WorldWideScience

Sample records for biodegradation

  1. Biodegradable Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Isabelle Vroman; Lan Tighzert

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources) or from biological resources (renewable resources). In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. ...

  2. Proceedings of biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains the proceedings of Biodegradation. Topics include:biodegradation using the tools of biotechnology, basic science aspects of biodegradation, the physiological characteristics of microorganisms, the use of selective techniques that enhance the process of microbial evolution of biodegradative genes in nature, the genetic characteristics of microorganisms allowing them to biodegrade both natural and synthetic toxic chemicals, the molecular techniques that allow selective assembly of genetic segments form a variety of bacterial strains to a single strain, and methods needed to advance biodegradation research as well as the high-priority chemical problems important to the Department of Defense or to the chemical industry

  3. Biodegradability of Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Tokiwa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.. In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  4. Grey water biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghunmi, Lina Abu; Zeeman, Grietje; Fayyad, Manar; van Lier, Jules B

    2011-02-01

    Knowing the biodegradability characteristics of grey water constituents is imperative for a proper design and operation of a biological treatment system of grey water. This study characterizes the different COD fractions of dormitory grey water and investigates the effect of applying different conditions in the biodegradation test. The maximum aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability and conversion rate for the different COD fractions is determined. The results show that, on average, dormitory grey water COD fractions are 28% suspended, 32% colloidal and 40% dissolved. The studied factors incubation time, inoculum addition and temperature are influencing the determined biodegradability. The maximum biodegradability and biodegradation rate differ between different COD fractions, viz. COD(ss), COD(col) and COD(diss). The dissolved COD fraction is characterised by the lowest degradation rate, both for anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The maximum biodegradability for aerobic and anaerobic conditions is 86 and 70% respectively, whereas the first order conversion rate constant, k₂₀, is 0.119 and 0.005 day⁻¹, respectively. The anaerobic and aerobic conversion rates in relation to temperature can be described by the Arrhenius relation, with temperature coefficients of 1.069 and 1.099, respectively. PMID:20658309

  5. Biodegradable modified Phba systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compositions as well as production technology of ecologically sound biodegradable multicomponent polymer systems were developed. Our objective was to design some bio plastic based composites with required mechanical properties and biodegradability intended for use as biodegradable packaging. Significant characteristics required for food packaging such as barrier properties (water and oxygen permeability) and influence of γ-radiation on the structure and changes of main characteristics of some modified PHB matrices was evaluated. It was found that barrier properties were plasticizers chemical nature and sterilization with γ-radiation dependent and were comparable with corresponding values of typical polymeric packaging films. Low γ-radiation levels (25 kGy) can be recommended as an effective sterilization method of PHB based packaging materials. Purposely designed bio plastic packaging may provide an alternative to traditional synthetic packaging materials without reducing the comfort of the end-user due to specific qualities of PHB - biodegradability, Biocompatibility and hydrophobic nature

  6. Green and biodegradable electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai Irimia-Vladu; Eric. D. Głowacki; Gundula Voss; Siegfried Bauer; Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci

    2012-01-01

    We live in a world where the lifetime of electronics is becoming shorter, now approaching an average of several months. This poses a growing ecological problem. This brief review will present some of the initial steps taken to address the issue of electronic waste with biodegradable organic electronic materials. Many organic materials have been shown to be biodegradable, safe, and nontoxic, including compounds of natural origin. Additionally, the unique features of such organic materials sugg...

  7. Green and biodegradable electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Irimia-Vladu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We live in a world where the lifetime of electronics is becoming shorter, now approaching an average of several months. This poses a growing ecological problem. This brief review will present some of the initial steps taken to address the issue of electronic waste with biodegradable organic electronic materials. Many organic materials have been shown to be biodegradable, safe, and nontoxic, including compounds of natural origin. Additionally, the unique features of such organic materials suggest they will be useful in biofunctional electronics; demonstrating functions that would be inaccessible for traditional inorganic compounds. Such materials may lead to fully biodegradable and even biocompatible/biometabolizable electronics for many low-cost applications. This review highlights recent progress in these classes of material, covering substrates and insulators, semiconductors, and finally conductors.

  8. Editorial: Biodegradable Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Schaschke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue “Biodegradable Materials” features research and review papers concerning recent advances on the development, synthesis, testing and characterisation of biomaterials. These biomaterials, derived from natural and renewable sources, offer a potential alternative to existing non-biodegradable materials with application to the food and biomedical industries amongst many others. In this Special Issue, the work is expanded to include the combined use of fillers that can enhance the properties of biomaterials prepared as films. The future application of these biomaterials could have an impact not only at the economic level, but also for the improvement of the environment.

  9. Absorbable and biodegradable polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Shalaby, Shalaby W

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION NOTES: Absorbable/Biodegradable Polymers: Technology Evolution. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATIONOF NEW SYSTEMS: Segmented Copolyesters with Prolonged Strength Retention Profiles. Polyaxial Crystalline Fiber-Forming Copolyester. Polyethylene Glycol-Based Copolyesters. Cyanoacrylate-Based Systems as Tissue Adhesives. Chitosan-Based Systems. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Systems. DEVELOPMENTS IN PREPARATIVE, PROCESSING, AND EVALUATION METHODS: New Approaches to the Synthesis of Crystalline. Fiber-Forming Aliphatic Copolyesters. Advances in Morphological Development to Tailor the Performance of Me

  10. Preparation of a biodegradable oil absorber and its biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Su-Yong; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan; Lee, Min-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    The biodegradable oil absorption resin (B-PEHA) was prepared by suspension polymerization, and its preparation was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared analysis. The oil absorption capacities of the prepared B-PEHA were: chloroform 30.88, toluene 19.75, xylene, 18.78, THF 15.96, octane 11.43, hexane 9.5, diesel oil 12.80, and kerosene 13.79 g/g. The biodegradation of the prepared B-PEHA was also investigated by determination of reduced sugar produced after enzymatic hydrolysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and incubation with Aspergillus niger. The biodegradation of B-PEHA was ~18%. PMID:21909668

  11. Biodegradation of Polypropylene Nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Brandi Nechelle

    The primary aim of the current research is to document the biodegradation of polypropylene nonwovens and filament under composting environments. To accelerate the biodegradat ion, pre-treatments and additives were incorporated into polypropylene filaments and nonwovens. The initial phase (Chapter 2) of the project studied the biodegradation of untreated polypropylene with/without pro-oxidants in two types of composting systems. Normal composting, which involved incubation of samples in food waste, had little effect on the mechanical properties of additive-free spunbond nonwovens in to comparison prooxidant containing spunbond nonwovens which were affected significantly. Modified composting which includes the burial of samples with food and compressed air, the polypropylene spunbond nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants displayed an extreme loss in mechanical properties and cracking on the surface cracking. Because the untreated spunbond nonwovens did not completely decompose, the next phase of the project examined the pre-treatment of gamma-irradiation or thermal aging prior to composting. After exposure to gamma-irradiation and thermal aging, polypropylene is subjected to oxidative degradation in the presence of air and during storage after irradiat ion. Similar to photo-oxidation, the mechanism of gamma radiation and thermal oxidative degradation is fundamentally free radical in nature. In Chapter 3, the compostability of thermal aged spunbond polypropylene nonwovens with/without pro-oxidant additives. The FTIR spectrum confirmed oxidat ion of the polypropylene nonwovens with/without additives. Cracking on both the pro-oxidant and control spunbond nonwovens was showed by SEM imaging. Spunbond polypropylene nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants were also preirradiated by gamma rays followed by composting. Nonwovens with/without pro-oxidants were severely degraded by gamma-irradiation after up to 20 kGy exposure as explained in Chapter 4. Furthermore (Chapter 5), gamma

  12. Biodegradable micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Greve, Anders; Schmid, Silvan;

    The development of biopolymers for food packaging, medical engineering or drug delivery is a growing field of research [1]. At the same time, the interest in methods for detailed analysis of biopolymers is increasing. Micromechanical sensors are versatile tools for the characterization of mechani......The development of biopolymers for food packaging, medical engineering or drug delivery is a growing field of research [1]. At the same time, the interest in methods for detailed analysis of biopolymers is increasing. Micromechanical sensors are versatile tools for the characterization...... of biopolymers to microfabrication is challenging, as these polymers are affected by common processes such as photolithography or wet etching. Here, we present two methods for fabrication of biodegradable micromechanical sensors. First, we fabricated bulk biopolymer microcantilevers using nanoimprint lithography...

  13. Biodegradation of biodiesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel fuel test substances Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Neat Rape Oil (NR), Say Methyl Ester (SME), Soy Ethyl Ester (SEE), Neat Soy Oil (NS), and proportionate combinations of RME/diesel and REE/diesel were studied to test the biodegradability of the test substances in an aerobic aquatic environment using the EPA 560/6-82-003 Shake Flask Test Method. A concurrent analysis of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel was also performed for comparison with a conventional fuel. The highest rates of percent CO2 evolution were seen in the esterified fuels, although no significant difference was noted between them. Ranges of percent CO2 evolution for esterified fuels were from 77% to 91%. The neat rape and neat soy oils exhibited 70% to 78% CO2 evolution. These rates were all significantly higher than those of the Phillips D-2 reference fuel which evolved from 7% to 26% of the organic carbon to CO2. The test substances were examined for BOD5 and COD values as a relative measure of biodegradability. Water Accommodated Fraction (WAF) was experimentally derived and BOD5 and COD analyses were carried out with a diluted concentration at or below the WAF. The results of analysis at WAF were then converted to pure substance values. The pure substance BOD5 and COD values for test substances were then compared to a control substance, Phillips D-2 Reference fuel. No significant difference was noted for COD values between test substances and the control fuel. (p > 0.20). The D-2 control substance was significantly lower than all test substances for BCD, values at p 5 value

  14. FOSSIL FUEL BIODEGRADATION: LABORATORY STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural processes of biodegradation, that return carbon from its various organic forms to the inorganic state, are increasingly screened for bioremediation applications. ariety of microbial systems capable of degrading synthetic organic chemicals, from pesticides to polychlorinat...

  15. Anaerobic biodegradability of kitchen waste

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, L.; Oliveira, Rosário; M. Mota; Alves, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradability of synthetic and real kitchen wastes was assessed in batch assays, under different solid contents between 1,8 and 24% and waste/inoculum ratios between 0,2 and 29 VSwaste/Vsseed sludge. Methanization rate and cumulative methane production from synthetic wastes simulated with different blends of protein, carbohydrates, fat and cellulose were compared. Although the excess of protein, carbohydrates and cellulose enhanced the biodegradability by 16 to 48%, the excess of fat re...

  16. Progress of biodegradable metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafang Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable metals (BMs are metals and alloys expected to corrode gradually in vivo, with an appropriate host response elicited by released corrosion products, then dissolve completely upon fulfilling the mission to assist with tissue healing with no implant residues. In the present review article, three classes of BMs have been systematically reviewed, including Mg-based, Fe-based and Zn-based BMs. Among the three BM systems, Mg-based BMs, which now have several systems reported the successful of clinical trial results, are considered the vanguards and main force. Fe-based BMs, with pure iron and Fe–Mn based alloys as the most promising, are still on the animal test stage. Zn-based BMs, supposed to have the degradation rate between the fast Mg-based BMs and the slow Fe-based BMs, are a rising star with only several reports and need much further research. The future research and development direction for the BMs are proposed, based on the clinical requirements on controllable degradation rate, prolonged mechanical stability and excellent biocompatibility, by optimization of alloy composition design, regulation on microstructure and mechanical properties, and following surface modification.

  17. Biodegradation of polyethoxylated nonylphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Yassellis; Medina, Luis; Borusiak, Margarita; Ramos, Nairalith; Pinto, Gilberto; Valbuena, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Polyethoxylated nonylphenols, with different ethoxylation degrees (NPEO x ), are incorporated into many commercial and industrial products such as detergents, domestic disinfectants, emulsifiers, cosmetics, and pesticides. However, the toxic effects exerted by their degradation products, which are persistent in natural environments, have been demonstrated in several animal and invertebrate aquatic species. Therefore, it seems appropriate to look for indigenous bacteria capable of degrading native NPEO x and its derivatives. In this paper, the isolation of five bacterial strains, capable of using NPEO 15 , as unique carbon source, is described. The most efficient NPEO 15 degrader bacterial strains were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain Yas2) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (strain Yas1). Maximal growth rates were reached at pH 8, 27°C in a 5% NPEO 15 medium. The NPEO 15 degradation extension, followed by viscometry assays, reached 65% after 54.5 h and 134 h incubation times, while the COD values decreased by 95% and 85% after 24 h for the Yas1 and Yas2 systems, respectively. The BOD was reduced by 99% and 99.9% levels in 24 h and 48 h incubations. The viscosity data indicated that the NPEO 15 biodegradation by Yas2 follows first-order kinetics. Kinetic rate constant (k) and half life time (τ) for this biotransformation were estimated to be 0.0072 h(-1) and 96.3 h, respectively. PMID:23936727

  18. Progress of biodegradable metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huafang Li; Yufeng Zheng; Ling Qin

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable metals (BMs) are metals and alloys expected to corrode gradually in vivo, with an appropriate host response elicited by released corrosion products, then dissolve completely upon fulfilling the mission to assist with tissue healing with no implant residues. In the present review article, three classes of BMs have been systematically reviewed, including Mg-based, Fe-based and Zn-based BMs. Among the three BM systems, Mg-based BMs, which now have several systems reported the successful of clinical trial results, are considered the vanguards and main force. Fe-based BMs, with pure iron and Fe–Mn based alloys as the most promising, are still on the animal test stage. Zn-based BMs, supposed to have the degradation rate between the fast Mg-based BMs and the slow Fe-based BMs, are a rising star with only several reports and need much further research. The future research and development direction for the BMs are proposed, based on the clinical requirements on controllable degradation rate, prolonged mechanical stability and excellent biocompat-ibility, by optimization of alloy composition design, regulation on microstructure and mechanical properties, and following surface modification.

  19. Effects of the Biodegradation on Biodegradable Polymer Blends and Polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, R. C. T.; Franchetti, S. M. M.; Agnelli, J. A. M.; Mattoso, L. H. C.

    2008-08-01

    The large use of plastics in the world generates a large amount of waste which persists around 200 years in the environment. To minimize this effect is important to search some new polymer materials: the blends of biodegradable polymers with synthetic polymers. It is a large area that needs an intensive research to investigate the blends properties and its behavior face to the different treatments to aim at the biodegradation. The blends used in this work are: some biodegradable polymers such as: poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and poly(ɛ-polycaprolactone) (PCL) with a synthetic polymer, polypropylene (PP), in lower concentration. These blends were prepared using an internal mixer (Torque Rheometer), and pressed. These films were submitted to fungus biotreatment. The films analyses will be carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), UV-Vis absorption (UV-Vis), Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), DSC and TGA.

  20. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PL

  1. Poly (3-Hydroxyalkanoates: Biodegradable Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Jain

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During the 1920’s, a polyester called poly (3-hydroxybutyrate was discovered in bacterial cells. This compound, otherwise known as PHB, is part of a polyester family called polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs. Polyhydroxyalkanoates are used as an energy and carbon sto rage compound within certain bacterial cells. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are thermoplastic, biodegradable polyesters synthesized by some bacteria from renewable carbon sources. However, their application is limited by high production cost. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs have attracted research and commercial interests worldwide because they can be used as biodegradable thermoplastics and also because they can be produced from renewable resources. This review will present an overview on synthesis and degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs, development as biodegradable plastics and its potential production from renewable resources such as palm oil products.

  2. Biodegradable congress 2012; Bioschmierstoff-Kongress 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    Within the Guelzower expert discussions at 5th and 6th June, 2012 in Oberhausen (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures were held: (1) Promotion of biodegradable lubricants by means of research and development as well as public relations (Steffen Daebeler); (2) Biodegradable lubricants - An overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the engaged product groups (Hubertus Murrenhoff); (3) Standardization of biodegradable lubricants - CEN/DIN standard committees - state of the art (Rolf Luther); (4) Market research for the utilization of biodegradable lubricants and means of proof of sustainability (Norbert Schmitz); (5) Fields of application for high performance lubricants and requirements upon the products (Gunther Kraft); (6) Investigations of biodegradable lubricants in rolling bearings and gears (Christoph Hentschke); (7) Biodegradable lubricants in central lubrication systems Development of gears and bearings of offshore wind power installations (Reiner Wagner); (8) Investigations towards environmental compatibility of biodegradable lubricants used in offshore wind power installations (Tolf Schneider); (9) Development of glycerine based lubricants for the industrial metalworking (Harald Draeger); (10) Investigations and utilization of biodegradable oils as electroinsulation oils in transformers (Stefan Tenbohlen); (11) Operational behaviour of lubricant oils in vegetable oil operation and Biodiesel operation (Horst Hamdorf); (12) Lubrication effect of lubricating oil of the third generation (Stefan Heitzig); (13) Actual market development from the view of a producer of biodegradable lubricants (Frank Lewen); (14) Utilization of biodegradable lubricants in forestry harvesters (Guenther Weise); (15) New biodegradable lubricants based on high oleic sunflower oil (Otto Botz); (16) Integrated fluid concept - optimized technology and service package for users of biodegradable lubricants (Juergen Baer); (17) Utilization of a bio oil sensor to control

  3. Biodegradation kinetics at low concentrations (

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toräng, Lars; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Nyholm, Niels

    Aerobic biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied in groundwater added sediment fines. At concentrations at or below 1 mu g/L of 2,4-D degradation kinetic was of true first order without significant growth of specific degraders and with half-life for mineralization in the...

  4. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  5. Biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Kaiyan

    In this dissertation, various noncrosslinked and crosslinked biobased and biodegradable polymer nanocomposites were fabricated and characterized. The properties of these polymer nanocomposites, and their relating mechanisms and corresponding applications were studied and discussed in depth. Chapter 1 introduces the research background and objectives of the current research. Chapter 2 presents the development of a novel low cost carbon source for bacterial cellulose (BC) production and fabrication and characterization of biobased polymer nanocomposites using produced BC and soy protein based resins. The carbon source, soy flour extract (SFE), was obtained from defatted soy flour (SF) and BC yield achieved using SFE medium was high. The results of this study showed that SFE consists of five sugars and Acetobacter xylinum metabolized sugars in a specific order. Chapter 3 discusses the fabrication and characterization of biodegradable polymer nanocomposites using BC and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). These polymer nanocomposites had excellent tensile and thermal properties. Crosslinking of PVA using glutaraldehyde (GA) not only increased the mechanical and thermal properties but the water-resistance. Chapter 4 describes the development and characterization of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) based biodegradable polymer nanocomposites by blending MFC suspension with PVA. Chemical crosslinking of the polymer nanocomposites was carried out using glyoxal to increase the mechanical and thermal properties as well as to make the PVA partially water-insoluble. Chapter 5 reports the development and characterization of halloysite nanotube (HNT) reinforced biodegradable polymer nanocomposites utilizing HNT dispersion and PVA. Several separation techniques were used to obtain individualized HNT dispersion. The results indicated uniform dispersion of HNTs in both PVA and malonic acid (MA) crosslinked PVA resulted in excellent mechanical and thermal properties of the materials, especially

  6. BIODEGRADABLE COATING FROM AGATHIS ALBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NORYAWATI MULYONO

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The adhesive property of copal makes it as a potential coating onto aluminum foil to replace polyethylene. This research aimed to develop copal-based coating. The coating was prepared by extracting the copal in ethyl acetate and dipping the aluminium foil in ethyl acetate soluble extract of copal. The characterization of coating included its thickness, weight, thermal and chemical resistance, and biodegradation. The results showed that the coating thickness and weight increased as the copal concentration and dipping frequency increased. Thermal resistance test showed that the coating melted after being heated at 110°C for 30 min. Copal-based coating wasresistant to acidic solution (pH 4.0, water, and coconut oil, but was deteriorated in detergent 1% (w/v and basic solution (pH 10.0. Biodegradability test using Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed weight reduction of 76.82% in 30 days.

  7. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR, İsmail; DEMİRBAĞ, Zihni

    1999-01-01

    Polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as petroleum and petroleum derivatives, are widespread organic pollutants entering the environment, chiefly, through oil spills and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Since most PAHs are persist in the environment for a long period of time and bioaccumulate, they cause environmental pollution and effect biological equilibrium dramatically. Biodegradation of some PAHs by microorganisms has been biochemically and genetically investigated. Ge...

  8. Biodegradable lubricants for road vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, J. [Denmark Technical Univ., Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-07-01

    This presentation outlined the characteristics of biolubricants and their use in vehicles. Experiments with compression ignition (CI) and spark ignition (SI) engines were also presented. Biolubes can be used in 4-stroke and 2-stroke engines, bearing compressors and hydraulic equipment. Studies have shown that biolubes do not cause unusual engine wear. They are produced from biomass, with the base material being vegetable oils and synthetic esters. Conventional lubricants are produced from fossil fuels, with the base material being mineral oils, polyglycol or synthetic ester. This presentation rated the characteristics of various lubricants in terms of viscosity temperature behaviour, low temperature behaviour, liquid range, oxidation stability, thermal stability, volatility, fire resistance, hydrolytic stability, corrosion protection, seal material compatibility, paints compatibility, miscibility with mineral oil, solubility of additives, lubricating properties, toxicity, and biodegradability. The environmental impacts of biolubes regarding emissions of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and particulate matter were discussed along with the impact of combining biolubes with alternative fuels. The future beneficial applications include outboard engines, off road vehicle engines and road vehicle engines. Currently, vegetable oil based biolubricants are 2 to 3 times more expensive than mineral based oils, and synthetic lubricants are even more expensive. It was suggested that future studies should examine the biodegradability of used lubricants, the performance of biodegradable lubricants, alternative fuels and fuel economy. tabs., figs.

  9. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.

  10. Radiation effects on biodegradable polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] and its copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] are microbial biodegradable polyesters produced by many types of bacteria. Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(E-caprolactone) (PCL) are also biodegradable synthetic polyesters which have been commercialized. These thermoplastics are expected for wide usage in environmental protection and blocompatible applications. Radiation grafting of hydrophilic monomers onto many polymers, e.g., polyethylene and polypropylene has been studied mainly for biomedical applications. In the present study, radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl monomers onto PHB and P(3HB-co-3HV) was carried out and improvement of their properties was studied. Changes in the properties and biodegradability were compared with the degree of grafting. Radiation-induced crosslinking of PBS and PCL which relatively show thermal and irradiation stability was also carried out to improve their thermal stability or processability. Irradiation to PBS and PCL mainly resulted in crosslinking and characterization of these crosslinked polyesters was investigated

  11. Biodegradation of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Stloukal, Petr; Koutný, Marek; Sedlařík, Vladimír; Kucharczyk, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Polylactid acid seems to be an appropriate replacement of conventional non-biodegradable synthetic polymer primarily due to comparable mechanical, thermal and processing properties in its high molecular weight form. Biodegradation of high molecular PLA was studied in compost for various forms differing in their specific surface area. The material proved its good biodegradability under composting conditions and all investigated forms showed to be acceptable for industrial composting. Despite e...

  12. Biodegradable materials as foundry moulding sands binders

    OpenAIRE

    K. Major-Gabryś

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show the possibility of using biodegradable materials as part of the composition of foundry moulding and core sand binders. Research shows that moulding sands with biodegradable materials selected as binders are not only less toxic but are also better suited to mechanical reclamation than moulding sands with phenol-furfuryl resin. The use of biodegradable materials as additives to typical synthetic resins can result in their decreased toxicity and improved abilit...

  13. Biodegradable materials as foundry moulding sands binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Major - Gabryś

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show the possibility of using biodegradable materials as part of the composition of foundry moulding and core sand binders. Research shows that moulding sands with biodegradable materials selected as binders are not only less toxic but are also better suited to mechanical reclamation than moulding sands with phenol-furfuryl resin. The use of biodegradable materials as additives to typical synthetic resins can result in their decreased toxicity and improved ability to reclamation as well as in accelerated biodegradation of binding material leftovers of mechanical reclamation.

  14. Biodegradation kinetics at low concentrations (

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toräng, Lars; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Nyholm, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied in groundwater added sediment fines. At concentrations at or below 1 mu g/L of 2,4-D degradation kinetic was of true first order without significant growth of specific degraders and with half-life for mineralization in the...... order of 200 days. Higher concentrations of 2,4-D resulted in a grossly overestimate of the actual degradation rate for concentrations characteristic for Danish found in groundwater....

  15. Biodegradation and toxicological evaluation of lubricant oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Shodji Tamada

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare different toxicity levels of lubricant oils. The tests were performed using the earthworm (Eisenia andrei, arugula seeds (Eruca sativa and lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa, with three types of contaminants (mineral lubricant oil, synthetic lubricant oil and used lubricant oil for various biodegradation periods in the soil. The toxicity tests indirectly measured the biodegradation of the contaminants. The samples were analyzed at t0, t60, t120 and t180 days of biodegradation. The used lubricant oil was proved very toxic in all the tests and even after biodegradation its toxicity was high. The mineral and synthetic oils were biodegraded efficiently in the soil although their toxicity did not disappear completely after 180 days.

  16. Intimately coupling of photolysis accelerates nitrobenzene biodegradation, but sequential coupling slows biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lihui [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Life and Environmental Science, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Zhang, Yongming, E-mail: zhym@shnu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Life and Environmental Science, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Bai, Qi; Yan, Ning; Xu, Hua [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Life and Environmental Science, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Rittmann, Bruce E. [Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5701 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Intimately coupled UV photolysis accelerated nitrobenzene biodegradation. • NB biodegradation was slowed by accumulation of nitrophenol. • Oxalic acid was a key product of UV photolysis. • Oxalic acid accelerated biodegradation of nitrobenzene and nitrophenol by a co-substrate effect. • Intimate coupling of UV and biodegradation accentuated the benefits of oxalic acid. - Abstract: Photo(cata)lysis coupled with biodegradation is superior to photo(cata)lysis or biodegradation alone for removal of recalcitrant organic compounds. The two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously via intimate coupling. We studied nitrobenzene (NB) removal and mineralization to evaluate why intimate coupling of photolysis with biodegradation was superior to sequential coupling. Employing an internal circulation baffled biofilm reactor, we compared direct biodegradation (B), biodegradation after photolysis (P + B), simultaneous photolysis and biodegradation (P&B), and biodegradation with nitrophenol (NP) and oxalic acid (OA) added individually and simultaneously (B + NP, B + OA, and B + NP + OA); NP and OA were NB’s main UV-photolysis products. Compared with B, the biodegradation rate P + B was lower by 13–29%, but intimately coupling (P&B) had a removal rate that was 10–13% higher; mineralization showed similar trends. B + OA gave results similar to P&B, B + NP gave results similar to P + B, and B + OA + NP gave results between P + B and P&B, depending on the amount of OA and NP added. The photolysis product OA accelerated NB biodegradation through a co-substrate effect, but NP was inhibitory. Although decreasing the UV photolysis time could minimize the inhibition impact of NP in P + B, P&B gave the fastest removal of NB by accentuating the co-substrate effect of OA.

  17. Intimately coupling of photolysis accelerates nitrobenzene biodegradation, but sequential coupling slows biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Intimately coupled UV photolysis accelerated nitrobenzene biodegradation. • NB biodegradation was slowed by accumulation of nitrophenol. • Oxalic acid was a key product of UV photolysis. • Oxalic acid accelerated biodegradation of nitrobenzene and nitrophenol by a co-substrate effect. • Intimate coupling of UV and biodegradation accentuated the benefits of oxalic acid. - Abstract: Photo(cata)lysis coupled with biodegradation is superior to photo(cata)lysis or biodegradation alone for removal of recalcitrant organic compounds. The two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously via intimate coupling. We studied nitrobenzene (NB) removal and mineralization to evaluate why intimate coupling of photolysis with biodegradation was superior to sequential coupling. Employing an internal circulation baffled biofilm reactor, we compared direct biodegradation (B), biodegradation after photolysis (P + B), simultaneous photolysis and biodegradation (P&B), and biodegradation with nitrophenol (NP) and oxalic acid (OA) added individually and simultaneously (B + NP, B + OA, and B + NP + OA); NP and OA were NB’s main UV-photolysis products. Compared with B, the biodegradation rate P + B was lower by 13–29%, but intimately coupling (P&B) had a removal rate that was 10–13% higher; mineralization showed similar trends. B + OA gave results similar to P&B, B + NP gave results similar to P + B, and B + OA + NP gave results between P + B and P&B, depending on the amount of OA and NP added. The photolysis product OA accelerated NB biodegradation through a co-substrate effect, but NP was inhibitory. Although decreasing the UV photolysis time could minimize the inhibition impact of NP in P + B, P&B gave the fastest removal of NB by accentuating the co-substrate effect of OA

  18. Biodegradable Metals From Concept to Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hermawan, Hendra

    2012-01-01

    This book in the emerging research field of biomaterials covers biodegradable metals for biomedical applications. The book contains two main parts where each of them consists of three chapters. The first part introduces the readers to the field of metallic biomaterials, exposes the state of the art of biodegradable metals, and reveals its application for cardiovascular implants. It includes some fundamental aspects to give basic understanding on metals for further review on the degradable ones is covered in chapter one. The second chapter introduces the concept of biodegradable metals, it's st

  19. Biodegradation of surfactant bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear industry, during decontamination of protective wears and contaminated materials, detergents are employed to bring down the level of radioactive contamination within safe limits. However, the surfactant present in these wastes interferes in the chemical treatment process, reducing the decontamination factor. Biodegradation is an efficient and ecologically safe method for surfactant removal. A surfactant degrading culture was isolated and inoculated separately into simulated effluents containing 1% yeast extract and 5-100 ppm sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and 1% yeast extract and 5-100 ppm of commercial detergent respectively. The growth of the bacterial culture and the degradation characteristics of the surfactant in the above effluents were monitored under both dynamic and static conditions. (author). 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  20. New perspectives in plastic biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Alex

    2011-06-01

    During the past 50 years new plastic materials, in various applications, have gradually replaced the traditional metal, wood, leather materials. Ironically, the most preferred property of plastics--durability--exerts also the major environmental threat. Recycling has practically failed to provide a safe solution for disposal of plastic waste (only 5% out of 1 trillion plastic bags, annually produced in the US alone, are being recycled). Since the most utilized plastic is polyethylene (PE; ca. 140 million tons/year), any reduction in the accumulation of PE waste alone would have a major impact on the overall reduction of the plastic waste in the environment. Since PE is considered to be practically inert, efforts were made to isolate unique microorganisms capable of utilizing synthetic polymers. Recent data showed that biodegradation of plastic waste with selected microbial strains became a viable solution. PMID:21356588

  1. Engineered biosynthesis of biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambunathan, Pooja; Zhang, Kechun

    2016-08-01

    Advances in science and technology have resulted in the rapid development of biobased plastics and the major drivers for this expansion are rising environmental concerns of plastic pollution and the depletion of fossil-fuels. This paper presents a broad view on the recent developments of three promising biobased plastics, polylactic acid (PLA), polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and polybutylene succinate (PBS), well known for their biodegradability. The article discusses the natural and recombinant host organisms used for fermentative production of monomers, alternative carbon feedstocks that have been used to lower production cost, different metabolic engineering strategies used to improve product titers, various fermentation technologies employed to increase productivities and finally, the different downstream processes used for recovery and purification of the monomers and polymers. PMID:27260524

  2. Biodegradation of halogenated organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, G R; Chapalamadugu, S

    1991-03-01

    In this review we discuss the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons by microorganisms, emphasizing the physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of the biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polycyclic compounds. Many environmentally important xenobiotics are halogenated, especially chlorinated. These compounds are manufactured and used as pesticides, plasticizers, paint and printing-ink components, adhesives, flame retardants, hydraulic and heat transfer fluids, refrigerants, solvents, additives for cutting oils, and textile auxiliaries. The hazardous chemicals enter the environment through production, commercial application, and waste. As a result of bioaccumulation in the food chain and groundwater contamination, they pose public health problems because many of them are toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. Although synthetic chemicals are usually recalcitrant to biodegradation, microorganisms have evolved an extensive range of enzymes, pathways, and control mechanisms that are responsible for catabolism of a wide variety of such compounds. Thus, such biological degradation can be exploited to alleviate environmental pollution problems. The pathways by which a given compound is degraded are determined by the physical, chemical, and microbiological aspects of a particular environment. By understanding the genetic basis of catabolism of xenobiotics, it is possible to improve the efficacy of naturally occurring microorganisms or construct new microorganisms capable of degrading pollutants in soil and aquatic environments more efficiently. Recently a number of genes whose enzyme products have a broader substrate specificity for the degradation of aromatic compounds have been cloned and attempts have been made to construct gene cassettes or synthetic operons comprising these degradative genes. Such gene cassettes or operons can be transferred into suitable microbial hosts for extending and custom designing the pathways for rapid degradation of recalcitrant

  3. Preparation and degradation mechanisms of biodegradable polymer: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, S. H.; Duan, P. P.; Shen, M. X.; Xue, Y. J.; Wang, Z. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Polymers are difficult to degrade completely in Nature, and their catabolites may pollute the environment. In recent years, biodegradable polymers have become the hot topic in people's daily life with increasing interest, and a controllable polymer biodegradation is one of the most important directions for future polymer science. This article presents the main preparation methods for biodegradable polymers and discusses their degradation mechanisms, the biodegradable factors, recent researches and their applications. The future researches of biodegradable polymers are also put forward.

  4. Biodegradable polymers: Which, when and why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotwal V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The plethora of drug therapies and types of drugs demand different formulations, fabrications conditions and release kinetics. No single polymer can satisfy all the requirements. Therefore there have been tremendous advances in area of biodegradable copolymers over the last 30 years. This article reviews current research on biodegradable polymers, focusing their potential as drug carries. The major classes of polymers are briefly discussed with regard to synthesis, properties and biodegradability, and known degradation modes and products are indicated based on studies reported in the literature. A vast majority of biodegradable polymers studied belongs to the polyester family, which includes polyglycolides and polylactides. Other degradable polymers such as polyorthoesters, polyanhydrides and polyphosphazenes are also discussed and their advantages and disadvantages are summarized.

  5. Biodegradable lubricants - ''the solution for future?''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental impact of lubricants use concern the direct effects from spills but also the indirect effects such as their lifetime and the emissions from thermal engines. The biodegradable performances and the toxicity are the environmental criteria that must be taken into account in the development and application of lubricants together with their technical performances. This paper recalls first the definition of biodegradable properties of hydrocarbons and the standardized tests, in particular the CEC and AFNOR tests. Then, the biodegradable performances of basic oils (mineral, vegetal, synthetic esters, synthetic hydrocarbons etc..), finite lubricants (hydraulic fluids..) and engine oils is analyzed according to these tests. Finally, the definition of future standards would take into account all the environmental characteristics of the lubricant: biodegradable performances, energy balance (CO2, NOx and Hx emissions and fuel savings), eco-toxicity and technical performances (wearing and cleanliness). (J.S.)

  6. Biodegradation of cresol isomers in anoxic aquifers.

    OpenAIRE

    Smolenski, W J; Suflita, J M

    1987-01-01

    The biodegradation of o-, m-, and p-cresol was examined in material obtained from a shallow anaerobic alluvial sand aquifer. The cresol isomers were preferentially metabolized, with p-cresol being the most easily degraded. m-Cresol was more persistent than the para-isomer, and o-cresol persisted for over 90 days. Biodegradation of cresol isomers was favored under sulfate-reducing conditions (SRC) compared with that under methanogenic conditions (MC). Slurries that were acclimated to p-cresol ...

  7. Biodegradation and toxicological evaluation of lubricant oils

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo Shodji Tamada; Paulo Renato Matos Lopes; Renato Nallin Montagnolli; Ederio Dino Bidoia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different toxicity levels of lubricant oils. The tests were performed using the earthworm (Eisenia andrei), arugula seeds (Eruca sativa) and lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa), with three types of contaminants (mineral lubricant oil, synthetic lubricant oil and used lubricant oil) for various biodegradation periods in the soil. The toxicity tests indirectly measured the biodegradation of the contaminants. The samples were analyzed at t0, t60, t120 and t180 days...

  8. Biodegradability of Chlorinated Anilines in Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO WANG; GUAN-GHUA LU; YAN-JIE ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify the bacteria tolerating chlorinated anilines and to study the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline and its coexistent compounds. Methods Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicant. Biodegradability of chlorinated anilines was determined using domesticated complex bacteria as an inoculum by shaking-flask test. Results The complex bacteria were identified, consisting of Xanthomonas, Bacillus alcaligenes,Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetaceae nocardia. The obtained complex bacteria were more tolerant to o-chloroaniline than mixture bacteria in natural river waters. The effects of exposure concentration and inoculum size on the biodegradability of o-chloroaniline were analyzed, and the biodegradation characteristics of single o-chloroaniline and 2,4-dichloroaniline were compared with the coexistent compounds. Conclusion The biodegradation rates can be improved by decreasing concentration of compounds and increasing inoculum size of complex bacteria. When o-chloroaniline coexists with aniline, the latter is biodegraded prior to the former, and as a consequence the metabolic efficiency of o-chloroaniline is improved with the increase of aniline concentration. Meanwhile, when o-chloroaniline coexists with 2,4-dichloroaniline, the metabolic efficiency of 2,4-dichloroaniline is markedly improved.

  9. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  10. Bio-Degradable Plastics Impact On Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.SUBRAMANI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of biodegradable polymers and more particularly that of polymers obtained from renewable resources such as the polysaccharides (e.g., starch have long been recognized. However, these biodegradable polymers have been largely used in some applications (e.g., food industry and have not found extensive applications in the packaging industries to replace conventional plastic materials, although they could be an interesting way to overcome the limitation of the petrochemical resources in the future. The fossil fuel and gas could be partially replaced by greener agricultural sources, which should participate in the reduction of CO2 emissions. Bio-based and biodegradable plastics can form the basis for environmentally preferable, sustainable alternative to current materials based exclusively on petroleum feed stocks. These bio-based materials offer value in the sustainability/life-cycle equation by being a part of the biological carbon cycle, especially as it relates to carbon-based polymeric materials such as plastics, water soluble polymers and other carbon based products like lubricants, biodiesel, and detergents. Identification and quantification of bio based content uses radioactive C-14 signature. Biopolymers are generally capable of being utilized by living matter (biodegraded, and so can be disposed in safe and ecologically sound ways through disposal processes (waste management like composting, soil application, and biological wastewater treatment. Single use, short-life, disposable products can be engineered to be bio-based and biodegradable.

  11. Biodegradable Photonic Melanoidin for Theranostic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Young; Lee, Changho; Jung, Ho Sang; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Ki Su; Yun, Seok Hyun; Kim, Chulhong; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2016-01-26

    Light-absorbing nanoparticles for localized heat generation in tissues have various biomedical applications in diagnostic imaging, surgery, and therapies. Although numerous plasmonic and carbon-based nanoparticles with strong optical absorption have been developed, their clearance, potential cytotoxicity, and long-term safety issues remain unresolved. Here, we show that "generally regarded as safe (GRAS)" melanoidins prepared from glucose and amino acid offer a high light-to-heat conversion efficiency, biocompatibility, biodegradability, nonmutagenicity, and efficient renal clearance, as well as a low cost for synthesis. We exhibit a wide range of biomedical photonic applications of melanoidins, including in vivo photoacoustic mapping of sentinel lymph nodes, photoacoustic tracking of gastrointestinal tracts, photothermal cancer therapy, and photothermal lipolysis. The biodegradation rate and renal clearance of melanoidins are controllable by design. Our results confirm the feasibility of biodegradable melanoidins for various photonic applications to theranostic nanomedicines. PMID:26623481

  12. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes

  13. Biodegradable Polymers and Stem Cells for Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijuan Lei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative to develop organ manufacturing technologies based on the high organ failure mortality and serious donor shortage problems. As an emerging and promising technology, bioprinting has attracted more and more attention with its super precision, easy reproduction, fast manipulation and advantages in many hot research areas, such as tissue engineering, organ manufacturing, and drug screening. Basically, bioprinting technology consists of inkjet bioprinting, laser-based bioprinting and extrusion-based bioprinting techniques. Biodegradable polymers and stem cells are common printing inks. In the printed constructs, biodegradable polymers are usually used as support scaffolds, while stem cells can be engaged to differentiate into different cell/tissue types. The integration of biodegradable polymers and stem cells with the bioprinting techniques has provided huge opportunities for modern science and technologies, including tissue repair, organ transplantation and energy metabolism.

  14. Biodegradable Polymers and Stem Cells for Bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Meijuan; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    It is imperative to develop organ manufacturing technologies based on the high organ failure mortality and serious donor shortage problems. As an emerging and promising technology, bioprinting has attracted more and more attention with its super precision, easy reproduction, fast manipulation and advantages in many hot research areas, such as tissue engineering, organ manufacturing, and drug screening. Basically, bioprinting technology consists of inkjet bioprinting, laser-based bioprinting and extrusion-based bioprinting techniques. Biodegradable polymers and stem cells are common printing inks. In the printed constructs, biodegradable polymers are usually used as support scaffolds, while stem cells can be engaged to differentiate into different cell/tissue types. The integration of biodegradable polymers and stem cells with the bioprinting techniques has provided huge opportunities for modern science and technologies, including tissue repair, organ transplantation and energy metabolism. PMID:27136526

  15. Petroleum biodegradation and oil spill bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in the marine environment following oil spills. These microorganisms naturally biodegrade numerous contaminating petroleum hydrocarbons, thereby cleansing the oceans of oil pullutants. Bioremediation, which is accomplished by adding exogenous microbial populations or stimulating indigenous ones, attempts to raise the rates of degradation found naturally to significantly higher rates. Seeding with oil degraders has not been demonstrated to be effective, but addition of nitrogenous fertilizers has been shown to increase rates of petroleum biodegradation. In the case of the Exxon Valdez spill, the largest and most thoroughly studied application of bioremediation, the application of fertilizer (slow release or oleophilic) increased rates of biodegradation 3-5 times. Because of the patchiness of oil, an internally conserved compound, hopane, was critical for demonstrating the efficacy of bioremediation. Multiple regression models showed that the effectiveness of bioremediation depended upon the amount of nitrogen delivered, the concentration of oil, and time. (author)

  16. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@mail.ntust.edu.tw; He, Wen-Jie [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Chiang, Chiao-Hsi [School of Pharmacy, National Defense Medical Center (China); Hong, Po-Da [National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech), Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and The Alex Grass Center for Drug Design and Synthesis (Israel); Ou, Keng-Liang [College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production (China)

    2013-07-15

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes.

  17. Biodegradability Evaluation of Polymers by ISO 14855-2

    OpenAIRE

    Masao Kunioka; Fumi Ninomiya; Masahiro Funabashi

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradabilities of polymers and their composites in a controlled compost were described. Polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were employed as biodegradable polymers. Biodegradabilities of PCL and PLA samples in a controlled compost were measured using a Microbial Oxidative Degradation Analyzer (MODA) according to ISO 14855-2. Sample preparation method for biodegradation test according to ISO/DIS 10210 was also described. Effects of sizes and shapes of samples on biodegradabi...

  18. Biodegradable polyesters based on succinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Marija S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two series of aliphatic polyesters based on succinic acid were synthesized by copolymerization with adipic acid for the first series of saturated polyesters, and with fumaric acid for the second series. Polyesters were prepared starting from the corresponding dimethyl esters and 1,4-butanediol by melt transesterification in the presence of a highly effective catalyst tetra-n-butyl-titanate, Ti(0Bu4. The molecular structure and composition of the copolyesters was determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The effect of copolymer composition on the physical and thermal properties of these random polyesters were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The degree of crystallinity was determined by DSC and wide angle X-ray. The degrees of crystallinity of the saturated and unsaturated copolyesters were generally reduced with respect to poly(butylene succinate, PBS. The melting temperatures of the saturated polyesters were lower, while the melting temperatures of the unsaturated copolyesters were higher than the melting temperature of PBS. The biodegradability of the polyesters was investigated by enzymatic degradation tests. The enzymatic degradation tests were performed in a buffer solution with Candida cylindracea lipase and for the unsaturated polyesters with Rhizopus arrhizus lipase. The extent of biodegradation was quantified as the weight loss of polyester films. Also the surface of the polyester films after degradation was observed using optical microscopy. It could be concluded that the biodegradability depended strongly on the degree of crystallinity, but also on the flexibility of the chain backbone. The highest biodegradation was observed for copolyesters containing 50 mol.% of adipic acid units, and in the series of unsaturated polyesters for copolyesters containing 5 and 10 mol.% of fumarate units. Although the degree of crystallinity of the unsaturated polyesters decreased slightly with increasing unsaturation, the biodegradation

  19. Histological evaluation of different biodegradable and non-biodegradable membranes implanted subcutaneously in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, S; Pinholt, E M; Madsen, J E; Donath, K

    2000-01-01

    Different types of biodegradable membranes have become available for guided tissue regeneration. The purpose of this study was to evaluate histologically three different biodegradable membranes (Bio-Gide, Resolut and Vicryl) and one non-biodegradable membrane (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/e-PTFE...... that e-PTFE was well tolerated and encapsulated by a fibrous connective tissue capsule. There was capsule formation around Resolut and Vicryl and around Bio-Gide in the early phase there was a wide inflammatory zone already. e-PTFE and Vicryl were stable materials while Resolut and Bio-Gide fragmented...

  20. Biodegradable containers from green waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartore, Luciana; Schettini, Evelia; Pandini, Stefano; Bignotti, Fabio; Vox, Giuliano; D'Amore, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Novel biodegradable polymeric materials based on protein hydrolysate (PH), derived from waste products of the leather industry, and poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEG) or epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were obtained and their physico-chemical properties and mechanical behaviour were evaluated. Different processing conditions and the introduction of fillers of natural origin, as saw dust and wood flour, were used to tailor the mechanical properties and the environmental durability of the product. The biodegradable products, which are almost completely manufactured from renewable-based raw materials, look promising for several applications, particularly in agriculture for the additional fertilizing action of PH or in packaging.

  1. Biodegradable multifunctional oil production chemicals: Thermal polyaspartates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with biodegradable oil production chemicals. Control of both mineral scale and corrosion with a single, environmentally acceptable material is an ambitious goal. Polyaspartate polymers represent a significant milestone in the attainment of this goal. Thermal polyaspartates (TPA) are polycarboxylate polymers derived via thermal condensation of the naturally occurring amino acid aspartic acid. These protein-like polymers are highly biodegradable and non-toxic, and are produced by an environmentally benign manufacturing process. TPAs exhibit excellent mineral scale inhibition activity and CO2 corrosion control. Laboratory data on scale inhibition and corrosion control in the North Sea oil field production applications is presented. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Synthetic biodegradable functional polymers for tissue engineering: a brief review

    OpenAIRE

    BaoLin, GUO; Ma, Peter X.

    2014-01-01

    Scaffolds play a crucial role in tissue engineering. Biodegradable polymers with great processing flexibility are the predominant scaffolding materials. Synthetic biodegradable polymers with well-defined structure and without immunological concerns associated with naturally derived polymers are widely used in tissue engineering. The synthetic biodegradable polymers that are widely used in tissue engineering, including polyesters, polyanhydrides, polyphosphazenes, polyurethane, and poly (glyce...

  3. Soluble Eggshell Mebrane Protein:Antibacterial Property and Biodegradability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Feng; YU Jian; LI Qiang; GUO Zhaoxia

    2007-01-01

    The antibacterial property and biodegradability of soluble eggshell membrane protein (SEP)are reported. Unlike the natural eggshell membrane (ESM), SEP does not possess antibacterial property against E.coli. The biodegradation tests with trypsin show that both ESM and SEP are biodegradable.

  4. Comparative study on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of silicate bioceramic coatings on biodegradable magnesium alloy as biodegradable biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, M.; Fathi, M. H.; Savabi, O.; Razavi, S. M.; Hashemibeni, B.; Yazdimamaghani, M.; Vashaee, D.; Tayebi, L.

    2014-03-01

    Many clinical cases as well as in vivo and in vitro assessments have demonstrated that magnesium alloys possess good biocompatibility. Unfortunately, magnesium and its alloys degrade too quickly in physiological media. In order to improve the biodegradation resistance and biocompatibility of a biodegradable magnesium alloy, we have prepared three types of coating include diopside (CaMgSi2O6), akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O6) and bredigite (Ca7MgSi4O16) coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy through a micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. In this research, the biodegradation and biocompatibility behavior of samples were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro analysis was performed by cytocompatibility and MTT-assay and the in vivo test was conducted on the implantation of samples in the greater trochanter of adult rabbits. The results showed that diopside coating has the best bone regeneration and bredigite has the best biodegradation resistance compared to others.

  5. Biodegradable polymers in clinical use and clinical development

    CERN Document Server

    Domb, Abraham J

    2011-01-01

    The definitive guide to biodegradable polymer science-where we are and what's to come The most comprehensive review of biodegradable polymers already utilized or under development for clinical use, Biodegradable Polymers in Clinical Use and Clinical Development looks at the state of biodegradable polymers now and over the next five years. Implantable molecules that break down within the body over a predetermined period of time, biodegradable polymers have been employed as drug carriers, orthopedic fixation devices, and absorbable sutures. Yet while hundreds of such polymers have been deve

  6. Biodegradation of chlorobenzoic acids by ligninolytic fungi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muzikář, Milan; Křesinová, Zdena; Svobodová, Kateřina; Filipová, Alena; Čvančarová, Monika; Cajthamlová, Kamila; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 196, - (2011), s. 386-394. ISSN 0304-3894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06156; GA ČR GA525/09/1058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Chlorobenzoic acid * Polychlorinated biphenyls * Biodegradation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.173, year: 2011

  7. Fabrication of Environmentally Biodegradable Lignin Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frangville, C.; Rutkevicius, M.; Richter, A.P.; Velev, O.D.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method for the fabrication of novel biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) from lignin which are apparently non-toxic for microalgae and yeast. We compare two alternative methods for the synthesis of lignin NPs which result in particles of very different stability upon change of pH. The fi

  8. Natural Biodegradation of Phenolic Compounds in Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A combination of field data and theoretical approaches is used to assess the natural attenuation and status of a complex plume of phenolic compounds (phenol, cresols, xylenols) in a deep, consolidated, UK Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifer. Biodegradation of the phenolic compounds at concentrations up to 12500mg·L-1 is occurring under aerobic, NO-3-reducing, Mn/Fe-reducing, SO2-4-reducing and methanogenic conditions in the aquifer, with the accumulation of inorganic and organic metabolites in the plume. An electron and carbon balance for the plume suggests that only 6% of the source term has been degraded in 50 years. The residual contaminant mass in the plume significantly exceeds estimates of electron acceptor inputs, indicating that the plume will grow. Two detailed vertical profiles through the plume show that contaminant distributions are controlled more by source history than by biodegradation processes. Microbiological and mass balance studies show that biodegradation is greatest at the plume fringe where contaminant concentrations are diluted by transverse mixing. Active bacterial populations exist throughout the plume but biodegradation is inhibited in the plume core by high contaminant concentrations. Stable isotope studies show that SO2-4-reduction is particularly sensitive to contaminant concentration. The aquifer is not oxidant-deficient but natural attenuation of the phenolic compounds in this system is limited by toxicity from the pollutant load and the bioavailability of electron acceptors. Natural attenuation of these contaminants will increase only after increased dilution of the plume.

  9. Biodegradable polymersomes for targeted ultrasound imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, W.; Meng, F.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Feijen, J.

    2006-01-01

    Biodegradable polymersomes with a sub-micron size were prepared by using poly(ethylene glycol)–polylactide (PEG–PDLLA) block-copolymers in aqueous media. Air-encapsulated polymersomes could be obtained by a lyophilization/rehydration procedure. Preliminary results showed that these polymersomes were

  10. Transport of nonlinearly biodegradable contaminants in aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, H.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the transport behavior of nonlinearly biodegradable contaminants in aquifers. Such transport occurs during in situ bioremediation which is based on the injection of an electron acceptor or electron donor. The main interests in this thesis are the mutual influences of underlyin

  11. Polyvinyl alcohol biodegradation under denitrifying conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marušincová, H.; Husárová, L.; Růžička, J.; Ingr, M.; Navrátil, Václav; Buňková, L.; Koutný, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 84, October (2013), s. 21-28. ISSN 0964-8305 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/0200 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : polyvinyl alcohol * biodegradation * denitrification * waste-water treatment * anaerobic * Steroidobacter Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2013

  12. Biodegradability of leathers through anaerobic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayalan, K; Fathima, N Nishad; Gnanamani, A; Rao, J Raghava; Nair, B Unni; Ramasami, T

    2007-01-01

    Leather processing generates huge amounts of both solid and liquid wastes. The management of solid wastes, especially tanned leather waste, is a challenging problem faced by tanners. Hence, studies on biodegradability of leather become imperative. In this present work, biodegradability of untanned, chrome tanned and vegetable tanned leather under anaerobic conditions has been addressed. Two different sources of anaerobes have been used for this purpose. The effect of detanning as a pretreatment method before subjecting the leather to biodegradation has also been studied. It has been found that vegetable tanned leather leads to more gas production than chrome tanned leather. Mixed anaerobic isolates when employed as an inoculum are able to degrade the soluble organics of vegetable tanned material and thus exhibit an increased level of gas production during the initial days, compared to the results of the treatments that received the anaerobic sludge. With chrome tanned materials, there was not much change in the volume of the gas produced from the two different sources. It has been found that detanning tends to improve the biodegradability of both types of leathers. PMID:16740383

  13. Biodegradable synthetic polymers for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunatillake P. A.

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews biodegradable synthetic polymers focusing on their potential in tissue engineering applications. The major classes of polymers are briefly discussed with regard to synthesis, properties and biodegradability, and known degradation modes and products are indicated based on studies reported in the literature. A vast majority of biodegradable polymers studied belongs to the polyester family, which includes polyglycolides and polylactides. Some disadvantages of these polymers in tissue engineering applications are their poor biocompatibility, release of acidic degradation products, poor processability and loss of mechanical properties very early during degradation. Other degradable polymers such as polyorthoesters, polyanhydrides, polyphosphazenes, and polyurethanes are also discussed and their advantages and disadvantages summarised. With advancements in tissue engineering it has become necessary to develop polymers that meet more demanding requirements. Recent work has focused on developing injectable polymer compositions based on poly (propylene fumarate and poly (anhydrides to meet these requirements in orthopaedic tissue engineering. Polyurethanes have received recent attention for development of degradable polymers because of their great potential in tailoring polymer structure to achieve mechanical properties and biodegradability to suit a variety of applications.

  14. Biodegradable Polymeric Microcapsules: Preparation and Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawalha, H.I.M.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric microcapsules can be produced through different methods of which emulsion solvent-evaporation/extraction is frequently used. In this technique, the polymer (often polylactide) is dissolved in a good solvent and is emulsified together with a poor solvent into a nonsolvent phas

  15. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU BIODEGRADATION TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    In situ biodegradation may be used to treat low-to-intermediate concentrations of organic contaminants in place without disturbing or displacing the contaminated media. Although this technology has been used to degrade a limited number of inorganics, specifically cyanide and nitr...

  16. Biodegradable PEG-based drug carriers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Braunová, Alena; Ulbrich, Karel; Jelínková, Markéta; Říhová, Blanka; Seymour, L. W.

    Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2005, s. 7-9. [Conference on New Approaches to Drug Delivery "Nanomedicines of the Future". Glasgow (GB), 18.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biodegradable polymers * drug carriers Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  17. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor. PMID:12491727

  18. Improving the biodegradative capacity of subsurface bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continual release of large volumes of synthetic materials into the environment by agricultural and industrial sources over the last few decades has resulted in pollution of the subsurface environment. Cleanup has been difficult because of the relative inaccessibility of the contaminants caused by their wide dispersal in the deep subsurface, often at low concentrations and in large volumes. As a possible solution for these problems, interest in the introduction of biodegradative bacteria for in situ remediation of these sites has increased greatly in recent years (Timmis et al. 1988). Selection of biodegradative microbes to apply in such cleanup is limited to those strains that can survive among the native bacterial and predator community members at the particular pH, temperature, and moisture status of the site (Alexander, 1984). The use of microorganisms isolated from subsurface environments would be advantageous because the organisms are already adapted to the subsurface conditions. The options are further narrowed to strains that are able to degrade the contaminant rapidly, even in the presence of highly recalcitrant anthropogenic waste mixtures, and in conditions that do not require addition of further toxic compounds for the expression of the biodegradative capacity (Sayler et al. 1990). These obstacles can be overcome by placing the genes of well-characterized biodegradative enzymes under the control of promoters that can be regulated by inexpensive and nontoxic external factors and then moving the new genetic constructs into diverse groups of subsurface microbes. ne objective of this research is to test this hypothesis by comparing expression of two different toluene biodegradative enzymatic pathways from two different regulatable promoters in a variety of subsurface isolates

  19. Biodegradation of natural oils in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Darbi, M.M.; Saeed, N.O.; Islam, M.R. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada). Faculty of Engineering; Lee, K. [Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, NS (Canada)

    2005-01-15

    Spills of non-petroleum hydrocarbons including oils and fish oils are of environmental concern because of their potential to cause serious effects on marine life and coastal environments. Biodegradation by indigenous microorganisms is an important and potentially ubiquitous process affecting both the chemical composition and physical properties of contaminant oils. Data on the environmental persistence of non-petroleum oils is now required for risk assessments and decision making by spill responders. This article investigates the biodegradability of various vegetable and fish oils under the influence of natural bacteria in seawater. The influence of nutrients and microbial environment on changes in bacterial numbers and the extent and rate of degradation for various test oils (olive, mustard, canola and cod liver oils) were studied over time. Time-series visual and microscopic observations were made to characterize physical changes in the residual oils, formation of floating and precipitate particles, oil droplets and dispersion. The biodegradation process was significantly influenced by environmental conditions, with a higher rate and extent of biodegradation observed in seawater amended with nutrients and wastewater that contained elevated numbers of bacteria and nutrients. It was observed that different oils respond in different rates and extents to biodegradation depending on their stability, viscosity and compositions. All results clearly revealed a significant response of the oil-contaminated samples to both the seawater and wastewater environments. Observations on changes in the physical properties of the residual oil may be important in the context of oil spill response strategies. For example, simple physical recovery methods may be used to recover polymeric lumps at the sea surface. (author)

  20. Improving the biodegradative capacity of subsurface bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romine, M.F.; Brockman, F.J.

    1993-04-01

    The continual release of large volumes of synthetic materials into the environment by agricultural and industrial sources over the last few decades has resulted in pollution of the subsurface environment. Cleanup has been difficult because of the relative inaccessibility of the contaminants caused by their wide dispersal in the deep subsurface, often at low concentrations and in large volumes. As a possible solution for these problems, interest in the introduction of biodegradative bacteria for in situ remediation of these sites has increased greatly in recent years (Timmis et al. 1988). Selection of biodegradative microbes to apply in such cleanup is limited to those strains that can survive among the native bacterial and predator community members at the particular pH, temperature, and moisture status of the site (Alexander, 1984). The use of microorganisms isolated from subsurface environments would be advantageous because the organisms are already adapted to the subsurface conditions. The options are further narrowed to strains that are able to degrade the contaminant rapidly, even in the presence of highly recalcitrant anthropogenic waste mixtures, and in conditions that do not require addition of further toxic compounds for the expression of the biodegradative capacity (Sayler et al. 1990). These obstacles can be overcome by placing the genes of well-characterized biodegradative enzymes under the control of promoters that can be regulated by inexpensive and nontoxic external factors and then moving the new genetic constructs into diverse groups of subsurface microbes. ne objective of this research is to test this hypothesis by comparing expression of two different toluene biodegradative enzymatic pathways from two different regulatable promoters in a variety of subsurface isolates.

  1. Hydrocarbons biodegradation in unsaturated porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological processes are expected to play an important role in the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils. However, factors influencing the kinetics of biodegradation are still not well known, especially in the unsaturated zone. To address these biodegradation questions in the unsaturated zone an innovative experimental set up based on a physical column model was developed. This experimental set up appeared to be an excellent tool for elaboration of a structured porous medium, with well defined porous network and adjusted water/oil saturations. Homogeneous repartition of both liquid phases (i.e., aqueous and non aqueous) in the soil pores, which also contain air, was achieved using ceramic membranes placed at the bottom of the soil column. Reproducible interfaces (and connectivity) are developed between gas, and both non mobile water and NAPL phases, depending on the above-defined characteristics of the porous media and on the partial saturations of these three phases (NAPL, water and gas). A respirometric apparatus was coupled to the column. Such experimental set up have been validated with hexadecane in dilution in an HMN phase. This approach allowed detailed information concerning n-hexadecane biodegradation, in aerobic condition, through the profile of the oxygen consumption rate. We have taken benefit of this technique, varying experimental conditions, to determine the main parameters influencing the biodegradation kinetics and compositional evolution of hydrocarbons, under steady state unsaturated conditions and with respect to aerobic metabolism. Impacts of the nitrogen quantity and of three different grain sizes have been examined. Biodegradation of petroleum cut, as diesel cut and middle distillate without aromatic fraction, were, also studied. (author)

  2. Controlled morphology of biodegradable polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhiranon, Sasiwimon; Kyu, Thein

    2009-03-01

    Phase diagrams of biodegradable polymer blends containing poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PDLLA) having two different molecular weights were established by means of cloud point measurement and differential scanning calorimetry. Subsequently, the theoretical phase diagram was calculated self-consistently based on the combination of Flory-Huggins free energy for liquid-liquid phase separation and phase field free energy for crystal solidification. The phase diagrams thus obtained were LCST type or hour-glass type, which depended on molecular weight of PDLLA utilized. Guided by the phase diagram, the emerged morphology was determined as a function of blend concentration and temperature. It appears that the morphology control is feasible that ultimately affects the end-use property of PCL/PDLLA blends. A wide variety of morphology of biodegradable polymer may be developed with the porous structure and pore size to control scaffold porosity and the rate of drug delivery.

  3. Starch-based completely biodegradable polymer materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Starch is a natural polymer which possesses many unique properties and some shortcoming simultaneously. Some synthetic polymers are biodegradable and can be tailor-made easily. Therefore, by combining the individual advantages of starch and synthetic polymers, starch-based completely biodegradable polymers (SCBP are potential for applications in biomedical and environmental fields. Therefore it received great attention and was extensively investigated. In this paper, the structure and characteristics of starch and some synthetic degradable polymers are briefly introduced. Then, the recent progress about the preparation of SCBP via physical blending and chemical modification is reviewed and discussed. At last, some examples have been presented to elucidate that SCBP are promising materials for various applications and their development is a good solution for reducing the consumption of petroleum resources and environmental problem.

  4. Biodegradable Epoxy Networks Cured with Polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Kramer, Edward J.

    2006-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used widely for adhesives as well as coatings. However, once cured they are usually highly cross-linked and are not biodegradable. To obtain potentially biodegradable polypeptides that can cure with epoxy resins and achieve as good properties as the conventional phenol novolac hardeners, poly(succinimide-co-tyrosine) was synthesized by thermal polycondensation of L-aspartic acid and L-tyrosine with phosphoric acid under reduced pressure. The tyrosine/succinimide ratio in the polypeptide was always lower than the tyrosine/(aspartic acid) feed ratio and was influenced by the synthesis conditions. Poly(succinimide-tyrosine- phenylalanine) was also synthesized from L-aspartic acid, L- tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. The thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resins cured with these polypeptides are comparable to those of similar resins cured with conventional hardeners. In addition, enzymatic degradability tests showed that Chymotrypsin or Subtilisin A could cleave cured films in an alkaline borate buffer.

  5. Anaerobic Biodegradability of Agricultural Renewable Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Bo; Lortscher, Peter; Palfery, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Natural fiber-based paper and paperboard products are likely disposed of in municipal wastewater, composting, or landfill after an intended usage. However, there are few studies reporting anaerobic sludge digestion and biodegradability of agricultural fibers although the soiled sanitary products, containing agricultural fibers, are increasingly disposed of in municipal wastewater or conventional landfill treatment systems, in which one or more unit operations are anaerobic digestion. We condu...

  6. Assessment of polymer-based nanocomposites biodegradability

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, A.V.; Araújo, Andreia Isabel Silva; Oliveira, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The management of solid waste is a growing concern in many countries. Municipal solid waste is a major component of the total solid waste generated by society, and the composting of municipal solid waste has gained some attention even though a composting treatment for it is not yet widespread. It may not be realistic to replace large portions of these plastics with biodegradable materials, and it may be more important to separate plastics unsuitable for the composting process at the generatin...

  7. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    MR Mehrasbi; B Haghighi; M.Shariat; S Naseri; Naddafi, K

    2003-01-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (20 g/kg dw soil) was investigated in 3 media, differing in the kind of petroleum fractions. In the laboratory experiments, during 5 months, the activities of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and dehydrogenase activity of soil was determined. Gas chromatographic analysis showed the biological decontaminations for gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture (gas oil, kerosene and furnace oil) are 60 %, 36 % and 55 %, respectively. Dehydrogenas...

  8. Nanomembranes and nanofibers from biodegradable conducting polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Jordi Puiggalí; Carlos Alemán; Luís Javier del Valle; Elaine Armelin; María del Mar Pérez-Madrigal; Elena Llorens

    2013-01-01

    This review provides a current status report of the field concerning preparation of fibrous mats based on biodegradable (e. g., aliphatic polyesters such as polylactide or polycaprolactone) and conducting polymers (e. g., polyaniline, polypirrole or polythiophenes). These materials have potential biomedical applications (e. g., tissue engineering or drug delivery systems) and can be combined to get free-standing nanomembranes and nanofibers that retain the better properties of their correspon...

  9. Biodegradation of tert-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodegradation of tert-butylphenyl diphenyl phosphate (BPDP) was examined in microcosms containing sediment and water from five different ecosystems as part of studies to elucidate the environmental fate of phosphate ester flame retardants. Biodegradation of [14C]BPDP was monitored in the environmental microcosms by measuring the evolution of 14CO2. Over 37% of BPDP was mineralized after 8 weeks in microcosms from an ecosystem which had chronic exposure to agricultural chemicals. In contrast, only 1.7% of BPDP was degraded to 14CO2 in samples collected from a noncontaminated site. The exposure concentration of BPDP affected the percentage which was degraded to 14CO2 in microcosms from the two most active ecosystems. Mineralization was highest at a concentration of 0.1 mg of BPDP and was inhibited with 10- and 100-fold higher concentrations of BPDP. The authors observed adaptive increases in both microbial populations and phosphoesterase enzymes in some sediments acclimated to BPDP. Chemical analyses of the residues in the microcosms indicated undegraded BPDP and minor amounts of phenol, tert-butylphenol, diphenyl phosphate, and triphenyl phosphate as biodegradation products. These data suggest that the microbial degradation of BPDP results from at least three catabolic processes and is highest when low concentrations of BPDP are exposed to sediment microorganisms of eutrophic ecosystems which have high phosphotri- and diesterase activities and previous exposure to anthropogenic chemicals

  10. Nanomembranes and Nanofibers from Biodegradable Conducting Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Puiggalí

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a current status report of the field concerning preparation of fibrous mats based on biodegradable (e.g., aliphatic polyesters such as polylactide or polycaprolactone and conducting polymers (e.g., polyaniline, polypirrole or polythiophenes. These materials have potential biomedical applications (e.g., tissue engineering or drug delivery systems and can be combined to get free-standing nanomembranes and nanofibers that retain the better properties of their corresponding individual components. Systems based on biodegradable and conducting polymers constitute nowadays one of the most promising solutions to develop advanced materials enable to cover aspects like local stimulation of desired tissue, time controlled drug release and stimulation of either the proliferation or differentiation of various cell types. The first sections of the review are focused on a general overview of conducting and biodegradable polymers most usually employed and the explanation of the most suitable techniques for preparing nanofibers and nanomembranes (i.e., electrospinning and spin coating. Following sections are organized according to the base conducting polymer (e.g., Sections 4–6 describe hybrid systems having aniline, pyrrole and thiophene units, respectively. Each one of these sections includes specific subsections dealing with applications in a nanofiber or nanomembrane form. Finally, miscellaneous systems and concluding remarks are given in the two last sections.

  11. Biodegradation of ion-exchange media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-exchange media, both bead resins and powdered filter media, are used in nuclear power plants to remove radioactivity from process water prior to reuse or environmental discharge. Since the ion- exchange media are made from synthetic hydrocarbon-based polymers, they may be susceptible to damage from biological activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate some of the more basic aspects of biodegradation of ion-exchange media, specifically to evaluate the ability of microorganisms to utilize the ion-exchange media or materials sorbed on them as a food source. The ASTM-G22 test, alone and combined with the Bartha Pramer respirometric method, failed to indicate the biodegradability of the ion-exchange media. The limitation of these methods was that they used a single test organism. In later phases of this study, a mixed microbial culture was grown from resin waste samples obtained from the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor. These microorganisms were used to evaluate the susceptibility of different types of ion-exchange media to biological attack. Qualitative assessments of biodegradability were based on visual observations of culture growths. Greater susceptibility was associated with increased turbidity in solution indicative of bacterial growth, and more luxuriant fungal mycelial growth in solution or directly on the ion-exchange resin beads. 21 refs., 9 figs., 18 tabs

  12. Titanate nanotube coatings on biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigid, biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were coated with titanate nanotubes (TNTs) by using a spin-coating method. TNTs were synthesized by a hydrothermal process at 150 °C under 4.7 bar ambient pressure. The biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted excimer laser photocuring at 308 nm. For scaffold coating, a stable ethanolic TNT sol was prepared by a simple colloid chemical route without the use of any binding compounds or additives. Scanning electron microscopy along with elemental analysis revealed that the scaffolds were homogenously coated by TNTs. The developed TNT coating can further improve the surface geometry of fabricated scaffolds, and therefore it can further increase the cell adhesion. Highlights: ► Biodegradable scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted UV laser photocuring. ► Titanate nanotube deposition was carried out without binding compounds or additives. ► The titanate nanotube coating can further improve the surface geometry of scaffolds. ► These reproducible platforms will be of high importance for biological applications

  13. Macmillan ring-free oil biodegradation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crude oil processing at the Macmillan Ring-Free Oil Company facility (Macmillan Oil Refinery) began in approximately 1929. Operations produced naphtha, diesel fuel, insulating oil, lubricating oil, and asphalt until approximately 1987. The waste material generated by the process was Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed waste K048-Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) float containing volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. On-site unlined surface impoundments used to store DAF and crude oil wastes have periodically overflowed and contaminated two adjacent creeks. A series of extensive site investigation activities in 1992 and 1993 addressed tank and drum, asbestos, lagoon and groundwater contamination at the site. The results of the investigation indicated that the majority of the contamination is contained within 10 lagoons and surrounding soils. Volume calculations indicate that approximately 45,000 cubic yards of contaminated soils and sediments required treatment. A field simulation of biodegradation of these wastes in a land treatment unit was implemented during removal actions. Results of the remedy selection biodegradation assessment provided evidence of a 61 to 96 percent reduction in contaminant concentrations. These concentrations are below land disposal and health risk-based criteria. The technology of biodegradation meets the EPA criteria for inclusion in the potential remedies for the Macmillan Oil Refinery

  14. Biodegradation potential of photocatalyzed surfactant washwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillacheruvu, K; Buck, L; Lee, E

    2001-01-01

    Enhanced release of hydrophobic compounds from a soil matrix can be achieved by use of soil-washing or soil-flushing using various surfactants. However, the surfactants used in achieving the desorption of organic contaminants may also cause a problem in subsequent removal/disposal of these contaminants. UV radiation in the presence of TiO2 as a pre-treatment step to achieve initial (or partial) breakdown of naphthalene and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) using batch experiments indicated that 56% to 88% naphthalene degradation occurred within 30 minutes to one hour. Preliminary results on the estimate of the batch aerobic biodegradation potential of photocatalyzed washwater containing naphthalene and SDS suggested that SDS was the major carbon and energy source for an activated sludge enrichment culture and an enrichment culture obtained from microorganisms at a contaminated site. Continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) with with a solids retention time (SRT) of 4 days were not effective, but an SRT of 8 days was successful in biodegrading the naphthalene and surfactant. These results indicated that photocatalytic treatment as a pre-treatment step followed by a biodegradation step may offer potential in cleaning up surfactant washwaters containing organic contaminants. PMID:11501312

  15. Titanate nanotube coatings on biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beke, S., E-mail: szabolcs.beke@iit.it [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Kőrösi, L. [Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertváros u. 2, H-7632, Pécs (Hungary); Scarpellini, A. [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Anjum, F.; Brandi, F. [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    Rigid, biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were coated with titanate nanotubes (TNTs) by using a spin-coating method. TNTs were synthesized by a hydrothermal process at 150 °C under 4.7 bar ambient pressure. The biodegradable photopolymer scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted excimer laser photocuring at 308 nm. For scaffold coating, a stable ethanolic TNT sol was prepared by a simple colloid chemical route without the use of any binding compounds or additives. Scanning electron microscopy along with elemental analysis revealed that the scaffolds were homogenously coated by TNTs. The developed TNT coating can further improve the surface geometry of fabricated scaffolds, and therefore it can further increase the cell adhesion. Highlights: ► Biodegradable scaffolds were produced by mask-assisted UV laser photocuring. ► Titanate nanotube deposition was carried out without binding compounds or additives. ► The titanate nanotube coating can further improve the surface geometry of scaffolds. ► These reproducible platforms will be of high importance for biological applications.

  16. Biodegradability evaluation of polymers by ISO 14855-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi; Kunioka, Masao

    2009-10-01

    Biodegradabilities of polymers and their composites in a controlled compost were described. Polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were employed as biodegradable polymers. Biodegradabilities of PCL and PLA samples in a controlled compost were measured using a Microbial Oxidative Degradation Analyzer (MODA) according to ISO 14855-2. Sample preparation method for biodegradation test according to ISO/DIS 10210 was also described. Effects of sizes and shapes of samples on biodegradability were studied. Reproducibility of biodegradation test of ISO 14855-2 by MODA was confirmed. Validity of sample preparation method for polymer pellets, polymer film, and polymer products of ISO/DIS 10210 for ISO 14855-2 was confirmed. PMID:20111676

  17. Biodegradable materials as binders for IVth generation moulding sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Major-Gabry

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the possibility of using the biodegradable materials as binders (or parts of binders?compositions for foundry moulding and core sands. Results showed that there is a great possibility of using available biodegradable materials as foundry moulding sand binders. Using biodegradable materials as partial content of new binders, or additives to moulding sands may not only decrease the toxicity and increase reclamation ability of tested moulding sands, but also accelerate the biodegradation rate of used binders, and the new biodegradable additive (PCL did not decrease the strength and thermal properties. In addition, using polycaprolactone (PCL as a biodegradable material may improve the flexibility of moulding sands with polymeric binder and reduce toxicity.

  18. Degradation of Oxo-Biodegradable Plastic by Pleurotus ostreatus

    OpenAIRE

    José Maria Rodrigues da Luz; Sirlaine Albino Paes; Mateus Dias Nunes; Marliane de Cássia Soares da Silva; Maria Catarina Megumi Kasuya

    2013-01-01

    Growing concerns regarding the impact of the accumulation of plastic waste over several decades on the environmental have led to the development of biodegradable plastic. These plastics can be degraded by microorganisms and absorbed by the environment and are therefore gaining public support as a possible alternative to petroleum-derived plastics. Among the developed biodegradable plastics, oxo-biodegradable polymers have been used to produce plastic bags. Exposure of this waste plastic to ul...

  19. Biodegradation of flax fiber reinforced poly lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Woven and nonwoven flax fiber reinforced poly lactic acid (PLA biocomposites were prepared with amphiphilic additives as accelerator for biodegradation. The prepared composites were buried in farmland soil for biodegradability studies. Loss in weight of the biodegraded composite samples was determined at different time intervals. The surface morphology of the biodegraded composites was studied with scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results indicated that in presence of mandelic acid, the composites showed accelerated biodegradation with 20–25% loss in weight after 50–60 days. On the other hand, in presence of dicumyl peroxide (as additive, biodegradation of the composites was relatively slow as confirmed by only 5–10% loss in weight even after 80–90 days. This was further confirmed by surface morphology of the biodegraded composites. We have attempted to show that depending on the end uses, we can add different amphiphilic additives for delayed or accelerated biodegradability. This work gives us the idea of biodegradation of materials from natural fiber reinforced PLA composites when discarded carelessly in the environment instead of proper waste disposal site.

  20. Silicon microneedles array with biodegradable tips for transdermal drug delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, B; Tay, Francis; Wong, Y T; Iliescu, C

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication process, characterization results and basic functionality of silicon microneedles array with biodegradable tips. In order to avoid the main problems related to silicon microneedles : broking of the top part of the needles inside the skin, a simple solution can be fabrication of microneedles array with biodegradable tips. The silicon microneedles array was fabricated by using reactive ion etching while the biodegradable tips were performed using and anodization process that generates selectively porous silicon only on the top part of the skin. The paper presents also the results of in vitro release of calcein using microneedles array with biodegradable tips

  1. Critical evaluation of biodegradable polymers used in nanodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Edgar; Briceño, Maria Isabel; Caballero-George, Catherina

    2013-01-01

    Use of biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications has increased in recent decades due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, flexibility, and minimal side effects. Applications of these materials include creation of skin, blood vessels, cartilage scaffolds, and nanosystems for drug delivery. These biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles enhance properties such as bioavailability and stability, and provide controlled release of bioactive compounds. This review evaluates the classification, synthesis, degradation mechanisms, and biological applications of the biodegradable polymers currently being studied as drug delivery carriers. In addition, the use of nanosystems to solve current drug delivery problems are reviewed. PMID:23990720

  2. Strawberry under low-tunnel protected with experimental biodegradable films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research was carried out in order to test innovative biodegradable materials for the protected cultivation of strawberry in Southern Italy. A field test was carried out in order to evaluate the agronomic performances of the biodegradable materials in comparison with non biodegradable LDPE materials. Different kinds of biodegradable black films were used for soil mulching and transparent biodegradable films for the covering of the low tunnels. Climatic data of the site, air temperature and relative humidity inside the low tunnels and soil temperature under the mulching films were gathered during the test. Besides, laboratory radiometric tests were executed on the films in order to evaluate parameters such as the transmissivity in different wavelength ranges. The biodegradable materials showed a high capacity to induce greenhouse effect due to their very low transmissivity in the long wave infrared range. The yield obtained using biodegradable materials was on average 12% higher then the one obtained with traditional films. Concerning the earliness, at the first day of the harvest, the yield obtained with biodegradable materials was 70% higher in comparison with the case of LDPE films. The research showed that the biodegradable materials could be a sustainable alternative to the plastic films based on fossil raw materials

  3. Influence of inorganic salt on aerobic biodegradability of dyestuffs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    this paper, the influence of inorganic salt on aerobic biodegradability of dyestuffs was studied by means of semicontinuous activated sludge method. It was found that: biodegradability of dyestuffs would decrease with the increase of the concentration of NaCl; however, biodegradability in the condition of NaCl = 30 g/L was better than that in the condition of NaCl =15 g/L; in the three NaCl conditions, biodegradability of tasted dyestuffs followed the following order: NaCl= 0 g/L > NaCl= 30g/L>NaCl= 15 g/L.

  4. Sociobiology of biodegradation and the role of predatory protozoa in biodegrading communities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tejashree Modak; Shalmali Pradhan; Milind Watve

    2007-06-01

    Predatory protozoa are known to enhance biodegradation by bacteria in a variety of systems including rumen. This is apparently counterintuitive since many protozoa do not themselves produce extracellular degradative enzymes and prey upon bacterial degraders. We propose a mechanism of protozoal enhancement of bacterial biodegradation based on the sociobiology of biodegradation. Since extracellular enzyme production by degraders involves a cost to the bacterial cell, cheaters that do not make the enzyme will have a selective advantage. In the presence of cheaters, degraders that physically attach to water-insoluble substrate will have a selective advantage over free-floating degraders. On the other hand, cheaters will benefit by being free floaters since they consume the solubilized products of extracellular enzymes. Predatory ciliated protozoa are more likely to consume free-floating cheaters. Thus, due to protozoan predation a control is exerted on the cheater population. We illustrate the dynamics of such a system with the help of a computer simulation model. Available data on rumen and other biodegradation systems involving protozoa are compatible with the assumptions and predictions of the model.

  5. Biodegradable and semi-biodegradable composite hydrogels as bone substitutes: morphology and mechanical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanginario, V; Ginebra, M P; Tanner, K E; Planell, J A; Ambrosio, L

    2006-05-01

    Biodegradable and semi-biodegradable composite hydrogels are proposed as bone substitutes. They consist of an hydrophilic biodegradable polymer (HYAFF 11) as matrix and two ceramic powders (alpha-TCP and HA) as reinforcement. Both components of these composites have been of great interest in biomedical applications due to their excellent biocompatibility and tissue interactions, however they have never been investigated as bone substitute composites. Morphological and mechanical analysis have shown that the two fillers behave in a very different way. In the HYAFF 11/alpha-TCP composite, alpha-TCP is able to hydrolyze in contact with water while in the HYAFF 11 matrix. As a result, the composite sets and hardens, and entangled CDHA crystals are formed in the hydrogel phase and increases in the mechanical properties are obtained. In the HYAFF11/HA composite the ceramic reinforcement acts as inert phase leading to lower mechanical properties. Both mechanical properties and microstructure analysis have demonstrated the possibility to design hydrophilic biodegradable composite structures for bone tissue substitution applications. PMID:16688585

  6. Development of biodegradable fungicide by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop the fungicide which is biodegradable and alternative to chemical pesticide that has an side effect of environmental pollution, Mutant induction of the enhanced antifungal activity was studied by using radiation. Characteristics and structure of antifungal biomaterials derived from these mutants were analysed. Two biomaterials related to the antifungal activity from the above mutant were isolated and purified. Microbial pesticide were manufactured in combination of various additives. Antiphytopathogenic effects were proven by pot experiment and It was promising to prevent pepper, Chinese cabbage and radish from anthrax, phytophthora and root rot

  7. Development of biodegradable fungicide by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop the fungicide which is biodegradable and alternative to chemical pesticide that has an side effect of environmental pollution, Mutant induction of the enhanced antifungal activity was studied by using radiation. Characteristics and structure of antifungal biomaterials derived from these mutants were analysed. Sixteen antifungal microbes were isolated and 4 antifungal activity enhanced mutants were induced by using radiation. P. lentimorbus WJ5a17 had 41% higher antifungal activity than the wild type. Two biomaterials related to the antifungal activity from the above mutant were isolated and purified

  8. Lipase biocatalysis for useful biodegradable products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linko, Y.Y.; Wang, Zhuo Lin; Uosukainen, E.; Seppaelae, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Laemsae, M. [Raisio Group Oil Milling Industry, Raisio (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    It was shown that lipases can be used as biocatalysts in the production of useful biodegradable compounds such as 1-butyl oleate by direct esterification of butanol and oleic acid to decrease viscosity of biodiesel in winter use. By enzymic transesterification, a mixture of 2-ethyl-1-hexyl esters from rapeseed oil fatty acids can be obtained in good yields for use as a solvent, and of trimethylolpropane esters for use as a lubricant. Finally, it was demonstrated that polyesters with a mass average molar mass in excess of 75,000 g mol{sup -}1 can be obtained by esterification or transesterification by using lipase as biocatalyst. (author) (3 refs.)

  9. Development of biodegradable fungicide by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngkeun; Kim, Dongsub

    2012-03-15

    To develop the fungicide which is biodegradable and alternative to chemical pesticide that has an side effect of environmental pollution, Mutant induction of the enhanced antifungal activity was studied by using radiation. Characteristics and structure of antifungal biomaterials derived from these mutants were analysed. Two biomaterials related to the antifungal activity from the above mutant were isolated and purified. Microbial pesticide were manufactured in combination of various additives. Antiphytopathogenic effects were proven by field test and it was promising to prevent Chinese cabbage and radish from phytophthora and root rot.

  10. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  11. Hydrocarbons biodegradation in unsaturated porous medium; Biodegradation des hydrocarbures en milieu poreux insature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C

    2007-12-15

    Biological processes are expected to play an important role in the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils. However, factors influencing the kinetics of biodegradation are still not well known, especially in the unsaturated zone. To address these biodegradation questions in the unsaturated zone an innovative experimental set up based on a physical column model was developed. This experimental set up appeared to be an excellent tool for elaboration of a structured porous medium, with well defined porous network and adjusted water/oil saturations. Homogeneous repartition of both liquid phases (i.e., aqueous and non aqueous) in the soil pores, which also contain air, was achieved using ceramic membranes placed at the bottom of the soil column. Reproducible interfaces (and connectivity) are developed between gas, and both non mobile water and NAPL phases, depending on the above-defined characteristics of the porous media and on the partial saturations of these three phases (NAPL, water and gas). A respirometric apparatus was coupled to the column. Such experimental set up have been validated with hexadecane in dilution in an HMN phase. This approach allowed detailed information concerning n-hexadecane biodegradation, in aerobic condition, through the profile of the oxygen consumption rate. We have taken benefit of this technique, varying experimental conditions, to determine the main parameters influencing the biodegradation kinetics and compositional evolution of hydrocarbons, under steady state unsaturated conditions and with respect to aerobic metabolism. Impacts of the nitrogen quantity and of three different grain sizes have been examined. Biodegradation of petroleum cut, as diesel cut and middle distillate without aromatic fraction, were, also studied. (author)

  12. Compared in vivo toxicity in mice of lung delivered biodegradable and non-biodegradable nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragao-Santiago, Letícia; Hillaireau, Hervé; Grabowski, Nadège; Mura, Simona; Nascimento, Thais L; Dufort, Sandrine; Coll, Jean-Luc; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2016-04-01

    To design nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems for pulmonary administration, biodegradable materials are considered safe, but their potential toxicity is poorly explored. We here explore the lung toxicity in mice of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) and compare it to the toxicity of non-biodegradable ones. NP formulations of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coated with chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) or poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which renders 200 nm NPs of positive, negative or neutral surface charge respectively, were analyzed for their biodistribution by in vivo fluorescence imaging and their inflammatory potential after single lung nebulization in mice. After exposure, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell population, protein secretion and cytokine release as well as lung histology were carried out. The inflammatory response was compared to the one induced by non-biodegradable counterparts, namely, TiO2 of rutile and anatase crystal form and polystyrene (PS). PLGA NPs were mostly present in mice lungs, with little passage to other organs. An increase in neutrophil recruitment was observed in mice exposed to PS NPs 24 h after nebulization, which declined at 48 h. This result was supported by an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) in BAL supernatant at 24 h. TiO2 anatase NPs were still present in lung cells 48 h after nebulization and induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells to BAL. In contrast, regardless of their surface charge, PLGA NPs did not induce significant changes in the inflammation markers analyzed. In conclusion, these results point out to a safe use of PLGA NPs regardless of their surface coating compared to non-biodegradable ones. PMID:26573338

  13. Biodegradation of clofibric acid and identification of its metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal do Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setubal (Portugal); Oehmen, A. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, G. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnologica (IBET), Av. da Republica (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Noronha, J.P. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Reis, M.A.M., E-mail: amr@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2012-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Metabolites produced during clofibric acid biodegradation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clofibric acid is biodegradable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mainly heterotrophic bacteria degraded the clofibric acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metabolites of clofibric acid biodegradation were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metabolic pathway of clofibric acid biodegradation is proposed. - Abstract: Clofibric acid (CLF) is the pharmaceutically active metabolite of lipid regulators clofibrate, etofibrate and etofyllinclofibrate, and it is considered both environmentally persistent and refractory. This work studied the biotransformation of CLF in aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with mixed microbial cultures, monitoring the efficiency of biotransformation of CLF and the production of metabolites. The maximum removal achieved was 51% biodegradation (initial CLF concentration = 2 mg L{sup -1}), where adsorption and abiotic removal mechanisms were shown to be negligible, showing that CLF is indeed biodegradable. Tests showed that the observed CLF biodegradation was mainly carried out by heterotrophic bacteria. Three main metabolites were identified, including {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid, lactic acid and 4-chlorophenol. The latter is known to exhibit higher toxicity than the parent compound, but it did not accumulate in the SBRs. {alpha}-Hydroxyisobutyric acid and lactic acid accumulated for a period, where nitrite accumulation may have been responsible for inhibiting their degradation. A metabolic pathway for the biodegradation of CLF is proposed in this study.

  14. The use of biodegradable mulch films in muskmelon crop production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Saraiva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the large amount of mulch films used in agricultural crops and to all the environmental problems related with their disposal, the biodegradable mulch films seems to be the best solution for replacing the conventional polyethylene mulches. The main goal of this work was to evaluate and compare the performance of biodegradable mulch films with the conventional polyethylene ones in muskmelon culture during two years. Beyond fruit productivity and quality, the impact of each plastic in the soil moisture and temperature were also assessed. Taking into account that there are no reported biodegradation studies realized in Portugal, it was also important to verify the biodegradability of this new mulch films under the Portuguese soil conditions. The biodegradable mulch films did not show significant differences in fruit productivity and quality. The biodegradation rate of the mulches tested was not as high as would be expected. From the overall results obtained, biodegradable mulch films appear to be a good solution for the replacement of the conventional polyethylene mulches, however the Research and Development should continue to be done ton improve their biodegradation rate.

  15. Biodegradable elastomers for biomedical applications and regenerative medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bat, Erhan; Zhang, Zheng; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Poot, Andre A.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biodegradable polymers are of great value for the preparation of implants that are required to reside only temporarily in the body. The use of biodegradable polymers obviates the need for a second surgery to remove the implant, which is the case when a nondegradable implant is used. After

  16. Biodegradation of Phosphonomycin by Rhizobium huakuii PMY1

    OpenAIRE

    McGrath, John W.; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich; Quinn, John P.

    1998-01-01

    The biodegradation by Rhizobium huakuii PMY1 of up to 10 mM phosphonomycin as a carbon, energy, and phosphorus source with accompanying Pi release is described. This biodegradation represents a further mechanism of resistance to this antibiotic and a novel, phosphate-deregulated route for organophosphonate metabolism by Rhizobium spp.

  17. Evaluation of Artificial Intelligence Based Models for Chemical Biodegradability Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Sabljic

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a review of biodegradability modeling efforts including a detailed assessment of two models developed using an artificial intelligence based methodology. Validation results for these models using an independent, quality reviewed database, demonstrate that the models perform well when compared to another commonly used biodegradability model, against the same data. The ability of models induced by an artificial intelligence methodology to accommodate complex interactions in detailed systems, and the demonstrated reliability of the approach evaluated by this study, indicate that the methodology may have application in broadening the scope of biodegradability models. Given adequate data for biodegradability of chemicals under environmental conditions, this may allow for the development of future models that include such things as surface interface impacts on biodegradability for example.

  18. Experimental studies of biodegradation of asphalt by microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the geological disposal system of the radioactive wastes, the activities of the microorganisms that could degrade the asphalt might be significant for the assessment of the system performance. As the main effects of the biodegradation of the asphalt, the fluctuation of leaching behavior of the nuclides included in asphalt waste has been indicated. In this study, the asphalt biodegradation test was carried out. The microorganism of which asphalt degradation ability was comparatively higher under aerobic condition and anaerobic condition was used. The asphalt biodegradation rate was calculated and it was evaluated whether the asphalt biodegradation in this system could occur. The results show that the asphalt biodegradation rate under anaerobic and high alkali condition will be 300 times lower than under aerobic and neutral pH. (author)

  19. Critical evaluation of biodegradable polymers used in nanodrugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin E

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Marin,1–3 Maria Isabel Briceño,2 Catherina Caballero-George11Unit of Pharmacology, Center of Biodiversity and Drug Discovery, Institute of Scientific Research and High Technology Services, 2Nano Dispersions Technology, Panama, Republic of Panama; 3Department of Biotechnology, Archaria Nagarjuna University, Guntur, IndiaAbstract: Use of biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications has increased in recent decades due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, flexibility, and minimal side effects. Applications of these materials include creation of skin, blood vessels, cartilage scaffolds, and nanosystems for drug delivery. These biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles enhance properties such as bioavailability and stability, and provide controlled release of bioactive compounds. This review evaluates the classification, synthesis, degradation mechanisms, and biological applications of the biodegradable polymers currently being studied as drug delivery carriers. In addition, the use of nanosystems to solve current drug delivery problems are reviewed.Keywords: biodegradable polymers, nanoparticles, drug delivery, cellular uptake, biomedical applications

  20. Polymeric Biodegradable Stent Insertion in the Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal stent insertion has been used as a well-accepted and effective alternative to manage and improve the quality of life for patients diagnosed with esophageal diseases and disorders. Current stents are either permanent or temporary and are fabricated from either metal or plastic. The partially covered self-expanding metal stent (SEMS has a firm anchoring effect and prevent stent migration, however, the hyperplastic tissue reaction cause stent restenosis and make it difficult to remove. A fully covered SEMS and self-expanding plastic stent (SEPS reduced reactive hyperplasia but has a high migration rate. The main advantage that polymeric biodegradable stents (BDSs have over metal or plastic stents is that removal is not require and reduce the need for repeated stent insertion. But the slightly lower radial force of BDS may be its main shortcoming and a post-implant problem. Thus, strengthening support of BDS is a content of the research in the future. BDSs are often temporarily effective in esophageal stricture to relieve dysphagia. In the future, it can be expect that biodegradable drug-eluting stents (DES will be available to treat benign esophageal stricture, perforations or leaks with additional use as palliative modalities for treating malignant esophageal stricture, as the bridge to surgery or to maintain luminal patency during neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  1. Biodegradation of cresol isomers in anoxic aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolenski, W.J.; Suflita, J.M.

    1987-04-01

    The biodegradation of o-, m-, and p-cresol was examined in material obtained from a shallow anaerobic alluvial sand aquifer. The cresol isomers wer preferentially metabolized, with p-cresol being the most easily degraded. m-Cresol was more persistent than the para-isomer, and o-cresol persisted for over 90 days. Biodegradations of cresol isomers was favored under sulfate-reducing conditions (SRC) compared with that under methanogenic conditions (MC). Slurries that were acclimated to p-cresol metabolism transformed this substrate at 18 and 330 nmol/h per g (dry weight) for MC and SRC, respectively. Inhibition of electron flow to sulfate reduction with 2.0 mM molybdate reduced p-cresol metabolism in incubations containing sulfate. When methanogenesis was blocked with 5 mM bromoethanesulfonic acid in incubations lacking sulfate, p-cresol catabolism was retarded. Under SRC 3.4 mol of sulfate was consumed per mol of p-cresol metabolized. The addition of sulfate to methanogenic incubations stimulated p-cresol degradation. Simultaneous adaptation studies in combination with spectrophotometric and chromatographic analysis of metabolites indicated that p-cresol was oxidized under SRC to p-hydroxybenzoate via the corresponding alcohol and aldehyde. This series of reactions was inhibited under sulfate-limited or aerobic conditions. Therefore, the primary catabolic event for p-cresol decomposition under SRC appears to involve the hydroxylation of the aryl methyl group.

  2. Optimization of low ring polycylic aromatic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N.; Abdul-Talib, S.; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recalcitrance and persistence that finally turn into problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered to be the primary mechanism of PAHs removal from the environment due to its organic criteria. This study is carried out to optimize degradation process of low ring PAHs. Bacteria used in this study was isolated from sludge collected from Kolej Mawar, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor. Working condition namely, substrate concentration, bacteria concentration, pH and temperature were optimized. PAHs in the liquid sample was extracted by using solid phase microextractio equipped with a 7 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fibr. Removal of PAHs were assessed by measuring PAHs concentration using GC-FID. Results from the optimization study of biodegradation indicated that maximum rate of PAHs removal occurred at 100 mgL-1 of PAHs, 10% bacteria concentration, pH 7.0 and 30°C. These working condition had proved the effectiveness of using bacteria in biodegradation process of PAHs.

  3. Monitoring Biodegradation of Magnesium Implants with Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Daoli; Wang, Tingting; Guo, Xuefei; Kuhlmann, Julia; Doepke, Amos; Dong, Zhongyun; Shanov, Vesselin N.; Heineman, William R.

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium and its alloys exhibit properties such as high strength, light weight, and in vivo corrosion that make them promising candidates for the development of biodegradable metallic implant materials for bone repair, stents and other medical applications. Sensors have been used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium and its alloys by measuring the concentrations of the following corrosion products: magnesium ions, hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. The corrosion characterization system with home-made capillary pH and Mg2+ microsensors has been developed for real-time detection of magnesium corrosion in vitro. A hydrogen gas sensor was used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium by measuring the concentration of the hydrogen gas reaction product in vivo. The high permeability of hydrogen through skin allows transdermal monitoring of the biodegradation of a magnesium alloy implanted beneath the skin by detecting hydrogen gas at the skin surface. The sensor was used to map hydrogen concentration in the vicinity of an implanted magnesium alloy.

  4. Immunological Response to Biodegradable Magnesium Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Karin; Fischerauer, Stefan; Ferlic, Peter; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Brezinsek, Hans-Peter; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Löffler, Jörg F.; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2014-04-01

    The use of biodegradable magnesium implants in pediatric trauma surgery would render surgical interventions for implant removal after tissue healing unnecessary, thereby preventing stress to the children and reducing therapy costs. In this study, we report on the immunological response to biodegradable magnesium implants—as an important aspect in evaluating biocompatibility—tested in a growing rat model. The focus of this study was to investigate the response of the innate immune system to either fast or slow degrading magnesium pins, which were implanted into the femoral bones of 5-week-old rats. The main alloying element of the fast-degrading alloy (ZX50) was Zn, while it was Y in the slow-degrading implant (WZ21). Our results demonstrate that degrading magnesium implants beneficially influence the immune system, especially in the first postoperative weeks but also during tissue healing and early bone remodeling. However, rodents with WZ21 pins showed a slightly decreased phagocytic ability during bone remodeling when the degradation rate reached its maximum. This may be due to the high release rate of the rare earth-element yttrium, which is potentially toxic. From our results we conclude that magnesium implants have a beneficial effect on the innate immune system but that there are some concerns regarding the use of yttrium-alloyed magnesium implants, especially in pediatric patients.

  5. Modification of Biodegradable Polyesters Using Electron Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(4-Hydroxybutyrate) P4HB, Poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) PBSA and Poly(ε-caprolactone) PCL were electron beam (EB)-irradiated. Poly(4-Hydroxybutyrate) was irradiated without any polyfunctional monomers (PFM). While PBSA and PCL were irradiated in the presence of polyfunctional monomers such as Trimethallyl isocyanurate (TMAIC), Polyethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (2G, 4G), Trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPT) and Tetramethylolmethane tetraacrylate (A-TMMT) at ambient temperature. Aim of the study is to improve the properties of biodegradable polyester. It was pointed out that crosslinking yield of P4HB (6.39% gel) was formed at dose of 90 kGy irradiated in vacuum conditions. Radiation degradation promoted, when P4HB was irradiated in air. The optimum crosslinking yield of PCL and PBSA respectively, were formed in the presence of 1% TMAIC at dose of 50 kGy. The biodegradability of the crosslinked PBSA evaluated by soil burial test is slightly retarded by increasing crosslinking yields. (author)

  6. A REVIEW ON BIODEGRADABLE STARCH BASED FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Molavi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, biodegradable edible films have become very important in research related to food, due to their compatibility with the environment and their use in the food packaging industry. Various sources can be used in the production of biopolymers as biodegradable films that include polysaccharides, proteins and lipids. Among the various polysaccharides, starch due to its low price and its abundance in nature is of significant importance. Several factors affect the properties of starch films; such as the source which starch is obtained from, as well as the ratio of constituents of the starch. Starch films have advantages such as low thickness, flexibility and transparency though; there are some downsides to mention, such as the poor mechanical properties and water vapor permeability. Thus, using starch alone to produce the film will led to restrictions on its use. To improve the mechanical properties of starch films and also increases resistance against humidity, several methods can be used; including the starch modifying techniques such as cross linking of starch and combining starch with other natural polymers. Other methods such as the use of lipid in formulations of films to increase the resistance to moisture are possible, but lipids are susceptible to oxidation. Therefore, new approaches are based on the integration of different biopolymers in food packaging.

  7. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon cuts used for diesel oil formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penet, S.; Marchal, R.; Monot, F. [Departement de Biotechnologie et Chimie de la Biomasse, Institut Francais de Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France); Sghir, A. [Genoscope, CNRS UMR 8030, Structure et Evolution des Genomes, Evry (France)

    2004-11-01

    The biodegradability of various types of diesel oil (DO), such as straight-run DO, light-cycle DO, hydrocracking DO, Fischer-Tropsch DO and commercial DO, was investigated in biodegradation tests performed in closed-batch systems using two microflorae. The first microflora was an activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant as commonly used in biodegradability tests of commercial products and the second was a microflora from a hydrocarbon-polluted soil with possible specific capacities for hydrocarbon degradation. Kinetics of CO{sub 2} production and extent of DO biodegradation were obtained by chromatographic procedures. Under optimised conditions, the polluted-soil microflora was found to extensively degrade all the DO types tested, the degradation efficiencies being higher than 88%. For all the DOs tested, the biodegradation capacities of the soil microflora were significantly higher than those of the activated sludge. Using both microflora, the extent of biodegradation was highly dependent upon the type of DO used, especially its hydrocarbon composition. Linear alkanes were completely degraded in each test, whereas identifiable branched alkanes such as farnesane, pristane or phytane were degraded to variable extents. Among the aromatics, substituted mono-aromatics were also variably biodegraded. (orig.)

  8. [Biodegradation Coefficients of Typical Pollutants in the Plain Rivers Network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuai; Li, Xu-yongl; Deng, Jian-cai

    2016-05-15

    Biodegradation is a significant part of pollutant integrated degradation, the process rate of which is represented by the biodegradation coefficient. To investigate the biodegradation law of typical pollutants in the plain rivers network located in the upstream of the Lake Taihu, experiments were conducted in site in September 2015, one order kinetics model was used to measure the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients were also analyzed. The results showed that the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 0.008 3-0.126 4 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.213 8 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.090 5 d⁻¹ and 0.011 0- 0.152 8 d⁻¹, respectively. The influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index were permanganate index and pH; those for ammonia were ammonia concentration and pH; those for total nitrogen were inorganic nitrogen concentration, total dissolved solid concentration and nitrite concentration; and those for total phosphorus were background concentration and pH. The research results were of important guiding significance for pollutants removal and ecological restoration of the plain rivers network located in the unstream of the Lake Taihu. PMID:27506025

  9. Degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastic by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Rodrigues da Luz

    Full Text Available Growing concerns regarding the impact of the accumulation of plastic waste over several decades on the environmental have led to the development of biodegradable plastic. These plastics can be degraded by microorganisms and absorbed by the environment and are therefore gaining public support as a possible alternative to petroleum-derived plastics. Among the developed biodegradable plastics, oxo-biodegradable polymers have been used to produce plastic bags. Exposure of this waste plastic to ultraviolet light (UV or heat can lead to breakage of the polymer chains in the plastic, and the resulting compounds are easily degraded by microorganisms. However, few studies have characterized the microbial degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastics. In this study, we tested the capability of Pleurotus ostreatus to degrade oxo-biodegradable (D2W plastic without prior physical treatment, such as exposure to UV or thermal heating. After 45 d of incubation in substrate-containing plastic bags, the oxo-biodegradable plastic, which is commonly used in supermarkets, developed cracks and small holes in the plastic surface as a result of the formation of hydroxyl groups and carbon-oxygen bonds. These alterations may be due to laccase activity. Furthermore, we observed the degradation of the dye found in these bags as well as mushroom formation. Thus, P. ostreatus degrades oxo-biodegradable plastics and produces mushrooms using this plastic as substrate.

  10. Degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastic by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, José Maria Rodrigues; Paes, Sirlaine Albino; Nunes, Mateus Dias; da Silva, Marliane de Cássia Soares; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi

    2013-01-01

    Growing concerns regarding the impact of the accumulation of plastic waste over several decades on the environmental have led to the development of biodegradable plastic. These plastics can be degraded by microorganisms and absorbed by the environment and are therefore gaining public support as a possible alternative to petroleum-derived plastics. Among the developed biodegradable plastics, oxo-biodegradable polymers have been used to produce plastic bags. Exposure of this waste plastic to ultraviolet light (UV) or heat can lead to breakage of the polymer chains in the plastic, and the resulting compounds are easily degraded by microorganisms. However, few studies have characterized the microbial degradation of oxo-biodegradable plastics. In this study, we tested the capability of Pleurotus ostreatus to degrade oxo-biodegradable (D2W) plastic without prior physical treatment, such as exposure to UV or thermal heating. After 45 d of incubation in substrate-containing plastic bags, the oxo-biodegradable plastic, which is commonly used in supermarkets, developed cracks and small holes in the plastic surface as a result of the formation of hydroxyl groups and carbon-oxygen bonds. These alterations may be due to laccase activity. Furthermore, we observed the degradation of the dye found in these bags as well as mushroom formation. Thus, P. ostreatus degrades oxo-biodegradable plastics and produces mushrooms using this plastic as substrate. PMID:23967057

  11. Biodegradability enhancement of textile wastewater by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tak-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Lee, Myun-Joo

    2007-06-01

    Textile wastewater generally contains various pollutants, which can cause problems during biological treatment. Electron beam radiation technology was applied to enhance the biodegradability of textile wastewater for an activated sludge process. The biodegradability (BOD 5/COD) increased at a 1.0 kGy dose. The biorefractory organic compounds were converted into more easily biodegradable compounds such as organic acids having lower molecular weights. In spite of the short hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the activated sludge process, not only high organic removal efficiencies, but also high microbial activities were achieved. In conclusion, textile wastewater was effectively treated by the combined process of electron beam radiation and an activated sludge process.

  12. "Rational" management of dichlorophenols biodegradation by the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Papazi

    Full Text Available The microalga Scenedesmus obliquus exhibited the ability to biodegrade dichlorophenols (dcps under specific autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. According to their biodegradability, the dichlorophenols used can be separated into three distinct groups. Group I (2,4-dcp and 2,6 dcp - no meta-substitution consisted of quite easily degraded dichlorophenols, since both chloride substituents are in less energetically demanding positions. Group II (2,3-dcp, 2,5-dcp and 3,4-dcp - one meta-chloride was less susceptible to biodegradation, since one of the two substituents, the meta one, required higher energy for C-Cl-bond cleavage. Group III (3,5-dcp - two meta-chlorides could not be biodegraded, since both chlorides possessed the most energy demanding positions. In general, when the dcp-toxicity exceeded a certain threshold, the microalga increased the energy offered for biodegradation and decreased the energy invested for biomass production. As a result, the biodegradation per cell volume of group II (higher toxicity was higher, than group I (lower toxicity and the biodegradation of dichlorophenols (higher toxicity was higher than the corresponding monochlorophenols (lower toxicity. The participation of the photosynthetic apparatus and the respiratory mechanism of microalga to biodegrade the group I and the group II, highlighted different bioenergetic strategies for optimal management of the balance between dcp-toxicity, dcp-biodegradability and culture growth. Additionally, we took into consideration the possibility that the intermediates of each dcp-biodegradation pathway could influence differently the whole biodegradation procedures. For this reason, we tested all possible combinations of phenolic intermediates to check cometabolic interactions. The present contribution bring out the possibility of microalgae to operate as "smart" bioenergetic "machines", that have the ability to continuously "calculate" the energy reserves and "use" the most

  13. Biodegradable Polyphosphazene Based Peptide-Polymer Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Linhardt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of peptide based hybrid polymers designed to undergo enzymatic degradation is presented, via macrosubstitution of a polyphosphazene backbone with the tetrapeptide Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly. Further co-substitution of the hybrid polymers with hydrophilic polyalkylene oxide Jeffamine M-1000 leads to water soluble and biodegradable hybrid polymers. Detailed degradation studies, via 31P NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and field flow fractionation show the polymers degrade via a combination of enzymatic, as well as hydrolytic pathways. The peptide sequence was chosen due to its known property to undergo lysosomal degradation; hence, these degradable, water soluble polymers could be of significant interest for the use as polymer therapeutics. In this context, we investigated conjugation of the immune response modifier imiquimod to the polymers via the tetrapeptide and report the self-assembly behavior of the conjugate, as well as its enzymatically triggered drug release behavior.

  14. Purified terephthalic acid wastewater biodegradation and toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-xiang; LUO Xiang; GU Ji-dong; WAN Yu-qiu; CHENG Shu-pei; SUN Shi-lei; ZHU Cheng-jun; LI Wei-xin; ZHANG Xiao-chun; WANG Gui-lin; LU Jian-hua

    2005-01-01

    The biodegradation and toxicity of the purified terephthalic acid(PTA) processing wastewater was researched at NJYZ pilot with the fusant strain Fhhh in the carrier activated sludge process(CASP). Sludge loading rate(SLR) for Fhhh to COD of the wastewater was 1.09 d-1 and to PTA in the wastewater was 0.29 d-1. The results of bioassay at the pilot and calculation with software Ebis3 showed that the 48h-LC50 (median lethal concentration) to Daphnia magna for the PTA concentration in the wastewater was only 1/10 of that for the chemical PTA. There were 5 kinds of benzoate pollutants and their toxicities existing in the wastewater at least. The toxicity parameter value of the pure chemical PTA cannot be used to predicate the PTA wastewater toxicity. The toxicity of the NJYZ PTA wastewater will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  15. Biodegradation of lignin by Agaricus Bisporus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vane, C.H.; Abbott, G.D.; Head, I.M. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    The lignolytic activity of Agaricus bisporus will be addressed in this paper. Sound and fungally degraded lignins were characterized by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FnR) and elemental analysis. Fungally degraded lignins displayed increased wt%N, wt%H and wt%O content and decreased wt%C content The FTIR spectrum of decayed lignin showed an increase in the relative intensity of absorption bands assigned to carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups located on the aliphatic side chain and a decrease in absorption bands assigned to aromatic skeletal vibration modes. Semiquantitative Py-GC-MS revealed an 82% decrease in lignin derived pyrolysis products upon biodegradation. No significant increase in pyrolysis products with an oxygenated aliphatic side chain were detected in the fungally degraded lignin however shortening of the aliphatic side chain via cleavage at the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} positions was observed.

  16. Lignin biodegradation with laccase-mediator systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lew Paul Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lignin has a significant and largely unrealized potential as a source for the sustainable production of fuels and bulk high-value chemicals. It can replace fossil-based oil as a renewable feedstock that would bring about socio-economic and environmental benefits in our transition to a biobased economy. The efficient utilization of lignin however requires its depolymerization to low molecular weight phenolics and aromatics that can then serve as the building blocks for chemical syntheses of high-value products. The ability of laccase to attack and degrade lignin in conjunction with laccase mediators is currently viewed as one of the potential breakthrough applications for lignin valorization. Here we review the recent progress in lignin biodegradation with laccase-mediator systems, and research needs that need to be addressed in this field.

  17. Biodegradation and flushing of MBT wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, A A; Richards, D J; Powrie, W

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) processes are increasingly being adopted as a means of diverting biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill, for example to comply with the EU Landfill Directive. However, there is considerable uncertainty concerning the residual pollution potential of such wastes. This paper presents the results of laboratory experiments on two different MBT waste residues, carried out to investigate the remaining potential for the generation of greenhouse gases and the flushing of contaminants from these materials when landfilled. The potential for gas generation was found to be between 8% and 20% of that for raw MSW. Pretreatment of the waste reduced the potential for the release of organic carbon, ammoniacal nitrogen, and heavy metal contents into the leachate; and reduced the residual carbon remaining in the waste after final degradation from ∼320g/kg dry matter for raw MSW to between 183 and 195g/kg dry matter for the MBT wastes. PMID:23973052

  18. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Mehrasbi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (20 g/kg dw soil was investigated in 3 media, differing in the kind of petroleum fractions. In the laboratory experiments, during 5 months, the activities of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and dehydrogenase activity of soil was determined. Gas chromatographic analysis showed the biological decontaminations for gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture (gas oil, kerosene and furnace oil are 60 %, 36 % and 55 %, respectively. Dehydrogenase activity which was assessed by TTC technique, correlated significantly positive with the numbers of microorganisms. The Spearman rank correlation coefficients(r in contaminated soils with gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture were 0.79, 0.80 and 0.69, respectively.

  19. Gas foamed open porous biodegradable polymeric microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taek Kyoung; Yoon, Jun Jin; Lee, Doo Sung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2006-01-01

    Highly open porous biodegradable polymeric microspheres were fabricated for use as injectable scaffold microcarriers for cell delivery. A modified water-in-oil-in-water (W1/O/W2) double emulsion solvent evaporation method was employed for producing the microspheres. The incorporation of an effervescent salt, ammonium bicarbonate, in the primary W1 droplets spontaneously produced carbon dioxide and ammonia gas bubbles during the solvent evaporation process, which not only stabilized the primary emulsion, but also created well inter-connected pores in the resultant microspheres. The porous microspheres fabricated under various gas foaming conditions were characterized. The surface pores became as large as 20 microm in diameter with increasing the concentration of ammonium bicarbonate, being sufficient enough for cell infiltration and seeding. These porous scaffold microspheres could be potentially utilized for cultivating cells in a suspension manner and for delivering the seeded cells to the tissue defect site in an injectable manner. PMID:16023197

  20. Biodegradation of polyester. Polyester no bunkai sei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokiwa, Y. (Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Fermentation Research Inst.)

    1991-09-10

    Penicillium sp. 14-3 and penicillium sp. 26-1 can degrade various kinds of polyester. The results of studies made on hydrolysis of polyester by enzyme, hydrolysis of polyester by various kinds of lipase, and degradation of ester type polyurethane by microbes and lipase are introduced. For the improvement of physical properties of aliphatic polyester, aromatic-aliphatic polyester copolymers (CPE) have been synthesized to study the biodegradability. Copolymer in which a number of polyamide (nylon) are alternately introduced (CPAE) to aliphatic polyester has been developed. The result of studies made on the degradability of a blended body of PCL and natural high polymer, and on the collapsibility by lipase of high polymer materials including aliphatic polyamide are introduced. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Biodegradation of concrete intended for their decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination of sub-structural materials represents a stake of high importance because of the high volume generated. It is agreed then to propose efficient and effective processes. The process of bio-decontamination of the hydraulic binders leans on the mechanisms of biodegradation of concretes, phenomenon characterized in the 40's by an indirect attack of the material by acids stem from the microbial metabolism: sulphuric acid (produced by Thiobacillus), nitric acid (produced by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter) and organic acids (produced by fungi). The principle of the bio-decontamination process is to apply those microorganisms on the surface of the contaminated material, in order to damage its surface and to retrieve the radionuclides. One of the multiple approaches of the process is the use of a bio-gel that makes possible the micro-organisms application. (author)

  2. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Tie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4 and aging (T6 heat treatment.The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH2 and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7, revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269, and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  3. Biodegradation of crystal violet by Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshetti, G K; Parshetti, S G; Telke, A A; Kalyani, D C; Doong, R A; Govindwar, S P

    2011-01-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter MTCC 8161 completely decolorized the Crystal Violet with 8 hr (10 mg/L) at static anoxic conditions. The decreased decolorization capability by A. radiobacter was observed, when the Crystal Violet concentration was increased from 10 to 100 mg/L. Semi-synthetic medium containing 1% yeast extract and 0.1% NH4C1 has shown 100% decolorization of Crystal Violet within 5 hr. A complete degradation of Crystal Violet by A. radiobacter was observed up to 7 cycles of repeated addition (10 mg/L). When the effect of increasing inoculum concentration on decolorization of Crystal Violet (100 mg/L) was studied, maximum decolorization was observed with 15% inoculum concentration. A significant increase in the activities of laccase (184%) and aminopyrine N-demethylase (300%) in cells obtained after decolorization indicated the involvement of these enzymes in decolorization process. The intermediates formed during the degradation of Crystal Violet were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). It was detected the presence of N,N,N',N"-tetramethylpararosaniline, [N, N-dimethylaminophenyl] [N-methylaminophenyl] benzophenone, N, N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, 4-methyl amino phenol and phenol. We proposed the hypothetical metabolic pathway of Crystal Violet biodegradation by A. radiobacter. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity study showed that Crystal Violet biodegradation metabolites were less toxic to bacteria (A. radiobacter, P. aurugenosa and A. vinelandii) contributing to soil fertility and for four kinds of plants (Sorghum bicolor Vigna radiata, Lens culinaris and Triticum aestivum) which are most sensitive, fast growing and commonly used in Indian agriculture. PMID:22128547

  4. Peptide biomarkers as evidence of perchlorate biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2011-02-01

    Perchlorate is a known health hazard for humans, fish, and other species. Therefore, it is important to assess the response of an ecosystem exposed to perchlorate contamination. The data reported here show that a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the detection of perchlorate-reducing enzymes can be used to measure the ability of microorganisms to degrade perchlorate, including determining the current perchlorate degradation status. Signature peptides derived from chlorite dismutase (CD) and perchlorate reductase can be used as biomarkers of perchlorate presence and biodegradation. Four peptides each derived from CD and perchlorate reductase subunit A (PcrA) and seven peptides derived from perchlorate reductase subunit B (PcrB) were identified as signature biomarkers for perchlorate degradation, as these sequences are conserved in the majority of the pure and mixed perchlorate-degrading microbial cultures examined. However, chlorite dismutase signature biomarker peptides from Dechloromonas agitata CKB were found to be different from those in other cultures used and should also be included with selected CD biomarkers. The combination of these peptides derived from the two enzymes represents a promising perchlorate presence/biodegradation biomarker system. The biomarker peptides were detected at perchlorate concentrations as low as 0.1 mM and at different time points both in pure cultures and within perchlorate-reducing environmental enrichment consortia. The peptide biomarkers were also detected in the simultaneous presence of perchlorate and an alternate electron acceptor, nitrate. We believe that this technique can be useful for monitoring bioremediation processes for other anthropogenic environmental contaminants with known metabolic pathways. PMID:21115710

  5. Vectorization of copper complexes via biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double emulsion-solvent diffusion approach with fully biocompatible materials was used to encapsulate copper complexes within biodegradable nanoparticles, for which the release kinetics profiles have highlighted their potential use for a prolonged circulating administration.

  6. Biodegradation of waste PET based copolyesters in thermophilic anaerobic sludge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hermanová, S.; Šmejkalová, P.; Merna, J.; Zarevúcka, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 111, Jan (2015), s. 176-184. ISSN 0141-3910 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : poly(ethylene terephthalate) * copolymers * sludge * biodegradation * hydrolysis * waste Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.163, year: 2014

  7. Biodegradation of cycloalkane carboxylic acids in oil sand tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodegradation of both an n-alkane and several carboxylated cycloalkanes was examined experimentally within tailings produced by the extraction of bitumen from the Athabasca oil sands. The carboxylated cycloalkanes examined were structurally similar to naphthenic acids that have been associated with the acute toxicity of oil sand tailings. The biodegradation potential of naphthenic acids was estimated by determining the biodegradation of both the carboxylated cycloalkanes and hexadecane in oil sand tailings. Carboxylated cycloalkanes were biodegraded within oil sands tailings, although compounds with methyl substitutions on the cycloalkane ring were more resistant to microbial degradation. Microbial activity against hexadecane and certain carboxylated cycloalkanes was found to be nitrogen and phosphorus limited. 21 refs., 3 refs., 1 tab

  8. Fade to Green: A Biodegradable Stack of Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Jonathan; Chambers, Lily D; Rossiter, Jonathan; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Walter, X Alexis; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-08-24

    The focus of this study is the development of biodegradable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) able to produce useful power. Reactors with an 8 mL chamber volume were designed using all biodegradable products: polylactic acid for the frames, natural rubber as the cation-exchange membrane and egg-based, open-to-air cathodes coated with a lanolin gas diffusion layer. Forty MFCs were operated in various configurations. When fed with urine, the biodegradable stack was able to power appliances and was still operational after six months. One useful application for this truly sustainable MFC technology includes onboard power supplies for biodegradable robotic systems. After operation in remote ecological locations, these could degrade harmlessly into the surroundings to leave no trace when the mission is complete. PMID:26212495

  9. State-of-the-art of biodegradable composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, the market demand for environment friendly materials is in strong growth. The biodegradable composites (biodegradable fibres and polymers) mainly extracted from renewable resources will be a major contributor to the production of new industrial high performance products partially solving the problem of waste management. At the end of the lifetime, a structural bio-composite could be be crushed and recycled through a controlled industrial composting process. This the state-of-the-art report focuses on the biopolymers the vegetable fibres properties, the mechanisms of biodegradation and the examples of biodegradable composites. Eco-design of new products requires these new materials for which a life cycle analysis is nevertheless necessary to validate their environmental benefits. (authors)

  10. Kinetics of Enzyme Biodegradation of New Synthesized Copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Mateva

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Block copolymers of the poly-(hexanlactam-co-block-poly-(?-valerolactone from ABA-type were synthesized via anionic polymerization of hexanlactam (HL with the sodium salt of hexanlactam (Na-HL as an initiator and polymeric activator (PAC. PAC, on the base of poly-?-valerolactone (PVL, was used as a soft central block. Synthetic PVL is very attractive biomaterial - nontoxic, biocompatibility and biodegradable polyester[5-8]. Modification of HL with PVL, renders these system biodegradable[1]. Isolated copolymers were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. The effect of the chemical and physical structure of the synthesized block copolymers on the biodegradation was investigated. Biodegradation of block copolyester amides was studied by means of lipase and involves the enzymatic hydrolysis of ester groups in PVL.

  11. Isomer-Specific Biodegradation and Chemical Oxidation of Nonylphenol

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhijiang

    2014-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), a well-known environmental estrogen with numerous isomers, is commonly treated as a single compound in the evaluation of its environmental occurrence, fate and transport, treatment removal and toxicity. Recent studies showed that NP isomers exhibited different estrogenicity and biodegradability. However, at present little systematic information is available on its isomer-specific biodegradation and chemical oxidation under natural and engineered conditions.We comprehensively...

  12. Comparative study on the biodegradability of morpholinium herbicidal ionic liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Ławniczak, Łukasz; Materna, Katarzyna; Framski, Grzegorz; Szulc, Alicja; Syguda, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on evaluating the toxicity as well as primary and ultimate biodegradability of morpholinium herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs), which incorporated MCPA, MCPP, 2,4-D or Dicamba anions. The studied HILs were also subjected to determination of surface active properties in order to assess their influence on toxicity and biodegradability. The study was carried out with microbiota isolated from different environmental niches: sediments from river channel, garden soil, drainage trenc...

  13. Biodegradable Nanocomposite Films Based on Sodium Alginate and Cellulose Nanofibrils

    OpenAIRE

    B. Deepa; Eldho Abraham; Pothan, Laly A; Nereida Cordeiro; Marisa Faria; Sabu Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable nanocomposite films were prepared by incorporation of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) into alginate biopolymer using the solution casting method. The effects of CNF content (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 and 15 wt %) on mechanical, biodegradability and swelling behavior of the nanocomposite films were determined. The results showed that the tensile modulus value of the nanocomposite films increased from 308 to 1403 MPa with increasing CNF content from 0% to 10%; however, it decreased with further...

  14. Biodegradation of Para Amino Acetanilide by Halomonas sp. TBZ3

    OpenAIRE

    Hajizadeh, Nader; Sefidi Heris, Youssof; Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Vallipour, Javad; Hejazi, Mohammad Amin; Golabi, Sayyed Mahdi; Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aromatic compounds are known as a group of highly persistent environmental pollutants. Halomonas sp. TBZ3 was isolated from the highly salty Urmia Lake of Iran. In this study, characterization of a new Halomonas isolate called Halomonas sp. TBZ3 and its employment for biodegradation of para-amino acetanilide (PAA), as an aromatic environmental pollutant, is described. Objectives: This study aimed to characterize the TBZ3 isolate and to elucidate its ability as a biodegradative age...

  15. Study of the biodegradation in soil of new generation plactics

    OpenAIRE

    Siotto,

    2011-01-01

    The intense use of plastic contributes to increase the amount of municipal waste that are generally disposed in landfill. For some applications and sectors, an important alternative to the conventional plastic materials can be found in the use of the new generation materials: the biodegradable polymers. Their use can be an alternative to landfill disposal and can thus reduce the cost of waste management and the accumulation in the environment. The biodegradable polymers, in fact, are used by ...

  16. Biodegradation of Asphalt Cement-20 by Aerobic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Pendrys, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Seven gram-negative, aerobic bacteria were isolated from a mixed culture enriched for asphalt-degrading bacteria. The predominant genera of these isolates were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Flavimonas, and Flavobacterium. The mixed culture preferentially degraded the saturate and naphthene aromatic fractions of asphalt cement-20. A residue remained on the surface which was resistant to biodegradation and protected the underlying asphalt from biodegradation. The most potent asphalt-...

  17. Biodegradability determination of municipal waste: an evaluation of methods

    OpenAIRE

    Godley, Andrew R.; Lewin, Kathy; Graham, Adele; Barker, H.; Smith, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The Environment Agency is required to monitor the diversion of biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill. Reliable methods are needed to measure the biodegradability of municipal waste, both as mixed municipal waste and as individually separated fractions. An evaluation of several methods was carried out using a variety of organic materials typically found in municipal solid waste. The assessment considered biological and non-biological methods to determine which provid...

  18. Critical evaluation of biodegradable polymers used in nanodrugs

    OpenAIRE

    Marin E; Briceño MI; Caballero-George C

    2013-01-01

    Edgar Marin,1–3 Maria Isabel Briceño,2 Catherina Caballero-George11Unit of Pharmacology, Center of Biodiversity and Drug Discovery, Institute of Scientific Research and High Technology Services, 2Nano Dispersions Technology, Panama, Republic of Panama; 3Department of Biotechnology, Archaria Nagarjuna University, Guntur, IndiaAbstract: Use of biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications has increased in recent decades due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, ...

  19. Biodegradation and biocompatibility of a degradable chitosan vascular prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Xiaoying; Xu, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    An instrument made by ourselves was used to fabricate biodegradable chitosan-heparin artificial vascular prosthesis with small internal diameter (2 mm) and different crosslinking degree from biodegradable chitosan, chitosan derivates and heparin. In vivo and in vitro degradation studies, inflammatory analysis and electron microscope scanning of this artificial vascular prosthesis were performed. It was observed that 50% of the prosthesis decomposed in vivo and was replaced by natural tissues....

  20. Factors influencing crude oil biodegradation by Yarrowia lipolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Felix Ferreira; Maria Alice Zarur Coelho; Maria Helena Miguez da Rocha-Leão

    2012-01-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is unique strictly aerobic yeast with the ability to efficiently degrade hydrophobic substrates such as n-alkenes, fatty acids, glycerol and oils. In the present work, a 2(4) full factorial design was used to investigate the influence of the independent variables of temperature, agitation, initial cell concentration and initial petroleum concentration on crude oil biodegradation. The results showed that all variables studied had significant effects on the biodegradation pr...

  1. Removal of Textile Dyestufes From Wastewater by Adsorptive Biodegradation

    OpenAIRE

    KAPDAN, İlgi KARAPINAR; KARGI, Fikret

    2000-01-01

    Removal of dyestuffs from a synthetic wastewater by adsorptive biodegradation was investigated in this study. The dyestuff adsorption capacities of granular, powdered activated carbon (GAC and PAC) and low-cost adsorbents such as zeolite, wood chips and wood ash were evaluated in order to obtain a low-cost adsorbent for use in an activated sludge unit. Then various activated sludge cultures were tested for biodegradation of a selected dyestuff. An activated sludge unit with the selected activ...

  2. Kinetics of Enzyme Biodegradation of New Synthesized Copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Mateva; Natalia Toncheva; Lubov Yotova

    2005-01-01

    Block copolymers of the poly-(hexanlactam)-co-block-poly-(?-valerolactone) from ABA-type were synthesized via anionic polymerization of hexanlactam (HL) with the sodium salt of hexanlactam (Na-HL) as an initiator and polymeric activator (PAC). PAC, on the base of poly-?-valerolactone (PVL), was used as a soft central block. Synthetic PVL is very attractive biomaterial - nontoxic, biocompatibility and biodegradable polyester[5-8]. Modification of HL with PVL, renders these system biodegradable...

  3. Base Oils Biodegradability Prediction with Data Mining Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Malika Trabelsi; Saloua Saidane; Sihem Ben Abdelmelek

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we apply various data mining techniques including continuous numeric and discrete classification prediction models of base oils biodegradability, with emphasis on improving prediction accuracy. The results show that highly biodegradable oils can be better predicted through numeric models. In contrast, classification models did not uncover a similar dichotomy. With the exception of Memory Based Reasoning and Decision Trees, tested classification techniques achieved high classifi...

  4. BACTERIAL BIODEGRADATION OF PERMETRINA AND CIPERMETRINA PESTICIDES IN CULTURE LOT

    OpenAIRE

    José C. Mendoza; Yazmin S. Perea; Jaime A. Salvador; Janette A. Morales; Gabriela Pérez

    2011-01-01

    The biodegradation of permetrhin and cypermethrin (50 and 100 mg/L) with Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas mendocina, Chromobacterium violaceum and Burkholderia cepacia in batch reactors was studied. The strain of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas mendocina showed a greater capability of biodegradation of pesticides, after 5 days, this is of 65% for both pesticides and after the 15 days it practically stays constant, being of until 95% for permetrina to 50 and 100 mg/l and for cipermetrina fr...

  5. Biodegradation of bioaccessible textile azo dyes by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Maria Adosinda; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Santos, Isabel; Queiroz, Maria João R. P.; Lima, Nelson

    2000-01-01

    Azo dyes are important chemical pollutants of industrial origin. Textile azo dyes with bioaccessible groups for lignin degrading fungi, such as 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol) and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (syringol), were synthesised using different aminobenzoic and aminosulphonic acids as diazo components. The inocula of the best biodegradation assays were obtained from a pre-growth medium (PAM), containing one of the synthesised dyes. The results of the dye biodegradation assays were eval...

  6. Development of biodegradable magnesium alloy stents with coating

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenza Petrini; Wei Wu; Dario Gastaldi; Lina Altomare; Silvia Farè; Francesco Migliavacca; Ali Gökhan Demir; Barbara Previtali; Maurizio Vedani

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents are attracting the attention of many researchers in biomedical and materials research fields since they can absolve their specific function for the expected period of time and then gradually disappear. This feature allows avoiding the risk of long-term complications such as restenosis or mechanical instability of the device when the vessel grows in size in pediatric patients. Up to now biodegradable stents made of polymers or magnesium alloys have been propose...

  7. Assessment of the biodegradability of xanthan in offshore injection water

    OpenAIRE

    Hovland, Beate

    2015-01-01

    The application of biopolymers in EOR operations is considered environmental friendly compared to synthetic polymers. However, microbial degradation of the biopolymers may lead to a deterioration of effect in EOR applications. This thesis is part of an industrial project conducted by UNI Research CIPR for Statoil ASA, were the aim is to assess biodegradation of xanthan at specific oil field conditions. Investigation of the biodegradation of xanthan was perform...

  8. Evaluation of the biodegradation of Alaska North Slope oil in microcosms using the biodegradation model BIOB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish eTorlapati

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the details of a numerical model, BIOB that is capable of simulating the biodegradation of oil entrapped in the sediment. The model uses Monod kinetics to simulate the growth of bacteria in the presence of nutrients and the subsequent consumption of hydrocarbons. The model was used to simulate experimental results of Exxon Valdez oil biodegradation in laboratory columns (Venosa et al. (2010. In that study, samples were collected from three different islands: Eleanor Island (EL107, Knight Island (KN114A, and Smith Island (SM006B, and placed in laboratory microcosms for a duration of 168 days to investigate oil bioremediation through natural attenuation and nutrient amendment. The kinetic parameters of the BIOB model were estimated by fitting to the experimental data using a parameter estimation tool based on Genetic Algorithms (GA. The parameter values of EL107 and KN114A were similar whereas those of SM006B were different from the two other sites; in particular biomass growth at SM006B was four times slower than at the other two islands. Grain size analysis from each site revealed that the specific surface area per unit mass of sediment was considerably lower at SM006B, which suggest that the surface area of sediments is a key control parameter for microbial growth in sediments. Comparison of the BIOB results with exponential decay curves fitted to the data indicated that BIOB provided better fit for KN114A and SM006B in nutrient amended treatments, and for EL107 and KN114A in natural attenuation. In particular, BIOB was able to capture the initial slow biodegradation due to the lag phase in microbial growth. Sensitivity analyses revealed that oil biodegradation at all three locations were sensitive to nutrient concentration whereas SM006B was sensitive to initial biomass concentration due to its slow growth rate. Analyses were also performed to compare the half-lives of individual compounds with the decay rate of the overall PAH.

  9. Biodegradation and surfactant-mediated biodegradation of diesel fuel by 218 microbial consortia are not correlated to cell surface hydrophobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Szulc, Alicja; Chrzanowski, Lukasz; Bogacki, Mariusz [Poznan Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Chemical Technology and Engineering; Cyplik, Pawel; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agniezka K. [Poznan Univ. of Life Sciences (Poland). Dept. of Biotechnology and Food Microbiology; Heipieper, Hermann J. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology

    2009-09-15

    In this study, we elucidated the role of cell surface hydrophobicity (microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons method, MATH) and the effect of anionic rhamnolipids and nonionic Triton X-100 surfactants on biodegradation of diesel fuel employing 218 microbial consortia isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils. Applied enrichment procedure with floating diesel fuel as a sole carbon source in liquid cultures resulted in consortia of varying biodegradation potential and diametrically different cell surface properties, suggesting that cell surface hydrophobicity is a conserved parameter. Surprisingly, no correlations between cell surface hydrophobicity and biodegradation of diesel fuel were found. Nevertheless, both surfactants altered cell surface hydrophobicity of the consortia in similar manner: increased for the hydrophilic and decreased for the hydrophobic cultures. In addition to this, the surfactants exhibited similar influence on diesel fuel biodegradation: Increase was observed for initially slow-degrading cultures and the opposite for fast degraders. This indicates that in the surfactant-mediated biodegradation, effectiveness of surfactants depends on the specification of microorganisms and not on the type of surfactant. In contrary to what was previously reported for pure strains, cell surface hydrophobicity, as determined by MATH, is not a good descriptor of biodegrading potential for mixed cultures. (orig.)

  10. Biodegradability enhancement of municipal landfill leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi Kewu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The method of enhancing the biodegradability of landfill leachate via air stripping followed by coagulation/ultrafiltration (UF processes is introduced. In this study, the air stripping process obtained a removal efficiency of 88.6% for ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N, at an air-to-liquid ratio (A/L of 3 300 (pH = 11 and after 18 h of stripping. The single coagulation process increased the BOD (biological oxygen demand/COD (chemical oxygen demand ratio by 0.089 with a FeCl3 dosage of 570 mg/L, at pH 7.0, and the single UF process increased the BOD/COD ratio from 0.049 to 0.311. However, the combination of coagulation and UF increased the BOD/COD ratio from 0.049 to 0.423, and the final BOD, COD, NH3-N, and colour of the leachate were 1 023 mg/L, 2 845 mg/L, 145 mg/L, and 2 056, respectively, when a 3 kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO membrane was used at an operating pressure of 0.7 MPa. In the ultrafiltration process, the average solution flux (JV, concentration multiple (MC, and retention rate (R for the COD were 107.3 L/(m2·h, 6.3, and 84.2%, respectively.

  11. Microbial ecology of bacterially mediated PCB biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roles of plasmid mediated and consortia mediated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) biodegradation by bacterial populations isolated from PCB contaminated freshwater sediments were investigated. PCB degrading bacteria were isolated by DNA:DNA colony hybridization, batch enrichments, and chemostat enrichment. Analysis of substrate removal and metabolite production were done using chlorinated biphenyl spray plates, reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography, Cl- detection, and 14C-labeled substrate mineralization methods. A bacterial consortium, designated LPS10, involved in a concerted metabolic attack on chlorinated biphenyls, was shown to mineralize 4-chlorobiphenyl (4CB) and 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl (4,4' CB). The LPS10 consortium was isolated by both batch and chemostat enrichment using 4CB and biphenyl (BP) as sole carbon source and was found to have tree bacterial isolates that predominated; these included: Pseudomonas, testosteroni LPS10A which mediated the breakdown of 4CB and 4,4' CB to the putative meta-cleavage product and subsequently to 4-chlorobenzoic acid (4CBA), an isolate tentatively identified as an Arthrobacter sp. LPS10B which mediated 4CBA degradation, and Pseudomonas putida by A LPS10C whose role in the consortium has not been determined

  12. Equilibrium gold nanoclusters quenched with biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Avinash K; Stover, Robert J; Borwankar, Ameya U; Nie, Golay D; Gourisankar, Sai; Truskett, Thomas M; Sokolov, Konstantin V; Johnston, Keith P

    2013-01-22

    Although sub-100 nm nanoclusters of metal nanoparticles are of interest in many fields including biomedical imaging, sensors, and catalysis, it has been challenging to control their morphologies and chemical properties. Herein, a new concept is presented to assemble equilibrium Au nanoclusters of controlled size by tuning the colloidal interactions with a polymeric stabilizer, PLA(1k)-b-PEG(10k)-b-PLA(1k). The nanoclusters form upon mixing a dispersion of ~5 nm Au nanospheres with a polymer solution followed by partial solvent evaporation. A weakly adsorbed polymer quenches the equilibrium nanocluster size and provides steric stabilization. Nanocluster size is tuned from ~20 to ~40 nm by experimentally varying the final Au nanoparticle concentration and the polymer/Au ratio, along with the charge on the initial Au nanoparticle surface. Upon biodegradation of the quencher, the nanoclusters reversibly and fully dissociate to individual ~5 nm primary particles. Equilibrium cluster size is predicted semiquantitatively with a free energy model that balances short-ranged depletion and van der Waals attractions with longer-ranged electrostatic repulsion, as a function of the Au and polymer concentrations. The close spacings of the Au nanoparticles in the clusters produce strong NIR extinction over a broad range of wavelengths from 650 to 900 nm, which is of practical interest in biomedical imaging. PMID:23230905

  13. Microporous biodegradable polyurethane membranes for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Yuen Kee; Gogolewski, Sylwester

    2009-08-01

    Microporous membranes with controlled pore size and structure were produced from biodegradable polyurethane based on aliphatic diisocyanate, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) diol and isosorbide chain extender using the modified phase-inversion technique. The following parameters affecting the process of membrane formation were investigated: the type of solvent, solvent-nonsolvent ratio, polymer concentration in solution, polymer solidification time, and the thickness of the polymer solution layer cast on a substrate. The experimental systems evaluated were polymer-N,N-dimethylformamide-water, polymer-N,N-dimethylacetamide-water and polymer-dimethylsulfoxide-water. From all three systems evaluated the best results were obtained for the system polymer-N,N-dimethylformamide-water. The optimal conditions for the preparation of microporous polyurethane membranes were: polymer concentration in solution 5% (w/v), the amount of nonsolvent 10% (v/v), the cast temperature 23 degrees C, and polymer solidification time in the range of 24-48 h depending on the thickness of the cast polymer solution layer. Membranes obtained under these conditions had interconnected pores, well defined pore size and structure, good water permeability and satisfactory mechanical properties to allow for suturing. Potential applications of these membranes are skin wound cover and, in combination with autogenous chondrocytes, as an "artificial periosteum" in the treatment of articular cartilage defects. PMID:19301104

  14. Kinetics of dimethoate biodegradation in bacterial system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha DebMandal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an investigation on the kinetics of dimethoate biodegradation and an estimation of residual dimethoate in bacterial culture by spectrophotometry. The methylene chloride extract of the culture medium was used for determination of dimethoate through its reaction with 1 chloro-2, 4 dinitrobenzene to produce methylamine whose absorbance at 505 nm gave an estimation of dimethoate content. The dimethoate standard curve follows Beer’s law at 505 nm with a slope of 0.0129 absorbance units per µg/mL. The regression equation relating concentration of dimethoate (x with the absorbance is (y: y = 0.037 + 0.0129x. The amount of residual dimethoate after 7 days were 0, 4, 17, 28 and 29 µg/mL; the rate constants were 0.775, 0.305, 0.225, 0.167 and 0.127 each per day, and the efficiency of dimethoate degradation were 100%, 96%, 83%, 72% and 71%, for Bacillus licheniformis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aeromonas hydrophila, Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus pumilus respectively. Dimethoate remediation could be attained through bacterial metabolism of the pesticide and colorimetric analysis might be useful in the estimation of dimethoate within a detection limit of 5-100 µg/mL.

  15. Biodegradability enhancement of municipal landfill leachate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pi Kewu; Gong Wenqi

    2008-01-01

    The method of enhancing the biodegradability of landfill leachate via air stripping followed by coagulation/ultrafiltration (UF) processes is introduced. In this study, the air stripping process obtained a removal efficiency of 88.6% for ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), at an air-to-liquid ratio (A/L) of 3 300 (pH=11) and after 18 h of stripping. The single coagulation process increased the BOD (biological oxygen demand)/COD (chemical oxygen demand) ratio by 0.089 with a FeCl3 dosage of 570 mg/L, at pH 7.0, and the single UF process increased the BOD/COD ratio from 0.049 to 0.311. However, the combination of coagulation and UF increased the BOD/COD ratio from 0.049 to 0.423, and the final BOD, COD, NH3-N, and colour of the leachate were 1 023 mg/L, 2 845 mg/L, 145 mg/L, and 2 056, respectively, when a 3 kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membrane was used at an operating pressure of 0.7 MPa. In the ultrafiltration process, the average solution flux (JⅤ), concentration multiple (MC), and retention rate (R) for the COD were 107.3 L/(m2.h), 6.3, and 84.2%, respectively.

  16. Electrospun biodegradable polymers loaded with bactericide agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaz Katsarava

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of materials with an antimicrobial activity is fundamental for different sectors, including medicine and health care, water and air treatment, and food packaging. Electrospinning is a versatile and economic technique that allows the incorporation of different natural, industrial, and clinical agents into a wide variety of polymers and blends in the form of micro/nanofibers. Furthermore, the technique is versatile since different constructs (e.g. those derived from single electrospinning, co-electrospinning, coaxial electrospinning, and miniemulsion electrospinning can be obtained to influence the ability to load agents with different characteristics and stability and to modify the release behaviour. Furthermore, antimicrobial agents can be loaded during the electrospinning process or by a subsequent coating process. In order to the mitigate burst release effect, it is possible to encapsulate the selected drug into inorganic nanotubes and nanoparticles, as well as in organic cyclodextrine polysaccharides. In the same way, processes that involve covalent linkage of bactericide agents during surface treatment of electrospun samples may also be considered. The present review is focused on more recent works concerning the electrospinning of antimicrobial polymers. These include chitosan and common biodegradable polymers with activity caused by the specific load of agents such as metal and metal oxide particles, quaternary ammonium compounds, hydantoin compounds, antibiotics, common organic bactericides, and bacteriophages.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of chitosan in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Jiang, Zhiwen; Han, Baoqin; Niu, Shuyi; Dong, Wen; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan, an excellent biomedical material, has received a widespread in vivo application. In contrast, its metabolism and distribution once being implanted were less documented. In this study, the pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled and muscle implantation administrated chitosan in rats were investigated with fluorescence spectrophotometry, histological assay and gel chromatography. After implantation, chitosan was degraded gradually during its distribution to diverse organs. Among the tested organs, liver and kidney were found to be the first two highest in chitosan content, which was followed by heart, brain and spleen. Urinary excretion was believed to be the major pathway of chitosan elimination, yet 80% of chitosan administered to rats was not trackable in their urine. This indicated that the majority of chitosan was degraded in tissues. In average, the molecular weight of the degradation products of chitosan in diverse organs and urine was found to be <65 kDa. This further confirmed the in vivo degradation of chitosan. Our findings provided new evidences for the intensive and safe application of chitosan as a biomedical material.

  18. Parallel pathways of ethoxylated alcohol biodegradation under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembrzuska, Joanna; Budnik, Irena; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2016-07-01

    Non-ionic surfactants (NS) are a major component of the surfactant flux discharged into surface water, and alcohol ethoxylates (AE) are the major component of this flux. Therefore, biodegradation pathways of AE deserve more thorough investigation. The aim of this work was to investigate the stages of biodegradation of homogeneous oxyethylated dodecanol C12E9 having 9 oxyethylene subunits, under aerobic conditions. Enterobacter strain Z3 bacteria were chosen as biodegrading organisms under conditions with C12E9 as the sole source of organic carbon. Bacterial consortia of river water were used in a parallel test as an inoculum for comparison. The LC-MS technique was used to identify the products of biodegradation. Liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate was selected for the isolation of C12E9 and metabolites from the biodegradation broth. The LC-MS/MS technique operating in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantitative determination of C12E9, C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6. Apart from the substrate, the homologues C12E8, C12E7 and C12E6, being metabolites of C12E9 biodegradation by shortening of the oxyethylene chain, as well as intermediate metabolites having a carboxyl end group in the oxyethylene chain (C12E8COOH, C12E7COOH, C12E6COOH and C12E5COOH), were identified. Poly(ethylene glycols) (E) having 9, 8 and 7 oxyethylene subunits were also identified, indicating parallel central fission of C12E9 and its metabolites. Similar results were obtained with river water as inoculum. It is concluded that AE, under aerobic conditions, are biodegraded via two parallel pathways: by central fission with the formation of PEG, and by Ω-oxidation of the oxyethylene chain with the formation of carboxylated AE and subsequent shortening of the oxyethylene chain by a single unit. PMID:27037882

  19. Intrinsic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation for groundwater remediation; Biodegradation intrinseque des hydrocarbures aromatiques pour la rehabilitation de nappes aquiferes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiehm, A.; Schulze, S. [Water Technology Center, Karlsruher (Germany)

    2003-08-01

    Intrinsic biodegradation, representing the key process in natural attenuation, is increasingly considered for the remediation of contaminated sites as an alternative to more active measures. In this paper, intrinsic biodegradation is discussed with respect to BTEX and PAH. In the first part, an overview is given summarizing the current understanding of microbial aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and the methods available for the assessment of intrinsic bio-remediation. In the second part, the concept and selected results of a case study are presented. Both aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons contribute to pollutant elimination at contaminated sites such as former manufactured gas plants and tar-oil polluted disposal sites. Intrinsic biodegradation processes usually result in a sequence of redox zones (methanogenic, sulfate-reducing, Fe(III)-reducing, denitrifying, aerobic) in the groundwater plume down-gradient the source of contamination. Methods to assess redox zonation include hydro- and geochemical analysis, measurement of the redox potential, and determination of hydrogen. Biodegradation of target pollutants can be demonstrated by alterations in the pollutant profiles, isotopic fractionation, specific metabolic products, and by microcosm studies with authentic field samples. Microcosm studies in particular are a useful tool to identify degradation mechanisms and to understand the role of specific electron acceptors and redox conditions. In a case study, intrinsic biodegradation was examined at a tar-oil polluted disposal site. Due to the low sorption capacity of the aquifer, decreasing pollutant concentrations with increasing plume length were attributed predominantly to biodegradation. Sulfate reduction and Fe(III) reduction were the most important redox processes in the anaerobic core of tire groundwater plume. Changing pollutant profiles with increasing plume length indicated active biodegradation processes, e.g. biodegradation of

  20. Intrinsic and Stimulated In Situ Biodegradation of Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of the biodegradation of HCH and its intermediates has been investigated. A recent characterisation of two sites in The Netherlands has shown intrinsic biodegradation of HCH. At one site, breakdown products (monochlorobenzene, benzene and chlorophenol) were found in the core of the HCH-plume, whereas the HCH-concentration decreased over time and space. Characterisation of a second, industrial site indicated less intrinsic biodegradation and the need to stimulate biodegradation. In the laboratory, enhanced HCH degradation was tested with soil and groundwater material from both sites, and the required conversion to the intermediates benzene and monochlorobenzene was demonstrated. Furthermore, the biodegradation of these intermediates could be initiated by adding low amounts of oxygen (<5%). Adding nitrate enhanced this degradation. We hypothesise that this occurs through anaerobic nitrate reducing conversion of oxidised intermediates.At the non-industrial other site, intrinsic degradation took place, as shown in the laboratory experiments. Interpretation of the field data with computer codes Modflow and RT3D was performed. As a result of the modelling study, it has been proposed to monitor natural attenuation for several years before designing the final approach.At the industrial site, the results of the batch experiments are applied. Anaerobic HCH degradation to monochlorobenzene and benzene is stimulated via the addition of an electron donor.Infiltration facilities have been installed at the site to create an anaerobic infiltration zone in which HCH will be degraded, and these facilities are combined with the redevelopment of the site

  1. Adsorption and biodegradation of antidiabetic pharmaceuticals in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozik, Wojciech; Stefańska, Justyna

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are emerging contaminants in the natural environment. Most studies of the environmental fate of these chemicals focus on their behavior in wastewater treatment processes and in sewage sludge. Little is known about their behavior in soils. In this study adsorption and biodegradation of four antidiabetic pharmaceuticals - glimepiride, glibenclamide, gliclazide and metformin - were examined in three natural soils. The sorption of sulfonylurea derivatives was high (higher than sulfonylurea herbicides for example), whereas metformin showed high mobility. Desorption rates were highest for metformin. Sorption isotherms in two of three soils fitted best to the Freundlich model. Despite their high affinity to for soil surfaces, biodegradation studies revealed that transformation of the drugs occurred. Biodegradation results were described by pseudo-first order kinetics with half-life values from 5 to over 120 d (under aerobic conditions) and indicate that none of the tested drugs can be classified as quickly biodegradable. Biodegradation under anoxic conditions was much slower; often degrading by less than 50% during time of the experiment. PMID:24083899

  2. [Biodegradation characteristics of organic pollutants contained in tannery wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Li, Wei-Guang; Yang, Li; Su, Cheng-Yuan

    2013-02-01

    In the batch experiments inoculated with activated sludge from tannery wastewater treatment plant, biodegradation characteristics and kinetics of three tanning agents, naphthalene-2-sulfonic sodium, tannic acid and bayberry tannin, were studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. And the aerobic/anaerobic biodegradation laws of real tannery wastewater with respect to COD change were also investigated using the same batch experiments. The results showed aerobic degradation was superior to anaerobic degradation for tanning agent removal and mineralization. The removal rates of naphthalene-2-sulfonic sodium, tannic acid and bayberry tannin by aerobic biodegradation were >90% , >90% and 50% -75% , respectively whereas 10%-40%, >95% and 20% -30%, respectively by anaerobic degradation. In terms of COD removal about tannic acid biodegradation, the removal rates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were >75% and or= 70 mg.L-1 was toxic to microorganism leading to a significant decline of kinetic constants. Biodegradation of real tannery wastewater under aerobic and anaerobic conditions represented obvious stage characteristics and the COD concentration had a good linear correlation with reaction time in the phases of fast degradation and slow degradation. The aerobic maximum specific degradation rate wqas 11.6 times higher of anaerobic degradation. PMID:23668129

  3. Biodegradable and edible gelatine actuators for use as artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. D.; Winfield, J.; Ieropoulos, I.; Rossiter, J.

    2014-03-01

    The expense and use of non-recyclable materials often requires the retrieval and recovery of exploratory robots. Therefore, conventional materials such as plastics and metals in robotics can be limiting. For applications such as environmental monitoring, a fully biodegradable or edible robot may provide the optimum solution. Materials that provide power and actuation as well as biodegradability provide a compelling dimension to future robotic systems. To highlight the potential of novel biodegradable and edible materials as artificial muscles, the actuation of a biodegradable hydrogel was investigated. The fabricated gelatine based polymer gel was inexpensive, easy to handle, biodegradable and edible. The electro-mechanical performance was assessed using two contactless, parallel stainless steel electrodes immersed in 0.1M NaOH solution and fixed 40 mm apart with the strip actuator pinned directly between the electrodes. The actuation displacement in response to a bias voltage was measured over hydration/de-hydration cycles. Long term (11 days) and short term (1 hour) investigations demonstrated the bending behaviour of the swollen material in response to an electric field. Actuation voltage was low (robotics.

  4. Biodegradable and radically polymerized elastomers with enhanced processing capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Burdick, Jason A [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Padera, Robert F [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: burdick2@seas.upenn.edu

    2008-09-01

    The development of biodegradable materials with elastomeric properties is beneficial for a variety of applications, including for use in the engineering of soft tissues. Although others have developed biodegradable elastomers, they are restricted by their processing at high temperatures and under vacuum, which limits their fabrication into complex scaffolds. To overcome this, we have modified precursors to a tough biodegradable elastomer, poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) with acrylates to impart control over the crosslinking process and allow for more processing options. The acrylated-PGS (Acr-PGS) macromers are capable of crosslinking through free radical initiation mechanisms (e.g., redox and photo-initiated polymerizations). Alterations in the molecular weight and % acrylation of the Acr-PGS led to changes in formed network mechanical properties. In general, Young's modulus increased with % acrylation and the % strain at break increased with molecular weight when the % acrylation was held constant. Based on the mechanical properties, one macromer was further investigated for in vitro and in vivo degradation and biocompatibility. A mild to moderate inflammatory response typical of implantable biodegradable polymers was observed, even when formed as an injectable system with redox initiation. Moreover, fibrous scaffolds of Acr-PGS and a carrier polymer, poly(ethylene oxide), were prepared via an electrospinning and photopolymerization technique and the fiber morphology was dependent on the ratio of these components. This system provides biodegradable polymers with tunable properties and enhanced processing capabilities towards the advancement of approaches in engineering soft tissues.

  5. Intrinsic and Stimulated In Situ Biodegradation of Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenhoff, A. A. M., E-mail: a.a.m.langenhoff@mep.tno.nl; Staps, J. J. M. [TNO Environmental, Energy and Process Innovation, Department of Environmental Biotechnology (Netherlands); Pijls, C.; Alphenaar, A. [Tauw Milieu Consultancy (Netherlands); Zwiep, G. [Akzo Nobel Chemicals (Netherlands); Rijnaarts, H. H. M. [TNO Environmental, Energy and Process Innovation, Department of Environmental Biotechnology (Netherlands)

    2002-05-15

    The feasibility of the biodegradation of HCH and its intermediates has been investigated. A recent characterisation of two sites in The Netherlands has shown intrinsic biodegradation of HCH. At one site, breakdown products (monochlorobenzene, benzene and chlorophenol) were found in the core of the HCH-plume, whereas the HCH-concentration decreased over time and space. Characterisation of a second, industrial site indicated less intrinsic biodegradation and the need to stimulate biodegradation. In the laboratory, enhanced HCH degradation was tested with soil and groundwater material from both sites, and the required conversion to the intermediates benzene and monochlorobenzene was demonstrated. Furthermore, the biodegradation of these intermediates could be initiated by adding low amounts of oxygen (<5%). Adding nitrate enhanced this degradation. We hypothesise that this occurs through anaerobic nitrate reducing conversion of oxidised intermediates.At the non-industrial other site, intrinsic degradation took place, as shown in the laboratory experiments. Interpretation of the field data with computer codes Modflow and RT3D was performed. As a result of the modelling study, it has been proposed to monitor natural attenuation for several years before designing the final approach.At the industrial site, the results of the batch experiments are applied. Anaerobic HCH degradation to monochlorobenzene and benzene is stimulated via the addition of an electron donor.Infiltration facilities have been installed at the site to create an anaerobic infiltration zone in which HCH will be degraded, and these facilities are combined with the redevelopment of the site.

  6. Biodegradable HEMA-based hydrogels with enhanced mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Mohamadreza Nassajian; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogels are widely used in the biomedical field. Their main purposes are either to deliver biological active agents or to temporarily fill a defect until they degrade and are followed by new host tissue formation. However, for this latter application, biodegradable hydrogels are usually not capable to sustain any significant load. The development of biodegradable hydrogels presenting load-bearing capabilities would open new possibilities to utilize this class of material in the biomedical field. In this work, an original formulation of biodegradable photo-crosslinked hydrogels based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) is presented. The hydrogels consist of short-length poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) chains in a star shape structure, obtained by introducing a tetra-functional chain transfer agent in the backbone of the hydrogels. They are cross-linked with a biodegradable N,O-dimethacryloyl hydroxylamine (DMHA) molecule sensitive to hydrolytic cleavage. We characterized the degradation properties of these hydrogels submitted to mechanical loadings. We showed that the developed hydrogels undergo long-term degradation and specially meet the two essential requirements of a biodegradable hydrogel suitable for load bearing applications: enhanced mechanical properties and low molecular weight degradation products. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1161-1169, 2016. PMID:26061346

  7. Biodegradable Polymers in Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon E. Govaert

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The use ofdegradable polymers in medicine largely started around the mid 20th century with their initial use as in vivo resorbing sutures. Thorough knowledge on this topic as been gained since then and the potential applications for these polymers were, and still are, rapidly expanding. After improving the properties of lactic acid-based polymers, these were no longer studied only from a scientific point of view, but also for their use in bone surgery in the 1990s. Unfortunately, after implanting these polymers, different foreign body reactions ranging from the presence of white blood cells to sterile sinuses with resorption of the original tissue were observed. This led to the misconception that degradable polymers would, in all cases, lead to inflammation and/or osteolysis at the implantation site. Nowadays, we have accumulated substantial knowledge on the issue of biocompatibility of biodegradable polymers and are able to tailor these polymers for specific applications and thereby strongly reduce the occurrence of adverse tissue reactions. However, the major issue of biofunctionality, when mechanical adaptation is taken into account, has hitherto been largely unrecognized. A thorough understanding of how to improve the biofunctionality, comprising biomechanical stability, but also visualization and sterilization of the material, together with the avoidance of fibrotic tissue formation and foreign body reactions, may greatly enhance the applicability and safety of degradable polymers in a wide area of tissue engineering applications. This review will address our current understanding of these biofunctionality factors, and will subsequently discuss the pitfalls remaining and potential solutions to solve these problems.

  8. Biodegradation of diesel/biodiesel blends in saturated sand microcosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisiecki, Piotr; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Szulc, Alicja;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the biodegradation extent of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon fractions in saturated sandy microcosm spiked with diesel/biodiesel blends (D, B10, B20, B30, B40, B50, B60, B70, B80, B90 and B100, where D is commercial petroleum diesel fuel and B is...... commercial biodiesel blend) augmented with a bacterial consortium of petroleum degraders. The biodegradation kinetics for blends were evaluated based on measuring the amount of emitted CO2 after 578 days. Subsequently, the residual aromatic and aliphatic fractions were separated and determined by employing...... GC-FID and GC _ GC–TOF-MS. Additionally, the influence of biodiesel-amendment on the community dynamics was assessed based on the results of real-time PCR analyzes. Our results suggest that the biodegradation extents of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon were uninfluenced by the addition of...

  9. Disposition and safety of inhaled biodegradable nanomedicines: Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Shadabul; Whittaker, Michael R; McIntosh, Michelle P; Pouton, Colin W; Kaminskas, Lisa M

    2016-08-01

    The inhaled delivery of nanomedicines can provide a novel, non-invasive therapeutic strategy for the more localised treatment of lung-resident diseases and potentially also enable the systemic delivery of therapeutics that are otherwise administered via injection alone. However, the clinical translation of inhalable nanomedicine is being hampered by our lack of understanding about their disposition and clearance from the lungs. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the biodegradable nanomaterials that are currently being explored as inhalable drug delivery systems and our current understanding of their disposition within, and clearance from the lungs. The safety of biodegradable nanomaterials in the lungs is discussed and latest updates are provided on the impact of inflammation on the pulmonary pharmacokinetics of inhaled nanomaterials. Overall, the review provides an in-depth and critical assessment of the lung clearance mechanisms for inhaled biodegradable nanomedicines and highlights the opportunities and challenges for their translation into the clinic. PMID:27033834

  10. Modeling Biodegradation Kinetics on Benzene and Toluene and Their Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido N. Módenes

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to model the biodegradation kinetics of toxic compounds toluene and benzene as pure substrates and in a mixture. As a control, Monod and Andrews models were used. To predict substrates interactions, more sophisticated models of inhibition and competition, and SKIP (sum kinetics interactions parameters model were applied. The models evaluation was performed based on the experimental data from Pseudomonas putida F1 activities published in the literature. In parameter identification procedure, the global method of particle swarm optimization (PSO was applied. The simulation results show that the better description of the biodegradation process of pure toxic substrate can be achieved by Andrews' model. The biodegradation process of a mixture of toxic substrates is modeled the best when modified competitive inhibition and SKIP models are used. The developed software can be used as a toolbox of a kinetics model catalogue of industrial wastewater treatment for process design and optimization.

  11. QSBR Study on the Anaerobic Biodegradation of Chlorophenols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Da-Sen; DAI You-Zhi; LI Jian-Hua; ZHU Fei

    2006-01-01

    18 Physicochemical and quantum chemical parameters of 12 kinds of chlorophenols are calculated in this paper. QSBR (quantitative structure-biodegradability relationship) study is performed using simca statistical software by PLS regression analysis method on anaerobic biodegradation data (logKb), and the QSBR model is developed with favorable prediction. The model shows that the size and energy of the molecule are the dominant factors affecting the anaerobic biodegradation of chlorophenols. And the degradation rate constants (logKb) increase with the increase of core-core repulsion (CCR), average molecular polarizability (α), total surface area (TSA), heat of formation (HOF) and total energy (TE), while decrease with the increase of molecular connectivity index (1XV), relative molecular mass (Mw) and electronic energy (EE).

  12. BIODEGRADABILITY AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF SUGAR PALM STARCH BASED BIOPOLYMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sahari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Sugar Palm Starch (SPS based biopolymer was successfully developed using glycerol as plasticizer. The effect of glycerol concentration (viz., 15, 20, 30 and 40 by weight percent to the mechanical properties of plasticized SPS biopolymer was investigated. From this investigation, it was found that the 30% glycerol concentrated biopolymer showed the highest flexural strength and impact with the value of 0.13 MPa and 6.13 kJ/m2 respectively. Later, the above 30% glycerol biopolymer was undergone through weathering and biodegradation test. The biodegradability test showed 78.09% of tensile strength lost after 72 h of weathering testing period. Meanwhile, the weight loss (% of the same biopolymer was 63.58% after 72 h of biodegradation test.

  13. Molecular Design of Synthetic Biodegradable Polymers as Cell Scaffold Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shen-guo; WAN Yu-qing; CAI Qing; HE Bin; CHEN Wen-na

    2004-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers are regarded as the most useful biomaterials. The good biocompatibility, biodegradability and mechanical properties of them make the synthetic biodegradable polymers have primary application to tissue engineering. The advantages and disadvantages of the synthetic biodegradable polymers as cell scaffold materials are evaluated. This article reviews the modification of polylactide-family aliphatic polymers to improve the cell affinity when the polymers are used as cell scaffolds. We have developed four main approaches: to modify polyester cell scaffolds in combination of plasma treating and collagen coating; to introduce hydrophilic segments into aliphatic polyester backbones; to introduce pendant functional groups into polyester chains; to modify polyester with dextran. The results of the cell cultures prove that the approaches mentioned above have improved the cell affinity of the polyesters and have modulated cell function such as adhesion, proliferation and migration.

  14. Preliminary study of biodegradation of AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yibin; HUANG Jingjing; ZHANG Bingchun; YANG Ke

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are potential to be developed as a new type of biodegradable implant material by use of their active corrosion behavior.Both in vitro and in vivo biodegradation properties of an AZ31B magnesium alloy were investigated in this work.The results showed that AZ31B alloy has a proper degradation rate and much lower hydrogen release in Hank's solution,with a degradation rate of about 0.3 mm/year and hydrogen release below 0.15mL/cm2.The animal implantation test showed that the AZ31B alloy could slowly biodegrade in femur of the rabbit and form calcium phosphate around the alloy sample,with the Ca/P ratio close to the natural bone.

  15. Modeling cutinase enzyme regulation in polyethylene terepthalate plastic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apri, M.; Silmi, M.; Heryanto, T. E.; Moeis, M. R.

    2016-04-01

    PET (Polyethylene terephthalate) is a plastic material that is commonly used in our daily life. The high production of PET and others plastics that can be up to three hundred million tons per year, is not matched by its degradation rate and hence leads to environmental pollution. To overcome this problem, we develop a biodegradation system. This system utilizes LC Cutinase enzyme produced by engineered escherichia coli bacteria to degrade PET. To make the system works efficaciously, it is important to understand the mechanism underlying its enzyme regulation. Therefore, we construct a mathematical model to describe the regulation of LC Cutinase production. The stability of the model is analyzed. We show that the designated biodegradation system can give an oscillatory behavior that is very important to control the amount of inclusion body (the miss-folded proteins that reduce the efficiency of the biodegradation system).

  16. Biodegradable polymers: emerging excipients for the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavesh Patel; Subhashis Chakraborty

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide many researchers are exploring the potential use of biodegradable polymerics as carriers for a wide range of therapeutic applications. In the past two decades, considerable progress has been made in the development of biodegradable polymeric materials, mainly in the biomedical and pharmaceutical industries due to their versatility, biocompatibility and biodegradability properties. The present review focuses on the use of biodegradable polymers in various therapeutic areas like or...

  17. Biodegradability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) after femtosecond laser irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Akimichi Shibata; Shuhei Yada; Mitsuhiro Terakawa

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradation is a key property for biodegradable polymer-based tissue scaffolds because it can provide suitable space for cell growth as well as tailored sustainability depending on their role. Ultrashort pulsed lasers have been widely used for the precise processing of optically transparent materials, including biodegradable polymers. Here, we demonstrated the change in the biodegradation of a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) following irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at diffe...

  18. Enzymatic oxidative biodegradation of nanoparticles: Mechanisms, significance and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Irina I; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Michael, Zachary P; Burkert, Seth C; Shurin, Michael R; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-15

    Biopersistence of carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide (GO) and several other types of carbonaceous nanomaterials is an essential determinant of their health effects. Successful biodegradation is one of the major factors defining the life span and biological responses to nanoparticles. Here, we review the role and contribution of different oxidative enzymes of inflammatory cells - myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase, lactoperoxidase, hemoglobin, and xanthine oxidase - to the reactions of nanoparticle biodegradation. We further focus on interactions of nanomaterials with hemoproteins dependent on the specific features of their physico-chemical and structural characteristics. Mechanistically, we highlight the significance of immobilized peroxidase reactive intermediates vs diffusible small molecule oxidants (hypochlorous and hypobromous acids) for the overall oxidative biodegradation process in neutrophils and eosinophils. We also accentuate the importance of peroxynitrite-driven pathways realized in macrophages via the engagement of NADPH oxidase- and NO synthase-triggered oxidative mechanisms. We consider possible involvement of oxidative machinery of other professional phagocytes such as microglial cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, in the context of biodegradation relevant to targeted drug delivery. We evaluate the importance of genetic factors and their manipulations for the enzymatic biodegradation in vivo. Finally, we emphasize a novel type of biodegradation realized via the activation of the "dormant" peroxidase activity of hemoproteins by the nano-surface. This is exemplified by the binding of GO to cyt c causing the unfolding and 'unmasking' of the peroxidase activity of the latter. We conclude with the strategies leading to safe by design carbonaceous nanoparticles with optimized characteristics for mechanism-based targeted delivery and regulatable life-span of drugs in circulation. PMID:26768553

  19. Biodegradation of concrete intended for their decontamination; Biodegradation de matrices cimentaires en vue de leur decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jestin, A

    2005-05-15

    The decontamination of sub-structural materials represents a stake of high importance because of the high volume generated. It is agreed then to propose efficient and effective processes. The process of bio-decontamination of the hydraulic binders leans on the mechanisms of biodegradation of concretes, phenomenon characterized in the 40's by an indirect attack of the material by acids stem from the microbial metabolism: sulphuric acid (produced by Thiobacillus), nitric acid (produced by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter) and organic acids (produced by fungi). The principle of the bio-decontamination process is to apply those microorganisms on the surface of the contaminated material, in order to damage its surface and to retrieve the radionuclides. One of the multiple approaches of the process is the use of a bio-gel that makes possible the micro-organisms application. (author)

  20. Effects of Biodegradation on Crude Oils from Karamay Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨斌; 杨坚强; 等

    1989-01-01

    Studies of biological marker compou nds in five oil samples from a profile wherenormal crude oil,low condensate oil and heavy oil are produced in the Karamay Oilfield have been carried out with great empha-sis on the biodegradation-resisting capability of 13,17 secosteranes,8,14 secohopanes,gammacerane and carotenes.Based on these studies,a sequence of biodegradation-resisting intensities has been established for saturated hydrocarbon biomarkers in crude oils from the Karamay Oilfield.

  1. Development of biodegradable packing for agriculture in application

    OpenAIRE

    Mota, Carlos Miguel Costa

    2013-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado integrado em Engenharia de Polímeros Este projeto nasce com a necessidade da indústria agrícola beneficiar das propriedades e funcionalidades dos polímeros biodegradáveis que se encontram em franca expansão no mercado global. Desta forma foram estudadas diversas formulações com base na matriz termoplástica biodegradável de PLA 3251D, e diversos aditivos orgânicos e inorgânicos como as borras de café, fibras de madeira e o adubo para, desta forma, desenvo...

  2. Biodegradation of mixture of VOC's in a biofilter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Arulneyam; T. Swaminathan

    2004-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds(VOC' s) in air have become major concem in recent years. Biodegradation of a mixture of ethanol and methanol vapor was evaluated in a laboratory biofilter with a bed of compost and polystyrene particles using an acclimated mixed culture. The continuous performance of the biofilter was studied with different proportion of ethanol and methanol at different initial concentration and flow rates. The result showed significant removal for both ethanol and methanol, which were composition dependent.The presence of either compound in the mixture inhibited the biodegradation of the other.

  3. Biodegraded and Polyurethane Drape-formed Urea Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; LI Jian; CHEN Xiaoyao

    2005-01-01

    Natural water absorbent konjac flour participates in synthesizing biodegraded and polyurethane foamed drape, which is used to release urea slowly.The experimental results indicate that the slowly-releasing velocity of urea nitrogen and the degrading velocity of the drape can be controlled by regulating the thicknesses of drapes, the amount of konjac flour and the water content. In addition, the biodegradability of the drape was investigated by burying the specimens in earth afterwards,and results show this drape can be degraded naturally.

  4. Corrosion protection of mesoporous bioactive glass coating on biodegradable magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojian; Wen, Cuie

    2014-06-01

    A mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) coating was synthesized and coated on pure Mg substrate using a sol-gel dip-coating method. The MBG coating uniformly covered the Mg substrate with a thickness of ˜1.5 μm. Electrochemical and immersion tests were performed in order to investigate the biodegradation performance of Mg with and without different surface coatings in simulated body fluids (SBF) at 37 °C. Results revealed that the MBG coated Mg displayed a significantly lower biodegradation rate, in comparison with normal bioactive glass (BG) coated and uncoated Mg samples.

  5. Effects of Biodegradation on the Distribution of Alkylcarbazoles in Crude Oils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG CHUNMING(张春明); MEI BOWEN(梅博文); STEVE R.LARTER; MARTIN P.KOOPMANS; XIAO QIANHUA(肖乾华)

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the distributions of alkylcarbazoles in a series of crude oils with different biodegradation extents, in combination with biomarker parameters, stable carbon isotopic ratios and viscosities. The analyses showed that slight biodegradation has little effect on alkylcarbazoles. The concentrations of C0-, C1-, and C2-carbazoles seem to display a slight decrease with biodegradation through the moderately biodegraded stage, and an abrupt decrease to the heavily biodegraded stage. The relative concentrations of C0-, C1-, and C2-carbazoles do not show any apparent change in the non-heavily biodegraded stages, but through non-heavily biodegraded to heavily biodegraded stages, the percentages of C0- and C1-carbazoles decrease,and those of C2-carbazoles increase significantly, which may indicate that C2-carbazoles are more resistant to biodegradation than lower homologous species. As to C2-carbazole isomers,the relative concentrations of the pyrrolic N-H-shielded, pyrrolic N-H partially shielded and pyrrolic N-H-exposed isomers do not show any obvious variation in the non-heavily biodegraded oil, but there is an abrupt change through the mid-biodegraded stage to the heavily biodegraded stage.

  6. Mechanical characterization of commercial biodegradable plastic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstrom, Joseph R.

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a biodegradable plastic that is relatively new compared to other plastics in use throughout industry. The material is produced by the polymerization of lactic acid which is produced by the fermentation of starches derived from renewable feedstocks such as corn. Polylactic acid can be manufactured to fit a wide variety of applications. This study details the mechanical and morphological properties of selected commercially available PLA film products. Testing was conducted at Iowa State University and in conjunction with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) BioPreferred ProgramRTM. Results acquired by Iowa State were compared to a similar study performed by the Cortec Corporation in 2006. The PLA films tested at Iowa State were acquired in 2009 and 2010. In addition to these two studies at ISU, the films that were acquired in 2009 were aged for a year in a controlled environment and then re-tested to determine effects of time (ageing) on the mechanical properties. All films displayed anisotropic properties which were confirmed by inspection of the films with polarized light. The mechanical testing of the films followed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. Mechanical characteristics included: tensile strength (ASTM D882), elongation of material at failure (ASTM D882), impact resistance (ASTM D1922), and tear resistance (ASTM D4272). The observed values amongst all the films ranged as followed: tensile strength 33.65--8.54 MPa; elongation at failure 1,665.1%--47.2%; tear resistance 3.61--0.46 N; and puncture resistance 2.22--0.28 J. There were significant differences between the observed data for a number of films and the reported data published by the Cortec Corp. In addition, there were significant differences between the newly acquired material from 2009 and 2010, as well as the newly acquired materials in 2009 and the aged 2009 materials, suggesting that ageing and manufacturing date had an effect on

  7. Molecular design of biodegradable polymers for tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rypáček, František; Kubies, Dana; Machová, Luďka; Proks, Vladimír; Popelka, Štěpán

    Myconos : Aegean Conferences, 2002. s. 75. [Symposium on Tissue Engineering Science : Critical Elements in the Research Development Continuum. 19.05.2002-23.05.2002, Myconos] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : biodegradable polymers * tissue engineering Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  8. Acute aquatic toxicity and biodegradation potential of biodiesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies on the biodegradation potential and aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels are reviewed. Biodegradation data were obtained using the shaker flask method observing the appearance of CO2 and by observing the disappearance of test substance with gas chromatography. Additional BOD5 and COD data were obtained. The results indicate the ready biodegradability of biodiesel fuels as well as the enhanced co-metabolic biodegradation of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel mixtures. The study examined reference diesel, neat soy oil, neat rape oil, and the methyl and ethyl esters of these vegetable oils as well as various fuel blends. Acute toxicity tests on biodiesel fuels and blends were performed using Oncorhynchus mykiss (Rainbow Trout) in a static non-renewal system and in a proportional dilution flow replacement system. The study is intended to develop data on the acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels and blends under US EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards. The test procedure is designed from the guidelines outlined in Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms and the Fish Acute Aquatic Toxicity Test guideline used to develop aquatic toxicity data for substances subject to environmental effects test regulations under TSCA. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an LC50, a lethal concentration effecting mortality in 50% of the test population

  9. Interspecific interactions in mixed microbial cultures in a biodegradation perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikesková, Hana; Novotný, Čeněk; Svobodová, Kateřina

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 4 (2012), s. 861-870. ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00200901 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Microbial consortia * Consortium development * Biodegradation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.689, year: 2012

  10. Biodegradable copolymers carrying cell-adhesion peptide sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proks, Vladimír; Machová, Luďka; Popelka, Štěpán; Rypáček, František

    Antalya : Ankara University, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials Laboratory, 2002. s. P-35. [International Symposium on Biomedical Science and Technology BIOMED /9./. 19.09.2002-22.09.2002, Antalya ] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050202; GA MŠk LN00A065 Keywords : amphiphilic block copolymers * cell adhesion * biodegradable Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. The development and performance testing of a biodegradable scale inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Julie; Fidoe, Steve; Jones, Chris

    2006-03-15

    The oil industry is currently facing severe restrictions concerning the discharge of oil field chemicals into the environment. Many commonly used materials in both topside and downhole applications are phased for substitution for use in the North Sea, and more will be identified. The development of biodegradable and low toxicity chemicals, which afford equal or improved efficacy, compared to conventional technology, available at a competitive price, is a current industry challenge. A range of biodegradable materials are increasingly available, however their limited performance can result in a restricted range of applications. This paper discusses the development and commercialization of a readily biodegradable scale inhibitor, ideal for use in topside applications. This material offers a broad spectrum of activity, notably efficiency against barium sulphate, calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate scales, in a range of water chemistries. A range of performance testing, compatibility, stability and OCNS dataset will be presented. Comparisons with commonly used chemicals have been made to identify the superior performance of this phosphate ester. This paper will discuss a scale inhibitor suitable for use in a variety of conditions which offers enhanced performance combined with a favourable biodegradation profile. This material is of great benefit to the industry, particularly in North Sea applications. (author) (tk)

  12. Effects of nitrogen source on crude oil biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of NH4Cl and KNO3 on biodegradation of light Arabian crude oil by an oil-degrading enrichment culture were studied in respirometers. In poorly buffered sea salts medium, the pH decreased dramatically in cultures that contained NH4Cl, but not in those supplied with KNO3. The ammonia-associated pH decline was severe enough to completely stop oil biodegradation as measured by oxygen uptake. Regular adjustment of the culture pH allowed oil biodegradation to proceed normally. A small amount of nitrate accumulated in all cultures that contained ammonia, but nitrification accounted for less than 5% of the acid that was observed. The nitrification inhibitor, nitrapyrin, had no effect on the production of nitrate or acid in ammonia-containing cultures. When the culture pH was controlled, either by regular adjustment of the culture pH or by supplying adequate buffering capacity in the growth medium, the rate and extent of oil biodegradation were similar in NH4Cl- and KNO3-containing cultures. The lag time was shorter in pH-controlled cultures supplied with ammonia than in nitrate-containing cultures. (author)

  13. Anaerobic biodegradation of spent sulphite liquor in a UASB reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantsch, T.G.; Angelidaki, Irini; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye;

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of fermented spent sulphite liquor, SSL, which is produced during the manufacture of sulphite pulp, was investigated. SSL contains a high concentration of lignin products in addition to hemicellulose and has a very high COD load (173 g COD l1). Batch experiments with...

  14. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation performance of a hydroxypropyl chitosan derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Kai; Han, Baoqin; Dong, Wen; Song, Fulai; Liu, Weizhi; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Hydroxypropyl chitosan (HP-chitosan) has been shown to have promising applications in a wide range of areas due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability and various biological activities, especially in the biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. However, it is not yet known about its pharmacokinetics and biodegradation performance, which are crucial for its clinical applications. In order to lay a foundation for its further applications and exploitations, here we carried out fluorescence intensity and GPC analyses to determine the pharmacokinetics mode of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled HP-chitosan (FITC-HP-chitosan) and its biodegradability. The results showed that after intraperitoneal administration at a dose of 10 mg per rat, FITC-HP-chitosan could be absorbed rapidly and distributed to liver, kidney and spleen through blood. It was indicated that FITC-HP-chitosan could be utilized effectively, and 88.47% of the FITC-HP-chitosan could be excreted by urine within 11 days with a molecular weight less than 10 kDa. Moreover, our data indicated that there was an obvious degradation process occurred in liver (chitosan has excellent bioavailability and biodegradability, suggesting the potential applications of hydroxypropyl-modified chitosan as materials in drug delivery, tissue engineering and biomedical area.

  15. Biodegradable composite films from chitosan and chitin nanofibrils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tishchenko, Galina; Kelnar, Ivan; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Pavlová, Eva; Kovářová, Jana; Mikešová, Jana; Brožová, Libuše; Strachota, Adam; Špírková, Milena; Kobera, Libor; Netopilík, Miloš; Bastl, Zdeněk; Carezzi, F.; Morganti, P.

    Pisa : University of Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, 2013, s. 58-59. [Workshop Green Chemistry and Nanotechnologies in Polymer Chemistry /4./. Pisa (IT), 04.09.2013-06.09.2013] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 315233 - N-CHITOPACK Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : biodegradable films * chitosan chitin nanofibrils Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  16. Influence of saponins on the biodegradation of halogenated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Smułek, Wojciech; Zdarta, Agata; Sawczuk, Agata; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    Biotransformation of aromatic compounds is a challenge due to their low aqueous solubility and sorptive losses. The main obstacle in this process is binding of organic pollutants to the microbial cell surface. To overcome these, we applied saponins from plant extract to the microbial culture, to increase pollutants solubility and enhance diffusive massive transfer. This study investigated the efficiency of Quillaja saponaria and Sapindus mukorossi saponins-rich extracts on biodegradation of halogenated phenols by Raoultella planticola WS2 and Pseudomonas sp. OS2, as an effect of cell surface modification of tested strains. Both strains display changes in inner membrane permeability and cell surface hydrophobicity in the presence of saponins during the process of halogenated phenols biotransformation. This allows them to more efficient pollutants removal from the environment. However, only in case of the Pseudomonas sp. OS2 the addition of surfactants to the culture improved effectiveness of bromo-, chloro- and fluorophenols biodegradation. Also introduction of surfactant allowed higher biodegradability of halogenated phenols and can shorten the process. Therefore this suggests that usage of plant saponins can indicate more successful halogenated phenols biodegradation for selected strains. PMID:27232205

  17. Application of a Biodegradable Lubricant in a Diesel Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    , NOx, THC, PM, lubricant-SOF and PAH from one diesel and one gasoline type vehicle using biodegradable lubricants and conventional lubricants. This paper describes the results of the experiments with the diesel type vehicle only. Lubricant consumption and fuel consumption are other important parameters...

  18. Physical, mechanical, and biodegradable properties of meranti wood polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In-situ polymerization and solution casting method used to manufacture WPC. • In-situ WPC exhibited better properties compared to pure wood, 5% WPC and 20% WPC. • Lowest water absorption and least biodegradability shown by In-situ wood. - Abstract: In-situ polymerization and solution casting techniques are two effective methods to manufacture wood polymer composites (WPCs). In this study, wood polymer composites (WPCs) were manufactured from meranti sapwood by solution casting and in-situ polymerization process using methyl methacrylate (MMA) and epoxy matrix respectively. Physical, mechanical, and morphological characterizations of fabricated WPCs were then carried out to analyse their properties. Morphological properties of composites samples were analyzed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The result reveals that in-situ wood composite exhibited better properties compared to pure wood, 5% WPC and 20% WPC. Moreover, in-situ WPC had lowest water absorption and least biodegraded. Conversely, pure wood shown moderate mechanical strength, high biodegradation and water absorption rate. In term of biodegradation, earth-medium brought more severe effect than water in deteriorating the properties of the specimens

  19. Biodegradation of oil refinery wastes under OPA and CERCLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamblin, W.W.; Banipal, B.S.; Myers, J.M. [Ecology and Environment, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Land treatment of oil refinery wastes has been used as a disposal method for decades. More recently, numerous laboratory studies have been performed attempting to quantify degradation rates of more toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). This paper discusses the results of the fullscale aerobic biodegradation operations using land treatment at the Macmillan Ring-Free Oil refining facility. The tiered feasibility approach of evaluating biodegradation as a treatment method to achieve site-specific cleanup criteria, including pilot biodegradation operations, is discussed in an earlier paper. Analytical results of biodegradation indicate that degradation rates observed in the laboratory can be met and exceeded under field conditions and that site-specific cleanup criteria can be attained within a proposed project time. Also prevented are degradation rates and half-lives for PAHs for which cleanup criteria have been established. PAH degradation rates and half-life values are determined and compared with the laboratory degradation rates and half-life values which used similar oil refinery wastes by other in investigators (API 1987).

  20. MICROORGANISMS’ SURFACE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES ROLE IN HYDROCARBONS BIODEGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оlga Vasylchenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  Existing data and publications regarding oil, hydrocarbon biodegradation, metabolism, and bioremediation were analyzed. Search of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria which are producers of biosurfactants was provided, types of microbial surfactants and their physiological role were analyzed and ordered. The study of factors affecting the surface active properties of producers’ cultures was done.

  1. Biodegradable Metals for Cardiovascular Stent Application: Interests and New Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moravej

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, biodegradable metallic stents have been developed and investigated as alternatives for the currently-used permanent cardiovascular stents. Degradable metallic materials could potentially replace corrosion-resistant metals currently used for stent application as it has been shown that the role of stenting is temporary and limited to a period of 6–12 months after implantation during which arterial remodeling and healing occur. Although corrosion is generally considered as a failure in metallurgy, the corrodibility of certain metals can be an advantage for their application as degradable implants. The candidate materials for such application should have mechanical properties ideally close to those of 316L stainless steel which is the gold standard material for stent application in order to provide mechanical support to diseased arteries. Non-toxicity of the metal itself and its degradation products is another requirement as the material is absorbed by blood and cells. Based on the mentioned requirements, iron-based and magnesium-based alloys have been the investigated candidates for biodegradable stents. This article reviews the recent developments in the design and evaluation of metallic materials for biodegradable stents. It also introduces the new metallurgical processes which could be applied for the production of metallic biodegradable stents and their effect on the properties of the produced metals.

  2. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of thin biodegradable polymer films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubb, D.M.; Toftmann, B.; Haglund Jr., R.F.;

    2002-01-01

    Thin films of the biodegradable polymer poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) were deposited using resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD). The output of a free-electron laser was focused onto a solid target of the polymer, and the films were deposited using 2.90 (resonant with O...

  3. Biodegradable thermosensitive polymers: synthesis, characterization and drug delivery applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soga, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this Thesis is to design polymeric micelles showing controlled instability due to "hydrophobic to hydrophilic" conversion of the core, and to demonstrate its utility as a drug delivery vehicle. For that purpose, a novel class of thermosensitive and biodegradable

  4. Biodegradable xylitol-based elastomers: In vivo behavior and biocompatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Bruggeman (Joost); C.J. Bettinger (Christopher); R.S. Langer (Robert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBiodegradable elastomers based on polycondensation reactions of xylitol with sebacic acid, referred to as poly(xylitol sebacate) (PXS) elastomers have recently been developed. We describe the in vivo behavior of PXS elastomers. Four PXS elastomers were synthesized, characterized, and com

  5. Bio-Based Polymers with Potential for Biodegradability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Garrison

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A variety of renewable starting materials, such as sugars and polysaccharides, vegetable oils, lignin, pine resin derivatives, and proteins, have so far been investigated for the preparation of bio-based polymers. Among the various sources of bio-based feedstock, vegetable oils are one of the most widely used starting materials in the polymer industry due to their easy availability, low toxicity, and relative low cost. Another bio-based plastic of great interest is poly(lactic acid (PLA, widely used in multiple commercial applications nowadays. There is an intrinsic expectation that bio-based polymers are also biodegradable, but in reality there is no guarantee that polymers prepared from biorenewable feedstock exhibit significant or relevant biodegradability. Biodegradability studies are therefore crucial in order to assess the long-term environmental impact of such materials. This review presents a brief overview of the different classes of bio-based polymers, with a strong focus on vegetable oil-derived resins and PLA. An entire section is dedicated to a discussion of the literature addressing the biodegradability of bio-based polymers.

  6. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Pristane by Nitrate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K. S.; Freeman, K. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    In recent sediments, microbial biodegradation provides a control on the long-term preservation of organic matter, through the preferential loss of certain biomolecules and the alteration and concentration of other more recalcitrant molecules. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons derived from membrane lipids, has been demonstrated by both aerobic and strictly anaerobic culturing experiments. The isoprenoid pristane, once considered stable under anaerobic conditions, is in fact degraded by a denitrifying microcosm (BREGNARD et al., 1997) and a methanogenic, sulphate-reducing enrichment culture (GROSSI, 2000). We recently demonstrated pristane biodegradation and accompanying loss of nitrate by an activated sludge isolate. The measured nitrate consumption accounts for a 7.1 +/- 0.4 mg loss of pristane, 4.74% of the initial substrate, in 181 days, assuming pristane conversion to CO2. We have characterized the microorganisms active in the biodegradation process, through the creation of a 16S rDNA clone library, as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Experiments are in progress to enrich cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria that utilize pristane as a sole carbon source and to characterize reaction mechanisms in pristane-oxidizing pathways.

  7. Study on the Synthesis and Biodegradation of Aliphatic Polyester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An aliphatic polyester, poly(hexalene adipate) (PHA) and an aliphatic copolyester, poly (hexalene adipate succinate) (PHAS) were synthesized by direct condensation of corresponding binary acid and binary alcohol in the presence of a catalyst, p-toluene sulfonic acid. The biodegradation of these polyesters were studied in the laboratory by enzyme attack and outdoor soil burial. The results show that these polyesters have good biodegradability and the copolyester PHAS, even displayed a better biodegradability than the polyester PHA. In the presence of Penicillium chrysogenum the weight loss reached 18.3% for the PHAS (film thickness 1.0 mm)and 9.1% for the PHA (film thickness 1.0 mm) after 28 days. Outdoor soil burial tests indicate that these polyesters also have good biodegradability in natural conditions. The weight loss reached 14.2% for PHAS (film thickness 0.1 mm) and 6.7% for PHA (film thickness 0.1mm) after burying in soil for 36 days.

  8. Biodegradable polyurethanes for short-term outdoor usage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kredatusová, Jana; Beneš, Hynek; Gawelczyk, Alexandra; Horák, Pavel; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Kobetičová, K.

    Cracow : Fampur A. Przekurat, Cracow University of Technology, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, 2015, P12. [Polyurethanes 2015 - cooperation for innovation . Kraków (PL), 09.09.2015-11.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04020853 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyurethane * biodegradable Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  9. Review on Chlorobenzoic Acids Biodegradation and Their Environmental Impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuWenming; QiYun; ZhaoLin; TanXin

    2005-01-01

    Chlorobenzoic Acids are toxic organic compounds largely distributed in soils and sediments. They can be degraded to various products by microorgans. This paper is a review of the literature on biodegradability of the chlorobenzoic acids. The degradation pathways, degradation genes, role of transposable elements, and construction of strains are discussed. A brief introduction is given on the environmental impacts and the pollution control.

  10. Ecotoxicity and biodegradability of new brominated flame retardants: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezechiáš, Martin; Covino, Stefano; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 2 (2014), s. 153-167. ISSN 0147-6513 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA TA ČR TE01020218 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ecotoxicity * brominated flame retardants * biodegradation * review Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.762, year: 2014

  11. Biodegradation of Lignocelluloses in Sewage Sludge Composting and Vermicomposting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Alidadi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Alidadi H, Najafpour AA, Vafaee A, Parvaresh A, Peiravi R. Biodegradation of lignocelluloses in sewage sludge composting and vermicomposting. Arch Hyg Sci 2012;1(1:1-5.   Aims of the Study: The aim of this study was to determine the amount of lignin degradation and biodegradation of organic matter and change of biomass under compost and vermicomposting of sewage sludge. Materials & Methods: Sawdust was added to sewage sludge at 1:3 weight bases to Carbon to Nitrogen ratio of 25:1 for composting or vermicomposting. Lignin and volatile solids were determined at different periods, of 0, 10, 30, 40 and 60 days of composting or vermicomposting period to determine the biodegradation of lignocellulose to lignin. Results were expressed as mean of two replicates and the comparisons among means were made using the least significant difference test calculated (p <0.05. Results: After 60 days of experiment period, the initial lignin increased from 3.46% to 4.48% for compost and 3.46% to 5.27% for vermicompost. Biodegradation of lignocellulose was very slow in compost and vermicompost processes. Vermicomposting is a much faster process than compost to convert lignocellulose to lignin (p <0.05. Conclusions: The organic matter losses in sewage sludge composting and vermicomposting are due to the degradation of the lignin fractions. By increasing compost age, the amount of volatile solids will decrease.

  12. Diesel Pollution Biodegradation: Synergetic Effect of Mycobacterium and Filamentous Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU-QING LI; HONG-FANG LIU; ZHEN-LE TIAN; LI-HUA ZHU; YIN-GHUI WU; HE-QING TANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To biodegrade the diesel pollution in aqueous solution inoculated with Mycobacterium and filamentous fungi.Methods Bacteria sampled from petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated sites in Karamay Oilfield were isolated and identified as Mycobacterium hyalinum (MH) and cladosporium. Spectrophotometry and gas chromatography (GC) were used to analyze of the residual concentrations of diesel oil and its biodegradation products. Results From the GC data, the values of apparent biodegradation ratio of the bacterial strain MH to diesel oil were close to those obtained in the control experiments. Moreover, the number of MH did not increase with degradation time. However, by using n-octadecane instead of diesel oil, the real biotic degradation ratio increased to 20.9% over 5 days of degradation. Cladosporium strongly biodegraded diesel oil with a real degradation ratio of up to 34% after 5 days treatment. When the two strains were used simultaneously, a significant synergistic effect between them resulted in almost cornplete degradation of diesel off, achieving a total diesel removal of 99% over 5 days of treatment, in which one part of about 80% and another part of about 19% were attributed to biotic and abiotic processes, respectively. Conclusion The observed synergistic effect was closely related to the aromatics-degrading ability of Cladosporium, which favored the growth of MH and promoted the bioavailability of diesel oil.

  13. Artificial biodegradable materials for tissue engineering: synthesis and biomimetic modification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotelnikov, Ilya; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Novotná, Katarína; Kučka, Jan; Bačáková, Lucie; Proks, Vladimír; Rypáček, František

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2013. L22. ISBN 978-80-85009-76-7. [Workshop "Career in Polymers" /5./. 12.07.2013-13.07.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : tissue engineering * biodegradable materials Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  14. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, M E; Carey, G R; Feinstein, D T; Bahr, J M

    2004-09-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum-contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  15. Biodegradable Magnetic Particles for Cellular MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Michael Kwasi

    Cell transplantation has the potential to treat numerous diseases and injuries. While magnetic particle-enabled, MRI-based cell tracking has proven useful for visualizing the location of cell transplants in vivo, current formulations of particles are either too weak to enable single cell detection or have non-degradable polymer matrices that preclude clinical translation. Furthermore, the off-label use of commercial agents like Feridex®, Bangs beads and ferumoxytol for cell tracking significantly stunts progress in the field, rendering it needlessly susceptible to market externalities. The recent phasing out of Feridex from the market, for example, heightens the need for a dedicated agent specifically designed for MRI-based cell tracking. To this end, we engineered clinically viable, biodegradable particles of iron oxide made using poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and demonstrated their utility in two MRI-based cell tracking paradigms in vivo. Both micro- and nanoparticles (2.1±1.1 μm and 105±37 nm in size) were highly magnetic (56.7-83.7 wt% magnetite), and possessed excellent relaxometry (r2* relaxivities as high as 614.1 s-1mM-1 and 659.1 s -1mM-1 at 4.7 T respectively). Magnetic PLGA micropartides enabled the in vivo monitoring of neural progenitor cell migration to the olfactory bulb in rat brains over 2 weeks at 11.7 T with ˜2-fold greater contrast-to-noise ratio and ˜4-fold better sensitivity at detecting migrated cells in the olfactory bulb than Bangs beads. Highly magnetic PLGA nanoparticles enabled MRI detection (at 11.7 T) of up to 10 rat mesenchymal cells transplanted into rat brain at 100-μm resolution. Highly magnetic PLGA particles were also shown to degrade by 80% in mice liver over 12 weeks in vivo. Moreover, no adverse effects were observed on cellular viability and function in vitro after labeling a wide range of cells. Magnetically labeled rat mesenchymal and neural stem cells retained their ability to differentiate into multiple

  16. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under sulfate-reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2016-10-01

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). Results indicate that the biodiesel could be effectively biodegraded in the presence or absence of petrodiesel, whereas petrodiesel could not be biodegraded at all under sulfate-reducing conditions. The kinetics of biodegradation of individual Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) compounds and their accompanying sulfate-reduction rates were studied using a serum bottle test. As for the biodegradation of individual FAME compounds, the biodegradation rates for the saturated FAMEs decreased with increasing carbon chain length. For unsaturated FAMEs, biodegradation rates increased with increasing number of double bonds. The presence of petrodiesel had a greater effect on the rate of biodegradation of biodiesel than on the extent of removal. PMID:27448319

  17. Cementation of biodegraded radioactive oils and organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of the microbiological pre-treatment of the oil-containing organic liquid radioactive waste (LRW) before solidification in the cement matrix has been studied. It is experimentally proved that the oil containing cement compounds during long-term storage are subject to microbiological degradation due to the reaction of biogenic organic acids with the minerals of the cement matrix. We recommend to biodegrade the LRW components before their solidification, which reduces the volume of LRW and prevent the destruction of the inorganic cement matrix during the long term storage. The biodegradation of the oil containing LRW is possible by using the radioresistant microflora which oxidize the organic components of the oil to carbon dioxide and water. Simultaneously there is the bio-sorption of the radionuclides by bacteria and emulsification of oil in cement slurry due to biogenic surface-active substances of glycolipid nature. It was experimentally established that after 7 days of biodegradation of oil-containing liquid radioactive waste the volume of LRW is reduced by the factor from 2 to 10 due to the biodegradation of the organic phase to the non-radioactive gases (CH4, H2O, CO2, N2), which are excluded from the volume of the liquid radioactive waste. At the same time, the microorganisms are able to extract from the LRW up to 80-90% of alpha-radionuclides, up to 50% of 90Sr, up to 20% of 137Cs due to sorption processes at the cellular structures. The radioactive biomass is subject to dehydration and solidification in the matrix. The report presents the following experimental data: type of bacterial flora, the parameters of biodegradation, the cementing parameters, the properties of the final cement compound with oil-containing liquid radioactive waste

  18. Toxicity of Fluoranthene and Its Biodegradation by Cyclotella caspia Alga

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Fluoranthene is one of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with four benzene rings. Because of its toxicity,mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity, fluoranthene is on the black lists of 129 and 68 priority pollutants established by US Environmental Protection Agency and the People's Republic of China, respectively. In recent years, the amount of fluoranthene in the aquatic environment has been increasing with increases in anthropogenic discharge. Based on the biological investigation of tidal water in the Futian mangrove, Cyclotella caspia was selected as the dominant algal species to determine the toxicity of fluoranthene towards C. caspia alga and to investigate the biodegradation of fluoranthene by C. caspia under pure culture. The toxicity experiment showed that the 96-h EC50 vaiue for fluoranthene was 0.2 mg/mL. Four parameters, namely C. caspia algal growth rate,chlorophyll (Chi) a content, cell morphology, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, were chosen as indices of toxicity and were measured at 6 d (144 h). The results showed that: (i) the toxicity of fluoranthene towards C.caspia alga was obvious; (ii) C. caspia algal growth rate and Chi a content decreased with increasing concentrations of fluoranthene; and (iii) the rate of cell deformation and SOD activity increased with increasing concentrations of fluoranthene. The biodegradation experiment showed that: (i) the rate of physical degradation of fluoranthene was only 5.86%; (ii) the rate of biodegradation of fluoranthene on the 1st and 6th days (i.e. at 24 and 144 h) was approximately 35% and 85%, respectively; and (iii) the biodegradation capability of C. caspia alga towards fluoranthene was high. It is suggested that further investigations on the toxicity of fluoranthene towards algae, as well as on algal biodegradation mechanisms, are of great importance to use C. caspia as a biological treatment species in an organic wastewater treatment system.

  19. Quantifying RDX biodegradation in groundwater using δ15N isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Anat; Adar, Eilon; Ronen, Zeev; Lowag, Harald; Stichler, Willibald; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2010-01-01

    Isotope analysis was used to examine the extent of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) biodegradation in groundwater along a ca. 1.35-km contamination plume. Biodegradation was proposed as a natural attenuating remediation method for the contaminated aquifer. By isotope analysis of RDX, the extent of biodegradation was found to reach up to 99.5% of the initial mass at a distance of 1.15-1.35 km down gradient from the contamination sources. A range of first-order biodegradation rates was calculated based on the degradation extents, with average half-life values ranging between 4.4 and 12.8 years for RDX biodegradation in the upper 15 m of the aquifer, assuming purely aerobic biodegradation, and between 10.9 and 31.2 years, assuming purely anaerobic biodegradation. Based on the geochemical data, an aerobic biodegradation pathway was suggested as the dominant attenuation process at the site. The calculated biodegradation rate was correlated with depth, showing decreasing degradation rates in deeper groundwater layers. Exceptionally low first-order kinetic constants were found in a borehole penetrating the bottom of the aquifer, with half life ranging between 85.0 to 161.5 years, assuming purely aerobic biodegradation, and between 207.5 and 394.3 years, assuming purely anaerobic biodegradation. The study showed that stable isotope fractionation analysis is a suitable tool to detect biodegradation of RDX in the environment. Our findings clearly indicated that RDX is naturally biodegraded in the contaminated aquifer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported use of RDX isotope analysis to quantify its biodegradation in contaminated aquifers.

  20. Biodegradation of free cyanide and subsequent utilisation of biodegradation by-products by Bacillus consortia: optimisation using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekuto, Lukhanyo; Ntwampe, Seteno Karabo Obed; Jackson, Vanessa Angela

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic alkali-tolerant bacterial consortium belonging to the Bacillus genus was evaluated for its ability to biodegrade high free cyanide (CN(-)) concentration (up to 500 mg CN(-)/L), subsequent to the oxidation of the formed ammonium and nitrates in a continuous bioreactor system solely supplemented with whey waste. Furthermore, an optimisation study for successful cyanide biodegradation by this consortium was evaluated in batch bioreactors (BBs) using response surface methodology (RSM). The input variables, that is, pH, temperature and whey-waste concentration, were optimised using a numerical optimisation technique where the optimum conditions were found to be as follows: pH 9.88, temperature 33.60 °C and whey-waste concentration of 14.27 g/L, under which 206.53 mg CN(-)/L in 96 h can be biodegraded by the microbial species from an initial cyanide concentration of 500 mg CN(-)/L. Furthermore, using the optimised data, cyanide biodegradation in a continuous mode was evaluated in a dual-stage packed-bed bioreactor (PBB) connected in series to a pneumatic bioreactor system (PBS) used for simultaneous nitrification, including aerobic denitrification. The whey-supported Bacillus sp. culture was not inhibited by the free cyanide concentration of up to 500 mg CN(-)/L, with an overall degradation efficiency of ≥ 99 % with subsequent nitrification and aerobic denitrification of the formed ammonium and nitrates over a period of 80 days. This is the first study to report free cyanide biodegradation at concentrations of up to 500 mg CN(-)/L in a continuous system using whey waste as a microbial feedstock. The results showed that the process has the potential for the bioremediation of cyanide-containing wastewaters. PMID:25721526

  1. Kinetics of Organic Matter Biodegradation in Leachate from Tobacco Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briški, F.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of wastes and leachate evolved in landfills is today an imperative due to rigorous environmental protection legislation. In this work, biodegradation of the organic fraction in tobaccowaste leachate was studied. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at initial concentra tion of activated sludge of 3.03 g dm–3 and different initial concentrations of organic matter in leachate, expressed as COD, which ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 g dm–3 . The working volume of the reactor (Fig. 1 was 7 dm3 within the cylindrical porous liner and it was filled with the suspension of leachate and activated sludge . The liner was designed such that it did not allow activated sludge to pass through. Continuous up-flow aeration was provided by a membrane pump. The temperature during the biodegradation process was 23 ± 2 °C. Dissolved oxygen, pH and temperature in reactor were monitored continuously by probes connected to a remote meter. Toxicity of leachate was performed by toxicity test using marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri before starting with the biodegradation in the batch reactor. The obtained results showed that effective concentration of leachate is EC 50 = 1.6 g dm–3 and toxicity impact index is TII50 = 9.99, meaning that untreated leachate must not be discharged into the environment before treatment. The results of the biodegradation process of leachate in batch reactor are presented in Table 1 and Fig. 2. The ratio γXv/γX was almost constant throughout the experiments and ranged from 0.69 do 0.73. This implies that the concentration of biomass remained unchanged during the experiments, and average yield was 5.26 %. The important kinetic and stoichiometric parameters required for performance of the biological removal process, namely the Y, Ks, Kd, and μmax were calculated from the batch experiments (Table 2. The experimental results of the influence of initial substrate concentrations on substrate degradation rate, and influence of

  2. How UV photolysis accelerates the biodegradation and mineralization of sulfadiazine (SD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shihui; Yan, Ning; Liu, Xinyue; Wang, Wenbing; Zhang, Yongming; Liu, Rui; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    Sulfadiazine (SD), one of broad-spectrum antibiotics, exhibits limited biodegradation in wastewater treatment due to its chemical structure, which requires initial mono-oxygenation reactions to initiate its biodegradation. Intimately coupling UV photolysis with biodegradation, realized with the internal loop photobiodegradation reactor, accelerated SD biodegradation and mineralization by 35 and 71 %, respectively. The main organic products from photolysis were 2-aminopyrimidine (2-AP), p-aminobenzenesulfonic acid (ABS), and aniline (An), and an SD-photolysis pathway could be identified using C, N, and S balances. Adding An or ABS (but not 2-AP) into the SD solution during biodegradation experiments (no UV photolysis) gave SD removal and mineralization rates similar to intimately coupled photolysis and biodegradation. An SD biodegradation pathway, based on a diverse set of the experimental results, explains how the mineralization of ABS and An (but not 2-AP) provided internal electron carriers that accelerated the initial mono-oxygenation reactions of SD biodegradation. Thus, multiple lines of evidence support that the mechanism by which intimately coupled photolysis and biodegradation accelerated SD removal and mineralization was through producing co-substrates whose oxidation produced electron equivalents that stimulated the initial mono-oxygenation reactions for SD biodegradation. PMID:25199943

  3. Biodegradation of chlorinated and non-chlorinated VOCs from pharmaceutical industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, P; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2011-02-01

    Biodegradation studies were conducted for major organic solvents such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetonitrile, toluene, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride commonly used in pharmaceutical industries. Various microbial isolates were enriched and screened for their biodegradation potential. An aerobic mixed culture that had been previously enriched for biodegradation of mixed pesticides was found to be the most effective. All the organic solvents except chloroform and carbon tetrachloride were consumed as primary substrates by this mixed culture. Biodegradation rates of methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetonitrile, and toluene were measured individually in batch systems. Haldane model was found to best fit the kinetics of biodegradation. Biokinetic parameters estimated from single-substrate experiments were utilized to simulate the kinetics of biodegradation of mixture of substrates. Among the various models available for simulating the kinetics of biodegradation of multi-substrate systems, competitive inhibition model performed the best. Performance of the models was evaluated statistically using the dimensionless modified coefficient of efficiency (E). This model was used for simulating the kinetics of biodegradation in binary, ternary, and quaternary substrate systems. This study also reports batch experiments on co-metabolic biodegradation of chloroform, with acetone and toluene as primary substrates. The Haldane model, modified for inhibition due to chloroform, could satisfactorily predict the biodegradation of primary substrate, chloroform, and the microbial growth. PMID:20799072

  4. Biodegradable polymers: emerging excipients for the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavesh Patel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide many researchers are exploring the potential use of biodegradable polymerics as carriers for a wide range of therapeutic applications. In the past two decades, considerable progress has been made in the development of biodegradable polymeric materials, mainly in the biomedical and pharmaceutical industries due to their versatility, biocompatibility and biodegradability properties. The present review focuses on the use of biodegradable polymers in various therapeutic areas like orthopedic and contraceptive device, surgical sutures, implants, depot parenteral injections, etc. Biodegradable polymers have also contributed significantly to the development of drug-eluting stents (DES used for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease, such as angioplasty. Biodegradable synthetic polymers have potential applications in orthopedic device fixation due to properties that impact bone healing, formation, regeneration or substitution in the human body. The present review also emphasizes areas such as the chemistry of polymer synthesis, factors affecting the biodegradation, methods for the production of biodegradable polymer based formulations, the application of biodegradable polymers in dental implants, nasal drug deliveries, contraceptive devices, immunology, gene, transdermal, ophthalmic and veterinary applications, as well as, the sterilization of biodegradable based formulations and regulatory considerations for product filing.

  5. Blendas PHB/copoliésteres biodegradáveis : biodegradação em solo Biodegradable PHB/copolyester blends : biodegradation in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan A. Casarin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta os resultados do comportamento de blendas do polímero biodegradável PHB poli(hidroxibutirato com os copoliésteres também biodegradáveis EastarBio® e Ecoflex®, na composição de 75% de PHB e 25% dos copoliésteres, em contato com solo composto simulado. Foi também avaliada a influência da adição de pó de serra ou farinha de madeira, na proporção de 70% da blenda e 30% de pó de serra (p.d.s.. A biodegradação foi avaliada para amostras após 30, 60 e 90 dias em contato com solo, através de análises gravimétricas, morfológicas e mecânicas. A preparação inicial dos grânulos dos compostos poliméricos foi feita por extrusão, utilizando uma extrusora dupla-rosca e a moldagem dos corpos de prova foi realizada através da moldagem por injeção. Os materiais estudados biodegradam nas condições testadas. A blenda PHB/EastarBio® (75/25 + 30% p.d.s. apresentou maior redução de massa, 29% após 90 dias. Notou-se que a biodegradação se inicia pela superfície do material e que 90 dias são insuficientes para observar alterações internas.This paper reports on blends made with the biodegradable polymers poly(hydroxybutyrate (PHB and Eastar Bio® or Ecoflex® copolyesters, in contact with simulated compound soil. The blends had 75% of PHB and 25% of copolyesters. We also analyzed the influence from adding 30% of powder-wood or wood flour (WPC to 70% of the blend. Biodegradation was analyzed for samples after 30, 60 and 90 days in contact with soil, through thermogravimetric, morphological and mechanical analyses. The initial preparation of the granules of polymeric compounds was made by extrusion, using a twin-screw extruder and the molding of the specimens was performed by injection molding. The analysis indicated material biodegradation under the conditions tested. The PHB/Eastar Bio® blend (75/25 + 30% WPC exhibited the highest degradation with 29% of mass loss at the end of 90 days. Biodegradation

  6. Study on biodegradated ability of thirteen edible fungi to straw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGRui-qing; DENGXun

    2004-01-01

    The biodegradated abilities of 13 edible fungi to straw were studied. The results showed that all the experimental fungi except Tricholama mongolicum had definite biodegradated abilities to the lignin and cellulose of straw. The Ideal fungus for straw degradation was screened out as Pleurotus ostreatus, which showed a higher degradation ability for lignin (17.86%) and lower degradation rate for cellulose (2.24%), with a Selection Factor (SF) of 7.97. The degradation rates of lignin and cellulose for other fungi ranged from 2.30% to 16.54% and 5.60% to 17.32%, respectively, and the SF was very low in range of 0.14 to 2.24.The ratio of colony's diameters to the color-zone (d1/d2) and SF are negative correlation, with a correlation coefficient of -0.1476.

  7. Design considerations for developing biodegradable and bioabsorbable magnesium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Harpreet S.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Manuel, Michele V.

    2011-04-01

    The integration of biodegradable and bioabsorbable magnesium implants into the human body is a complex undertaking that faces major challenges. Candidate biomaterials must meet both engineering and physiological requirements to ensure the desired properties. Historically, efforts have been focused on the behavior of commercial magnesium alloys in biological environments and their resultant effect on cell-mediated processes. Developing causal relationships between alloy chemistry and microstructure, and effects as a cellular behavior can be a difficult and time-intensive process. A systems design approach has the power to provide significant contributions in the development of the next generation of magnesium alloy implants with controlled degradability, biocompatibility, and optimized mechanical properties, at reduced time and cost. This approach couples experimental research with theory and mechanistic modeling for the accelerated development of materials. The aim of this article is to enumerate this strategy, design considerations, and hurdles for developing new cast magnesium alloys for use as biodegradable implant materials.

  8. Factors influencing crude oil biodegradation by Yarrowia lipolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Felix Ferreira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Yarrowia lipolytica is unique strictly aerobic yeast with the ability to efficiently degrade hydrophobic substrates such as n-alkenes, fatty acids, glycerol and oils. In the present work, a 2(4 full factorial design was used to investigate the influence of the independent variables of temperature, agitation, initial cell concentration and initial petroleum concentration on crude oil biodegradation. The results showed that all variables studied had significant effects on the biodegradation process. Temperature, agitation speed and initial cell concentration had positive effects, and initial petroleum concentration had a negative effect. Among the crude oil removal conditions studied, the best temperature and agitation conditions were 28ºC and 250 rpm, respectively.

  9. Biodegradable polymeric microcarriers with controllable porous structure for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xudong; Sun, Lei; Jiang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ding, Wenjun; Gan, Zhihua

    2009-12-01

    Porous microspheres fabricated by biodegradable polymers show great potential as microcarriers for cell cultivation in tissue engineering. Herein biodegradable poly(DL-lactide) (PLA) was used to fabricate porous microspheres through a modified double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The influence of fabrication parameters, such as the stirring speed of the primary and secondary emulsion, the polymer concentration of the oil phase, and solvent type, as well as the post-hydrolysis treatment of the porous structure of the PLA microspheres are discussed. Good attachment and an active spread of MG-63 cells on the microspheres is observed, which indicates that the PLA microspheres with controllable porous structure are of great potential as cell delivery carriers for tissue engineering. PMID:19821453

  10. Naphthalene biodegradation kinetics in an aerobic slurry-phase bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collina, E.; Bestetti, G.; Di Gennaro, P.; Franzetti, A.; Gugliersi, F.; Lasagni, M.; Pitea, D. [Milano-Bicocca Univ. (Italy). Dip. Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio

    2005-02-01

    The research was focused on the slurry-phase biodegradation of naphthalene in soil. Among ex situ techniques, the slurry phase offers the advantage of increased availability of contaminants to bacteria. From naphthalene contaminated soil, a Pseudomonas putida M8 strain capable to degrade naphthalene was selected. Experiments were performed in a stirred and oxygenated reactor. In this study, the influence of air flow rate and agitation rate on volatilisation and biodegradation of naphthalene was investigated. The hydrocarbon disappearance, the carbon dioxide production, and the ratio of total heterotrophic and naphthalene-degrading bacteria was monitored. The results obtained confirm that the selected bioremediation technology is successful in the treatment of contaminated soils. (author)

  11. Biodegradability and ecotoxicity of commercially available geothermal heat transfer fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kathrin R.; Körner, Birgit; Sacher, Frank; Conrad, Rachel; Hollert, Henner; Tiehm, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Commercially available heat transfer fluids used in borehole heat exchangers were investigated for their composition, their biodegradability as well as their ecotoxicity. The main components of the fluids are organic compounds (often glycols) for freezing protection. Biodegradation of the fluids in laboratory studies caused high oxygen depletion as well as nitrate/iron(III) reduction under anaerobic conditions. Additives such as benzotriazoles for corrosion protection were persistent. Ecotoxicity data show that the commercially available fluids caused much higher ecotoxicity than their main organic constituents. Consequently, with regard to groundwater protection pure water as heat transfer medium is recommended. The second best choice is the usage of glycols without any additives. Effects on groundwater quality should be considered during ecological-economical cost-benefit-analyses of further geothermal energy strategies. The protection of groundwater as the most important drinking water resource must take priority over the energy gain from aquifers.

  12. Biodegradable composites based on L-polylactide and jute fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Løgstrup Andersen, T.; Batsberg Pedersen, W.;

    2003-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers can potentially be combined with plant fibres to produce biodegradable composite materials. In our research, a commercial L-polylactide was converted to film and then used in combination with jute fibre mats to generate composites by a film stacking technique. Composite...... tensile properties were determined and tensile specimen fracture surfaces were examined using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Degradation of the polylactide during the process was investigated using size exclusion chromatography. The tensile properties of composites produced at temperatures in...... the 180-220 degreesC range were significantly higher than those of polylactide alone. Composite samples failed in a brittle fashion under tensile load and showed little sign of fibre pull-out. Examination of composite fracture surfaces using electron microscopy showed voids occurring between the jute...

  13. Evaluation of biodegradable plastics for rubber seedling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Mohd Khairulniza; Dayang Habibah A. I., H.; Kamal, Mazlina Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    The main negative consequence of conventional plastics in agriculture is related to handling the wastes plasticand the associated environmental impact. Hence, a study of different types of potentially biodegradable plastics used for nursery applications have been evaluated on its mechanical,water absorption propertiesand Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. Supplied samples from different companies were designated as SF, CF and CO. Most of the polybags exhibited mechanical properties quite similar to the conventional plastics (polybag LDPE). CO polybag which is based on PVA however had extensively higher tensile strength and water absorption properties. FTIR study revealed a characteristics absorbance of conventional plastic, SF, CF and CO biodegradable polybag are associated with polyethylene, poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT), polyethylene and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) structures respectively.

  14. Biodegradability of leachates from Chinese and German municipal solid waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SELIC E.; WANG Chi; BOES N., HERBELL J.D.

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative composition of Chinese municipal solid waste (MSW) differs significantly from German waste. The focus of this paper is on whether these differences also lead to dissimilar qualities of leachates during storage or landfilling. Leachates ingredients determine the appropriate treatment technique. MSW compositions of the two cities Guilin (China) and Essen (Germany), each with approx. 600000 inhabitants, are used to simulate Chinese and German MSW types. A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) is used, combining aerobic and anaerobic reaction principles, to test the biodegradability of leachates. Leachates are tested for temperature, pH-value, redox potentials, and oxygen concentration. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) values are determined. Within 8 h, the biodegradation rates for both kinds of leachates are more than 90%. Due to the high organic content of Chinese waste, the degradation rate for Guilin MSW leachate is even higher, up to 97%. The effluent from SBR technique is suitable for direct discharge into bodies of water.

  15. Spatial disorder and degradation kinetics in intrinsic biodegradation schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaViolette, R.A.; Stoner, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watwood, M.E. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Ginn, T.R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1999-06-10

    The restoration of contaminated soils by intrinsic biodegradation employs microorganisms in the subsurface that degrade the contaminant substrate infiltrating the subsurface matrix. The outcome of intrinsic biodegradation has been difficult to predict. The authors examine a source of the difficulty with a computational model of diffusive-reactive transport that introduces spatial disorder in the arrangement of the degrading microorganisms. Spatial disorder alone, even on the small scales that characterize the distance between aggregates of microorganisms, is enough to induce a wide range of times to complete the degradation to an arbitrary limit. The mean time for the concentration to achieve the limit becomes twice that for the case of spatial order. Bounds on the range of the effective degradation kinetics can be obtained by computing the distribution of times to complete degradation.

  16. Biodegradation and recycling potential of barrier coated paperboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazhad, M.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Four commercial barrier coated boards (i.e., internally-sized uncoated board, one-side polyethylene coated board, double-side polyethylene coated board, and multilayer laminated board were examined for biodegradation using a soil burial approach on a laboratory scale. It was observed that the base-boards were fully biodegradable in a matter of weeks or months, and the degradation process could be accelerated either by sample size modification or enrichment of the soil microbial population. Freezing pretreatment of boards or the fiber directionality of boards had no influence on the rate of degradation. The boards were also found to be recyclable following a simple procedure of re-slushing and screening. The base-boards became almost fully separated from the polyethylene coated material without any special pretreatment.

  17. Biodegradable resistive switching memory based on magnesium difluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiping; Tsang, Melissa; Chen, I-Wei

    2016-08-11

    This study presents a new type of resistive switching memory device that can be used in biodegradable electronic applications. The biodegradable device features magnesium difluoride as the active layer and iron and magnesium as the corresponding electrodes. This is the first report on magnesium difluoride as a resistive switching layer. With on-off ratios larger than one hundred, the device on silicon switches at voltages less than one volt and requires only sub-mA programming current. AC endurance of 10(3) cycles is demonstrated with ±1 V voltage pulses. The switching mechanism is attributed to the formation and rupture of conductive filaments comprising fluoride vacancies in magnesium difluoride. Devices fabricated on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate are tested for functionality, and degradation is subsequently demonstrated in de-ionized water. An additional layer of magnesium difluoride is used to hinder the degradation and extend the lifetime of the device. PMID:27476796

  18. ENDOCRINE DISUPTIVE CHEMICALS: MECHANISMS OF WHITE ROT FUNGI BIODEGRADATION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cajthaml, Tomáš; Křesinová, Zdena; Čvančarová, Monika; Maternová, H.; Filipová, A.

    Praha : Vodní zdroje Ekomonitor, 2013, s. 176-181. ISBN 978-80-86832-73-9. [Inovativní sanační technologie ve výzkumu a praxi /6./. Praha (CZ), 16.10.2013-17.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01020804 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : biodegradation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  19. Long-term release of clodronate from biodegradable microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Perugini, Paola; Genta, Ida; Conti, Bice; Modena, Tiziana; Pavanetto, Franca

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation of a biodegradable microparticulate drug delivery system containing clodronate, a bisphosphonate intended for the treatment of bone diseases. Microspheres were prepared with several poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) copolymers of various molecular weights and molar compositions and 1 poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) homopolymer by a water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsion solvent evaporation procedure. Critical process parameters and formulation variabl...

  20. Analysis of methane biodegradation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Andréa dos Santos; Salgado, Belkis Valdman e Andréa Medeiros

    2009-01-01

    The microbial oxidation of methane in the atmosphere is performed by methanotrophic bacteria that use methane as a unique source of carbon and energy. The objective of this work consisted of the investigation of the best conditions of methane biodegradation by methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b that oxidize it to carbon dioxide, and the use of these microorganisms in monitoring methods for methane. The results showed that M. trichosporium OB3b was capable to degrade metha...

  1. Preparation and performance of Ecobras/bentonite biodegrading films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compounds based on the biodegradable polymer Ecobras and bentonite clay in its pristine, sonicated, and organically modified with a quaternary ammonium salt forms were prepared as flat films. Clays and compounds were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties of the films were determined according to pertinent ASTM standards. Reasonable properties, higher than those of the matrix, were obtained with compounds prepared with purified clays and organoclays, particularly for low clay loading. (author)

  2. MODIFICACION ESTRUCTURAL DEL POLIETILENTEREFTALATO. SINTESIS DE POLIMEROS BIODEGRADABLES

    OpenAIRE

    PERALES CASTRO, MAGDA ELVA

    2013-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is a very important polymer, but this kind of synthetic polymer is resistant to biological degradation, so it is necessary to add to its polymeric matrix another material that provides such characteristic. An interesting biodegradable polymer is poly(lactide acid) (PLA), which made primarily from renewable agricultural resources. Extrusion is widely used for processing thermoplastic polymer, and studies indicate that, under the high-shear and high-temperat...

  3. Obtaining nanofibers from sisal to reinforce nanocomposites biodegradable matrixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellulose nanofibers have been extracted by acid hydrolysis from sisal fibers. They are seen a good source material due to availability and low cost. The nanofibers was evaluated by thermal degradation behavior using thermogravimetry (TG), crystallinity by X-ray diffraction and morphological structure was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. The resulting nanofibers was shown high crystallinity and a network of rodlike cellulose elements. The nanofibers will be incorporated as reinforcement in a biodegradable matrix and evaluated. (author)

  4. Biodegradable copolymers carrying cell-adhesion peptide sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proks, Vladimír; Machová, Luďka; Popelka, Štěpán; Rypáček, František

    New York : Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publ., 2003 - (Elcin, Y.), s. 191-199 ISSN 0065-2598. - (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology.. 534). [International Symposium on Biomedical Science and Technology /9./. Antalya (TR), 19.09.2002-22.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050202; GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : biodegradable polymers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  5. Biodegradation of polystyrene, poly(metnyl methacrylate), and phenol formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D L; Hartenstein, R; Sutter, J

    1979-01-01

    The biodegradation of three synthetic 14C-labeled polymers, poly(methyl methacrylate), phenol formaldehyde, and polystyrene, was studied with 17 species of fungi in axenic cultures, five groups of soil invertebrates, and a variety of mixed microbial communities including sludges, soils, manures, garbages, and decaying plastics. Extremely low decomposition rates were found. The addition of cellulose and mineral failed to increase decomposition rates significantly. PMID:533278

  6. Biodegradable Polycaprolactone-Titania Nanocomposites: Preparation, Characterization and Antimicrobial Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Muñoz-Bonilla; Cerrada, María L.; Marta Fernández-García; Anna Kubacka; Manuel Ferrer; Marcos Fernández-García

    2013-01-01

    Nanocomposites obtained from the incorporation of synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles (≈10 nm average primary particle size) in different amounts, ranging from 0.5 to 5 wt.%, into a biodegradable polycaprolactone matrix are achieved via a straightforward and commercial melting processing. The resulting nanocomposites have been structurally and thermally characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), wide/small angle X-ray diffraction (WAXS/SAXS, respectively) and differential scanning ca...

  7. Extractability and subsequent biodegradation of PAHs from contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been well documented; however, the biodegradation of PAHs in contaminated soil has proved to be problematic. Sorption of PAHs to soil over time can significantly decrease their availability for extraction much less than for biodegradation. In this study the ability of various organic solvents to extract PAHs from coal tar-contaminated soil obtained from former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites was investigated. Solvents investigated included acetone/hexane, dichloromethane, ethanol, methanol, toluene, and water. The extraction of MGP soils with solvents was investigated using soxhlet extraction, multiple soxhlet extractions, sonication, and brief agitation at ambient temperature with a range of solvent concentrations. Of particular interest was the documentation of the recalcitrance of PAHs in weathered MGP soils to extraction and to bioremediation, as well as to demonstrate the ease with which PAHs extracted from these soils can be biodegarded. The efficiency of the extraction of PAHs from MGP soils was found to be more dependent upon the choice of solvent. The environmentally-benign solvent ethanol, was shown to be equal to if not better than acetone/hexane (the EPA recommended solvent) for the extraction of PAHs from MGP soils, brief contact/agitation times (minutes) using small quantities of ethanol (2 volumes or less) can achieve nearly quantitative extraction of PAHs from MGP soils. Moreover aqueous slurries of an MGP soil experienced less than 10% degradation of PAHs in 14 days while in the same period about 95% biodegradation was achieved using PAHs extracted from this soil by ethanol and subsequently added to aqueous bacterial suspensions. 27 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  8. Insights on the biodegradation of acrylic reline resins

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, Maria Cristina Bettencourt, 1976-

    2012-01-01

    Acrylic reline resins are extensively used in dentistry, since they readapt dentures to the continuous reabsorbed underlying tissues. Since present in the oral cavity for long periods of time, these materials are objective of the biodegradation phenomena, which represents the change on their chemical, physical and mechanical properties due to the oral environment conditions and its constituents. These processes may permanently alter the properties of the material and compromise its function. ...

  9. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine...

  10. Properties of biodegradable PCL/B-starch composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruliš, Zdeněk; Kovářová, Jana; Kotek, Jiří; Růžek, L.; Šárka, E.

    Praha : Ústav makromolekulární chemie AV ČR, v. v. i., 2010. s. 118-120. ISBN 978-80-85009-64-4. [Česko-slovenská konference POLYMERY 2010 /6./. 04.10.2010-07.10.2010, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0607 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biodegradable * PCL/B- starch composites Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  11. Biodegradable polymeric materials based on B-starch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponyrko, Sergii; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Kotek, Jiří

    Halle (Saale) : Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, 2010 - (Radusch, H.; Fiedler, L.). s. 91 ISBN 978-3-86829-282-4. [International Scientific Conference on Polymeric Materials /14./. 15.09.2010-17.09.2010, Halle (Saale)] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0607 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : starch -derived polymers * biodegradability * B- starch Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing

  12. Biodegradation studies of oil sludge containing high hydrocarbons concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin-Lora, P.; Munoz-Colunga, A.; Castorena-Cortes, G.; Roldan-Carrillo, T.; Quej Ake, L.; Reyes-Avila, J.; Zapata-Penasco, I.; Marin-Cruz, J.

    2009-07-01

    Oil industry has a significant impact on environment due to the emission of, dust, gases, waste water and solids generated during oil production all the way to basic petrochemical product manufacturing stages. the aim of this work was to evaluate the biodegradation of sludge containing high hydrocarbon concentration originated by a petroleum facility. A sludge sampling was done at the oil residuals pool (ORP) on a gas processing center. (Author)

  13. Biodegradation studies of oil sludge containing high hydrocarbons concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil industry has a significant impact on environment due to the emission of, dust, gases, waste water and solids generated during oil production all the way to basic petrochemical product manufacturing stages. the aim of this work was to evaluate the biodegradation of sludge containing high hydrocarbon concentration originated by a petroleum facility. A sludge sampling was done at the oil residuals pool (ORP) on a gas processing center. (Author)

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Biodegradable Polyurethane for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Zhisen; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Zhang, Zongyong; Zhu, Yabin

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable crosslinked polyurethane (cPU) was synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG), L-lactide (L-LA), and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), with iron acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3) as the catalyst and PEG as the extender. Chemical components of the obtained polymers were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectra, and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). The thermodynamic properties, mechanical behaviors, surface hydrophilicity, degradability, and cytotoxicity were tested via d...

  15. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Ethylene Glycol within Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyob, K. M.; Mouser, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is a commonly used organic additive in hydraulic fracturing fluids used for shale gas recovery. Under aerobic conditions, this compound readily biodegrades to acetate and CO2 or is oxidized through the glycerate pathway. In the absence of oxygen, organisms within genera Desulfovibrio, Acetobacterium, and others can transform EG to acetaldehyde, a flammable and suspected carcinogenic compound. Acetaldehyde can then be enzymatically degraded to ethanol or acetate and CO2. However, little is known on how EG degrades in the presence of other organic additives, particularly under anaerobic conditions representative of deep groundwater aquifers. To better understand the fate and attenuation of glycols within hydraulic fracturing fluids we are assessing their biodegradation potential and pathways in batch anaerobic microcosm treatments. Crushed Berea sandstone was inoculated with groundwater and incubated with either EG or a synthetic fracturing fluid (SFF) containing EG formulations. We tracked changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), EG, and its transformation products over several months. Approximately 41% of bulk DOC in SFF is degraded within 21 days, with 58% DOC still remaining after 63 days. By comparison, this same SFF degrades by 70% within 25 days when inoculated with sediment-groundwater microbial communities, suggesting that bulk DOC degradation occurs at a slower rate and to a lesser extent with bedrock. Aerobic biodegradation of EG occurs rapidly (3-7 days); however anaerobic degradation of EG is much slower, requiring several weeks for substantial DOC loss to be observed. Ongoing experiments are tracking the degradation pathways of EG alone and in the presence of SFF, with preliminary data showing incomplete glycol transformation within the complex hydraulic fracturing fluid mixture. This research will help to elucidate rates, processes, and pathways for EG biodegradation and identify key microbial taxa involved in its degradation.

  16. Biodegradable polymer gadolinium contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Braunová, Alena; Kříž, Jaroslav; Pechar, Michal; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel

    Egmond aan Zee : University of Twente, 2012 - (Engbersen, J.), s. 72-73 [European Symposium on Controlled Drug Delivery /12./. Egmond aan Zee (NL), 04.04.2012-06.04.2012] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00500803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : biodegradable polymer carrier * polyethylene glycol * PEG Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  17. Biodegradation testing of solidified low-level waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRC Technical Position on Waste Form (TP) specifies that waste should be resistant to biodegradation. The methods recommended in the TP for testing resistance to fungi, ASTM G21, and for testing resistance to bacteria, ASTM G22, were carried out on several types of solidified simulated wastes, and the effect of microbial activity on the mechanical strength of the materials tested was examined. The tests are believed to be sufficient for distinguishing between materials that are susceptible to biodegradation and those that are not. It is concluded that failure of these tests should not be regarded of itself as an indication that the waste form will biodegrade to an extent that the form does not meet the stability requirements of 10 CFR Part 61. In the case of failure of ASTM G21 or ASTM G22 or both, it is recommended that additional data be supplied by the waste generator to demonstrate the resistance of the waste form to microbial degradation. To produce a data base on the applicability of the biodegradation tests, the following simulated laboratory-scale waste forms were prepared and tested: boric acid and sodium sulfate evaporator bottoms, mixed-bed bead resins and powdered resins each solidified in asphalt, cement, and vinyl ester-styrene. Cement solidified wastes supported neither fungal nor bacterial growth. Of the asphalt solidified wastes, only the forms of boric acid evaporator bottoms did not support fungal growth. Bacteria grew on all of the asphalt solidified wastes. Cleaning the surface of these waste forms did not affect bacterial growth and had a limited effect on the fungal growth. Only vinyl esterstyrene solidified sodium sulfate evaporator bottoms showed viable fungi cultures, but surface cleaning with solvents eliminated fungal growth in subsequent testing. Some forms of all the waste streams solidified in vinyl ester-styrene showed viable bacteria cultures. 13 refs., 12 tabs

  18. Complex resistivity signatures of ethanol biodegradation in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personna, Yves Robert; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Werkema, Dale; Szabo, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Numerous adverse effects are associated with the accidental release of ethanol (EtOH) and its persistence in the subsurface. Geophysical techniques may permit non-invasive, real time monitoring of microbial degradation of hydrocarbon. We performed complex resistivity (CR) measurements in conjunction with geochemical data analysis on three microbial-stimulated and two control columns to investigate changes in electrical properties during EtOH biodegradation processes in porous media. A Debye Decomposition approach was applied to determine the chargeability (m), normalized chargeability (mn) and time constant (τ) of the polarization magnitude and relaxation length scale as a function of time. The CR responses showed a clear distinction between the bioaugmented and control columns in terms of real (σ′) and imaginary (σ″) conductivity, phase (ϕ) and apparent formation factor (Fapp). Unlike the control columns, a substantial decrease in σ′ and increase in Fapp occurred at an early time (within 4 days) of the experiment for all three bioaugmented columns. The observed decrease in σ′ is opposite to previous studies on hydrocarbon biodegradation. These columns also exhibited increases in ϕ (up to ~ 9 mrad) and σ″ (up to two order of magnitude higher) 5 weeks after microbial inoculation. Variations in m and mn were consistent with temporal changes in ϕ and σ″ responses, respectively. Temporal geochemical changes and high resolution scanning electron microscopy imaging corroborated the CR findings, thus indicating the sensitivity of CR measurements to EtOH biodegradation processes. Our results offer insight into the potential application of CR measurements for long-term monitoring of biogeochemical and mineralogical changes during intrinsic and induced EtOH biodegradation in the subsurface.

  19. Biodegradable porous silicon barcode nanowires with defined geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Chiappini, Ciro; Liu, Xuewu; Fakhoury, Jean Raymond; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are of proven importance in diverse fields such as energy production and storage, flexible electronics, and biomedicine due to the unique characteristics emerging from their one-dimensional semiconducting nature and their mechanical properties. Here we report the synthesis of biodegradable porous silicon barcode nanowires by metal assisted electroless etch of single crystal silicon with resistivity ranging from 0.0008 Ω-cm to 10 Ω-cm. We define the geometry of the barcode na...

  20. Application of wheat B-starch in biodegradable plastic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šárka, E.; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Kotek, Jiří; Růžek, L.; Korbářová, A.; Bubník, Z.; Růžková, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2011), s. 232-242. ISSN 1212-1800 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0607 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biodegradable plastic * polycaprolactone * B-starch Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.522, year: 2011 http://www.agriculturejournals.cz/publicFiles/39918.pdf

  1. The characterization of novel biodegradable blends based on polyhydroxybutyrate

    OpenAIRE

    Pankova, Yulia; Shchegolikhin, Alexandr; lordanskii, Alexey; Zhulkina, Anna; Ol'khov, Anatoliy; Zaikov, Gennady

    2011-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the study of novel blends based on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and polymers with different hydrophilicity (LDPE and PA). Polymer blends were produced from five ratios of PHB/LDPE in order to regulate the resistance to hydrolysis or (bio)degradation through the control of water permeability. The relation between the water transport and morphology (TEM data) shows the impact of polymer component ratio on the regulating water flux in a hydrophobic matrix. To elucid...

  2. Biodegradable Xylitol-Based Elastomers: In Vivo Behavior and Biocompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bruggeman, Joost; Bettinger, Christopher; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBiodegradable elastomers based on polycondensation reactions of xylitol with sebacic acid, referred to as poly(xylitol sebacate) (PXS) elastomers have recently been developed. We describe the in vivo behavior of PXS elastomers. Four PXS elastomers were synthesized, characterized, and compared with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). PXS elastomers displayed a high level of structural integrity and form stability during degradation. The in vivo half-life ranged from approximate...

  3. The Aerobic Biodegradation Kinetics of Plant Tannins in Industrial Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Tramšek, Marko; Goršek, Andreja; Glavič, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental determination of the biodegradation rate for tannins present in industrial wastewater, after the extraction of chestnut chips. Experiments were performed in a laboratory aerobic reactor (Armfield) by using biomass from an existing industrial wastewater treatment plant. The outlet tannins concentration was determined under various processing conditions. Simultaneously, an optical microscope was used to monitor the mix of microbiological cultures in the biom...

  4. Protein-Reactive, Thermoresponsive Copolymers with High Flexibility and Biodegradability

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Jianjun; Hong, Yi; Ma, Zuwei; Wagner, William R.

    2008-01-01

    A family of injectable, biodegradable, and thermosensitive copolymers based on N-isopropylacrylamide, acrylic acid, N-acryloxysuccinimide, and a macromer polylactide–hydroxyethyl methacrylate were synthesized by free radical polymerization. Copolymers were injectable at or below room temperature and formed robust hydrogels at 37 °C. The effects of monomer ratio, polylactide length, and AAc content on the chemical and physical properties of the hydrogel were investigated. Copolymers exhibited ...

  5. Biodegradation of azo and heterocyclic dyes by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    OpenAIRE

    Cripps, C.; Bumpus, J A; Aust, S D

    1990-01-01

    Biodegradation of Orange II, Tropaeolin O, Congo Red, and Azure B in cultures of the white rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was demonstrated by decolarization of the culture medium, the extent of which was determined by monitoring the decrease in absorbance at or near the wavelength maximum for each dye. Metabolite formation was also monitored. Decolorization of these dyes was most extensive in ligninolytic cultures, but substantial decolorization also occurred in nonligninolytic cult...

  6. FUNGAL BIODEGRADATION OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL IN SOIL AND COMPOST ENVIRONMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Mollasalehi, Somayeh

    2013-01-01

    For over 50 years, synthetic petrochemical-based plastics have been produced in ever growing volumes globally and since their first commercial introduction; they have been continually developed with regards to quality, colour, durability, and resistance. With some exceptions, such as polyurethanes, most plastics are very stable and are not readily degraded when they enter the ground as waste, taking decades to biodegrade and therefore are major pollutants of terrestrial and marine ecosystems....

  7. Clay-biodegradable polymer combination for pollutant removal from water

    OpenAIRE

    M. F. Mohd Amin; S. G. J. Heijman; L. C. Rietveld

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new treatment alternative is investigated to remove micropollutants from wastewater effectively and in a more cost-effective way. A potential solution is the use of clay in combination with biodegradable polymeric flocculants. Flocculation is viewed as the best method to get the optimum outcome from the combination of clay with starch. Clay is naturally abundantly available and relatively inexpensive compared to the conven...

  8. Biodegradable nanocomposite coatings accelerate bone healing: In vivo evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Mehdikhani-Nahrkhalaji; Mohammad Hossein Fathi; Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Sayed Behrouz Mousavi; Ali Akhavan; Abbas Haghighat; Batool Hashemi-Beni; Sayed Mohammad Razavi; Fatemeh Mashhadiabbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction of bioactive and biodegradable poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite (PBGHA) and poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/bioactive glass (PBG) nanocomposite coatings with bone. Materials and Methods: Sol-gel derived 58S bioactive glass nanoparticles, 50/50 wt% poly (lactic acid)/poly (glycolic acid) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were used to prepare the coatings. The nanocomposite coatings were characterized by ...

  9. A biodegradable and biocompatible gecko-inspired tissue adhesive

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Ferreira, Lino; Sundback, Cathryn; Nichol, Jason W.; Chan, Edwin P.; Carter, David J. D.; Bettinger, Chris J.; Patanavanich, Siamrut; Chignozha, Loice; Ben-Joseph, Eli; Galakatos, Alex; Pryor, Howard; Pomerantseva, Irina; Masiakos, Peter T.; Faquin, William

    2008-01-01

    There is a significant medical need for tough biodegradable polymer adhesives that can adapt to or recover from various mechanical deformations while remaining strongly attached to the underlying tissue. We approached this problem by using a polymer poly(glycerol-co-sebacate acrylate) and modifying the surface to mimic the nanotopography of gecko feet, which allows attachment to vertical surfaces. Translation of existing gecko-inspired adhesives for medical applications is complex, as multipl...

  10. High purity biodegradable magnesium coating for implant application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes efforts to create high purity Mg coating by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) technique that is appropriate for implant applications and to improve the interaction between the implant and the biological environment. The in vitro and in vivo tests conducted with Mg coatings that consist of grains with controlled size demonstrated promising properties in terms of lower corrosion and acceptable foreign body reaction which makes them prospective as biodegradable metallic materials.

  11. Biodegradable blends based on Polyhydroxybutyrate: structure and water diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    OLKHOV ANATOLIY ALEKSANDROVICH; MARKIN VALERIY SERGEEVICH; KOSENKO REGINA YUDELEVNA; GOLDSHTRAKH MARIANNA ALEKSANDROVNA; ZAIKOV GENNADIY EFREMOVICH; IORDANSKIY ALEKSEY LEONIDOVICH; PANKOVA YULIYA NIKOLAEVNA

    2015-01-01

    The present article focuses on the study of novel blends based on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and polymers with different hydrophilicity (PELD, PA and PVA). Polymer blends were produced from five ratios of PHB/PELD in an effort to regulate the resistance to hydrolysis or (bio)degradation through the control of water permeability. The relation between the water transport and morphology (TEM data) shows the impact of polymer component ratio on the regulation of water flux in hydrophobic matri...

  12. Synthetic biodegradable vascular grafts for the regeneration of arteries

    OpenAIRE

    De Valence De Minardiere, Sarra

    2012-01-01

    There is an important clinical need for suitable vascular grafts, especially for small diameter vessel replacements in adult patients and for pediatric reconstructions. The objective of this thesis was to develop a synthetic biodegradable vascular graft to guide the regeneration of a natural artery. The developed graft was made of micro and nano fibers of polycaprolactone, forming a porous, but mechanically strong structure. The long term in vivo performance of the graft was evaluated in an a...

  13. Porous biodegradable polyurethane nanocomposites: preparation, characterization, and biocompatibility tests

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Coeli Moreira Dias; Alfredo de Miranda Góes; Rogéria Serakides; Eliane Ayres; Rodrigo Lambert Oréfice

    2010-01-01

    A porous biodegradable polyurethane nanocomposite based on poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and nanocomponents derived from montmorillonite (Cloisite®30B) was synthesized and tested to produce information regarding its potential use as a scaffold for tissue engineering. Structural and morphological characteristics of this nanocomposite were studied by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The reaction between...

  14. Biodegradation of Mexel 432 By Bacteria From the Seine River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with a study of the biodegradation of a filmogenic organic product (Mexel 432) usable in the fight against corrosion, scale and fouling, presenting a certain interest in the research of processes enabling a functional and environmental efficiency for the cooling systems of thermal power stations. The study of the degradation of this product is followed by a global colorimetric method. It shows that the product is stable on the long-term in demineralized water. On the other hand, its rate of disappearance in river waters is significant (50 % in 2 or 3 days). In this phenomenon of disappearance, biodegradation seems to play a part. Some bacteria from the natural environment (river Seine) have been isolated. Two of them seem to play a significant part, since they can degrade the product in three weeks. During the degradation, the amines with long chains (more than six carbons) of the Mexel, measured by the colorimetric method, disappear. The other compounds generated by the biodegradation process are not identified. (authors)

  15. Biodegradation of pitch-based high performance carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. (Yamaguchi Univ., Yamaguchi, (Japan). Faculty of Education)

    1992-09-10

    Although carbon fibers are widely used in various purposes because of their excellent mechanical properties, their behavior under biodegradation by microorganisms has not been elucidated. To elucidate the process of biodegradation of carbon fibers is important for understanding thoroughly the durability and the functionality of the fibers. In this article, a study has been made on biodegradation of pitch-based high performance carbon fibers by microorganisms. The fiber which was degraded has been examined with a scanning electron microscope. Aspergillus flavus has broken surface areas of high performance carbon fibers in 60 days and the fibril structure under the surface layer of the fiber has been exfoliated by degradation. The fibrils on the second layer have been 100-110nm wide. The fibrils have been in line nearly parallel to the fiber axis. The above carbon fibers are carbon type, but in case of graphite type high performance carbon fibers, its broken areas have not been shown and they have shown much stronger resistance against microbial attacks. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Viability of biocompatible and biodegradable seeds production with incorporated radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims the development of radioactive seeds, biocompatible and biodegradable, with the objective of adding options in the cancer treatment. The work focus on the production of seeds biodegradable that incorporate radioisotopes with half life inferior than the degradation time of the material. The idea of producing devices with biodegradable materials impregnated with radioisotopes of short half life will offer new possibilities in the cancer treatment, since they can be used following the same procedures of the permanent interstitial brachytherapy, but using degradable materials compatible with the physiological environment. It will be discussed in particular the possible application of these seeds in the treatment of prostate cancer. A review of the subject and a preliminary evaluation of the viability of production of the seeds will be presented. The method of production of the seeds is based on the incorporation of Iodine and Samarium in glass matrixes obtained by sol-gel processing. X-ray fluorescence was done in the samples produced and the incorporation of Iodine and Samarium atoms was confirmed. (author)

  17. Investigation of wheat straw biodegradation by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of renewable fuels and chemicals from biomass requires an efficient pretreatment technology, which further depends on better understanding of biodegradation process of such lignocellulosic biomass. The biodegradation of wheat straw by Phanerochaete chrysosporium was investigated in this study. The fungal secretomes and compositional, functional groups and structural changes of the fungal spent wheat straw lignin were determined. The result showed ∼ 30% loss of total lignin within three weeks of biopretreatment by P. chrysosporium. Detailed structural analysis through two dimentional heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence nuclear magnatic resonance (2D HMQC NMR) of the pretreated lignin (acetylated) revealed low abundance of substructures D (dibenzodioxacin) and E (cinnamyl alcohol). Further, analysis of lignin by Fourier Transmission Infrared (FTIR) and Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) demonstrated the significant decrease of guaiacyl (G) units. The results support the previous findings in the biodegradation of wheat straw analyzed by 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS). Revealing the characteristic behavior of P. chrysosporium mediated biomass degradation, the information presented in this paper offers new insights for understanding the biological lignin degradation of wheat straw by P. chrysosporium.

  18. Biodegradation of VOCs: a unique oxygen-injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In light of increased interest in methyl tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) remediation, a biodegradation test was carried out by Orchard Park, New York-based Matrix Environmental Technologies Inc. While a pilot project by others had shown MTBE remediation, this site was the first full-scale remediation process that successfully removed MTBE from groundwater. Matrix Technologies has remediated VOC-contaminated groundwater at a variety of petroleum release sites through the use of its novel biodegradation-enhancing oxygen injection system. The system features an AirSep Pressure Swing oxygen generator. At a site contaminated with less than one ppm enzene/toluene/ethlybenzene/xylene (BTEX) and 0.5-2.8 ppm MTBE, oxygen was injected at 80 standard cubic feet per hour at seven points directly down-gradient of the former source area. After approximately one year of oxygen injection, MTBE decreased to below 50 ppb state drinking water standard in groundwater from monitoring wells that did not contain BTEX. In another monitoring well, MTBE decreased by two orders of magnitude in groundwater, after BTEX was biodegraded to low levels

  19. Analysis of proteins involved in biodegradation of crop biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kamau; Trotman, Audrey

    1998-01-01

    The biodegradation of crop biomass for re-use in crop production is part of the bioregenerative life support concept proposed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long duration, manned space exploration. The current research was conducted in the laboratory to evaluate the use of electrophoretic analysis as a means of rapidly assaying for constitutive and induced proteins associated with the bacterial degradation of crop residue. The proteins involved in crop biomass biodegradation are either constitutive or induced. As a result, effluent and cultures were examined to investigate the potential of using electrophoretic techniques as a means of monitoring the biodegradation process. Protein concentration for optimum banding patterns was determined using the Bio-Rad Protein Assay kit. Four bacterial soil isolates were obtained from the G.W. Carver research Farm at Tuskegee University and used in the decomposition of components of plant biomass. The culture, WDSt3A was inoculated into 500 mL of either Tryptic Soy Broth or Nutrient Broth. Incubation, with shaking of each flask was for 96 hours at 30 C. The cultures consistently gave unique banding patterns under denaturing protein electrophoresis conditions, The associated extracellular enzymes also yielded characteristic banding patterns over a 14-day period, when native electrophoresis techniques were used to examine effluent from batch culture bioreactors. The current study evaluated sample preparation and staining protocols to determine the ease of use, reproducibility and reliability, as well as the potential for automation.

  20. Preliminary Ecotoxicity and Biodegradability Assessment of Metalworking Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerulová, Kristína; Amcha, Peter; Filická, Slávka

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of activated sludge from sewage treatment plant to degrade selected MWFs (ecotoxicity to bacterial consortium) and to evaluate the ecotoxicity by Lemna minor-higher plant. After evaluating the ecotoxicity, biodegradations rate with activated sludge was assessed on the basis of COD measurement. Preliminary study of measuring the ecotoxicity according to OECD 221 by Lemna minor shows effective concentration of Emulzin H at the rate of 81.6 mg l-1, for Ecocool 82.9 mg l-1, for BC 25 about 99.3 mg l-1, and for Dasnobor about 97.3 mg l-1. Preliminary study of measuring the ecotoxicity by bacterial consortium according to OECD 209 (STN EN ISO 8192) shows effective concentration of Blasocut BC 25 at the rate 227.4 mg l-1. According to OECD 302B, the biodegradations level of Emulzin H, Ecocool and BC 25 achieved 80% in 10 days. It can be stated that these MWFs have potential to ultimate degradation, but the statement has to be confirmed by a biodegradability test with other parameters than COD, which exhibits some disadvantages in testing O/W emulsions.

  1. In-situ biodegradation of ethanolamine in low permeability soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research program to investigate whether ethanolamine is susceptible to biodegradation is described. The project was undertaken at a former Edmonton area gas plant site to demonstrate in-situ site remediation techniques. A horizontal well was drilled at a depth of four metres below ground surface and hydraulically fractured to increase permeability of the glacial till soils. A sand propant was used to prevent the subsequent closure of the water-based slurry used in fracturing the soil, with phosphoric acid added to provide a source of phospate to stimulate bacterial growth. A network of monitoring wells was installed along the horizontal wells to monitor bacterial respiration. Field test results showed oxygen depletion and carbon dioxide production. Bioventing was restricted as a result of unexpectedly high water levels, but in a subsequent dewatering bioventing program the ethanolamine levels in groundwater extracted from the monitoring wells showed an overall decline in concentration. There were no changes in ammonia levels. Since ammonia is a breakdown product of amines its increase in the groundwater would have provided positive proof of biodegradation. However, the fact that there was no change, is not taken as an indication of the total absence of biodegradation. Rather, it is suspected that the concentration of the ammonia in the groundwater is at a level that it exerts a a toxic influence on the soil bacteria, thus preventing additional degradation. 14 refs., 4 tabs.7 figs

  2. Assessing the toxicity and biodegradability of deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qing; Chen, Jing-Xin; Tang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Juan; Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have emerged as a new type of promising ionic solvents with a broad range of potential applications. Although their ecotoxicological profile is still poorly known, DESs are generally regarded as "green" because they are composed of ammonium salts and H-bond donors (HBDs) which are considered to be eco-friendly. In this work, cholinium-based DESs comprised of choline chloride (ChCl) and choline acetate (ChAc) as the salt and urea (U), acetamide (A), glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) as the HBD were evaluated for their toxic effects on different living organisms such as Escherichia coli (a bacterium), Allium sativum (garlic, a plant) and hydra (an invertebrate), and their biodegradabilities were assessed by means of closed bottle tests. These DESs possessed an anti-bacterial property and exhibited inhibitory effects on the test organisms adopted, depending on the composition and concentration of the DES. The mechanism for the impact of DESs and their components on different living organisms can be associated to their interactions with the cellular membranes. Not all DESs can be considered readily biodegradable. By extending the limited knowledge about the toxicity and biodegradation of this particular solvent family, this investigation on DESs provides insight into our structure-based understanding of their ecotoxicological behavior. PMID:25800513

  3. Surface characterization and cytotoxicity response of biodegradable magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium alloys have raised an immense amount of interest to many researchers because of their evolution as a new kind of third generation materials. Due to their biocompatibility, density, and mechanical properties, magnesium alloys are frequently reported as prospective biodegradable implant materials. Moreover, magnesium alloys experience a natural phenomenon to biodegrade in aqueous solutions due to its corrosion activity, which is excellent for orthopedic and cardiovascular applications. However, a major concern with such alloys is fast and non-uniform corrosion degradation. Controlling the degradation rate in the physiological environment determines the success of biodegradable implants. In this investigation, three different grades of magnesium alloys: AZ31B, AZ91E and ZK60A were studied for their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle meter are used to study surface morphology, chemistry, roughness and wettability, respectively. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of the leached metal ions was evaluated by using a tetrazolium based bio-assay, MTS. - Highlights: • Micro-textured features formed after the anodization of magnesium alloys. • Contact angle increased and surface free energy decreased by anodization. • Corrosion rate increased for anodized surfaces compared to untreated samples. • Cell viability was greater than 75% implying the cytocompatibility of Mg alloys

  4. Characterization and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in radioactive wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Biodegradation of recalcitrant toxic organics under radioactive conditions. → Biodegradation of PAHs of varying size and complexity in mixed waste streams. → Validation of radiation-tolerance and performance of the isolated organisms. - Abstract: PAH degrading Pseudomonad and Alcaligenes species were isolated from landfill soil and mine drainage in South Africa. The isolated organisms were mildly radiation tolerant and were able to degrade PAHs in simulated nuclear wastewater. The radiation in the simulated wastewater, at 0.677 Bq/μL, was compatible to measured values in wastewater from a local radioisotope manufacturing facility, and was enough to inhibit metabolic activity of known PAH degraders from soil such as Pseudomonas putida GMP-1. The organic constituents in the original radioactive waste stream consisted of the full range of PAHs except fluoranthene. Among the observed PAHs in the nuclear wastewater from the radioisotope manufacturing facility, acenaphthene and chrysene predominated-measured at 25.1 and 14.2 mg/L, respectively. Up to sixteen U.S.EPA priority PAHs were detected at levels higher than allowable limits in drinking water. The biodegradation of the PAHs was limited by the solubility of the compounds. This contributed to the observed faster degradation rates in low molecular weight (LMW) compounds than in high molecular weight compounds.

  5. Enhancement of spilled oil biodegradation by nutrients of natural origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten years ago, Elf Aquitaine began developing the technologies for the acceleration of hydrocarbon biodegradation. The continuation of this work has involved the study of new additives to complement the oleophilic nutrient, INIPOL EAP 22. In particular, it has been shown in both laboratory and in situ tests that hydrocarbon degradation can be accelerated by animal meals, which are natural products. Preliminary laboratory studies carried out under batch conditions have shown that the use of these products has resulted in considerable growth of the bacteria, coupled with a notable increase in the biological degradation kinetics of the hydrocarbons. These results are comparable with the performance of the nutrient INIPOL EAP 22. In situ experiments undertaken on soils polluted by hydrocarbons have shown that by using animal meals, 50 percent biodegradation was obtained after six weeks and this increased to 80 percent when mechanical aeration was also employed. Under nutrient-free control conditions, 25 percent biodegradation was obtained with no aeration and 35 percent with mechanical aeration. In trials using coastal sandy sediments, the use of these nutrients has resulted in an increase of both the number of hydrocarbon specific bacteria and the hydrocarbon degradation. It can be concluded from these pilot experiments that in the development of bioremediation as an operational tool in the response to accidental oil spills, these nutrients of natural origin represent an interesting advance

  6. Isolation and characterization of luminescent bacterium for sludge biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahaba, Maryam; Halmi, Mohd Izuan Effendi; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Syed, Mohd Arif

    2015-11-01

    Microtox is based on the inhibition of luminescence of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri by the toxicants. This technique has been accepted by the USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) as a biomonitoring tool for remediation of toxicants such as hydrocarbon sludge. In the present study, a luminescent bacterium was isolated from yellow striped scad (Selaroides leptolepis) and was tentatively identified as Vibrio sp. isolate MZ. This aerobic isolate showed high luminescence activity in a broad range of temperature from 25 to 35 °C. In addition, optimal conditions for high bioluminescence activity in range of pH 7.5 to 8.5 and 10 gl(-1) of sodium chloride, 10 gl(-1) of peptone and 10 gl(-1) of sucrose as carbon source. Bench scale biodegradation 1% sludge (w/v) was set up and degradation was determined using gas chromatography with flame ionised detector (GC-FID). In this study, Rhodococcus sp. strain AQ5NOL2 was used to degrade the sludge. Based on the preliminary results obtained, Vibrio sp. isolate MZwas able to monitor the biodegradation of sludge. Therefore, Vibrio sp. isolate MZ has the potential to be used as a biomonitoring agent for biomonitoring of sludge biodegradation particularly in the tropical ranged environment. PMID:26688958

  7. (Eco)toxicity and biodegradability of protic ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria V S; Vidal, Bruna T; Melo, Claudia M; de Miranda, Rita de C M; Soares, Cleide M F; Coutinho, João A P; Ventura, Sónia P M; Mattedi, Silvana; Lima, Álvaro S

    2016-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are often claimed to be "environmentally friendly" compounds however, the knowledge of their potential toxicity towards different organisms and trophic levels is still limited, in particular when protic ionic liquids (PILs) are addressed. This study aims to evaluate the toxicity against various microorganisms and the biodegradability of four PILs namely, N-methyl-2-hydroxyethylammonium acetate, m-2-HEAA; N-methyl-2-hydroxyethylammonium propionate, m-2-HEAPr; N-methyl-2-hydroxyethylammonium butyrate, m-2-HEAB; and N-methyl-2-hydroxyethylammonium pentanoate, m-2-HEAP. The antimicrobial activity was determined against the two bacteria, Sthaplylococcus aureus ATCC-6533 and Escherichia coli CCT-0355; the yeast Candida albicans ATCC-76645; and the fungi Fusarium sp. LM03. The toxicity of all PILs was tested against the aquatic luminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri using the Microtox(®) test. The impact of the PILs was also studied regarding their effect on lettuce seeds (Lactuta sativa). The biodegradability of these PILs was evaluated using the ratio between the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and the chemical oxygen demand (COD). The results show that, in general, the elongation of the alkyl chain tends to increase the negative impact of the PILs towards the organisms and biological systems under study. According to these results, m-2-HEAA and m-2-HEAP are the less and most toxic PILs studied in this work, respectively. Additionally, all the PILs have demonstrated low biodegradability. PMID:26796340

  8. Anaerobic biodegradability of fish remains: experimental investigation and parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso-Bravo, Andres; Bindels, Francoise; Gerin, Patrick A; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The generation of organic waste associated with aquaculture fish processing has increased significantly in recent decades. The objective of this study is to evaluate the anaerobic biodegradability of several fish processing fractions, as well as water treatment sludge, for tilapia and sturgeon species cultured in recirculated aquaculture systems. After substrate characterization, the ultimate biodegradability and the hydrolytic rate were estimated by fitting a first-order kinetic model with the biogas production profiles. In general, the first-order model was able to reproduce the biogas profiles properly with a high correlation coefficient. In the case of tilapia, the skin/fin, viscera, head and flesh presented a high level of biodegradability, above 310 mLCH₄gCOD⁻¹, whereas the head and bones showed a low hydrolytic rate. For sturgeon, the results for all fractions were quite similar in terms of both parameters, although viscera presented the lowest values. Both the substrate characterization and the kinetic analysis of the anaerobic degradation may be used as design criteria for implementing anaerobic digestion in a recirculating aquaculture system. PMID:25812103

  9. Occurrence and Biodegradation of Nonylphenol in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonylphenol (NP is an ultimate degradation product of nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPE that is primarily used in cleaning and industrial processes. Its widespread use has led to the wide existence of NP in various environmental matrices, such as water, sediment, air and soil. NP can be decreased by biodegradation through the action of microorganisms under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Half-lives of biodegradation ranged from a few days to almost one hundred days. The degradation rate for NP was influenced by temperature, pH and additions of yeast extracts, surfactants, aluminum sulfate, acetate, pyruvate, lactate, manganese dioxide, ferric chloride, sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, heavy metals, and phthalic acid esters. Although NP is present at low concentrations in the environment, as an endocrine disruptor the risks of long-term exposure to low concentrations remain largely unknown. This paper reviews the occurrence of NP in the environment and its aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation in natural environments and sewage treatment plants, which is essential for assessing the potential risk associated with low level exposure to NP and other endocrine disruptors.

  10. Durability of Starch Based Biodegradable Plastics Reinforced with Manila Hemp Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Ochi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The biodegradability of Manila hemp fiber reinforced biodegradable plastics was studied for 240 days in a natural soil and 30 days in a compost soil. After biodegradability tests, weights were measured and both tensile strength tests and microscopic observation were performed to evaluate the biodegradation behavior of the composites. The results indicate that the tensile strength of the composites displays a sharp decrease for up to five days, followed by a gradual decrease. The weight loss and the reduction in tensile strength of biodegradable composite materials in the compost soil are both significantly greater than those buried in natural soil. The biodegradability of these composites is enhanced along the lower portion because this area is more easily attacked by microorganisms.

  11. Influence of chemical surfactants on the biodegradation of crude oil by a mixed bacterial culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted in which the effects of surfactant physicochemical properties on crude oil biodegradation by a mixed-bacterial culture were examined. The effects of hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) and molecular structure on the biodegradation of Bow River crude oil were determined. It was shown that chemical surfactants have the potential to improve crude oil biodegradation in complex microbial systems. Surfactant selection should consider factors such as molecular structure, HLB and surfactant concentration. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  12. HOW DO DEGRADABLE/BIODEGRADABLE PLASTIC MATERIALS DECOMPOSE IN HOME COMPOSTING ENVIRONMENT?

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena Vaverková; Dana Adamcová; Jan Zloch

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides information about biodegradability of polymeric (biodegradable/degradable) materials advertised as 100%-degradable or certified as compostable, which may be a part of biodegradable waste, in home composting conditions. It describes an experiment that took place in home wooden compost bins and contained 9 samples that are commonly available in retail chains in the Czech Republic and Poland. The experiment lasted for the period of 12 weeks. Based on the results thereof it ca...

  13. Biodegradable packaging and edible coating for fresh-cut fruits and vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Galgano

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on biodegradable packaging and edible coatings applied to fresh-cut fruits and vegetables and their effects on the product quality. Practical applications are mainly limited to the use of biodegradable materials that, however, do not allow full control of the product moisture loss. Better results can be achieved by the combined use of biodegradable packagings with edible coatings and recent research has shown that enrichment with silver montmorillonite nanoparticles may be a...

  14. Fabrication of a Delaying Biodegradable Magnesium Alloy-Based Esophageal Stent via Coating Elastic Polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Tianwen Yuan; Jia Yu; Jun Cao; Fei Gao; Yueqi Zhu; Yingsheng Cheng; Wenguo Cui

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal stent implantation can relieve esophageal stenosis and obstructions in benign esophageal strictures, and magnesium alloy stents are a good candidate because of biodegradation and biological safety. However, biodegradable esophageal stents show a poor corrosion resistance and a quick loss of mechanical support in vivo. In this study, we chose the elastic and biodegradable mixed polymer of Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) as the coated membrane on ma...

  15. Biodegradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 to N-isopropylammelide with subsequent assessment of toxicity of biodegraded metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Parag D; Phugare, Swapnil S; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2014-02-01

    Atrazine is a persistent organic pollutant in the environment which affects not only terrestrial and aquatic biota but also human health. Since its removal from the environment is needed, atrazine biodegradation is achieved in the present study using the bacterium Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 isolated from soil, long-term treated with atrazine. The bacterium was capable of degrading about 75 % atrazine in liquid medium having pH 7 under aerobic and dark condition within 7 days. The degradation ability of the bacterium at various temperatures (20-60 °C), pH (range 3-11), carbon (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch, lactose, and maltose), and nitrogen (ammonium molybdate, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, and urea) sources were studied for triumph optimum atrazine degradation. The results indicate that atrazine degradation at higher concentrations (100 ppm) was pH and temperature dependent. However, glucose and potassium nitrate were optimum carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Atrazine biodegradation analysis was carried out by using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (LC/Q-TOF-MS) techniques. LC/Q-TOF-MS analysis revealed formation of various intermediate metabolites including hydroxyatrazine, N-isopropylammelide, deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and deisopropyldeethylatrazine which was helpful to propose biochemical degradation pathway of atrazine. Furthermore, the toxicological studies of atrazine and its biodegraded metabolites were executed on earthworm Eisenia foetida as a model organism with respect to enzymatic (SOD and Catalase) antioxidant defense mechanism and lipid peroxidation studies. These results suggest innocuous degradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 in nontoxic form. Therefore the Rhodococcus sp.BCH2 could prove a valuable source for the eco-friendly biodegradation of atrazine pesticide. PMID

  16. A biodegradation study of forest biomass by Aspergillus niger F7: correlation between enzymatic activity, hydrolytic percentage and biodegradation index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Sharma

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus niger F7 isolated from soil was found to be the potent producer of cellulase and xylanase. The residue of forest species Toona ciliata, Celtris australis, Cedrus deodara and Pinus roxburghii was selected as substrate for biodegradation study due to its easy availability and wide use in industry. It was subjected to alkali (sodium hydroxide treatment for enhancing its degradation. Biodegradation of forest waste by hydrolytic enzymes (cellulase and xylanase secreted by A. niger under solid state fermentation (SSF was explored. SSF of pretreated forest biomass was found to be superior over untreated forest biomass. Highest extracellular enzyme activity of 2201±23.91 U/g by A. niger was shown in pretreated C. australis wood resulting in 6.72±0.20 percent hydrolysis and 6.99±0.23 biodegradation index (BI. The lowest BI of 1.40±0.08 was observed in untreated saw dust of C. deodara having the least enzyme activity of 238±1.36 U/g of dry matter. Biodegradation of forest biomass under SSF was increased many folds when moistening agent i.e. tap water had been replaced with modified basal salt media (BSM. In BSM mediated degradation of forest waste with A. niger, extracellular enzyme activity was increased up to 4089±67.11 U/g of dry matter in turn resulting in higher BI of 15.4±0.41 and percent hydrolysis of 19.38±0.81 in pretreated C. australis wood. A. niger exhibited higher enzyme activity on pretreated biomass when moistened with modified BSM in this study. Statistically a positive correlation has been drawn between these three factors i.e. enzyme activity, BI and percent hydrolysis of forest biomass thus proving their direct relationship with each other.

  17. A Biocompatible and Biodegradable Protein Hydrogel with Green and Red Autofluorescence: Preparation, Characterization and In Vivo Biodegradation Tracking and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Sun, Xiangcheng; Hargrove, Derek; Chen, Jun; Song, Donghui; Dong, Qiuchen; Lu, Xiuling; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Fu, Youjun; Lei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Because of its good biocompatibility and biodegradability, albumins such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) have found a wide range of biomedical applications. Herein, we report that glutaraldehyde cross-linked BSA (or HSA) forms a novel fluorescent biological hydrogel, exhibiting new green and red autofluorescence in vitro and in vivo without the use of any additional fluorescent labels. UV-vis spectra studies, in conjunction with the fluorescence spectra studies including emission, excitation and synchronous scans, indicated that three classes of fluorescent compounds are presumably formed during the gelation process. SEM, FTIR and mechanical tests were further employed to investigate the morphology, the specific chemical structures and the mechanical strength of the as-prepared autofluorescent hydrogel, respectively. Its biocompatibility and biodegradability were also demonstrated through extensive in vitro and in vivo studies. More interestingly, the strong red autofluorescence of the as-prepared hydrogel allows for conveniently and non-invasively tracking and modeling its in vivo degradation based on the time-dependent fluorescent images of mice. A mathematical model was proposed and was in good agreement with the experimental results. The developed facile strategy to prepare novel biocompatible and biodegradable autofluorescent protein hydrogels could significantly expand the scope of protein hydrogels in biomedical applications.

  18. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of

  19. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig, S.

    2003-12-11

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of

  20. Biodegradation of Mexican Diesel for a bacteria consortium of an agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodegradation of diesel in water was done by means of the microorganisms present in an agriculture soil. The kinetics of biodegradation and adsorption of diesel were determined in order to applying the procedure in soil and water resources contaminated with diesel. The methodology and results of biodegradation and adsorption of diesel in synthetic water is presented with a soil characterization. Degradation takes place using the original microorganisms present in the soil but giving nitrogen as nutrient. As oxygen source the hydrogen peroxide was used. The kinetics of diesel volatility is presented too. Kinetics equations for degradation, adsorption and speed constant were determined with the obtained results biodegradation, diesel, agriculture soil, bacterium group

  1. Soil Physical Constraints on Intrinsic Biodegradation of Petroleum Vapors in a Layered Subsurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Andreas Houlberg; Henriksen, Kaj; Mortensen, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    in a deep and highly layered vadose zone contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Soil slurry experiments on benzene biodegradation were used for determining the relative potential for hydrocarbon biodegradation in 100 soil samples collected from 2-16 m below ground surface. Regardless of nutrient...... biodegradation in the deep vadose zone. As a result, management of petroleum hydrocarbon spill sites will benefit from site-specific conceptual models in which the vadose zone is divided into geological compartments with different biophysical potential for biodegradation and bioremediation....

  2. Assessment of toxicity and biodegradability on activated sludge of priority and emerging pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobajas, Montserrat; Verdugo, Verónica; Polo, Alicia M; Rodriguez, Juan J; Mohedano, Angel F

    2016-03-01

    Several methods for evaluating the toxicity and biodegradability of hazardous pollutants (chlorinated compounds, chemical additives and pharmaceuticals) have been studied in this work. Different bioassays using representative bacteria of marine and terrestrial ecosystems such as Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida have been used to assess the ecotoxicity. Activated sludge was used to analyse the effect of those pollutants in a biological reactor of a sewage treatment plant (STP). The results demonstrate that none of the compounds is toxic to activated sludge, except ofloxacin to P. putida. The additives tested can be considered moderately toxic according to the more sensitive V. fischeri assays, whereas the EC50 values of the pharmaceuticals depend on the specific microorganism used in each test. Regarding the biodegradability, respirometric measurements were carried out for fast biodegradability assessment and the Zahn-Wellens test for inherent biodegradability. The evolution of the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) showed that only diethyl phthalate was easily biodegradable and acetylsalicylic acid was partially biodegradable (98% and 65% degradation, respectively). The persistence of dichloromethane, ofloxacin and hidrochlorothiazide was confirmed along the 28 days of the Zahn-Wellens test whereas 1,1,1-trichloroethane showed inherent biodegradability (74% removal). Most of the chlorinated compounds, pharmaceuticals, bisphenol A and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were partially degraded in 28 d with total organic carbon (TOC) reduction ranging from 21% to 51%. Sulphamethoxazole showed certain biodegradation (50% removal) with TOC decrease around 31%, which indicates the formation of non-biodegradable by-products. PMID:26243262

  3. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Macrophages through Respiratory Burst Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Wan, Bin; Yang, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Min; Guo, Liang-Hong; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may be one of major determinants of the toxic outcomes in exposed individuals. In this study, we employed a macrophage/monocyte model, Raw264.7, to investigate the feasibility of regulating the biodegradation of three types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (pristine, ox-, and OH-SWCNTs) by respiratory burst modulation. An artificial fluid mimicking the enzymatic reactions of respiratory burst was constituted to reveal the role of respiratory burst played in SWCNT biodegradation. The biodegradation of SWCNTs were characterized by Raman, ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed significantly accelerated biodegradation of ox-SWCNTs and OH-SWCNTs in macrophages activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which could be prevented by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), whereas p-SWCNTs were resistant to biodegradation. Similar tendencies were observed by using the in vitro enzymatic system, and the degradation rates of these SWCNTs are in the order of OH-SWCNTs > ox-SWCNTs >> p-SWCNTs, suggesting a pivotal role of respiratory burst in accelerating the biodegradation of SWCNTs and that defect sites on SWCNTs might be a prerequisite for the biodegradation to occur. Our findings might provide invaluable clues on the development of intervention measurements for relieving the side effects of SWCNTs and would help to design safer SWCNT products with higher biodegradability and less toxicity. PMID:27011169

  4. Decomposition of biodegradable films developed on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol in the natural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timofiychuk O.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of polymeric pack has made for many important problems. Biodegradable plastics may provide solutions to global environmental problems. The aim of this study is to examine the utilization possibilities in natural environment of biodegradable films, which was developed with polyvinyl alcohol and organic filler materials (amylum and cellulose. The films stability against the filamentous fungus was analyzed, the soil type with optimal conditions to the biodegradation of polymers was determined; the mold fungi were separated from biodegradable films and were identified to a genus.

  5. Characterization of biodegradation intermediates of nonionic surfactants by MALDI-MS. 2. Oxidative biodegradation profiles of uniform octylphenol polyethoxylate in 18O-labeled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Shibata, Atsushi; Wang, Yang; Yoshikawa, Hiromichi; Tamura, Hiroto

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the characterization of the biodegradation intermediates of octylphenol octaethoxylate (OP(8)EO) by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The biodegradation test study was carried out in a pure culture (Pseudomonas putida S-5) under aerobic conditions using OP(8)EO as the sole carbon source and (18)O-labeled water as an incubation medium. In the MALDI-MS spectra of biodegraded samples, a series of OP(n)EO molecules with n = 2-8 EO units and their corresponding carboxylic acid products (OP(n)EC) were observed. The use of purified OP(8)EO enabled one to distinguish the shortened OPEO molecules as biodegradation intermediates. Furthermore, the formation of OP(8)EC (the oxidized product of OP(8)EO) supported the notion that terminal oxidation is a step in the biodegradation process. When biodegradation study was carried out in (18)O-labeled water, incorporation of (18)O atoms into the carboxyl group was observed for OPEC, while no incorporation was observed for the shortened OPEO products. These results could provide some rationale to the biodegradation mechanism of alkylphenol polyethoxylates. PMID:12523845

  6. The peroxidase-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a H2O2-induced SBR using in-situ production of peroxidase: Biodegradation experiments and bacterial identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-08-01

    A bacterial peroxidase-mediated oxidizing process was developed for biodegrading total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Almost complete biodegradation (>99%) of high TPH concentrations (4g/L) was attained in the bioreactor with a low amount (0.6mM) of H2O2 at a reaction time of 22h. A specific TPH biodegradation rate as high as 44.3mgTPH/gbiomass×h was obtained with this process. The reaction times required for complete biodegradation of TPH concentrations of 1, 2, 3, and 4g/L were 21, 22, 28, and 30h, respectively. The catalytic activity of hydrocarbon catalyzing peroxidase was determined to be 1.48U/mL biomass. The biodegradation of TPH in seawater was similar to that in fresh media (no salt). A mixture of bacteria capable of peroxidase synthesis and hydrocarbon biodegradation including Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp. were identified in the bioreactor. The GC/MS analysis of the effluent indicated that all classes of hydrocarbons could be well-degraded in the H2O2-induced SBR. Accordingly, the peroxidase-mediated process is a promising method for efficiently biodegrading concentrated TPH-laden saline wastewater. PMID:27060866

  7. Study on the biodegradability and biocompatibility of WE magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium alloys have been widely applied in biomedical devices because of their high strength, toughness, processing performance and the trace release of Mg2+. In this study, we investigated the biodegradability, cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility of four kinds of WE Mg alloys (where “W” indicates the metallic element Y and “E” represents mixed rare earth [RE] elements; Y: 2.5, 5.0, 6.5, and 7.5 wt.%; Nd: 1.0, 2.5, 2.6, and 4.2 wt.%; Zr: 0.8 wt.%) for their application in intravascular stent fabrication. The content of alloying elements affected not only mechanical properties of materials, but also their biocompatibility. We found that addition of RE elements could reduce the corrosion rates. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultured in different extracts of WE Mg alloys. MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was used to examine the cytotoxicity. The nitric oxide (NO) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were used to evaluate effects of Mg alloys on HUVECs. The addition of Y, Nd and Zr increased the cell viability and improved the hemocompatibility. Different alloy elements affected the morphology of samples, Mg2+ release, and pH values in the medium. The results of mechanical properties, biocompatibility and biodegradability showed that Mg–5.0Y–2.6Nd–0.8Zr might be used as alternative materials of stent. However, it still needs to be further modified for clinical use. These findings suggest that selecting suitable alloying elements is particularly important. - Highlights: ► Y, Nd and Zr are used as alloying elements of magnesium alloys. ► Biodegradability and biocompatibility are explored. ► Cell viability and hemocompatibility are improved as compared with pure Mg.

  8. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in an immobilized cell airlift bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermanshahi Pour, A.; Karamanev, D.; Margaritis, A. [Universityn of Western Ontario, London (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

    2005-09-01

    An ''immobilized cell airlift bioreactor'', was used for the aerobic bioremediation of simulated diesel fuel contaminated groundwater and tested with p-xylene and naphthalene in batch and continuous regimes. The innovative design of the experiments consists of two stages. At the first stage ''immobilized soil bioreactor'' (ISBR) was used to develop an efficient microbial consortium from the indigenous microorganisms, which exist in diesel fuel contaminated soil. The concept of ISBR relies on the entrapment of the soil particles into the pores of a semi-permeable membrane, which divides the bioreactor into two aerated and non-aerated portions. The second stage involves inoculating the ''immobilized cell air lift bioreactor'' with the cultivated microbial consortia of the first stage. Immobilized cell airlift bioreactor has the same configuration as ISBR except that in this bioreactor instead of soil, microorganisms were immobilized on the fibers of the membrane. The performance of a 0.83 L immobilized cell airlift bioreactor was investigated at various retention time (0.5-6 h) and concentrations of p-xylene (15, 40 and 77 mg/L) and naphthalene (8, 15 and 22 mg/L) in the continuous operation. In the batch regime, 0.9 L bioreactor was operated at various biodegradation times (15-135 min) and concentrations of p-xylene (13.6, 44.9 and 67.5 mg/L) and naphthalene (1.5 and 3.8 mg/L). Under the conditions of the complete biodegradation of p-xylene and naphthalene, the obtained volumetric biodegradation rates at biomass density of 720 mg/L were 15 and 16 mg/L h, respectively. (author)

  9. WAXD and FTIR studies of electron beam irradiated biodegradable polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL) have been receiving much attention lately due to their biodegradability in human body as well as in the soil, biocompatibility, environmentally friendly characteristics and non-toxicity. Morphology of biodegradable polymers affects the rate of their biodegradation. A polymer that has high degree of crystallinity will degrade at a slower rate due to the inherent increased stability. PCL homopolymer cross-linking degree increases with increasing doses of high energy radiation. On the other hand, the irradiation of PLLA homopolymer promotes mainly chain-scissions at doses below 250 kGy. In the present work, twin screw extruded films of PLLA and PCL biodegradable homopolymers and 50:50 (w:w) blend were electron beam irradiated using electron beam accelerator Dynamitron (E = 1.5 MeV) from Radiation Dynamics, Inc. at doses in the range of 50 to 1000 kGy in order to evaluate the effect of electron beam radiation on the homopolymers and blend. Wide-angle X- ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns of non irradiated and irradiated samples were obtained using a diffractometer Rigaku Denki Co. Ltd., Multiflex model; and FTIR spectra was obtained using a NICOLET 4700, ATR technique, ZnSe crystal at 45o. By WAXD patterns of as extruded non irradiated and irradiated PLLA it was observed broad diffusion peaks corresponding to amorphous polymer. There was a slight increase of the mean crystallite size of PCL homopolymer with increasing radiation dose. PCL crystalline index (CI) was 68% and decreased with radiation dose above 500 kGy. On the other hand. PLLA CI was 10% and increased with radiation dose above 750 kGy. On the other hand, PLLA presence on the 50:50 blend did not interfere on the observed mean crystallite size increase up to 250 kGy. From 500 kGy to 1 MGy the crystallite size of PCL was a little bigger in the blend than the homopolymer. Also it could be observed that the PLLA peak increase at 14.2o was affected by PCL

  10. Biodegradable Xylitol-Based Elastomers: In Vivo Behavior and Biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Joost P.; Bettinger, Christopher J.; Langer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomers based on polycondensation reactions of xylitol with sebacic acid, referred to as poly(xylitol sebacate) (PXS) elastomers have recently been developed. Herein, we describe the in vivo behavior of PXS elastomers. Four PXS elastomers were synthesized, characterized and compared to poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). PXS elastomers displayed a high level of structural integrity and form stability during degradation. The in vivo half-life ranged from approximately 3 to 52 weeks. PXS elastomers exhibited increased biocompatibility compared to PLGA implants. PMID:20540093

  11. The use of ecocores to evaluate biodegradation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Nielsen, Jef;

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory sediment microcosm called the ecocore is described. It has been used to test the biodegradability of substances which predominantly enter the sediment. A new method for introducing hydrophobic test substances such as hydrocarbons to the test system is also described. In a series of...... tests using 14C-labelled hydrocarbons, it has been demonstrated that evolved and trapped 14C02 in all probability reflects the rates of mineralization of the test substance. The fate of the substances within the test system has been described and the total recovery exceeds 80%. The system shows good...

  12. APPLICATION OF A BIODEGRADABLE MATERIAL FOR BONE REPLACEMENT IN TRAUMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Druzhinina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 20 men (medium age (31.5 ± 13.5 years were studied. All patients underwent arthroscopic auditing plastic anterior cruciate ligament of the knee. Osteoregeneration dynamics were determined by biochemical testing of blood serum and X-ray computed tomography (CT of the fracture in 1–4 months after surgery. As a result, an estimation of the bone tissue reparative regeneration according to CT data in 10 patients with a defect of the patella, treated with the material is provided. The obtained results of the clinical study indicate the reparative effect of the biodegradable material for bone replacing on bone regeneration

  13. Transformation and biodegradation of 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP)

    OpenAIRE

    Samin, Ghufrana; Janssen, Dick B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a persistent groundwater pollutant and a suspected human carcinogen. It is also is an industrial chemical waste that has been formed in large amounts during epichlorohydrin manufacture. In view of the spread of TCP via groundwater and its toxicity, there is a need for cheap and efficient technologies for the cleanup of TCP-contaminated sites. In situ or on-site bioremediation of TCP is an option if biodegradation can be achieved and stimulated. This pap...

  14. Transformation and biodegradation of 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP)

    OpenAIRE

    Samin, Ghufrana; Janssen, Dick B.; Kronberg, Leif

    2012-01-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a persistent groundwater pollutant and a suspected human carcinogen. It is also is an industrial chemical waste that has been formed in large amounts during epichlorohydrin manufacture. In view of the spread of TCP via groundwater and its toxicity, there is a need for cheap and efficient technologies for the cleanup of TCP-contaminated sites. In situ or on-site bioremediation of TCP is an option if biodegradation can be achieved and stimulated. This paper prese...

  15. Biodegradation of vapor phase contaminants in a packed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation of a contaminated vapor stream involves overcoming at least three external mass transfer resistances in order to supply the contaminant to a biofilm where further diffusion and biodegradation occur. This paper reports on a process model incorporating these phenomena which has been developed, and several experimental systems are in use for its validation and calibration. Salient features of the model and system performance data will be presented in support of a rational basis for design and operation of vapor phase bioremediation systems for industrial and environmental applications

  16. Biodegradation Rates of Aromatic Contaminants in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols......, chlorophenols, nitrophenol, chlorobenzenes and aromatic nitrogen-, sulphur- or oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds (NSO-compounds). Furthermore, a comparison with degradation rates observed for easily degradable organics is also presented. At concentrations below 20-100 μg/l the degradation of the aromatic...

  17. [Plasmid characteristics of naphthalene and salicylate biodegradation in Pseudomonas putida].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharian, R A; Bakunin, K A; Gasparian, N S; Kocharian, Sh M; Arakelov, G M

    1980-01-01

    The object of this work was to study the physico-chemical and biological properties of DNAs of the biodegradation plasmids NAH and SAL. A comparative analysis of the physico-chemical parameters for these DNAs made it possible to detect a number of identical properties in them: the same sedimentation profile for covalently-closed circular DNA forms, 68--70 S; the molecular weight of ca. 50 MD; a roughly equal number of fragments (up to 23) was found when the DNAs of NAH and SAL were restricted by EcoRI endonuclease. The transformation of the plasmidless strain PpGI was done. PMID:6259498

  18. Processing and characterization of novel biobased and biodegradable materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Srikanth

    Human society has benefited tremendously from the use of petroleum-based plastics. However, there are growing concerns with their adverse environmental impacts and volatile costs attributed to the skyrocketing oil prices. Additionally most of the petroleum-based polymers are non-biodegradable causing problems about their disposal. Thus, during the last couple of decades, scientists ail over the world have been focusing on developing new polymeric materials that are biobased and biodegradable, also termed as green plastics . This study aims to develop green materials based on polylactide (PLA) biopolymer that can be made from plants. Although PLA can provide important advantages in terms of sustainability and biodegradability, it has its own challenges such as high cost, brittleness, and narrow processing window. These challenges are addressed in this study by investigating both new material formulations and processes. To improve the material properties and control the material costs, PLA was blended with various fillers and modifiers. The types of fillers investigated include carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoparticles and various natural fibers such as pine-wood four, recycled-wood fibers and flax fiber. Using natural fibers as fillers for PLA can result in fully biodegradable and eco-friendly biocomposites. Also due to PLA's sensitivity to moisture and temperature, molecular degradation can occur during processing leading to inferior material properties. To address this issue, one of the approaches adopted by this study was to incorporate a multifunctional chain-extender into PLA, which increased the molecular weight of PLA thereby improving the material properties. To improve the processability and reduce the material cost, both microcellular injection molding and extrusion processes have been studied. The microcellular technology allows the materials to be processed at a lower temperature, which is attractive for thermo- and moisture-sensitive materials like PLA. They

  19. Biodegradation of Mycotoxins: Tales from Known and Unexplored Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoutte, Ilse; Audenaert, Kris; De Gelder, Leen

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins, secondary metabolites produced by fungi, may infer serious risks for animal and human health and lead to economic losses. Several approaches to reduce these mycotoxins have been investigated such as chemical removal, physical binding, or microbial degradation. This review focuses on the microbial degradation or transformation of mycotoxins, with specific attention to the actual detoxification mechanisms of the mother compound. Furthermore, based on the similarities in chemical structure between groups of mycotoxins and environmentally recalcitrant compounds, known biodegradation pathways and degrading organisms which hold promise for the degradation of mycotoxins are presented. PMID:27199907

  20. Biodegradation of DTP and PET Fiber by Microbe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健飞; 王晓春; 巩继贤; 顾振亚

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of diethylene glycol terephthalate (DTP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fiber by microbe was studied.The degree of DTP degradation was determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to be more than 90%.The products after degradation of DTP and PET fiber were various.The degradation of DTP can be described by the first-order reaction model.The degradation of PET fiber was found to be little,but surface erosion of PET fiber could be clearly seen from the SEM photographs indicating there occurred some traces of biodegradation on the PET fiber surface.

  1. BIODEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM-WASTE BY BIOSURFACTANT-PRODUCING BACTERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; Kamlesh Jangid, K; Krystyna Lukasik, K; Grzegorz Nalecz-Jawecki, G; Topher Berry, T

    2007-05-16

    The degradation of petroleum waste by mixed bacterial cultures which produce biosurfactants: Ralstonia pickettii SRS (BP-20), Alcaligenes piechaudii SRS (CZOR L-1B), Bacillus subtilis (1'- 1a), Bacillus sp. (T-1) and Bacillus sp. (T'-1) was investigated. The total petroleum hydrocarbons were degraded substantially (91 %) by the mixed bacterial culture in 30 days (reaching up to 29 % in the first 72 h). Similarly, the toxicity of the biodegraded petroleum waste decreased 3 times after 30 days as compared to raw petroleum waste. Thus, the mixed bacterial strains effectively clean-up the petroleum waste and they can be used in other bioremediation processes.

  2. Biodegradable Polymer-Based Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sultana, Naznin

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the principles, methods and applications of biodegradable polymer based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. The general principle of bone tissue engineering is reviewed and the traditional and novel scaffolding materials, their properties and scaffold fabrication techniques are explored. By acting as temporary synthetic extracellular matrices for cell accommodation, proliferation, and differentiation, scaffolds play a pivotal role in tissue engineering. This book does not only provide the comprehensive summary of the current trends in scaffolding design but also presents the new trends and directions for scaffold development for the ever expanding tissue engineering applications.

  3. Biodegradation aspects of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAHs are aromatic hydrocarbons with two or more fused benzene rings with natural as well as anthropogenic sources. They are widely distributed environmental contaminants that have detrimental biological effects, toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenicity. Due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity, the PAHs have gathered significant environmental concern. Although PAH may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical degradation, microbial degradation is the major degradation process. PAH degradation depends on the environmental conditions, number and type of the microorganisms, nature and chemical structure of the chemical compound being degraded. They are biodegraded/biotransformed into less complex metabolites, and through mineralization into inorganic minerals, H2O, CO2 (aerobic) or CH4 (anaerobic) and rate of biodegradation depends on pH, temperature, oxygen, microbial population, degree of acclimation, accessibility of nutrients, chemical structure of the compound, cellular transport properties, and chemical partitioning in growth medium. A number of bacterial species are known to degrade PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil or sediments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomons fluoresens, Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Lignolytic fungi too have the property of PAH degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Bjerkandera adusta, and Pleurotus ostreatus are the common PAH-degrading fungi. Enzymes involved in the degradation of PAHs are oxygenase, dehydrogenase and lignolytic enzymes. Fungal lignolytic enzymes are lignin peroxidase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase. They are extracellular and catalyze radical formation by oxidation to destabilize bonds in a molecule. The biodegradation of PAHs has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and the rate can be

  4. Desenvolvimento de uma Nanosonda Biodegradável

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar, Nuno André da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Actualmente, há uma grande procura por nanopartículas magnéticas de alta qualidade para uso como nanosonda magnética em técnicas de imagiologia médica e no tratamaneto de cancro por hipertermia. Por outro lado, óleos oriundos da floresta Amazónica têm despertado cada vez maior interesse em possíveis tratamentos médicos devido às suas qualidade fitoterapêuticas. O objectivo principal deste trabalho será desenvolver uma nanosonda magnética biodegradável que alie a versatilidad...

  5. Lignin biodegradation: experimental evidence, molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monties, B.

    1985-01-01

    A critical review is presented of English, French and some German language literature, mainly from 1983 onwards. It examines experimental evidence on the behaviour as barriers to biodegradation of lignins and phenolic polymers such as tannins and suberins. The different molecular mechanisms of lignolysis by fungi (mainly), actinomycetes and bacteria are examined. A new biochemical approach to the physiological mechanism of regulation of lignolytic activities is suggested based on the discoveries of ligniolytic enzymes: effects of nitrogen, oxygen and substrate are discussed. It is concluded that a better knowledge of the structure and reactivity of phenolic barriers is needed in order to control the process of lignolysis.

  6. Biodegradation aspects of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haritash, A.K., E-mail: akharitash@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana (India); Kaushik, C.P. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana (India)

    2009-09-30

    PAHs are aromatic hydrocarbons with two or more fused benzene rings with natural as well as anthropogenic sources. They are widely distributed environmental contaminants that have detrimental biological effects, toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenicity. Due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity, the PAHs have gathered significant environmental concern. Although PAH may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical degradation, microbial degradation is the major degradation process. PAH degradation depends on the environmental conditions, number and type of the microorganisms, nature and chemical structure of the chemical compound being degraded. They are biodegraded/biotransformed into less complex metabolites, and through mineralization into inorganic minerals, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} (aerobic) or CH{sub 4} (anaerobic) and rate of biodegradation depends on pH, temperature, oxygen, microbial population, degree of acclimation, accessibility of nutrients, chemical structure of the compound, cellular transport properties, and chemical partitioning in growth medium. A number of bacterial species are known to degrade PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil or sediments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomons fluoresens, Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Lignolytic fungi too have the property of PAH degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Bjerkandera adusta, and Pleurotus ostreatus are the common PAH-degrading fungi. Enzymes involved in the degradation of PAHs are oxygenase, dehydrogenase and lignolytic enzymes. Fungal lignolytic enzymes are lignin peroxidase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase. They are extracellular and catalyze radical formation by oxidation to destabilize bonds in a molecule. The biodegradation of PAHs has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions

  7. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Eosinophil Peroxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Andõn, F. T.; Kapralov, A A; Yanamala, N.; Feng, W.; Baygan, Arjang; Chambers, B.J.; Hultenby, K.; Ye, Fei; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Brandner, B. D.; Fornara, Andrea; Klein-Seetharaman, J.; Kotchey, G. P.; Star, A.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is one of the major oxidant-producing enzymes during inflammatory states in the human lung. The degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) upon incubation with human EPO and H2O 2 is reported. Biodegradation of SWCNTs is higher in the presence of NaBr, but neither EPO alone nor H2O2 alone caused the degradation of nanotubes. Molecular modeling reveals two binding sites for SWCNTs on EPO, one located at the proximal side (same side as the catalytic site)...

  8. A new method study biodegradation kinetics of anorganic trace pollutants by activated sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, H.; Klapwijk, A.

    2003-01-01

    A reliable prediction of the behaviour of organic trace compounds in activated sludge plants requires an accurate input of the biodegradation kinetics. Often these kinetics are extrapolated from the results of standardised biodegradation tests. However, these tests generally are not designed to yiel

  9. Morphological, mechanical properties and biodegradability of biocomposite thermoplastic starch and polycaprolactone reinforced with sisal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incorporation of fibers as reinforcements in polymer composites has increased due to their renewability, low cost and biodegradability. In this study, sisal fibers were added to a polymer matrix of thermoplastic starch and polycaprolactone, both biodegradable polymers. Sisal fibers (5% and 10%) ...

  10. Spatial uncoupling of biodegradation, soil respiration, and PAH concentration in a creosote contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotspots and coldspots of concentration and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) marginally overlapped at the 0.5-100 m scale in a creosote contaminated soil in southern Sweden, suggesting that concentration and biodegradation had little spatial co-variation. Biodegradation was substantial and its spatial variability considerable and highly irregular, but it had no spatial autocorrelation. The soil concentration of PAHs explained only 20-30% of the variance of their biodegradation. Soil respiration was spatially autocorrelated. The spatial uncoupling between biodegradation and soil respiration seemed to be governed by the aging of PAHs in the soil, since biodegradation of added 13C phenanthrene covaried with both soil respiration and microbial biomass. The latter two were also correlated with high concentrations of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) that are common in gram-negative bacteria. However, several of the hotspots of biodegradation coincided with hotspots for the distribution of a PLFA indicative of fungal biomass. - Hotspots of PAH biodegradation in a creosote contaminated soil do not coincide with hotspots of PAH concentration, microbial biomass and respiration.

  11. Hybrid Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for the biodegradation of benzotriazoles and hydroxy-benzothiazole in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazioti, Aikaterini A.; Stasinakis, Athanasios S.; Psoma, Aikaterini K.;

    2016-01-01

    of a model for describing micropollutants removal in the examined system showed that AS is mainly involved in biodegradation of OHBTH, 1H-benzotriazole (BTR) and xylytriazole (XTR), carriers contribute significantly on 4TTR biodegradation, while both types of biomass participate on elimination of 5...

  12. Chemometric Analysis of Multicomponent Biodegradable Plastics by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry: The R-Matrix Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new chemometric method based on absorbance ratios from Fourier transform infrared spectra was devised to analyze multicomponent biodegradable plastics. The method uses the BeerLambert law to directly compute individual component concentrations and weight losses before and after biodegradation of c...

  13. Biodegradation of organ chlorine pesticides in contaminated soil collected from Yen Tap, Cam Khe, Phu Tho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation of POPs contaminant in soil collected from Phu Tho province and Nghe An province had carried out. The process comprises treating soil, which contains anaerobic and aerobic microbes capable of transforming lindane and DDT into harmless material and being under anaerobic and aerobic steps. Significant biodegradation of POPs contaminants occurred in there tests. But some of toxic organic compounds remained. (author)

  14. BIODEGRADATIVE ANALYSIS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN LABORATORY-SCALE LANDFILLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of research to characterize the anaerobic biodegradability of the major biodegradable components of municipal solid waste (MSW). Tests were conducted in quadruplicate in 2-L reactors operated to obtain maximum yields. Measured methane (CH4) yields for gra...

  15. Synthesis, Characterization and Evaluation of Physical Properties of Biodegradable Composites from Corn Starch

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Kumar; Deepak Prashar

    2012-01-01

    This research paper deals with the synthesis and characterization of corn starch based composites using resorcinol-formaldehyde as cross linker. Acid, base and moisture resistance studies of the composites were also done. Moreover, biodegradation studies of the composites were also done using composting method and the different stages of the biodegradation were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Bioenergetic strategy for the biodegradation of p-cresol by the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Papazi

    Full Text Available Cultures from the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus biodegrade the toxic p-cresol (4-methylphenol and use it as alternative carbon/energy source. The biodegradation procedure of p-cresol seems to be a two-step process. HPLC analyses indicate that the split of the methyl group (first step that is possibly converted to methanol (increased methanol concentration in the growth medium, leading, according to our previous work, to changes in the molecular structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus and therefore to microalgal biomass increase. The second step is the fission of the intermediately produced phenol. A higher p-cresol concentration results in a higher p-cresol biodegradation rate and a lower total p-cresol biodegradability. The first biodegradation step seems to be the most decisive for the effectiveness of the process, because methanol offers energy for the further biodegradation reactions. The absence of LHCII from the Scenedesmus mutant wt-lhc stopped the methanol effect and significantly reduced the p-cresol biodegradation (only 9%. The present contribution deals with an energy distribution between microalgal growth and p-cresol biodegradation, activated by p-cresol concentration. The simultaneous biomass increase with the detoxification of a toxic phenolic compound (p-cresol could be a significant biotechnological aspect for further applications.

  17. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eBettas Ardisson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥ 90% prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012 was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012. The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects. This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil.

  18. Biodegradation of [14C]phenol in secondary sewage and landfill leachate measured by double-vial radiorespirometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Deeley, G M; Skierkowski, P; Robertson, J M

    1985-01-01

    Double-vial radiorespirometry was used to estimate the biodegradation rates of 14C-labeled phenol in a landfill leachate and a secondary treated domestic wastewater. Rates were found to be comparable for each material at each of the three concentrations tested. Sewage microorganisms immediately began biodegrading the [14C]phenol; landfill leachate microorganisms required a lag period before maximum biodegradation of the [14C]phenol. The apparent rate of [14C]phenol biodegradation was 2.4 time...

  19. Comparison of the efficacy of biodegradable and non-biodegradable scintillation liquids on the counting of tritium- and [14C]- labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The widespread use of 3H and 14C in research has generated a large volume of waste mixed with scintillation liquid, requiring an effective control and appropriate storage of liquid radioactive waste. In the present study, we compared the efficacy of three commercially available scintillation liquids, Optiphase Hi Safe 3, Ultima-GoldTM AB (biodegradable) and Insta-Gel-XF (non-biodegradable), in terms of [14 C]-glucose and [3 H]-thymidine counting efficiency. We also analyzed the effect of the relative amount of water (1.6 to 50%), radioisotope concentration (0.1 to 100 nCi/ml), pH (2 to 10) and color of the solutions (samples containing 0.1 to 1.0 mg/ml of Trypan blue) on the counting efficiency in the presence of these scintillation liquids. There were few significant differences in the efficiency of 14C and 3H counting obtained with biodegradable or non-biodegradable scintillation liquids. However, there was an 83 and 94% reduction in the efficiency of 14 C and 3 H counting, respectively, in samples colored with 1 mg/ml Trypan blue, but not with 0.1 mg/ml, independent of the scintillation liquid used. Considering the low cost of biodegradable scintillation cocktails and their efficacy, these results show that traditional hazardous scintillation fluids may be replaced with the new safe biodegradable fluids without impairment of 3 H and 14 C counting efficiency. The use of biodegradable scintillation cocktails minimizes both human and environmental exposure to hazardous solvents. In addition, some biodegradable scintillation liquids can be 40% less expensive than the traditional hazardous cocktails. (author)

  20. Comparison of the efficacy of biodegradable and non-biodegradable scintillation liquids on the counting of tritium- and [14C]-labeled compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeiros R.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of ³H and 14C in research has generated a large volume of waste mixed with scintillation liquid, requiring an effective control and appropriate storage of liquid radioactive waste. In the present study, we compared the efficacy of three commercially available scintillation liquids, Optiphase HiSafe 3, Ultima-Gold(TM AB (biodegradable and Insta-Gel-XF (non-biodegradable, in terms of [14C]-glucose and [³H]-thymidine counting efficiency. We also analyzed the effect of the relative amount of water (1.6 to 50%, radioisotope concentration (0.1 to 100 nCi/ml, pH (2 to 10 and color of the solutions (samples containing 0.1 to 1.0 mg/ml of Trypan blue on the counting efficiency in the presence of these scintillation liquids. There were few significant differences in the efficiency of 14C and ³H counting obtained with biodegradable or non-biodegradable scintillation liquids. However, there was an 83 and 94% reduction in the efficiency of 14C and ³H counting, respectively, in samples colored with 1 mg/ml Trypan blue, but not with 0.1 mg/ml, independent of the scintillation liquid used. Considering the low cost of biodegradable scintillation cocktails and their efficacy, these results show that traditional hazardous scintillation fluids may be replaced with the new safe biodegradable fluids without impairment of ³H and 14C counting efficiency. The use of biodegradable scintillation cocktails minimizes both human and environmental exposure to hazardous solvents. In addition, some biodegradable scintillation liquids can be 40% less expensive than the traditional hazardous cocktails.

  1. Cylindrospermopsin Biodegradation Abilities of Aeromonas sp. Isolated from Rusałka Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziga, Dariusz; Kokocinski, Mikolaj; Maksylewicz, Anna; Czaja-Prokop, Urszula; Barylski, Jakub

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence of the cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) in freshwater reservoirs is a common phenomenon. However, the biodegradation of this toxin in environmental samples has been observed only occasionally. In this work the biodegradation ability of cylindrospermopsin was investigated based on isolates from lakes with previous cyanotoxin history. Bacterial strains were identified based on the 16S rDNA and rpoD gene comparison. CYN biodegradation was monitored using the HPLC method. The R6 strain identified as Aeromonas sp. was documented as being capable of CYN removal. This biodegradation was dependent on the pH and temperature. Additionally, the stimulation of the growth of the R6 strain in the presence of CYN was indicated. Our discovery supports the hypothesis that (in analogy to the well-known phenomenon of microcystin biodegradation) in lakes dominated by potential CYN-producing cyanobacteria, the processes of microbial utilization of this toxin may occur. PMID:26927173

  2. Biodegradability of injection molded bioplastic pots containing polylactic acid and poultry feather fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, H K; Huda, M S; Smith, M C; Mulbry, W; Schmidt, W F; Reeves, J B

    2011-04-01

    The biodegradability of three types of bioplastic pots was evaluated by measuring carbon dioxide produced from lab-scale compost reactors containing mixtures of pot fragments and compost inoculum held at 58 °C for 60 days. Biodegradability of pot type A (composed of 100% polylactic acid (PLA)) was very low (13 ± 3%) compared to literature values for other PLA materials. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) results suggest that the PLA undergoes chemical structural changes during polymer extrusion and injection molding. These changes may be the basis of the low biodegradability value. Biodegradability of pot types B (containing 5% poultry feather, 80% PLA, 15% starch), and C (containing 50% poultry feather, 25% urea, 25% glycerol), were 53 ± 2% and 39 ± 3%, respectively. More than 85% of the total biodegradation of these bioplastics occurred within 38 days. NIRS results revealed that poultry feather was not degraded during composting. PMID:21320772

  3. Anoxic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in saline media using denitrifier biogranules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine; Naddafi, Kazem

    2016-07-01

    The total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) biodegradation was examined using biogranules at different initial TPH concentration and contact time under anoxic condition in saline media. The circular compact biogranules having the average diameter between 2 and 3mm were composed of a dense population of Bacillus spp. capable of biodegrading TPH under anoxic condition in saline media were formed in first step of the study. The biogranules could biodegrade over 99% of the TPH at initial concentration up to 2g/L at the contact time of 22h under anoxic condition in saline media. The maximum TPH biodegradation rate of 2.6 gTPH/gbiomass.d could be obtained at initial TPH concentration of 10g/L. Accordingly, the anoxic biogranulation is a possible and promising technique for high-rate biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in saline media. PMID:26990939

  4. Effect of biostimulation on biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon in biological filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tihomirova

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The addition of labile organic carbon (LOC to enhance the biodegradation rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in biological columns was studied. Acetate standard solution (NaAc and Luria Bertrani (LB medium were used as LOC as biostimulants in glass column system used for measurements of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC. The addition of LOC related with the increase of total DOC in sample. The concentration of BDOC increased up to 7 and 5 times and was utilized after 24 min. contact time. The biodegradation rate constant was increased at least 26 times during adaptation-biostimulation period. There was a strong positive correlation between the biodegradation rate constant and the concentration of BDOC. Biostimulation period ranged from 24 to 53 h for NaAc biostimulant and from 20 to 168 h for LB. The study has shown that LOC could be used as stimulator to enhance the biodegradation rate of DOC during biofiltration.

  5. Effect of biostimulation on biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon in biological granular activated carbon filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tihomirova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The addition of labile organic carbon (LOC to enhance the biodegradation rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in biological columns was studied. Acetate standard solution (NaAc and LB (Luria Bertrani medium were used as LOC as biostimulants in glass column system used for measurements of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC. The addition of LOC related with the increase of total DOC in sample. The concentration of BDOC increased up to 7 and 5 times and was utilized after 24 min. contact time. The biodegradation rate constant was increased at least 8 times during adaptation-biostimulation period. There was a strong positive correlation between the biodegradation rate constant and the concentration of BDOC. Biostimulation period ranged from 24 to 53 h for NaAc biostimulant and from 20 to 168 h for LB. The study has shown that LOC could be used as stimulator to enhance the biodegradation rate of DOC during biofiltration.

  6. Cylindrospermopsin Biodegradation Abilities of Aeromonas sp. Isolated from Rusałka Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziga, Dariusz; Kokocinski, Mikolaj; Maksylewicz, Anna; Czaja-Prokop, Urszula; Barylski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of the cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) in freshwater reservoirs is a common phenomenon. However, the biodegradation of this toxin in environmental samples has been observed only occasionally. In this work the biodegradation ability of cylindrospermopsin was investigated based on isolates from lakes with previous cyanotoxin history. Bacterial strains were identified based on the 16S rDNA and rpoD gene comparison. CYN biodegradation was monitored using the HPLC method. The R6 strain identified as Aeromonas sp. was documented as being capable of CYN removal. This biodegradation was dependent on the pH and temperature. Additionally, the stimulation of the growth of the R6 strain in the presence of CYN was indicated. Our discovery supports the hypothesis that (in analogy to the well-known phenomenon of microcystin biodegradation) in lakes dominated by potential CYN-producing cyanobacteria, the processes of microbial utilization of this toxin may occur. PMID:26927173

  7. Biodegradability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) after femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Akimichi; Yada, Shuhei; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradation is a key property for biodegradable polymer-based tissue scaffolds because it can provide suitable space for cell growth as well as tailored sustainability depending on their role. Ultrashort pulsed lasers have been widely used for the precise processing of optically transparent materials, including biodegradable polymers. Here, we demonstrated the change in the biodegradation of a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) following irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at different wavelengths. Microscopic observation as well as water absorption and mass change measurement revealed that the biodegradation of the PLGA varied significantly depending on the laser wavelength. There was a significant acceleration of the degradation rate upon 400 nm-laser irradiation, whereas 800 nm-laser irradiation did not induce a comparable degree of change. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that laser pulses at the shorter wavelength dissociated the chemical bonds effectively, resulting in a higher degradation rate at an early stage of degradation.

  8. Status seminar: rapidly biodegradable lubricants and working agents; Statusseminar: Biologisch schnell abbaubare Schmier- und Verfahrensstoffe. Guelzower Fachgespraeche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Lubricants and hydraulic fluids based on vegetable oils have many advantages over mineral oils. They are biodegradable, have excellent tribological, wear and lubricating properties. The topics of the status seminar were: field test with biodegradable hydraulic fluids, chemical modification, additives, wear resistance, tribology. Examples of biodegradable oils were sunflower oil, rape oil and sunthetic esters.

  9. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of biodegraded oil in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aal, Gamal Z.; Atekwana, Estella A.

    2014-02-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of different oil saturation (0.2-0.8), wetting conditions (water-wet and oil-wet), and the addition of asphaltene on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of biodegraded and fresh crude oil in sand columns. In the water-wet case, no significant differences were observed for both the fresh and biodegraded oil and both displayed an increase in the magnitude of the phase (ϕ) and decrease in the magnitudes of the real (σ') and imaginary (σ'') conductivity components with increasing oil saturation. In this instance the SIP response is most likely controlled by the conduction and polarization of the electric double layer at the mineral-water interface. However, when oil is the wetting phase there were considerable differences in the magnitude of the SIP parameters between the fresh and biodegraded oil. The magnitude of ϕ and σ'' increased with increasing oil saturation, whereas σ' decreased. The magnitude of σ' and σ'' for the biodegraded oil-wetted sands were relatively higher compared to fresh oil-wetted sands. In experiments with fresh and biodegraded oil-wet sand, the addition of 1 per cent asphaltene increased σ' and σ'' with the biodegraded oil showing the highest magnitude. Asphaltenes are the most dipolar fraction of crude oil and increase in concentration with increasing biodegradation. Asphaltene creates a surface charge due to the ionization and complexation reactions of functional groups at interfaces. Therefore, the enhancement in the conduction and polarization observed with the biodegraded oil-wetted sands may be due to the increase in polar components (e.g. asphaltene) from the biodegradation process and the interactions of the polar components with the surfaces of water and mineral grains. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of other components in biodegraded oil such as resins, trace metals, biogenic metallic minerals (e.g. magnetite) and organic

  10. Sequential biodegradation of TNT, RDX and HMX in a mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagi-Ben Moshe, S. [Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Ronen, Z., E-mail: zeevrone@bgu.ac.i [Dept. of Environmental Hydrology and Microbiology, Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel); Dahan, O.; Weisbrod, N. [Dept. of Environmental Hydrology and Microbiology, Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel); Groisman, L. [Research Laboratory of Water Quality, National Public Health Laboratory, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 8255, Tel-Aviv 61080 (Israel); Adar, E. [Dept. of Environmental Hydrology and Microbiology, Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel); Nativ, R. [Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2009-08-15

    We describe TNT's inhibition of RDX and HMX anaerobic degradation in contaminated soil containing indigenous microbial populations. Biodegradation of RDX or HMX alone was markedly faster than their degradation in a mixture with TNT, implying biodegradation inhibition by the latter. The delay caused by the presence of TNT continued even after its disappearance and was linked to the presence of its intermediate, tetranitroazoxytoluene. PCR-DGGE analysis of cultures derived from the soil indicated a clear reduction in microbial biomass and diversity with increasing TNT concentration. At high-TNT concentrations (30 and 90 mg/L), only a single band, related to Clostridium nitrophenolicum, was observed after 3 days of incubation. We propose that the mechanism of TNT inhibition involves a cytotoxic effect on the RDX- and HMX-degrading microbial population. TNT inhibition in the top active soil can therefore initiate rapid transport of RDX and HMX to the less active subsurface and groundwater. - TNT and its metabolites are cytotoxic for RDX and HMX-degrading bacteria in polluted soil.

  11. Sequential biodegradation of TNT, RDX and HMX in a mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe TNT's inhibition of RDX and HMX anaerobic degradation in contaminated soil containing indigenous microbial populations. Biodegradation of RDX or HMX alone was markedly faster than their degradation in a mixture with TNT, implying biodegradation inhibition by the latter. The delay caused by the presence of TNT continued even after its disappearance and was linked to the presence of its intermediate, tetranitroazoxytoluene. PCR-DGGE analysis of cultures derived from the soil indicated a clear reduction in microbial biomass and diversity with increasing TNT concentration. At high-TNT concentrations (30 and 90 mg/L), only a single band, related to Clostridium nitrophenolicum, was observed after 3 days of incubation. We propose that the mechanism of TNT inhibition involves a cytotoxic effect on the RDX- and HMX-degrading microbial population. TNT inhibition in the top active soil can therefore initiate rapid transport of RDX and HMX to the less active subsurface and groundwater. - TNT and its metabolites are cytotoxic for RDX and HMX-degrading bacteria in polluted soil.

  12. Biodegradation of organic chemicals at environmentally relevant concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the estuary of the river Elbe as well as in the North and Baltic Sea, the mineralization of some chemicals in low concentrations by natural microbial communities in water and sediment samples was studied. The following substances were examined: 4-nitrophenol, 2-nitrophenol, phenol, diethylene glycole (DEG), ethylendiamine-tetraacetate (EDTA), thiourea (THIO), 4-chloraniline, 4-naphthalene-1,5-disulfonic acid (NDSS), 2,4,6-trichlorphenol (TCP) and tetrapropylenebenzenesulfonic acid (TPBS). The three first phenolic substances can be biodegraded relatively easy in eutrophicated or already chemically polluted aquatic habitats. In marine habitats there was either no degradation of these substances of it was slow, incomplete or an acclimation period was observed. DEG, THIO and chloraniline often showed longer turnover times at different stations than the phenols. The biodegradability of these substances differed strongly between habitats. EDTA was not mineralized for more than 20%. NDSS, TCP and TPBS were not degraded by natural microbial communities. (orig.). 86 refs., 14 tabs., 38 figs

  13. Biodegradable polyurethane nanocomposites containing dexamethasone for ocular route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues da Silva, Gisele [Federal University of Sao Joao Del Rei, School of Pharmacy, Divinopolis, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Silva-Cunha, Armando da [Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Pharmacy, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Behar-Cohen, Francine [INSERM, Physiopathology of ocular diseases: Therapeutic innovations, Institut des Cordeliers, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Innovations Therapeutiques, Fondation Rothschild, Paris (France); Universite Rene Descartes, Hotel Dieu University Hospital, Paris (France); Ayres, Eliane [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Orefice, Rodrigo L., E-mail: rorefice@demet.ufmg.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2011-03-12

    The treatment of posterior segment ocular diseases, such as uveitis, by using eye drops and oral drugs is usually not effective due to the body's natural barriers to drug penetration. In this study, ocular implants to treat uveitis were synthesized by incorporating dexamethasone acetate, an important type of corticoid used in the treatment of some uveitis, into a biodegradable polyurethane containi clay nanoparticles. Biodegradable polyurethane nanocomposites having poly(caprolactone) oligomers as soft segments were obtained by delaminating clay particles within a polyurethane aqueous dispersion. The drug was incorporated into the polymer by dispersing it in the waterborne polyurethane followed by a drying step. Nanoparticles derived from clay were demonstrated to be able to tailor the mechanical properties of polyurethanes to achieve values that can match the properties of ocular soft tissues. Infrared spectra (FTIR) showed that the presence of clay particles was able to change the microphase separation process typical of polyurethanes. X-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results were explored to show that the incorporation of both dexamethasone acetate and nanocomponents derived from clay led to a less defined two-phase polyurethane. The presence of clay nanoparticles increased the rate of drug release measured in vitro. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) were cultured in contact with polyurethanes and polyurethane nanocomposites, and the viability of them (evaluated by using MTT assay after 7 days) showed that no toxic components were released from polyurethanes containing no drugs during the test.

  14. Biodegradation of Complex Bacteria on Phenolic Derivatives in River Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANG-HUA LU; CHAO WANG; ZHE SUN

    2009-01-01

    Objective To isolate, incubate, and identify 4-chlorophenol-degrading complex bacteria, determine the tolerance of these bacteria to phenolic derivatives and study their synergetic metabolism as well as the aboriginal microbes and co-metabolic degradation of mixed chlorophenols in river water. Methods Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicants. Biodegradability of phenolic derivatives was determined by adding 4-chlorophenol-degrading bacteria in river water. Results The complex bacteria were identified as Mycopiana, Alcaligenes, Pseudvmonas, and Flavobacterium. The domesticated complex bacteria were more tolerant to phenolic derivatives than the aboriginal bacteria from Qinhuai River. The biodegradability of chlorophenols, dihydroxybenzenes and nitrophenols under various aquatic conditions was determined and compared. The complex bacteria exhibited a higher metabolic efficiency on chemicals than the aboriginal microbes, and the final removal rate of phenolic derivatives was increased at least by 55% when the complex bacteria were added into river water. The metabolic relationship between dominant mixed bacteria and river bacteria was studied. Conclusion The complex bacteria domesticated by 4-chlorophenol can grow and be metabolized to take other chlorophenols, dihydroxybenzenes and nitrophenols as the sole carbon and energy source. There is a synergetic metabolism of most compounds between the aboriginal microbes in river water and the domesticated complex bacteria. 4-chlorophenol-degrading bacteria can co-metabolize various chlorophenols in river water.

  15. Biodegradable polyoxyethylenated pentaerythritol quaternary esters as oil spill dispersants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Abdel-Raouf, Manar [Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, Cairo (Egypt). Petroleum Application Dept.

    2012-03-15

    Four polyoxyethylenated pentaerythritol (PE) ester surfactants have been synthesized. The molecular weights of these surfactants were calculated and evaluated experimentally by GPC and confirmed by calculations based on {sup 1}H-NMR. Also, their HLB values were calculated by Griffin formula. The surface tension and thermodynamic properties of the surfactants were obtained from surface tension measurements at different temperatures (298-318 K). It was found that the minimum area/surfactant molecule (A{sub min}) for the investigated surfactants increased with increasing the molecular weight of the incorporated ethylene oxide. The thermodynamic parameters of micellization ({delta}G{sub mic,} {delta}H{sub mic} and {delta}S{sub mic}) and that for adsorption ({delta}G{sub ad,} {delta}H{sub ad} and {delta}S{sub ad}) were also calculated. The more negative Gibbs free energy of adsorption values than those of micellization suggest that these surfactants favor adsorption than micellization. This finding is utilized for monitoring their dispersancy power. It was found that the water solubility of the prepared surfactants is correlated to their HLB values. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the prepared compounds was studied at different conditions in order to investigate their usability as oil spill dispersants. The data revealed that PE200-C12 had maximum dispersion efficiency and it was completely biodegraded after 8 days. (orig.)

  16. Enzymatic remediated biodegradation of propylene glycol 1,2-dinitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, M.; Geelhaar, L.; Speedie, M.K. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Two bacterial species, Enterobacter agglomerans and Bacillus thuringiensis/cereus, which were selected from nitroglycerin (GTN) contaminated soil, have previously been shown to have denitrating ability on nitroglycerin. This abstract presents the investigation of the cell free extracts from both microorganisms for the degradation of another nitrate ester contaminant; propylene glycol 1,2-dinitrate (PGDN). This compound has been previously considered resistant to the biodegradation. In order to probe the pathway, the whole process was monitored by using [1-{sup 14}C]-PGDN as substrate and the intermediates were identified by HPLC and TLC chromatography. Long term biodegradation experiments have shown that the enzymes in the cytoplasm fraction of Bacillus thuringiensis/cereus and the membrane fraction of Enterobacter agglomerans convert PGDN successively into propylene glycol 1-mononitrate (1-PGMN) and propylene glycol 2-mononitrate (2-PGMN), and finally, propylene glycol. The capacity to achieve sequential and complete degradation of PGDN implies that it follows a similar mechanism to that observed in the GTN degradation. Cofactor requirements for PGDN breakdown have been studied, it was found that no dissociable, dialyzable cofactors are required.

  17. Hopane, a new chemical tool for measuring oil biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to determine the fate of spilled oil in the environment is critically dependent on an understanding of natural oil degradation processes. Immediately after an oil spill, physical weathering such as evaporation, dispersion and solubilization alter the chemical, physical, and toxicological properties of the spilled product. After this initial weathering, microbial degradation is the principal route for the eventual removal of oil from the environment. A joint Bioremediation Monitoring Program employed a novel approach in characterizing and quantifying the rate of oil biodegradation on selected beaches of Prince William Sound. Hopanes, a class of polycyclic alkanes that are water-insoluble and extremely resistant to biodegradation, were used as an internal oil reference to quantify the depletion of crude oil and its individual components in oiled beach sediments. The depletions of total oil and individual oil components were calculated relative to 30 percent depleted Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a reference material that approximates the composition of the spilled oil that landed on the beaches. In this paper, traditional weathering indicators such as C18/phytane, C17/pristane, and the aromatic weathering ratio were compared to the hopane oil degradation indicator

  18. Influence of oxidation on fulvic acids composition and biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyatnyk, Ivan; Świetlik, Joanna; Raczyk-Stanisławiak, Ursula; Dąbrowska, Agata; Klymenko, Nataliya; Nawrocki, Jacek

    2013-08-01

    Oxidation is well-known process of transforming natural organic matter during the treatment of drinking water. Chlorine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide are common oxidants used in water treatment technologies for this purpose. We studied the influence of different doses of these oxidants on by-products formation and changes in biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of fulvic acids (FA) with different BDOC content. Chlorination did not significantly change the MWD of FA and disinfection by-products formation. However, higher molecular weight compounds, than those in the initial FA, were formed. It could be a result of chlorine substitution into the FA structure. Chlorine dioxide oxidized FA stronger than chlorine. During ozonation of FA, we found the highest increase of BDOD due to the formation of a high amount of organic acids and aldehydes. FA molecules were transformed into a more biodegradable form. Ozonation is the most preferable process among those observed for pre-treatment of FA before biofiltration. PMID:23746389

  19. Comparison of Aerobic and Anaerobic Biodegradation of Sugarcane Vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, V T; Araújo, T A; Amaral, M C S

    2015-07-01

    Vinasse is the main liquid waste from ethanol production, and it has a considerable pollution potential. Biological treatment is a promising alternative to reduce its organic load. The aim of this study was to analyze the biodegradation of sugarcane juice vinasse in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The content of carbohydrates, proteins and volatile fatty acids was evaluated. Vinasse samples showed a high biodegradability (>96.5 %) and low percentage of inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) (<3.2 %) in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rates of substrate utilization were slightly higher in aerobic reactors, but COD stabilization occurred simultaneously in the anaerobic reactors, confirming its suitability for anaerobic digestion. Inert COD in anaerobic conditions was lower than in aerobic conditions. On the other hand, COD from metabolic products in the anaerobic reactors was higher than in the aerobic ones, indicating an increased release of soluble microbial products (SMPs) by anaerobic microorganisms. The results indicated that carbohydrates were satisfactorily degraded and protein-like substances were the major components remaining after biological degradation of vinasse. PMID:25957273

  20. Biodegradable Mg corrosion and osteoblast cell culture studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium (Mg) is a biodegradable metal that has significant potential advantages as an implant material. In this paper, corrosion and cell culture experiments were performed to evaluate the biocompatibility of Mg. The corrosion current and potential of a Mg disk were measured in different physiological solutions including deionized (DI) water, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and McCoy's 5A culture medium. The corrosion currents in the PBS and in the McCoy's 5A-5% FBS media were found to be higher than in DI water, which is expected because corrosion of Mg occurs faster in a chloride solution. Weight loss, open-circuit potential, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were also performed. The Mg specimens were also characterized using an environmental scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). The X-ray analysis showed that in the cell culture media a passive interfacial layer containing oxygen, chloride, phosphate, and potassium formed on the samples. U2OS cells were then co-cultured with a Mg specimen for up to one week. Cytotoxicity results of magnesium using MTT assay and visual observation through cell staining were not significantly altered by the presence of the corroding Mg sample. Further, bone tissue formation study using von Kossa and alkaline phosphatase staining indicates that Mg may be suitable as a biodegradable implant material.

  1. Modeling Biodegradation and Reactive Transport: Analytical and Numerical Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y; Glascoe, L

    2005-06-09

    The computational modeling of the biodegradation of contaminated groundwater systems accounting for biochemical reactions coupled to contaminant transport is a valuable tool for both the field engineer/planner with limited computational resources and the expert computational researcher less constrained by time and computer power. There exists several analytical and numerical computer models that have been and are being developed to cover the practical needs put forth by users to fulfill this spectrum of computational demands. Generally, analytical models provide rapid and convenient screening tools running on very limited computational power, while numerical models can provide more detailed information with consequent requirements of greater computational time and effort. While these analytical and numerical computer models can provide accurate and adequate information to produce defensible remediation strategies, decisions based on inadequate modeling output or on over-analysis can have costly and risky consequences. In this chapter we consider both analytical and numerical modeling approaches to biodegradation and reactive transport. Both approaches are discussed and analyzed in terms of achieving bioremediation goals, recognizing that there is always a tradeoff between computational cost and the resolution of simulated systems.

  2. Solubilization and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in microemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.W.C.; Zhao, Z.Y.; Yang, J.; Wong, S.Y. [Hong Kong Baptist Univ., Hong Kong (China). Sino-Forest Applied Research Centre for Pearl River Delta Environment, Dept. of Biology

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using microemulsions to enhance the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Microemulsions are commonly used in soil washing as a means of enhancing the solubility of hydrophobic pollutants. The microemulsions were composed of Tween-80, 1-pentanol and linseed oil. Phenanthrene (PHE) was dissolved in dichloromethane and added to a glass vial. Microemulsions were added separately to the vials. A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) was used to determine PHE concentrations. The vials were inoculated with an isolated PAH degradative bacterium Bacillus subtilis B-UM. Soil collected from abandoned shipyards in Hong Kong were then spiked with the mixtures and aged for 3 months. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) analyses were conducted. Results of the study showed that a microemulsion composed of 0.4 Tween-80, 0.1 per cent 1-pentanol, and 0.05 linseed oil effectively enhanced the biodegradation of PHE in the aqueous phase. It was concluded that microemulsions can be used to remediate soils contaminated by PAHs. 26 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  3. The toxicity of oil-contaminated muskeg following biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current environmental criteria for the maximum allowable levels of hydrocarbons resulting from an oil spill assume that all detectable hydrocarbons are petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and do not account for naturally-occurring biogenic hydrocarbons (BHC). As such, some soils may be wrongfully assessed as being PHC contaminated. A false identification could lead to unnecessary and costly bioremediation that is potentially disruptive to functioning ecosystems. This study is part of a larger project to differentiate between natural and petroleum F3 hydrocarbons in muskeg material that has been impacted by an oil spill. The toxicity of oil-contaminated muskeg was examined following biodegradation in laboratory microcosms. Preliminary acute toxicity tests using locally purchased Sphagnum peat moss contaminated with Federated Crude oil had no effect on the survival of earthworms (Eisenia andrei), but springtails (Orthonychiurus folsomi) were more sensitive. Earthworm and springtail reproduction bioassays and a Northern wheatgrass (Elymus lanceolatus) growth bioassay was used to test the crude-oil-contaminated peat. All 3 test species will be used to test for reduced toxicity following biodegradation of Federated Crude oil-contaminated muskeg from northern Alberta under simulated conditions.

  4. Enhanced crude oil biodegradation in soil via biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Hassan, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Research on feasible methods for the enhancement of bioremediation in soil contaminated by crude oil is vital in oil-exporting countries such as Kuwait, where crude oil is a major pollutant and the environment is hostile to biodegradation. This study investigated the possibility of enhancing crude oil bioremediation by supplementing soil with cost-effective organic materials derived from two widespread locally grown trees, Conocarpus and Tamarix. Amendments in soils increased the counts of soil microbiota by up to 98% and enhanced their activity by up to 95.5%. The increase in the biodegradation of crude oil (75%) and high levels of alkB expression substantiated the efficiency of the proposed amendment technology for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. The identification of crude-oil-degrading bacteria revealed the dominance of the genus Microbacterium (39.6%), Sphingopyxis soli (19.3%), and Bordetella petrii (19.6%) in unamended, Conocarpus-amended, and Tamarix-amended contaminated soils, respectively. Although soil amendments favored the growth of Gram-negative bacteria and reduced bacterial diversity, the structures of bacterial communities were not significantly altered. PMID:26854134

  5. Characterization of Proteins in Filtrate from Biodegradation of Crop Residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Wileatha; Trotman, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Biodegradation of plant biomass is a feasible path for transformation of crop residue and recycling of nutrients for crop growth. The need to model the effects of factors associated with recycling of plant biomass resulting from hydroponic sweet potato production has led to investigation of natural soil isolates with the capacity for starch hydrolysis. This study sought to use nondenaturing gel electrophoresis to characterize the proteins present in filtered effluent from bioreactors seeded with starch hydrolyzing bacterial culture used in the biodegradation of senesced sweet potato biomass. The study determined the relative molecular weight of proteins in sampled effluent and the protein banding pattern was characterized. The protein profiles of effluent were similar for samples taken from independent runs under similar conditions of starch hydrolysis. The method can be used as a quality control tool for confirmation of starch hydrolysis of crop biomass. In addition, this method will allow monitoring for presence of contaminants within the system-protein profiles indicative of new enzymes in the bioreactors.

  6. Banana fiber-reinforced biodegradable soy protein composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rakesh Kumar; Veena Choudhary; Saroj Mishra; Ik Varma

    2008-01-01

    Banana fiber,a waste product of banana cultivation,has been used to prepare banana fiber reinforced soy protein composites. Alkali modified banana fibers were characterized in terms of density,denier and crystallinity index. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR),scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were also performed on the fibers. Soy protein composites were prepared by incorporating different volume fractions of alkali,treated and untreated fibers into soy protein isolate (SPI) with different amounts of glycerol (25%,50%) as plasticizer.Composites thus prepared were characterized in terms of mechanical properties,SEM and water resistance.The results indicate that at 0.3 volume fraction,tensile strength and modulus of alkali treated fiber reinforced soy protein composites increased to 82% and 963%,respectively,compared to soy protein film without fibers.Water resistance of the composites increased significantly with the addition of glutaraldehyde which acts as crosslinking agent. Biodegradability of the composites has also been tested in the contaminated environment and the composites were found to be 100% biodegradable.

  7. Biodegradation of Ochratoxin A for Food and Feed Decontamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Abrunhosa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is one of the most important mycotoxins that is found in food and feed products. It has proven toxic properties, being primarily known for its nephrotoxicity and carcinogenicity to certain animal species. OTA is produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium that can be found in a wide variety of agricultural products, which makes the presence of OTA in these products common. Many countries have statutory limits for OTA, and concentrations need to be reduced to as low as technologically possible in food and feed. The most important measures to be taken to control OTA are preventive in order to avoid fungal growth and OTA production. However, these measures are difficult to implement in all cases with the consequence of OTA remaining in agricultural commodities. Remediation processes are often used to eliminate, reduce or avoid the toxic effects of OTA. Biological methods have been considered increasingly as an alternative to physical and chemical treatments. However, examples of practical applications are infrequent. This review will focus on the (i known microorganisms and enzymes that are able to biodegrade OTA; (ii mode of action of biodegradation and (iii current applications. A critical discussion about the technical applicability of these strategies is presented.

  8. Biodegradable polyurethane nanocomposites containing dexamethasone for ocular route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of posterior segment ocular diseases, such as uveitis, by using eye drops and oral drugs is usually not effective due to the body's natural barriers to drug penetration. In this study, ocular implants to treat uveitis were synthesized by incorporating dexamethasone acetate, an important type of corticoid used in the treatment of some uveitis, into a biodegradable polyurethane containi clay nanoparticles. Biodegradable polyurethane nanocomposites having poly(caprolactone) oligomers as soft segments were obtained by delaminating clay particles within a polyurethane aqueous dispersion. The drug was incorporated into the polymer by dispersing it in the waterborne polyurethane followed by a drying step. Nanoparticles derived from clay were demonstrated to be able to tailor the mechanical properties of polyurethanes to achieve values that can match the properties of ocular soft tissues. Infrared spectra (FTIR) showed that the presence of clay particles was able to change the microphase separation process typical of polyurethanes. X-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results were explored to show that the incorporation of both dexamethasone acetate and nanocomponents derived from clay led to a less defined two-phase polyurethane. The presence of clay nanoparticles increased the rate of drug release measured in vitro. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) were cultured in contact with polyurethanes and polyurethane nanocomposites, and the viability of them (evaluated by using MTT assay after 7 days) showed that no toxic components were released from polyurethanes containing no drugs during the test.

  9. Electrical properties of starch-PVA biodegradable polymer blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, B.; Kulshrestha, N.; Gupta, P. N.

    2015-02-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte films were prepared by adding different contents of potassium chloride (KCl) in a polymer matrix composed of two versatile biodegradable polymers: starch and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), using the solution cast method. The complexation of the added salt (KCl) with the polymer matrix was confirmed from an x-ray diffraction study (XRD). The evolution of a smooth and uniform morphology with the increasing content of KCl was confirmed from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The transference number measurement established ions as the dominant charge carriers in the system. The maximum ionic conductivity ˜5.44 × 10-5 S cm-1 at ambient conditions was obtained for the film with 1.5 wt% of KCl using complex impedance spectroscopy. The ionic conductivity and dielectric constant increased with the salt content, thus affirming the amplification in the number of charge carriers. The noteworthy aspect of the investigation is the observation of appreciable ionic conductivity at a relatively low salt content. Low values of activation energy obtained from temperature-dependent ionic conductivity could be favorable from the point of view of the application. Electric modulus studies confirmed the absence of electrode polarization effects in the polymer electrolyte films. The scaling of the electric modulus shows a distribution of relaxation times in the polymer electrolyte films. The study unveils the efficiency of the starch-PVA blend, with glycerol and citric acid as additives, as a hopeful material for preparing biodegradable solid polymer electrolyte films.

  10. [Biodegradation under UV irradiation and microbial community changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Xia, Si-Qing; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yong-Ming

    2011-10-01

    Photolytic circulating-bed biofilm reactor (PCBBR) and internal loop photolytic-biological reactor (ILPBR) were respectively used for degradation of phenol, 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol (TCP) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX). Experimental results indicated that the rates of phenol, TCP and SMX removal by coupled photolysis with biodegradation (P&B) reached at 0.65, 0.11 and 0.17 mg x (L x min)(-1), which was clearly higher than that by photolysis alone (P), biodegradation alone (B), except phenol removal rate by B,which was similar to the rates by P&B. The COD removal percentages of phenol and TCP were 99.5% and 72.1%, and TOC removal percentage of SMX was 57.3, which all were higher that by P and B. The biofilms under UV irradiation were taken as samples for molecular biological analysis to get the significant results that microbial communities in biofilms took great change compared with that without UV irradiation, but they still kept bioactivity degrading organic pollutants. That is significant results for technological innovation on recalcitrant organic wastewater treatment. PMID:22279924

  11. Reprint of: The history of biodegradable magnesium implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Today, more than 200 years after the first production of metallic magnesium by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, biodegradable magnesium-based metal implants are currently breaking the paradigm in biomaterial science to develop only highly corrosion resistant metals. This groundbreaking approach to temporary metallic implants is one of the latest developments in biomaterials science that is being rediscovered. It is a challenging topic, and several secrets still remain that might revolutionize various biomedical implants currently in clinical use. Magnesium alloys were investigated as implant materials long ago. A very early clinical report was given in 1878 by the physician Edward C. Huse. He used magnesium wires as ligature for bleeding vessels. Magnesium alloys for clinical use were explored during the last two centuries mainly by surgeons with various clinical backgrounds, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and general surgery. Nearly all patients benefited from the treatment with magnesium implants. Although most patients experienced subcutaneous gas cavities caused by rapid implant corrosion, most patients had no pain and almost no infections were observed during the postoperative follow-up. This review critically summarizes the in vitro and in vivo knowledge and experience that has been reported on the use of magnesium and its alloys to advance the field of biodegradable metals. PMID:26235343

  12. Orthopaedic applications for PLA-PGA biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, K A; Agrawal, C M; Barber, F A; Burkhart, S S

    1998-10-01

    Biodegradable polymers, especially those belonging to the family of polylactic acid (PLA) and polyglycolic acid (PGA), play an increasingly important role in orthopaedics. These polymers degrade by hydrolysis and enzymatic activity and have a range of mechanical and physical properties that can be engineered appropriately to suit a particular application. Their degradation characteristics depend on several parameters including their molecular structure, crystallinity, and copolymer ratio. These biomaterials are also rapidly gaining recognition in the fledging field of tissue engineering because they can be fashioned into porous scaffolds or carriers of cells, extracellular matrix components, and bioactive agents. Although their future appears to be bright, several questions regarding the biocompatibility of these materials linger and should be addressed before their wide-scale use. In the context of musculoskeletal tissue, this report provides a comprehensive review of properties and applications of biodegradable PLA/PGA polymers and their copolymers. Of special interest are orthopaedic applications, biocompatibility studies, and issues of sterilization and storage of these versatile biomaterials. Also discussed is the fact that terms such as PLA, PGA, or PLA-PGA do not denote one material, but rather a large family of materials that have a wide range of differing bioengineering properties and concomitant biological responses. An analysis of some misconceptions, problems, and potential solutions is also provided. PMID:9788368

  13. BIODEGRADATION OF TEXTILE DYES BY Anabaena flos-aqual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigida Pimentel Villar de Queiroz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The pollution caused by dumping of toxic waste into the environment has resulted in impairment of essential natural resources such as water. With population growth and industries, the generation of waste increases substantially. Specifically, about 3,000 were commercial dyes to be carcinogenic and have no longer been manufactured, but in third world countries such as Brazil, some of these dyes high commercial value, are still in use. This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of biodegradation of dyes technical Drim CL 2 R Yellow and Blue Drim CL R. We tested the ability of degradation of these dyes by the cyanobacteria blue-green algae Anabaena flos-aqual. For this, their effectiveness in the degradation was evaluated in terms of discoloration spectrophotometrically. The blue dye was greater than R Drim CL degradation rate compared to the yellow dye Drim CL 2R. The species Anabaena flos-aqual achieved high degradation efficiency compared to blue dye, revealing a high potential applicability in processes of textile biodegradations in the county of Americana.

  14. Development of biodegradation kinetics for mixed substrate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed substrate systems are often encountered in pharmaceutical, food, wastewater processes and chemical manufacturing industries. In wastewater treatment systems, a number of organic compounds are present at the same time. In these cases it is inevitable that the toxic, or inhibitory substrates will be found in mixtures with nontoxic, or conventional wastes. In the presence of alternative carbon sources, a number of possible substrate interactions can occur. Extensive studies on biodegradation of single components have been conducted. However, there is insufficient information on the performance of biological treatment facilities for the removal of a specific chemical from wastewater, consisting of a mixture of organic pollutants. There is a strong need for extensive studies of multisubstrate systems. A broad data base will help to understand the interaction and removal rates of organic compounds in mixtures. These studies will also help to establish control mechanisms that regulate the relative utilization rates of mixtures. In this paper emphasis will be given on a comprehensive review of mechanisms, experimental methods, and modeling studies for biodegradation of mixed substrates. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  15. [Biodegradation of herbicide pendimethalin by fungi and its characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aijun; Zhu, Lusheng; Wang, Jun; Liu, Aiju; Sun, Ruilian

    2003-11-01

    Fungi, which can grow on and degrade pendimethalin, were isolated from activated sludge and soil. The biodegradation characterization in vitro was studied. The results showed that pendimethalin could be degraded by fungi, 16 fungi were isolated by enrichment culture, among which, 10 fungi could degrade more than 60% pendimethalin in 5 days in culture fluid. According to the physiological resistance and the capacity to degrade pendimethalin, three fungi were considered as efficiently degrading strains identified as Aspergillus terreus, Monilochaetes and Aspergillus furnigatus. The efficiency of degradation was affected by culture conditions such as pH, temperature, and concentration of cane sugar and pendimethanlin. The results showed that when the additional carbon source was 0.5%-1.0%, pH value was 6-8, and cultivated temperature was 20-30 degrees C, the growth amount of fungi and the degradation rate were enhanced. The fungi grew quickly, and the biodegradation rate was high under pendimethalin concentration being 100 mg.L-1. The removed amount of pendimethalin increased with increasing pendimethalin concentration. The optimal conditions were proposed, which could provide theoretic basis for prevention and control of pesticides pollution. PMID:14997649

  16. The toxicity of oil-contaminated muskeg following biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farwell, A.; Kelly-Hooper, F.; McAlear, J.; Sinnesael, K.; Dixon, D. [Waterloo Univ., Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The current environmental criteria for the maximum allowable levels of hydrocarbons resulting from an oil spill assume that all detectable hydrocarbons are petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and do not account for naturally-occurring biogenic hydrocarbons (BHC). As such, some soils may be wrongfully assessed as being PHC contaminated. A false identification could lead to unnecessary and costly bioremediation that is potentially disruptive to functioning ecosystems. This study is part of a larger project to differentiate between natural and petroleum F3 hydrocarbons in muskeg material that has been impacted by an oil spill. The toxicity of oil-contaminated muskeg was examined following biodegradation in laboratory microcosms. Preliminary acute toxicity tests using locally purchased Sphagnum peat moss contaminated with Federated Crude oil had no effect on the survival of earthworms (Eisenia andrei), but springtails (Orthonychiurus folsomi) were more sensitive. Earthworm and springtail reproduction bioassays and a Northern wheatgrass (Elymus lanceolatus) growth bioassay was used to test the crude-oil-contaminated peat. All 3 test species will be used to test for reduced toxicity following biodegradation of Federated Crude oil-contaminated muskeg from northern Alberta under simulated conditions.

  17. Electrical properties of starch-PVA biodegradable polymer blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid polymer electrolyte films were prepared by adding different contents of potassium chloride (KCl) in a polymer matrix composed of two versatile biodegradable polymers: starch and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), using the solution cast method. The complexation of the added salt (KCl) with the polymer matrix was confirmed from an x-ray diffraction study (XRD). The evolution of a smooth and uniform morphology with the increasing content of KCl was confirmed from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The transference number measurement established ions as the dominant charge carriers in the system. The maximum ionic conductivity ∼5.44 × 10−5 S cm−1 at ambient conditions was obtained for the film with 1.5 wt% of KCl using complex impedance spectroscopy. The ionic conductivity and dielectric constant increased with the salt content, thus affirming the amplification in the number of charge carriers. The noteworthy aspect of the investigation is the observation of appreciable ionic conductivity at a relatively low salt content. Low values of activation energy obtained from temperature-dependent ionic conductivity could be favorable from the point of view of the application. Electric modulus studies confirmed the absence of electrode polarization effects in the polymer electrolyte films. The scaling of the electric modulus shows a distribution of relaxation times in the polymer electrolyte films. The study unveils the efficiency of the starch-PVA blend, with glycerol and citric acid as additives, as a hopeful material for preparing biodegradable solid polymer electrolyte films. (paper)

  18. Biodegradation of phenanthrene in an anaerobic batch reactor: growth kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.S. Nasrollahzadeh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present research was to demonstrate the ability of mixed consortia of microorganisms to degrade high concentrations of phenanthrene (PHE as the sole carbon source. Batch experiments were carried out by the induction of mineral salt medium containing PHE to the seed culture and monitoring PHE biodegradation. The microbial propagation was conducted using PHE concentrations in the range of 20 to 100 mg/l. The microbial growth on PHE was defined based on Monod and modified Logistic rate models. The kinetic studies revealed that maximum specific growth rates (μm for PHE concentrations of 20, 50 and 100 mg/l were 0.12, 0.23 and 0.035 h-1, respectively. The doubling times for microbial population in PHE concentrations of 20, 50 and 100 mg/l were 13, 15 and 17.5 h, respectively. Also, maximum cell dry weight (xm of 54.23 mg/l was achieved, while the inhibition coefficient was 0.023 h-1. It was observed that the experimental data were well represented by the proposed models. It was also found that the biodegradation of PHE was successfully performed by the isolated strains.

  19. Biodegradation and biocompatibility of mechanically active magnetoelastic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetoelastic (ME) materials have many advantages for use as sensors and actuators due to their wireless, passive nature. This paper describes the application of ME materials as biodegradable implants with controllable degradation rates. Experiments have been conducted to show that degradation rates of ME materials are dependent on the material compositions. In addition, it was shown that the degradation rates of the ME materials can be controlled remotely by applying a magnetic field, which causes the ME materials to generate low-magnitude vibrations that hasten their degradation rates. Another concern of ME materials for medical applications is biocompatibility. Indirect cytotoxicity analyses were performed on two types of ME materials: Metglas™ 2826 MB (FeNiMoB) and iron–gallium alloy. While results indicate Metglas is not biocompatible, the degradation products of iron–gallium materials have shown no adverse effects on cell viability. Overall, these results present the possibility of using ME materials as biodegradable, magnetically-controlled active implants. (paper)

  20. Biodegradation of liquid coal tar in an aqueous bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal tar is a by-product of the coal gasification process used between 1820 and 1950 to produce a gasified fuel. This material contains numerous monoaromatic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) some of which are considered to be carcinogenic. Environmentally disposed coal tar can migrate downward through the soil leaving a light fraction floating on the groundwater, referred to here as liquid coal tar. This research was carried out to determine whether liquid coal tar recovered during site clean-up operations could be cost-effectively biodegraded. Preliminary aqueous microcosm experiments demonstrated that the liquid tar was not toxic to site bacteria in concentrations up to 220,000 ppm. Liquid tar was treated in a 15 liter laboratory bioreactor operated in a batch mode with gas phase oxygen as the oxygen source. Thirty-nine major constituents were followed during treatment. In the first 63 days of operation 87% of these compounds were biodegraded or transformed. 2-, 3-, and 4-ring PAH were degraded 89%, 90%, and 70% respectively. Of the volatile compounds 89% were degraded and only 0.7% were trapped on carbon during reactor off-gassing

  1. Performance of pulsed plate bioreactor for biodegradation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradation of phenol was carried out using Nocardia hydrocarbonoxydans immobilised on glass beads, in a pulsed plate bioreactor. The effect of operating parameters like frequency of pulsation and amplitude of pulsation on the performance of pulsed plate bioreactor for biodegradation of phenol in a synthetic wastewater containing 500 ppm phenol was studied. Axial concentration profile measurements revealed that the pulsed plate bioreactor shows continuous stirred tank behaviour. As the amplitude was increased, percentage degradation increased, reaching 100% at amplitude of 4.7 cm and higher. Introduction of pulsation is found to increase the percentage degradation. Percentage degradation has increased with increase in frequency and 100% degradation was achieved at 0.5 s-1 and above. Biofilms developed in a non-pulsed bioreactor were thicker than those in the pulsed plate bioreactor. But biofilm thickness remained almost constant with increasing frequency. Biofilm density was found to be influenced by pulsation. The time required to reach steady state was more for pulsed reactor than the non-pulsed reactor and this start-up time had increased with increase in frequency of pulsation. The performance studies reveal that the pulsed plate bioreactor with immobilized cells has the potential to be an efficient bioreactor for wastewater treatment

  2. Biodegradability and toxicity assessment of bleach plant effluents treated anaerobically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, T R; Botta, C M; Pires, E C

    2010-01-01

    As part of an experimental project on the treatment of bleach plant effluents the results of biodegradability and toxicity assessment of effluents from a bench-scale horizontal anaerobic immobilized bioreactor (HAIB) are discussed in this paper. The biodegradability of the bleach plant effluents from a Kraft pulp mill treated in the HAIB was evaluated using the modified Zahn-Wellens test. The inoculum came from a pulp mill wastewater treatment plant and the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was used as the indicator of organic matter removal. The acute and chronic toxicity removal during the anaerobic treatment was estimated using Daphnia similis and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii respectively. Moreover, the evaluation of chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleus frequencies (MN) and mitotic index (IM) in Allium cepa cells were used as genotoxicity indicators. The results indicate that the effluents from the anaerobic reactor are amenable to aerobic polishing. Acute and chronic toxicity were reduced by 90 and 81%, respectively. The largest CA and MN incidence in the meristematic cells of A. cepa were observed after exposure to the raw bleach plant effluent. The HAIB was able to reduce the acute and chronic toxicity as well as chromosome aberrations and the occurrence of micronucleus. PMID:20861545

  3. Toxicity and biodegradation of PCBs in contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PCBs represent a serious ecological problem due to their low degradability, high toxicity, and strong bioaccumulation. Because of many environmental and economical problems, there are efforts to develop bio-remediation technologies for decontamination of the PCB-polluted areas. PCB were used by storage of spent nuclear fuel in nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice. In the locality of the former producer of PCB - Chemko Strazske a. s. - big amount of these substances is still persisting in sediments and soil. The goal of this study was to analyze the contaminated sediments from Strazsky canal and Zemplinska Sirava water reservoir from several points of view. The study of eco-toxicity confirmed that both sediments were toxic for various tested organisms. The genotoxicity test has not proved the mutagenic effect. The subsequent step included microbiological analysis of the contaminated sediments and isolation of pure bacterial cultures capable of degrading PCBs. In order to determine the genetic potential for their biodegradability, the gene bphA1 was identified using PCR technique in their genomes. This gene codes the enzyme biphenyl-dioxygenase, which is responsible for PCB degradation. The final goal was to perform aerobic biodegradation of PCBs in the sediments. The bacteria present in both sediments are able to degrade certain low chlorinated congeners. The issue of biodiversity is still open and has to be studied to reveal the real cooperation between bacteria. (authors)

  4. Biodegradation of malathion by Bacillus licheniformis strain ML-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malathion, a well-known organophosphate pesticide, has been used in agriculture over the last two decades for controlling pests of economically important crops. In the present study, a single bacterium, ML-1, was isolated by soil-enrichment technique and identified as Bacillus licheniformis on the basis of the 16S rRNA technique. The bacterium was grown in carbon-free minimal salt medium (MSM and was found to be very efficient in utilizing malathion as the sole source of carbon. Biodegradation experiments were performed in MSM without carbon source to determine the malathion degradation by the selected strain, and the residues of malathion were determined quantitatively using HPLC techniques. Bacillus licheniformis showed very promising results and efficiently consumed malathion as the sole carbon source via malathion carboxylesterase (MCE, and about 78% malathion was degraded within 5 days. The carboxylesterase activity was determined by using crude extract while using malathion as substrate, and the residues were determined by HPLC. It has been found that the MCE hydrolyzed 87% malathion within 96 h of incubation. Characterization of crude MCE revealed that the enzyme is robust in nature in terms of organic solvents, as it was found to be stable in various concentrations of ethanol and acetonitrile. Similarly, and it can work in a wide pH and temperature range. The results of this study highlighted the potential of Bacillus licheniformis strain ML-1 as a biodegrader that can be used for the bioremediation of malathion-contaminated soil.

  5. Effect of biodegradable amendments on uranium solubility in contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duquene, L. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Environment Health and Safety, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)], E-mail: lduquene@sckcen.be; Tack, F.; Meers, E. [Ghent University, Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Baeten, J. [Katholieke Hogeschool Kempen, Departement of Health-Care and Chemistry, Kleinhoefstraat 4, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Wannijn, J.; Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Environment Health and Safety, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2008-02-25

    Chelate-assisted phytoextraction has been proposed as a potential tool for phytoremediation of U contaminated sites. In this context, the effects of five biodegradable amendments on U release in contaminated soils were evaluated. Three soils were involved in this study, one with a relatively high background level of U, and two which were contaminated with U from industrial effluents. Soils were treated with 5 mmol kg{sup -1} dry weight of either citric acid, NH{sub 4}-citrate/citric acid, oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid or nitrilotriacetic acid. Soil solution concentration of U was monitored during 2 weeks. All amendments increased U concentration in soil solution, but citric acid and NH{sub 4}-citrate/citric acid mixture were most effective, with up to 479-fold increase. For oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid, the increase ranged from 10-to 100-fold. The highest concentrations were observed 1 to 7 days after treatment, after which U levels in soil solution gradually decreased. All amendments induced a temporary increase of soil solution pH and TOC that could not be correlated with the release of U in the soil solution. Thermodynamic stability constants (log K) of complexes did not predict the relative efficiency of the selected biodegradable amendments on U release in soil solution. Amendments efficiency was better predicted by the relative affinity of the chelate for Fe compared to U.

  6. Effect of biodegradable amendments on uranium solubility in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquène, L; Tack, F; Meers, E; Baeten, J; Wannijn, J; Vandenhove, H

    2008-02-25

    Chelate-assisted phytoextraction has been proposed as a potential tool for phytoremediation of U contaminated sites. In this context, the effects of five biodegradable amendments on U release in contaminated soils were evaluated. Three soils were involved in this study, one with a relatively high background level of U, and two which were contaminated with U from industrial effluents. Soils were treated with 5 mmol kg(-1) dry weight of either citric acid, NH(4)-citrate/citric acid, oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid or nitrilotriacetic acid. Soil solution concentration of U was monitored during 2 weeks. All amendments increased U concentration in soil solution, but citric acid and NH(4)-citrate/citric acid mixture were most effective, with up to 479-fold increase. For oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid, the increase ranged from 10-to 100-fold. The highest concentrations were observed 1 to 7 days after treatment, after which U levels in soil solution gradually decreased. All amendments induced a temporary increase of soil solution pH and TOC that could not be correlated with the release of U in the soil solution. Thermodynamic stability constants (log K) of complexes did not predict the relative efficiency of the selected biodegradable amendments on U release in soil solution. Amendments efficiency was better predicted by the relative affinity of the chelate for Fe compared to U. PMID:18061243

  7. An efficient magnetically modified microbial cell biocomposite for carbazole biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yufei; Du, Xiaoyu; Wu, Chao; Liu, Xueying; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic modification of microbial cells enables to prepare smart biocomposites in bioremediation. In this study, we constructed an efficient biocomposite by assembling Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto the surface of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells. The average particle size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was about 20 nm with 45.5 emu g-1 saturation magnetization. The morphology of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells before and after Fe3O4 nanoparticle loading was verified by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. Compared with free cells, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite had the same biodegradation activity but exhibited remarkable reusability. The degradation activity of the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite increased gradually during recycling processes. Additionally, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite could be easily separated and recycled by an external magnetic field due to the super-paramagnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticle coating. These results indicated that magnetically modified microbial cells provide a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the biodegradation of hazardous compounds.

  8. Preparation and Characteristics of Biodegradable Polyurethane/Clay Nanocomposite Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Woo [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Biodegradable polyurethane (PU)/clay nanocomposite films were prepared via extrusion compounding process followed by casting film process. Organically modified montmorillonite (denoted as C30B) with a large amount of hydroxyl groups on its surface was used for the formation of strong bonding with PU resin. From both XRD analysis and TEM observations, the intercalated and exfoliated structure, and dispersion state of silicate platelets in the compounded nanocomposite films were confirmed. In addition, the rheological and tensile properties, optical transparency, oxygen permeability of the prepared nanocomposites were investigated as a function of added nanoclay content, and moreover based on these results, the correlation between the morphology and the resulting properties of the nanocomposites could be presented. The inclusion of nanoclays at appropriate content resulted in remarkable improvement in the nanocomposite performance including tensile modulus, elongation, transparency, and oxygen barrier property, however at excess amount of nanoclays, reduction or very slight increase was observed due to poor dispersion. The biodegradability of the prepared nanocomposite film was evaluated by examining the deterioration in the barrier and tensile properties during degradation period under compost.

  9. Biodegradation of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate by Mycobacterium austroafricanum IFP 2173

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compounds such as 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (2-EHN) are added to diesel fuel to improve ignition and boost cetane number. The production of 2-EHN reaches around 100000 tons per year in France, principally. Risks associated to its utilization are however poorly known because, in case of accidental release in the environment, nothing is known about its biodegradation. In this study, we aimed at (i) identifying bacterial strains able to degrade 2-EHN and compare their capabilities, (ii) elucidating the degradation pathway, and (iii) identifying the enzymes involved. Biodegradation of 2-EHN was first tested in biphasic cultures under conditions that reduce the toxicity and increase the availability of the hydrophobic substrate. Using optimized culture conditions, we showed that several strains of Mycobacterium austroafricanum were able to degrade 2-EHN. One of the most efficient strain (IFP 2173) which could grow at 2-EHN concentrations up to 6 g.L-1, was chosen to investigate the degradation pathway. On the basis of carbon balance determination and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis on the culture medium, I found that the degradation of 2-EHN was incomplete and gave rise to the accumulation of a metabolite. This metabolite was identified as β-methyl-γ-butyrolactone by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS analysis. The structure of the lactone indicated that 2-EHN was degraded through a pathway involving the hydroxylation of the methyl group of the main carbon chain, its oxidation into aldehyde an acid and a subsequent cycle of b-oxidation. Enzymes involved in the 2-EHN biodegradation pathway were looked for by a proteomic approach. Analyses by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that, when exposed to 2-EHN, strain IFP 2173 triggered the synthesis of a bunch of enzymes specialized in fatty acid metabolism such as β-oxidation enzymes, as well as alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. An exhaustive analysis of the IFP 2173 proteome resulted in the identification of more than 200

  10. Development of biodegradable magnesium alloy stents with coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Petrini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable stents are attracting the attention of many researchers in biomedical and materials research fields since they can absolve their specific function for the expected period of time and then gradually disappear. This feature allows avoiding the risk of long-term complications such as restenosis or mechanical instability of the device when the vessel grows in size in pediatric patients. Up to now biodegradable stents made of polymers or magnesium alloys have been proposed. However, both the solutions have limitations. The polymers have low mechanical properties, which lead to devices that cannot withstand the natural contraction of the blood vessel: the restenosis appears just after the implant, and can be ascribed to the compliance of the stent. The magnesium alloys have much higher mechanical properties, but they dissolve too fast in the human body. In this work we present some results of an ongoing study aiming to the development of biodegradable stents made of a magnesium alloy that is coated with a polymer having a high corrosion resistance. The mechanical action on the blood vessel is given by the magnesium stent for the desired period, being the stent protected against fast corrosion by the coating. The coating will dissolve in a longer term, thus delaying the exposition of the magnesium stent to the corrosive environment. We dealt with the problem exploiting the potentialities of a combined approach of experimental and computational methods (both standard and ad-hoc developed for designing magnesium alloy, coating and scaffold geometry from different points of views. Our study required the following steps: i selection of a Mg alloy suitable for stent production, having sufficient strength and elongation capability; ii computational optimization of the stent geometry to minimize stress and strain after stent deployment, improve scaffolding ability and corrosion resistance; iii development of a numerical model for studying stent

  11. Biodegradation of vapor-phase toluene in unsaturated porous media: Column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ali M; Wick, Lukas Y; Harms, Hauke; Thullner, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradation of organic chemicals in the vapor phase of soils and vertical flow filters has gained attention as promising approach to clean up volatile organic compounds (VOC). The drivers of VOC biodegradation in unsaturated systems however still remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the processes controlling aerobic VOC biodegradation in a laboratory setup mimicking the unsaturated zone above a shallow aquifer. The setup allowed for diffusive vapor-phase transport and biodegradation of three VOC: non-deuterated and deuterated toluene as two compounds of highly differing biodegradability but (nearly) identical physical and chemical properties, and MTBE as (at the applied experimental conditions) non-biodegradable tracer and internal control. Our results showed for toluene an effective microbial degradation within centimeter VOC transport distances despite high gas-phase diffusivity. Degradation rates were controlled by the reactivity of the compounds while oxic conditions were found everywhere in the system. This confirms hypotheses that vadose zone biodegradation rates can be extremely high and are able to prevent the outgassing of VOC to the atmosphere within a centimeter range if compound properties and site conditions allow for sufficiently high degradation rates. PMID:26774779

  12. Biodegradation of polystyrene-graft-starch copolymers in three different types of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Vladimir; Velickovic, Sava; Popovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Materials based on polystyrene and starch copolymers are used in food packaging, water pollution treatment, and textile industry, and their biodegradability is a desired characteristic. In order to examine the degradation patterns of modified, biodegradable derivates of polystyrene, which may keep its excellent technical features but be more environmentally friendly at the same time, polystyrene-graft-starch biomaterials obtained by emulsion polymerization in the presence of new type of initiator/activator pair (potassium persulfate/different amines) were subjected to 6-month biodegradation by burial method in three different types of commercially available soils: soil rich in humus and soil for cactus and orchid growing. Biodegradation was monitored by mass decrease, and the highest degradation rate was achieved in soil for cactus growing (81.30%). Statistical analysis proved that microorganisms in different soil samples have different ability of biodegradation, and there is a significant negative correlation between the share of polystyrene in copolymer and degree of biodegradation. Grafting of polystyrene on starch on one hand prevents complete degradation of starch that is present (with maximal percentage of degraded starch ranging from 55 to 93%), while on the other hand there is an upper limit of share of polystyrene in the copolymer (ranging from 37 to 77%) that is preventing biodegradation of degradable part of copolymers. PMID:24792982

  13. Biodegradation of New Polymer Foundry Binders for the Example of the Composition Polyacrylic Acid/Starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Grabowska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The investigations on the biodegradation process pathway of the new polymer binders for the example of water soluble compositionpolyacrylic acid/starch are presented in the hereby paper. Degradation was carried out in water environment and in a soil. Thedetermination of the total oxidation biodegradation in water environment was performed under laboratory conditions in accordance with the static water test system (Zahn-Wellens method, in which the mixture undergoing biodecomposition contained inorganic nutrient,activated sludge and the polymer composition, as the only carbon and energy source. The biodecomposition progress of the polymercomposition sample in water environment was estimated on the basis of the chemical oxygen demand (COD measurements and thedetermination the biodegradation degree, Rt, during the test. These investigations indicated that the composition polyacrylic acid/starchconstitutes the fully biodegradable material in water environment. The biodegradation degree Rt determined in the last 29th day of the test duration achieved 65%, which means that the investigated polymer composition can be considered to be fully biodegradable.During the 6 months biodegradation process of the cross-linked sample of the polymer composition in a garden soil several analysis ofsurface and structural changes, resulting from the sample decomposition, were performed. Those were: thermal analyses (TG-DSC,structural analyses (Raman spectroscopy and microscopic analyses (optical microscopy, AFM.

  14. Influence of biodegradation on benzocarbazole distri-butions in reservoired oils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Partition coefficient difference of benzocarba-zole isomers between oil, water and mineral phase makes them auseful indicator to quantify petroleum migration distance. Because of their nitrogen-heteroatom andannelated aromatic cycles they are generally regarded asbeing more resistant and the effects of biodegradation ontheir concentrations and distributions have not previouslybeen investigated. Reservoir extracts from three wells lo-cated in the Leng43 block of the Liaohe Basin were analyzed to investigate their occurrence and the effect of biodegrada-tion. Both hydrocarbon biomarkers and benzocarbazole isomers show systematical changes with the increase extent of biodegradation in study columns. Carbazole compounds may be biodegraded in a similar way to that observed in aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The distance from oil water contact is a primary control factor for biodegradation. The concentrations of benzocarbazole isomers show a slight increase in the upper part of the columns then a sharp de-crease towards oil water contact (OWC). Among three iso-mers benzo[a]carbazole seems more susceptible to biode-gradation than other two isomers and benzo[b]carbazole has higher ability to res ist bacterial attack. Benzo[b]carba-zole/benzo- [a]carbazole ratios can sensitively indicate the degree of biodegradation and the benzocarbazole index (BCratio) cannot be directly used as a migration indicator inbiodegraded oils.

  15. Aerobic biodegradation of a mixture of monosubstituted phenols in a sequencing batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Aerobic biodegradation of a mixture of p-nitrophenol and o-cresol is feasible. • Simultaneous biodegradation of p-nitrophenol and o-cresol was achieved at long-term. • o-Chlorophenol caused complete failure of the sequencing batch reactor. • Biomass had good settling properties although no mature granules were obtained. • p-Nitrophenol is believed to be responsible for granulation failure. -- Abstract: A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was inoculated with p-nitrophenol-degrading activated sludge to biodegrade a mixture of monosubstituted phenols: p-nitrophenol (PNP), PNP and o-cresol; and PNP, o-cresol and o-chlorophenol. Settling times were progressively decreased to promote biomass granulation. PNP was completely biodegraded. The PNP and o-cresol mixture was also biodegraded although some transitory accumulation of intermediates occurred (mainly hydroquinone and catechol). o-Chlorophenol was not biodegraded and resulted in inhibition of o-cresol and PNP biodegradation and complete failure of the SBR within a few days. The biomass had very good settling properties when a settling time of 1 min was applied: sludge volume index (SVI5) below 50 mL g−1, SVI5/SVI30 ratio of 1 and average particle size of 200 μm

  16. Effect of an acid filler on hydrolysis and biodegradation of poly-lactic acid (PLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzino, Valentina; Speranza, Vito; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The use of biodegradable polymers is certainly an excellent strategy to solve many of the problems related to the disposal of the traditional polymers, whose accumulation in the environment is harmful and damaging. In order to optimize the use of biodegradable polymers, it is very important to understand and control the transformation processes, the structures and the morphologies resulting from the process conditions used to produce the articles and, not least, the biodegradation. The latter is strictly dependent on the just mentioned variables. The poly-lactic acid, PLA, is a biodegradable polymer. Many studies have been carried out on the degradation process of this polymer. In the course of this work we performed degradation tests on the PLA, with a specific D-isomer content, having amorphous structure, and in particular of biodegradation and hydrolysis. An acid chemical, fumaric acid, was added to PLA with the objective of controlling the rate of hydrolysis and of biodegradation. The hydrolysis process was followed, as function of time, by means of different techniques: pH variation, variation of weight of samples and variation of crystallinity degree and glass transition temperature using DSC analysis. The samples were also analyzed in terms of biodegradability by means of a homemade respirometer apparatus, in controlled composting conditions.

  17. Kinetics and thermodynamics of biodegradation of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide under anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanmei; Bao, Mutai; Yan, Miao; Lu, Jinren

    2016-09-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) biodegradation in anaerobic and aerobic activated sludge biochemical treatment systems were explored to determine the maximum rate and feasibility of HPAM biodegradation. The optimal nutrient proportions for HPAM biodegradation were determined to be 0.08g·L(-1) C6H12O6, 1.00g·L(-1) NH4Cl, 0.36g·L(-1) NaH2PO4 and 3.00g·L(-1) K2HPO4 using response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the kinetics, the maximum HPAM biodegradation rates were 16.43385mg·L(-1)·d(-1) and 2.463mg·L(-1)·d(-1) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The activation energy (Ea) of the aerobic biodegradation was 48.9897kJ·mol(-1). Entropy changes (ΔS) of biochemical treatment system decreased from 216.21J·K(-1) to 2.39J·K(-1). Thermodynamic windows of opportunity for HPAM biodegradation were drawn. And it demonstrated HPAM was biodegraded into acetic acid and CO2 under laboratory conditions. Growth-process equations for functional bacteria anaerobically grown on polyacrylic acid were constructed and it confirmed electron equivalence between substrate and product. PMID:27235971

  18. Biodegradability of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) film grafted with vinyl acetate: Effect of grafting and saponification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl acetate (VAc) onto poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) film was carried out. At a degree of grafting higher than 5%, the grafted films (PHB-g-VAc) completely lost the enzymatic degradability that is characteristic of PHB due to the grafted VAc covering the surface of the PHB film. However, the biodegradability of the PHB-g-VAc films was recovered when the films were saponified in alkali solution under optimum conditions. Graft chains of the PHB-g-VAc film reacted selectively to become biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The biodegradability of the saponified PHB-g-VAc film increased rapidly with time

  19. Biodegradability of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) film grafted with vinyl acetate: Effect of grafting and saponification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yuki; Seko, Noriaki; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Tamada, Masao; Kasuya, Ken-ichi; Mitomo, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl acetate (VAc) onto poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) film was carried out. At a degree of grafting higher than 5%, the grafted films (PHB-g-VAc) completely lost the enzymatic degradability that is characteristic of PHB due to the grafted VAc covering the surface of the PHB film. However, the biodegradability of the PHB-g-VAc films was recovered when the films were saponified in alkali solution under optimum conditions. Graft chains of the PHB-g-VAc film reacted selectively to become biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The biodegradability of the saponified PHB-g-VAc film increased rapidly with time.

  20. Biodegradability of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) film grafted with vinyl acetate: Effect of grafting and saponification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Yuki [Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)]. E-mail: wada.yuki@jaea.go.jp; Seko, Noriaki [Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nagasawa, Naotsugu [Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Tamada, Masao [Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kasuya, Ken-ichi [Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Mitomo, Hiroshi [Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl acetate (VAc) onto poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) film was carried out. At a degree of grafting higher than 5%, the grafted films (PHB-g-VAc) completely lost the enzymatic degradability that is characteristic of PHB due to the grafted VAc covering the surface of the PHB film. However, the biodegradability of the PHB-g-VAc films was recovered when the films were saponified in alkali solution under optimum conditions. Graft chains of the PHB-g-VAc film reacted selectively to become biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The biodegradability of the saponified PHB-g-VAc film increased rapidly with time.

  1. Effectiveness and kinetics of hydrogen peroxide and nitrate-enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques are rapidly developing for insitu biodegradation processes of contaminations in lower water bearing formations. It is well known that underground biodegradation is limited by the lack of electron acceptors and nutrients. Hydrogen peroxide and nitrate are the most commonly applied electron acceptors to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils. This paper has two purposes. The first is to compare the effects and rates of degradation processes with hydrogen peroxide and nitrates as electron acceptors despite of differences in type of metabolism. The second is to develop a bioreactor system that allows consideration of the effects of mass transportation and evaluation of the overall kinetics for biodegradation processes in soils

  2. STUDY ON BIODEGRADABILITY OF POLY (3-HYDROXYBUTYRATE-co-3-HYDROXYVALERATE)/ORGANOPHILIC MONTMORILLONITE NANOCOMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shufang; SONG Cunjiang; CHEN Guangxin; LIU Jing; YANG Chao; ZHANG Xihui; GUO Tianying; ZHANG Banghua

    2004-01-01

    Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate)/Organophilic montmorillonite (PHBV/OMMT) nanocomposites were prepared and the biodegradability of the PHBV/OMMT nanocomposites was studied by a cultivation degrading method in soil suspension. The relationship between structure and biodegradability of PHBV/OMMT nanocomposites was investigated. The results showed that the biodegradability of PHBV/OMMT nanocomposites decreased with increasing amount of OMMT and it was related to the number of PHBV degrading microorganisms in degradation environment, the anti-microbial property of OMMT and the degree of crystallinity of the nanocomposites.

  3. The performance of ammonium exchanged zeolite for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons migrating in soil water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen deficiency has been identified as the main inhibiting factor for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in low nutrient environments. This study examines the performance of ammonium exchanged zeolite to enhance biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons migrating in soil water within laboratory scale flow cells. Biofilm formation and biodegradation were accelerated by the exchange of cations in soil water with ammonium in the pores of the exchanged zeolite when compared with natural zeolite flow cells. These results have implications for sequenced permeable reactive barrier design and the longevity of media performance within such barriers at petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites deficient in essential soil nutrients. PMID:27132074

  4. Biodegradation rate of shellac coated bovine hydroxyapatite for bone filler material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyono, Joko; Triyono, Susilowati, Endang; Murdiyantara, Suci Anindya

    2016-03-01

    This work reports on the effect of shellac coated hydroxyapatite (HA) on the biodegradation rate. The HA was processed from bovine bone. Shellac was derived from the resinous secretion of the lac insect. The aims of the addition of shellac solution is to know how the biodegradation rate material in the Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) solution. The four different of shellac solutions (2,5%; 5%; 7,5%; and 10% weight) coated HA scaffoldand one ratio as a control. It was concluded that the ability of biodegradation rate a materialwas not influenced by the ratio of shellac. All materials were biodegradedwhen they were soaked in PBS solution.

  5. Biodegradable packaging and edible coating for fresh-cut fruits and vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Galgano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on biodegradable packaging and edible coatings applied to fresh-cut fruits and vegetables and their effects on the product quality. Practical applications are mainly limited to the use of biodegradable materials that, however, do not allow full control of the product moisture loss. Better results can be achieved by the combined use of biodegradable packagings with edible coatings and recent research has shown that enrichment with silver montmorillonite nanoparticles may be a promising technique. However, the actual utilization of these materials is still limited, due to the high costs of the raw materials and the limited production.

  6. Microbial production of four biodegradable siderophores under submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazary, Ahmed E; Al-Shihri, Ayed S; Alfaifi, Mohammad Y; Saleh, Kamel A; Alshehri, Mohammed A; Elbehairi, Serag Eldin I; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2016-07-01

    Four siderophore analogues were isolated and purified from Escherichia coli, Bacillus spp. ST13, and Streptomyces pilosus microorganisms under some specific submerged fermentation conditions. In order to evaluate the highest production of this siderophore analogues through the growth, a rapid spectrophotometric screening semi-quantitative method was used, in which interestingly the analogues were isolated in its own form not its iron chelate. After chromatographic separation, the chemical structures of the isolated and purified siderophores were illustrated using detailed spectroscopic techniques. The biodegradation studies were done on that four novel isolated and purified siderophores following OECD protocols. In addition, the bioactivities of these siderophores and their iron complexes were examined and evaluated. PMID:27091230

  7. Biodegradation of keratin waste: Theory and practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniłłowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Bohacz, Justyna

    2011-08-01

    Keratin-rich by-products, i.e. bristles, horns and hooves, chicken feathers and similar, are a source of nutrients for animals (amino acids) and plants (N, S). Contemporary developments in the management of keratin waste in feeds and fertilizers comply with human and animal health protection regulations and respect the principles of ecological development. Biotechnological methods employing keratinolytic bacteria and microscopic fungi play a key role in processing keratin waste. This study reviews the current knowledge on the ecology and physiology of keratinolytic microorganisms and presents the biodegradation mechanism of native keratin. The structure and chemical composition of keratin proteins are described, and methods of keratin waste biotransformation into products of practical industrial and natural value, especially composts, are discussed. PMID:21550224

  8. Characterization of biodegradable polymers irradiated with swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salguero, N.G. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grosso, M.F. del, E-mail: delgrosso@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917 C1033AAJ CABA (Argentina); Duran, H. [CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917 C1033AAJ CABA (Argentina); Gerencia de Desarrollo Tecnologico y Proyectos Especiales, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Mart Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Acute-Accent n, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, H. Yrigoyen 3100, CP 1650, San Martin, UNSAM (Argentina); Peruzzo, P.J. [CICPBA - Grupo de Materiales y Nanomateriales Polimericos, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), CCT La Plata CONICET - Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina); Amalvy, J.I. [CICPBA - Grupo de Materiales y Nanomateriales Polimericos, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), CCT La Plata CONICET - Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Calle 116 y 48 (B1900TAG), La Plata (Argentina); Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad Regional La Plata, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, 60 y 124 (1900), La Plata (Argentina); and others

    2012-02-15

    In view of their application as biomaterials, there is an increasing interest in developing new methods to induce controlled cell adhesion onto polymeric materials. The critical step in all these methods involves the modification of polymer surfaces, to induce cell adhesion, without changing theirs degradation and biocompatibility properties. In this work two biodegradable polymers, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) were irradiated using carbon and sulfur beams with different energies and fluences. Pristine and irradiated samples were degradated by immersion in a phosphate buffer at pH 7.0 and then characterized. The analysis after irradiation and degradation showed a decrease in the contact angle values and changes in their crystallinity properties.

  9. Enhanced biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in manufactured gas plant wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) have focused on enhancing destruction of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present as pollutants in manufactured gas plant (MGP) soils. The factor that bears the most restrictive influence on successful biological PAH degradation is low pollutant transfer from soil into an aqueous environment where biotreatment processes can take place. Physical and chemical enhancements were used in conjunction with biological processes. Physical enhancements overcame the mass transfer problem and made possible the biological destruction of aromatic hydrocarbons. One- to three-ring aromatic hydrocarbons were readily biodegraded in liquid, soil slurry, and -- to a lesser degree -- composted soil systems. Four- to six-ring PAHs remained persistent but were effectively destroyed when chemical co-treatments were used. Combined biological/chemical/physical processes are currently being tested to achieve the most extensive PAH degradation possible for MGP soils. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of thin biodegradable polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of the biodegradable polymer poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) were deposited using resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD). The output of a free-electron laser was focused onto a solid target of the polymer, and the films were deposited using 2.90 (resonant with O-H stretch) and 3.40 (C-H) μm light at macropulse fluences of 7.8 and 6.7 J/cm2, respectively. Under these conditions, a 0.5-μm thick film can be grown in less than 5 min. Film structure was determined from infrared absorbance measurements and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). While the infrared absorbance spectrum of the films is nearly identical with that of the native polymer, the average molecular weight of the films is a little less than half that of the starting material. Potential strategies for defeating this mass change are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Biodegradation of crude oil in different types of marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An active oil-oxidizing bacterium, named Nap C was isolated from the sediment sample of Port Dickson coastal area for this study. Nap C is a gram negative, rod shape marine bacterium. It forms spore when the condition is not favorable. Three different types of treated marine sediment; sand, silt and clay were used in this study. The degradation of Malaysian Tapis A crude oil in the different types of marine sediment were assessed. Silt type of marine sediment was found to sustain highest biodegradation compared to clay type and sand type. 8.6.67% of the Malaysian Tapis A crude oil was degraded in silt type of marine sediment within 10 days of incubation. Where as there were only 60% and 73% of the Malaysian Tapis A crude oil was degraded in sand and clay type of marine sediment respectively. Microbial biomass estimation in the sediment was estimated by indirect phospholipid enumeration technique. (author)

  12. Enhanced biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in manufactured gas plant wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) have focused on enhancing destruction of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present as pollutants in manufactured gas plant (MGP) soils. The factor that bears the most restrictive influence on successful biological PAH degradation is low pollutant transfer from soil into an aqueous environment where biotreatment processes can take place. Physical and chemical enhancements were used in conjunction with biological processes. Physical enhancements overcame the mass transfer problem and made possible the biological destruction of aromatic hydrocarbons. One- to three-ring aromatic hydrocarbons were readily biodegraded in liquid, soil slurry, and - to a lesser degree - composted soil systems. Four- to six-ring PAHs remained persistent but were effectively destroyed when chemical co-treatments were used. Combined biological/chemical/physical processes are currently being tested to achieve the most extensive PAH degradation possible for MGP soils

  13. Development of biodegradable starch microspheres for intranasal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Domperidone microspheres for intranasal administration were prepared by emulsification crosslinking technique. Starch a biodegradable polymer was used in preparation of microspheres using epichlorhydrine as cross-linking agent. The formulation variables were drug concentration and polymer concentration and batch of drug free microsphere was prepared for comparisons. All the formulations were evaluated for particle size, morphological characteristics, percentage drug encapsulation, equilibrium swelling degree, percentage mucoadhesion, bioadhesive strength, and in vitro diffusion study using nasal cell. Spherical microspheres were obtained in all batches with mean diameter in the range of above 22.8 to 102.63 μm. They showed good mucoadhesive property and swelling behaviour. The in vitro release was found in the range of 73.11% to 86.21%. Concentration of both polymer and drug affect in vitro release of drug.

  14. Biodegradation of lignocellulosic materials: Present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodegradation of lignocellulosic material depends on the source and prior treatment of the substrate. As the composition of the substrate influences the mode of degradation, a resume of the structure of cell wall components is given. This shows the relationship between cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin and the other non-carbohydrate components and how they are arranged within the wall architecture. A summary is given of the different types of enzymes which can attack lignocellulosics, some limitations on their use, and how they can be influenced by other methods of pretreatment. The role of different types of microorganisms is discussed and the paper concludes with some results from work by the authors. (author). 37 refs, 4 figs

  15. Biodegradable Polylactic Acid (PLA) Microstructures for Scaffold Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, G -J; Hsueh, C -C

    2008-01-01

    In this research, we present a simple and cost effective soft lithographic process to fabricate PLA scaffolds for tissue engineering. In which, the negative photoresist JSR THB-120N was spun on a glass subtract followed by conventional UV lithographic processes to fabricate the master to cast the PDMS elastomeric mold. A thin poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) layer was used as a mode release such that the PLA scaffold can be easily peeled off. The PLA precursor solution was then cast onto the PDMS mold to form the PLA microstructures. After evaporating the solvent, the PLA microstructures can be easily peeled off from the PDMS mold. Experimental results show that the desired microvessels scaffold can be successfully transferred to the biodegradable polymer PLA.

  16. Hydrolyzed polyacrylamide biodegradation and mechanism in sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Miao; Zhao, Lanmei; Bao, Mutai; Lu, Jinren

    2016-05-01

    An investigation was performed to study the performance of a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) to treat hydrolyzed polyacrylamides (HPAMs) and to determine the mechanisms of HPAM biodegradation. The mechanisms for the optimized parameters that significantly improved the degradation efficiency of the HPAMs were investigated by a synergistic effect of the co-metabolism in the sludge and the enzyme activities. The HPAM and TOC removal ratio reached 54.69% and 70.14%. A significant decrease in the total nitrogen concentration was measured. The carbon backbone of the HPAMs could be degraded after the separation of the amide group according to the data analysis. The HPLC results indicated that the HPAMs could be converted to polymer fragments without the generation of the acrylamide monomer intermediate. The results from high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed proteobacterias, bacteroidetes and planctomycetes were the key microorganisms involved in the degradation. PMID:26896716

  17. Synthesis of biodegradable polymers using biocatalysis with Yarrowia lipolytica lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Rivera, Karla A; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Martínez-Richa, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica lipase (YLL) was used as catalyst in the enzymatic ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of ε-caprolactone. This low-cost solid-state lipase produces low-molecular-weight polyesters with unique multiphase morphology as determined by carbon-13 NMR. YLL attaches sugar head groups to polycaprolactone in a one-pot biocatalytic pathway. Synthesis of α-ω-telechelic (polymer with two reactive hydroxyl end groups) PCL diols is achieved by enzymatic ROP with YLL immobilized on the macroporous resin Lewatit VPOC 1026, and in the presence of diethylene glycol or poly(ethylene glycol). Biodegradable linear polyester urethanes are prepared by polycondensation between synthesized PCL diols and hexamethylene-diisocyanate. PMID:22426736

  18. Degradation kinetics and metabolites in continuous biodegradation of isoprene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastva, Navnita; Singh, Ram S; Upadhyay, Siddh N; Dubey, Suresh K

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic parameters of isoprene biodegradation were studied in a bioreactor, comprising of bioscrubber and polyurethane foam packed biofilter in series and inoculated with Pseudomonas sp., using a Michaelis-Menten type model. The maximum elimination capacity, ECmax; substrate constant, Ks and ECmax/Ks values for bioscrubber were found to be 666.7gm(-3)h(-1), 9.86gm(-3) and 67.56h(-1), respectively while those for biofilter were 3333gm(-3)h(-1), 13.96gm(-3) and 238.7h(-1), respectively. The biofilter section exhibited better degradation efficiency compared to the bioscrubber unit. Around 62-75% of the feed isoprene got converted to carbon dioxide, indicating the efficient capability of bacteria to mineralize isoprene. The FTIR and GC-MS analyses of degradation products indicated oxidative cleavage of unsaturated bond of isoprene. These results were used for proposing a plausible degradation pathway for isoprene. PMID:26883059

  19. Synthesis and characterization of biomimetic citrate-based biodegradable composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Richard T; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Minjun; Tang, Wanjin; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Zhongmin; Jin, Dadi; Banik, Brittany; Brown, Justin L; Xie, Zhiwei; Bai, Xiaochun; Yang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Natural bone apatite crystals, which mediate the development and regulate the load-bearing function of bone, have recently been associated with strongly bound citrate molecules. However, such understanding has not been translated into bone biomaterial design and osteoblast cell culture. In this work, we have developed a new class of biodegradable, mechanically strong, and biocompatible citrate-based polymer blends (CBPBs), which offer enhanced hydroxyapatite binding to produce more biomimetic composites (CBPBHAs) for orthopedic applications. CBPBHAs consist of the newly developed osteoconductive citrate-presenting biodegradable polymers, crosslinked urethane-doped polyester and poly (octanediol citrate), which can be composited with up to 65 wt % hydroxyapatite. CBPBHA networks produced materials with a compressive strength of 116.23 ± 5.37 MPa comparable to human cortical bone (100-230 MPa), and increased C2C12 osterix gene and alkaline phosphatase gene expression in vitro. The promising results above prompted an investigation on the role of citrate supplementation in culture medium for osteoblast culture, which showed that exogenous citrate supplemented into media accelerated the in vitro phenotype progression of MG-63 osteoblasts. After 6 weeks of implantation in a rabbit lateral femoral condyle defect model, CBPBHA composites elicited minimal fibrous tissue encapsulation and were well integrated with the surrounding bone tissues. The development of citrate-presenting CBPBHA biomaterials and preliminary studies revealing the effects of free exogenous citrate on osteoblast culture shows the potential of citrate biomaterials to bridge the gap in orthopedic biomaterial design and osteoblast cell culture in that the role of citrate molecules has previously been overlooked. PMID:23996976

  20. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils. PMID:26037076

  1. Biodegradable magnesium nanoparticle-enhanced laser hyperthermia therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Qian Wang,1 Liping Xie,1 Zhizhu He,2 Derui Di,2 Jing Liu1,21Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, 2Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Recently, nanoparticles have been demonstrated to have tremendous merit in terms of improving the treatment specificity and thermal ablation effect on tumors. However, the potential toxicity and long-term side effects caused by the introduced nanoparticles and by expelling them out of the body following surgery remain a significant challenge. Here, we propose for the first time to directly adopt magnesium nanoparticles as the heating enhancer in laser thermal ablation to avoid these problems by making full use of the perfect biodegradable properties of this specific material.Methods: To better understand the new nano “green” hyperthermia modality, we evaluated the effects of magnesium nanoparticles on the temperature transients inside the human body subject to laser interstitial heating. Further, we experimentally investigated the heating enhancement effects of magnesium nanoparticles on a group of biological samples: oil, egg white, egg yolk, in vitro pig tissues, and the in vivo hind leg of rabbit when subjected to laser irradiation.Results: Both the theoretical simulations and experimental measurements demonstrated that the target tissues injected with magnesium nanoparticles reached much higher temperatures than tissues without magnesium nanoparticles. This revealed the enhancing behavior of the new nanohyperthermia method.Conclusion: Given the unique features of magnesium nanoparticles – their complete biological safety and ability to enhance heating – which most other advanced metal nanoparticles do not possess, the use of magnesium nanoparticles in hyperthermia therapy offers an important “green” nanomedicine modality for treating tumors

  2. Biodegradation of Aliphatic-aromatic Coplyester under Thermophilic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed B. Belal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The biodegradation of poly (tetramethylene adipate-co-tetramethylene terephthalate (BTA-copolyester as synthetic polyester was investigated under thermophilic conditions. Two efficient BTA degrading actinomycetes were isolated from compost at thermophilic phase. These strains were identified as Thermobifida fusca and Thermobispora bispora. The degradation rate for BTA films within 7 days was 17.12 and 16.96 mg/week.cm2 by T. fusca and T. bispora, respectively. The optimum BTA40:60 degradation conditions are obtained as pH7 and 55°C. The both strains exhibited a wider substrate spectrum as they are able to degrade synthetic polyesters (BTA40:60, PCL-S MaterBi ZF03U/A and natural polymers (poly-&beta-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB and carboxymethyl cellulose. It was shown that the extracellular hydrolyases activity from the both strains was induced in the presence of BTA-copolyester, while the presence of additional carbon sources such as glucose or a complex medium suppressed enzyme formation. Tributyrin as triglycerides was degraded by the both crude concentrated BTA-hydrolases. In contrast the enzyme was not capable to depolymerize the natural polymers PHB and carboxymethyl cellulose, although the organism itself degraded both types of polymers. The obtained results showed that the degradation rate with T. fusca BTA40:60-hydrolase was 3.67 mg/day.cm2 and was 3.5 mg/day.cm2 with T. bispora BTA40:60-hydrolase. The pH optimum for BTA-hydrolases was 7 with 20 and 100 mM phosphate buffer and it was 6 with 150 mM citrate buffer. Finally, it could be concluded that actinomycetes and their hydrolases play an outstanding role in recycling of biodegradable plastics under thermophilic phase during composting process.

  3. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements as a Proxy for Hydrocarbon Biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewafy, F.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Werkema, D.; Revil, A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Skold, M.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements have been commonly used in paleoclimate studies, as a proxy for environmental pollution such as heavy metal contamination, and for delineating zones of oil seeps related to hydrocarbon exploration. Few studies have assessed the use of MS measurements for mapping zones of oil pollution. In this study, we investigated the variation in magnetic susceptibility across a hydrocarbon contaminated site undergoing biodegradation. Our objective was to investigate if MS measurements could be used as a proxy indicator of intrinsic bioremediation linked to the activity of iron reducing bacteria. An improved understanding of the mechanisms generating geophysical signatures associated with microbial enzymatic activity could permit the development of geophysical imaging technologies for long-term, minimally invasive and sustainable monitoring of natural biodegradation at oil spill sites. We used a Bartington MS probe to measure MS data along fifteen boreholes within contaminated (both free phase and dissolved phase hydrocarbon plumes) and clean areas. Our results show the following: (1) an enhanced zone of MS straddling the water table at the contaminated locations, not observed at the clean locations; (2) MS values within the free product plume are higher compared to values within the dissolved product plume; (3) the MS values within the vadoze zone above the free product plume are higher compared to values within the dissolved product plume; 4) the zone of high MS is thicker within the free product plume compared to the dissolved product plume. We suggest that the zone of enhanced MS results from the precipitation of magnetite related to the oxidation of the hydrocarbons coupled to iron reduction. Our data documents a strong correlation between MS and hydrocarbon concentration. We conclude that recognition of these zones of enhanced magnetite formation allows for the application of MS measurements as a: (1) low cost, rapid monitoring

  4. Biodegradation of radioactive organic liquid waste from spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development program in reprocessing of low burn-up spent fuel elements began in Brazil in 70's, originating the lab-scale hot cell, known as Celeste located at Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN - CNEN/SP. The program was ended at the beginning of 90's, and the laboratory was closed down. Part of the radioactive waste generated mainly from the analytical laboratories is stored waiting for treatment at the Waste Management Laboratory, and it is constituted by mixture of aqueous and organic phases. The most widely used technique for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes is the solidification in cement matrix, due to the low processing costs and compatibility with a wide variety of wastes. However, organics are generally incompatible with cement, interfering with the hydration and setting processes, and requiring pre -treatment with special additives to stabilize or destroy them. The objective of this work can be divided in three parts: organic compounds characterization in the radioactive liquid waste; the occurrence of bacterial consortia from Pocos de Caldas uranium mine soil and Sao Sebastiao estuary sediments that are able to degrade organic compounds; and the development of a methodology to biodegrade organic compounds from the radioactive liquid waste aiming the cementation. From the characterization analysis, TBP and ethyl acetate were chosen to be degraded. The results showed that selected bacterial consortia were efficient for the organic liquid wastes degradation. At the end of the experiments the biodegradation level were 66% for ethyl acetate and 70% for the TBP. (author)

  5. Stability of biodegradable waterborne polyurethane films in buffered saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying Yi; Hung, Kun-Che; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The stability of polyurethane (PU) is of critical importance for applications such as in coating industry or as biomaterials. To eliminate the environmental concerns on the synthesis of PU which involves the use of organic solvents, the aqueous-based or waterborne PU (WBPU) has been developed. WBPU, however, may be unstable in an electrolyte-rich environment. In this study, the authors reported the stability of biodegradable WBPU in the buffered saline solutions evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Various biodegradable WBPU films were prepared by spin coating on coverslip glass, with a thickness of ∼300 nm. The surface AFM images of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) diol-based WBPU revealed nanoglobular structure. The same feature was observed when 20% molar of the PCL diol soft segment was replaced by polyethylene butylenes adipate diol. After hydration in buffered saline solutions for 24 h, the surface domains generally increased in sizes and became irregular in shape. On the other hand, when the soft segment was replaced by 20% poly(l-lactide) diol, a meshlike surface structure was demonstrated by AFM. When the latter WBPU was hydrated, the surface domains appeared to be disconnected. Results from the attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the surface chemistry of WBPU films was altered after hydration. These changes were probably associated with the neutralization of carboxylate by ions in the saline solutions, resulting in the rearrangements of soft and hard segments and causing instability of the WBPU. PMID:26296357

  6. Nova tecnologia: valvuloplastias com anéis biodegradáveis New technology: valve repair using biodegradable rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Neirotti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Introduzir um novo conceito na tecnologia de anuloplastia. Embora anéis rígidos e flexíveis cumpram com as necessidades básicas em adultos, não preservam mudanças na forma e no tamanho ocorridos durante o ciclo cardíaco. Se implantado em crianças, eles não permitem o crescimento do anel nativo. Métodos: De março de 2003 a março de 2007, 207 pacientes submeteram-se ao reparo da valva mitral e/ou tricúspide implantando anéis biodegradáveis de polidioxanona Bioring®. Pacientes foram separados em dois grupos: Grupo 1, Adultos n=121. Idade média: 48 anos (± 19,2. Mais velho 85 anos. Grupo 2, Pediátrico: n=86. Idade média: 9,6 anos (± 4,4. Mais novo 0,5 anos. RESULTADOS: Grupo 1 - mortalidade hospitalar: 3,3%; seguimento médio: 26,4 meses ± 15,4. Quatro pacientes submetidos à substituição da valva mitral 1,2,2 e 4 meses pós-reparo. Grupo 2 - mortalidade hospitalar: 1,2%; seguimento médio: 26,7 meses, ± 13,4. Sete reoperações mitrais entre 1 a 24 meses, duas para novo reparo da válvula, cinco para substituição valvar. CONCLUSÕES: Anéis biodegradáveis remodelam a forma, reforçam o reparo, devolvem a função das valvas atrioventriculares, mantendo a dinâmica tridimensional e geometria dos anéis valvares mitrais e tricuspídeos. Além disso, estes anéis preservam o crescimento potencial em crianças. Embora o anel de anuloplastia biodegradável tenha sido inicialmente desenvolvido para população pediátrica, é atualmente aplicado em adultos. Crianças com ventrículoúnico e incompetências valvares A-V são indicações adicionais. Resultados a médio prazo mostraram que a degradação do produto ocorreu sem conseqüências negativas observáveis. Resultados a longo termo deverão comprovar estes achados.OBJECTIVE: To introduce a new concept in the annuloplasty technology. Although rigid and flexible rings meet the basic needs of adults, they do not preserve the changes in shape and size occurring

  7. Biodegradation of phthalate esters during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Alatriste-Mondragon, Felipe; Iranpour, R.;

    2003-01-01

    Phthalic acid esters (PAE) are commonly found in the sludge generated in the wastewater treatment plants. Anaerobic digestion followed by land application is a common treatment and disposal practice of sludge. To date, many studies exist on the anaerobic biodegradation rates of PAE, especially...... of the easily biodegradable ones, whereas the higher molecular weight PAE have reported to be non-biodegradable under methanogenic conditions. Furthermore, there is no information on the effect of the PAE on the performance of the anaerobic digesters treating sludge. In this study, the anaerobic biodegradation...... of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), di-ethyl phthalate (DEP) and di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) was investigated and their relative rates of anaerobic degradation were calculated. Also, the biological removal of PAE during the anaerobic digestion of sludge in bench-scale digesters was investigated using DBP...

  8. Study on Biodegradation of Palm Oil-based UV-Curable Films in Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The palm oil-based ultraviolet (UV)-curable films were subjected to an outdoor soil burial test to investigate the biodegradation under natural environment. The films were burial in the soil experiment plot at the Nuclear Malaysia's Dengkil complex which is near the BTS building at block 42. Biodegradation tests are more specific to burial film in soil experiments for 12 months under natural conditions. The biodegradability of palm oil resin based UV-curable films were investigated and compared with the petrochemical resin based film. The films properties were compared with respect to properties of the film morphology and the film weight loss which are analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM), an optical microscope and the weight loss of film calculation. These findings suggested that the palm oil-based UV-curable films show quite satisfactory biodegradation levels. (author)

  9. Biodegradable nanocomposites from toughened polyhydroxybutyrate and titanate-modified montmorillonite clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmorillonite clay treated with neopentyl (diallyl)oxy tri( dioctyl) pyrophosphato-titanate was used as a reinforcement for toughened bacterial bioplastic, Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in order to develop novel biodegradable nanocomposites. The modified clay, PHB, toughening partner and specific comp...

  10. Biodegradation of trace pharmaceutical substances in wastewater by a membrane bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longli BO; Taro URASE; Xiaochang WANG

    2009-01-01

    The biodegradation of selected pharmaceutical micropollutants, including two pharmaceuticals with argued biodegradation, was studied by a lab-scale membrane bioreactor. The reaction kinetics and affecting factors were also investigated in this paper. Clofibric acid (CA) with contradictive biodegradation reported was degraded almost completely at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) after adaptation to microorganisms. The biodegradation of CA was disturbed at low pH operation,while the activity of microorganisms recovered again after pH adjustment to neutral condition. Ibuprofen (IBP)degraded under neutral and acidic conditions. Removals of IBP and CA were zero-order and first-order reactions under high and low initial concentrations, respectively. Carbamazepine and diclofenac were not degraded regardless of HRTs and pH.

  11. BIODEGRADATION AND GAS-EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS ALKANES IN MODEL ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas exchange-biodegradation experiments conducted in model estuarine ecosystems indicate that the ease of degradation of gaseious normal alkanes increases with chain length. The behavior of gaseous perhalogenated alkanes can be explained by gas exchange alone with no degradation....

  12. Effect of acclimation and nutrient supply on 5-tolyltriazole biodegradation with activated sludge communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Bastian; Yuan, Heyang; Lemmer, Hilde; Horn, Harald; Müller, Elisabeth

    2014-07-01

    The corrosion inhibitor 5-tolyltriazole (5-TTri) can have a detrimental impact on aquatic systems thus implying an acute need to reduce the effluent concentrations of 5-TTri. In this study, 5-TTri biodegradation was enhanced through acclimation and nutrient supply. Activated sludge communities (ASC) were setup in nine subsequent ASC generations. While generation two showed a lag phase of five days without biodegradation, generations four to nine utilized 5-TTri right after inoculation, with biodegradation rates from 3.3 to 5.2 mg L(-1)d(-1). Additionally, centrifuged AS supernatant was used to simulate the nutrient conditions in wastewater. This sludge supernatant (SS) significantly enhanced biodegradation, resulting in removal rates ranging from 3.2 to 5.0 mg L(-1)d(-1) without acclimation while the control groups without SS observed lower rates of ⩽ 2.2 mg L(-1)d(-1). PMID:24841493

  13. Process of prototyping coronary stents from biodegradable Fe-Mn alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermawan, Hendra; Mantovani, Diego

    2013-11-01

    Biodegradable stents are considered to be a recent innovation, and their feasibility and applicability have been proven in recent years. Research in this area has focused on materials development and biological studies, rather than on how to transform the developed biodegradable materials into the stent itself. Currently available stent technology, the laser cutting-based process, might be adapted to fabricate biodegradable stents. In this work, the fabrication, characterization and testing of biodegradable Fe-Mn stents are described. A standard process for fabricating and testing stainless steel 316L stents was referred to. The influence of process parameters on the physical, metallurgical and mechanical properties of the stents, and the quality of the produced stents, were investigated. It was found that some steps of the standard process such as laser cutting can be directly applied, but changes to parameters are needed for annealing, and alternatives are needed to replace electropolishing. PMID:23665503

  14. Biodegradability of terephthalic acid in terylene artificial silk printing and dyeing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    As the characteristic pollutant, terephthalic acid(TA)was in charge of 40%-78% of the total COD of terylene artificial silk printing and dyeing wastewater(TPW-water). The studies on biodegradability of TA were conducted in a serial of activated sludge reactors with TPW-water. TA appeared to be readily biodegradable with removal efficiency over 96.5% under aerobic conditions, hardly biodegradable with removal efficiency below 10% under anoxic conditions and slowly biodegradable with a turnover between 31.4% and 56.0% under anaerobic conditions. TA also accounted for the majority of BOD in TPW-water. The process combined by anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic activated sludge reactor was suitable for TA degradation and TPW-water treatment. Further, the aerobic process was essentially much more effective than the anaerobic or anoxic one to degrade TA in TPW-water.

  15. Morphological and biodegradability studies of Euphorbia latex modified polyester - Banana fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Bhuvneshwar; Kumar, Gulshan; Diwan, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    The composites of Banana fiber were prepared using polyester resin blended Euphorbia coagulum, morphology and the degree of rate of aerobic biodegradation of the prepared composites were studied. Polyester resin blended Euphorbia coagulum containing Banana fiber, Euphorbia coagulum and polyester resin taken in the ratio 40: 24: 36 was used for the study, which was the optimum composition of the composite reported in a previous study by the authors. In the biodegradability study cellulose has been used as positive reference material. Result shows that Euphorbia coagulum modified polyester - Banana fiber composites exhibited biodegradation to the extent of around 40%. The use of developed green composites may help in reducing the generation of non-biodegradable polymeric wastes.

  16. Application of biosurfactant from Sphingobacterium spiritivorum AS43 in the biodegradation of used lubricating oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noparat, Pongsak; Maneerat, Suppasil; Saimmai, Atipan

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating the application of biosurfactant from Sphingobacterium spiritivorum AS43 using molasses as a substrate and fertilizer to enhance the biodegradation of used lubricating oil (ULO). The cell surface hydrophobicity of bacteria, the emulsification activity, and the biodegradation efficiency of ULO were measured. The bacterial adhesion in the hydrocarbon test was used to denote the cell surface hydrophobicity of the used bacterial species. The results indicate a strong correlation between cell surface hydrophobicity, emulsification activity, and the degree of ULO biodegradation. The maximum degradation of ULO (62 %) was observed when either 1.5 % (w/v) of biosurfactant or fertilizer was added. The results also revealed that biosurfactants alone are capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent without added fertilizer. The data indicate the potential for biosurfactant production by using low-cost substrate for application in the bioremediation of soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or oils. PMID:24590892

  17. Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil in a large-scale field simulated experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Mutai; Sun, Peiyan; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xinping; Wang, Lina; Cao, Lixin; Li, Fujuan

    2014-08-01

    Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil with hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients was carried out by a large-scale field simulated experiment in this paper. After a 103 day experiment, for n-alkanes, the maximum biodegradation rate reached 71% and the results showed hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients have a comprehensive effect. It also showed that rhamnolipid biosurfactants could shorten the biodegradation time through an emulsifying function; the nutrients could greatly increase the biodegradation rate by promoting HDB production. For PAHs, the chrysene series had higher weathering resistance. For the same series, the weathering resistance ability is C1- biosurfactants or nutrients, respectively. Except for C14, C15 and C16 sesquiterpanes, most of the steranes and terpanes had high antibiodegradability. PMID:24931448

  18. Modelling as a tool when interpreting biodegradation of micro pollutants in activated sludge systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Press-Kristensen, Kåre; Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Henze, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present work were to improve the biodegradation of the endocrine disrupting micro pollutant, bisphenol A (BPA), used as model compound in an activated sludge system and to underline the importance of modelling the system. Previous results have shown that BPA mainly is degraded under...... probably was caused by either a larger specific biomass to influent BPA ratio, improved biodegradation related to the increased aerobic phase time, or a combination of the two. Thereby it was not possibly to determine if the increase in aerobic phase time improved the biodegradation of BPA. The work...... underlines the importance of combining experimental results with modelling when interpreting results from biodegradation experiments with fluctuating influent concentrations of micro pollutants....

  19. Primary biodegradation of veterinary antibiotics in aerobic and anaerobic surface water simulation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Flemming; Toräng, Lars; Loke, M.-L.;

    2001-01-01

    The primary aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability at intermediate concentrations (50-5000 mug/l) of the antibiotics olaquindox (OLA), metronidazole (MET), tylosin (TYL) and oxytetracycline (OTC) was studied in a simple shake flask system simulating the conditions in surface waters. The purpose of...... substances. The biodegradation behaviour was influenced by neither the concentrations of antibiotics nor the time of the year and location for sampling of surface water. Addition of 1 g/l of sediment or 3 mg/l of activated sludge from wastewater treatment increased the biodegradation potential which is...... the study was to provide rate data for primary biodegradation in the scenario where antibiotics pollute surface waters as a result of run-off from arable land. The source of antibiotics may be application of manure as fertilizer or excreta of grazing animals. Assuming first-order degradation kinetics...

  20. A BIODEGRADABLE RUBBER BY CROSS-LINKING POLY(HYDROXYALKANOATE) FROM PSEUDOMONAS-OLEOVORANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEKONING, GJM; VANBILSEN, HMM; LEMSTRA, PJ; HAZENBERG, W; WITHOLT, B; PREUSTING, H; VANDERGALIEN, JG; SCHIRMER, A; JENDROSSEK, D

    1994-01-01

    Poly((R)-3-hydroxyalkanoate)s (PHAs) are bacterial storage polyesters, currently receiving much attention because of their potential application as biodegradable and biocompatible plastics. Among them are the PHAs from Pseudomonas oleovorans, which are semicrystalline elastomers. Their applicability

  1. Effects of thermo-chemical pre-treatment on anaerobic biodegradability and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, T V; Bos, G J Klaasse; Zeeman, G; Sanders, J P M; van Lier, J B

    2009-05-01

    The effects of different thermo-chemical pre-treatment methods were determined on the biodegradability and hydrolysis rate of lignocellulosic biomass. Three plant species, hay, straw and bracken were thermo-chemically pre-treated with calcium hydroxide, ammonium carbonate and maleic acid. After pre-treatment, the plant material was anaerobically digested in batch bottles under mesophilic conditions for 40 days. From the pre-treatment and subsequent anaerobic digestion experiments, it was concluded that when the lignin content of the plant material is high, thermo-chemical pre-treatments have a positive effect on the biodegradability of the substrate. Calcium hydroxide pre-treatment improves the biodegradability of lignocellulosic biomass, especially for high lignin content substrates, like bracken. Maleic acid generates the highest percentage of dissolved COD during pre-treatment. Ammonium pre-treatment only showed a clear effect on biodegradability for straw. PMID:19144515

  2. Anaerobic biodegradation of fluoranthene under methanogenic conditions in presence of surface-active compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchedzhieva, Nadezhda; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    Bacillus cereus isolated from municipal wastewater treatment plant was used as a model strain to assess the efficiency of two anionic surfactants, a chemical surfactant and a biosurfactant during fluoranthene biodegradation under anaerobic methanogenic conditions. The surfactants selected for the...

  3. Effects of Tween 80 on the removal, sorption and biodegradation of pyrene by Klebsiella oxytoca PYR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption and biodegradation of pyrene by Klebsiella oxytoca PYR-1 (PYR-1) in the presence of nonionic surfactant Tween 80 were investigated toward a better understanding that how surfactants can affect biodegradation of hydrophobic organic compounds. The results indicated that Tween 80 can promote the removal, sorption and biodegradation of pyrene depending on the surfactant concentration, of which the most significant promotion of biodegradation was achieved at critical micelle concentration of Tween 80 with an improvement of 22.4%. A highly positive correlation (P < 0.0001) was observed between the biodegradation and sorption of pyrene with the presence of Tween 80. Biosorption experiments showed the same trends as biodegradation and further illustrated the improved biodegradation of pyrene was mainly due to surfactant-facilitated sorption. The regularly changes of cell surface hydrophobicity suggested formation of more hydrophobic surface caused by surfactant sorption lead to stimulation of pyrene sorption. - Highlights: ► Tween 80 could promote the removal, sorption and biodegradation of pyrene. ► Highly positive correlation between sorption and degradation of pyrene was found. ► Biodegradation promotion by Tween 80 mainly arose from surfactant-facilitated enhancement of sorption. - Nonionic surfactant Tween 80 could promote the removal and biodegradation of pyrene, mainly due to the enhancement of surfactant-facilitated sorption.

  4. Remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants in cold environments : electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation and biodegradable oil sorbents

    OpenAIRE

    Suni, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the vast amounts of oil in the world, oil spills are common on land as well as at sea. In addition to oil products, other industrially used hydrocarbons, such as creosote, also contaminate soils. Most hydrocarbons are biodegradable. Hence, bioremediation is an attractive alternative for cleaning up hydrocarbon spills. In cold climate areas, however, biodegradation is often a slow process. The aim of this thesis was to develop efficient, cost-effective, and ecologically sound techniqu...

  5. Organic halogens in the environment: studies of environmental biodegradability and human exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Salkinoja-Salonen, M.; Uotila, J; Jokela, J.; Laine, M.; Saski, E

    1995-01-01

    Organic halogens from chlorobleaching of kraft pulp were not as biorecalcitrant as has been assumed. Fifty percent were removed during biotreatment of wastewater, and 50% of the remaining organohalogens faded in fresh water ecosystems in 200 to 400 days. Molecular size seemed not to hinder biodegradation up to sizes of approximately 2000 daltons. Anoxic biodegradation was of prime importance for halomineralization of pulp bleaching organohalogens but could also lead to toxic metabolites such ...

  6. Continuous biodegradation of sulfanilic acid in a multi-stage packed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Huerta, A.; Velazquez-Garcia, A.; Cobos-Vasconcelos, D. de los.; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N.; Galindez-Mayer, J.

    2009-07-01

    Sulfanilic acid SA is an aromatic amine derived from the azo-bond cleavage of several textile dyes. Recalcitrance and toxicity of this amine is high, and with frequency it could be found as an aquatic contaminant; thus biodegradation process for its removal are justified. Although the SA molecule contains carbon, nitrogen and sulphur, its C:N:S proportion is unbalanced for microbial growth in a biodegradation process; thus nutrient complementation should be necessary for its complete removal. (Author)

  7. Faecal separation and urine diversion for nutrient management of household biodegradable waste and wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Vinnerås, Björn

    2001-01-01

    To create a sustainable society, the nutrients in household biodegradable solid waste and wastewater have to be recycled to agriculture. lf the nutrients present in wastes from society were recycled, the use of fossil resources would decrease and so would the undesirable effects arising from discharge of nutrients to water recipients. The main proportion of nutrients in the waste is to be found in the urine, faeces and the biodegradable solids. If all of these fractions are collected and recy...

  8. Research on the weed control degree and glyphosate soil biodegradation in apple plantations (Pioneer variety)

    OpenAIRE

    Alexa, Ersilia; Roxana MICU; Monica NEGREA; Renata SUMALAN; Olimpia IORDANESCU

    2010-01-01

    In this study we follow control degree of glyphosate herbicide on weeds in apple plantations (Pioneer variety) of the Research Station Timisoara. It was also followed glyphosate biodegradation capacity in the soil by determining the amount of CO2 released by the action of microorganisms on C14 glyphosate marked isotope. Laboratory analysis of glyphosate residues in soil was made using a Liquid Scintillation TRIATHLER. Glyphosate biodegradation ability in the presence of soil microorganisms is...

  9. Assessing the Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Surface-Active Gene Expression in Hexadecane Biodegradation in Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, P. A.; LaMontagne, M. G.; Bruce, A. K.; Miller, W.G.; Lindow, S E

    2002-01-01

    Low pollutant substrate bioavailability limits hydrocarbon biodegradation in soils. Bacterially produced surface-active compounds, such as rhamnolipid biosurfactant and the PA bioemulsifying protein produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, can improve bioavailability and biodegradation in liquid culture, but their production and roles in soils are unknown. In this study, we asked if the genes for surface-active compounds are expressed in unsaturated porous media contaminated with hexadecane. Furth...

  10. Preparation and characterization of highly porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds for soft tissue applications

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro L.; Sacks, Michael S.; Wagner, William R.

    2005-01-01

    In the engineering of soft tissues, scaffolds with high elastance and strength coupled with controllable biodegradable properties are necessary. To fulfill such design criteria we have previously synthesized two kinds of biodegradable polyurethaneureas, namely poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) and poly(ether ester urethane)urea (PEEUU) from polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone-b-polyethylene glycol-b-polycaprolactone, 1,4-diisocyanatobutane and putrescine. PEUU and PEEUU were further fabricated i...

  11. Trichloroethylene biodegradation by mesophilic and psychrophilic ammonia oxidizers and methanotrophs in groundwater microcosms.

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, B N; Hickey, W J

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of methane and ammonium for stimulating trichloroethylene (TCE) biodegradation in groundwater microcosms (flasks and batch exchange columns) at a psychrophilic temperature (12 degrees C) typical of shallow aquifers in the northern United States or a mesophilic temperature (24 degrees C) representative of most laboratory experiments. After 140 days, TCE biodegradation rates by ammonia oxidizers and methanotrophs in mesophilic flask microcosms were similar...

  12. Improving the capacity of biodegradation of two pesticides (methyl parathion, methomyl) by irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-resistant strains isolated from mining sites in Khouribgua, have been identified following a morphological, biochemical and molecular level. The scope of the study is biodegradability of the two pesticides namely methyl parathion and methomyl through these identified strains .The objective of this research is to improve the biodegradability potential of pesticides by identified strains via ionizing radiation Gamma known for its mutagenic potential.

  13. A microcosm study of the biodegradability of adsorbed toluene by acclimated bacteria in soils

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by man-made chemicals is increasingly being reported in the United States. The potential for detrimental health effects is substantial and has been addressed by the environmental engineering profession. Typically, contaminated groundwater is pumped to the surface and treated in a variety of methods including air stripping, carbon adsorption, and biodegradation. In situ biodegradation is increasingly being considered as an alternative to pump-and-...

  14. Biodegradation Study of Microcrystalline Chitosan and Microcrystalline Chitosan/β-TCP Complex Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Kinga Brzoza-Malczewska; Magdalena Kucharska; Bogdan Gruchała; Maria Wísniewska-Wrona; Luciano Pighinelli

    2012-01-01

    Bone repair or regeneration is a common and complicated clinical problem in orthopedic surgery. The importance of natural polymers, such as microcrystalline chitosan, and minerals such as HAp and β-TCP, has grown significantly over the last two decades due to their renewable and biodegradable source, increasing the knowledge and functionality of composites in technological and biomedical applications. This study compares the biodegradation process, bioactivity, structure, morphology, and mech...

  15. Process and formulation variables in the preparation of injectable and biodegradable magnetic microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hong; Gagnon, Jeffrey; Häfeli, Urs O

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare biodegradable sustained release magnetite microspheres sized between 1 to 2 μm. The microspheres with or without magnetic materials were prepared by a W/O/W double emulsion solvent evaporation technique using poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) as the biodegradable matrix forming polymer. Effects of manufacturing and formulation variables on particle size were investigated with non-magnetic microspheres. Microsphere size could be controlled by modification o...

  16. Synthesis of biodegradable microspheres of tramadol by simple phase separation technique and their in vitro evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Aamir, Muhammad N.; Ahmad, Mahmood; Murtaza, Ghulam; Akhtar, Naveed; Khan, Shujaat A.; Usman, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable microspheres of Tramadol Hydrochloride (TmH) were developed using simple phase separation technique. Poly lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) was employed as a release controlling polymer. Simple phase separation method was adopted to prepare microspheres; Dichloromethane (DCM) and Liquid Paraffin (LP) were employed as solvent and non-solvent respectively. Five kinetic models were applied to assess and describe the mechanism and pattern of TmH release from biodegradable micr...

  17. Biodegradation of Textile Dyes by Fungi Isolated from North Indian Field Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Arshi Shahid; Jagvijay Singh; Sandeep Bisht; Priyanku Teotia; Vivek Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In this study one azo dye "Congo red", two triphenymethane dyes "Crystal violet" and "Methylene blue" have been selected for biodegradation using three soil fungal isolates A. niger, F. oxysporum and T. lignorum. These fungal strains were isolated from field soil. Three methods were selected for biodegradation, viz. agar overlay and liquid media methods; stationary and shaking conditions at 25°C. The experiment was conducted for 10 days and the results were periodically observed. Aspergillus ...

  18. Measuring biodegradation of oil products by means of environmental forensic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J. R.; Garcia-Mtnez, M. J.; Ortiz, J. E.; Ortega, M.; Torres, T. de; Llamas, J. F.

    2009-07-01

    Bioremediation technologies are focused to the biodegradation of organic pollutants. This approach is particularly helpful when soils and/or groundwater are affected by oil products spills, given the satisfactory biodegradability of most hydrocarbons. However, during a bio-treatment the decreasing in pollutants concentration may be due to both biotic and biotic processes, whose distinction is very important, albeit difficult, in order to evaluate if bioremediation is being properly applied. (Author)

  19. Measuring biodegradation of oil products by means of environmental forensic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation technologies are focused to the biodegradation of organic pollutants. This approach is particularly helpful when soils and/or groundwater are affected by oil products spills, given the satisfactory biodegradability of most hydrocarbons. However, during a bio-treatment the decreasing in pollutants concentration may be due to both biotic and biotic processes, whose distinction is very important, albeit difficult, in order to evaluate if bioremediation is being properly applied. (Author)

  20. Aerobic digester design for the biodegradation of plant tannins in industrial wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Tramšek, Marko; Goršek, Andreja

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes aerobic digester design for the biodegradation of plant tannins in industrial wastewater. For optimal design, using the criterion of minimal total holding time, some experimental investigations into tannins’ biodegradation rate in industrial wastewater were performed in the first part of this research. The chemical oxygen demand method (COD) was applied to follow the tannins degradation rate. The kinetic parameters of a supposed Aiba’s inhibition kinetic model were determ...

  1. Review of Methods of Wastewater Reuse to Diminish Non-Biodegradable Organic Compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Bitow Meles, Desbele

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater reuse is very important in water resource management for both environmental and economic reasons. Unfortunately, wastewater from textile industries is difficult to treat by convectional wastewater treatment technologies. Now days, polluted water due to color from textile dyeing and finishing industries is burning issue for researchers. Textile or industrial wastewaters contain non-biodegradable organic compounds, which cannot be easily biodegraded because of their complex chemical ...

  2. Bioenergetic Strategy for the Biodegradation of p-Cresol by the Unicellular Green Alga Scenedesmus obliquus

    OpenAIRE

    Aikaterini Papazi; Konstantinos Assimakopoulos; Kiriakos Kotzabasis

    2012-01-01

    Cultures from the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus biodegrade the toxic p-cresol (4-methylphenol) and use it as alternative carbon/energy source. The biodegradation procedure of p-cresol seems to be a two-step process. HPLC analyses indicate that the split of the methyl group (first step) that is possibly converted to methanol (increased methanol concentration in the growth medium), leading, according to our previous work, to changes in the molecular structure and function of the p...

  3. Different indices to express biodegradability in organic solid wastes. Application to full scale waste treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ponsá Salas, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable waste receives especial attention in the European Legislation (Revised Framework Directive 2008/98/CE) and this has been also reflected in Spanish Legislation in the Plan Nacional Integrado de Residuos 20082015 (PNIR), due to the high importance that this municipal solid waste fraction has on the waste treatment environmental impact when it is not treated correctly and the possibility of recycling the biodegradable waste, to finally obtain compost or/and biogas that means green ...

  4. Biodegradation of MC252 oil in oil:sand aggregates in a coastal headland beach environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaikrishnah eElango

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation potential of MC252 in oil:sand aggregates, termed surface residue balls (SRBs, was examined using multiple lines of evidence on a heavily-impacted coastal headland beach in Louisiana, USA. SRBs were sampled over a 16-month period on the supratidal beach environment where reasonable control existed on the residence time of the aggregates on the beach surface. PAH and alkane concentration ratios were measured including PAH/C30-hopane, C2/C3 phenanthrenes, C2/C3 dibenzothiophenes and alkane/C30-hopane and demonstrated unequivocally that biodegradation was occurring in SRBs in the supratidal. These biodegradation reactions occurred over time frames relevant to the coastal processes moving SRBs off the beach. In contrast, submerged oil mat (SOM samples did not demonstrate chemical changes consistent with biodegradation. Review and analysis of additional biogeochemical parameters suggested the existence of a moisture and N-limited biodegradation regime on the supratidal beach environment. At this location, SRBs possess moisture contents < 2% and molar C:N ratios from 131-323, well outside of optimal values for biodegradation in the literature. Despite these limitations, biodegradation of PAHs and alkanes proceeded at relevant rates (2-8 year-1 due in part to the presence of degrading populations, i.e., Mycobacterium sp., adapted to these conditions. For SOM samples in the intertidal, an oxygen and salinity-impacted regime is proposed that severely limits biodegradation of alkanes and PAHs in this environment. These results support the hypothesis that SRBs deposited at different locations on the beach have different biogeochemical characteristics (e.g., moisture; salinity; terminal electron acceptors; nutrient; and oil composition due, in part, to their location on the landscape.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Biodegradable Film Compositions Based on Gelatin with Colchicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokeriya, L A; Bokeriya, O L; Sivtsev, V S; Novikova, S P; Salokhedinova, R R; Nikolashina, L N; Samsonova, N N; Gorodkov, A Yu; Serov, R A

    2016-07-01

    Biodegradable film compositions based on natural biopolymer gelatin with immobilized colchicine were prepared and their efficiency in prevention of the adhesion process in the pericardium was evaluated on rabbit model of postoperative pericarditis. The use of gelatin-based biodegradable film compositions significantly reduced the intensity of adhesion formation in the pericardial cavity, while immobilization of anti-inflammatory drug colchicine amplified their anti-adhesion activity. PMID:27496036

  6. Solid Waste Biodegradation Enhancements and the Evaluation of Analytical Methods Used to Predict Waste Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Ryan J.

    2002-01-01

    Conventional landfills are built to dispose of the increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated each year. A relatively new type of landfill, called a bioreactor landfill, is designed to optimize the biodegradation of the contained waste to stabilized products. Landfills with stabilized waste pose little threat to the environment from ozone depleting gases and groundwater contamination. Limited research has been done to determine the importance of biodegradation enhancement tech...

  7. Formation and Identification of Unresolved Complex Mixtures in Lacustrine Biodegraded Oil from Nanxiang Basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil ...

  8. Polyester-Based (Bio)degradable Polymers as Environmentally Friendly Materials for Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Rydz; Wanda Sikorska; Mariya Kyulavska; Darinka Christova

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the polyesters such as polylactide and polyhydroxyalkonoates, as well as polyamides produced from renewable resources, which are currently among the most promising (bio)degradable polymers. Synthetic pathways, favourable properties and utilisation (most important applications) of these attractive polymer families are outlined. Environmental impact and in particular (bio)degradation of aliphatic polyesters, polyamides and related copolymer structures are described in vie...

  9. Biodegradation of Metal-EDTA Complexes by an Enriched Microbial Population

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Russell A.P.; Lawlor, Kirsten; Bailey, Mark; Macaskie, Lynne E

    1998-01-01

    A mixed culture utilizing EDTA as the sole carbon source was isolated from a mixed inoculum of water from the River Mersey (United Kingdom) and sludge from an industrial effluent treatment plant. Fourteen component organisms were isolated from the culture, including representatives of the genera Methylobacterium, Variovorax, Enterobacter, Aureobacterium, and Bacillus. The mixed culture biodegraded metal-EDTA complexes slowly; the biodegradability was in the order Fe>Cu>Co>Ni>Cd. By incorporat...

  10. Biobased additives as biodegradability enhancers with application in TPU-based footwear components

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Isabel Patrícia; Barbosa, Mariana; Amaral, Joana Soares; Pinto, Vera; Rodrigues, José Luís; Ferreira, Maria José; Barreiro, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Among the wide variety of materials employed in the manufacture of shoes, thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs) are one of the most widely used. Given its widespread use, and associated waste management problems, the development of more biodegradable and evironmentally compatible solutions is needed. In this work, a polyester-based TPU used in the footwear industry for outsoles production was modified by compounding with lignin, starch and cellulose at content of 4% (w/w). The biodegradability w...

  11. Polyester-Based (Biodegradable Polymers as Environmentally Friendly Materials for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Rydz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the polyesters such as polylactide and polyhydroxyalkonoates, as well as polyamides produced from renewable resources, which are currently among the most promising (biodegradable polymers. Synthetic pathways, favourable properties and utilisation (most important applications of these attractive polymer families are outlined. Environmental impact and in particular (biodegradation of aliphatic polyesters, polyamides and related copolymer structures are described in view of the potential applications in various fields.

  12. Study and modification of poly(butylene succinate) properties, a biobased and biodegradable polyester

    OpenAIRE

    Freyermouth, Floriane

    2014-01-01

    Within the frame of sustainable development, biobased and biodegradable polymers are going to play an important role according to economic and environmental perspectives. The polyolefins currently used in packaging and automotive industries will be replaced by biomaterials. The poly(butylene succinate), an “old” aliphatic polyester, has recently regained interest thanks to its biobased and biodegradable potential and mechanical properties similar to polyolefins. However, this polyester is ver...

  13. Removal of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants from Aqueous Solutions by Sorption onto Biodegradable Polyesters

    OpenAIRE

    Mikio Shibayama; Yoshiro Nishimura; Zen-Ichiro Kimura; Yukiko Matsuzawa; Akira Hiraishi

    2010-01-01

    Sorption by biodegradable polyesters of several aromatic chemicals as model compounds for hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) was studied. The biodegradable polyesters used were poly(butylene succinate), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate), poly(ε-caprolactone), poly(butylene succinate/ terephthalate), and poly(L-lactic acid). Petrochemical plastics, low-density polyethylene and polyethylene terephtalate, were used for comparison. The target HOCs were biphenyl, bisphenol-A, diben...

  14. Performance and environmental impact of biodegradable polymers as agricultural mulching films

    OpenAIRE

    Touchaleaume, François; Martin-Closas, Lluís; Angellier-Coussy, Hélène; Chevillard, Anne; Cesar, Guy; Gontard, Nathalie; Gastaldi, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    In the aim of resolving environmental key issues such as irreversible soil pollution by non-biodegradable and non-recoverable polyethylene (PE) fragments, a full-scale field experiment was set up to evaluate the suitability of four biodegradable materials based on poly(butylene adipate-co-terephtalate) (PBAT) to be used as sustainable alternatives to PE for mulching application in vineyard. Initial ultimate tensile properties, functional properties during field ageing (water vapour permeabili...

  15. Biodegradation of Toluene under seasonal and diurnal fluctuations of soil-water temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, B.K.; Shrestha, S. R.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing interest in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites raises the question of the influence of seasonal and diurnal changes on soil-water temperature on biodegradation of BTEX, a widespread group of (sub)-surface contaminants. Therefore, we investigated the impact of a wide range of varying soil-water temperature on biodegradation of toluene under aerobic conditions. To see the seasonal impact of temperature, three sets of batch experiments were conducted at three different co...

  16. Microbial Community Profiling of Biodegradable Municipal Solid Waste Treatments : Aerobic Composting and Anaerobic Digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    An enormous quantity of solid waste is generated annually all over the world. Solid waste can be divided into three main categories: municipal waste, industrial waste and agricultural waste. The focus of the research presented in this thesis was on the biodegradable fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), and particularly on the biowaste and sewage sludge generated in the Nordic countries. In general, there are two major options for processing biodegradable MSW in a sustainable manner: aerob...

  17. Screening of Biodegradable Function of Indigenous Ligno-degrading Mushroom Using Dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Kab-Yeul; Cho, Soo-Muk; Seok, Soon-Ja; Kong, Won-Sik; Kim, Gyu-Hyun; Sung, Jae-Mo

    2009-01-01

    The process of biodegradation in lingo-cellulosic materials is critically relevant to biospheric carbon. The study of this natural process has largely involved laboratory investigations, focused primarily on the biodegradation and recycling of agricultural by-products, generally using basidiomycetes species. In order to collect super white rot fungi and evaluate its ability to degrade lingo-cellulosic material, 35 fungal strains, collected from forests, humus soil, livestock manure, and dead ...

  18. The potential of cyanobacterium Schizothrix vaginata ISC108 in biodegradation of crude oil

    OpenAIRE

    M Safari; S Ahmady-Asbchin; N Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Petroleum hydrocarbons are a bunch of pollutants hazardous to the environment. Nowadays, biodegradation of petroleum contaminants is considered as one of the most efficient and most cost effective methods of removing oil contamination from the environment. The main objective of this study is to investigate the potential of cyanobacterium Schizothrix vaginata ISC108 in the biodegradation of crude oil and to evaluate oil effects on growth rates, dry weight, and chlorop...

  19. A novel biodegradable nicotinic acid/calcium phosphate composite coating on Mg–3Zn alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel biodegradable composite coating is prepared to reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg–3Zn alloy. The Mg–3Zn substrate is first immersed into 0.02 mol L−1 nicotinic acid (NA) solution, named as vitamin B3, to obtain a pretreatment film, and then the electrodeposition of calcium phosphate coating with ultrasonic agitation is carried out on the NA pretreatment film to obtain a NA/calcium phosphate composite coating. Surface morphology is observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition is determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and EDX. Protection property of the coatings is evaluated by electrochemical tests. The biodegradable behavior is investigated by immersion tests. The results indicate that a thin but compact bottom layer can be obtained by NA pretreatment. The electrodeposition calcium phosphate coating consists of many flake particles and ultrasonic agitation can greatly improve the compactness of the coating. The composite coating is biodegradable and can reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg alloys in stimulated body fluid (SBF) for twenty times. The biodegradation process of the composite coating can be attributed to the gradual dissolution of the flake particles into chippings. - Highlights: ► NA/calcium phosphate composite coating is prepared to protect Mg–3Zn alloy implant. ► Nicotinic acid (vitamin B3) is available to obtain a protective bottom film. ► Ultrasonic agitation greatly improves the compactness of calcium phosphate coating. ► The composite coating can reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg–3Zn twenty times. ► The composite coating is biodegraded by the dissolution of flakes into chippings.

  20. RESULTS OF CORONARY STENTING USING THE STENTS WITH BIODEGRADABLE POLYMER AND ANTIPROLIFERATIVE (BIOLIMUS A9) COATING

    OpenAIRE

    Zeynalov, Rufat; Asadov, D.; M Matini; Mazurova, V.; Gromov, D.; Zakharova, O.; Koledinsky, A.; Iosseliani, D.

    2011-01-01

    The study comprised two groups of patients with coronary artery disease. Then patients from Group 1 received DES with biodegradable coating, and the patients from Group 2 DES with permanent polymer coating. Baseline clinical, historic and angiographic characteristics were comparable in both groups. The rate of restenosis in the mid-term follow up was similar in both groups. The rate of thrombosis was reliably lower in the group of DES with biodegradable polymer coating.