeric substance production. Moreover, biofilms formed at a glucose concentration of 1.0 or 2.0% were more resistant to sodium hypochlorite than those formed at a glucose concentration of 0.1%. This knowledge can be used to help design the most appropriate sanitation strategy. PMID:27353113

  10. Enhanced Uranium Immobilization and Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Cologgi, Dena L.; Speers, Allison M.; Bullard, Blair A; Kelly, Shelly D.; Reguera, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentra...

  11. Control of biofilms using surfactants : persistence and regrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, M; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Vieira, Maria João

    2005-01-01

    The action of the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), respectively, a cationic and an anionic surfactant were investigated to control mature biofilms formed under turbulent and laminar flow, by P.fluorescens. The sanitizer action of the surfactants on biofilms was assessed by means of respiratory activity and variation of biofilm mass, immediately, 3, 7 and 12 h after the treatment of the chemicals. The latter experimental times were tested in order to a...

  12. Effect of mechanical stress on biofilms challenged by different chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, M; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Vieira, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study a methodology was applied in order to ascertain the mechanical stability of biofilms, by using a stainlesssteel (SS) rotating device immersed in a biological reactor where biofilms formed by Pseudomonas fluorescens were allowed to grow for 7 days at a Reynolds number of agitation of 2400. The biofilms developed with this system were characterised in terms of amount of total, extracellular and intracellular proteins and polysaccharides, amount of mass, metabolic activ...

  13. Protocols to Study the Physiology of Oral Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lemos, José A.; Abranches, Jacqueline; Koo, Hyun; Marquis, Robert E.; Burne, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The oral cavity harbors several hundred different bacterial species that colonize both hard (teeth) and soft tissues, forming complex populations known as microbial biofilms. It is widely accepted that the phenotypic characteristics of bacteria grown in biofilms are substantially different from those grown in suspensions. Because biofilms are the natural habitat for the great majority of oral bacteria, including those contributing to oral diseases, a better understanding of the physiology of ...

  14. Effect of Biofilm Formation by Oenococcus oeni on Malolactic Fermentation and the Release of Aromatic Compounds in Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastard, Alexandre; Coelho, Christian; Briandet, Romain; Canette, Alexis; Gougeon, Régis; Alexandre, Hervé; Guzzo, Jean; Weidmann, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The winemaking process involves the alcoholic fermentation of must, often followed by malolactic fermentation (MLF). The latter, mainly carried out by the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni, is used to improve wine quality when acidity reduction is required. Moreover, it prevents microbial spoilage and improves the wine's organoleptic profile. Prior observations showed that O. oeni is able to resist several months in harsh wine conditions when adhered on oak barrels. Since biofilm is a prevailing microbial lifestyle in natural environments, the capacity of O. oeni to form biofilms was investigated on winemaking material such as stainless steel and oak chips. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed that O. oeni was able to adhere to these surfaces and form spatially organized microcolonies embedded in extracellular substances. To assess the competitive advantage of this mode of life in wine, the properties of biofilm and planktonic cells were compared after inoculation in a fermented must (pH 3.5 or 3.2 and 12% ethanol) The results indicated that the biofilm culture of O. oeni conferred (i) increased tolerance to wine stress, and (ii) functional performance with effective malolactic activities. Relative gene expression focusing on stress genes and genes involved in EPS synthesis was investigated in a mature biofilm and emphasized the role of the matrix in increased biofilm resistance. As oak is commonly used in wine aging, we focused on the O. oeni biofilm on this material and its contribution to the development of wine color and the release of aromatic compounds. Analytical chromatography was used to target the main oak aging compounds such as vanillin, gaiacol, eugenol, whisky-lactones, and furfural. The results reveal that O. oeni biofilm developed on oak can modulate the wood-wine transfer of volatile aromatic compounds during MLF and aging by decreasing furfural, gaiacol, and eugenol in particular. This work showed that O

  15. Effect of biofilm formation by Oenococcus oeni on malolactic fermentation and the release of aromatic compounds in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eBastard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The winemaking process involves the alcoholic fermentation of must, often followed by malolactic fermentation. The latter, mainly carried out by the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni, is used to improve wine quality when acidity reduction is required. Moreover, it prevents microbial spoilage and improves the wine’s organoleptic profile. Prior observations showed that O. oeni is able to resist several months in harsh wine conditions when adhered on oak barrels. Since biofilm is a prevailing microbial lifestyle in natural environments, the capacity of O. oeni to form biofilms was investigated on winemaking material such as stainless steel and oak chips. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed that O. oeni was able to adhere to these surfaces and form spatially organized microcolonies embedded in extracellular substances. To assess the competitive advantage of this mode of life in wine, the properties of biofilm and planktonic cells were compared after inoculation in a fermented must (pH 3.5 or 3.2 and 12% ethanol The results indicated that the biofilm culture of O. oeni conferred (i increased tolerance to wine stress, and (ii functional performance with effective malolactic activities. Relative gene expression focusing on stress genes and genes involved in EPS synthesis was investigated in a mature biofilm and emphasized the role of the matrix in increased biofilm resistance.As oak is commonly used in wine aging, we focused on the O. oeni biofilm on this material and its contribution to the development of wine color and the release of aromatic compounds. Analytical chromatography was used to target the main oak aging compounds such as vanillin, gaiacol, eugenol, whisky-lactones and furfural. The results reveal that O. oeni biofilm developed on oak can modulate the wood-wine transfer of volatile aromatic compounds during malolactic fermentation and aging by decreasing furfural, gaiacol and eugenol in

  16. Effect of Biofilm Formation by Oenococcus oeni on Malolactic Fermentation and the Release of Aromatic Compounds in Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastard, Alexandre; Coelho, Christian; Briandet, Romain; Canette, Alexis; Gougeon, Régis; Alexandre, Hervé; Guzzo, Jean; Weidmann, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The winemaking process involves the alcoholic fermentation of must, often followed by malolactic fermentation (MLF). The latter, mainly carried out by the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni, is used to improve wine quality when acidity reduction is required. Moreover, it prevents microbial spoilage and improves the wine’s organoleptic profile. Prior observations showed that O. oeni is able to resist several months in harsh wine conditions when adhered on oak barrels. Since biofilm is a prevailing microbial lifestyle in natural environments, the capacity of O. oeni to form biofilms was investigated on winemaking material such as stainless steel and oak chips. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed that O. oeni was able to adhere to these surfaces and form spatially organized microcolonies embedded in extracellular substances. To assess the competitive advantage of this mode of life in wine, the properties of biofilm and planktonic cells were compared after inoculation in a fermented must (pH 3.5 or 3.2 and 12% ethanol) The results indicated that the biofilm culture of O. oeni conferred (i) increased tolerance to wine stress, and (ii) functional performance with effective malolactic activities. Relative gene expression focusing on stress genes and genes involved in EPS synthesis was investigated in a mature biofilm and emphasized the role of the matrix in increased biofilm resistance. As oak is commonly used in wine aging, we focused on the O. oeni biofilm on this material and its contribution to the development of wine color and the release of aromatic compounds. Analytical chromatography was used to target the main oak aging compounds such as vanillin, gaiacol, eugenol, whisky-lactones, and furfural. The results reveal that O. oeni biofilm developed on oak can modulate the wood-wine transfer of volatile aromatic compounds during MLF and aging by decreasing furfural, gaiacol, and eugenol in particular. This work showed that O

  17. Does bacterial communication play a role for the effect of triclosan, Corsodyl and Listerine on biofilm formation and growth of Streptococcus mutans?

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm and biofilm formation Bacteria colonize biological and inert surfaces in the form of matrixencapsulated communities referred to as biofilms (1). These microbial biofilms are a highly distinct form of microbial life compared with the planktonic, or freely floating, form of microbial life that has been exhaustively studied for the last century (2). Bacterial biofilms account for the majority of chronic diseases, including gingivitis, endocarditis and nosocomial infections (1). Mic...

  18. The influence of hydrogen bubble formation on the removal of Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms from platinum electrode surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gião, M. S.; Montenegro, M. I.; Vieira, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen bubble formation on the surface of platinum electrodes as a means of removing biofilms was studied. Biofilms of Pseudomonas fluorescens of different ages were grown on platinum electrodes and challenged with hydrogen bubbles formed at the surface of the electrodes, by cycling the potential at -2.0 V. The removal of the biofilms from the surfaces was assessed by direct epifluorescence microscopy. The removal of the biofilm from the surface was dependent on the biofilm age. As the b...

  19. Metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses of Accumulibacter phosphatis-enriched floccular and granular biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeremy J; Dutilh, Bas E; Skennerton, Connor T; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Hastie, Marcus L; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Tyson, Gene W; Bond, Philip L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, forming diverse adherent microbial communities that perform a plethora of functions. Here we operated two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors enriched with Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (Accumulibacter) performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Reactors formed two distinct biofilms, one floccular biofilm, consisting of small, loose, microbial aggregates, and one granular biofilm, forming larger, dense, spherical aggregates. Using metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, we investigated the proteomic differences between these two biofilm communities, identifying a total of 2022 unique proteins. To understand biofilm differences, we compared protein abundances that were statistically enriched in both biofilm states. Floccular biofilms were enriched with pathogenic secretion systems suggesting a highly competitive microbial community. Comparatively, granular biofilms revealed a high-stress environment with evidence of nutrient starvation, phage predation pressure, and increased extracellular polymeric substance and cell lysis. Granular biofilms were enriched in outer membrane transport proteins to scavenge the extracellular milieu for amino acids and other metabolites, likely released through cell lysis, to supplement metabolic pathways. This study provides the first detailed proteomic comparison between Accumulibacter-enriched floccular and granular biofilm communities, proposes a conceptual model for the granule biofilm, and offers novel insights into granule biofilm formation and stability. PMID:26279094

  20. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Carrolo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population.

  1. Biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating Halomonas venusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Mercedes; Domènech, Òscar; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    Biofilm development is characterized by distinct stages of initial attachment, microcolony formation and maturation (sessile cells), and final detachment (dispersal of new, planktonic cells). In this work we examined the influence of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation on bacterial surface properties and biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of an environmental strain isolated from microbial mats, Halomonas venusta MAT28. This strain was cultured either in an artificial biofilm in which the cells were immobilized on alginate beads (sessile) or as free-swimming (planktonic) cells. For the two modes of growth, conditions allowing or preventing PHA accumulation were established. Cells detached from alginate beads and their planktonic counterparts were used to study cell surface properties and cellular adhesion on polystyrene. Detached cells showed a slightly higher affinity than planktonic cells for chloroform (Lewis-acid) and a greater hydrophobicity (affinity for hexadecane and hexane). Those surface characteristics of the detached cells may explain their better adhesion on polystyrene compared to planktonic cells. Adhesion to polystyrene was not significantly different between H. venusta cells that had accumulated PHA vs. those that did not. These observations suggest that the surface properties of detached cells clearly differ from those of planktonic cells and that for at least the first 48 h after detachment from alginate beads H. venusta retained the capacity of sessile cells to adhere to polystyrene and to form a biofilm. PMID:26421734

  2. Proteobacteria, extremophiles and unassigned species dominate in a tape-like showerhead biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Charnock

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of showerhead biofilms exposes the user to repeated contact with potentially pathogenic microbes, yet we know relatively little about the content of these aggregates. The aim of the present study was to examine the microbial content of tape-like films found protruding from a domestic showerhead. Culturing showed that the films were dominated by aerobic α- and β-proteobacteria. Three isolates made up almost the entire plate count. These were a Brevundimonas species, a metalophilic Cupriavidus species and a thermophile, Geobacillus species. Furthermore, it was shown that the Cupriavidus isolate alone had a high capacity for biofilm formation and thus might be the initiator of biofilm production. A clone library revealed the same general composition. However, half of the 70 clones analyzed could not be assigned to a particular bacterial phylum and of these 29 differed from one another by only 1–2 base pairs, indicating a single species. Thus both the culture dependent and culture independent characterizations suggest a simple yet novel composition. The work is important as the biofilm is fundamentally different in form (tape-like and content from that of all previously reported ones, where variously Mycobacterium, Methylobacterium and Xanthomonas species have dominated, and extremophiles were not reported.

  3. Multi-depth valved microfluidics for biofilm segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. T.; Subramanian, S.; Kim, Y. W.; Ben-Yoav, H.; Gnerlich, M.; Gerasopoulos, K.; Bentley, W. E.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms present a societal challenge, as they occur in the majority of infections but are highly resistant to both immune mechanisms and traditional antibiotics. In the pursuit of better understanding biofilm biology for developing new treatments, there is a need for streamlined, controlled platforms for biofilm growth and evaluation. We leverage advantages of microfluidics to develop a system in which biofilms are formed and sectioned, allowing parallel assays on multiple sections of one biofilm. A microfluidic testbed with multiple depth profiles was developed to accommodate biofilm growth and sectioning by hydraulically actuated valves. In realization of the platform, a novel fabrication technique was developed for creating multi-depth microfluidic molds using sequentially patterned photoresist separated and passivated by conformal coatings using atomic layer deposition. Biofilm thickness variation within three separately tested devices was less than 13% of the average thickness in each device, while variation between devices was 23% of the average thickness. In a demonstration of parallel experiments performed on one biofilm within one device, integrated valves were used to trisect the uniform biofilms with one section maintained as a control, and two sections exposed to different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The technology presented here for multi-depth microchannel fabrication can be used to create a host of microfluidic devices with diverse architectures. While this work focuses on one application of such a device in biofilm sectioning for parallel experimentation, the tailored architectures enabled by the fabrication technology can be used to create devices that provide new biological information.

  4. Activity of ciprofloxacin and azithromycin on biofilms produced in vitro by Haemophilus influenzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong; WANG Ying; LIU You-ning

    2009-01-01

    Background It is recognized that Haemophilus influenzae isolated from patients with otitis media forms biofilms both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that biofilm formation in vivo might play an important role in the pathogenesis and chronicity of otitis media, but the effect of antibiotics on biofilm has not been well studied. We investigated the impact of ciprofloxacin and azithromycin on bacterial biofilms formed by Haemophilus influenzae in vitro in this study.Methods Eleven strains of Haemophilus influenzae were isolated from sputum specimens collected from patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Formation of bacterial biofilm was examined by crystal violet assay and a scanning electron microscope. Alterations of biofilms were measured under varying concentrations of azithromycin and ciprofloxacin.Results Striking differences were observed among strains with regard to the ability to form biofilm. Typical membrane-like structure formed by bacterial cells and extracellular matrix was detected. Initial biofilm synthesis was inhibited by azithromycin and ciprofloxacin at concentrations higher than two-fold minimal inhibitory concentration.Disruption of mature biofilms could be achieved at relatively higher concentration, and ciprofloxacin displayed more powerful activity.Conclusions Haemophilus influenzae is capable of forming biofilm in vitro. Sufficient dosage might control early formation of biofilms. Ciprofloxacin exerts better effects on breakdown of biofilm than azithromycin at conventional concentration in clinics.

  5. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  6. Extracellular DNA is essential for maintaining Bordetella biofilm integrity on abiotic surfaces and in the upper respiratory tract of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S Conover

    Full Text Available Bacteria form complex and highly elaborate surface adherent communities known as biofilms which are held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. We have previously shown that by adopting a biofilm mode of existence in vivo, the gram negative bacterial pathogens Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis are able to efficiently colonize and persist in the mammalian respiratory tract. In general, the bacterial biofilm matrix includes polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA. In this report, we investigated the function of DNA in Bordetella biofilm development. We show that DNA is a significant component of Bordetella biofilm matrix. Addition of DNase I at the initiation of biofilm growth inhibited biofilm formation. Treatment of pre-established mature biofilms formed under both static and flow conditions with DNase I led to a disruption of the biofilm biomass. We next investigated whether eDNA played a role in biofilms formed in the mouse respiratory tract. DNase I treatment of nasal biofilms caused considerable dissolution of the biofilm biomass. In conclusion, these results suggest that eDNA is a crucial structural matrix component of both in vitro and in vivo formed Bordetella biofilms. This is the first evidence for the ability of DNase I to disrupt bacterial biofilms formed on host organs.

  7. Novel strategies against Candida biofilms: interest of synthetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardot, Marion; Imbert, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A biofilm is a consortium of microbial cells that are attached to a substratum or an interface. It should be considered a reservoir that may induce serious infections. Indeed, Candidaspp. biofilms may be involved in the persistence or worsening of some chronic inflammatory diseases as well as in systemic infections, which may lead to high morbidity and mortality rates. New strategies are currently being explored, utilizing several synthetic compounds to prevent or fight these Candida biofilms. This article focuses on active synthetic compounds classified with regards to their modes of action: inhibition of early adherence phase, inhibition or control of biofilm maturation and finally elimination of already formed biofilms. Some of them show promise in fighting biofilm. PMID:26673571

  8. Morphological responses of Legionella pneumophila biofilm to nanoparticle exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojak, Amber R; Raftery, Tara; Klaine, Stephen J; McNealy, Tamara L

    2011-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms in natural and anthropogenic habitats. This feature not only facilitates colonization but also limits the effectiveness of biocides. L. pneumophila was exposed to three sizes of citrate-capped gold nanospheres in both planktonic and biofilm stages. TEM micrographs indicated that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) adsorbed to the bacterial cell surface, were absorbed into the cells, aggregated within the cells, and integrated into the extrapolymeric matrix of the biofilm. Both 4 and 18 nm, but not 50 nm AuNPs caused an alteration of biofilm morphology. Treatment with 20 nm polystyrene spheres did not induce these changes suggesting that the response was a result of the gold and not just the presence of the nanosphere. The morphological changes observed in the biofilm suggest that aquatic ecosystems may be affected by nanoparticle exposure. This may compromise ecosystem functions such as nutrient cycling facilitated by natural biofilms. PMID:21294606

  9. [Structural components and peculiarities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, O B; Avdieieva, L V

    2010-01-01

    Peculiarities of the structural organization of bacterial biofilm during its formation and disintegration have been investigated on the model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCM B-900 (ATCC 9027). It was shown, that development of the biofilm in a stationary system on glass was a two-vector process with changes in time and space. P. aeruginosa UCM B-900 biofilm is formed from single cells, passes through the stages of base components, net structure, islands and comes to the end with integration into a complete monolayer. The biofilm degradation repeats the stages of its formation in the reverse sequence. PMID:20812507

  10. Bacterial metabolism in biofilm consortia: Consequences for potential ennoblement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekaran, P.; Dexter, S.C. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States). Graduate College of Marine Studies

    1994-12-31

    Platinum metal coupons were used in studying the mechanism of ennoblement in the presence of mature seawater biofilms. Presence of a bacterial consortia, rather than any single organism is determined to be necessary for ennoblement. Millimolar concentrations of iron and manganese were measured in biofilms formed over platinum. EDAX and ICP techniques were used for measuring the chemistry of particles in a biofilm. Utilization of various electron acceptors like oxygen, iron, manganese, etc. are thought to be important for ennoblement to take place over platinum. Heavy metal accumulation is hypothesized to favor the low pH mechanism of ennoblement due to heavy metal hydrolysis. Monoculture biofilms cannot support ennoblement on platinum.

  11. Electro-active bio-films: formation, characterization and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some bacteria, which are able to exchange electrons with a conductive material without mediator form on conductive surfaces electro-active bio-films. This bacterial property has been recently discovered (2001). Objectives of this work are to develop electro-active bio-films in various natural environments from indigenous flora, then through complementary electrochemical techniques (chrono-amperometry and cyclic voltammetry), to evaluate electro-activity of isolates coming from so-formed bio-films and to characterize mechanisms of electron transfer between bacteria and materials. First, electro-active bio-films have been developed under chrono-amperometry in garden compost and in water coming from Guyana mangrove. These bio-films were respectively able to use an electrode as electron acceptor (oxidation) or as electron donor (reduction). In compost, results obtained in chrono-amperometry and cyclic voltammetry suggest a two-step electron transfer: slow substrate consumption, then rapid electron transfer between bacteria and the electrode. Thereafter, the ability to reduce oxygen was demonstrated with cyclic voltammetry for facultative aerobic isolates from compost bio-films (Enterobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp.) and for aerobic isolates obtained from marine electro-active bio-films (Roseobacter spp. in majority). Finally, bio-films inducing current increase in chrono-amperometry were developed in bioreactor with synthetic medium from a pure culture of isolates. Hence, for the first time, electro-activity of several anaerobic strains of Geobacter bremensis isolated from compost bio-films was highlighted. (author)

  12. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica biofilm formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukahil, Ismail; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-30

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the primary bacterial agent in the bovine respiratory disease complex. It is thought that M. haemolytica colonizes the tonsillar crypts of cattle as a commensal and subsequently descends into the lungs to cause disease. Many bacterial species persist in the host as biofilms. There is limited information about the ability of M. haemolytica to form biofilms. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro model for M. haemolytica biofilm formation. We found that M. haemolytica required at least 36 h to form robust biofilms on plastic in vitro when incubated in RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium at 37 °C, with maximal biofilm formation being evident at 48 h. Biofilm formation was inhibited by adding the monosaccharides d(+) galactose and d(+) mannose to the growth medium. Addition of antibodies to the M. haemolytica surface protein OmpA also reduced biofilm formation. Upon evaluating the macromolecules within the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance we found it contained 9.7 μg/cm(2) of protein, 0.81 μg/cm(2) of total carbohydrate, and 0.47 μg/cm(2) of extracellular DNA. Furthermore, proteinase K treatment significantly decreased biofilms (Pbovine upper respiratory tract. PMID:25480166

  13. Transmission Electron Microscopic Study of Antibiotic Action on Klebsiella pneumoniae Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Zahller, Jeff; Philip S. Stewart

    2002-01-01

    The penetration of ampicillin and ciprofloxacin through biofilms formed by Klebsiella pneumoniae was confirmed by transmission electron microscopic observation of antibiotic-affected cells at the distal edge of the biofilm. Because the bacteria nevertheless survived antibiotic treatment, some protective mechanism other than inadequate penetration must have been at work in the biofilm.

  14. csrA Inhibits the Formation of Biofilms by Vibrio vulnificus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Melissa K.; Warner, Elizabeth B.; Oliver, James D.

    2008-01-01

    PCR screening of the shellfish-borne pathogen Vibrio vulnificus revealed csrA-negative strains, and these strains formed increased biofilm compared to csrA-positive strains. Complementation in trans with csrA resulted in reduced biofilm formation, similar to that by csrA+ strains. Our results provide evidence that csrA inhibits biofilm formation in V. vulnificus.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilm tolerance towards systemic antifungals depends on growth phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Regenberg, Birgitte; Folkesson, Sven Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background : Biofilm-forming Candida species cause infections that can be difficult to eradicate, possibly because of antifungal drug tolerance mechanisms specific to biofilms. In spite of decades of research, the connection between biofilm and drug tolerance is not fully understood. Results : We...

  16. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, David R; Helena M. R. T. Parracho; James Walker; Richard Sharp; Gavin Hughes; Maria Werthén; Susan Lehman; Sandra Morales

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this commo...

  17. Biofilms bacterianos e infección Bacterial biofilms and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lasa

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available En los países desarrollados tendemos a pensar que las principales causas de mortalidad son las enfermedades cardiovasculares y el cáncer en sus múltiples modalidades. Sin embargo, los datos en Europa resultan elocuentes; las enfermedades infecciosas representan la segunda causa de mortalidad (14,9 millones de muertes, después de las enfermedades cardiovasculares (16,9 millones de muertes y causan el doble de muertes que el cáncer (7,1 millones de muertes (datos del World Health Organization, WHO, 2002. Los agentes infecciosos responsables de mortalidad en el hombre han ido evolucionando a medida que las medidas higiénicas y las técnicas médicas han ido evolucionando. Actualmente, las enfermedades infecciosas agudas causadas por bacterias patógenas especializadas como la difteria, tétanos, peste, cólera o la tosferina, que representaban la principal causa de muerte a principios del siglo XX, han sido controladas gracias a la acción de los antibióticos y de las vacunas. En su lugar, más de la mitad de las infecciones que afectan a pacientes ligeramente inmunocomprometidos son producidas por bacterias ubicuas, capaces de producir infecciones de tipo crónico, que responden pobremente a los tratamientos antibióticos y no pueden prevenirse mediante inmunización. Ejemplos de estas infecciones son la otitis media, endocarditis de válvulas nativas, infecciones urinarias crónicas, infecciones de próstata, osteomielitis y todas las infecciones relacionadas con implantes. El análisis directo de los implantes y tejidos de estas infecciones muestra claramente que en la mayoría de los casos la bacteria responsable de la infección crece adherida sobre el tejido o el implante formando comunidades de bacterias a las que se les ha denominado "biofilms". Dentro del biofilm, las bacterias están protegidas de la acción de los anticuerpos, del ataque de las células fagocíticas y de los tratamientos antimicrobianos. En este artículo se

  18. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P;

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  19. Biofilms and their effect on local chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouling and corrosion are frequently mediated by microorganisms attached to the metal surface and/or embedded in a gelatinous organic matrix termed a biofilm. Biofilms substantially change the local chemistry of the adjacent metal and, thereby, influence corrosion processes. The extent of changes in local chemistry is influenced by the microenvironmental conditions at the metal surface including the number and types of microorganisms present, the dissolved oxygen concentration, the flow velocity, the buffering capacity of the bulk water, and many other factors. Since microbial-influenced corrosion is generally localized, the spatial distribution or patchiness of the microbial activity also affects the corrosion processes. A unified approach to understanding and controlling biofilms and the related corrosion is presented in the context of a case study recently conducted by CCE, Inc. at a nuclear power plant site

  20. Host Responses to Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, C; Fleming, D; Bishop, D; Rumbaugh, K P

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death the human host immune system interacts with bacterial cells. Biofilms are communities of microbes embedded in matrices composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and have been implicated in both the healthy microbiome and disease states. The immune system recognizes many different bacterial patterns, molecules, and antigens, but these components can be camouflaged in the biofilm mode of growth. Instead, immune cells come into contact with components of the EPS matrix, a diverse, hydrated mixture of extracellular DNA (bacterial and host), proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. As bacterial cells transition from planktonic to biofilm-associated they produce small molecules, which can increase inflammation, induce cell death, and even cause necrosis. To survive, invading bacteria must overcome the epithelial barrier, host microbiome, complement, and a variety of leukocytes. If bacteria can evade these initial cell populations they have an increased chance at surviving and causing ongoing disease in the host. Planktonic cells are readily cleared, but biofilms reduce the effectiveness of both polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, in the presence of these cells, biofilm formation is actively enhanced, and components of host immune cells are assimilated into the EPS matrix. While pathogenic biofilms contribute to states of chronic inflammation, probiotic Lactobacillus biofilms cause a negligible immune response and, in states of inflammation, exhibit robust antiinflammatory properties. These probiotic biofilms colonize and protect the gut and vagina, and have been implicated in improved healing of damaged skin. Overall, biofilms stimulate a unique immune response that we are only beginning to understand. PMID:27571696

  1. Degradation of Phenolic Compounds in Coal Gasification Wastewater by Biofilm Reactor with Isolated Klebsiella sp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang; HongJun Han; ChunYan Xu; Qian Zhao; LingHan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the degradation of phenolic compounds by one strain isolated from coal gasification wastewater ( CGW ) . 16S rRNA gene sequences homology and phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate is belonged to the genus Klebsiella sp. The effect of different phenolic compounds on the isolate was investigated by determining OD600 and phenoloxidase activity, of which the results showed that the isolate can utilize phenol, 4-methyl phenol, 3, 5-dimethyl phenol and resorcinol as carbon resources. The biofilm reactor ( formed by the isolate) can resist the influent concentration of phenolic compounds as high as 750 mg/L when fed with synthetic CGW and incubated at optimum conditions. The capacity of improving the biodegradability of CGW through degrading phenolic compounds was testified with fed the biofilm reactor with real CGW. Thus, it might be an effective strain for bioaugmentation of CGW treatment.

  2. Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms subjected to phage phiIBB-PF7A

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer Peter; Sillankorva Sanna; Azeredo Joana

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens is an important food spoilage organism, usually found in the form of biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are inherently resistant to a variety of antimicrobial agents, therefore alternative methods to biofilm control, such as bacteriophages (phages) have been suggested. Phage behavior on biofilms is still poorly investigated and needs further understanding. Here we describe the application of phage ϕIBB-PF7, a newly isolated phage, to control P. fluorescen...

  3. Biofilm Localization in the Vertical Wall of Shaking 96-Well Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Luciana C.; Moreira, Joana M. R.; Manuel Simões; Luís F. Melo; Filipe J. Mergulhão

    2014-01-01

    Microtiter plates with 96 wells are being increasingly used for biofilm studies due to their high throughput, low cost, easy handling, and easy application of several analytical methods to evaluate different biofilm parameters. These methods provide bulk information about the biofilm formed in each well but lack in detail, namely, regarding the spatial location of the biofilms. This location can be obtained by microscopy observation using optical and electron microscopes, but these techniques...

  4. The role of bacterial biofilm in persistent infections and control strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Li; Wen, Yu-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms can be viewed as a specific type of persistent bacterial infection. After initial invasion, microbes can attach to living and non-living surfaces, such as prosthetics and indwelling medical devices, and form a biofilm composed of extracellular polysaccharides, proteins, and other components. In hosts, biofilm formation may trigger drug resistance and inflammation, resulting in persistent infections. The clinical aspects of biofilm formation and leading strategies for biofil...

  5. A Communal Bacterial Adhesin Anchors Biofilm and Bystander Cells to Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Absalon, Cedric; Van Dellen, Katrina; Paula I. Watnick

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary The bacterial multilayer biofilm consists of matrix-enclosed cells attached to each other to form large aggregates. The base of these aggregates may be attached to a living or non-living surface. The biofilm matrix most often contains at least one exopolysaccharide component and may also contain protein and DNA. While much is known about the exopolysaccharide component of the Gram-negative biofilm matrix, little is known about the function of biofilm matrix proteins. We hypothe...

  6. Stress-Induced Production of Biofilm in the Hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    OpenAIRE

    Lapaglia, C.; Hartzell, P L

    1997-01-01

    Archaeoglobus fulgidus, an anaerobic marine hyperthermophile, forms a biofilm in response to environmental stresses. The biofilm is a heterogeneous, morphologically variable structure containing protein, polysaccharide, and metals. Production of the biofilm can be induced by nonphysiological extremes of pH and temperature, by high concentrations of metals, and by addition of antibiotics, xenobiotics, or oxygen. Cells within the biofilm show an increased tolerance to otherwise toxic environmen...

  7. Removing Biofilms from Microstructured Titanium Ex Vivo: A Novel Approach Using Atmospheric Plasma Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Rupf, Stefan; Idlibi, Ahmad Nour; Marrawi, Fuad Al; Hannig, Matthias; Schubert, Andreas; von Mueller, Lutz; Spitzer, Wolfgang; Holtmann, Henrik; Lehmann, Antje; Rueppell, Andre; Schindler, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The removal of biofilms from microstructured titanium used for dental implants is a still unresolved challenge. This experimental study investigated disinfection and removal of in situ formed biofilms from microstructured titanium using cold atmospheric plasma in combination with air/water spray. Titanium discs (roughness (Ra): 1.96 µm) were exposed to human oral cavities for 24 and 72 hours (n = 149 each) to produce biofilms. Biofilm thickness was determined using confocal laser scanning mic...

  8. Candida albicans Biofilms Do Not Trigger Reactive Oxygen Species and Evade Neutrophil Killing

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Zhihong; Thompson, Angela; Sobue, Takanori; Kashleva, Helena; Xu, Hongbin; Vasilakos, John; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are found within Candida albicans biofilms in vivo and could play a crucial role in clearing the pathogen from biofilms forming on catheters and mucosal surfaces. Our goal was to compare the antimicrobial activity of neutrophils against developing and mature C. albicans biofilms and identify biofilm-specific properties mediating resistance to immune cells. Antibiofilm activity was measured with the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide assay and a ...

  9. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis: new insights into regulatory strategies and assembly mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Lynne S; Hobley, Laura; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R

    2014-08-01

    Biofilm formation is a social behaviour that generates favourable conditions for sustained survival in the natural environment. For the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis the process involves the differentiation of cell fate within an isogenic population and the production of communal goods that form the biofilm matrix. Here we review recent progress in understanding the regulatory pathways that control biofilm formation and highlight developments in understanding the composition, function and structure of the biofilm matrix. PMID:24988880

  10. Identification of Genes Involved in Polysaccharide-Independent Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Boles, Blaise R.; Thoendel, Matthew; Roth, Aleeza J.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potent biofilm former on host tissue and medical implants, and biofilm growth is a critical virulence determinant for chronic infections. Recent studies suggest that many clinical isolates form polysaccharide-independent biofilms. However, a systematic screen for defective mutants has not been performed to identify factors important for biofilm formation in these strains. We created a library of 14,880 mariner transposon mutants in a S. aureus strain that generates ...

  11. A biofilm model for flowing systems in the food industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt-den Aantrekker, van E.D.; Vernooij, W.W.; Reij, M.W.; Zwietering, M.H.; Beumer, R.R.; Schothorst, van M.; Boom, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    When bacteria attach to the walls of pipelines, they can form biofilms, which can cause the recontamination of food products. In order to quantify such recontamination, a one-dimensional biofilm model was developed taking into account adsorption, desorption, and the growth of cells. The model consis

  12. Preparation of Candida albicans Biofilms for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Taff, Heather T.; Andes, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy is a form of microscopy that allows for imaging of distinct portions of an individual cell. For Candida albicans biofilms, it is often used to visualize the cell walls of fixed samples of yeast and hyphae. This protocol describes how to grow, harvest, and fix Candida albicans biofilms in preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Flow Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Many microbial cells have the ability to form sessile microbial communities defined as biofilms that have altered physiological and pathological properties compared to free living microorganisms. Biofilms in nature are often difficult to investigate and reside under poorly defined conditions(1). ...

  14. ROLE OF BIOFILMS IN BIOCONTROL OF BOTRYTIS CINEREA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microorganisms often inhabit the leaf surface in organized structures termed biofilms. Burkholderia sp., FP62 is a biocontrol agent of B. cinerea in geranium and forms extensive biofilms in the phyllosphere. Scanning electron micrographs demonstrate extensive phyllosphere colonization (60-70% of t...

  15. Histophilus somni biofilm formation in cardiopulmonary tissue of the bovine host following respiratory challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Indra; Shao, Jian Q.; Annadata, Satish; Apicella, Michael A.; Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Saunders, Geoffrey K.; Inzana, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms form in a variety of host sites following infection with many bacterial species. However, the study of biofilms in a host is hindered due to the lack of protocols for the proper experimental investigation of biofilms in vivo. Histophilus somni is an agent of respiratory and systemic...... diseases in bovines, and readily forms biofilms in vitro. In the present study the capability of H. somni to form biofilms in cardiopulmonary tissue following experimental respiratory infection in the bovine host was examined by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy...... filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), predicted to be involved in attachment. Thus, this investigation demonstrated that H. somni is capable of forming a biofilm in its natural host, that such a biofilm may be capable of harboring other bovine respiratory disease pathogens, and that the genes responsible for...

  16. Use of In-Biofilm Expression Technology To Identify Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development†

    OpenAIRE

    Finelli, Antonio; Gallant, Claude V.; Jarvi, Keith; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms form complex three-dimensional architecture and are tolerant of antibiotics and other antimicrobial compounds. In this work, an in vivo expression technology system, originally designed to study virulence-associated genes in complex mammalian environments, was used to identify genes up-regulated in P. aeruginosa grown to a mature (5-day) biofilm. Five unique cloned promoters unable to promote in vitro growth in the absence of purines after recovery from ...

  17. The influence of sulphate-reducing bacteria biofilm on the corrosion of stainless steel AISI 316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigates microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) of stainless steel AISI 316 by two sulphate-reducing bacteria, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and a local marine isolate. The biofilm and pit morphology that developed with time were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results were interpreted with an equivalent circuit to model the physicoelectric characteristics of the electrode/biofilm/solution interface. D. desulfuricans formed one biofilm layer on the metal surface, while the marine isolate formed two layers: a biofilm layer and a ferrous sulfide deposit layer. AFM images corroborated results from the EIS modeling which showed biofilm attachment and subsequent detachment over time

  18. Bearing capacity of compressed continuous and perforated thin-walled steel members of C-shaped cold-formed profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Nazmeeva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there is steady rising demand for thin-walled light-weight steel structures. But the shortage of relevant standards on their design and use taking into account Russian conditions leads to the current situation when thin-walled light-weight steel structures are used according to the recommended guidelines of thin-walled structures’ producers. The author performed numerical and experimental investigations on general stability and bearing capacity of members of different length which are made of C-shaped profile and C-shaped perforated profile. The main aim of the investigations was to receive a reliable engineering methodology of their calculation. The author developed the testing methodology and designed two test beds С-12 (1200mm/20t and В-50 (2200mm/50t to perform the experimental investigation. Numerical solution for stability of thin-walled member made of C-shaped profile was received during the numerical simulation done in PLM Femap 10.1 Nastran. Subsequently the processing of research results will be continued in order to get the corresponding dependences for development of method for calculating thin-walled members under compression.

  19. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  20. Evaluation of leguminous lectins activities against bacterial biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro, Victor Alves; Cavalcante, Theodora Thays Arruda; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Oliveira, Rosário; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are composed by microbial cells that are irreversibly associated with a surface and enclosed in a matrix of polymeric material. Lectins are sugar binding proteins of non immune origin that agglutinate cells and ⁄ or precipitate glycoconjugate molecules. Due to their capacity to bind and recognize specific carbohydrates, lectins can be a potent tool in biofilm studies. The search for potential phytochemicals as anti-biofilm agents has become an active area of research, and these protei...

  1. Functional Relationship between Sucrose and a Cariogenic Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian-Na; Jung, Ji-Eun; Dang, Minh-Huy; Kim, Mi-Ah; Yi, Ho-Keun; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose is an important dietary factor in cariogenic biofilm formation and subsequent initiation of dental caries. This study investigated the functional relationships between sucrose concentration and Streptococcus mutans adherence and biofilm formation. Changes in morphological characteristics of the biofilms with increasing sucrose concentration were also evaluated. S. mutans biofilms were formed on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs in culture medium containing 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, or 40% (w/v) sucrose. The adherence (in 4-hour biofilms) and biofilm composition (in 46-hour biofilms) of the biofilms were analyzed using microbiological, biochemical, laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic methods. To determine the relationships, 2nd order polynomial curve fitting was performed. In this study, the influence of sucrose on bacterial adhesion, biofilm composition (dry weight, bacterial counts, and water-insoluble extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) content), and acidogenicity followed a 2nd order polynomial curve with concentration dependence, and the maximum effective concentrations (MECs) of sucrose ranged from 0.45 to 2.4%. The bacterial and EPS bio-volume and thickness in the biofilms also gradually increased and then decreased as sucrose concentration increased. Furthermore, the size and shape of the micro-colonies of the biofilms depended on the sucrose concentration. Around the MECs, the micro-colonies were bigger and more homogeneous than those at 0 and 40%, and were surrounded by enough EPSs to support their structure. These results suggest that the relationship between sucrose concentration and cariogenic biofilm formation in the oral cavity could be described by a functional relationship. PMID:27275603

  2. Development of a high-throughput Candida albicans biofilm chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Srinivasan

    Full Text Available We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed "nano-biofilms". The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of biofilm formation was determined using a microarray scanner from changes in fluorescence intensities due to FUN 1 metabolic processing. This staining technique was also adapted for antifungal susceptibility testing, which demonstrated that, similar to regular biofilms, cells within the on-chip biofilms displayed elevated levels of resistance against antifungal agents (fluconazole and amphotericin B. Thus, results from structural analyses and antifungal susceptibility testing indicated that despite miniaturization, these biofilms display the typical phenotypic properties associated with the biofilm mode of growth. In its final format, the C. albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip is composed of 768 equivalent and spatially distinct nano-biofilms on a single slide; multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Compared to current methods for the formation of microbial biofilms, namely the 96-well microtiter plate model, this fungal biofilm chip has advantages in terms of miniaturization and automation, which combine to cut reagent use and analysis time, minimize labor intensive steps, and dramatically reduce assay costs. Such a chip should accelerate the antifungal drug discovery process by enabling rapid, convenient and inexpensive screening of hundreds-to-thousands of compounds simultaneously.

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashuan eChao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over 1 million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease is not yet clear. Pneumococci in biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and this phenotype can be recapitulated when pneumococci are grown on respiratory epithelial cells under conditions found in the nasopharyngeal environment. Pneumococcal biofilms display lower levels of virulence in vivo and provide an optimal environment for increased genetic exchange both in vitro and in vivo, with increased natural transformation seen during co-colonization with multiple strains. Biofilms have also been detected on mucosal surfaces during pneumonia and middle ear infection, although the role of these biofilms in the disease process is debated. Recent studies have shown that changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by concomitant virus infection, changes in the microflora, inflammation, or other host assaults trigger active release of pneumococci from biofilms. These dispersed bacteria have distinct phenotypic properties and transcriptional profiles different from both biofilm and broth-grown, planktonic bacteria, resulting in a significantly increased virulence in vivo.In this review we discuss the properties of pneumococcal biofilms, the role of biofilm formation during pneumococcal colonization, including their propensity for increased ability to exchange genetic material, as well as mechanisms involved in transition from asymptomatic biofilm colonization to dissemination and disease of otherwise sterile sites. Greater understanding of

  4. A trait-based approach to bacterial biofilms in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Jay T; Lehmkuhl, Brent K

    2016-09-01

    A trait-based approach focuses on attributes of taxa that influence the structure and function of communities. Biofilm production is a common trait among microorganisms in a wide range of environmental, engineered, and host-associated ecosystems. Here, we used Pseudomonas aeruginosa to link biofilm production to moisture availability, a common stressor for microorganisms in soil. First, we demonstrate that biofilm production is a response trait that influences the desiccation phenotype by increasing survivorship, shifting the niche space, and reducing the minimum water potential needed to sustain a net-positive growth rate (Ψ*). Although the allocation of resources to biofilms is thought to be costly, we found no evidence for a trade-off between fitness and biofilm production along a soil moisture gradient. Second, we demonstrated that biofilm production is an effect trait. Specifically, biofilm production increased water retention in soils that were exposed to a series of drying and rewetting cycles. Although this form of niche construction should affect species interactions, we found no evidence that the benefits of biofilm production were extended to another co-occurring soil bacterium. Together, our results support the view that biofilm production is an important trait that may contribute to the distribution, abundance, and functioning of microorganisms in soils. PMID:27104876

  5. Light therapy: complementary antibacterial treatment of oral biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, O

    2012-09-01

    Conventional antibacterial treatment fails to eradicate biofilms associated with common infections of the oral cavity. Unlike chemical agents, which are less effective than anticipated, owing to diffusion limitations in biofilms, light is more effective on bacteria in biofilm than in suspension. Effectiveness depends also on the type and parameters of the light. We tested the phototoxic effects of non-coherent blue light (wavelengths, 400-500 nm) and CO(2) laser (wavelength, 10.6 μm), which have different mechanisms of action on the oral bacterium Streptoccocus mutans, in biofilm and on tooth enamel. Exposure of S. mutans in biofilm to blue light had a delayed effect on bacterial viability throughout the biofilm and a sustained antibacterial effect on biofilm newly formed by previously irradiated bacteria. A synergistic antibacterial effect between blue light and H(2)O(2) may enhance the phototoxic effect, which involves a photochemical mechanism mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. The effect of CO(2) laser irradiation on the viability of S. mutans in biofilm on enamel samples appeared to be higher in the deep layers, due to heating of the enamel surface by the absorbed energy. Biofilms do not interfere with the chemical changes resulting from irradiation, which may increase the enamel's resistance to acid attack. PMID:22899690

  6. Effect of different N fertilizer forms on antioxidant capacity and grain yield of rice growing under Cd stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium contamination in soil has become a serious issue in sustainable agriculture production and food safety. A pot experiment was conducted to study the influence of four N fertilizer forms on grain yield, Cd concentration in plant tissues and oxidative stress under two Cd levels (0 and 100 mg Cd kg-1 soil). The results showed that both N form and Cd stress affected grain yield, with urea-N and NH4+-N treatments having significantly higher grain yields, and Cd addition reducing yield. NO3--N and NH4+-N treated plants had the highest and lowest Cd concentration in plant tissues, respectively. Urea-N and NH4+-N treatments had significantly higher N accumulation in plant tissues than other two N treatments. Cd addition caused a significant increase in leaf superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities for all N treatments, except for NO3--N treatment, with urea-N and NH4+-N treated plants having more increase than organic-N treated ones. The results indicated that growth inhibition, yield reduction and Cd uptake of rice plants in response to Cd addition varied with the N fertilizer form

  7. Thiol reductive stress induces cellulose-anchored biofilm formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Mavi, Parminder Singh; Bhatt, Deepak; Kumar, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) forms biofilms harbouring antibiotic-tolerant bacilli in vitro, but the factors that induce biofilm formation and the nature of the extracellular material that holds the cells together are poorly understood. Here we show that intracellular thiol reductive stress (TRS) induces formation of Mtb biofilms in vitro, which harbour drug-tolerant but metabolically active bacteria with unchanged levels of ATP/ADP, NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH. The development of these biofilms requires DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Transcriptional analysis suggests that Mtb modulates only ∼7% of its genes for survival in biofilms. In addition to proteins, lipids and DNA, the extracellular material in these biofilms is primarily composed of polysaccharides, with cellulose being a key component. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying Mtb biofilm formation, although the clinical relevance of Mtb biofilms in human tuberculosis remains unclear. PMID:27109928

  8. Development and validation of a microfluidic reactor for biofilm monitoring via optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mariana T.; Roy, Varnika; Bentley, William E.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2011-05-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and verification of a microfluidic platform for optical monitoring of bacterial biofilms. Biofilm formation characterizes the majority of infections caused by bacteria that are developing increased resistance to traditional antibiotic treatment, necessitating the development of reliable tools not only for study of biofilm growth, but also for in situ examination of the response to applied stimuli. The presented platform was used to continuously and non-invasively observe the dependence of Escherichia coli biofilm formation on bacterial signaling by monitoring the change in biofilm optical density over the growth period. Results were corroborated by measurement of biofilm morphological properties via confocal microscopy, and statistical analysis was applied to verify the repeatability of observed optical and morphological differences in the biofilms formed. The presented platform will be used to characterize biofilm formation and response in drug discovery applications.

  9. Development and validation of a microfluidic reactor for biofilm monitoring via optical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design, fabrication, and verification of a microfluidic platform for optical monitoring of bacterial biofilms. Biofilm formation characterizes the majority of infections caused by bacteria that are developing increased resistance to traditional antibiotic treatment, necessitating the development of reliable tools not only for study of biofilm growth, but also for in situ examination of the response to applied stimuli. The presented platform was used to continuously and non-invasively observe the dependence of Escherichia coli biofilm formation on bacterial signaling by monitoring the change in biofilm optical density over the growth period. Results were corroborated by measurement of biofilm morphological properties via confocal microscopy, and statistical analysis was applied to verify the repeatability of observed optical and morphological differences in the biofilms formed. The presented platform will be used to characterize biofilm formation and response in drug discovery applications

  10. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Lambertsen, Lotte Munch; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    for P. aeruginosa initial attachment or biofilm formation, but the cell appendages had roles in biofilm development, as wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants formed biofilms with different structures. Dynamics and selection during biofilm formation were investigated by tagging the wild type and...... flagella/type IV mutants with Yfp and Cfp and performing time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy in mixed colour biofilms. The initial microcolony formation occurred by clonal growth, after which wild-type P. aeruginosa bacteria spread over the substratum by means of twitching motility. The wild......-type biofilms were dynamic compositions with extensive motility, competition and selection occurring during development. Bacterial migration prevented the formation of larger microcolonial structures in the wild-type biofilms. The results are discussed in relation to the current model for P. aeruginosa biofilm...

  11. The effect of selected plant extracts on the development of single-species dental biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the effect of a mixture of plant extracts on the adherence and retention of bacteria in dental biofilm. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study:Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from December 2009 to December 2011. Methodology: For determination of adhering ability, experimental pellicle was first treated with the Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) before inoculating it with individual bacterial species ( S. mitis / S. sanguinis / S. mutans). For the determination of retention ability, the procedure was repeated with the experimental pellicle being inoculated first with the individual bacterial species and then treating it with the PEM. These two experiments were repeated with deionized distilled water (negative control) and Thymol (0.64%) (positive control). The bacterial populations in biofilms for the two experiments were expressed as Colony Forming Unit (CFU) / mL x 10/sup 4/ and the corresponding values were expressed as mean +- SD. Results: The effect of the Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) for the two experiments was compared with that of Thymol and deionized distilled water. It was shown that there is a reduced adherence of bacteria to PEM-treated and Thymol (0.064%) treated experimental pellicle compared with the negative control (p < 0.001). It was also found that the retention of bacteria in both treated biofilms is also lower than that of negative control (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Plant Extracts Mixture (PEM) may influence the development of dental biofilm by affecting the adhering and retention capacities of the bacterial species in the dental biofilms. (author)

  12. Detection of Multiple Resistances, Biofilm Formation and Conjugative Transfer of Bacillus cereus from Contaminated Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Reshma; Krakat, Niclas

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect microbial resistances to a set of antibiotics/pesticides (multi-resistance) within pesticide and antibiotic-contaminated alluvial soils and to identify the corresponding antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). To assess whether identified multi-resistant isolates are able to construct biofilms, several biofilm formation and conjugation experiments were conducted. Out of 35 isolates, six strains were used for filter mating experiments. Nine strains were identified by 16S rDNA gene sequence analyses and those were closely related to Pseudomonas sp., Citrobacter sp., Acinetobacter sp., Enterobacter sp., and in addition, Bacillus cereus was chosen for multi-resistant and pesticide-tolerant studies. Antibiotic-resistant and pesticide-tolerant bacterial strains were tested for the presence of ARGs. All nine strains were containing multiple ARGs (ampC, ermB, ermD, ermG, mecA, tetM) in different combinations. Interestingly, only strain WR34 (strongly related to Bacillus cereus) exhibited a high biofilm forming capacity on glass beads. Results obtained by filter mating experiments demonstrated gene transfer frequencies from 10(-5) to 10(-8). This study provides evidence that alluvial soils are hot spots for the accumulation of antibiotics, pesticides and biofilm formation. Particularly high resistances to tetracycline, ampicillin, amoxicillin and methicillin were proved. Apparently, isolate WR34 strongly correlated to a pathogenic organism had high potential to deploy biofilms in alluvial soils. Thus, we assume that loosened and unconsolidated soils investigated pose a high risk of an enhanced ARG prevalence. PMID:26650381

  13. The Effect of Predators on Cholera Biofilms: If it Lyses, We Can Smash It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalziqi, Arben; Bernardy, Eryn; Thomas, Jacob; Ratcliff, Will; Hammer, Brian; Yunker, Peter

    Many microbes form biofilms--dense clumps of cells and proteins--on surfaces. Biofilms are complex communities that facilitate the study of biological competition (e.g., two types of microbes may compete to form a biofilm in the same location) and interesting physics (e.g., the source of a biofilm's rigidity). Vibrio cholerae can produce biofilms which have a network-like structure--however, cholera can be genetically engineered to kill other cholera with different genotypes, which leaves behind a structureless ``slime'' rather than such a biofilm. Through mechanical creep testing of both predator-prey and non-predator populations, we found that the predator-prey population responds viscously and decreases in height with repeated compression, whereas the non-predator population responds elastically and maintains its original height. The current work suggests that cell lysis after killing disrupts biofilm formation, preventing microbial colonies from forming rigid networks.

  14. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming of...... P. aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.25%. Oral administration of ginseng extracts in mice promoted phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by airway phagocytes, but did not affect phagocytosis of a PAO1-filM mutant. Our study suggests that ginseng treatment may help to eradicate the biofilm...

  15. Strategies for antimicrobial drug delivery to biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claire; Low, Wan Li; Gupta, Abhishek; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Radecka, Iza; Britland, Stephen T; Raj, Prem; Kenward, Ken M A

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are formed by the attachment of single or mixed microbial communities to a variety of biological and/or synthetic surfaces. Biofilm micro-organisms benefit from many advantages of the polymicrobial environment including increased resistance against antimicrobials and protection against the host organism's defence mechanisms. These benefits stem from a number of structural and physiological differences between planktonic and biofilm-resident microbes, but two main factors are the presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and quorum sensing communication. Once formed, biofilms begin to synthesise EPS, a complex viscous matrix composed of a variety of macromolecules including proteins, lipids and polysaccharides. In terms of drug delivery strategies, it is the EPS that presents the greatest barrier to diffusion for drug delivery systems and free antimicrobial agents alike. In addition to EPS synthesis, biofilm-based micro-organisms can also produce small, diffusible signalling molecules involved in cell density-dependent intercellular communication, or quorum sensing. Not only does quorum sensing allow microbes to detect critical cell density numbers, but it also permits co-ordinated behaviour within the biofilm, such as iron chelation and defensive antibiotic activities. Against this backdrop of microbial defence and cell density-specific communication, a variety of drug delivery systems have been developed to deliver antimicrobial agents and antibiotics to extracellular and/or intracellular targets, or more recently, to interfere with the specific mechanisms of quorum sensing. Successful delivery strategies have employed lipidic and polymeric-based formulations such as liposomes and cyclodextrins respectively, in addition to inorganic carriers e.g. metal nanoparticles. This review will examine a range of drug delivery systems and their application to biofilm delivery, as well as pharmaceutical formulations with innate antimicrobial properties

  16. Bioluminescence imaging of fungal biofilm development in live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Kucharíková, Soňa; Van Dijck, Patrick; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Fungal biofilms formed on various types of medical implants represent a major problem for hospitalized patients. These biofilms and related infections are usually difficult to treat because of their resistance to the classical antifungal drugs. Animal models are indispensable for investigating host-pathogen interactions and for identifying new antifungal targets related to biofilm development. A limited number of animal models is available that can be used for testing novel antifungal drugs in vivo against C. albicans, one of the most common pathogens causing fungal biofilms. Fungal load in biofilms in these models is traditionally analyzed postmortem, requiring host sacrifice and enumeration of microorganisms from individual biofilms in order to evaluate the amount of colony forming units and the efficacy of antifungal treatment. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) made compatible with small animal models for in vivo biofilm formation is a valuable noninvasive tool to follow-up biofilm development and its treatment longitudinally, reducing the number of animals needed for such studies. Due to the nondestructive and noninvasive nature of BLI, the imaging procedure can be repeated in the same animal, allowing follow-up of the biofilm growth in vivo without removing the implanted device or detaching the biofilm from its substrate. The method described here introduces BLI of C. albicans biofilm formation in vivo on subcutaneously implanted catheters in mice. One of the main challenges to overcome for BLI of fungi is the hampered intracellular substrate delivery through the fungal cell wall, which is managed by using extracellularly located Gaussia luciferase. Although detecting a quantifiable in vivo BLI signal from biofilms formed on the inside of implanted catheters is challenging, BLI proved to be a practical tool in the study of fungal biofilms. This method describing the use of BLI for in vivo follow-up of device-related fungal biofilm formation has the potential for

  17. Three-Dimensional Stratification of Bacterial Biofilm Populations in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for Nitritation-Anammox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Almstrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers.

  18. Cell-to-cell aggregation in S. epidermidis and its effect on quantification of total and viable bacteria within biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Ana Isabel Costa; França, Ângela; Vasconcelos, C; Vilanova, Manuel; Cerca, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms forming on the surface of indwelling medical devices by microorganisms such as Staphylococcus epidermidis, act as a source of acute infections. Since colonization of medical devices represents a serious problem in public healthcare-associated infections, bacteria forming biofilms have been an important issue often studied. Proper quantification of viable bacteria within S. epidermidis biofilms can however be challenging. Often, biofilm quantification of S. epidermidis is performed wi...

  19. Dinosaurian soft tissues interpreted as bacterial biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Kaye

    Full Text Available A scanning electron microscope survey was initiated to determine if the previously reported findings of "dinosaurian soft tissues" could be identified in situ within the bones. The results obtained allowed a reinterpretation of the formation and preservation of several types of these "tissues" and their content. Mineralized and non-mineralized coatings were found extensively in the porous trabecular bone of a variety of dinosaur and mammal species across time. They represent bacterial biofilms common throughout nature. Biofilms form endocasts and once dissolved out of the bone, mimic real blood vessels and osteocytes. Bridged trails observed in biofilms indicate that a previously viscous film was populated with swimming bacteria. Carbon dating of the film points to its relatively modern origin. A comparison of infrared spectra of modern biofilms with modern collagen and fossil bone coatings suggests that modern biofilms share a closer molecular make-up than modern collagen to the coatings from fossil bones. Blood cell size iron-oxygen spheres found in the vessels were identified as an oxidized form of formerly pyritic framboids. Our observations appeal to a more conservative explanation for the structures found preserved in fossil bone.

  20. Development and maturation of Escherichia coli K-12 biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Haagensen, J.A.J.; Schembri, Mark;

    2003-01-01

    The development and maturation of E. coli biofilms in flow-chambers was investigated. We found that the presence of transfer constitutive IncF plasmids induced biofilm development forming structures resembling those reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The development occurred in a step-wise pro......The development and maturation of E. coli biofilms in flow-chambers was investigated. We found that the presence of transfer constitutive IncF plasmids induced biofilm development forming structures resembling those reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The development occurred in a step....... We further provide evidence that flagella, type 1 fimbriae, curli and Ag43 are all dispensable for the observed biofilm maturation. In addition, our results indicate that cell-to-cell signalling mediated by autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is not required for differentiation of E. coli within a biofilm community....... We suggest on the basis of these results that E. coli K-12 biofilm development and maturation is dependent on cell-cell adhesion factors, which may act as inducers of self-assembly processes that result in differently structured biofilms depending on the adhesive properties on the cell surface....

  1. Biofilm formation by Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica and its removal by chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Periasamy; Nancharaiah, Y Venkata; Venugopalan, Vayalam P; Rao, T Subba; Jayachandran, Seetharaman

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of a recently described marine bacterium, SBT 033 GenBank Accession No. AY723742), Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica, at the seawater intake point, outfall and mixing point of an atomic power plant is described, and its ability to form biofilm was investigated. The effectiveness of the antifouling biocide chlorine in the inactivation of planktonic as well as biofilm cells of P. ruthenica was studied in the laboratory. The results show that the planktonic cells were more readily inactivated than the cells enclosed in a biofilm matrix. Viable counting showed that P. ruthenica cells in biofilms were up to 10 times more resistant to chlorine than those in liquid suspension. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy it was shown that significant detachment of P. ruthenica biofilm developed on a glass substratum could be accomplished by treatment with a dose of 1 mg l-1 chlorine. Chlorine-induced detachment led to a significant reduction in biofilm thickness (up to 69%) and substratum coverage (up to 61%), after 5-min contact time. The results show that P. ruthenica has a remarkable ability to form biofilms but chlorine, a common biocide, can be used to effectively kill and detach these biofilms. PMID:17178570

  2. Microbial biofilm study by synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennafirme, S.; Lima, I.; Bitencourt, J. A.; Crapez, M. A. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-11-01

    Microbial biofilm has already being used to remove metals and other pollutants from wastewater. In this sense, our proposal was to isolate and cultivate bacteria consortia from mangrove's sediment resistant to Zn (II) and Cu (II) at 50 mg L-1 and to observe, through synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (microXRF), whether the biofilm sequestered the metal. The biofilm area analyzed was 1 mm2 and a 2D map was generated (pixel size 20×20 μm2, counting time 5 s/point). The biofilm formation and retention followed the sequence Zn>Cu. Bacterial consortium zinc resistant formed dense biofilm and retained 63.83% of zinc, while the bacterial consortium copper resistant retained 3.21% of copper, with lower biofilm formation. Dehydrogenase activity of Zn resistant bacterial consortium was not negatively affect by 50 mg ml-1 zinc input, whereas copper resistant bacterial consortium showed a significant decrease on dehydrogenase activity (50 mg mL-1 of Cu input). In conclusion, biofilm may protect bacterial cells, acting as barrier against metal toxicity. The bacterial consortia Zn resistant, composed by Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp formed dense biofilm and sequestered metal from water, decreasing the metal bioavailability. These bacterial consortia can be used in bioreactors and in bioremediation programs.

  3. In situ environment rather than substrate type dictates microbial community structure of biofilms in a cold seep system

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O.O.

    2014-01-08

    Using microscopic and molecular techniques combined with computational analysis, this study examined the structure and composition of microbial communities in biofilms that formed on different artificial substrates in a brine pool and on a seep vent of a cold seep in the Red Sea to test our hypothesis that initiation of the biofilm formation and spreading mode of microbial structures differs between the cold seep and the other aquatic environments. Biofilms on different substrates at two deployment sites differed morphologically, with the vent biofilms having higher microbial abundance and better structural features than the pool biofilms. Microbes in the pool biofilms were more taxonomically diverse and mainly composed of various sulfate-reducing bacteria whereas the vent biofilms were exclusively dominated by sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira. These results suggest that the redox environments at the deployment sites might have exerted a strong selection on microbes in the biofilms at two sites whereas the types of substrates had limited effects on the biofilm development.

  4. Hierarchical population model with a carrying capacity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Indekeu, J O

    2002-01-01

    A time- and space-discrete model for the growth of a rapidly saturating local biological population $N(x,t)$ is derived from a hierarchical random deposition process previously studied in statistical physics. Two biologically relevant parameters, the probabilities of birth, $B$, and of death, $D$, determine the carrying capacity $K$. Due to the randomness the population depends strongly on position, $x$, and there is a distribution of carrying capacities, $\\Pi (K)$. This distribution has self-similar character owing to the imposed hierarchy. The most probable carrying capacity and its probability are studied as a function of $B$ and $D$. The effective growth rate decreases with time, roughly as in a Verhulst process. The model is possibly applicable, for example, to bacteria forming a "towering pillar" biofilm. The bacteria divide on randomly distributed nutrient-rich regions and are exposed to random local bactericidal agent (antibiotic spray). A gradual overall temperature change away from optimal growth co...

  5. Shaping the Growth Behaviour of Biofilms Initiated from Bacterial Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaugh, Gavin; Hutchison, Jaime; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Irie, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Aled; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Diggle, Stephen P; Gordon, Vernita D; Allen, Rosalind J

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are usually assumed to originate from individual cells deposited on a surface. However, many biofilm-forming bacteria tend to aggregate in the planktonic phase so that it is possible that many natural and infectious biofilms originate wholly or partially from pre-formed cell aggregates. Here, we use agent-based computer simulations to investigate the role of pre-formed aggregates in biofilm development. Focusing on the initial shape the aggregate forms on the surface, we find that the degree of spreading of an aggregate on a surface can play an important role in determining its eventual fate during biofilm development. Specifically, initially spread aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated bacterial cells is low, while initially rounded aggregates perform better when competition with surrounding unaggregated cells is high. These contrasting outcomes are governed by a trade-off between aggregate surface area and height. Our results provide new insight into biofilm formation and development, and reveal new factors that may be at play in the social evolution of biofilm communities. PMID:26934187

  6. The catabolite repression control protein Crc plays a role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Gao, Qingguo;

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria form complex surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. Biofilm cells differentiate into subpopulations which display tolerance towards antimicrobial agents. However, the signal transduction pathways regulating subpopulation differentiation in biofilms are largely unelucidated. In t....... In the present study, we show that the catabolite repression control protein Crc regulates the metabolic state of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in biofilms, and plays an important role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in P. aeruginosa biofilms....

  7. d-Amino Acids Indirectly Inhibit Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis by Interfering with Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Leiman, Sara A.; May, Janine M.; Lebar, Matthew D.; Kahne, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms on surfaces and at air-liquid interfaces. It was previously reported that these biofilms disassemble late in their life cycle and that conditioned medium from late-stage biofilms inhibits biofilm formation. Such medium contained a mixture of d-leucine, d-methionine, d-tryptophan, and d-tyrosine and was reported to inhibit biofilm formation via the incorporation of these d-amino acids into the cell wall. Here, we show that l-amino acids were ...

  8. [Effect of the biofilm biopolymers on the microbial corrosion rate of the low-carbon steel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borets'ka, M O; Kozlova, I P

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between exopolymer's specific production, relative carbohydrate and protein content in the biofilm exopolymers of the pure and mixed Thiobacillus thioparus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia cultures and their corrosion activity was studied. Change of growth model of investigated cultures from plankton to biofilm led to an increase of specific exopolymer's production. In the biofilm formed by T. thioparus and S. maltophilia biofilm on the low-carbon steel surface one could observe an increase of relative protein content in the exopolymer complex in comparison with those in the pure culture. The development of such biofilms stimulatied the 7-fold corrosion activity. PMID:17977451

  9. Nanoparticles for Control of Biofilms of Acinetobacter Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are the cause of 80% of microbial infections. Acinetobacter species have emerged as multi- and pan-drug-resistant bacteria and pose a great threat to human health. These act as nosocomial pathogens and form excellent biofilms, both on biotic and abiotic surfaces, leading to severe infections and diseases. Various methods have been developed for treatment and control of Acinetobacter biofilm including photodynamic therapy, radioimmunotherapy, prophylactic vaccines and antimicrobial peptides. Nanotechnology, in the present scenario, offers a promising alternative. Nanomaterials possess unique properties, and multiple bactericidal mechanisms render them more effective than conventional drugs. This review intends to provide an overview of Acinetobacter biofilm and the significant role of various nanoparticles as anti-biofouling agents, surface-coating materials and drug-delivery vehicles for biofilm control and treatment of Acinetobacter infections.

  10. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  11. Delving through electrogenic biofilms: from anodes to cathodes to microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Semenec

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of electromicrobiology has grown into its own field over the last decades and involves microbially driven redox reactions at electrodes as part of a microbial electrochemical system (MES. The microorganisms known to use electrodes as either electron acceptors; electricigens, or electron donors; electrotrophs, drive the redox reactions within these systems through extracellular electron transfer (EET processes. These exoelectrogenic microorganisms form biofilms, referred to as electroactive biofilms (EAB, in order to maximize adherence and contact with electrode surfaces and with one another. In this review, we will discuss the key differences between biofilms that utilize the electrode as an electron acceptor or donor, including their mechanisms for electron transfer, structural and functional compositions as well as which species are enriched for in each microenvironment. Lastly, we will discuss the intricacies of interspecies and intraspecies biofilm formation in electrode biofilms and considerations required for future bioengineering efforts.

  12. Numerical spatio-temporal characterization of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera-Fernández, M; Rodríguez-López, P; Cabo, M L; Balsa-Canto, E

    2014-07-16

    As the structure of biofilms plays a key role in their resistance and persistence, this work presents for the first time the numerical characterization of the temporal evolution of biofilm structures formed by three Listeria monocytogenes strains on two types of stainless-steel supports, AISI 304 SS No. 2B and AISI 316 SS No. 2R. Counting methods, motility tests, fluorescence microscopy and image analysis were combined to study the dynamic evolution of biofilm formation and structure. Image analysis was performed with several well-known parameters as well as a newly defined parameter to quantify spatio-temporal distribution. The results confirm the interstrain variability of L. monocytogenes species regarding biofilm structure and structure evolution. Two types of biofilm were observed: homogeneous or flat and heterogeneous or clustered. Differences in clusters and in attachment and detachment processes were due mainly to the topography and composition of the two surfaces although an effect due to motility was also found. PMID:24858448

  13. DNase inhibits Gardnerella vaginalis biofilms in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymes, Saul R; Randis, Tara M; Sun, Thomas Yang; Ratner, Adam J

    2013-05-15

    Bacterial vaginosis is a highly prevalent and poorly understood polymicrobial disorder of the vaginal microbiota, with significant adverse sequelae. Gardnerella vaginalis predominates in bacterial vaginosis. Biofilms of G. vaginalis are present in human infections and are implicated in persistent disease, treatment failure, and transmission. Here we demonstrate that G. vaginalis biofilms contain extracellular DNA, which is essential to their structural integrity. Enzymatic disruption of this DNA specifically inhibits biofilms, acting on both newly forming and established biofilms. DNase liberates bacteria from the biofilm to supernatant fractions and potentiates the activity of metronidazole, an antimicrobial agent used in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Using a new murine vaginal colonization model for G. vaginalis, we demonstrate >10-fold inhibition of G. vaginalis colonization by DNase. We conclude that DNase merits investigation as a potential nonantibiotic adjunct to existing bacterial vaginosis therapies in order to decrease the risk of chronic infection, recurrence, and associated morbidities. PMID:23431033

  14. Comparison of two methods for quantification of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghar Hendiani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: ‏ Medical devices are made from a variety of materials such as polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly styrene, glass and etc. by attaching to this surfaces, Acinetobacter baumannii can form biofilms and then cause several device associated infections. Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces. In this study, biofilm formation ability in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii was assessed by two methods on different surfaces. Materials and methods: ‏ Biofilm formation by 75 clinical isolates of A. baumannii was evaluated on polycarbonate surface (microtiter plate and polypropylene surface (falcon by crystal violet and 2,3-Bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide salt (XTT tetrazolium sodium salt assay methods. Falcon or tube method was carried out under static and agitation conditions. Results: ‏ Results showed the most isolates can form biofilm but higher numbers of isolates form biofilm on polypropylene surface under agitation. XTT method confirmed strong biofilm formation ability of 10 isolates. Discussion and conclusion: Each of the two assays showed an excellent applicability for the quantification of biofilms. The Crystal violet assay is cheap, easy and is usually used for the quantification of biofilms formed by microorganisms but XTT is more reliable and repeatable. Most of A. baumannii isolates have potential to form biofilm on the medical devices which may result in device-associated infections.

  15. Candida albicans in oral biofilms could prevent caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Hubertine Marjoleine; Kos, Kevin; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive bacterium involved in development to caries, the most common infectious disease of our time. Streptococcus mutans interacts with other microbes, like the fungus Candida albicans and both are commonly isolated from patients with caries. Since the role of C. albicans in caries remains unknown, our aim was to unravel this using an in vitro dual-species cariogenic oral biofilm model. Biofilms were grown for 24-72 h on glass cover slips or hydroxyapatite (HA) disks to mimic the surface of teeth. Medium pH, lactic acid production capacity and calcium release from HA disks were determined. All 24-h biofilms had external pH values below the critical pH of 5.5 where enamel dissolves. In contrast, 72-h dual-species biofilms had significantly higher pH (above the critical pH) and consequently decreased calcium release compared to single-species S. mutans biofilms. Counter intuitively, lactic acid production and growth of S. mutans were increased in 72-h dual-species biofilms. Candida albicans modulates the pH in dual-species biofilms to values above the critical pH where enamel dissolves. Our results suggest that C. albicans is not by definition a cariogenic microorganism; it could prevent caries by actively increasing pH preventing mineral loss. PMID:27129365

  16. Microbial Biofilm as a Smart Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Christian; Welch, Martin; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper;

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilm colonies will in many cases form a smart material capable of responding to external threats dependent on their size and internal state. The microbial community accordingly switches between passive, protective, or attack modes of action. In order to decide which strategy to employ......, it is essential for the biofilm community to be able to sense its own size. The sensor designed to perform this task is termed a quorum sensor, since it only permits collective behaviour once a sufficiently large assembly of microbes have been established. The generic quorum sensor construct involves...

  17. Effects of probiotics and antibiotics on biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep, B.; Pandey, P K; S. Ayyappan

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effects of probiotics and antibiotics on 3-months old biofilms formed on three different substrates, namely glass, granite and fiberglass reinforced plastic. The variations in heterotrophic bacterial populations associated with biofilms were monitored for a period of one month after one-time application of the probiotic Biogreen (Gee Key Marine Pvt. Ltd, Chennai) at 0.2 mg lˉ¹ and the antibiotic tetracycline at 1.0 mg lˉ¹. The variations in heterotrophi...

  18. Hydrophobicity of biofilm coatings influences the transport dynamics of polystyrene nanoparticles in biofilm-coated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzel, Michael R; Sand, Stefanie; Whalen, Joann K; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are used in the manufacture of over 2000 industrial and consumer products to enhance their material properties and functions or to enable new nanoparticle-dependent functions. The widespread use of ENPs will result in their release to the subsurface and aquatic environments, where they will interact with indigenous biota. Laboratory column experiments were designed to understand the influence of two different Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on the mobility of polystyrene latex nanoparticles in granular porous media representative of groundwater aquifers or riverbank filtration settings. The transport behavior of 20 nm carboxylate-modified (CLPs) and sulfate (SLPs) polystyrene latex ENPs suspended in NaCl or CaCl2 (1 and 10 mM ionic strength, pH 7) was studied in columns packed with quartz sand coated with biofilms formed by two P. aeruginosa strains that differed in cell surface hydrophobicity (P. aeruginosa 9027™, relatively hydrophilic and P. aeruginosa PAO1, relatively hydrophobic). Biofilm-coated quartz sand retained more of the electrostatically-stabilized latex ENPs than clean, uncoated sand, regardless of the serotype. As IS increased, clear differences in the shape of the ENP breakthrough curves were observed for each type of biofilm coating. ENP breakthrough in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm-coated sand was generally constant with time whereby breakthrough in the P. aeruginosa 9027 biofilm-coated sand showed dynamic behavior. This indicates a fundamental difference in the mechanisms of ENP deposition onto hydrophilic or hydrophobic biofilm coatings due to the hydration properties of these biofilms. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of considering the surface properties of aquifer grain coatings when evaluating ENP fate in natural subsurface environments. PMID:26845456

  19. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  20. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the...... benefits and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial...

  1. Purpurin Triggers Caspase-Independent Apoptosis in Candida dubliniensis Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Wai-Kei Tsang; Alan Pak-Kin Wong; Hai-Ping Yang; Ngai-For Li

    2013-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an important human fungal pathogen that causes oral infections in patients with AIDS and diabetes mellitus. However, C. Dubliniensis has been frequently reported in bloodstream infections in clinical settings. Like its phylogenetically related virulent species C. albicans, C. Dubliniensis is able to grow and switch between yeast form and filamentous form (hyphae) and develops biofilms on both abiotic and biotic surfaces. Biofilms are recalcitrant to antifungal therapie...

  2. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Ma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organism for the study of biofilms. The extracellular polymeric substance of P. aeruginosa biofilms is an ill-defined mix of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Here, we directly visualize the product of the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl exopolysaccharide at different stages of biofilm development. During attachment, Psl is anchored on the cell surface in a helical pattern. This promotes cell-cell interactions and assembly of a matrix, which holds bacteria in the biofilm and on the surface. Chemical dissociation of Psl from the bacterial surface disrupted the Psl matrix as well as the biofilm structure. During biofilm maturation, Psl accumulates on the periphery of 3-D-structured microcolonies, resulting in a Psl matrix-free cavity in the microcolony center. At the dispersion stage, swimming cells appear in this matrix cavity. Dead cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA are also concentrated in the Psl matrix-free area. Deletion of genes that control cell death and autolysis affects the formation of the matrix cavity and microcolony dispersion. These data provide a mechanism for how P. aeruginosa builds a matrix and subsequently a cavity to free a portion of cells for seeding dispersal. Direct visualization reveals that Psl is a key scaffolding matrix component and opens up avenues for therapeutics of biofilm-related complications.

  3. Impact of early colonizers on in vitro subgingival biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Ammann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early colonizing species on the structure and the composition of the bacterial community developing in a subgingival 10-species biofilm model system. The model included Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomycesoris, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Veillonella dispar, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Based on literature, we considered Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Actinomyces oris as early colonizers and examined their role in the biofilms by either a delayed addition to the consortium, or by not inoculating at all the biofilms with these species. We quantitatively evaluated the resulting biofilms by real-time quantitative PCR and further compared the structures using confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The absence of the early colonizers did not hinder biofilm formation. The biofilms reached the same total counts and developed to normal thickness. However, quantitative shifts in the abundances of individual species were observed. In the absence of streptococci, the overall biofilm structure appeared looser and more dispersed. Moreover, besides a significant increase of P. intermedia and a decrease of P. gingivalis , P. intermedia appeared to form filamented long chains that resembled streptococci. A. oris, although growing to significantly higher abundance in absence of streptococci, did not have a visible impact on the biofilms. Hence, in the absence of the early colonizers, there is a pronounced effect on P. intermedia and P. gingivalis that may cause distinct shifts in the structure of the biofilm. Streptococci possibly facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis into subgingival biofilms, while in their absence P. intermedia became more dominant and forms elongated chains.

  4. Biofilm Formation by Bacteria Isolated from Intravenous Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Hedayati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports on the association of nosocomial bacterial infections with indwelling medical devices such as intravenous catheters (IVC has increased in recent years. The potential to form biofilm on these devices seems to be the main reason for establishment of such infections. The aim of this study was to measure the potential of biofilm formation by bacterialisolates from IVCs.Methods: Seventy-one IVCs were collected from hospitalized patients in ICU, NICU, hematology and oncology wards at Taleghani Hospital from Jan 2010 to Jan 2011. The bacterial isolates were identified using the standard biochemical tests and the potential to form biofilms was determined by the microtiter plate assay method (MTP and colony morphology using Congo red agar plates (CRA.Results: Overall, 54 (71% IVCs were colonized and 76 bacteria were isolated among which, 64 (84.2% were coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS, 3 (3.9% S. aureus, 3 (3.9% Enterococcus spp., 2 (2.6% E. coli and 4 (5.3% were miscellaneous isolates not further identified. Among the CoNS, biofilm formation was observed in 68.7% and 82.8% of bacteriausing MTP and CRA methods, respectively. S. aureus and E. coli isolates also were biofilm producers but Enterococcus and other unknown isolates were biofilm negative.Conclusions: Our results confirm that the prevalent biofilm forming bacteria on IVCs were CoNS and that was the reason for high rates of nosocomial infections.

  5. Fimbriae have distinguishable roles in Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavone, Paola; Iribarnegaray, Victoria; Caetano, Ana Laura; Schlapp, Geraldine; Härtel, Steffen; Zunino, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is one of the most common etiological agents of complicated urinary tract infections, especially those associated with catheterization. This is related to the ability of P. mirabilis to form biofilms on different surfaces. This pathogen encodes 17 putative fimbrial operons, the highest number found in any sequenced bacterial species so far. The present study analyzed the role of four P. mirabilis fimbriae (MR/P, UCA, ATF and PMF) in biofilm formation using isogenic mutants. Experimental approaches included migration over catheter, swimming and swarming motility, the semiquantitative assay based on adhesion and crystal violet staining, and biofilm development by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Different assays were performed using LB or artificial urine. Results indicated that the different fimbriae contribute to the formation of a stable and functional biofilm. Fimbriae revealed particular associated roles. First, all the mutants showed a significantly reduced ability to migrate across urinary catheter sections but neither swimming nor swarming motility were affected. However, some mutants formed smaller biofilms compared with the wild type (MRP and ATF) while others formed significantly larger biofilms (UCA and PMF) showing different bioarchitecture features. It can be concluded that P. mirabilis fimbriae have distinguishable roles in the generation of biofilms, particularly in association with catheters. PMID:27091004

  6. Ambroxol influences voriconazole resistance of Candida parapsilosis biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcrano, Giovanna; Panellis, Dimitrios; De Domenico, Giovanni; Rossano, Fabio; Catania, Maria Rosaria

    2012-06-01

    The ability to form biofilm on different surfaces is typical of most Candida species. Microscopic structure and genetic aspects of fungal biofilms have been the object of many studies because of very high resistance to antimycotic agents because of the scarce permeability of the external matrix and to the alterations in cell metabolism. In our study, 31 isolates of Candida parapsilosis, isolated from bloodstream infections, were tested for their ability to produce biofilm and were found to be good producers. The susceptibility to voriconazole, assayed by colorimetrical XTT assay, revealed a very elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations for sessile cells in comparison with planktonic ones. The addition of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent, increased the susceptibility of biofilm forming cells to voriconazole. Expression of the efflux pump genes CDR and MDR was analyzed in biofilms alone or treated with ambroxol, evidencing a role of ambroxol in the expression of genes involved in azole resistance mechanisms of C. parapsilosis biofilms. In conclusion, our data seem to encourage the use of different substances in combination with classical antimycotics, with the aim of finding a solution to the increasing problem of the resistance of biofilms formed on medical devices by nonalbicans Candida species. PMID:22315984

  7. Interactions in multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Ren, Dawei; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    The recent focus on complex bacterial communities has led to the recognition of interactions across species boundaries. This is particularly pronounced in multispecies biofilms, where synergistic interactions impact the bacterial distribution and overall biomass produced. Importantly, in a number...... of settings, the interactions in a multispecies biofilm affect its overall function, physiology, or surroundings, by resulting in enhanced resistance, virulence, or degradation of pollutants, which is of significant importance to human health and activities. The underlying mechanisms causing these...

  8. 两种营养条件对尿路致病性大肠埃希菌生物膜形成的影响%Effects of two culture media on the growth of biofilm formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛新; 王辉; 张晓雷; 董小青

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究2种培养基对尿路致病性大肠埃希菌(UPEC)生物膜形成能力的影响.方法 将5株UPEC分别接种LB培养基或M63基础培养基,用结晶紫染色半定量法检测各菌株生物膜形成能力,分别用荧光显微镜和共聚焦显微镜观察绿色荧光蛋白标记的UPEC在2种培养基中的生物膜形成过程与厚度的差异.结果 5株UPEC在2种培养基中均为生物膜阳性菌株,早期生物膜的形成趋势基本一致,但同时期LB培养基中的生物膜菌量少于M63基础培养基中的生物膜菌量.共聚焦显微镜观察发现在M63基础培养基中各菌株生物膜最大平均厚度均大于LB培养基的相应数值(P<0.05).结论 培养基成分对UPEC生物膜的形成具有重要影响,M63基础培养基相对于LB培养基更适于培养UPEC生物膜.%Objective To compare the effects of two different levels of nutrition on the growth of biofilm formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Methods Five clinical strains of UPEC were cultured in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth or M63 minimal medium. The ability of biofilm formation was semiquantitatively measured by crystal violet stain. Green fluorescent protein-tagged strains were observed by a fluorescent microscope and a confocal microscope for the growth process and the levels of thickness of biofilm formed in the LB or M63. Results Five UPEC isolates were all biofilm positive strains. The early biofilm growth in LB was basically consistent with the growth in M63, but the bacterial population producing biofilm in LB was less than in M63 at the same time point. The confocal microscope observation showed that all strains formed thicker biofilm in M63 than in LB (P<0. 05). Conclusions The growth of UPEC biofilm was obviously affected by culture media. M63 minimal medium is more suitable for the formation of UPEC biofilm than LB.

  9. EFFECT OF ESSENTIAL OIL ON BIOFILM PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENT LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Comi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different essential oil (hexanal, 2-(E-hexenal, carvacrol, citron, red orange, thymol and limonene on biofilm production of some Lmonocytogenes strains are evaluated. The formation of biofilm on certain surfaces or on the food, seems to be related with cross-contamination during processing or with the contamination of the final product, with potential risk for the consumer. Many studies were done on the antimicrobial activity of essential oils and their components, but not too much is known about their capacity to influence and reduce the microbial production of biofilm. Our data showed that essential oils can inhibit or limit the biofilm production.

  10. Involvement of bacterial migration in the development of complex multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Mikkel; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the developmental process from single cells scattered on a surface to complex multicellular biofilm structures is essential in order to create strategies to control biofilm development. In order to study bacterial migration patterns during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm...... development, we have performed an investigation with time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms formed by various combinations of colour-coded P. aeruginosa wild type and motility mutants. We show that mushroom-shaped multicellular structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms can form in a sequential...... process involving a non-motile bacterial subpopulation and a migrating bacterial subpopulation. The non-motile bacteria form the mushroom stalks by growth in certain foci of the biofilm. The migrating bacteria form the mushroom caps by climbing the stalks and aggregating on the tops in a process which is...

  11. Biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, many researchers have written numerous articles about microbial biofilms. Biofilm is a complex community of microorganisms and an example of bacterial group behavior. Biofilm is usually considered a sessile mode of life derived from the attached growth of microbes to surfaces, and most biofilms are embedded in self-produced extracellular matrix composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), such as polysaccharides, extracellular DNAs (eDNA), and proteins. Dispersal, a mode of biofilm detachment indicates active mechanisms that cause individual cells to separate from the biofilm and return to planktonic life. Since biofilm cells are cemented and surrounded by EPSs, dispersal is not simple to do and many researchers are now paying more attention to this active detachment process. Unlike other modes of biofilm detachment such as erosion or sloughing, which are generally considered passive processes, dispersal occurs as a result of complex spatial differentiation and molecular events in biofilm cells in response to various environmental cues, and there are many biological reasons that force bacterial cells to disperse from the biofilms. In this review, we mainly focus on the spatial differentiation of biofilm that is a prerequisite for dispersal, as well as environmental cues and molecular events related to the biofilm dispersal. More specifically, we discuss the dispersal-related phenomena and mechanisms observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen and representative model organism for biofilm study. PMID:26832663

  12. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    OpenAIRE

    MarieArchambault

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than th...

  13. BslA is a self-assembling bacterial hydrophobin that coats the Bacillus subtilis biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Hobley, Laura; Ostrowski, Adam; Rao, Francesco V.; Bromley, Keith M.; Porter, Michael; Prescott, Alan R.; MacPhee, Cait E.; van Aalten, Daan M F; Nicola R. Stanley-Wall

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms represent the predominant mode of microbial growth in the natural environment. Bacillus subtilis is a ubiquitous Gram-positive soil bacterium that functions as an effective plant growth-promoting agent. The biofilm matrix is composed of an exopolysaccharide and an amyloid fiber-forming protein, TasA, and assembles with the aid of a small secreted protein, BslA. Here we show that natively synthesized and secreted BslA forms surface layers around the biofilm. Biophysical analysis demon...

  14. Early Staphylococcal Biofilm Formation on Solid Orthopaedic Implant Materials: In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Koseki, Hironobu; Yonekura, Akihiko; Shida, Takayuki; Yoda, Itaru; Horiuchi, Hidehiko; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Osaki, Makoto; Tomita, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms forming on the surface of biomaterials can cause intractable implant-related infections. Bacterial adherence and early biofilm formation are influenced by the type of biomaterial used and the physical characteristics of implant surface. In this in vitro research, we evaluated the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis, the main pathogen in implant-related infections, to form biofilms on the surface of the solid orthopaedic biomaterials, oxidized zirconium-niobium alloy, cobalt-chromiu...

  15. Physiology and behavior of Pseudomonas fluorescens single and dual strain biofilms under diverse hydrodynamics stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, M.; Simões, Lúcia C.; Vieira, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Three selected Pseudomonas fluorescens strains (the type strain and two strains originally isolated from a dairy processing plant—D3-348 and D3-350)were used to form turbulent and laminar flow-generated biofilms under laboratorial conditions using flowcell reactors with stainless steel substrata. TheD3-348 and D3-350 strainswere also used to form dual biofilms. Biofilm phenotypic characteristics, such as respiratory activity, total and culturable cells, biomass, total and matrix p...

  16. The Presence of Pathogenic Bacteria in Recirculating Aquaculture System Biofilms and their Response to Various Sanitizers

    OpenAIRE

    King, Robin K.

    2001-01-01

    THE PRESENCE OF BACTERIAL PATHOGENS IN BIOFILMS OF RECIRCULATING AQUACULTURE SYSTEMS AND THEIR RESPONSE TO VARIOUS SANITIZERS Robin K. King ABSTRACT Recirculating aquaculture offers a prospect for successful fish farming, but this form of aquaculture presents a great potential for pathogenic microorganisms to become established in the system through the formation of biofilms. Biofilms are capable of forming on all aquaculture system components, incorporating the various microflor...

  17. Monoculture and mixed biofilms of listeria monocytogenes and pseudomonas fluorescens: effect of different culture media and temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana; Teixeira, P.; Cerqueira, Bruna; Rodrigues, Diana Alexandra Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Like most microorganisms, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas fluorescens are able to form biofilms and are rarely found as monoculture biofilms in natural environments. Previous works showed that associations between bacteria from different genus commonly found in food-processing environments may affect their growth, attachment and biofilm formation. This work studied L. monocytogenes and P. fluorescens monoculture and multispecies biofilm formation, and investigated how diffe...

  18. In Vitro Analysis of Tobramycin-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms on Cystic Fibrosis-Derived Airway Epithelial Cells▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Gregory G.; Moreau-Marquis, Sophie; Stanton, Bruce A.; O'Toole, George A.

    2008-01-01

    P. aeruginosa forms biofilms in the lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF); however, there have been no effective model systems for studying biofilm formation in the CF lung. We have developed a tissue culture system for growth of P. aeruginosa biofilms on CF-derived human airway cells that promotes the formation of highly antibiotic-resistant microcolonies, which produce an extracellular polysaccharide matrix and require the known abiotic biofilm formation genes flgK and pilB. Treatm...

  19. Role of the luxS Quorum-Sensing System in Biofilm Formation and Virulence of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Lin; Li, Hualin; Vuong, Cuong; Vadyvaloo, Viveka; Wang, Jianping; Yao, Yufeng; Otto, Michael; Gao, Qian

    2006-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis are characterized by biofilm formation on implanted medical devices. Quorum-sensing regulation plays a major role in the biofilm development of many bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe luxS, a quorum-sensing system in staphylococci that has a significant impact on biofilm development and virulence. We constructed an isogenic ΔluxS mutant strain of a biofilm-forming clinical isolate of S. epidermidis and demonstrated that luxS signa...

  20. Adhesive Fiber Stratification in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Biofilms Unveils Oxygen-Mediated Control of Type 1 Pili

    OpenAIRE

    Kyle A Floyd; Jessica L Moore; Allison R Eberly; James A D Good; Carrie L Shaffer; Himesh Zaver; Fredrik Almqvist; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Maria Hadjifrangiskou

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms account for a significant number of hospital-acquired infections and complicate treatment options, because bacteria within biofilms are generally more tolerant to antibiotic treatment. This resilience is attributed to transient bacterial subpopulations that arise in response to variations in the microenvironment surrounding the biofilm. Here, we probed the spatial proteome of surface-associated single-species biofilms formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the maj...

  1. Influence of putative exopolysaccharide genes on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilm stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Martin; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Fazli, Mustafa;

    2011-01-01

    We report a study of the role of putative exopolysaccharide gene clusters in the formation and stability of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilm. Two novel putative exopolysaccharide gene clusters, pea and peb, were identified, and evidence is provided that they encode products that stabilize P....... putida KT2440 biofilm. The gene clusters alg and bcs, which code for proteins mediating alginate and cellulose biosynthesis, were found to play minor roles in P. putida KT2440 biofilm formation and stability under the conditions tested. A P. putida KT2440 derivative devoid of any identifiable...... exopolysaccharide genes was found to form biofilm with a structure similar to wild-type biofilm, but with a stability lower than that of wild-type biofilm. Based on our data, we suggest that the formation of structured P. putida KT2440 biofilm can occur in the absence of exopolysaccharides; however...

  2. [Biofilm Formation by the Nonflagellated flhB1 Mutant of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelud'ko, A V; Filip'echeva, Yu A; Shumiliva, E M; Khlebtsov, B N; Burov, A M; Petrova, L P; Katsy, E I

    2015-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 with mixed flagellation are able to form biofilms on various surfaces. A nonflagellated mutant of this strain with inactivated chromosomal copy of the flhB gene (flhB1) was shown to exhibit specific traits at the later stages of biofilm formation on a hydrophilic (glass) surface. Mature biofilms of the flhB1::Omegon-Km mutant Sp245.1063 were considerably thinner than those of the parent strain Sp245. The biofilms of the mutant were more susceptible to the forces of hydrodynamic shear. A. brasilense Sp245 cells in biofilms were not found to possess lateral flagella. Cells with polar flagella were, however, revealed by atomic force microscopy of mature native biofilms of strain Sp245. Preservation of a polar flagellum (probably nonmotile) on the cells of A. brasilense Sp245 may enhance the biofilm stability. PMID:26263623

  3. Extracellular matrix assembly in extreme acidic eukaryotic biofilms and their possible implications in heavy metal adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the importance of the extracellular matrix in relation to heavy metal binding capacity in extreme acidic environments, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) composition of 12 biofilms isolated from Rio Tinto (SW, Spain) was analyzed. Each biofilm was composed mainly by one or two species of eukaryotes, although other microorganisms were present. EPS ranged from 130 to 439 mg g-1 biofilm dry weight, representing between 15% and the 40% of the total biofilm dry weight (DW). Statistically significant differences (p -1 dry weight; 10% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Capsular EPS ranged from 50 to 318 mg g-1 dry weight; 5% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Seven of the 12 biofilms showed higher amounts of capsular than colloidal EPS (p -1 biofilm dry weight, reaching up to 16% of the total composition. In general, the heavy metal composition of the EPS extracted from the biofilms closely resembled the metal composition of the water from which the biofilms were collected

  4. Effects of Iron Chelators on the Formation and Development of Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazik, Hasan; Penner, John C; Ferreira, Jose A; Haagensen, Janus A J; Cohen, Kevin; Spormann, Alfred M; Martinez, Marife; Chen, Vicky; Hsu, Joe L; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2015-10-01

    Iron acquisition is crucial for the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus. A. fumigatus biofilm formation occurs in vitro and in vivo and is associated with physiological changes. In this study, we assessed the effects of Fe chelators on biofilm formation and development. Deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DFS), and deferoxamine (DFM) were tested for MIC against a reference isolate via a broth macrodilution method. The metabolic effects (assessed by XTT [2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt]) on biofilm formation by conidia were studied upon exposure to DFP, DFM, DFP plus FeCl3, or FeCl3 alone. A preformed biofilm was exposed to DFP with or without FeCl3. The DFP and DFS MIC50 against planktonic A. fumigatus was 1,250 μM, and XTT gave the same result. DFM showed no planktonic inhibition at concentrations of ≤2,500 μM. By XTT testing, DFM concentrations of biofilms forming in A. fumigatus or preformed biofilms (P biofilm formation (P Biofilm formation with 625 μM DFP plus any concentration of FeCl3 was lower than that in the controls (P biofilms, DFP in the range of ≥625 to 1,250 μM was inhibitory compared to the controls (P biofilm formation (P biofilm increased with 2,500 μM FeCl3 only (P biofilms of A. fumigatus clinical isolates to DFP were noted. In conclusion, iron stimulates biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Chelators can inhibit or enhance biofilms. Chelation may be a potential therapy for A. fumigatus, but we show here that chelators must be chosen carefully. Individual isolate susceptibility assessments may be needed. PMID:26239975

  5. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-10-01

    A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm-based infections that are difficult to eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic cells. Developing treatments against biofilms requires an understanding of bacterial biofilm-specific physiological traits. Research efforts have started to elucidate the intricate mechanisms underlying biofilm development. However, many aspects of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we addressed questions regarding biofilm metabolism using a genome-scale kinetic model of the P. aeruginosa metabolic network and gene expression profiles. Specifically, we computed metabolite concentration differences between known mutants with altered biofilm formation and the wild-type strain to predict drug targets against P. aeruginosa biofilms. We also simulated the altered metabolism driven by gene expression changes between biofilm and stationary growth-phase planktonic cultures. Our analysis suggests that the synthesis of important biofilm-related molecules, such as the quorum-sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal and the exopolysaccharide Psl, is regulated not only through the expression of genes in their own synthesis pathway, but also through the biofilm-specific expression of genes in pathways competing for precursors to these molecules. Finally, we investigated why mutants defective in anthranilate degradation have an impaired ability to form biofilms. Alternative to a previous hypothesis that this biofilm reduction is caused by a decrease in energy production, we proposed that the dysregulation of the synthesis of secondary metabolites derived from anthranilate and chorismate is what impaired the biofilms of these mutants. Notably, these insights generated through our kinetic model-based approach are not accessible from previous constraint-based model analyses of P. aeruginosa biofilm

  6. The role of iron in Mycobacterium smegmatis biofilm formation: the exochelin siderophore is essential in limiting iron conditions for biofilm formation but not for planktonic growth

    OpenAIRE

    Ojha, Anil; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2007-01-01

    Many species of mycobacteria form structured biofilm communities at liquid–air interfaces and on solid surfaces. Full development of Mycobacterium smegmatis biofilms requires addition of supplemental iron above 1 μM ferrous sulphate, although addition of iron is not needed for planktonic growth. Microarray analysis of the M. smegmatis transcriptome shows that iron-responsive genes – especially those involved in siderophore synthesis and iron uptake – are strongly induced during biofilm format...

  7. Biofilm Formation of Listeria monocytogenes on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mahdavi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Listeria monocytogenes is considered as a ubiquitous foodborne pathogen which can lead to serious infections, especially in newborns, elderly, pregnant, and immunocompromised people. The organism has been isolated from many foods and may cause meningitis, septicemia and abortion in pregnant women. Also L. monocytogenes forms biofilms on many food contact surface materials and medical devices. Development of biofilms on many surfaces is a potential source of contamination of foods that may lead to spoilage or transmission of foodborne pathogens. Materials & Methods: Biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes (RITCC 1293 serotype 4a was investigated. Hydrophobicity of L. monocytogenes was measured by MATH method. Then biofilm formation of the organism was assessed at 2, 4, 8, 16 and 20 hours on stainless steel (type 304 no 2B, polyethylene and glass by drop plate method. Results: Results indicated that L. monocytogenes with 85% of hydrophobicity formed biofilm on each of three surfaces. Biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces was significantly more than other surfaces (p<0.05. Conclusion: The ability of biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes on medical devices and food containers is very important as far as hygiene and disease outbreaks are concerned.

  8. Experimental study of cadmium interaction with periphytic biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study addresses the interaction of Cd with natural biofilms of periphytic diatoms grown during different seasons in metal-contaminated and metal-non-contaminated streams, along a tributary of the Lot River, France. Specifically, it aims to test whether the biofilms from contaminated sites have developed a protective mechanism due to high Cd exposure. Towards this goal, reversible adsorption experiments on untreated biofilms were performed in 0.01 M NaNO3 with a pH ranging from 2 to 8, Cd concentration from 0.5 to 10,000 μg/L and exposure time from 1 to 24 h. Two types of experiments, pH-dependent adsorption edge and constant-pH 'Langmuirian'-type isotherms were conducted. Results were adequately modeled using a Linear Programming Model. It was found that the adsorption capacities of natural biofilm consortia with respect to Cd do not depend on season and are not directly linked to the growth environment. The biofilms grown in non-contaminated (4.6 ppb Cd in solid) and contaminated (570 ppb Cd in solid) settings exhibit similar adsorption capacities in the Cd concentration range in solution of 100-10,000 μg/L but quite different capacities at low Cd concentration (0.5-100 μg/L); unexpectedly, the non-contaminated biofilm adsorbs approximately 10 times more Cd than the contaminated one. It is therefore possible that the strong low-abundant ligands (for example, phosphoryl or sulfhydryls) are already metal-saturated on surfaces of biofilm grown in the contaminated site whereas these sites are still available for metal adsorption in samples grown in non-contaminated sites.

  9. Experimental study of cadmium interaction with periphytic biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, O.S., E-mail: oleg@lmtg.obs-mip.fr [Geochimie et Biogeochimie Experimentale, UMR 5563, CNRS-OMP-Universite Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Feurtet-Mazel, A. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Martinez, R.E. [Center for Applied Geosciences, Universitat Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany); Morin, S. [Unite de Recherche Reseaux, Epuration et Qualite des Eaux REQE, Cemagref, 50 Avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Baudrimont, M. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Duong, T. [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)] [Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Coste, M. [Unite de Recherche Reseaux, Epuration et Qualite des Eaux REQE, Cemagref, 50 Avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    This study addresses the interaction of Cd with natural biofilms of periphytic diatoms grown during different seasons in metal-contaminated and metal-non-contaminated streams, along a tributary of the Lot River, France. Specifically, it aims to test whether the biofilms from contaminated sites have developed a protective mechanism due to high Cd exposure. Towards this goal, reversible adsorption experiments on untreated biofilms were performed in 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} with a pH ranging from 2 to 8, Cd concentration from 0.5 to 10,000 {mu}g/L and exposure time from 1 to 24 h. Two types of experiments, pH-dependent adsorption edge and constant-pH 'Langmuirian'-type isotherms were conducted. Results were adequately modeled using a Linear Programming Model. It was found that the adsorption capacities of natural biofilm consortia with respect to Cd do not depend on season and are not directly linked to the growth environment. The biofilms grown in non-contaminated (4.6 ppb Cd in solid) and contaminated (570 ppb Cd in solid) settings exhibit similar adsorption capacities in the Cd concentration range in solution of 100-10,000 {mu}g/L but quite different capacities at low Cd concentration (0.5-100 {mu}g/L); unexpectedly, the non-contaminated biofilm adsorbs approximately 10 times more Cd than the contaminated one. It is therefore possible that the strong low-abundant ligands (for example, phosphoryl or sulfhydryls) are already metal-saturated on surfaces of biofilm grown in the contaminated site whereas these sites are still available for metal adsorption in samples grown in non-contaminated sites.

  10. Biofilms and the food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past, interest in biofilms was limited to research related to water distribution systems, waste water treatment and dental plaques. Biofilm has become a more popular research topic in many other areas in recent years including food safety. Biofilm formation can compromise the sanitation of food surfaces and environmental surfaces by spreading detached organisms to other areas of processing plants. Unfortunately, these detached organisms are not similar to normal microorganisms suspended in an aquatic environment but are more resistant to several stresses or microbial inactivation including some food preservation methods. Microstructures of biofilms as revealed by different types of microscopic techniques showed that biofilms are highly complex and consist of many symbiotic organisms, some of which are human pathogens. This article reviewed the process of biofilm formation, the significance of biofilms on food or food contact surfaces, their ability to protect foodborne pathogens from environmental stresses and recent methods for the study of biofilms on food contact surfaces.

  11. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  12. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eCharlebois

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277. Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta 1-4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PNAG. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials.

  13. Biofilm development in membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Savnik, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of biofilm development and its removal has crucial meaning in membrane reactor. Biofilm causes pore blocking on membranes, which causes a drop in efficiency of mixed liquor filtration and consequently deteriorates the efficiency of whole membrane bioreactor. This thesis deals with factors that affect biofilm development in membrane bioreactors. Structure and growth of biofilm are presented from its initial attachment of individual particles, their parameters of adhesion, hydrodynam...

  14. New Tool To Monitor Biofilm Growth in Industrial Process Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco Suárez, Ángeles; Torres, Esperanza; de la Fuente González, Elena; Negro Álvarez, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    A new online methodology based on a continuous process video microscopy and image analysis has been developed to study the effects of enzymes on the formation of biofilm. This research consists of two parts: (1) the monitoring of the growth of a biofilm formed with the axenic culture isolated from the process waters of a recycling paper mill, aiming at determining the most appropriate way to quantify the biofilm growth from the obtained images; and (2) the study of the effects of three new en...

  15. Evaluation of different detection methods of biofilm formation in the clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afreenish Hassan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are associated with chronic and recurrent human infections and are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents. There are various methods to detect biofilm production like Tissue Culture Plate (TCP, Tube method (TM, Congo Red Agar method (CRA, bioluminescent assay, piezoelectric sensors, and fluorescent microscopic examination. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to compare three methods for the detection of biofilms. METHOD: The study was carried out at the Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan, from January 2010 to June 2010. A total of 110 clinical isolates were subjected to biofilm detection methods. Isolates were identified by standard microbiological procedures. Biofilm detection was tested by TCP, TM and CRA. Antibiotic susceptibility test of biofilm producing bacteria was performed by using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique according to CLSI guidelines. RESULTS: The TCP method was considered to be superior to TM and CRA. From the total of 110 clinical isolates, TCP method detected 22.7% as high, 41% moderate and 36.3% as weak or non-biofilm producers. We have observed higher antibiotic resistance in biofilm producing bacteria than non-biofilm producers. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from our study that the TCP method is a more quantitative and reliable method for the detection of biofilm forming microorganisms as compared to TM and CRA methods, and it can be recommended as a general screening method for detection of biofilm producing bacteria in laboratories.

  16. Viable Compositional Analysis of an Eleven Species Oral Polymicrobial Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Leighann; Lappin, Gillian; O'Donnell, Lindsay E.; Millhouse, Emma; Millington, Owain R.; Bradshaw, David J.; Axe, Alyson S.; Williams, Craig; Nile, Christopher J.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    reduction and changes in population dynamics following evaluation of various denture cleansing regimens. Specifically, it was demonstrated that daily combinational treatment of brushing and cleansing proved to be the most advantageous denture hygiene regimen, however, residual organisms still remained within the pores of PMMA surface, which could act as a reservoir for further biofilm regrowth. We have identified an industry need for denture cleansing agents with the capacity to penetrate these pores and disaggregate these complex biofilm consortia.

  17. Biofilm Cohesive Strength as a Basis for Biofilm Recalcitrance: Are Bacterial Biofilms Overdesigned?

    OpenAIRE

    Srijan Aggarwal; Philip S. Stewart; Hozalski, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are highly resistant to common antibacterial treatments, and several physiological explanations have been offered to explain the recalcitrant nature of bacterial biofilms. Herein, a biophysical aspect of biofilm recalcitrance is being reported on. While engineering structures are often overdesigned with a factor of safety (FOS) usually under 10, experimental measurements of biofilm cohesive strength suggest that the FOS is on the order of thousands. In other words, bacteria...

  18. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Pleumeekers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix. This study evaluated the performance of culture-expanded human chondrocytes from ear (EC, nose (NC and articular joint (AC, as well as bone-marrow-derived and adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. All cells (≥ 3 donors per source were culture-expanded, encapsulated in alginate and cultured for 5 weeks. Subsequently, constructs were implanted subcutaneously for 8 additional weeks. Before and after implantation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen content were measured using biochemical assays. Mechanical properties were determined using stress-strain-indentation tests. Hypertrophic differentiation was evaluated with qRT-PCR and subsequent endochondral ossification with histology. ACs had higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other cell sources, as assessed by gene expression and GAG content (p < 0.001. However, after implantation, ACs did not further increase their matrix. In contrast, ECs and NCs continued producing matrix in vivo leading to higher GAG content (p < 0.001 and elastic modulus. For NC-constructs, matrix-deposition was associated with the elastic modulus (R2 = 0.477, p = 0.039. Although all cells – except ACs – expressed markers for hypertrophic differentiation in vitro, there was no bone formed in vivo. Our work shows that cartilage formation and functionality depends on the cell source used. ACs possess the highest chondrogenic capacity in vitro, while ECs and NCs are most potent in vivo, making them attractive cell sources for cartilage repair.

  19. Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated from “High Event Period” beef contamination have strong biofilm forming ability and low sanitizer susceptibility which are associated with high pO157 plasmid copy number

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the meat industry, a “High Event Period” (HEP) is defined as a time period when beef processing establishments experience an increased occurrence of product contamination by E. coli O157:H7. Our previous studies suggested that bacterial biofilm formation and sanitizer resistance might contribute...

  20. Biofilms in wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, R A; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, M

    2014-01-01

    Following confirmation of the presence of biofilms in chronic wounds, the term biofilm became a buzzword within the wound healing community. For more than a century pathogens have been successfully isolated and identified from wound specimens using techniques that were devised in the nineteenth...... century by Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch. Although this approach still provides valuable information with which to help diagnose acute infections and to select appropriate antibiotic therapies, it is evident that those organisms isolated from clinical specimens with the conditions normally used in...... extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cells within such aggregations (or biofilms) display varying physiological and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of planktonic cells, and which contribute to their persistence. There are many factors that influence healing in wounds and the discovery of...

  1. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms and the use of a RTPCR assay to detect parasite species within biofilm structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M.; Coughlan, G.; Murphy, N.; Rowan, N.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pathogenic organisms namely parasite species and bacteria in biofilms in veterinary settings, is a public health concern in relation to human and animal exposure. Veterinary clinics represent a significant risk factor for the transfer of pathogens from housed animals to humans, especially in cases of wound infection and the shedding of faecal matter. This study aims to provide a means of detecting veterinary relevant parasite species in bacterial biofilms, and to provide a means of disinfecting these biofilms. A real time PCR assay was utilized to detect parasite DNA in Bacillus cereus biofilms on stainless steel and PVC surfaces. Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts) in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia) in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose. PMID:26862516

  2. Swine MRSA isolates form robust biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Measures to prevent, control, or eliminate MRSA in swine is of considerable public health concern. Bacterial colonization ...

  3. Diversity and functions of bacterial community in drinking water biofilms revealed by high-throughput sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanqing; Mao, Yanping; Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Tong

    2015-06-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water (DW) systems may cause various problems to water quality. To investigate the community structure of biofilms on different pipe materials and the global/specific metabolic functions of DW biofilms, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing data for 16S rRNA genes and Illumina metagenomic data were generated and analysed. Considerable differences in bacterial diversity and taxonomic structure were identified between biofilms formed on stainless steel and biofilms formed on plastics, indicating that the metallic materials facilitate the formation of higher diversity biofilms. Moreover, variations in several dominant genera were observed during biofilm formation. Based on PCA analysis, the global functions in the DW biofilms were similar to other DW metagenomes. Beyond the global functions, the occurrences and abundances of specific protective genes involved in the glutathione metabolism, the SoxRS system, the OxyR system, RpoS regulated genes, and the production/degradation of extracellular polymeric substances were also evaluated. A near-complete and low-contamination draft genome was constructed from the metagenome of the DW biofilm, based on the coverage and tetranucleotide frequencies, and identified as a Bradyrhizobiaceae-like bacterium according to a phylogenetic analysis. Our findings provide new insight into DW biofilms, especially in terms of their metabolic functions.

  4. Architectural transitions in Vibrio cholerae biofilms at single-cell resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Knut; Dunkel, Jörn; Nadell, Carey D; van Teeffelen, Sven; Grnja, Ivan; Wingreen, Ned S; Stone, Howard A; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial species colonize surfaces and form dense 3D structures, known as biofilms, which are highly tolerant to antibiotics and constitute one of the major forms of bacterial biomass on Earth. Bacterial biofilms display remarkable changes during their development from initial attachment to maturity, yet the cellular architecture that gives rise to collective biofilm morphology during growth is largely unknown. Here, we use high-resolution optical microscopy to image all individual cells in Vibrio cholerae biofilms at different stages of development, including colonies that range in size from 2 to 4,500 cells. From these data, we extracted the precise 3D cellular arrangements, cell shapes, sizes, and global morphological features during biofilm growth on submerged glass substrates under flow. We discovered several critical transitions of the internal and external biofilm architectures that separate the major phases of V. cholerae biofilm growth. Optical imaging of biofilms with single-cell resolution provides a new window into biofilm formation that will prove invaluable to understanding the mechanics underlying biofilm development. PMID:26933214

  5. Multi-channel microfluidic biosensor platform applied for online monitoring and screening of biofilm formation and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bruchmann

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization of surfaces and interfaces has a major impact on various areas including biotechnology, medicine, food industries, and water technologies. In most of these areas biofilm development has a strong impact on hygiene situations, product quality, and process efficacies. In consequence, biofilm manipulation and prevention is a fundamental issue to avoid adverse impacts. For such scenario online, non-destructive biofilm monitoring systems become important in many technical and industrial applications. This study reports such a system in form of a microfluidic sensor platform based on the combination of electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometric current measurement, which allows sensitive online measurement of biofilm formation and activity. A total number of 12 parallel fluidic channels enable real-time online screening of various biofilms formed by different Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains and complex mixed population biofilms. Experiments using disinfectant and antibiofilm reagents demonstrate that the biofilm sensor is able to discriminate between inactivation/killing of bacteria and destabilization of biofilm structures. The impedance and amperometric sensor data demonstrated the high dynamics of biofilms as a consequence of distinct responses to chemical treatment strategies. Gene expression of flagellar and fimbrial genes of biofilms grown inside the microfluidic system supported the detected biofilm growth kinetics. Thus, the presented biosensor platform is a qualified tool for assessing biofilm formation in specific environments and for evaluating the effectiveness of antibiofilm treatment strategies.

  6. Multi-channel microfluidic biosensor platform applied for online monitoring and screening of biofilm formation and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchmann, Julia; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E; Schwartz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of surfaces and interfaces has a major impact on various areas including biotechnology, medicine, food industries, and water technologies. In most of these areas biofilm development has a strong impact on hygiene situations, product quality, and process efficacies. In consequence, biofilm manipulation and prevention is a fundamental issue to avoid adverse impacts. For such scenario online, non-destructive biofilm monitoring systems become important in many technical and industrial applications. This study reports such a system in form of a microfluidic sensor platform based on the combination of electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometric current measurement, which allows sensitive online measurement of biofilm formation and activity. A total number of 12 parallel fluidic channels enable real-time online screening of various biofilms formed by different Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains and complex mixed population biofilms. Experiments using disinfectant and antibiofilm reagents demonstrate that the biofilm sensor is able to discriminate between inactivation/killing of bacteria and destabilization of biofilm structures. The impedance and amperometric sensor data demonstrated the high dynamics of biofilms as a consequence of distinct responses to chemical treatment strategies. Gene expression of flagellar and fimbrial genes of biofilms grown inside the microfluidic system supported the detected biofilm growth kinetics. Thus, the presented biosensor platform is a qualified tool for assessing biofilm formation in specific environments and for evaluating the effectiveness of antibiofilm treatment strategies. PMID:25706987

  7. Biofilm formation among Candida albicans isolated from vagina

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Study was conducted in a rural tertiary care hospital with a purpose to demonstrate the biofilm forming abilities of C. albicans isolated from cases of vulvovaginal candidiasis and asymptomatic carriers.Material and Methods: C. albicans was isolated and identified by standard laboratory techniques. Biofilm formation in vitro was tested using the 96 well microtitre plate method with crystal violet staining.Results: Overall rate of Candida isolation in study subjects was 40%. Candida i...

  8. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms: role in chronic airway infections

    OpenAIRE

    Swords, W. Edward

    2012-01-01

    Like many pathogens inhabiting mucosal surfaces, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) forms multicellular biofilm communities both in vitro and in various infection models. In the past 15 years much has been learned about determinants of biofilm formation by this organism and potential roles in bacterial virulence, especially in the context of chronic and recurrent infections. However, this concept has not been without some degree of controversy, and in the past some have expressed doubt...

  9. Importance of Candida-bacterial polymicrobial biofilms in disease

    OpenAIRE

    Harriott, Melphine M.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, with an ability to inhabit diverse host niches and cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. C. albicans also readily forms biofilms on indwelling medical devices and mucosal tissues, which serve as an infectious reservoir that is difficult to eradicate, and can lead to lethal systemic infections. Biofilm formation occurs within a complex milieu of host factors and other members of the human microbiot...

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Yashuan; Marks, Laura R.; Pettigrew, Melinda M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over one million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease...

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yashuan eChao; Marks, Laura R.; Pettigrew, Melinda M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over 1 million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease i...

  12. Initial Phases of Biofilm Formation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Thormann, Kai M; Saville, Renée M.; Shukla, Soni; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2004-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism and serves as a model for studying microbially induced dissolution of Fe or Mn oxide minerals as well as biogeochemical cycles. In soil and sediment environments, S. oneidensis biofilms form on mineral surfaces and are critical for mediating the metabolic interaction between this microbe and insoluble metal oxide phases. In order to develop an understanding of the molecular basis of biofilm formation, we in...

  13. Effect of natural marine biofilms on galvanic corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, S.C.; LaFontaine, J.P. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Galvanic corrosion of copper (UNS C11000), 1018 carbon steel (CS, UNS G10180), aluminum alloy 3003 (UNS A93003), and zinc (UNS Z32121) coupled to cathodes of UNS N08367 was tested with and without natural marine biofilms on the cathode surface. Weight losses were significantly higher, and corrosion currents were up to 2 decades higher with a biofilm on the cathode surface for anodes of copper, steel, and aluminum. There was no difference for zinc. Results showed an increase in consumption of the anodic material should be expected in any case where biofilms on the cathodic member of a galvanic couple result in a systematic and significant increase in reduction current at the mixed potential of the couple. Cathodic reduction currents (versus control with no biofilm) were increased at all potentials down to {approximately}{minus}900 mV{sub SCE}, resulting in an elevated current capacity capable of increasing the weight loss of anodic materials over a sustained period of at least 2 months. Biofilms, however, did not increase consumption of zinc anodes. Potentiodynamic polarization curves taken from the corroded samples were used successfully to predict the effect of biofilms on galvanic corrosion rates for the materials tested. Weight-loss values calculated by Faraday`s law using corrosion currents from the polarization curves agreed well with actual measured values for anodes of steel, aluminum, and zinc, although there were some discrepancies for copper.

  14. The biofilm ecology of microbial biofouling, biocide resistance and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Science Div.; Kirkegaard, R.D.; Palmer, R.J. Jr.; Flemming, C.A.; Chen, G.; Leung, K.T.; Phiefer, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Arrage, A.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Microbial Insights, Inc., Rockford, TN (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. Heterogeneous distribution of microbes and/or their metabolic activity can promote microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) which is a multibillion dollar problem. Consequently, it is important that biofilm microbial ecology be understood so it can be manipulated rationally. It is usually simple to select organisms that form biofilms by flowing a considerably dilute media over a substratum, and propagating the organisms that attach. To examine the biofilm most expeditiously, the biomass accumulation, desquamation, and metabolic activities need to be monitored on-line and non-destructively. This on-line monitoring becomes even more valuable if the activities can be locally mapped in time and space within the biofilm. Herein the authors describe quantitative measures of microbial biofouling, the ecology of pathogens in drinking water distributions systems, and localization of microbial biofilms and activities with localized MIC.

  15. Nutrient depletion in Bacillus subtilis biofilms triggers matrix production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many types of bacteria form colonies that grow into physically robust and strongly adhesive aggregates known as biofilms. A distinguishing characteristic of bacterial biofilms is an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix that encases the cells and provides physical integrity to the colony. The EPS matrix consists of a large amount of polysaccharide, as well as protein filaments, DNA and degraded cellular materials. The genetic pathways that control the transformation of a colony into a biofilm have been widely studied, and yield a spatiotemporal heterogeneity in EPS production. Spatial gradients in metabolites parallel this heterogeneity in EPS, but nutrient concentration as an underlying physiological initiator of EPS production has not been explored. Here, we study the role of nutrient depletion in EPS production in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. By monitoring simultaneously biofilm size and matrix production, we find that EPS production increases at a critical colony thickness that depends on the initial amount of carbon sources in the medium. Through studies of individual cells in liquid culture we find that EPS production can be triggered at the single-cell level by reducing nutrient concentration. To connect the single-cell assays with conditions in the biofilm, we calculate carbon concentration with a model for the reaction and diffusion of nutrients in the biofilm. This model predicts the relationship between the initial concentration of carbon and the thickness of the colony at the point of internal nutrient deprivation. (paper)

  16. Fungal Metabolites for the Control of Biofilm Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Bergamo Estrela

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many microbes attach to surfaces and produce a complex matrix of polymers surrounding their cells, forming a biofilm. In biofilms, microbes are much better protected against hostile environments, impairing the action of most antibiotics. A pressing demand exists for novel therapeutic strategies against biofilm infections, which are a grave health wise on mucosal surfaces and medical devices. From fungi, a large number of secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activity have been characterized. This review discusses natural compounds from fungi which are effective against fungal and bacterial biofilms. Some molecules are able to block the cell communication process essential for biofilm formation (known as quorum sensing, others can penetrate and kill cells within the structure. Several targets have been identified, ranging from the inhibition of quorum sensing receptors and virulence factors, to cell wall synthesizing enzymes. Only one group of these fungal metabolites has been optimized and made it to the market, but more preclinical studies are ongoing to expand the biofilm-fighting arsenal. The broad diversity of bioactive compounds from fungi, their activities against various pathogens, and the multi-target trait of some molecules are promising aspects of fungal secondary metabolites. Future screenings for biofilm-controlling compounds will contribute to several novel clinical applications.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    biofilms, which protect the aggregated, biopolymer-embedded bacteria from the detrimental actions of antibiotic treatments and host immunity. A key component in the protection against innate immunity is rhamnolipid, which is a quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factor. QS is a cell-to-cell signaling...... mechanism used to coordinate expression of virulence and protection of aggregated biofilm cells. Rhamnolipids are known for their ability to cause hemolysis and have been shown to cause lysis of several cellular components of the human immune system, for example, macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  18. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Bak Christensen, Bjarke;

    2015-01-01

    Confined spatial patterns of microbial distribution are prevalent in nature, such as in microbial mats, soil communities, and water stream biofilms. The symbiotic two-species consortium of Pseudomonas putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6, originally isolated from a creosote-polluted aquifer, has evolved......, as well as the ecology of engineered communities that have the potential for enhanced and sustainable bioprocessing capacity....

  19. Effects of Low-Dose Amoxicillin on Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, Kevin D; Callahan, Mary T; Shimkevitch, Anton V; Farmer, Jackson T; Endres, Jennifer L; Marchand, Mélodie; Bayles, Kenneth W; Horswill, Alexander R; Kaplan, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies showed that sub-MIC levels of β-lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Here, we investigated this process by measuring the effects of sub-MIC amoxicillin on biofilm formation by the epidemic community-associated MRSA strain USA300. We found that sub-MIC amoxicillin increased the ability of USA300 cells to attach to surfaces and form biofilms under both static and flow conditions. We also found that USA300 biofilms cultured in sub-MIC amoxicillin were thicker, contained more pillar and channel structures, and were less porous than biofilms cultured without antibiotic. Biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin correlated with the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA). However, eDNA released by amoxicillin-induced cell lysis alone was evidently not sufficient to stimulate biofilm. Sub-MIC levels of two other cell wall-active agents with different mechanisms of action-d-cycloserine and fosfomycin-also stimulated eDNA-dependent biofilm, suggesting that biofilm formation may be a mechanistic adaptation to cell wall stress. Screening a USA300 mariner transposon library for mutants deficient in biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin identified numerous known mediators of S. aureus β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation, as well as novel genes not previously associated with these phenotypes. Our results link cell wall stress and biofilm formation in MRSA and suggest that eDNA-dependent biofilm formation by strain USA300 in low-dose amoxicillin is an inducible phenotype that can be used to identify novel genes impacting MRSA β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation. PMID:26856828

  20. Role of type 1 and type 3 fimbriae in Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krogfelt Karen A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important gram-negative opportunistic pathogen causing primarily urinary tract infections, respiratory infections, and bacteraemia. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms on medical devices, e.g. catheters, has a major role in development of many nosocomial infections. Most clinical K. pneumoniae isolates express two types of fimbrial adhesins, type 1 fimbriae and type 3 fimbriae. In this study, we characterized the role of type 1 and type 3 fimbriae in K. pneumoniae biofilm formation. Results Isogenic fimbriae mutants of the clinical K. pneumoniae isolate C3091 were constructed, and their ability to form biofilm was investigated in a flow cell system by confocal scanning laser microscopy. The wild type strain was found to form characteristic biofilm and development of K. pneumoniae biofilm occurred primarily by clonal growth, not by recruitment of planktonic cells. Type 1 fimbriae did not influence biofilm formation and the expression of type 1 fimbriae was found to be down-regulated in biofilm forming cells. In contrast, expression of type 3 fimbriae was found to strongly promote biofilm formation. Conclusion By use of well defined isogenic mutants we found that type 3 fimbriae, but not type 1 fimbriae, strongly promote biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae C3091. As the vast majority of clinical K. pneumoniae isolates express type 3 fimbriae, this fimbrial adhesin may play a significant role in development of catheter associated K. pneumoniae infections.

  1. Study on Hydro-Alcoholic Extract Effect of Pomegranate Peel on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Habibipour

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Microorganisms form biomass as biofilm in response to many factors, in order to adapt to hostile extracellular environments and biocides. Using different herbal compounds are of those strategies to deal with biofilm. It has been proved that plants extracts such as pomegranate, raspberry and chamomile essential oils have anti-biofilm effects. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of black peel pomegranate ex-tract on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation. Materials & Methods: In this experimental research the anti-biofilm effect, reducing the amount of biofilm formation and growth kinetics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different treatments was measured by microtiter and plate colorimetric crystal violet method. Biofilm formation was also examined using a microscope. Statistical analysis of data obtained from the reading of the ELISA was performed using SPSS software, P value 0.05. Results: Findings of this study showed that bacteria cannot form any biofilm in first 6 hours of incubation, in all treatments. The amount of biofilm formation after 12 hours in 0.01 and 0.05 g/ mL treatments were medium. Among treatments, after 18 and 24 hours of incubation 0.001 g/ mL concentration of pomegranate peel extract had medium and strong inhibitory effect on biofilm formation, respectively. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that biofilm formation and biofilm reduction percent-age is directly related to the duration of exposure of bacteria that could be due to the different phases of growth. Growth kinetics study also revealed that in the majority of treatments the growth was incremental up to about 15 hours and decrement afterwards due to the effective-ness of different treatments. After 18 hours, treatments have greatest influence on biofilm formation. The foregoing has been fully confirmed by the results of microscopic slides. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 22 (3: 195-202

  2. Biofilm may not be Necessary for the Epidemic Spread of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; He, Lihua; Tao, Xiaoxia; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is recognized as a contributing factor to the capacity of Acinetobacter baumannii to persist and prosper in medical settings, but it is still unknown whether biofilms contribute to the spread of A. baumannii. In this study, the biofilm formation of 114 clinical A. baumannii isolates and 32 non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates was investigated using a microtiter plate assay. The clonal relationships among A. baumannii isolates were assessed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing, and one major outbreak clone and 5 other epidemic clones were identified. Compared with the epidemic or outbreak A. baumannii isolates, the sporadic isolates had significantly higher biofilm formation, but no significant difference was observed between the sporadic A. baumannii isolates and the non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates, suggesting that biofilm is not important for the epidemic spread of A. baumannii. Of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii isolates in this study, 95.7% were assigned to international clone 2 (IC2) and showed significantly lower biofilm formations than the other isolates, suggesting that biofilm did not contribute to the high success of IC2. These findings have increased our understanding of the potential relationship between biofilm formation and the epidemic capacity of A. baumannii. PMID:27558010

  3. Innovative Porous Media Approach in Modeling Biofilm Applications, Human Eye and Nanofluid Based Heat Pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Shafahi, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Biofilm is a dominant form of existence for bacteria in most natural and synthetic environments. Depending on the application area, they can be useful or harmful. They have a helpful influence in bioremediation, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and metal extraction. On the other hand, biofilms are damaging for water pipes, heat exchangers, submarines and body organs. Formation of biofilm within a porous matrix reduces the pore size and total empty space of the system, altering the porosity an...

  4. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Manash C.; Padmani Sandhu; Priya Gupta; Prasenjit Rudrapaul; Utpal C. De; Prosun Tribedi; Yusuf Akhter; Surajit Bhattacharjee

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combin...

  5. Impact of biofilms in simulated drinking water and urban heat supply systems

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. Lopes; Morin, P.; Oliveira, Rosário; L. F. Melo

    2009-01-01

    Biofouling and biocorrosion were studied in drinking water and heating water systems by forming biofilms on steel and on polymethylmetacrylate. In the drinking water system, biofilm development was more significant on corroded surfaces, suggesting that in these conditions they were largely protected from disinfection, probably because of sheltering and chlorine demand by corrosion products. In the urban heat supply system, results suggest a higher biofilm activity at lower p...

  6. Studies on the behaviour of Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms after ortho-phthalaldehyde treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, M; Carvalho, Helena; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Vieira, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    A relatively novel biocide, ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), was tested to control biofilms formed by Pseudomonas fluorescens on stainless steel surfaces. The toxic action of OPA was assessed in terms of inactivation and removal of the biofilm by means of, respectively, the determination of the respiratory activity and the variation in the dry weight of the biofilms. For comparison, the activity of OPA against suspended bacteria was also evaluated. The results showed that higher concentrations of ...

  7. Influence of batch or fed-batch growth on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Cerca, Nuno; Pier, Gerald B.; Vilanova, Manuel; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To make a quantitative evaluation of the differences in biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis using batch and fed-batch growth systems and to correlate this with production of the major biofilm polysaccharide, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine (PNAG). Methods and Results: Dry weight measurements of biofilms formed in batch and fed-batch conditions were compared with haemagglutination titres, which measure the amount of PNAG produced. Strains grown in batch systems devel...

  8. Comparison of two methods for quantification of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Saghar Hendiani; Ahya Abdi-Ali; Parisa Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: ‏ Medical devices are made from a variety of materials such as polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly styrene, glass and etc. by attaching to this surfaces, Acinetobacter baumannii can form biofilms and then cause several device associated infections. Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces. In this study, biofilm formation ability in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii was assessed by two methods on different surfaces. Materials and methods: ‏ Biof...

  9. Proteus mirabilis biofilm - Qualitative and quantitative colorimetric methods-based evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Kwiecinska-Piróg; Tomasz Bogiel; Krzysztof Skowron; Ewa Wieckowska; Eugenia Gospodarek

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis strains ability to form biofilm is a current topic of a number of research worldwide. In this study the biofilm formation of P. mirabilis strains derived from urine of the catheterized and non-catheterized patients has been investigated. A total number of 39 P. mirabilis strains isolated from the urine samples of the patients of dr Antoni Jurasz University Hospital No. 1 in Bydgoszcz clinics between 2011 and 2012 was used. Biofilm formation was evaluated using two independen...

  10. Impact of Environmental and Genetic Factors on Biofilm Formation by the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lebeer, Sarah; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Perea Vélez, Mónica; Vanderleyden, Jos; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.

    2007-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103) is one of the clinically best-studied probiotic organisms. Moreover, L. rhamnosus GG displays very good in vitro adherence to epithelial cells and mucus. Here, we report that L. rhamnosus GG is able to form biofilms on abiotic surfaces, in contrast to other strains of the Lactobacillus casei group tested under the same conditions. Microtiter plate biofilm assays indicated that in vitro biofilm formation by L. rhamnosus GG is strongly modulated by cultur...

  11. ANALYSIS OF CHROMATE UPTAKE IN BACTERIAL BIOFILMS DEVELOPED ON ABIOTIC SUPPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Aditi Bhattacharya

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms also practice community living and form biofilms developed on preferred surfaces. The sessile and planktonic organisms show differences in hydrophobicity as determined by the BATH index. The saccharides of the EPS produced was determined using the phenol-sulphuric acid method and Rhamnolipids using the Orcinol method. Dye released from stained biofilms is also indicative of the density of the biofilm. Motility was reduced on formation of cell aggregates in m...

  12. Elimination of the formation of biofilm in industrial pipes using enzyme cleaning technique

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaobo Liu; Bo Tang,; Qiuya Gu; Xiaobin Yu

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is a growing demand in how to eliminate the biofilm formed in industrial pipelines, especially in food, fermentation, and water treatment industry. However, the traditional techniques for CIP (cleaning in place) are usually ineffective, superficial, halfway, and do not clean or sterilize microbes located in the inner layers of the biofilm. A recent strategy for removing the biofilm in pipes is employing enzymes to clean it in the circulating water system under an optimal cond...

  13. Growing Burkholderia pseudomallei in Biofilm Stimulating Conditions Significantly Induces Antimicrobial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sawasdidoln, Chakrit; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Sermswan, Rasana W.; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2010-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis, was reported to produce biofilm. As the disease causes high relapse rate when compared to other bacterial infections, it therefore might be due to the reactivation of the biofilm forming bacteria which also provided resistance to antimicrobial agents. However, the mechanism on how biofilm can provide tolerance to antimicrobials is still unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings The change in resistance of B...

  14. The Ciprofloxacin Impact on Biofilm Formation by Proteus Mirabilis and P. Vulgaris Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiecinska-Pirog, Joanna; Skowron, Krzysztof; Bartczak, Wojciech; Gospodarek-Komkowska, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Background Proteus spp. bacilli belong to opportunistic human pathogens, which are primarily responsible for urinary tract and wound infections. An important virulence factor is their ability to form biofilms that greatly reduce the effectiveness of antibiotics in the site of infection. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the value of the minimum concentration of ciprofloxacin that eradicates a biofilm of Proteus spp. strains. Materials and Methods A biofilm formation of 20 stra...

  15. Early detection of biofilms using low-cost polymeric optical Lab-on-a-chip

    OpenAIRE

    Antúnez Vallès, Bernat

    2015-01-01

    In surface colonization, microorganisms tend to form complex biological structures containing cells and adhesion molecules, called biofilms, which provide them with high stability and resistance to biocide compounds. These biofilms are dynamic structures in which bacteria, individually or in layers, are continuously recruited and released with time. This dynamism makes biofilms a source of microorganism, sometimes pathogens, becoming elements of risk for public health. Up to now, most widespr...

  16. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis: new insights into regulatory strategies and assembly mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, Lynne S; Hobley, Laura; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a social behaviour that generates favourable conditions for sustained survival in the natural environment. For the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis the process involves the differentiation of cell fate within an isogenic population and the production of communal goods that form the biofilm matrix. Here we review recent progress in understanding the regulatory pathways that control biofilm formation and highlight developments in understanding the composition, func...

  17. Campylobacter jejuni biofilms contain extracellular DNA and are sensitive to DNase I treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Helen L.; Hanman, Kate; Reuter, Mark; Betts, Roy P.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms make an important contribution to survival and transmission of bacterial pathogens in the food chain. The human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is known to form biofilms in vitro in food chain-relevant conditions, but the exact roles and composition of the extracellular matrix are still not clear. Extracellular DNA has been found in many bacterial biofilms and can be a major component of the extracellular matrix. Here we show that extracellular DNA is also an important component of the...

  18. Biofilm Formation by the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans: Development, Architecture, and Drug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Kuhn, Duncan M.; Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Hoyer, Lois L.; McCormick, Thomas; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2001-01-01

    Biofilms are a protected niche for microorganisms, where they are safe from antibiotic treatment and can create a source of persistent infection. Using two clinically relevant Candida albicans biofilm models formed on bioprosthetic materials, we demonstrated that biofilm formation proceeds through three distinct developmental phases. These growth phases transform adherent blastospores to well-defined cellular communities encased in a polysaccharide matrix. Fluorescence and confocal scanning l...

  19. Development and Validation of an In Vivo Candida albicans Biofilm Denture Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Marchillo, Karen; Spiegel, Carol A.; Andes, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The most common form of oral candidiasis, denture-associated stomatitis, involves biofilm growth on an oral prosthetic surface. Cells in this unique environment are equipped to withstand host defenses and survive antifungal therapy. Studies of the biofilm process on dentures have primarily been limited to in vitro models. We developed a rodent acrylic denture model and characterized the Candida albicans and mixed oral bacterial flora biofilm formation, architecture, and drug resistance in viv...

  20. Glucose & sodium chloride induced biofilm production & ica operon in clinical isolates of staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: All colonizing and invasive staphylococcal isolates may not produce biofilm but may turn biofilm producers in certain situations due to change in environmental factors. This study was done to test the hypothesis that non biofilm producing clinical staphylococci isolates turn biofilm producers in presence of sodium chloride (isotonic and high concentration of glucose, irrespective of presence or absence of ica operon. Methods: Clinical isolates of 100 invasive, 50 colonizing and 50 commensal staphylococci were tested for biofilm production by microtiter plate method in different culture media (trypticase soy broth alone or supplemented with 0.9% NaCl/ 5 or 10% glucose. All isolates were tested for the presence of ica ADBC genes by PCR. Results: Biofilm production significantly increased in the presence of glucose and saline, most, when both glucose and saline were used together. All the ica positive staphylococcal isolates and some ica negative isolates turned biofilm producer in at least one of the tested culture conditions. Those remained biofilm negative in different culture conditions were all ica negative. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results showed that the use of glucose or NaCl or combination of both enhanced biofilm producing capacity of staphylococcal isolates irrespective of presence or absence of ica operon.