WorldWideScience

Sample records for bio-shielding concrete samples

  1. Fractionation of plutonium in environmental and bio-shielding concrete samples using dynamic sequential extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Fractionation of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239,240Pu) in environmental samples (i.e. soil and sediment) and bio-shielding concrete from decommissioning of nuclear reactor were carried out by dynamic sequential extraction using an on-line sequential injection (SI) system combined with a specially...... designed extraction column. Plutonium in the fractions from the sequential extraction was separated by ion exchange chromatography and measured using alpha spectrometry. The analytical results show a higher mobility of plutonium in bio-shielding concrete, which means attention should be paid...

  2. Tests on standard concrete samples

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Compression and tensile tests on standard concrete samples. The use of centrifugal force in tensile testing has been developed by the SB Division and the instruments were built in the Central workshops.

  3. Concrete sample point: 304 Concretion Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollison, M.D.

    1995-03-10

    This report contains information concerning the analysis of concretes for volatile organic compounds. Included are the raw data for these analysis and the quality control data, the standards data, and all of the accompanying chains-of-custody records and requests for special analysis.

  4. Surface protection in bio-shields via a functional soft skin layer: Lessons from the turtle shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Yaniv; Bar-On, Benny

    2017-01-12

    The turtle shell is a functional bio-shielding element, which has evolved naturally to provide protection against predator attacks that involve biting and clawing. The near-surface architecture of the turtle shell includes a soft bi-layer skin coating - rather than a hard exterior - which functions as a first line of defense against surface damage. This architecture represents a novel type of bio-shielding configuration, namely, an inverse structural-mechanical design, rather than the hard-coated bio-shielding elements identified so far. In the current study, we used experimentally based structural modeling and FE simulations to analyze the mechanical significance of this unconventional protection architecture in terms of resistance to surface damage upon extensive indentations. We found that the functional bi-layer skin of the turtle shell, which provides graded (soft-softer-hard) mechanical characteristics to the bio-shield exterior, serves as a bumper-buffer mechanism. This material-level adaptation protects the inner core from the highly localized indentation loads via stress delocalization and extensive near-surface plasticity. The newly revealed functional bi-layer coating architecture can potentially be adapted, using synthetic materials, to considerably enhance the surface load-bearing capabilities of various engineering configurations.

  5. Radiochemical analysis of concrete samples for decommission of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata-Garcia, Daniel; Wershofen, Herbert [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100 38116, Braunschweig (Germany); Larijani, Cyrus; Sobrino-Petrirena, Maitane; Garcia-Miranda, Maria; Jerome, Simon M. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Decommissioning of the oldest nuclear power reactors are some of the most challenging technological legacy issues many countries will face in forthcoming years, as many power reactors reach the end of their design lives. Decommissioning of nuclear reactors generates large amounts of waste that need to be classified according to their radioactive content. Approximately 10 % of the contaminated material ends up in different repositories (depending on their level of contamination) while the rest is decontaminated, measured and released into the environment or sent for recycling. Such classification needs to be done accurately in order to ensure that both the personnel involved in decommissioning and the population at large are not needlessly exposed to radiation or radioactive material and to minimise the environmental impact of such work. However, too conservative classification strategies should not be applied, in order to make proper use of radioactive waste repositories since space is limited and the full process must be cost-effective. Implicit in decommissioning and classification of waste is the need to analyse large amounts of material which usually combine a complex matrix with a non-homogeneous distribution of the radionuclides. Because the costs involved are large, it is possible to make great savings by the adoption of best available practices, such as the use of validated methods for on-site measurements and simultaneous determination of more than one radionuclide whenever possible. The work we present deals with the development and the validation of a procedure for the simultaneous determination of {sup 241}Am, plutonium isotopes, uranium isotopes and {sup 90}Sr in concrete samples. Samples are firstly ground and fused with LiBO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. After dissolution of the fused sample, silicate and alkaline elements are removed followed by radiochemical separation of the target radionuclides using extraction chromatography. Measurement

  6. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gribok, Andrei V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  7. Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities.Through tangible experiments the project discusses materiality and digitally controlled fabrications tools as direct expansions of the architect’s digital drawing and workflow. The project sees this expansion as an opportunity to connect th...

  8. Ballistic penetration test results for Ductal and ultra-high performance concrete samples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (KTech)

    2010-03-01

    This document provides detailed test results of ballistic impact experiments performed on several types of high performance concrete. These tests were performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility using a 50 caliber powder gun to study penetration resistance of concrete samples. This document provides test results for ballistic impact experiments performed on two types of concrete samples, (1) Ductal{reg_sign} concrete is a fiber reinforced high performance concrete patented by Lafarge Group and (2) ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) produced in-house by DoD. These tests were performed as part of a research demonstration project overseen by USACE and ERDC, at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research (STAR) facility. Ballistic penetration tests were performed on a single stage research powder gun of 50 caliber bore using a full metal jacket M33 ball projectile with a nominal velocity of 914 m/s (3000 ft/s). Testing was observed by Beverly DiPaolo from ERDC-GSL. In all, 31 tests were performed to achieve the test objectives which were: (1) recovery of concrete test specimens for post mortem analysis and characterization at outside labs, (2) measurement of projectile impact velocity and post-penetration residual velocity from electronic and radiographic techniques and, (3) high-speed photography of the projectile prior to impact, impact and exit of the rear surface of the concrete construct, and (4) summarize the results.

  9. Impact of sample saturation on the detected porosity of hardened concrete using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The present work studied the impact of sample saturation on the analysis of pore volume and pore size distribution by low temperature (micro-)calorimetry. The theoretical background was examined, which emphasizes that the freezing/melting temperature of water/ice confined in non-fully saturated...... pores is further depressed compared with that when the pores are fully saturated. The study of the experimental data on hardened concrete samples showed that for a same concrete mix, the total pore volume detected from the capillary saturated samples was always lower than that of the vacuum saturated...

  10. Process and effects of Project BioShield%美国生物盾牌计划的完善进程及实施效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉荣荣; 雷二庆; 徐天昊

    2013-01-01

    The US Project BioShield is a ten-year plan to respond to chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) threat agents. So far, the US government has appropriated $ 5. 567billion for the program. The development and acquisitions under Project BioShield are vaccines and therapeutic drugs which are used to address each of the above 4 threat agents, including Bacillus anthracis( anthrax) .smallpox virus, botulinum toxins, chemical and radiological agents. The implementation of Project BioShield has improved the ability to respond to CBRN terrorist attacks, promoted the development and transfer of basic research products and preclinical development, and enhanced the management system of biodefense scientific research.%生物盾牌计划是美国应对核化生放(CBRN)等大规模杀伤性武器威胁的一项十年计划.截至目前,生物盾牌计划共获拨款55.67亿美元,研发并储备了炭疽芽孢杆菌、天花病毒、肉毒毒素疫苗以及化学、放射和核损伤的治疗药物.生物盾牌计划的实施提升了美国应对CBRN恐怖袭击能力,促进了生物医药基础研究和临床前期产品的研发与转化,推动了美国生物防御体系的完善.

  11. Elemental analysis of a concrete sample by capture gamma rays with a radioisotope neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collico Savio, D.L. [Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear; Mariscotti, M.A.J. [Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear; Ribeiro Guevara, S. [Laboratorio Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    1995-03-15

    Gamma radiation from capture of neutrons in concrete has been studied in the energy region from 0.3 to 10.5 MeV with a HPGe spectrometer and an AmBe neutron source. A careful analysis of the Fe, Si, Ca, and Cl peak intensities made it possible to determine their relative concentrations in the sample. A comparison has been made between this nuclear method and chemical techniques, resulting in good agreement. The employment of these nuclear reactions constitutes a promising technique for the bulk analysis of samples in the concrete industry, because of its nondestructive and in-situ nature. ((orig.)).

  12. Rapid radiochemical method for determination of actinides in emergency concrete and brick samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L; Culligan, Brian K; Kelsey-Wall, Angel; Shaw, Patrick J

    2011-09-02

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in emergency concrete and brick samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or nuclear accident occurs, there will be a urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including building materials such as concrete and brick, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean-up. The new method for actinides in concrete and brick method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The determination of actinides in concrete and brick sample analysis can be performed in less than 8h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles are effectively digested.

  13. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES POURED AUGUST 29, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, D.; Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

    2012-12-20

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples poured 8/29/12 were received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642 was within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.6.1, 8.7.1, and 8.5.3 as measured using method ASTM E 1311 met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density of each sample met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.5.1, 8.6.3, and 8.7.3 did not meet the lower bound. The samples, as received, were not wrapped in a moist towel as previous samples and appeared to be somewhat drier. This may explain the lower hydrogen partial density with respect to previous samples.

  14. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES POURED AUGUST 29, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A.; Best, D.; Reigel, M.

    2012-10-30

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples poured 8/29/12 were received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642 was within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.6.1, 8.7.1, and 8.5.3 as measured using method ASTM E 1311 met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density of each sample met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.5.1, 8.6.3, and 8.7.3 did not meet the lower bound. The samples, as received, were not wrapped in a moist towel as previous samples and appeared to be somewhat drier. This may explain the lower hydrogen partial density with respect to previous samples.

  15. Concrete and abstract thinking styles and art preferences in a sample of serious art collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, Mark C

    2006-06-01

    59 art collectors (30 men, 29 women) were given the Gregorc Style Delineator to classify them by thinking styles and a questionnaire regarding their art preferences. Their ages ranged from 33 to 99 years (M=59.5 yr.). Abstract art was preferred by 34% of the sample. Representational art, such as Dutch Masters and Impressionism, was preferred by 66% of the sample. Of the collectors who preferred nonobjective abstract paintings, such as works by color field artists like Mark Rothko, and Abstract Expressionist paintings, such as works by Jackson Pollock, 62% had scores on the Gregorc Style Delineator by which they were classified as showing abstract thinking styles. Of the collectors who preferred representational painting, 86% were classified as showing concrete thinking styles.

  16. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE PBC-44.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, D.; Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

    2012-12-20

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Sample PBC-44.2 was received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.03 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm3. The average partial hydrogen density was 6.64E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.70E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  17. Ultrasonic Techniques for Air Void Size Distribution and Property Evaluation in Both Early-Age and Hardened Concrete Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaicheng Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Entrained air voids can improve the freeze-thaw durability of concrete, and also affect its mechanical and transport properties. Therefore, it is important to measure the air void structure and understand its influence on concrete performance for quality control. This paper aims to measure air void structure evolution at both early-age and hardened stages with the ultrasonic technique, and evaluates its influence on concrete properties. Three samples with different air entrainment agent content were specially prepared. The air void structure was determined with optimized inverse analysis by achieving the minimum error between experimental and theoretical attenuation. The early-age sample measurement showed that the air void content with the whole size range slightly decreases with curing time. The air void size distribution of hardened samples (at Day 28 was compared with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM C457 test results. The air void size distribution with different amount of air entrainment agent was also favorably compared. In addition, the transport property, compressive strength, and dynamic modulus of concrete samples were also evaluated. The concrete transport decreased with the curing age, which is in accordance with the air void shrinkage. The correlation between the early-age strength development and hardened dynamic modulus with the ultrasonic parameters was also evaluated. The existence of clustered air voids in the Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ area was found to cause severe compressive strength loss. The results indicated that this developed ultrasonic technique has potential in air void size distribution measurement, and demonstrated the influence of air void structure evolution on concrete properties during both early-age and hardened stages.

  18. Evaluation and calibration of a pulsed neutron method for total hydrogen determination in mineral and concrete samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennun, L.; Santibanez, M. [Universidad de Concepcion, Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada, Departamento de Fisica, P.O. Box 160c, Concepcion (Chile); Gomez, J. [Holcim (Costa Rica) S.A, Alajuela (Costa Rica); Santisteban, J.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2011-11-15

    We studied the feasibility of a nondestructive method to determine hydrogen concentrations in concrete and mineral samples. The amount of total hydrogen in the sample is directly related to the proportion of water included in the paste preparation; and also considers all subsequent processes which can add or remove hydrogen in a real sample (like rain, evaporation, etc.). The hydrogen proportion is a critical variable in the curing concrete process; its excess or deficiency impacts negatively in the quality of the final product. The proposed technique is based on a pulsed neutron source and the technical support of the time of flight, which allow discriminating epithermal neutrons interacting with hydrogen (inelastic scattering) from the elastic and quasi-isotropic scattering produced by other kinds of atoms. The method was externally calibrated in limestone rocks fragments (CaCO{sub 3}-main material used in cement fabrication) and in steel, allowing an easy retrieval of the required information. The technique's simplicity may facilitate the development of a mobile measuring device in order to make determinations ''in situ.'' In this paper, we describe the foundations of the proposed method and various analysis results. (orig.)

  19. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants – Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, K.G., E-mail: fieldkg@ornl.gov; Remec, I.; Pape, Y. Le

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Neutron and gamma rays fields in concrete biological shield are calculated. • An extensive database on irradiated concrete properties has been collected. • Concrete mechanical properties decrease beyond 1.0 × 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} fluence. • Loss of properties appears correlated with radiation induced-aggregate swelling. • Commercial reactor bio-shield may experience long-term irradiation damage. - Abstract: A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation.

  20. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  1. A method for disaggregating clay concretions and eliminating formalin smell in the processing of sediment samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1989-01-01

    A complete handling procedure for processing sediment samples is described. It includes some improvements of conventional methods. The fixed sediment sample is mixed with a solution of the alkaline detergent AJAX® (Colgate-Palmolive). It is kept at 80-900 C for 20-40 min. This treatment facilitates...

  2. How Concrete is Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these tw...

  3. How Concrete is Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics

  4. Concrete portable handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Woodson, R Dodge

    2011-01-01

    Whether or not, you are on the job site or back in the office, this book will help you to avoid mistakes, code violations, and wasted time and money. The book's four part treatment begins with constituent materials followed by self contained parts on Concrete Properties, Processes, and Concrete Repair and Rehabilitation. Designed to be an ""all in one"" reference, the author includes a wealth information for the most popular types of testing. This includes: Analysis of Fresh Concrete; Testing Machines; Accelerated Testing Methods; Analysis of Hardened Concrete and Mortar; Core Sampl

  5. Concrete, hardened: Self desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Persson, Bertil

    1999-01-01

    The test method covers the determination of internal relative humidity (RH) in hardened concrete and cement mortar using RH instruments. The determination of RH is done on crushed samples of concrete or cement motar. This test method is only for measuring equipment which gives off or takes up...

  6. Project BioShield: Purposes and Authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-06

    billion to acquire countermeasures against anthrax, botulism , radiation, and smallpox. The HHS has also employed the emergency use authority...HHS to purchase unapproved and unlicensed countermeasures. It requires the HHS Secretary to determine that “... sufficient and satisfactory clinical ...identify cases of this disease.15 As of October 2008, antibiotic kits containing Doxycycline Hyclate are allowed to be distributed to certain people

  7. Pervious Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Pervious concrete is a type of concrete with little or no fines which give a large void. This enables high permeability and because of this it enables water to percolate through the concrete. Pervious concrete have been used in many years both as pavement material and on several other applications in the U.S and in other countries in Western Europe. In Norway pervious concrete is not currently in use. This thesis aims to investigate if pervious concrete can withstand the harsh Norwegian clima...

  8. Structural Precast Concrete Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly.......Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly....

  9. LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE BASED GRANSHLAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NETESA M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Concrete advisable to obtain a low strength with local secondary resources for recycling and reduce the environmental burden on the environment. But it is important to design such concrete compositions with a reduced flow of cement. It is known that the coefficient of efficiency of use of cement in the concrete of the heavy and B10 is less than about 0.5, which is almost two times smaller than in class B15 concrete and above. Even lower coefficient of efficiency in light concrete cement low strength. Therefore, it is important to find patterns determining the composition of lightweight concrete based on local-products industry with more efficient use of cement in them. Purpose.. Based on the analysis of earlier research results, including with the use of methods of mathematical planning of experiments to determine the concrete contents, which can provide the requirements for the underlying layers of the floor, the compressive strength of which should correspond to the class B5. It is important to provide the required strength at minimum flow of the cement, which is the most expensive and energy-intensive part of concrete. Conclusion. Analysis of the test results of control samples of concrete in 28-day-old, the following laws. The required tensile strength of concrete compressive strength of 7.0 MPa can be obtained in the test range when used in formulations as a filler as the Dnieper hydroelectric power station fly ash and tailings Krivoy Rog iron ore YuGOK. To ensure providing the required characteristic strength of the concrete in the underlying layers of the floor is advisable to use a nominal composition per cubic meter of concrete: cement 160 kg granshlaka Plant named after Petrovsky, 675 kg of fly ash Dnieper HPP 390 kg, 400 kg of sand, 230 liters of water. Thus, while ensuring rational grain composition components can obtain the desired strength lightweight concrete based granshlaka plant Petrovsky, using as fillers

  10. Glazed Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Anja Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    Why glazed concrete? Concrete hardens and finds its strength at room temperature whereas clay products must first be fired before they achieve this strength. They are stronger and three times as durable as clay products, which is a weighty reason for choosing concrete.5 Another reason, which....... If this succeeds, it will be possible to manufacture thin, large-scale glazed concrete panels comparable in size to concrete sandwich construction and larger which, with or without back-casting, can work as load-bearing construction elements....

  11. Concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Setareh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    This revised, fully updated second edition covers the analysis, design, and construction of reinforced concrete structures from a real-world perspective. It examines different reinforced concrete elements such as slabs, beams, columns, foundations, basement and retaining walls and pre-stressed concrete incorporating the most up-to-date edition of the American Concrete Institute Code (ACI 318-14) requirements for the design of concrete structures. It includes a chapter on metric system in reinforced concrete design and construction. A new chapter on the design of formworks has been added which is of great value to students in the construction engineering programs along with practicing engineers and architects. This second edition also includes a new appendix with color images illustrating various concrete construction practices, and well-designed buildings. The ACI 318-14 constitutes the most extensive reorganization of the code in the past 40 years. References to the various sections of the ACI 318-14 are pro...

  12. Concrete Hinges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the 20th century concrete hinges developed by Freyssinet and Mesnager were widely tested and implemented in concrete structures. The concrete hinges were used a great deal in closed-spandrel arch bridges. Since such a bridge type has not been competitive for the past 40 years......, the research in concrete hinges has not evolved significantly in that period. But introducing a new state-of-the-art concrete arch bridge solution (Pearl-Chain arches invented at the Technical University of Denmark) creates a necessity of a concrete hinge research based on modern standards. Back when research...... in concrete hinges was more common different designs were proposed for the geometry and reinforcement. Previous research focused on fatigue, multi-axial stresses around the hinge throat, and the relation between rotation- and moment. But many different test-setups were proposed by different researchers...

  13. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  14. NANOMODIFIED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main directions in construction material science is the development of  next generation concrete that is ultra-dense, high-strength, ultra-porous, high heat efficient, extra corrosion-resistant. Selection of such direction is caused by extreme operational impacts on the concrete, namely: continuously increasing load on the concrete and various dynamics of such loads; the necessity in operation of concrete products in a wide temperature range and their exposure to various chemical and physical effects.The next generation concrete represents high-tech concrete mixtures with additives that takes on and retain the required properties when hardening and being used under any operational conditions. A differential characteristic of the next generation concrete is its complexity that presumes usage of various mineral dispersed components, two- and three fractional fine and coarse aggregates, complex chemical additives, combinations of polymer and iron reinforcement.Design strength and performance properties level of the next generation concrete is achieved by high-quality selection of the composition, proper selection of manufacturing techniques, concrete curing, bringing the quality of concrete items to the required level of technical condition during the operational phase. However, directed formation of its structure is necessary in order to obtain high-tech concrete.Along with the traditional methods for regulation of the next generation concrete structure, modification of concrete while using silica nanoparticles is also considered as a perspective one because the concrete patterning occurs due to introduction of a binder in a mineral matrix. Due to this it is possible to obtain nano-modified materials with completely new properties.The main problem with the creation of nano-modified concrete is a uniform distribution of nano-materials in the volume of the cement matrix which is particularly important in the cases of adding a modifier in

  15. 某水电站大坝裂缝化灌混凝土芯样抗剪试验研究%Shear Tests on the Concrete Core Samples for the Chemical Grouting of Dam Cracks of a Hydropower Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 沈蓉; 赵云川; 龚维群

    2016-01-01

    Temperature crack in the pouring process of mass concrete of concrete arch dam and gravity dam could be a hidden troubles that affects the safety of the dam, especially reduces the tensile strength and shear mechanical properties of concrete dam, and also affects the long⁃term stability and the service life of the dam. During the pou⁃ring of mass concrete of a hydropower station, part of the dam was affected by temperature and cracks penetrated through. By using the crack grouting material for the hydropower station dam, we carried out indoor tests and com⁃pared the test results. The indoor tests include:shear test on the original concrete core sample with no crack from the dam, shear test on cube concrete samples with cracks ( made by splitting) and concrete core samples after sim⁃ulation chemical grouting, and shear test on concrete core samples with cracks fully bonded after grouting. Results show that after chemical grouting treatment on the cracks, the shear parameter f ′ reaches the 83% of the original concrete, and c′s the 68%of the original concrete. The result of indoor chemical grouting simulation is better, with f′equaling the level of original concrete, and c′reaching above 85% of the original concrete. Chemical grouting is an effective measure to treat dam cracks and improve the shear strength and the impermeability of concrete. The re⁃search results provide reference for reasonable values of mechanical parameters of concrete after chemical grouting.%混凝土拱坝、重力坝等的大体积混凝土在浇筑过程中产生的温度裂缝可能会成为大坝的安全隐患,尤其会降低大坝混凝土的抗拉、抗剪力学性能,影响大坝的长期稳定性和降低大坝的寿命。某水电站在大体积混凝土浇筑过程中,部分坝段受温度影响,形成一些贯通裂缝。采用该水电站大坝坝体的裂缝灌浆材料,在室内进行了无缝本体混凝土芯样抗剪试验、

  16. Drying of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Geiker, Mette Rica; Nygaard, Peter Vagn;

    2002-01-01

    Estimated and measured relative humidity (RH) change during drying are compared for two concretes, 1: w/c=0.46 and 2: w/(c+0.5fa+2sf)=0.50. The estimations were undertaken by means of the Swedish program TorkaS 1.0. Measurements were performed by RH-sensors type Humi-Guard. Drying of 150 mm thick...... samples from sides at 60% RH and 22 °C took place from 4 to 56 days after casting. At the end of the drying period the measured RH was about 4% lower than the estimated RH at 1/5th depth from the exposed surface for both concretes. In the middle of the samples, the measured RH of concretes 1 and 2 were 2...

  17. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year) and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in t...

  18. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapidevskaya Ol'ga Borisovna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in the paper according to the US Environmental Protection Agency materials. As an alternative, one can use cement-concrete pavement, which is in many ways more efficient than the bituminous concrete. It is proposed to enhance environmental performance of the cement-concrete pavement via usage of photocatalysis. The mechanism of different photocatalytic reactions is described in the paper, namely heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysis, photo-induces, photoactivated catalysis and catalytical photoreactions. It is pro-posed to use heterogeneous photocatalysis with titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst. The mechanism of photo oxidation of air contaminants, with the usage of titanium dioxide is2described. The paper sets problems, connected with the sensibilization of TiOto thevisible light (it is proposed to use titanium dioxide, doped with the atoms of certain elements to increase its sensibility to the visible light and with the development of a new photocatalytic paving concrete, which will meet the requirements, specified for paving in the climatic and traffic conditions of the Russian Federation.

  19. Significance of tests and properties of concrete and concrete-making materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pielert, James H

    2006-01-01

    Reflects a decade of technological changes in concrete industry! The newest edition of this popular ASTM publication reflects the latest technology in concrete and concrete-making materials. Six sections cover: (1) General information on the nature of concrete, sampling, variability, and testing laboratories. A new chapter deals with modeling cement and concrete properties. (2) Properties of freshly mixed concrete. (3) Properties of hardened concrete. (4) Concrete aggregates—this section has been revised and the chapters are presented in the order that most concerns concrete users: grading, density, soundness, degradation resistance, petrographic examination, reactivity, and thermal properties. (5) Materials other than aggregates—the chapter on curing materials now reflects the current technology of materials applied to new concrete surfaces. The chapter on mineral admixtures has been separated into two chapters: supplementary cementitious materials and ground slag. (6) Specialized concretes—contains a ...

  20. 堆芯混凝土样品中63 Ni 的分析测量%Measurement of 63 Ni in Concrete Samples in Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萍; 但贵萍; 谭昭怡; 苏容波; 杜良

    2015-01-01

    为建立堆芯混凝土材料中63 Ni 活度测量的方法,进行了溶样方法的确定、淋洗曲线的绘制、液闪测量效率的确定、回收率实验、去污实验及空白实验等方面的研究工作。混凝土样品磨至粒径小于0.074 mm,用混合酸(V(HNO3)∶V(HClO4)∶V(HF)=3∶2∶1)进行溶解,再通过阴离子交换分离、氢氧化物沉淀及萃取和反萃等样品纯化程序去除杂质离子后,用液体闪烁能谱仪测量其中63 Ni 的活度。该方法的化学回收率为73.05%,放化回收率为71.99%,通过空白实验得出计数的标准偏差为0.200/s,相对标准偏差为12.8%(n=12),方法检出限为3.596 Bq/g。该方法可应用于堆内混凝土材料及非堆材料中63 Ni 的常规监测及应急监测。%In order to develop a new method of measuring 6 3 Ni in concrete samples of reactor, these study were done,including the ways of dissolving the samples,drawing the elution curve,the measurement efficiency,recovery tests,decontamination experiments and blank tests.Samples were ground to 0.074 mm and were pretreated before liquid scintillation counting(LSC)by leaching with mixed acid (V (HNO3 )∶V (HClO4 )∶V (HF)=3 ∶2 ∶1), anion exchange,hydroxide precipitation,and solvent extraction.The chemical yield of this method is 73.05%,and the radiochemical yield of this method is 71.99%.The standard de-viation is 0.200/s and the relatively standard deviation is 12.8%(n=12).The detection limit of the method is 3.596 Bq/g.This method can be applied to the routine and emergency moni-toring for 6 3 Ni of the concrete materials in or not in the reactor.

  1. Concrete Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    2015-01-01

    and poetic appropriations and inscriptions of the bunker site are depicted. Ranging between overlooked side presences and an overwhelming visibility, the concrete remains of fascist war architecture are involved in and motivate different sensuous experiences and mnemonic appropriations. The article meets...

  2. 阿海水电站碾压混凝土长心样取心技术%Coring Technology of Long Core Sample of Roller Compacted Concrete in A’ hai Hydropower Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹琳

    2013-01-01

    A 19.28m complete concrete core sample was successfully removed in RCC dam of A’hai hydropower station. The article introduces the coring technology for long concrete cores in drilling equipment selection, drilling material selec-tion, drilling parameter setting and adjustment, core samples pulling breaking and removing out, core positioning and post maintenance.%  阿海水电站碾压混凝土大坝成功钻取出了一根长19.28 m的完整混凝土心样.从钻孔设备选型、钻孔材料选择、钻进参数制定与调整、心样拔断与提取、出心摆放和后期养护等方面简要介绍了混凝土长心样的取心技术.

  3. High Performance Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Traian Oneţ

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the last studies and researches accomplished in Cluj-Napoca related to high performance concrete, high strength concrete and self compacting concrete. The purpose of this paper is to raid upon the advantages and inconveniences when a particular concrete type is used. Two concrete recipes are presented, namely for the concrete used in rigid pavement for roads and another one for self-compacting concrete.

  4. Concrete spirituality

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on a number of liturgical innovations in the worship of Melodi ya Tshwane, an inner-city congregation of the Uniting Reformed Church in Southern Africa (URCSA). The focus of the innovations was to implement the understanding of justice in Article 4 of the Confession of Belhar, a confessional standard of the URCSA. The basic contention of the article is that well designed liturgies that facilitate experiences of beauty can nurture a concrete spirituality to mobilise urba...

  5. Quick concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Olaya Beracasa, Santiago Eduardo; Flórez Gutiérrez, Richard Daniel

    2016-01-01

    QUICK CONCRETE es un emprendimiento el cual se planteó como una empresa prestadora de servicios en el sector de la construcción en la ciudad de Ibagué, Colombia. Con ayuda de empresas ya reconocidas a nivel regional como lo son: la distribuidora de materiales y ferretería La Española, A&C y la ladrillera Ladrillos Roma. Se espera impactar en el mercado con un método diferente y un precio competitivo de servicio. El mayor impulso de la construcción puede estar asociado a una mayor demanda de v...

  6. Concrete construction engineering handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Nawy, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    Provides coverage of concrete construction engineering and technology. This work features discussions focusing on: the advances in engineered concrete materials; reinforced concrete construction; specialized construction techniques; and, design recommendations for high performance.

  7. Concrete durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar Tébar, Demetrio

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available The evidence that the concrete is not a material for ever was noticed from the beginning of its industrial use. In the present work, the author describes the studies carried out during the last century and the early ages of the present one, mainly devoted to the study of the durability in sea water. At the present days, and in spite of the numerous papers published from then, the study of the concrete durability continues focusing the research priorities and economical resources of researchers and industries related with this material. Moreover, the new laboratory techniques are allowing to understand old problems and even to open again the discussion on reaction mechanisms which were believed to be completely understood. The article finalizes with a brief description of the numerous studies carried out at the Institute Eduardo Torroja on concrete durability, mainly those related with the resistance against gypsum attack (so abundant in our country land and against sea water attack.

    La realidad de que el hormigón no es un material eterno y es susceptible de sufrir ataques por agentes químicos, fue constatada desde el comienzo mismo de su uso industrial. En el presente trabajo el autor enumera los estudios realizados el siglo pasado y a comienzos del presente sobre la durabilidad del hormigón en agua de mar. En la actualidad y a pesar de los numerosos trabajos desarrollados desde entonces, el estudio de la durabilidad del hormigón sigue centrando la atención prioritaria y los recursos económicos de los investigadores e industrias relacionadas con este material. Además las nuevas técnicas de estudio están permitiendo comprender antiguos problemas e incluso reabrir la discusión sobre mecanismos de reacción que se creían completamente explicados. Finaliza el artículo con una descripción somera de los múltiples trabajos realizados en el Instituto Eduardo Torreja sobre la materia, en especial los estudios realizados sobre

  8. STRUCTURAL AND THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF HARDENING CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Krasulina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural and thermophysical properties of thermally treated concrete have been studied in the paper. The paper demonstrates regularities of changes in structural and thermophysical properties of concrete during heat treatment process. It is established that stabilization of coefficient values for heat- and temperature conductivity of concrete corresponds to completion of the process pertaining to intensive formation of the material pore structure and indicates the possibility of transition from the stage of isothermal extraction to the stage of temperature decrease. The obtained results are confirmed by studies of strength growth kinetics of concrete samples.

  9. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  10. The Influence of Crushed Concrete Demolition Waste Aggregates on the Hardening Process of Concrete Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga FINOŽENOK

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Concrete – complex structure composite material consisting of the components with various structure and size. Not only coarse and fine aggregates are used in concrete production, but also filler aggregates. Aggregates of natural, man-made origin or aggregates, produced from recycled materials, can be utilised in concrete production. Aggregates can be produced from recycled materials by reprocessing of concrete and reinforced concrete waste. The influence of the filler aggregates produced from the crushed concrete waste on the characteristics of binder’s paste, when part of the binder (5; 10; 15; 20; 25; 30 % is replaced by such filler aggregate, is analysed in the research. Concrete mixtures with natural aggregates and crushed concrete waste were selected and concrete mixtures of required consistence were produced during the research. Exothermic reactions take place during the hardening of concrete mixture, at that time the heat is dissipated, which increases the temperature of the concrete sample. Thus the exothermic processes were investigated during the concrete’s mixture hardening period and the temperatures of exothermic reactions were determined.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3833

  11. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  12. Comparative testing of nondestructive examination techniques for concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Smith, Cyrus M.

    2014-03-01

    A multitude of concrete-based structures are typically part of a light water reactor (LWR) plant to provide foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) because of three primary properties, its inexpensiveness, its structural strength, and its ability to shield radiation. Examples of concrete structures important to the safety of LWR plants include containment building, spent fuel pool, and cooling towers. Comparative testing of the various NDE concrete measurement techniques requires concrete samples with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. These samples can be artificially created under laboratory conditions where the various properties can be controlled. Other than NPPs, there are not many applications where critical concrete structures are as thick and reinforced. Therefore, there are not many industries other than the nuclear power plant or power plant industry that are interested in performing NDE on thick and reinforced concrete structures. This leads to the lack of readily available samples of thick and heavily reinforced concrete for performing NDE evaluations, research, and training. The industry that typically performs the most NDE on concrete structures is the bridge and roadway industry. While bridge and roadway structures are thinner and less reinforced, they have a good base of NDE research to support their field NDE programs to detect, identify, and repair concrete failures. This paper will summarize the initial comparative testing of two concrete samples with an emphasis on how these techniques could perform on NPP concrete structures.

  13. Porosity of the recycled concrete with substitution of recycled concrete aggregate. An experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Soberón, José Manuel Vicente

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present the experimental analysis of samples of recycled concrete (RC) with replacement of natural aggregate (NA) by recycled aggregate originating from concrete (RCA). The results of the tests of mechanical properties of RC were used for comparison with tests of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), in which the distribution of the theoretical pore radius, critical pore ratio, the surface area of the concrete, threshold ratio and average pore radius were studied at ages of 7...

  14. Recycling of demolished concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagataki, S. [Niigata Univ., Niigata (Japan). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Iida, K. [Technology Centre of Taisei Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    There is a significant amount of research being conducted in Japan on ways to recycle demolished concrete. The material is already being used for road bases and foundations, but in the future, the concrete will have to be recycled as concrete aggregate. Recycling may also include the cement in the concrete in order to address the issue of global warming and carbon dioxide reductions. This initiative is in response to predictions that in the future there will be tremendous quantities of demolished concrete to deal with. Recycling of cement is also necessary in terms of resolving environmental problems and promoting sustainable development. The properties of concrete made with recycled aggregates were described and were compared with original concrete made of known materials. The paper also proposed an approach that should be taken to recycling concrete in the twenty-first century in which reduced limestone was used to reclaim cement. Recycled concrete with cement requires more energy, but uses less resources and discharges less carbon dioxide. Currently, recycled aggregate does not meet the Japanese Industrial Standard for concrete aggregate. The resistance to freeze/thaw cycles was not adequate. The amount of mortar adhered to the recycled aggregate had little affect on the strength and durability of recycled concrete. It was concluded that the quality of recycled concrete aggregate depends on the quality of original concrete. 11 refs., 12 tabs., 11 figs.

  15. Experimental Investigation on the Head Face Optimal Processing Mode of the Concrete Core Sample%混凝土芯样的端面最优处理方式试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立勃

    2015-01-01

    通过对三种端面状态的芯样进行抗压强度试验和分析,发现未打磨的芯样和打磨未修补的芯样,其抗压强度与立方体抗压强度均存在较大差异,同时强度的离散性较大,所以,不应直接用该强度来推定混凝土抗压强度.用水泥净浆修补打磨过的芯样,其抗压强度与立方体抗压强度基本一致,且该法要比用硫磺胶泥修补便捷,因此,在实际应用时推荐使用该法.但需注意,推定混凝土强度时应对强度标准值做一定妥协.%Based on compressive strength test and analysis by three head face states of the core samples found that the compressive strength and the cube compressive strength had a big difference between unpolished and burnished which was unrepaired core samples. Meanwhile,the intensity of large discreteness caused that it was not suitable to make presumption compressive strength of concrete use the strength directly. Core sample with cement paste repair polished its two strengths basically the same,and this method were more convenient than the sulfur plaster repair one,which was recommended to use in actual applications. It was worth noting that presumption of concrete strength when dealing with strength standard values for compromise.

  16. Sustainable Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern over global warming and significant ecological changes requires sustainable development in all fields of science and technology. Concrete not only consumes huge amount of energy and natural sources, but also emits large amount of CO2, mainly due to the production of cement. It is evident that such large amount of concrete production has put significant impact on the energy, resource, environment, and ecology of the society. Hence, how to develop the concrete technology in a sustainable way has become a significant issue. In this paper, some of Korean researches for sustainable development of concrete are presented. These are sustainable strengthening for deteriorated concrete structure, sustainable reinforcement of new concrete structure, sustainable concrete using recycled aggregate and supplementary cementing materials and finally application of each technique to precast concrete.

  17. Concrete Pavement Joint Deterioration

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Concrete pavements are an important part of our national infrastructure. In recent years the relatively small number of reported joints deteriorating prematurely in concrete pavements around Indiana has increased. Changes over the past 45 years in INDOT specification, pavement materials, designs and construction practices, and current de-icing materials were examined and related to the durability of concrete at the joints of existing pavements. A survey of concrete pavements across the state ...

  18. concrete5 for developers

    CERN Document Server

    Uzayr, Sufyan bin

    2014-01-01

    Whether you have had some previous experience with concrete5 or are entirely new to it, this book will help you understand all that you need to know in order to get started with concrete5 development. A background in PHP is required; some knowledge of HTML/CSS is needed in order to fully grasp the concepts underlying concrete5 theme development.

  19. Deterioration of Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Chloride ingress is a common cause of deterioration of reinforced concrete bridges. Concrete may be exposed to chloride by seawater or de-icing salts. The chloride initiates corrosion of the reinforcement, which through expansion disrupts the concrete. In addition, the corrosion reduces the cross...

  20. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Karhunen, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same electrodes. These boundary measurements are used for reconstructing the internal (3D) conductivity distribution of the target. In reinforced concrete, the metallic phases (reinforcing bars and fibers), cracks and air voids, moisture gradients, and the chloride distribution in the matrix carry contrast with respect to conductivity. While electrical measurements have been widely used to characterize the properties of concrete, only preliminary results of applying ERT to concrete imaging have been published so far. The aim of this paper is to carry out a feasibility evaluation with specifically cast samples. The results indicate that ERT may be a feasible modality for non-destructive evaluation of concrete. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2016-03-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m(3) of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m(3) of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96-100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m(3) of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water.

  2. An Investigation of Tendon Corrosion-Inhibitor Leakage into Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1999-07-05

    During inspections performed at US nuclear power plants several years ago, some of the prestressed concrete containment had experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler. A study was conducted to indicate the extent of the leakage into the concrete and its potential effects on concrete properties. Concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant. Examination and testing of the core samples indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the surface was due to leakage of the filler from the conduits and its subsequent migration to the concrete surface through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks with no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength tests indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased relative to the strength at 28 days age.

  3. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  4. Behavior of compacted clay-concrete interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.R. SHAKIR; Jungao ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Tests of interface between compacted clay and concrete were conducted systematically using interface simple shear test apparatus. The samples, having same dry density with different water content ratio, were prepared.Two types of concrete with different surface roughness, i.e., relatively smooth and relatively rough surface rough-ness, were also prepared. The main objectives of this paper are to show the effect of water content, normal stress and rough surface on the shear stress-shear displacement relationship of clay-concrete interface. The following were concluded in this study: 1) the interface shear sliding dominates the interface shear displacement behavior for both cases of relatively rough and smooth concrete surface except when the clay water content is greater than 16% for the case of rough concrete surface where the shear failure occurs in the body of the clay sample; 2) the results of interface shear strength obtained by direct shear test were different from that of simple shear test for the case of rough concrete surface; 3) two types of interface failure mechanism may change each other with different water content ratio; 4) the interface shear strength increases with increasing water content ratio especially for the case of clay-rough concrete surface interface.

  5. Lunar concrete: Prospects and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitab, Anwar; Anwar, Waqas; Mehmood, Imran; Kazmi, Syed Minhaj Saleem; Munir, Muhammad Junaid

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of using concrete as a construction material at the Moon surface is considered. Dissimilarities between the Earth and the Moon and their possible effects on concrete are also emphasized. Availability of constituent materials for concrete at lunar surface is addressed. An emphasis is given to two types of materials, namely, hydraulic concrete and sulfur concrete. Hydraulic concrete necessitates the use of water and sulfur concrete makes use of molten sulfur in lieu of cement and water.

  6. Impact resistance of concrete – using slit rubber from tyres

    OpenAIRE

    Coventry, Kathryn; Richardson, Alan; Diaz, Eli

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines recycled tyre rubber, which was machine cut into slits and these were added to Portland cement concrete mixes in different percentages, based on specimen volume. They were then tested to determine the impact performance of each mix in comparison to a plain non-rubberised mix. \\ud The results indicated that concrete samples containing recycled rubber, exhibited a loss in compressive strength when compared to the plain concrete mix, however, the rubber modified samples were ...

  7. Prompt gamma analysis of chlorine in concrete for corrosion study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-02-15

    Measurement of chlorine in concrete is very important for studying of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is primarily ascribed to the penetration of chloride ions to the steel surface. Preventive measures for avoiding concrete structure reinforcement corrosion requires monitoring the chloride ion concentration in concrete so that its concentration does not exceed a threshold limit to initiate reinforcement concrete corrosion. An accelerator based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed for non-destructive analysis of elemental composition of concrete samples. The setup has been used to measure chlorine concentration in concrete samples over a 1-3 wt% concentration range. Although a strong interference has been observed between the chlorine {gamma}-rays and calcium {gamma}-rays from concrete, the chlorine concentration in concrete samples has been successfully measured using the 1.164 and 7.643 MeV chlorine {gamma}-rays. The experimental data were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations. The study has demonstrated the successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of chlorine in concrete samples.

  8. Prompt gamma analysis of chlorine in concrete for corrosion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2006-02-01

    Measurement of chlorine in concrete is very important for studying of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is primarily ascribed to the penetration of chloride ions to the steel surface. Preventive measures for avoiding concrete structure reinforcement corrosion requires monitoring the chloride ion concentration in concrete so that its concentration does not exceed a threshold limit to initiate reinforcement concrete corrosion. An accelerator based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed for non-destructive analysis of elemental composition of concrete samples. The setup has been used to measure chlorine concentration in concrete samples over a 1-3 wt% concentration range. Although a strong interference has been observed between the chlorine gamma-rays and calcium gamma-rays from concrete, the chlorine concentration in concrete samples has been successfully measured using the 1.164 and 7.643 MeV chlorine gamma-rays. The experimental data were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations. The study has demonstrated the successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of chlorine in concrete samples.

  9. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  10. Molecular survey of concrete sewer biofilm microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Revetta, Randy P; Iker, Brandon; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Garcia, Jarissa; Sullivan, John; Weast, James

    2011-10-01

    The microbial composition of concrete biofilms within wastewater collection systems was studied using molecular assays. SSU rDNA clone libraries were generated from 16 concrete surfaces of manholes, a combined sewer overflow, and sections of a corroded sewer pipe. Of the 2457 sequences analyzed, α-, β-, γ-, and δ-Proteobacteria represented 15%, 22%, 11%, and 4% of the clones, respectively. β-Proteobacteria (47%) sequences were more abundant in the pipe crown than any of the other concrete surfaces. While 178 to 493 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) were associated with the different concrete samples, only four sequences were shared among the different clone libraries. Bacteria implicated in concrete corrosion were found in the clone libraries while archaea, fungi, and several bacterial groups were also detected using group-specific assays. The results showed that concrete sewer biofilms are more diverse than previously reported. A more comprehensive molecular database will be needed to better study the dynamics of concrete biofilms.

  11. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work.

  12. Concrete-Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leczovics Péter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Present paper introduces a new interpretation of concrete, demonstrating some extreme possibilities of this rigid material such as a design element. In the first part a brief overview of the previous achievements are shown. The second part of this paper focuses on the relationship between concrete and fashion.

  13. concrete5 Beginner's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Laubacher, Remo

    2011-01-01

    This book is part of Packt's Beginner's Guide series. You will be guided through the set up of a Concrete5 site with step-by-step practical examples. This book is ideal for developers who would like to build their first site with Concrete5. Some k

  14. The Albedo of Pervious Cement Concrete Linearly Decreases with Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pervious pavements have been advocated as a potential countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. To understand if pervious pavements stay cooler than conventional pavements, the albedo of the pervious concrete must be understood. This study measured the albedo of pervious concrete with different porosity. Four Portland cement concrete mixes were casted, using designed amounts of sand to vary the porosity of the pervious concrete samples. The samples were sliced and the spectral reflectance and albedo of the sliced samples were measured and analyzed. It is found that the albedo of pervious concrete decreases linearly with the increase of the porosity. The albedo of a pervious Portland concrete varies from 0.25 to 0.35, which is 0.05~0.15 lower than the albedo of conventional cement concrete. Due to this lower albedo, it should be cautious to develop pervious concrete to battle with urban heat island unless the evaporation of pervious concrete is promoted to compensate the additional solar absorption caused by the low albedo.

  15. Dynamic Response of Concrete and Concrete Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-30

    Strain Rate Effects on Fracture (ed. S. Mindess and S. P. Shah), Symposium ’- S, Boston, Dec. 1985, Materials Research Society Symp. Proceedings, ". Vol...Reinforced Concrete Subjected to Impact Loading," in Cement-Based Composites: Strain-Rate Effects on Fracture (ed. S. Mindess and S.P. Shah) Materials

  16. Binary effect of fly ash and palm oil fuel ash on heat of hydration aerated concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin; Rafique Bhutta, Muhammad Aamer; Samadi, Mostafa; Sajjadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    The binary effect of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on heat of hydration of aerated concrete was studied. Three aerated concrete mixes were prepared, namely, concrete containing 100% ordinary Portland cement (control sample or Type I), binary concrete made from 50% POFA (Type II), and ternary concrete containing 30% POFA and 20% PFA (Type III). It is found that the temperature increases due to heat of hydration through all the concrete specimens especially in the control sample. However, the total temperature rises caused by the heat of hydration through both of the new binary and ternary concrete were significantly lower than the control sample. The obtained results reveal that the replacement of Portland cement with binary and ternary materials is beneficial, particularly for mass concrete where thermal cracking due to extreme heat rise is of great concern.

  17. concrete5 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Strack, David

    2013-01-01

    The Cookbook-style recipes allow you to go both directly to your topic of interest or follow topics throughout a chapter to gain in-depth knowledge. This practical Cookbook will cater to the needs of both intermediate and advanced concrete5 developers.This book is geared towards intermediate to advanced PHP developers who would like to learn more about the concrete5 content management system. Developers already familiar with concrete5 will learn new time-saving tricks and will find the book to be a great reference tool.

  18. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  19. Injection technologies for the repair of damaged concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Panasyuk, V V; Sylovanyuk, V P

    2014-01-01

    This book analyzes the most important achievements in science and engineering practice concerning operational factors that cause damage to concrete and reinforced concrete structures. It includes methods for assessing their strength and service life, especially those that are based on modern concepts of the fracture mechanics of materials. It also includes basic approaches to the prediction of the remaining service life for long-term operational structures. Much attention is paid to injection technologies for restoring the serviceability of damaged concrete and reinforced concrete structures. In particular, technologies for remedying holes, cracks, corrosion damages etc. The books contains sample cases in which the above technologies have been used to restore structural integrity and extend the reliable service life of concrete and reinforced concrete constructions, especially NPPs, underground railways, bridges, seaports and historical relics.

  20. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  1. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C., E-mail: taylorlanges@utexas.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, 1 University Station C1748, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Juenger, Maria C.G. [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, 1 University Station C1748, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Siegel, Jeffrey A. [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, 1 University Station C1748, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Civil Engineering, 35 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    Radon ({sup 222}Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ± 5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling. - Highlights: • Fly ash or metakaolin SCMs can neutralize or reduce concrete emanation fractions. • The specific activity of constituents is a poor predictor of the concrete emanation fraction. • Exhalation from fly ash concretes represents a small fraction of the total indoor radon concentration.

  2. Functional characterization of two concrete biofilms using pyrosequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phylogenetic studies of concrete biofilms using 16SrRNA-based approaches have demonstrated that concrete surfaces harbor a diverse microbial community. These approaches can provide information on the general taxonomical groups present in a sample but cannot shed light on the func...

  3. Concrete Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is a 20,000-sq ft laboratory that supports research on all aspects of concrete and materials technology. The staff of this facility offer wide-ranging expertise...

  4. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, Jens Peder

    Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high-strength......Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high......-strength concrete. Chapter 2 A description of the factors which influence the strength and cracking of concrete and high strength concrete is made. Then basic linear fracture mechanics is outlined followed by a description and evaluation of the models used to describe concrete fracture in tension. The chapter ends...

  5. Self-Healing Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    履之

    1994-01-01

    Although concrete is an excellent building material because of its abili-ty to withstand stress and compression, it is susceptible to cracking. Car-olyn Dry, an associate professor of architecture at the University of Illinois

  6. Prestressed concrete design

    CERN Document Server

    Hurst, MK

    1998-01-01

    This edition provides up-to-date guidance on the detailed design of prestressed concrete structures. All major topics are dealt with, including prestressed flat slabs, an important and growing application in the design of buildings.

  7. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  8. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Malešev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate (50% and 100% replacement of coarse recycled aggregate. Ninety-nine specimens were made for the testing of the basic properties of hardened concrete. Load testing of reinforced concrete beams made of the investigated concrete types is also presented in the paper. Regardless of the replacement ratio, recycled aggregate concrete (RAC had a satisfactory performance, which did not differ significantly from the performance of control concrete in this experimental research. However, for this to be fulfilled, it is necessary to use quality recycled concrete coarse aggregate and to follow the specific rules for design and production of this new concrete type.

  9. Composite Concrete Modifier CM 02-10 and Its Impact on the Strength Characteristics of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akimov Luka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research is the investigation of effect of the composite additive (a mixture of hyperplasticizer and microsilica CM 02-10 (10 % of MS and 0.2 % of HP on strength characteristics of concrete. Interaction of concrete with plasticizing and siliceous additives individually depending on their percentage content by the weight of cement is also investigated. Results of experiments with such additives on the fluidity of concrete mix and strength of concrete are presented. Additives used in the experiment: superplasticizer S-3, fused microsilica FMS-85, hyperplasticizer PENTAFLOW AC 2, and composite additive CM 02-10. In this paper results of tests of samples aged 3, 7 and 28 days are presented.

  10. High-performance heavy concrete as a multi-purpose shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S M J; Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Roshan-Shomal, P; Raadpey, N; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, M

    2010-12-01

    Concrete has long been used as a shield against high-energy photons and neutrons. In this study, colemanite and galena minerals (CoGa) were used for the production of an economical high-performance heavy concrete. To measure the gamma radiation attenuation of the CoGa concrete samples, they were exposed to a narrow beam of gamma rays emitted from a (60)Co radiotherapy unit. An Am-Be neutron source was used for assessing the shielding properties of the samples against neutrons. The compression strengths of both types of concrete mixes (CoGa and reference concrete) were investigated. The range of the densities of the heavy concrete samples was 4100-4650 kg m(-3), whereas it was 2300-2600 kg m(-3) in the ordinary concrete reference samples. The half-value layer of the CoGa concrete samples for (60)Co gamma rays was 2.49 cm; much less than that of ordinary concrete (6.0 cm). Moreover, CoGa concrete samples had a 10 % greater neutron absorption compared with reference concrete.

  11. Strength and durability of concrete modified by sulfur-based impregnating compounds

    OpenAIRE

    MASSALIMOV Ismail Alexandrovich; YANAKHMETOV Marat Rafisovich; CHUYKIN Alexander Eugenyevich

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine how sulfur-containing compound impregnation influences on concrete compressive strength and the impact resistance of concrete tiles. The results of these studies indicate that impregnation of vibropressed concrete paving tiles and concrete samples of dif-ferent strength classes with aqueous solutions based on calcium polysulfide leads to a significant increase of compressive strength and impact resistance. These data show that the strength of the pr...

  12. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  13. Evaluating plastic shrinkage and permeability of polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Sadiqul Islam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plastic concrete is susceptible to develop cracks due to shrinkage in dry and windy conditions. Addition of fibers could reduce propagation of this crack. On the other hand, permeability determines the durability properties of concrete. This study evaluated strength, plastic shrinkage and permeability (gas and water of concrete incorporating ‘polypropylene’ fiber (aspect ratio 300 in various proportions (viz. 0.10%, 0.15%, 0.2%, 0.25% and 0.3% by volume of concrete. Plane concrete samples were also prepared and tested for reference purpose. Inclusion of 0.1% fiber gave minor reduction (2% in compressive strength while the tensile strength increased by 39% with same fiber content compared to the plain concrete. A significant reduction in crack generation, appearance period of first crack and crack area between plane concrete and fiber reinforced concretes was found. The experimental result with inclusion of 0.1–0.3% fiber in concrete indicated that plastic shrinkage cracks were reduced by 50–99% compared to the plain concrete. For reference concrete (without fiber, test within the high temperature and controlled humidity chamber gave higher crack width than the acceptable limit (3 mm specified by the ACI 224. With the inclusion of 0.1% fiber reduced the crack width down to 1 mm and the trend was continued with the addition of more fibers. However, results showed that with the addition of polypropylene fiber both water and gas permeability coefficient was increased. Therefore, it is concluded that the fiber reinforced concrete would work better for plastic shrinkage susceptible structural elements (flat elements such as slab; however, it requires careful judgement while applying to a water retaining structures.

  14. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Misra; Renu Mathur

    2007-06-01

    The scope of magnesium oxychloride (MOC) cement in concrete works has been evaluated. MOC cement concrete compositions of varying strengths having good placing and finishing characteristics were prepared and investigated for their compressive and flexural strengths, -values, abrasion resistance etc. The durability of MOC concrete compositions against extreme environmental conditions viz. heating–cooling, freezing–thawing, wetting–drying and penetration and deposition of salts etc were investigated. The results reveal that MOC concrete has high compressive strength associated with high flexural strength and the ratio of compressive to flexural strength varies between 6 and 8. The elastic moduli of the compositions studied are found to be 23–85 GPa and the abrasion losses between 0.11 and 0.20%. While alternate heating–cooling cycles have no adverse effect on MOC concrete, it can be made durable against freezing–thawing and the excessive exposure to water and salt attack by replacing 10% magnesium chloride solution by magnesium sulphate solution of the same concentration.

  15. Developing chloride resisting concrete using PFA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhir, R.K.; El-Mohr, M.A.K.; Dyer, T.D. [Univ. of Dundee (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1997-11-01

    PFA concrete mixes were designed to optimize resistance to chloride ingress. Chloride binding capacity, intrinsic permeability and their concomitant influence on the coefficient of chloride diffusion have been investigated. PFA replacements up to 67% and exposure concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 mole/liter were used. Chloride binding capacity was found to increase with increasing PFA replacement up to 50% and to then decline. It increased with chloride exposure concentration as well as water/binder ratio. The coefficient of chloride diffusion of concrete samples was found to be dependent on both the intrinsic permeability of the concrete and the ability of its cement matrix to bind chlorides.

  16. Enhanced radiation shielding with galena concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadad Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concrete, containing galena mineral, with enhanced shielding properties for gamma sources is developed. To achieve optimized shielding properties, ten types of galena concrete containing different mixing ratios and a reference normal concrete of 2300 kg/m3 density are studied experimentally and numerically using Monte Carlo and XCOM codes. For building galena concrete, in addition to the main composition, micro-silica and water, galena mineral (containing lead were used. The built samples have high density of 4470 kg/m3 to 5623 kg/m3 and compressive strength of 628 kg/m2 to 685 kg/m2. The half and tenth value layers (half value layer and tenth value layers for the galena concrete, when irradiated with 137Cs gamma source, were found to be 1.45 cm and 4.94 cm, respectively. When irradiated with 60Co gamma source, half value layer was measured to be 2.42 cm. The computation modeling by FLUKA and XCOM shows a good agreement between experimental and computational results.

  17. Water Entrainment in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    This report gives a survey of different techniques for incorporation of designed, water-filled cavities in concrete: Water entrainment. Also an estimate of the optimum size of the water inclusions is given. Water entrainment can be used to avoid self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage...... during hydration [1,26]. What is needed is some sort of container which retains the shape of the water when mixed into the concrete. The container may function based on several different physical or chemical principles. Cells and gels are examples of containers found in nature. A cell membrane provides...... a boundary to water, whereas a polymer network incorporates water in its intersticious space with its affinity due to interaction energy and polymer entropy. Such containers allow water to be stored as an entity. In relation to concrete the water encapsulation may be accomplished either before or after start...

  18. ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE RCC UNTUK BANGUNAN BENDUNGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handoko Sugiharto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The using of Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC is one of many alternatives that can be used to decrease dam construction cost. Many Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC composition has been developed to achieve maximum compressive strength. Due to the economical consideration and the possibility of the execution, drop hammer system has been used for this research. Compression test is done after the age of the sample reaches seven, 28, 60, and 90 days. The result shows that 60/40 composition of gravel/sand has higher average compressive strength on all age of sample. The highest compressive strength the achieve is 17.78 MPa for 90 days sample. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Penggunaan Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC merupakan salah satu alternatif yang dapat digunakan untuk mengurangi biaya pembuatan konstruksi bendungan. Berbagai komposisi benda uji Roller Compacted Concrete (RCC dibuat untuk mengetahui kuat tekan yang paling maksimal. Ditinjau dari segi ekonomis dan kemudahan pelaksanaan, maka digunakan sistem alat pemadat drop hammer. Dilakukan tes kuat tekan setelah umur benda uji masing-masing mencapai tujuh, 28, 60, dan 90 hari. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa komposisi kerikil/pasir sebesar 60/40 selalu memiliki kuat tekan rata-rata yang lebih tinggi pada semua umur benda uji. Kuat tekan terbesar pada benda uji umur 90 hari mencapai 17.78 MPa.

  19. Moisture and salt monitoring in concrete by evanescent field dielectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riminesi, C.; Marie-Victoire, E.; Bouichou, M.; Olmi, R.

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring the water content and detecting the presence of soluble salts in concrete is a key issue for its maintenance. Evanescent field dielectrometry, originally developed for the diagnostics of frescoes and mural paintings, is proposed as a tool for monitoring the decay of cement-based materials. A measuring system, based on a scalar network analyzer and a resonant probe, has been realized and tested on concrete samples taken from historical buildings in France or purposely developed in the laboratory. Measurements on water-saturated and oven-dry samples provide the basis for calibrating the instrument for on site monitoring of concrete historical buildings, sculptures and cement-based artifacts.

  20. Ancient concrete works

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the ancient Romans were the first to create and use concrete. This is not true, as we can easily learn from the Latin literature itself. For sure, Romans were able to prepare high-quality hydraulic cements, comparable with the modern Portland cements. In this paper, we will see that the use of concrete is quite older, ranging back to the Homeric times. For instance, it was used for the floors of some courts and galleries of the Mycenaean palace at Tiryns

  1. Concentrated loads on concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Karen Grøndahl; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas are devel......This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas...

  2. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomasney, H. [ISOTRON Corp., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  3. The Effect of a Plasticizing Admixture on the Properties of Hardened Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasija Abasova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is material obtained mixing matrix material, coarse and small aggregates and water along with additives acquiring necessary properties of hardening. The quality and properties of raw material used for manufacturing concrete, V/C ratio and the uniformity of the compaction of the mixture lead to the fundamental properties of concrete. The compressive strength of concrete is one of the most important properties of concrete. The article deals with the impact of plasticizers on the structural properties of concrete choosing an optimal content of additives. Concrete plasticizers increasing the content of additive increase the strength of samples, the density and ultrasonic pulse of velocity and decrease absorption. Test results have revealed that a plasticizing admixture under dosing or overdosing can reduce the properties of concrete.

  4. Numerical modelling of reinforced concrete beams with fracture-plastic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sucharda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of models of fracture-plastic materials for reinforced concrete in numerical modelling of beams made from reinforced concrete. The purpose of the paper is to use of a model of concrete for modelling of a behaviour of reinforced concrete beams which have been tested at the University of Toronto within re-examination of classic concrete beam tests. The original tests were performed by Bresler- Scordelis. A stochastic modelling based on LHS (Latin Hypercube Sampling has been performed for the reinforced concrete beam. An objective of the modelling is to evaluate the total bearing capacity of the reinforced concrete beams depending on distribution of input data. The beams from the studied set have longitudinal reinforcement only. The beams do not have any shear reinforcement. The software used for the fracture-plastic model of the reinforced concrete is the ATENA.

  5. Corrosion Inhibitors for Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Steel corrosion in reinforced concrete structures has been a major problem across the U.S. Steel-reinforced concrete structures are continually subject to attack by corrosion brought on by naturally occurring environmental conditions. FerroGard, a corrosion inhibitor, developed by Sika Corporation, penetrates hardened concrete to dramatically reduce corrosion by 65% and extend the structure's service life.

  6. Effects of cyclic chloride exposure on penetration of concrete cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, K.; Hooton, R.D.

    1999-09-01

    Concretes are in a state of flux between saturated and partially saturated conditions as they undergo continuous cycles of wetting and drying. In saturated concrete, dissolved ions enter through diffusion, whereas in partially saturated concrete, ion-containing fluids are absorbed by capillary suction and concentrated by evaporation of water. The primary focus of this study was to examine the effects of cyclic wetting and drying with sodium chloride solution on chloride ingress into concrete. Chloride profiles of samples exposed to various lengths and numbers of cycles were determined for three mixtures of concrete: two containing slag and/or silica fume with a 0.4 w/cm (water to cementing materials ratio) and one with a 0.3 w/cm. It was found that longer drying times increase the rate of chloride ingress. A good relationship exists between the depth of chloride penetration and the square root of the number of cycles.

  7. Thermal Proprieties of Concrete Lightened by Wood Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Taoukil

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is about an experimental study of the thermal proprieties of a concrete lightened by wood aggregates stemming from waste products of the carpentry work. We were especially interested in the comparison between the proprieties of concretes lightened by sawdust and those lightened by wood shavings. The determination of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of various samples allowed us to demonstrate that the incorporation of wood aggregates in the concrete increases considerably its thermal insulation capacity. Also, we found that, at equal mass percentage of wood aggregates, the concretes elaborated from shavings present thermal insulation capacities better than those obtained from sawdust. On other hand, we have examined the influence of the water content on the thermophysical properties of the studied concretes. So, we have demonstrated and confirmed that the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the studied materials are strongly dependent on the water content.

  8. Freeze/thaw phenomena in concrete at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Freeze/thaw damage in concrete is by general practice concluded to be a problem that can be avoided by using air-entraining agents to develop an air bubble structure in the hardened concrete together with the use of a relatively low water to cement ratio in mix. This fact is true for inner damages......, however, the so-called salt-frost damage, occurring mainly at the surfaces of concrete constructions, can not totally be avoided by the above mentioned method. The performance and the mechanisms occurring in concrete, with a substantial amount of water in its micro-structure, at very low temperature are......, however, in most part unknown. In this work samples of concrete at different water to cement ratios and air bubble contents subjected to freeze/thaw cycles with the lowest temperature at about -80 oC are investigated. By adopting a novel technique a scanning calorimeter is used to obtain data from which...

  9. Nanomechanics and Multiscale Modeling of Sustainable Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani Zadeh, Vahid

    The work presented in this dissertation is aimed to implement and further develop the recent advances in material characterization for porous and heterogeneous materials and apply these advances to sustainable concretes. The studied sustainable concretes were concrete containing fly ash and slag, Kenaf fiber reinforced concrete, and lightweight aggregate concrete. All these cement-based materials can be categorized as sustainable concrete, by achieving concrete with high strength while reducing cement consumption. The nanoindentation technique was used to infer the nanomechanical properties of the active hydration phases in bulk cement paste. Moreover, the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) of lightweight aggregate, normal aggregate, and Kenaf fibers were investigated using nanoindentation and imagine techniques, despite difficulties regarding characterizing this region. Samples were also tested after exposure to high temperature to evaluate the damage mechanics of sustainable concretes. It has been shown that there is a direct correlation between the nature of the nanoscale structure of a cement-based material with its macroscopic properties. This was addressed in two steps in this dissertation: (i) Nanoscale characterization of sustainable cementitious materials to understand the different role of fly ash, slag, lightweight aggregate, and Kenaf fibers on nanoscale (ii) Link the nanoscale mechanical properties to macroscale ones with multiscale modeling. The grid indentation technique originally developed for normal concrete was extended to sustainable concretes with more complex microstructure. The relation between morphology of cement paste materials and submicron mechanical properties, indentation modulus, hardness, and dissipated energy is explained in detail. Extensive experimental and analytical approaches were focused on description of the materials' heterogeneous microstructure as function of their composition and physical phenomenon. Quantitative

  10. From concrete repair to concrete conservation: How to preserve the heritage values of historic concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, H.A.; Zijlstra, H.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Nijland, T.G.

    2012-01-01

    The conservation of historic concrete is an increasing task, challenging both concrete repair specialists and conservation specialists. In practice, too often repair strategies are followed where conservation strategies would have been necessary. The application of repair techniques poses two threat

  11. Comparison of different forms of gravel as aggregate in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikiru ORITOLA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gradation plays an important role in the workability, segregation, and pump ability of concrete. Uniformly distributed aggregates require less paste which will also decrease bleeding, creep and shrinkage while producing better workability, more durable concrete and higher packing. This attempt looks at the effect of particle size distribution pattern for five types of gravel aggregate forms, angular, elongated, smooth rounded, irregular and flaky as related to the strength of concrete produced. Different forms of naturally existing gravel aggregate were collected from a particular location and tests were carried out on them to determine their gradation. Based on the gradation the aggregates were used to prepare different samples of grade 20 concrete with water-cement ratio of 0.5. The particle size distribution resulted in coefficients of uniformity ranging from 1.24 to 1.44. The granite aggregate, which serves as a reference, had a coefficient of uniformity of 1.47. Tests were conducted on fresh and hardened concrete cube samples. The concrete sample CT5 recorded a slump of 32mm and highest compressive strength value of 21.7 N/mm2, among the concrete produced from different forms of gravel.

  12. Contaminated soil concrete blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Limbachiya, Mukesh C.; Kew, Hsein Y.

    2009-01-01

    According to Dutch law the contaminated soil needs to be remediated or immobilised. The main focus in this article is the design of concrete blocks, containing contaminated soil, that are suitable for large production, financial feasible and meets all technical and environmental requirements. In ord

  13. Electrical pulses protect concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kasteren, J.

    2006-01-01

    Even concrete is not as hard as it looks. Sea water, salt on icy roads, and indirectly even carbon dioxide from the air can corrode the steel of the reinforcing bars and so threaten the strength and integrity of a bridge pier, jetty, or viaduct. Dessi Koleva, a chemical engineer from Bulgaria, spent

  14. Micromechanics of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-25

    reflects the dispersion of the coarse aggregates on the mesoscale. Specifically, the experimental measure- ments indicate ( Mindess and Young 1981, Zaitsev...Mecanique des Materiaux Solides, Dunod, Paris. Mindess , S. and J. Young (1981), Concrete, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Mura, T. (1982

  15. Mechanics of Concrete II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-18

    Mindess (1981) also agrees with the first of the two reactions but allows for transformation of the ettringite to monosulphate in the case when all...Comp. Materials, 23, pp. 163-194. 3 Mindess , S. and J. F. Young (1981), Concrete, Prentice Hall, Englewood Clifs, N.J. * 74 I Moavenzadeh, F.(1971

  16. Designing concrete for durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Some of the factors affecting the durability of modern concrete structures are discussed, with an emphasis on the problems caused by modern portland cements. This is followed by a description of some concrete durability issues of current interest, such as plastic shrinkage, seawater attack, and sulfate attack. The strategies for testing for durability are also discussed. It is concluded that, to produce durable concretes, a holistic approach to concrete construction must be adopted.

    Se discuten algunos de los factores que influyen en la durabilidad de las estructuras de hormigón modernas, haciendo énfasis en los problemas causados por el cemento Portland. A esto sigue una descripción de algunas cuestiones de interés general de la durabilidad del hormigón tales como la retracción plástica, el ataque por agua de mar y el ataque por sulfatos. Se discuten también las estrategias de los ensayos de durabilidad. Se concluye que para producir hormigones durables se debe adoptar un enfoque holístico de la construcción con hormigón.

  17. Concrete Block Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    1967, Cedergren 1974, Federal Highway .’,U .. V,47 -’":: 37 Administration 1980). Block pavements have essentially the same prob- lems with moisture...Vicksburg, Miss. Cedergren , H. R. 1974. Drainage of Highway and Airfield Pavements, John Wiley and Sons, New VOk. I Cement and Concrete Association

  18. Teaching concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of concrete structures has been revised and a number of new approaches have been developed, implemented and evaluated. Inductive teaching, E-learning and “patches” have been found to be improvements and may be an inspiration and help for others development of the teaching and learning...

  19. Danish High Performance Concretes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. P.; Christoffersen, J.; Frederiksen, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the main results obtained in the research program High Performance Concretes in the 90's are presented. This program was financed by the Danish government and was carried out in cooperation between The Technical University of Denmark, several private companies, and Aalborg University...

  20. Precast Concrete Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    Gorsuch 1962, Kruse 1966, Jacoby 1967, and Hargett 1970). The final slab design used in construction is shown in Figure 2. These slabs were 6 ft wide, 24...Experiment Station, CE, Vicksburg, Miss. Gorsuch , R. F. 1962. "Preliminary Investigation of Precast Prestressed Concrete Pavements," MS Thesis, South Dakota

  1. Hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the maintenance policy of the Dutch Ministry of Transport, Civil Engineering Division, hydrophobic treatment of concrete was considered as an additional protective measure against penetration of aggressive substances, for instance deicing salts in bridge decks. A set of tests was designed

  2. Hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J.de; Polder, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the maintenance policy of the dutch Ministry of Transport, Civil Engineering Division, hydrophobic treatment of concrete was considered as an additional protective measure against penetration of aggressive substances, for instance deicing salts in bridge decks. A set of tests was designed

  3. Combination Of The Non-Destructive Methods For Evaluating The Quality Of Concrete Used In Structures In Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. R. OBAD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study is aboutthe use and comparison of three non-destructive methods (dynamic auscultation, sclerometric auscultation and auscultation by RADAR (Radio Detecting and Ranging to monitor and assess the quality of concrete. Samples of reinforced concrete panels, dimensions 200x100x30 cm of concrete dosed at 350 kg/m3 with diverse E/C ratio were achieved, conserved in the laboratory and subjected to various non-destructive test. The synthesis of the results obtained by auscultation RADAR shows a decrease in the propagation speed of the electromagnetic wave with an increase of the E/C ratio and a decrease in resistance of concrete values measured and confirmed by other non-destructive techniques (sclerometric and dynamic auscultations. This shows that more the dielectric constant is high, morethe concrete resistance is reduced, and conversely the opposite.

  4. Mechanical properties of recycled PET fibers in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pelisser

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced concrete represents the current tendency to apply more efficient crack-resistant concrete. For instance, polyethylene terephthalate (PET is a polyester polymer obtained from recyclable bottles; it has been widely used to produce fibers to obtain cement-based products with improved properties. Therefore, this paper reports on an experimental study of recycled-bottle-PET fiber-reinforced concrete. Fibers with lengths of 10, 15 and 20 mm and volume fractions of 0.05, 0.18 and 0.30% related to the volume of the concrete were used. Physical and mechanical characterization of the concrete was performed, including the determination of compressive strength, flexural strength, Young's modulus and fracture toughness as well as analysis using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Flexure and impact tests were performed after 28 and 150 days. No significant effect of the fiber addition on the compressive strength and modulus of elasticity was observed. However, the Young's modulus was observed to decrease as the fiber volume increased. At 28 days, the concrete flexural toughness and impact resistance increased with the presence of PET fibers, except for the 0.05 vol.% sample. However, at 150 days, this improvement was no longer present due to recycled-bottle-PET fiber degradation in the alkaline concrete environment, as visualized by SEM observations. An increase in porosity also has occurred at 365 days for the fiber-reinforced concrete, as determined by MIP.

  5. Gas and Water Permeability of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Martin, P. L.; Romero, F. J.; Gutierrez-Rodirgo, V.; Barcala, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The gas pressure of concrete samples was measured in an unsteady-state equipment working under low injection pressures and in a newly fine tuned steady-state setup working under different pressures. These measurements allowed the estimation of the intrinsic and relative gas permeability of the concrete and of the effect of boundary conditions on them. Permeability decreased with water content, but it was also greatly affected by the hydraulic history of concrete, i.e. if it had been previously dried or wetted. In particular, and for a given degree of saturation, the gas permeability of concrete previously saturated was lower than if the concrete had been just air dried or saturated after air drying. In any case, the gas permeability was about two orders of magnitude higher than the liquid water permeability (10-16 vs. 10-18 m2), probably due to the chemical reactions taking place during saturation (carbonation). The relative gas permeability of concrete increased sharply for water degrees of saturation smaller than 50%. The boundary conditions also affected the gas permeability, which seemed to be mostly conditioned by the back pressure and the confining pressure, increasing as the former increased and decreasing as the latter increased, i.e. decreasing as the effective pressure increased. Overall the increase of pressure head or injection pressure implied a decrease in gas permeability. External,microcracking during air-drying could not be ruled out as responsible for the decrease of permeability with confining pressure. The apparent permeability obtained applying the Klinkenberg method for a given effective pressure was only slightly smaller than the average of all the values measured for the same confining pressure range. For this reason it is considered that the Klinkenberg effect was not relevant in the range of pressures applied. (Author) 37 refs.

  6. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  7. Self-compacting concrete (SCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    In many aspects Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC, “Self-Consolidating Concrete” in North America) can be considered the concrete of the future. SCC is a family of tailored concretes with special engineered properties in the fresh state. SCC flows into the formwork and around even complicated...... reinforcement arrangements under its own weight. Thus, SCC is not vibrated like conventional concrete. This drastically improves the working environment during construction, the productivity, and potentially improves the homogeneity and quality of the concrete. In addition SCC provides larger architectural...

  8. Life Cycle Assessment of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjunnesson, Jeannette

    2005-09-15

    This is an environmental study on concrete that follows the standard protocol of life cycle assessment (LCA). The study is done for two types of concrete, ordinary and frost-resistant concrete, and has an extra focus on the superplasticizers used as admixtures. The utilization phase is not included in this study since the type of construction for which the concrete is used is not defined and the concrete is assumed to be inert during this phase. The results show that it is the production of the raw material and the transports involved in the life cycle of concrete that are the main contributors to the total environmental load. The one single step in the raw material production that has the highest impact is the production of cement. Within the transportation operations the transportation of concrete is the largest contributor, followed by the transportation of the cement. The environmental impact of frost-resistant concrete is between 24-41 % higher than that of ordinary concrete due to its higher content of cement. Superplasticizers contribute with approximately 0.4-10.4 % of the total environmental impact of concrete, the least to the global warming potential (GWP) and the most to the photochemical ozone creation potential (POCP). Also the toxicity of the superplasticizers is investigated and the conclusion is that the low amount of leakage of superplasticizers from concrete leads to a low risk for the environment and for humans.

  9. Corrosion of steel reinforced concrete in the tropical coastal atmosphere of Havana City, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Castañeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of chloride deposition rate on concrete using an atmospheric corrosion approach is rarely studied in the literature. Seven exposure sites were selected in Havana City, Cuba, for exposure of reinforced concrete samples. Two significantly different atmospheric corrosivity levels with respect to corrosion of steel reinforced concrete were observed after two years of exposure depending on atmospheric chloride deposition and w/c ratio of the concrete. Changes in corrosion current are related to changes in chloride penetration and chloride atmospheric deposition. The influence of sulphur compound deposition could also be a parameter to consider in atmospheric corrosion of steel reinforced concrete.

  10. Gamma radiation shielding analysis of lead-flyash concretes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwaldeep; Singh, Sukhpal; Dhaliwal, A S; Singh, Gurmel

    2014-11-04

    Six samples of lead-flyash concrete were prepared with lead as an admixture and by varying flyash content - 0%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% (by weight) by replacing cement and keeping constant w/c ratio. Different gamma radiation interaction parameters used for radiation shielding design were computed theoretically and measured experimentally at 662keV, 1173keV and 1332keV gamma radiation energy using narrow transmission geometry. The obtained results were compared with ordinary-flyash concretes. The radiation exposure rate of gamma radiation sources used was determined with and without lead-flyash concretes.

  11. Experimental discussion on the mechanisms behind the fire spalling of concrete

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The behaviour of six concretes at high temperature (600 °C) and in particular the risk of fire spalling is studied. Two of the four ordinary concretes are made with calcareous aggregates (including one with polypropylene fibres) and two are made with silico-calcareous aggregates (including one with polypropylene fibres). In complement, tests are also done on two high performance concretes. Tests are performed with two sizes of samples: small samples (300 x 300 x 120 mm...

  12. Micro Environmental Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanez, M.; Oudjit, M. N.; Zenati, A.; Arroudj, K.; Bali, A.

    Reactive powder concretes (RPC) are characterized by a particle diameter not exceeding 600 μm and having very high compressive and tensile strengths. This paper describes a new generation of micro concrete, which has an initial as well as a final high physicomechanical performance. To achieve this, 15% by weight of the Portland cement have been substituted by materials rich in Silica (Slag and Dune Sand). The results obtained from the tests carried out on the RPC show that compressive and tensile strengths increase when incorporating the addition, thus improving the compactness of mixtures through filler and pozzolanic effects. With a reduction in the aggregate phase in the RPC and the abundance of the dune sand (southern of Algeria) and slag (industrial by-product of the blast furnace), the use of the RPC will allow Algeria to fulfil economical as well as ecological requirements.

  13. Interferences in Prompt γ Analysis of corrosive contaminants in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Nagadi, M. M.; Al-Amoudi, O. S. B.

    2006-12-01

    An accelerator-based Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed to measure the concentration of corrosive chloride and sulfate contaminants in concrete. The Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) limit of chlorine and sulfur in the concrete depends upon the γ-ray used for elemental analysis. For more interfering γ-rays, the MDC limit is higher than that for less interfering γ-rays. The MDC limit of sulfur in concrete measured for the KFUPM PGNAA setup was calculated to be 0.60±0.19 wt%. The MDC limit is equal to the upper limit of sulfur concentration in concrete set by the British Standards. The MDC limit of chlorine in concrete for the KFUPM PGNAA setup, which was calculated for less interfering 1.165 MeV γ-rays, was found to be 0.075±0.025 wt%. The lower limits of the MDC of chlorine in concrete was 73% higher than the limit set by American Concrete Institute. The limit of the MDC can be improved to the desired standard by increasing the intensity of neutron source. For moreinterfering 5.715 and 6.110 MeV chlorine γ-rays the MDC limit was found to be 2-3 times larger than that of 1.165 MeV γ-rays. When normalized to the same intensity of the neutron source, the MDC limits of chlorine and sulfur in concrete from the KFUPM PGNAA setup are better than MDC limits of chlorine in concrete obtained with the 241Am-Be source-based PGNAA setup. This study has shown that an accelerator-based PGNAA setup can be used in chlorine and sulfur analysis of concrete samples.

  14. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C; Juenger, Maria C G; Siegel, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ±5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling.

  15. Tonsil concretions and tonsilloliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruet, C W; Duplan, D A

    1987-05-01

    Although infrequently seen in many clinical practices, tonsillar concretions can be the source of both fetor oris and physical and social concern for the patient. Though stones rarely form in the tonsil or peritonsillar area, the findings of calcified objects or stones anywhere within the body has long been a subject of interest. The salient features of these entities and their relevance to clinical practice are discussed in this article.

  16. Design of ultra-lightweight concrete: towards monolithic concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qing Liang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the development of ultra-lightweight concrete. A moderate strength and an excellent thermal conductivity of the lightweight concrete are set as the design targets. The designed lightweight aggregates concrete is targeted to be used in monolithic concrete façade structure, performing as both load bearing element and thermal insulator. The developed lightweight concrete shows excellent thermal properties, with a low thermal conductivity of about 0.12 W/(m·K; and moderate mechanical properties, with 28-day compressive strengths of about 10-12 N/mm . This combination of values exceeds, to the researchers’ knowledge, the performance of all other lightweight building materials. Furthermore, the developed lightweight concrete possesses excellent durability properties.

  17. Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Containing Micronised Biomass Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraya Hani Adnan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on Micronised Biomass Silica (MBS that was produced from the controlled burning of waste Rice Husk. The MBS was used as pozzolan material to enhance the performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete (RAC. Various percentages by mass of Micronised Biomass Silica were applied in the normal and recycled aggregate concrete cube samples. Compressive strength and water permeability tested on the samples at the age of 7, 14, 28 and 90 days showed that concrete containing MBS has attained higher compressive strength. Furthermore, the test on MBS also showed its ability to enhance the concrete water permeability. Lengthen to this; the study established a good correlation between the MBS content with compressive strength and water permeability coefficient.

  18. Sulfur 'Concrete' for Lunar Applications - Environmental Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction material, an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. For the purpose of this Technical Memorandum, it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. With this stipulation, it is then noted that the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. The work presented here evaluates two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar simulant as an aggregate addition. One set was subjected to extended periods in high vacuum to evaluate sublimation issues, and the other was cycled between room and liquid nitrogen temperatures to investigate their subsequent mechanical integrity. Results are presented from both investigations, discussed, and put into the context of the lunar environment.

  19. Estimation of concrete compressive strength using artificial neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić, Srđan; Vasović, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    In present paper, concrete compressive strength is evaluated using back propagation feed-forward artificial neural network. Training of neural network is performed using Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm for four architectures of artificial neural networks, one, three, eight and twelve nodes in a hidden layer in order to avoid the occurrence of overfitting. Training, validation and testing of neural network is conducted for 75 concrete samples with distinct w/c ratio and amount of superp...

  20. Let’s Get Concrete!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Candace; Boxenbaum, Eva

    Scholars emphasize the cognitive or ideational aspects of institutional logics. Less clear is the role of materiality, which is a key aspect of institutional logics, and aesthetic responses to material objects. This study focuses on the introduction of a new building material—concrete— during 1890......-legitimated not only concrete but also stone. Concrete was perceived as merely imitative and thus inauthentic. For concrete to become a legitimate and widely adopted material, architects had to theorize concrete as unique material with distinctive aesthetic possibilities, which led to new kinds of buildings and new...... to 1939 in the architectural profession. Our findings reveal that how professional logics were enacted drove different process for incorporating concrete as a legitimate building material: in France professional and state logics combined to create regulations that governed architects’ use of concrete...

  1. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method.

  2. Jarosite added concrete along with fly ash: Properties and characteristics in fresh state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyansha Mehra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of different properties and characteristics of jarosite added concrete along with fly ash during its fresh state. Jarosite is an industrial by product from zinc manufacturing industry obtained through hydrometallurgical process from its sulphide ore. It has been tried to incorporate jarosite in concrete as sand replacement. Different concrete mixtures have been prepared for three water–cement ratios (0.40, 0.45 and 0.50 and 5 jarosite replacement levels (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%. Cement has been partially replaced (25% by fly ash in all the concrete mixtures. Density, workability and setting & hardening of fresh concrete has been evaluated and analyzed. Keeping the environmental suitability of concrete in mind, toxicity leaching characteristic potential test has been performed on raw jarosite and concrete samples.

  3. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  4. Inspection Strategies for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1989-01-01

    In this paper an optimal inspection strategy for concrete bridges based on periodic routine and detailed inspections is presented. The failure mode considered is corrosion of the reinforcement due to chlorides. A simple modelling of the corrosion and of the inspection strategy is presented....... The optimal inspection strategy is determined from an optimization problem, where the design variables are time intervals between detailed inspections and the concrete cover. The strategy is illustrated on a simple structure, namely a reinforced concrete beam....

  5. Stabilization of electric-arc furnace dust in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Caldas de Souza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric-arc furnace dust (EAFD is a by-product of steel production and recycling. This fine-grained material contains high amounts of zinc and iron as well as significant amounts of potentially toxic elements such as lead, cadmium and chromium. Therefore, the treatment and stabilization of this industrial residue is necessary. Concrete is a well-known suitable environment for stabilization/solidification of materials which have leachable elements in need of fixation. The effect of the EAFD content on the mechanical and chemical performance of Portland cement concrete is investigated in this paper. The effect of the EAFD content on the setting time of cement slurry was also analyzed. The axial compressive strength of the concrete samples increases with the EAFD addition in the range of 10 to 20 wt. (% EAFD; also the tensile strength increases with the EAFD addition. An increase in EAFD content significantly increases the setting time of the concrete. The acetic acid leaching and water solubilization tests indicate low mobility of the potentially toxic elements from the EAFD concrete composite. The results of the immersion tests show that the addition of EAFD to the concrete seems to reduce chloride penetration, which may help prevent pitting corrosion in reinforced concrete.

  6. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  7. Continuous Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with stress and stiffness estimates of continuous reinforced concrete beams with different stiffnesses for negative and positive moments e.g. corresponding to different reinforcement areas in top and bottom. Such conditions are often met in practice.The moment distribution...... at the limit state of serviceability is in some simple cases determined by setting up the statical and the compatibility conditions.With these moment distributions, the maximum deflection and the reinforcement stresses at the span middle and at a support are calculated.The results are compared with results...

  8. Integrity of sulfur concrete subjected to simulated lunar temperature cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2012-11-01

    In view of potential application as a construction material on the lunar surface the mechanical integrity of sulfur concrete was evaluated after being subjected to simulated temperature cycles. Here, small cubes of sulfur concrete were repeatedly cycled between room (20 °C) and liquid nitrogen (-191 °C) temperatures after which they, and non-cycled cubes, were evaluated by compression testing. The compression strength of the non-cycled samples averaged ˜35 MPa (5076 psi) before failing whereas the cycled samples fractured at about 7 MPa (1015 psi). Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate whereas it was seen adhering in those non-cycled. Based on a simple analysis it was concluded that the large strength discrepancy between cycled and non-cycled samples is due to differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion of the materials constituting the concrete.

  9. An attempt to validate the ultra-accelerated microbar and the concrete performance test with the degree of AAR-induced damage observed in concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch [Empa, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Merz, Christine [Holcim (Schweiz) AG, Würenlingen (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    There is little knowledge about the relation between AAR-induced damage observed in structures and the expansion potential obtained with accelerated tests. In this study, aggregates used in structures damaged by AAR were tested with the microbar test (MBT/AFNOR XP 18-594) and the concrete performance test (CPT/AFNOR P18-454). After the tests, the samples were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Based on the results, the significance of the microbar test has to be examined very critically. The agreement of measured expansion, reacted rock types and the composition of the reaction products between the on-site concrete and the reproduced concrete subjected to the CPT clearly indicates that the reaction mechanisms in the structure and in the concrete performance test are comparable. As such, the concrete performance test seems to be an appropriate tool to test the potential reactivity of specific concrete mixtures.

  10. The influence of recycled concrete aggregates in pervious concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. TAVARES

    Full Text Available The expansion of urban areas under constant changes in the hydrological cycle directly affects the drainage of rainwater. The problems of urban drainage become major engineering problems to be solved in order to avoid negative consequences for local populations. Another urban problem is the excessive production of construction and demolition waste (CDW, in which , even with a increasingly policy of waste management , have been an end up being thrown in inappropriate disposal sites. Alternatively aiming to a minimization of the problems presented, we propose the study of permeable concrete using recycled concrete aggregate. In this study, there were evaluated the performance of concrete by means of permeability, consistency, strength, and interface conditions of the materials . Satisfactory relationships of resistance/permeability of concrete with recycled aggregate in relation to the concrete with natural aggregates was obtained, showing their best potential.

  11. Bond Strength Degradation of Corrosive Reinforced Lightweight Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yueshun; LU Yiyan; LI Houxiang; ZENG Sanhai

    2007-01-01

    The influence of reinforced bar corrosion on the bond degradation in lightweight concrete was studied. Accelerated constant current corrosion tests were performed on lightweight reinforced concrete samples, and the influential factors, such as protective layer thickness, reinforced bar diameter and corrosive level were investigated. The constant current step method was used to measure the electric resistance of the concrete protective cover, which was used to characterize the corrosion level of the rebar. Experimental results indicated that the corrosive resistance increased with increasing the cover dimension and decreasing the reinforced bar diameter, and the rate of decrease in the specimen impedance after cracking depended on the cover dimension. A new medium was offered for the further research on the performance degradation of corrosion lightweight concrete.

  12. Prediction of Concrete Compressive Strength by Evolutionary Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nikoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive strength of concrete has been predicted using evolutionary artificial neural networks (EANNs as a combination of artificial neural network (ANN and evolutionary search procedures, such as genetic algorithms (GA. In this paper for purpose of constructing models samples of cylindrical concrete parts with different characteristics have been used with 173 experimental data patterns. Water-cement ratio, maximum sand size, amount of gravel, cement, 3/4 sand, 3/8 sand, and coefficient of soft sand parameters were considered as inputs; and using the ANN models, the compressive strength of concrete is calculated. Moreover, using GA, the number of layers and nodes and weights are optimized in ANN models. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the model, the optimized ANN model is compared with the multiple linear regression (MLR model. The results of simulation verify that the recommended ANN model enjoys more flexibility, capability, and accuracy in predicting the compressive strength of concrete.

  13. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Yusof, E-mail: yusofabd@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Ahmad, Sahrim [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hamid, Roszilah [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga National, Jalan Ikram-Uniten, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  14. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  15. Seals, Concrete Anchors, and Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    the system the cable sizes can be changed even after concreting work _ is finished. i W The structure is also suitable for modern concrete formwork ...1 ruiinn 0i all 3up-H-Stud is a heavy-duty, all steel, expansion wedge anchor types of equipment. Typical applications: tunnel liner panels, air

  16. Proportioning of light weight concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmus, Lars

    1996-01-01

    Development of a method to determine the proportions of the raw materials in light weight concrete made with leight expanded clay aggregate. The method is based on composite theory......Development of a method to determine the proportions of the raw materials in light weight concrete made with leight expanded clay aggregate. The method is based on composite theory...

  17. Fatigue of Concrete Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N. B.; Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    In the present article fatigue as a possible reason for failure of Dolosse armour units made of plain concrete is discussed.......In the present article fatigue as a possible reason for failure of Dolosse armour units made of plain concrete is discussed....

  18. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.;

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  19. Electrical resistance tomography of concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Binley, A.; Henry-Poulter, S. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of using Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to nondestructively examine the interior of concrete structures such as bridge pillars and roadways. We report the results of experiments wherein ERT is used to image the two concrete specimens in the laboratory. Each specimen is 5 inches square and 12 inches long and contained steel reinforcing rods along its length. Twenty electrodes were placed on each sample and an-image of electrical resistivity distribution was generated from current and voltage measurements. We found that the images show the general location of the reinforcing steel and, what`s more important, delineate the absence of the steel. The method may therefore be useful for determining if such steel has been destroyed by corrosion, however to make it useful, the technique must have better resolution so that individual reinforcing steel units are resolved.

  20. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  1. Shear reinforced beams in autoclaved aerated concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different combinat......Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different...

  2. Basic principles of concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xianglin; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the latest version of designing codes both for buildings and bridges (GB50010-2010 and JTG D62-2004), this book starts from steel and concrete materials, whose properties are very important to the mechanical behavior of concrete structural members. Step by step, analysis of reinforced and prestressed concrete members under basic loading types (tension, compression, flexure, shearing and torsion) and environmental actions are introduced. The characteristic of the book that distinguishes it from other textbooks on concrete structures is that more emphasis has been laid on the basic theories of reinforced concrete and the application of the basic theories in design of new structures and analysis of existing structures. Examples and problems in each chapter are carefully designed to cover every important knowledge point. As a basic course for undergraduates majoring in civil engineering, this course is different from either the previously learnt mechanics courses or the design courses to be learnt. Compa...

  3. Study on healthcare magnetic concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yushan; DONG Faqin; FENG Jianjun

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic concrete was prepared by adding SrFe12O9 magnetic functional elementary material into concrete, and its magnetism was charged by magnetizing machine. The effect of SrFe12O9 content on magnetic field intensity and the attenuation of magnetic field intensity were investigated in different medium. The blood viscosity of rats kept in magnetic concrete was carried out. The results show that magnetic concrete can be prepared by adding SrFe12O9, and magnetic fields intensity increases with the augment of ferrite content. The attenuation of magnetic fields is mainly related with the density of medium, but it is secondary to the properties of medium. The blood viscosity of rats decreases under magnetic condition, but the blood cells remain the same as before. Experimental results support that magnetic concrete has great healthcare function.

  4. Rubberized Concrete Durability Against Abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Noor Nurazuwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Durability performance of rubberized concrete against abrasion is presented in this paper. Surface depth loss was measured when abrasion load was constantly applied on concrete surface at each 500 interval rotation. Specimen with water-to cement ratio of 0.50 and 0.35 was prepared and tested at 28 days of curing age. In addition, 10% silica fume, SF was added to provide denser concrete and to understand its effectiveness against wear when added with crumb rubber. Results showed that crumb rubber shows good potential in providing abrasion resistance to concrete mix. However, in the case of rubberized concrete with silica fume, abrasion resistance was found to be slightly decreased with compressive strength more than 50N/mm2 due to the lack of low elastic modulus of CR particles to accommodate with denser cement matrix.

  5. Novel techniques for concrete curing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovler, Konstantin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    It is known that some high-strength/high-performance concretes (HSC/HPC) are prone to cracking at an early age unless special precautions are taken. The paper deals with the methods of curing as one of the main strategies to ensure good performance of concrete. Curing by both external (conventional......) and internal methods is reviewed and analyzed, among other methods of mitigating shrinkage and cracking of concrete. The focus is on the mitigation of autogenous shrinkage of low water to binder ratio (w/b) concrete by means of internal curing. The concepts of internal curing are based on using lightweight...... aggregate, superabsorbent polymers or water-soluble chemicals, which reduce water evaporation (so called "internal sealing"). These concepts have been intensively researched in the 90s, but still are not widespread among contractors and concrete suppliers. The differences between conventional methods...

  6. 基于CT的混凝土试样静动力单轴拉伸破坏裂纹分形特征比较研究%FRACTAL COMPARISON RESEARCH OF FRACTURE OF CONCRETE SAMPLES UNDER STATIC AND DYNAMIC UNIAXIAL TENSILE USING CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党发宁; 方建银; 丁卫华

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the static and dynamic strength and crack evolution law of concrete quantitatively by using CT numbers,the portable loading device suitable for CT scanner is used to carry out the static and dynamic uniaxial tensile tests of the cylindrical concrete specimen. Then,the fractal dimension of CT scan section is calculated by using differential box program. And on this basis,the differences of the uniaxial tensile strength feature,failure mechanism and fractal characteristics of crack of the concrete samples under static and dynamic loading were analyzed comparatively from the microscopic level. The results show that the damaged crack of concrete under static uniaxial tensile load grows slowly,the crack surface is rough and twists,and the crack around aggregate follows the weakest interface. The damaged crack of concrete under dynamic uniaxial tensile load grows quickly,the crack surface is flat,and the crack cutting aggregate follows the path which energy released fastest. The static and dynamic CT scan sections have obvious fractal characteristics. The fractal dimension develops with the crack propagation regularly. The CT scan section can well reflect the crack evolution law of the concrete material and can be used as a quantitative parameter of the crack evolution.%为了能定量地利用CT数资源研究混凝土静动力强度特性及裂纹演化规律,利用适合CT扫描仪的便携式动力加载设备,对圆柱体混凝土试样进行单轴静动力拉伸CT试验,并利用编制的差分盒维数计算程序计算CT扫描断面的分形维数,以此为基础从细观层面上比较分析混凝土静动单轴拉伸强度特性、受力破坏机制及裂纹分形特征。结果表明:静力拉伸荷载条件下混凝土破坏时裂纹扩展速度慢,破裂面粗糙曲折,裂纹绕着骨料追随最薄弱界面发展;动力拉伸时裂纹扩展速度快,破裂面较平直,裂纹切割骨料追随能量释放最快路径发

  7. Influence of metakaolin on chemical resistance of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlinárik, L.; Kopecskó, K.

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays the most suitable and widely used construction material is concrete. We could develop concrete for every request in connection with the properties of fresh concrete and the quality of hardened concrete, too. The demand is rising in application of special concretes, like high performance and ultra high performance concretes (HPC, UHPC). These are usable in extreme natural circumstances or in very corrosive surroundings (for example: sewage farm, sewer, cooling tower, biogas factories). The pH value of the commercial sewage is between 7-8, but this value is often around 4 or less. The concrete pipes, which transport the sewage, are under corrosion, because above the liquid level sulphuric acid occurs due to microbes. Acidic surroundings could start the corrosion of concrete. When the pH value reduces, the influence of the acids will increase. The most significant influence has the sulphuric acid. The pH value of sulphuric acid is about 1, or less. Earlier in the cooling towers of coal thermal power stations used special coating on the concrete wall. Recently application of high performance concrete without polymeric coating is more general. Cementitious supplementary materials are widely used to protect the concrete from these corrosive surroundings. Usually used cementitious supplementary materials are ground granulated blastfurnace slag (GGBS), flying ash (FA) or silica fume (SF). In the last years there has been a growing interest in the application of metakaolin. Metakaolin is made by heat treatment, calcinations of a natural clay mineral, kaolinite. In our present research the chemical resistance of mortars in different corrosive surroundings (pH=1 sulphuric acid; pH=3 acetic acid) and the chloride ion migration were studied on series of mortar samples using rapid chloride migration test. Cement paste and mortar samples were made with 17% metakaolin replacement or without metakaolin. The following cements were used: CEM II/A-S 42.5 N, CEM I 42.5 N-S. We

  8. High performance polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías, M.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the performance of concrete whose chief components are natural aggregate and an organic binder —a thermosetting polyester resin— denominated polymer concrete or PC. The material was examined macro- and microscopically and its basic physical and mechanical properties were determined using mercury porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDAX, X-ray diffraction (XRD and strength tests (modulus of elasticity, stress-strain curves and ultimate strengths. According to the results of these experimental studies, the PC exhibited a low density (4.8%, closed pore system and a concomitantly continuous internal microstructure. This would at least partially explain its mechanical out-performance of traditional concrete, with average compressive and flexural strength values of 100 MPa and over 20 MPa, respectively. In the absence of standard criteria, the bending test was found to be a useful supplement to compressive strength tests for establishing PC strength classes.Este trabajo de investigación aborda el estudio de un hormigón de altas prestaciones, formado por áridos naturales y un aglomerante orgánico constituido por una resina termoestable poliéster, denominado hormigón polimérico HP. Se describe el material a nivel microscópico y macroscópico, presentando sus propiedades físicas y mecánicas fundamentales, mediante diferentes técnicas experimentales, tales como: porosimetría de mercurio, microscopía electrónica (SEM-EDAX, difracción de rayos X (DRX y ensayos mecánicos (módulo de elasticidad, curvas tensión- deformación y resistencias últimas. Como consecuencia del estudio experimental llevado a cabo, se ha podido apreciar cómo el HP está formado por porosidad cerrada del 4,8%, proporcionando una elevada continuidad a su microestructura interna, lo que justifica, en parte, la mejora de propiedades mecánicas respecto al hormigón tradicional, con unos valores medios de resistencia a compresión de 100

  9. Physicochemical Study on the Interface Zone of Concrete Exposed to Different Sulfate Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the visual observations and micro-analysis of concrete core samples after 6 and 12 months of their exposure to sodium, ammonium and magnesium sulfate solutions with the same concentration of sulfate ions. XRD, SEM and EDS were used for micro-analysis of the microstructure and the composition of the interface zone in the samples. The results indicate that the deterioration of concrete by different sulfate solutions could proceed differently with regard to the mechanism and the mode of damage caused. The damage of concrete exposed to sodium sulfate solution is mainly caused by the gypsum crystals formed in the interface zone, which lead to expansion and cracking. In the case of concrete immersed in magnesium sulfate solutions, a layer of brucite (magnesium hydroxide) and gypsum was produced in the interface zone, which reduces the cohesiveness of the interface zone in concrete. For the concrete immersed in ammonium sulfate solutions, the conversation of mortar to some mush mass by ammonium ions and the formation of a large of gypsum occurred in the interface zone, consequently, serious softening of hydrated cement pastes and expansion and cracking of concrete are the characteristics of the attack by ammonium sulfate solutions. Also, it is considered that using drilled concrete core as samples to evaluate the sulfate resistance of concrete is a good and accelerated method.

  10. The effects of latex additions on centrifugally cast concrete for internal pipeline protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Hinkebein, T.E.; Hlava, P.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Melton, D.G. [LaQue Center for Corrosion Technology, Inc., Wrightsville Beach, NC (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Centrifugally-cast concrete liners applied to the interiors of plain steel pipe sections were tested for corrosion performance in brine solutions. An American Petroleum Institute (API) standard concrete, with and without additions of a styrene-butadiene copolymer latex, was subjected to simulated service and laboratory tests. Simulated service tests used a mechanically pumped test manifold containing sections of concrete-lined pipe. Linear polarization probes embedded at steel-concrete interfaces tracked corrosion rates of these samples as a function of exposure time. Laboratory tests used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study corrosion occurring at the steel-concrete interfaces. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) determined ingress and distribution of damaging species, such as Cl, in concrete liners periodically returned from the field. Observations of concrete-liner fabrication indicate that latex loading levels were difficult to control in the centrifugal-casting process. Overall, test results indicate that latex additions do not impart significant improvements to the performance of centrifugally cast liners and may even be detrimental. Corrosion at steel-concrete interfaces appears to be localized and the area fraction of corroding interfaces can be greater in latex-modified concretes than in API baseline material. EPMA shows higher interfacial Cl concentration in the latex-modified concretes than in the API standard due to rapid brine transport through cracks to the steel surface.

  11. Development of Vegetation-Pervious Concrete in Grid Beam System for Soil Slope Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Bao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most efficient and environmentally friendly methods for preventing a landslide on a slope is to vegetate it. Vegetation-pervious concretes have a promising potential for soil protection. In this study, the vegetation-pervious concrete with low alkalinity was developed and studied. Combined with a grid beam structure system, the stability and strength between the vegetation-pervious concrete and base soil are believed to be enhanced effectively. For improving plant adaptability, the alkalinity of concrete can be decreased innovatively by adding a self-designed admixture into the cement paste. The effects of the admixture content on alkalinity and compressive strength of the hardened pervious concrete were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD and compression test, respectively. Meanwhile, the permeability of the vegetation-pervious concrete was studied as well. Through comparing with ordinary pervious concrete, the effect of low alkaline pervious concrete on vegetation growth was investigated in a small-scale field for ten weeks. The test results indicated that the alkalinity of the cement samples decreased with the increase of admixture content, and the vegetation grew successfully on previous concrete. By increasing the admixture content to approximately 3.6%, the compressive strength of pervious concrete was more than 25 MPa.

  12. Porosity of Concrete - Morphological Study of Model Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, J.

    2004-01-01

    This study has developed a comprehensive methodological framework for characterizing geometrical and morphological aspects of pore space in cementitious materials and explored its application to actual cement pastes and model concretes for the purpose of predicting mechanical and transport propertie

  13. PCM Concrete. [Phase Change Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juul Andersen, T. [Danish Technological Institute, Taastrup (Denmark); Poulsen, H.-H. [BASF A/S, Roedekro (Denmark); Passov, F. [Spaencom A/S, Hedehusene (Denmark); Heiselberg, P. [Aalborg Univ..Aalborg (Denmark)

    2013-04-01

    PCM-Concrete was a research and development project launched in 2009 and finished in 2012. The project, which was funded by The Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation, had a total budget of 1.7 million Euros and included 4 partners: Danish Technological Institute (project manager), Aalborg University, BASF A/S and Spaencom A/S. The overall vision of the project was to reduce energy consumption for heating and cooling in buildings by developing high-performance concrete structures microencapsulated Phase Change Materials (PCM). The PCM used in the project was Micronal produced by BASF A/S. Micronal is small capsules with an acrylic shell and inside a wax with a melting point at approx. 23 deg. C equal to a comfortable indoor temperature. During the melting process thermal energy is transferred to chemical reaction (melting/solidification) depending on PCM being heated up or cooled down. Adding Micronal to concrete would theoretically increase the thermal mass of the concrete and improve the diurnal heat capacity which is the amount of energy that can be stored and released during 24 hours. Nevertheless, it is a relatively new technology that has not received much attention, yet. In the PCM-Concrete project 5 main investigations were carried out: 1) Development of concrete mix design with PCM. 2) Investigation of thermal properties of the PCM concrete: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, density. 3) Up-scaling the research to industrial production of PCM-concrete structures. 4) Testing energy efficiency in full scale. 5) Confronting aesthetic and acoustic barriers to full exploitation of the potential of PCM-concrete structures. The results from the test program showed: 1) That the diurnal heat storage capacity is higher for all 4 hollow core decks with tiles attached compared to the reference hollow core deck. 2) The hollow core decks with concrete tiles without PCM performs slightly better than the tiles with PCM. 3) That is was impossible to

  14. Chlorine detection in fly ash concrete using a portable neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Kalakada, Zameer; Al-Matouq, Faris A; Maslehuddin, M; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2012-08-01

    The chlorine concentration in chloride-contaminated FA cement concrete specimens was measured using a portable neutron generator based prompt gamma-ray neutron activation (PGNAA) setup with the neutron generator and the gamma-ray detector placed side-by-side on one side of the concrete sample. The minimum detectable concentration of chlorine in FA cement concrete measured in the present study was comparable with previous results for larger accelerator based PGNAA setup. It shows the successful application of a portable neutron generator in concrete corrosion studies.

  15. Concrete ice abrasion rig and wear measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamsutdinova, G.; Rike, P.B.; Hendriks, M.A.N.; Jacobsen, S.

    2015-01-01

    The wear of concrete material due to ice movement is a challenge for offshore and coastal structures. Concrete surfaces exposed to moving ice are subjected to wear at various rates depending on concrete and ice properties. At NTNU, Department of Structural Engineering, concrete ice abrasion phenomen

  16. Understanding the tensile properties of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.

    2013-01-01

    The response of concrete under tensile loading is crucial for most applications because concrete is much weaker in tension than in compression. Understanding the response mechanisms of concrete under tensile conditions is therefore key to understanding and using concrete in structural applications.

  17. Method of effective evaluation for examination of chloride ion in concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNG Wen-pei; CHEN Kuen-suan; LIN Hsue-chun

    2005-01-01

    The chloride ion contained in reinforced concrete seriously corrodes the steel surface and damages concrete, resulting in inferior reinforced concrete that strength seriously compromises the entire structure's safety. Consequently, the examination of chloride ions contained in reinforced concrete becomes an important part of a complete quality control procedure. To effectively check the concentration of chloride ions in concrete, the evaluation process should be accurate and precise. Laboratory data obtained using existing evaluation methods for the examination of chloride ion are not sufficiently objective to yield reliable results with accuracy and consistency for each sample. An evaluation algorithm with capability to define indices of precision degree (Ep)and accuracy degree (Ea) is presented in this paper. The authors established a statistically reliable index of unbiased estimators and equations to critically examine the laboratory methods' precision, accuracy degrees and application value for measuring chlorine ion concentration in reinforced concrete.

  18. Study of the fracture behavior of mortar and concretes with crushed rock or pebble aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to compare the fracture energy of mortar and concretes produced with crushed rock and pebble aggregates using zero, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of aggregates mixed with standard mortar and applying the wedge splitting method to achieve stable crack propagation. The samples were cast in a special mold and cured for 28 days, after which they were subjected to crack propagation tests by the wedge splitting method to determine the fracture energies of the mortar and concrete. The concretes showed higher fracture energy than the mortar, and the concretes containing crushed rock showed higher resistance to crack propagation than all the compositions containing pebbles. The fracture energy varied from 38 to 55 J.m-2. A comparison of the number of aggregates that separated from the two concrete matrices with the highest fracture energies indicated that the concrete containing pebbles crumbled more easily and was therefore less resistant to crack propagation.

  19. Towards Better Understanding of Concrete Containing Recycled Concrete Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Qasrawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of using recycled concrete aggregates (RCA on the basic properties of normal concrete is studied. First, recycled aggregate properties have been determined and compared to those of normal aggregates. Except for absorption, there was not a significant difference between the two. Later, recycled aggregates were introduced in concrete mixes. In these mixes, natural coarse aggregate was partly or totally replaced by recycled aggregates. Results show that the use of recycled aggregates has an adverse effect on the workability and air content of fresh concrete. Depending on the water/cement ratio and on the percent of the normal aggregate replaced by RCA, the concrete strength is reduced by 5% to 25%, while the tensile strength is reduced by 4% to 14%. All results are compared with previous research. As new in this research, the paper introduces a simple formula for the prediction of the modulus of elasticity of RCA concrete. Furthermore, the paper shows the variation of the air content of RAC.

  20. Effect of Temperature and Age of Concrete on Strength – Porosity Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zadražil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The compressive strengths of unsealed samples of concrete at the age of 180 days and have been measured at temperatures 20 °C, 300 °C, 600 °C and 900 °C. All of tests were performed for cold material. We compared our results with those obtained in [10] for the same type of concrete (age 28, resp. 90 days and measured at temperature ranging from 20 °C to 280 °C. Dependencies of compressive strength and porosity were correlated together and compared for the samples of age 28, 90 and 180 days. Behaviour of concrete of the age 90, resp. 180 days confirms generally accepted hypothesis that with increasing porosity strength of the concrete decreases. It has to be stressed out, howerer, that concrete samples of the age 28 days exhibit totally opposite dependency. 

  1. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin, E-mail: pauzi@nm.gov.my; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri [NDT Group, Nuclear Malaysia, Bangi, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin [Material Technology Program, Faculty of Applied Sciences, UiTM, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin [Pusat Penyelidikan Mineral, Jabatan Mineral dan Geosains, Ipoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  2. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  3. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  4. Applicability of recycled aggregates in concrete piles for soft soil improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Junior, Ronaldo A; Balestra, Carlos Et; Lima, Maryangela G

    2017-01-01

    The expressive generation of construction and demolition waste is stimulating several studies for reusing this material. The improvement of soft soils by concrete compaction piles has been widely applied for 40 years in some Brazilian cities. This technique is used to improve the bearing capacity of soft soils, allowing executing shallow foundations instead of deep foundations. The compaction piles use a high volume of material. This article explored the possibility of using recycled aggregates from construction waste to replace the natural aggregates in order to improve the bearing capacity of the soft soil, regarding its compressive strength. Construction wastes from different stages of a construction were used in order to make samples of concrete with recycled aggregates. The strength of concretes with natural aggregates was compared with the strength of concretes with recycled (fine and coarse) aggregates. Results show that all samples met the minimum compressive strength specified for compaction piles used to improve the bearing capacity of soft soils. The concrete with recycled aggregate from the structural stage had even higher resistances than the concrete with natural aggregates. This behaviour was attributed to the large amount of cementitious materials in the composition of this type of concrete. It was also observed that concrete with recycled fine aggregate has a superior resistance to concrete with recycled coarse aggregate.

  5. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, H.S.; Lens, P.N.L.; Nielsen, J.L.; Bester, K.; Nielsen, A.H.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.; Vollertsen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria,

  6. Self healing phenomena in concretes and masonry mortars: A microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Lubelli, B.A.; Rooij, M.R. de

    2007-01-01

    A microscopic survey of over 1000 of samples of concrete and masonry mortars from structures in the Netherlands shows that, in practice, self healing occurs in historic lime and lime – puzzolana mortars, in contrast to modern cement bound concretes and mortars. Self healing may be effected by the fo

  7. CBP [TASK 12] experimental study of the concrete salstone two-layer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, Eric [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Ville de Québec, QC (Canada); Protiere, Yannick [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Ville de Québec, QC (Canada)

    2016-11-01

    This report presents the results of a study which intended to study the behavior of concrete samples placed in contact with a wasteform mixture bearing high level of sulfate in its pore solution. A setup was prepared which consisted in a wasteform poured on top of vault concrete mixes (identified as Vault 1/4 and Vault 2 mixes) cured for approximately 6 months.

  8. Cellular fiber–reinforced concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Isachenko S.; Kodzoev M.

    2016-01-01

    Methods disperse reinforcement of concrete matrix using polypropylene, glass, basalt and metal fibers allows to make the construction of complex configuration, solve the problem of frost products. Dispersed reinforcement reduces the overall weight of the structures. The fiber replaces the secondary reinforcement, reducing the volume of use of structural steel reinforcement. Cellular Fiber concretes are characterized by high-performance properties, especially increased bending strength and...

  9. Porous Structure of Road Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such st...

  10. The influence of filler type on the corrosion stability of the sulfure concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojković Velislav M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur concrete was prepared by using the initial components: sand as an aggregate, modified sulfur binder, and talc, alumina, microsilica, and fly ash as fillers. Portland cement concrete was made of the same aggregate and fillers and portland cement. The durability of prepared concrete samples was tested in following aggressive solutions: 10% HCl, 20% H2SO4, and 3% NaCl as a function of time. Changes in mass and strength of the sulfur concrete were monitored periodicallly during the immersion time of 360 days in above solutions. These changes were used as a measure of deterioration level. It should be highlighted that the samples with the ash and especially talc exhibit higher durability in the solutions of HCl and H2SO4 than the samples with alumina and microsilica. In the solutions of NaCl all samples shown excellent durability while the samples with talc were the best. Portland cement concrete samples after two months lost 20 % of mass and shown degradation of mechanical properties. By usage of sulfur for sulfur concrete production, huge environmental problem regarding storage of waste sulfur from oil refining process is solved. On the other hand, sulfur concrete with its low price has an excellent quality for the application in aggressive environments unlike more expensive PCC.

  11. Digital laminography assessment of the damage in concrete exposed to freezing temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Wakimoto, Kentaro

    2008-10-01

    The research explores the possibility of using digital laminography as a non-destructive inspection X-ray method to image the damage existing in concrete exposed to low temperatures. Freezing-thawing and scaling tests were performed and digital laminography was used to determine the degree of damage existing inside the concrete samples. First, digital laminography was performed on the concrete sample and then a visual inspection was done by slicing the sample after it was vacuum-impregnated with epoxy in order to compare the differences in crack width. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Computation of Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onwuka, D.O

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available - In this presentation, a computer based method which uses a set of algebraic equations and statistical data, were used to compute concrete mixes for prescribeable elastic concrete modulus, and vice versa. The computer programs based on Simplex and Regression theories can be used to predict several mix proportions for obtaining a desired modulus of elasticity of concrete made from crushed granite rock and other materials. The modulus of elasticity of concrete predicted by these programs agreed with experimentally obtained values. The programs are easy and inexpensive to use, and give instant and accurate results. For example, if the modulus of elasticity is specified as input, the computer instantly prints out all possible concrete mix ratios that can yield concrete having the specified elastic modulus. When the concrete mix ratio is specified as input, the computer quickly prints out the elastic modulus of the concrete obtainable from a given concrete mix ratio.

  13. Retrofitting Of Reinforced Concrete Column by Steel Jacketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Jodawat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures often require strengthening to increase their capacity to sustain additional loads, due to change in use that resulted in additional live loads, deterioration of the load carrying elements, design errors, construction problems during erection, aging of structure itself or upgrading to confirm to current code requirements. These situations may require additional concrete elements or the entire concrete structure to be strengthened, repaired or retrofitted. Common methods for strengthening columns include concrete jacketing, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP jacketing and steel jacketing. All these methods have been shown to effectively increase the axial load capacity of columns. The experimental study was carried out on RC column on designed and detailed using IS 456:2000 provisions. The concrete mix design being performed after conducting numerous material test and cube test to validate expected strength as per specified grade of concrete. The trial testing conducted to estimate load at 1st crack and failure load for normal RC column with capturing displacement using dial gauges at regular load increment in UTM. The loading conditions are decided based on failure load to induce cracks in column under 85% loading of the failure one. In all fifteen specimen casted and tested with three samples for failure load estimation, three samples each for plate jacketing & angle battening system and three samples each for plate jacketing & angle battening with column preloaded to 85% of its failure load. The angle batten system proves to be better compared to full plate retrofitting in terms of load carrying capacity and enhancing confinement effect.

  14. Radiological and material characterization of high volume fly ash concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatović, I; Sas, Z; Dragaš, J; Somlai, J; Kovács, T

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of research presented in this paper was the material and radiological characterization of high volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) in terms of determination of natural radionuclide content and radon emanation and exhalation coefficients. All concrete samples were made with a fly ash content between 50% and 70% of the total amount of cementitious materials from one coal burning power plant in Serbia. Physical (fresh and hardened concrete density) and mechanical properties (compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) of concrete were tested. The radionuclide content ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) and radon massic exhalation of HVFAC samples were determined using gamma spectrometry. Determination of massic exhalation rates of HVFAC and its components using radon accumulation chamber techniques combined with a radon monitor was performed. The results show a beneficial effect of pozzolanic activity since the increase in fly ash content resulted in an increase in compressive strength of HVFAC by approximately 20% for the same mass of cement used in the mixtures. On the basis of the obtained radionuclide content of concrete components the I -indices of different HVFAC samples were calculated and compared with measured values (0.27-0.32), which were significantly below the recommended 1.0 index value. The prediction was relatively close to the measured values as the ratio between the calculated and measured I-index ranged between 0.89 and 1.14. Collected results of mechanical and radiological properties and performed calculations clearly prove that all 10 designed concretes with a certain type of fly ash are suitable for structural and non-structural applications both from a material and radiological point of view.

  15. Natural aggregate totally replacement by mechanically treated concrete waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junak Jozef

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from the research focused on the utilization of crushed concrete waste aggregates as a partial or full replacement of 4/8 and 8/16 mm natural aggregates fraction in concrete strength class C 16/20. Main concrete characteristics such as workability, density and compressive strength were studied. Compressive strength testing intervals for samples with recycled concrete aggregates were 2, 7, 14 and 28 days. The amount of water in the mixtures was indicative. For mixture resulting consistency required slump grade S3 was followed. Average density of all samples is in the range of 2250 kg/m3 to 2350 kg/m3. The highest compressive strength after 28 days of curing, 34.68 MPa, reached sample, which contained 100% of recycled material in 4/8 mm fraction and 60% of recycled aggregates in 8/16 mm fraction. This achieved value was only slightly different from the compressive strength 34.41 MPa of the reference sample.

  16. Optimal formulations of some asphalt concrete roadway protective impregnation compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia A. Ubas’kina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current paper describes optimization of the formulations of asphalt concrete roadway protective impregnation compositions based on BND 60/90 bitumen modified with petroleum resin. Physicochemical, technological and operating parameters of the prepared samples of the compositions are investigated.

  17. An Experimental and Numerical Study on Embedded Rebar Diameter in Concrete Using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Istiaque Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR has been widely used to detect and locate rebars in concrete. In this paper, a method of estimating the diameter of steel rebars in concrete with GPR is investigated. The relationship between the maximum normalized positive GPR amplitude from embedded rebars and the rebar diameter was established. Concrete samples with rebars of different diameters were cast and the maximum normalized amplitudes were recorded using a 2.6 GHz GPR antenna. Numerical models using GPRMAX software were developed and verified with the experimental data. The numerical models were then used to investigate the effect of dielectric constant of concrete and concrete cover on the maximum normalized amplitude. The results showed that there is an approximate linear relationship between the rebar diameter and the maximum GPR normalized amplitude. The developed models can be conveniently used to estimate the embedded rebar diameters in existing concrete with GPR scanning; if the concrete is homogeneous, the cover depth is known and the concrete dielectric constant is also known. The models will be highly beneficial in forensic investigations of existing concrete structures with unknown rebar sizes and locations.

  18. Research on fracture performance of epoxy asphalt concrete based on double-K fracture criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Qian, Z. D.; Xue, Y. C.

    2017-01-01

    After cracks appear on steel bridge deck epoxy asphalt concrete pavement, cracks propagate fast under vehicle load. This paper studied the fracture performance of epoxy asphalt concrete, utilized single edge notched beam (SEB) three-point bending test, measured the load (P) exerted on epoxy asphalt SEB; utilized digital camera to record the fracture process of epoxy asphalt SEB, extracted the images according to the required sampling frequency and utilized Image-Pro Plus to measure the crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) of epoxy asphalt SEB on the extracted images; calculated the double-K fracture parameters according to the P-CMOD curve. Results indicate that of epoxy asphalt concrete is 1.11 MPa and of epoxy asphalt concrete is 2.31 MPa at -15°C of epoxy asphalt concrete is 1.02 MPa and of epoxy asphalt concrete is 1.83 MPa at -5°C of epoxy asphalt concrete is 0.77 MPa and of epoxy asphalt concrete is 1.82 MPa at 5°C. The double-K fracture parameters of epoxy asphalt concrete increase slightly when the temperature decreases at the scope of -15°C to 5°C. The relation of and is .

  19. Numerical simulations of concrete flow: A benchmark comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Gram, Annika; Cremonesi, Massimiliano;

    2016-01-01

    First, we define in this paper two benchmark flows readily usable by anyone calibrating a numerical tool for concrete flow prediction. Such benchmark flows shall allow anyone to check the validity of their computational tools no matter the numerical methods and parameters they choose. Second, we...... compare numerical predictions of the concrete sample final shape for these two benchmark flows obtained by various research teams around the world using various numerical techniques. Our results show that all numerical techniques compared here give very similar results suggesting that numerical...

  20. Comparative Analysis of Measured and Predicted Shrinkage Strain in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kossakowski P. G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the issues related to concrete shrinkage. The basic information on the phenomenon is presented as well as the factors that determine the contraction are pointed out and the stages of the process are described. The guidance for estimating the shrinkage strain is given according to Eurocode standard PN-EN 1992-1-1:2008. The results of studies of the samples shrinkage strain of concrete C25/30 are presented with a comparative analysis of the results estimated by the guidelines of the standard according to PN-EN 1992-1- 1:2008

  1. A study on sodium-concrete reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Heum; Min, Byong Hun [Suwon University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    A small sodium-concrete reaction facility was designed, manufactured and installed. this facility has been operated under inert gas(N{sub 2}) with different experimental variables such as sodium injection temperature, injection amount of sodium, aging period of concrete, sodium reservoir temperature. As a result, it was found that sodium injection temperature and injected amount of sodium has little effect on sodium-concrete reaction. However, sodium reservoir temperature and aging period of concrete has relatively high impact on sodium-concrete reaction. Sodium-concrete reaction model has also been developed and compared with experimental results. (Author) 51 refs., 16 tabs., 64 figs.

  2. Carbonation-Related Microstructural Changesin Long-Term Durability Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio A. Rigo da Silva

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effects of carbonation on the microstructure of Portland cement concrete for long-term durability applications. A class C40 concrete (characteristic compression strength between 40 MPa and 44 MPa on the 28th day, according to Brazilian standard NBR 8953 was chosen for the experimental study of the carbonation effects, from which test samples were molded for accelerated test under a 100%-CO2 atmosphere after physical and mechanical characterization. It was observed that carbonation provoked a reduction of 5% to 12% of the concrete open porosity accessible to water. Flexural strength values obtained after the carbonation tests revealed a decrease of 12% and 25% in relation to the values obtained before tests on the 28th and 91st days, respectively.

  3. Porosity and Mechanical Strength of an Autoclaved Clayey Cellular Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Guglielmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the porosity and the mechanical strength of an Autoclaved Clayey Cellular Concrete (ACCC with the binder produced with 75 wt% kaolinite clay and 25 wt% Portland cement. Aluminum powder was used as foaming agent, from 0.2 wt% to 0.8 wt%, producing specimens with different porosities. The results show that the specimens with higher content of aluminum presented pore coalescence, which can explain the lower porosity of these samples. The porosities obtained with the aluminum contents used in the study were high (approximately 80%, what accounts for the low mechanical strength of the investigated cellular concretes (maximum of 0.62 MPa. Nevertheless, comparing the results obtained in this study to the ones for low temperature clayey aerated concrete with similar compositions, it can be observed that autoclaving is effective for increasing the material mechanical strength.

  4. EFFECT OF PORTLAND-POZZOLAN CEMENTS ON CONCRETE MATURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arın YILMAZ

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The maturity concept expressed by the combined effect of time and temperature on the concrete is a useful technique for prediction of the strength gain of concrete. According to maturity concept, samples of the same concrete at same maturity whatever combination of temperature and time, have approximately the same strength. Many maturity functions have been proposed for the last 50 years. The validity of these functions are only for ordinary portland cements. In this study, the suitable of traditional maturity functions for different types of Portland-pozzolan cements were investigated and a new maturity-strength relationship was tried to be established. For this purpose, four different pozzolans and one Portland cement was selected. Portland-pozzolan cements were prepared by using three different replacement amounts of % 5, % 20 and 40 % by weight of cement.

  5. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  6. Characteristics of treated effluents and their potential applications for producing concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noruzman, Ainul Haezah; Muhammad, Bala; Ismail, Mohammad; Abdul-Majid, Zaiton

    2012-11-15

    Conservation and preservation of freshwater is increasingly becoming important as the global population grows. Presently, enormous volumes of freshwater are used to mix concrete. This paper reports experimental findings regarding the feasibility of using treated effluents as alternatives to freshwater in mixing concrete. Samples were obtained from three effluent sources: heavy industry, a palm-oil mill and domestic sewage. The effluents were discharge into public drain without danger to human health and natural environment. Chemical compositions and physical properties of the treated effluents were investigated. Fifteen compositional properties of each effluent were correlated with the requirements set out by the relevant standards. Concrete mixes were prepared using the effluents and freshwater to establish a base for control performance. The concrete samples were evaluated with regard to setting time, workability, compressive strength and permeability. The results show that except for some slight excesses in total solids and pH, the properties of the effluents satisfy the recommended disposal requirements. Two concrete samples performed well for all of the properties investigated. In fact, one sample was comparatively better in compressive strength than the normal concrete; a 9.4% increase was observed at the end of the curing period. Indeed, in addition to environmental conservation, the use of treated effluents as alternatives to freshwater for mixing concrete could save a large amount of freshwater, especially in arid zones.

  7. Analysis of Comparison between Unconfined and Confined Condition of Foamed Concrete Under Uni-Axial Compressive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zairul A. Abdul Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Foamed concrete has become most commercial material in construction industry. People in industries were come out with the new mix design of foamed concrete to meet the specification and the requirements needed. Approach: This is because foamed concrete has the possibility as alternative of lightweight concrete for producing intermediate strength capabilities with excellent thermal insulation, freeze-thaw resistance, high-impact resistance and good shock absorption. Results: Currently Standard test to measure the compressive strength of foamed concrete is using standard unconfined compressive test. Several research has been conduct but the compressive strength using standard unconfined compressive test not capture true behavior of foamed concrete because it just achieved only low compressive strength and sample under compression failed due to brittle collapse of the sample. This paper was analyses the comparison between standard compressive test and confined compressive test. The confinement test introduced to prevent sample from brittle collapse. Foamed concrete cylindrical sample has been investigated under the standard compressive test for hard concrete (ASTM-C39. Based on the research, samples are produced under unconfined and confined condition. Analysis has been done and the result show that under standard compressive test, the sample failed due to early crack initiation and failed. Confinement condition was increase the compressive strength but this condition influence the result. Conclusion/Recommendations: Standard test is not suitable to capture the true behavior of foamed concrete, and to prevent the sample from brittle collapse during the test, new testing method was introduced to capture the true behavior of foamed concrete which is using Quasi Static Indentation Test. This test can be used to study about the behaviour of foamed concrete before it can be implemented to its final application.

  8. Flexural behavior of reinforced concrete beams: Comparative analysis between high-performance concrete and ordinary concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamrat Mostefa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the flexural strength of reinforced concrete beams made with high performance concrete (HPC and ordinary concrete (OC. We are carried an experimental campaign aimed comes in three points: 1- the study of the law of behavior of the two materials (OC and HPC, 2- the influence of the compressive strength of concrete and the rate of longitudinal reinforcement on the loaddeflection behavior and ductility index, 3- comparative analysis (ACI318, Eurocode 2 and BS8110 against the crack opening. Test results showed that the capacity of the beams in HPC is higher (6% to 20 % than the beams in OC. The use of HPC is more efficient than the OC to delay the first cracking. The average value of the ductility index for the beams in HPC is 1.30 times those beams in OC. The formula for calculating the crack opening derived of the Eurocode 2 gives the best prediction the crack width of beams (for both types of concrete.

  9. Concrete structures under projectile impact

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Qin

    2017-01-01

    In this book, the authors present their theoretical, experimental and numerical investigations into concrete structures subjected to projectile and aircraft impacts in recent years. Innovative approaches to analyze the rigid, mass abrasive and eroding projectile penetration and perforation are proposed. Damage and failure analyses of nuclear power plant containments impacted by large commercial aircrafts are numerically and experimentally analyzed. Ultra-high performance concrete materials and structures against the projectile impact are developed and their capacities of resisting projectile impact are evaluated. This book is written for the researchers, engineers and graduate students in the fields of protective structures and terminal ballistics.

  10. A Failure Criterion for Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, N. S.

    1977-01-01

    A four-parameter failure criterion containing all the three stress invariants explicitly is proposed for short-time loading of concrete. It corresponds to a smooth convex failure surface with curved meridians, which open in the negative direction of the hydrostatic axis, and the trace in the devi......A four-parameter failure criterion containing all the three stress invariants explicitly is proposed for short-time loading of concrete. It corresponds to a smooth convex failure surface with curved meridians, which open in the negative direction of the hydrostatic axis, and the trace...

  11. Reliability Assessment of Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Middleton, C. R.

    This paper is partly based on research performed for the Highways Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: concrete bridges". It contains the details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability...... profiles. These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for concrete bridges. This paper is to some extend based on Thoft-Christensen et. al. [1996], Thoft-Christensen [1996] et. al. and Thoft-Christensen [1996]....

  12. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold...... is reached causing the formation of anodic and cathodic regions along the reinforcement. Critical chloride thresholds, randomly distributed along the reinforcement sur-face, link the initiation and propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion. To demonstrate the potential use of the developed model......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  13. Topology optimization of reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Oded

    Recent advances regarding topology optimization procedures of reinforced concrete structures are presented. We discuss several approaches to the challenging problem of optimizing the distribution of concrete and steel reinforcement. In particular, the consideration of complex nonlinear constitutive...

  14. Concrete with Highly Active Rice Husk Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qing-ge; LIN Qing-yu; YU Qi-jun; ZHAO San-ying; YANG Lu-feng; Shuichi Sugita

    2004-01-01

    The overall aim was to investigate the effect of highly active rice husk ash (RHA) produced by an industrial furnace on some properties of concrete. The strength, pore volume and pore distribution of concrete and the Ca(OH)2 content in concrete were investigated by JIS A 1108 (Method of test for compressive strength of concrete), a mercury instrument porosimeter, and the thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. The results show that,with RHA replacement of cement,the compressive strength of concrete is increased evidently;the average pore radius of concrete is greatly decreased, especially the portion of the pores greater than 20nm in radius is decreased while the amount of smaller pores is increased, and the more the RHA replacement, the less the amount of Ca(OH)2 in concrete. The latter two results are the main reasons for the strength enhancement of concrete.

  15. Control of Early Age Concrete. Phase 3: Creep in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Anders Boe; Damkilde, Lars; Hansen, Per Freiesleben;

    1997-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the "Road Directorate Concrete" at early ages are studied. Creep in tension at 24 and 72 maturity hours are measured on dogbone shaped specimens. The development of tensile modulus of elasticity and strength are measured with a method developed here. The results are c...

  16. Recycling of fresh concrete exceeding and wash water in concrete mixing plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Férriz Papí, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The exceeding concrete and washing equipment water are a matter to solve in concrete production. This paper explains several possibilities for recycling and analyses the products obtained with one recycling equipment. The objective of this work is to study the possibility to increase the percentage of recycling in new mixes. The developed study relates wash water density and fine particles content. Besides, mortar and concrete samples were tested introducing different quantities of these fine particles, substituting cement, sand or only as an addition. Consistency, compressive strength, setting time, absorption, and capillarity were tested. The results indicated an improvement of the studied properties in some percentages when substituting sand. It confirms the possibility to introduce larger quantities of wash water in new concrete mixes, with corrections in sand quantity depending on water density.Los hormigones frescos sobrantes y aguas procedentes de la limpieza de equipos son un inconveniente a resolver en las plantas de hormigón. Este artículo explica varias posibilidades de reciclado y analiza los productos obtenidos en un equipo reciclador concreto, con el objetivo de estudiar el incremento del porcentaje de reciclaje en nuevas amasadas. El estudio realizado relaciona la densidad del agua de lavado y el contenido de partículas finas. Además, ensaya muestras de mortero y hormigón realizando sustituciones de estas partículas finas por cemento, arena o simplemente como adición. Determina consistencia, resistencia a compresión, principio y fin de fraguado, absorción y capilaridad. Los resultados indicaron un incremento general de las propiedades estudiadas en algunos porcentajes de sustitución por arena. Ello confirma la posibilidad de introducir mayores cantidades de agua de lavado en nuevas amasadas de hormigón, mediante correcciones en la dosificación de arena en función de la densidad del agua.

  17. CONCRETE MIX DESIGN FOR STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO EXPOSURE CLASS XC1 DEPENDING ON CONCRETE COVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Cherniakevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reinforced steel corrosion which is the most important problem of reinforced concrete structures durability is generally stipulated for carbonization of concrete surrounding it. Concrete cover calculation at the design stage is predicated one because of the differences in manufacturing conditions and use of constructions. The applying of the probabilistic approaches to the carbonation process modeling allows to get predicated grade of the depth of carbonization of concrete and, thus, to settle minimum concrete cover thickness for a given projected service life of a construction. The procedures for concrete mix design for different strength classes of concrete are described in the article. Current recommendations on assignment of concrete strength class as well as concrete cover are presented. The European Standard EN 206:2013 defines the content requirements for the concrete structures operated in the exposure class XC1, including the minimum values of water-cement ratio, minimum cement content, and minimum strength class of concrete. Since the standard does not include any basis or explanations of the requirements, we made an effort to develop a scientific justification for the mentioned requirements. We developed the probabilistic models for the process of carbonation of concrete based on the concrete mix which was designed using the software VTK-Korroziya. The reinforced concrete structures with concrete cover 20–35 mm operated in the most unfavorable conditions within the exposure class XC1 were analyzed. The corresponding probabilistic calculations of the depth of carbonated concrete are described in the article. 

  18. Modelling the Loss of Steel-Concrete Bonds in Corroded Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The existing stochastic models for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is extended by adding modelling of "loss of bond" due to corrosion between the reinforcement bars and the surrounding concrete.......The existing stochastic models for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is extended by adding modelling of "loss of bond" due to corrosion between the reinforcement bars and the surrounding concrete....

  19. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  20. Enhanced radiation shielding with galena concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Hadad Kamal; Majidi Hosein; Sarshough Samira

    2015-01-01

    A new concrete, containing galena mineral, with enhanced shielding properties for gamma sources is developed. To achieve optimized shielding properties, ten types of galena concrete containing different mixing ratios and a reference normal concrete of 2300 kg/m3 density are studied experimentally and numerically using Monte Carlo and XCOM codes. For building galena concrete, in addition to the main composition, micro-silica and water, galena mineral (contai...

  1. VISCOELASTIC STRUCTURAL MODEL OF ASPHALT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bogomolov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The viscoelastic rheological model of asphalt concrete based on the generalized Kelvin model is offered. The mathematical model of asphalt concrete viscoelastic behavior that can be used for calculation of asphalt concrete upper layers of non-rigid pavements for strength and rutting has been developed. It has been proved that the structural model of Burgers does not fully meet all the requirements of the asphalt-concrete.

  2. Modelling localised fracture of reinforced concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, F; Huang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a robust finite element procedure for simulating the localised fracture of reinforced concrete members. In this new model the concrete member is modelled as an assembly of plain concrete, reinforcing steel bar and bond-link elements. The 4-node quadrilateral elements are used for 2D modelling of plain concrete elements, in which the extended finite element method is adopted to simulate the formation and growth of individual cracks. The reinforcing steel bars are modelled b...

  3. The most suitable techiniques and methods to identify high alumina cement and based portland cement in concretes

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, M. T.; Puertas, F; Vázquez, T.; de la Fuente, A

    1992-01-01

    Instrumental techniques are indicated and the most adequated methodologies for determining the nature of the binder in concretes are explained. These methods are: a) Determination of the Silicic Moduli through chemical analysis of the sample. This test reveáis very different valúes between cement portland based concrete and high alumina cement based concretes. b) X-ray diffraction. It is considered as the best method. In the present paper the main diffraction Unes corresponding to...

  4. Project BioShield: Authorities, Appropriations, Acquisitions, and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    Relenza could continue to be sold and used, whereas hospitals were instructed to destroy any unused Peramivir. 17 75 Fed. Reg. 20441-20480, April...for Biodefense Biotechs,” Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science, vol. 8, no. 4 (2010), pp. 365-372. 58 U.S...Flexible Defenses Roundtable Meeting: Promoting the Strategic Innovation of Medical Countermeasures,” Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy

  5. Abrasion Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete According to Los Angeles and Water Abrasion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Ching CHENG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study mainly investigated the influence of different tests on the abrasion resistance of concrete mixed with steel fibers and silica fume. The abrasion resistance was assessed at 28, 56 and 91 days on concretes with water-binder ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 where in some mixes silica fume was substituted by 5 % of cement by weight. Steel fibers of 0.5 % and 1.0 % of concrete volume were also added into the test concrete by replacement of coarse and fine aggregates. The results showed that concrete with higher compressive strength in Los Angeles abrasion tests also had better abrasion resistance. The inclusion of steel fibers into test concrete with a water-binder ratio of 0.35 resulted in a significant increase in compressive strength. This concrete also displayed better abrasion resistance and splitting tensile strength than reference concrete; in the test sample with a water-binder ratio of 0.55, the added steel fibers was unable to effectively produce cementation with the concrete. The inclusion of silica fume improved the abrasion resistance of concretes. In water abrasion testing, the abrasion resistance of concrete containing steel fiber was worse than that of concrete without steel fibers. In the water abrasion testing, the surface of steel fiber reinforced concrete was eroded by water and steel balls, and the impact caused the steel fibers to separate from the concrete and led to higher wear loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6460

  6. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  7. Chloride migration in concrete with superabsorbent polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2015-01-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) can be used as a means for internal curing of concrete. In the present study, the development of transport properties of concrete with SAP is investigated. The chloride migration coefficient according to NT BUILD 492 is used as a measure of this. Twenty concrete mixt...

  8. Limits of Spalling of Fire Exposed Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    1998-01-01

    The supporting document describes the present knowledge about explosive spalling of traditional concrete and dense concrete based on 36 references and the authors own tests and observations.The document concludes that the risk of spalling is limited for traditional concretes within 3-4 percent mo...

  9. Lightweight concrete with enhanced neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2016-09-13

    A lightweight concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate in an amount of 20% by total volume. The concrete is enriched with hydrogen and is therefore highly effective at thermalizing neutrons. The concrete can be used independently or as a component of an advanced neutron radiation shielding system.

  10. Operations Guide and Modification Analysis for Use of the CE (Corps of Engineers) Concrete Quality Monitor on Roller-Compacted Concrete and Soil Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Donald Samanie, DAEN- ECC -C. The research was performed by the Engineering and Materials Division (EM), U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research...1O-5 gal) of of fresh concrete, mix the sample to ensure homo . the actual sample, using an Eppendorf, into the meter’s , geneity, and weigh out two...the 12- to 15-kg (26.4- to 33-b) gate (this takes about I to 1.5 min). Remove the No. 5 concrete sample, mix the sample to ensure homo - sieve

  11. Strength and durability of concrete modified by sulfur-based impregnating compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASSALIMOV Ismail Alexandrovich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine how sulfur-containing compound impregnation influences on concrete compressive strength and the impact resistance of concrete tiles. The results of these studies indicate that impregnation of vibropressed concrete paving tiles and concrete samples of dif-ferent strength classes with aqueous solutions based on calcium polysulfide leads to a significant increase of compressive strength and impact resistance. These data show that the strength of the products can be controlled by varying duration and frequency of the impregnation and by using pre-vacuum method. Impregnation with a solution of calcium polysulfide density of 1,23 g/cm³ can be recommended to increase strength of concrete products that are exposed to intense hydration and mechanical stress.

  12. Quality control of concrete at the stage of designing its composition and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudyakov, A., E-mail: kudyakow@mail.tomsknet.ru; Prischepa, I., E-mail: ingaprishepa@mail.ru; Kiselev, D.; Prischepa, B. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya sq., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The results of tests on samples of foam concrete with a hardening accelerator are presented. As the setting and hardening accelerators the following chemical additives were used: Universal-P-2 and Asilin 12. All additives were added into the insulating foam concrete mix of brand D 400 in the amount of 0.5% to 1% of cement weight. By using of additives in foam concrete technology – hardening accelerators Asilin 12 and Universal P2 in the amount of 0.5 % - and 1.0% by weight of cement foam concrete structure formation is accelerated and increases strength by 60%. For the industrial preparation of foam concrete mix technological regulations are worked out, in which it is recommended to use additives – hardening accelerators Asilin 12 in the amount of 0.5% and Universal P2 - 1% of cement weight.

  13. Concrete: Too young for conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heineman, H.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Nijland, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    The 20th century built heritage is one of the new conservation challenges, due to its architectural differences from the traditional heritage and new materials. One major new material is concrete; its quantity and importance for the new heritage requires a tailored conservation approach. Until now,

  14. Early Property Development in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Gitte; Munch-Petersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The Freiesleben Maturity function is widely used for planning of execution. We tested if for concrete with and without fly ash. The test showed surprisingly that the maturity function in general is not valid. We found that curing at high temperature gave a significant decrease in strength. Fly as...

  15. Annotated Bibliography: Polymers in Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    rheology of the plastic mix, development of strength and properties of hardened concrete, including performance history, are discussed and an extensive...additives consisting of alum, alk. metal sulfates, alginates , bentonite, diatomaceous earth, and carrageenates. C196 Naus, D. J., et al., "Cost

  16. Timber floors strengthened with concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blass, H.J.; Linden, M.L.R. van der; Schlager, M.

    1998-01-01

    Timber-concrete composite (tcc) beams may be used for the renovation of old timber floors. Although these systems are not new (Pokulka, 1997) and form a simple and practical solution, they are not widely adopted. One of the reasons for this is the Jack of uniform design rules. In this research progr

  17. Neutron shielding qualities and gamma ray buildup factors of concretes containing limonite ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oto, Berna, E-mail: bpekgoz@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yüzüncü Yıl University, 65080 Van (Turkey); Yıldız, Nergiz [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yüzüncü Yıl University, 65080 Van (Turkey); Korkut, Turgay [Department of Nuclear Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sinop University, 57000 Sinop (Turkey); Kavaz, Esra [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Macroscopic removal cross-sections (Σ{sub R}, cm{sup −1}) have been determined experimentally and theoretically for concrete samples. • EABF and EBF of the concrete samples has been determined using the Geometric Progression (G-P) approximation. • Penetration depth and energy dependence of the buildup factors evaluated. • FCL is good shielding material for neutron and gamma radiation. - Abstract: Neutron dose transmissions for fast neutrons produced by 5.486 MeV alpha particles on beryllium are measured in concrete samples with and without limonite ore to investigate their neutron shielding qualities. Using measured values, macroscopic removal cross-sections (Σ{sub R}, cm{sup −1}) have been determined experimentally and also Σ{sub R}values have been calculated theoretically using the elemental composition of the concrete mixes. The best neutron shielding property of concrete sample containing 100% limonite ore (FCL: fine and coarse limonite) was found. Additionally, energy absorption buildup factor (EABF) and exposure buildup factor (EBF) of concrete sample were calculated using the five-parameter Geometric Progression (G-P) approximation in the energy range of 0.015–15 MeV for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path (mfp). The incident photon energy and penetration depth dependence of buildup factors were examined. Finally, we observed that concrete samples have maximum values of buildup factors in the intermediate energy region around 0.1–0.3 MeV. FCL has the minimum values of both of the buildup factors. FCL has the excellent gamma shielding properties compared to the concrete samples.

  18. Impact echo scanning of concrete and wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Dennis A.; Olson, Larry D.; Aouad, Marwan F.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of a new nondestructive testing (NDT) system that allows rapid nondestructive assessment of many types of structural materials. The new system is based on scanning impact echo (IE), using a rolling receiver, digitally controlled impact source, and a distance measurement wheel integrated into a system that is capable of performing over 3000 IE tests per hour. The system has been successfully used on both concrete and wood for condition assessment. Previously, impact echo testing has been limited to point-by-point testing at rates of typically 30 - 60 points per hour. The new system is usable on any flat, relatively smooth surface such as floor slabs, pavements, walls, columns, beams, etc. In addition to IE scanning, the new system has recently been expanded to allow the performance of spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) scanning on concrete and wood. The SASW method allows the measurement of material stiffness (modulus) versus depth, and therefore can give a profile of the material condition versus depth. Included in this paper are brief discussions of the IE and SASW methods, the scanner system hardware, and the software which was developed to enable efficient processing, analysis, and display of the test data and results. Also included are sample data plots and a case history presentation of the use of the system in the field, including one in which 23,000 IE tests were performed on an elevated floor slab in approximately 16 hours of testing time.

  19. Characterization and hardening of concrete with ultrasonic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, L M; Jiménez, A; López, F; Rosa, F J; Rufo, M M; Paniagua, J M

    2004-04-01

    In this study, we describe a technique which can be used to characterize some relevant properties of 26 cylindrical samples (15 x 30 cm2) of concrete. The characterization has been performed, according to Spanish regulations in force, by some destructive and ultrasound-based techniques using frequencies of 40 kHz. Samples were manufactured using different water/cement ratios (w/c), ranging from 0.48 to 0.80, in order to simulate different values of compressive strength at each sample. We have correlated the propagation velocity v of ultrasonic waves through the samples to compressive strength R values. As some other authors remark, there exists an exponential relationship between the two above parameters. We have found that a highly linear relationship is present between R and w/c concentration at the samples. Nevertheless, when the same linear model is adopted to describe the relationship between v and w/c, the value of r decreases significantly. Thus, we have performed a multiple regression analysis which takes into account the impact of different concrete constituents (water, cement, sand, etc.) on ultrasound propagation speed. One of the most relevant practical issues addressed in our study is the estimation of the hardening curve of concrete, which can be used to quantify the viability of applying the proposed method in a real scenario. Subsequently, we also show a detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of v and R through 61 days, beginning at the date where the samples were manufactured. After analyzing both parameters separately, a double reciprocal relationship is deduced. Using the above parameters, we develop an NDE-based model which can be used to estimate hardening time of concrete samples.

  20. Development of Geopolymer Concrete with Different Curing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Nuruddin Nuruddin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental issues resulted from cement production have become a major concern today. To develop a sustainable future it is encouraged to limit the use of this construction material that can affect the environment. Cement replacement material was proposed to partially replace cement portion in concrete. Geopolymer is a part of inorganic polymer material that has similar bonding function like cement in concrete. It consists of alkaline solutions and geological source material. Alkaline liquids used in this research are 8 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH solution and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 solutions, while source materials are fly ash and microwave incinerated rice husk ash (MIRHA. Three different curing regimes, namely hot gunny curing, ambient curing, and external exposure curing, were applied to obtain suitable method that was suitable with cast in situ application. Geopolymer concrete samples were tested on their compressive strength and microstructure properties. It was found that external exposure curing had the highest compressive strength compared to other two curing methods. Scanning electron microscopy analysis also showed better improvement in interfacial transition zone for concrete sample with external exposure curing.

  1. Assessment of L/D Ratio of Eco Fibre - Bamboo as a Reinforcement Material in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha.s

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fibres are commonly used in concrete to control the cracks, shrinkage and to improve the strength and performance of the concrete. Generally various types of fibres are used like natural and artificial fibres in the concrete mix to produce the expected strength and crack resistance. an attempt is made to innovate a natural, eco friendly fibre which is available to the common man. In this paper, tests are carryout on bamboo fibre reinforced concrete to evaluate aspect ratio (l/d of bamboo fibres. Different ages of bamboo is collected, the extraction of fibres is done by mechanical method. Once the bamboo fibres are extracted the various lengths and diameters are selected and SEM analysis is carried out to find out the microstructure of bamboo fibres to know the failure analysis .these selected bamboo fibres add at the fixed rate of 0.1% to 1.5%(0.5,0.75,1,1.25,1.5 by the cement weight to the concrete mix. Then the samples of cubes, beams and cylinders are casted from the concrete mix and curing will be done for required period. Experimental investigations are carried out using most commonly used tests in laboratory, which includes concrete workability test, compressive test, split tensile test, and test for flexure from the various test results the aspect ratio (l/d ratio and also the effectiveness of bamboo fibres usage in concrete has been evaluated.

  2. Identification of concrete deteriorating minerals by polarizing and scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregerova, Miroslava, E-mail: mirka@sci.muni.cz [Masaryk University in Brno, Faculty of Science, Institute of Geological Sciences, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Vsiansky, Dalibor, E-mail: daliborv@centrum.cz [Research Institute of Building Materials, JSC., Hnevkovskeho 65, 617 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2009-07-15

    The deterioration of concrete represents one of the most serious problems of civil engineering worldwide. Besides other processes, deterioration of concrete consists of sulfate attack and carbonation. Sulfate attack results in the formation of gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite in hardened concrete. Products of sulfate attack may cause a loss of material strength and a risk of collapse of the concrete constructions. The authors focused especially on the microscopical research of sulfate attack. Concrete samples were taken from the Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic. A succession of degrading mineral formation was suggested. Microscope methods represent a new approach to solving the deterioration problems. They enable evaluation of the state of concrete constructions and in cooperation with hydro-geochemistry, mathematics and statistics permit prediction of the durability of a structure. Considering the number of concrete constructions and their age, research of concrete deterioration has an increasing importance. The results obtained can also be useful for future construction, because they identify the risk factors associated with formation of minerals known to degrade structures.

  3. Progress Implementing a Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm for Ultrasound Imaging of Thick Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansouri, Hani [Purdue University; Johnson, Christi R [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bouman, Charlie [Purdue University; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    All commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States contain concrete structures. These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and the degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Concrete structures in NPPs are often inaccessible and contain large volumes of massively thick concrete. While acoustic imaging using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) works adequately well for thin specimens of concrete such as concrete transportation structures, enhancements are needed for heavily reinforced, thick concrete. We argue that image reconstruction quality for acoustic imaging in thick concrete could be improved with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) techniques. MBIR works by designing a probabilistic model for the measurements (forward model) and a probabilistic model for the object (prior model). Both models are used to formulate an objective function (cost function). The final step in MBIR is to optimize the cost function. Previously, we have demonstrated a first implementation of MBIR for an ultrasonic transducer array system. The original forward model has been upgraded to account for direct arrival signal. Updates to the forward model will be documented and the new algorithm will be assessed with synthetic and empirical samples.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity of High Strength Lightweight Raw Perlite Aggregate Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandiroglu, Ahmet

    2010-06-01

    Twenty-four types of high strength lightweight concrete have been designed with raw perlite aggregate (PA) from the Erzincan Mollaköy region as new low-temperature insulation material. The effects of the water/cement ratio, the amount of raw PA, and the temperature on high strength lightweight raw perlite aggregate concrete (HSLWPAC) have been investigated. Three empirical equations were derived to correlate the thermal conductivity of HSLWPAC as a function of PA percentage and temperature depending on the water/cement ratio. Experimentally observed thermal conductivities of concrete samples were predicted 92 % of the time for each set of concrete matrices within 97 % accuracy and over the range from 1.457 W · m-1 · K-1 to 1.777 W · m-1 · K-1. The experimental investigation revealed that the usage of raw PA from the Erzincan Mollaköy region in concrete production reduces the concrete unit mass, increases the concrete strength, and furthermore, the thermal conductivity of the concrete has been improved. The proposed empirical correlations of thermal conductivity were considered to be applicable within the range of temperatures 203.15 K ≤ T ≤ 303.15 K in the form of λ = a( PAP b ) + c( T d ).

  5. Prompt gamma analysis of fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz blended cement concrete specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Garwan, M A; Maslehuddin, M; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B; Khateeb-ur-Rehman; Raashid, M

    2009-09-01

    Preventive measures against corrosion of reinforcing steel require making the concrete dense by adding pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag, etc. to Portland cement. In order to obtain the desired strength and durability of concrete, it is desirable to monitor the concentration of the pozzolan in the blended cement concrete. Addition of pozzolan to blended cement changes the overall concentration of calcium and silicon in the blended cement concrete. The resulting variation in calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield ratio from blended cement concrete has found to have an inverse correlation with concentration of fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag in the blended cement concrete. For experimental verification of the correlation, intensities of calcium and silicon prompt gamma-ray due to capture of thermal neutrons in blended cement concrete samples containing 5-80% (by weight of cement) silica fume, fly ash and Superpozz were measured. The gamma-ray intensity ratio was measured from 6.42 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 4.94 MeV gamma-ray from silicon. The experimentally measured values of calcium to silicon gamma-ray yield ratio in the fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz cement concrete specimens agree very well with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Prompt gamma analysis of fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz blended cement concrete specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Garwan, M.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Research, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khateeb-ur-Rehman; Raashid, M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-09-15

    Preventive measures against corrosion of reinforcing steel require making the concrete dense by adding pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag, etc. to Portland cement. In order to obtain the desired strength and durability of concrete, it is desirable to monitor the concentration of the pozzolan in the blended cement concrete. Addition of pozzolan to blended cement changes the overall concentration of calcium and silicon in the blended cement concrete. The resulting variation in calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield ratio from blended cement concrete has found to have an inverse correlation with concentration of fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag in the blended cement concrete. For experimental verification of the correlation, intensities of calcium and silicon prompt gamma-ray due to capture of thermal neutrons in blended cement concrete samples containing 5-80% (by weight of cement) silica fume, fly ash and Superpozz were measured. The gamma-ray intensity ratio was measured from 6.42 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 4.94 MeV gamma-ray from silicon. The experimentally measured values of calcium to silicon gamma-ray yield ratio in the fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz cement concrete specimens agree very well with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Progress implementing a model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm for ultrasound imaging of thick concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansouri, Hani; Johnson, Christi; Clayton, Dwight; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charles; Santos-Villalobos, Hector

    2017-02-01

    All commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States contain concrete structures. These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and the degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Concrete structures in NPPs are often inaccessible and contain large volumes of massively thick concrete. While acoustic imaging using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) works adequately well for thin specimens of concrete such as concrete transportation structures, enhancements are needed for heavily reinforced, thick concrete. We argue that image reconstruction quality for acoustic imaging in thick concrete could be improved with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) techniques. MBIR works by designing a probabilistic model for the measurements (forward model) and a probabilistic model for the object (prior model). Both models are used to formulate an objective function (cost function). The final step in MBIR is to optimize the cost function. Previously, we have demonstrated a first implementation of MBIR for an ultrasonic transducer array system. The original forward model has been upgraded to account for direct arrival signal. Updates to the forward model will be documented and the new algorithm will be assessed with synthetic and empirical samples.

  8. Effect of applied load on the nondestructive measurement of concrete strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudabadi, E.; Amjad, U.; Kundu, T.; Saadatmanesh, H.

    2014-03-01

    Nondestructive measurement of the concrete strength is an important topic of research. Among different nondestructive testing (NDT) methods the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) technique is the most popular method for concrete strength estimation. While measuring concrete strength by this method almost all researchers have neglected the effect of applied stress or load on the concrete member. In this investigation attempts were made to properly incorporate the effect of the applied load on the strength prediction of concrete specimens from UPV value. To achieve this goal, 4 groups of concrete specimens with different values of final strength were made. Materials used for making cylindrical specimens of 3 inch diameter and 6 inch height included regular Portland cement, water and two types of aggregate - fine and coarse. After applying the load on the specimen in multiple steps - up to 70% of its failure strength fc'- the time of flight (TOF) value was measured for every loading step. The recorded results showed that applied load on the member has significant effect on the measured UPV value on concrete specimens. Therefore, to find the strength of the concrete from the UPV value, the applied load on the sample should be considered as an important factor that cannot be neglected.

  9. Compressive Strength of Concrete Containing Palm Kernel Shell Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FADELE Oluwadamilola A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the influence of varying palm kernel shell ash content, as supplementary cementitious material (SCM at specified water/cement ratios and curing ages on the compressive strength of concrete cubes samples. Palm kernel shell ash was used as a partial replacement for ordinary Portland cement (OPC up to 30% at 5% intervals using mix ratio 1:2:4. River sand with particles passing 4.75mmBS sieve and crushed aggregate of 20mm maximum size were used while the palm kernel shell ash used was ofparticles passing through 212μm BS sieve. The compressive strength of the test cubes (100mm were tested at 5 different curing ages of 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days. The result showed that test cube containing Palm kernel shell ash gained strength over a longer curing period compared with ordinary Portlandcement concrete samples and the strength varies with percentagePKSAcontent in the cube samples. The results showed that at 28 days test cubes containing 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30% PKSA content achieved compressive strength of 26.1 MPa, 22.53MPa, 19.43 MPa, 20.43 MPa, 16.97 MPa and 16.5MPa compared to 29MPa of Ordinary Portland cement concrete cubes. It was concluded that for structural concrete works requiring a characteristic strength of 25Mpa,5% palm kernel shell ash can effectively replace ordinary Portland cement while up to 15% PKSA content can be used for concrete works requiring 20Mpa strength at 28 days

  10. Microbiologically induced deterioration of concrete: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiping Wei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbiologically induced deterioration (MID causes corrosion of concrete by producing acids (including organic and inorganic acids that degrade concrete components and thus compromise the integrity of sewer pipelines and other structures, creating significant problems worldwide. Understanding of the fundamental corrosion process and the causal agents will help us develop an appropriate strategy to minimize the costs in repairs. This review presents how microorganisms induce the deterioration of concrete, including the organisms involved and their colonization and succession on concrete, the microbial deterioration mechanism, the approaches of studying MID and safeguards against concrete biodeterioration. In addition, the uninvestigated research area of MID is also proposed.

  11. Microbiologically induced deterioration of concrete - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shiping; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sanchez-Silva, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically induced deterioration (MID) causes corrosion of concrete by producing acids (including organic and inorganic acids) that degrade concrete components and thus compromise the integrity of sewer pipelines and other structures, creating significant problems worldwide. Understanding of the fundamental corrosion process and the causal agents will help us develop an appropriate strategy to minimize the costs in repairs. This review presents how microorganisms induce the deterioration of concrete, including the organisms involved and their colonization and succession on concrete, the microbial deterioration mechanism, the approaches of studying MID and safeguards against concrete biodeterioration. In addition, the uninvestigated research area of MID is also proposed. PMID:24688488

  12. Mechanical characterization of fiber reinforced Polymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marciano Laredo dos Reis

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study between epoxy Polymer Concrete plain, reinforced with carbon and glass fibers and commercial concrete mixes was made. The fibers are 6 mm long and the fiber content was 2% and 1%, respectively, in mass. Compressive tests were performed at room temperature and load vs. displacement curves were plotted up to failure. The carbon and glass fibers reinforcement were randomly dispersed into the matrix of polymer concrete. An increase in compressive properties was observed as function of reinforcement. The comparison also showed that Polymer Concrete, plain and reinforced, has a better performance than regular market concrete, suggesting that PC is a reliable alternative for construction industry.

  13. Strength of Concrete Containing Basalt Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvez Imraan Ansari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparative study of effect of basalt fibre on compressive and split tensile strength of M40 grade concrete. The basalt fibre was mixed in concrete by (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5% of its total weight of cement in concrete. Results indicated that the strength increases with increase of basalt fibre content up to 1.0% beyond that there is a reduction in strength on increasing basalt fibre. The results show that the concrete specimen with 1.0% of basalt fibre gives better performance when it compared with 0.5%and 1.5% basalt fibre mix in concrete specimens.

  14. Concrete structures protection, repair and rehabilitation

    CERN Document Server

    Woodson, R Dodge

    2009-01-01

    The success of a repair or rehabilitation project depends on the specific plans designed for it. Concrete Structures: Protection, Repair and Rehabilitation provides guidance on evaluating the condition of the concrete in a structure, relating the condition of the concrete to the underlying cause or causes of that condition, selecting an appropriate repair material and method for any deficiency found, and using the selected materials and methods to repair or rehabilitate the structure. Guidance is also provided for engineers focused on maintaining concrete and preparing concrete investigation r

  15. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1998-01-01

    Durability studies are carried out at BKM as part of the research project "Design Methods for Fibre Reinforced Concrete" (FRC) involving BKM, The Concrete Research Center at DTI, Building Technology at Aalborg University, Rambøll, 4K-Beton and Rasmussen & Schiøtz. Concrete beams with or without...... structure are made on specimens drilled or sawed from beams after unloading (mechanical load). The pore structure of the concretes will be studied by microscopy, sorption and suction curves. The test programme involves three different concrete qualities (water-cement ratios). Both steel fibres (ZP...

  16. Self-consolidating concrete homogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarque, J. C.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Concrete instability may lead to the non-uniform distribution of its properties. The homogeneity of self-consolidating concrete in vertically cast members was therefore explored in this study, analyzing both resistance to segregation and pore structure uniformity. To this end, two series of concretes were prepared, self-consolidating and traditional vibrated materials, with different w/c ratios and types of cement. The results showed that selfconsolidating concretes exhibit high resistance to segregation, albeit slightly lower than found in the traditional mixtures. The pore structure in the former, however, tended to be slightly more uniform, probably as a result of less intense bleeding. Such concretes are also characterized by greater bulk density, lower porosity and smaller mean pore size, which translates into a higher resistance to pressurized water. For pore diameters of over about 0.5 μm, however, the pore size distribution was found to be similar to the distribution in traditional concretes, with similar absorption rates.En este trabajo se estudia la homogeneidad de los hormigones autocompactantes en piezas hormigonadas verticalmente, determinando su resistencia a la segregación y la uniformidad de su estructura porosa, dado que la pérdida de estabilidad de una mezcla puede conducir a una distribución no uniforme de sus propiedades. Para ello se han fabricado dos tipos de hormigones, uno autocompactante y otro tradicional vibrado, con diferentes relaciones a/c y distintos tipos de cemento. Los resultados ponen de manifiesto que los hormigones autocompactantes presentan una buena resistencia a la segregación, aunque algo menor que la registrada en los hormigones tradicionales. A pesar de ello, su estructura porosa tiende a ser ligeramente más uniforme, debido probablemente a un menor sangrado. Asimismo, presentan una mayor densidad aparente, una menor porosidad y un menor tamaño medio de poro, lo que les confiere mejores

  17. Impact of separated bottom ashes on the parameters of concrete mix and hardened concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wałach Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of the addition of bottom ashes obtained from hard coal combustion in conventional and fluidised bed boilers on the properties of fresh and hardened concrete. A concrete mix composition was developed by an experimental method, which was then modified with the use of bottom ashes. The impact of the substitution of cement and aggregates with bottom ash on the concrete properties was examined. For all the obtained series of concretes, tests were performed for the consistency of the fresh concrete using the concrete slump test, the compressive strength and tensile strength of the concrete after 3, 7 and 28 days of maturing and their absorption. The experiments have shown significant declines in the strength parameters of the concretes being analysed in the case of the substitution of cement with separated bottom ash. However, substituting relevant aggregate fractions with separated bottom ash resulted in an increase in both the compressive strength and the tensile strength in the analysed concretes.

  18. Detection of sulfur in the reinforced concrete structures using a dual pulsed LIBS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, M. A.; Dastageer, A.; Maslehuddin, M.; Alnehmi, A. J.; Al-Amoudi, O. S. B.

    2012-04-01

    In concrete structures, an excessive amount of sulfate ions can cause severe damage to the strength and the stability of the building structures and hence a sensitive and reliable technique for sulfate ion detection in concrete is highly desirable. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is one of the most reliable and sensitive techniques to identify the presence of potentially dangerous sulfur in the concrete structure. The atomic emission lines of sulfur lying in the 200-900 nm region are mostly singly ionized states and hence inherently very weak. In order to enhance the sensitivity of the conventional LIBS system, we employed a dual pulsed LIBS system for detection of weak spectral line of sulfur in concrete using the S II peak at 545.38 nm as a marker for quantifying sulfur content in the concrete. The 1064 nm fundamental and 266 nm fourth harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser in conjunction with Spectrograph/gated ICCD camera are the core factors in improvement of sensitivity. Furthermore, the dual pulsed LIBS system and the fine maneuvering of the gate parameters and interpulse delay yielded improvement in the sensitivity, and resulted in a systematic correlation of the LIBS signal with the concentration of sulfur in the concrete sample. In order to quantify the sulfur content in concrete, a calibration curve was also drawn by recording the LIBS spectra of sample having sulfur in various concentrations. The limit of detection achieved with our dual pulsed LIBS system is approximately 38 μg/g.

  19. Characterization of basin concrete in support of structural integrity demonstration for extended storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, A. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Concrete core samples from C basin were characterized through material testing and analysis to verify the design inputs for structural analysis of the L Basin and to evaluate the type and extent of changes in the material condition of the concrete under extended service for fuel storage. To avoid the impact on operations, core samples were not collected from L area, but rather, several concrete core samples were taken from the C Basin prior to its closure. C basin was selected due to its similar environmental exposure and service history compared to L Basin. The microstructure and chemical composition of the concrete exposed to the water was profiled from the water surface into the wall to evaluate the impact and extent of exposure. No significant leaching of concrete components was observed. Ingress of carbonation or deleterious species was determined to be insignificant. No evidence of alkali-silica reactions (ASR) was observed. Ettringite was observed to form throughout the structure (in air voids or pores); however, the sulfur content was measured to be consistent with the initial concrete that was used to construct the facility. Similar ettringite trends were observed in the interior segments of the core samples. The compressive strength of the concrete at the mid-wall of the basin was measured, and similar microstructural analysis was conducted on these materials post compression testing. The microstructure was determined to be similar to near-surface segments of the core samples. The average strength was 4148 psi, which is well-above the design strength of 2500 psi. The analyses showed that phase alterations and minor cracking in a microstructure did not affect the design specification for the concrete.

  20. Practical evaluation of resistivity of concrete in test cylinders using a Wenner array probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, W.; Moreno, E.I.; Saguees, A.A. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Cell constant correction values (K) for concrete resistivity measurements on cylindrical test samples performed with the four-point Wenner array probe technique are presented. Specimens dimensions correspond to standard cylinder sizes used for compressive strength or rapid chloride permeability tests, as well as typical concrete core sizes. The values of K were determined experimentally and numerically, by means of Finite Element (FE) simulation. The effect of different maximum aggregate sizes and aggregate types on the variability of the resistivity readings was evaluated. Cell constant correction values are given to allow quick determination of concrete resistivity.

  1. Examples of feedback, experimental and theoretical approaches for concrete durability assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toutlemonde F.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some experimental data obtained from UHPFRC (Ultra-High Performance Fibre-Reinforced Concrete being exposed for 10 years in a cooling tower and a high slag content concrete being exposed for 30 years in a marine environment. Experimental data are then used for assessing concrete durability through a theoretical approach, namely performance-based analysis. The results from the application of this approach are consistent with the penetration depth of aggressive agents measured from core samples. Finally a simulation method currently being developed by EDF is presented, which has great relevance to durability assessment.

  2. Urban Experiments and Concrete Utopias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lasse

    2009-01-01

    The paper explores how concrete urban experiments can challenge the pecuniary version of the experience city and stimulate a locally rooted and democratic version of an experience based city using heterotopias and concrete utopias as the link between top down planning and bottom up experiments...... in an emerging  experience city.  The first part of the article describes the growing and uncritical interest in the concepts of the ‘creative economy’, ‘creative class’ (Florida 2002) and their relationship with cultural production and economic growth (Bille & Schulze 2006), many of which, however, are driven...... mainly by political discourses producing more strategies and reports or commodified ´experience projects´ that are not rooted in real democratic experiments. Instead, the experience based development should emphasize a more object-oriented and a critical approach where real urban experiments link public...

  3. Designing of concrete diamond sawblade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-he; DING Xin-yu; ZHOU Jia-xiang

    2005-01-01

    By analyzing the abrasive theory of concrete diamond sawblade, the proposal that the diamond should be selected by its function in cutting concrete is presented. The part of the big grit diamonds cut rock, and the part of the small grit diamonds improve the wearability of the matrix. The contrast tests are done with different shapes of sawbaldes in split segment, slant "U" slot segment, sandwich segment, turbo segment and three-slot segment. The special shapes of sawblades can improve the effect of cooling and the removing ability of the rock powder. The data of tests show that the efficiency of cutting and the life of sawblades are improved by designing the diamond prescription and using the especial geometry of segment.

  4. Neutron attenuation characteristics of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and heavy aggregate concrete and mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Majid, S; Othman, F

    1994-03-01

    Polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets were introduced into concrete to improve its neutron attenuation characteristics while several types of heavy coarse aggregates were used to improve its gamma ray attenuation properties. Neutron and gamma ray attenuation were studied in concrete samples containing coarse aggregates of barite, pyrite, basalt, hematite, and marble as well as polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets in narrow-beam geometry. The highest neutron attenuation was shown by polyethylene mortar, followed by polyvinyl chloride mortar; barite and pyrite concrete showed higher gamma ray attenuation than ordinary concrete. Broad-beam and continuous (infinite) medium geometries were used to study the neutron attenuation of samples containing polymers at different concentrations with and without heavy aggregates, the fitting equations were established, and from these the neutron removal coefficients were deduced. In a radiation field of neutrons and gamma rays, the appropriate concentration of polymer and heavy aggregate can be selected to give the optimum total dose attenuation depending on the relative intensities of each type of radiation. This would give much better design flexibility over ordinary concrete. The compressive strength tests performed on mortar and concrete samples showed that their value, in general, decreases as polymer concentration increases and that the polyvinyl chloride mortar showed higher values than the polyethylene mortar. For general construction purposes, the compression strength was considered acceptable in these samples.

  5. Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-12-21

    Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance

  6. Influences of Fly Ash on Concrete Product's Properties and Environmental Impact Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thipsuree Kornboonraksa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to study effects of incorporating fly ash into concrete products. Scope of this study were (1 hazard identification of fly ash (2 study on standard testing of various concrete products and (3 study on environmental impact assessment of concrete products mixed with fly ash. Various types of fly ash namely A, B, C and D were sampling from different power plants. Hazard identification of fly ash was analyzed in terms of total threshold limit concentration (TTLC and soluble threshold limit concentration (STLC. It was found that concentrations of chromium, cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel, zinc, copper and arsenic passed the criteria of notification of the ministry of industry regarding disposal of wastes or unusable materials B.E. 2548 (2005 in appendix-2.Three types of concrete products namely brick road, concrete block and ready mixed concrete were studied. Fly ash was used as cementitious materials to replace Portland cement at 10% and 30% mixture. Concrete products with proportion of fly ash showed lower compressive strengths during 28 days of curing times. However, increase of curing times showed higher compressive strengths for all types of concrete products. ANOVA analysis showed that different fly ash proportion and curing times had a significant effect on compressive strength. The method of CML2 baseline 2000, SimaPro 7.3 was used in environmental impact assessment. The functional unit was set up through working area of 1 m3. It was found that concrete products mixed with fly ash showed lower environmental impact compared to concrete products without fly ash. Increasing proportion of fly ash showed decreased environmental impact. From ANOVA analysis, there was no significant effect of fly ash types on environmental impact reduction for all types of concrete products. However, % fly ash mixture showed significant effect on environmental impact reduction especially in terms of global warming. Decrease in global warming (GW

  7. Viscoelastic behavior of concrete pile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁科; 唐小弟

    2008-01-01

    Based on constitutive theory of viscoelasticity,the viscoelastic behaviour of concrete pile was investigated.The influence of viscosity coefficient on the stress,displacement and velocity response was discussed.With the increase of viscosity coefficient,the amplitude of stress wave decreases,and the maximum value of the stress wave shifts to deeper position of the pile.In other words,the viscosity coefficient behaves as lag effect to stress wave.

  8. Severe ASR damaged concrete bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonio Barbosa, Ricardo; Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and University of Southern Denmark (SDU) have conducted several full-scale experiments with severe ASR deteriorated bridges. This paper presents few and preliminary results from both the shear tests and the measuring of the material properties. The shear test...... show that the shear capacity is almost unaffected of ASR despite significant reduction in compressive concrete strength. Furthermore, measurements show a significant tensile reinforcement strain developed due to ASR expansion....

  9. SHAPE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONCRETE AGGREGATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As a composite material, the performance of concrete materials can be expected to depend on the properties of the interfaces between its two major components, aggregate and cement paste. The microstructure at the interfacial transition zone (ITZ is assumed to be different from the bulk material. In general, properties of conventional concrete have been found favoured by optimum packing density of the aggregate. Particle size is a common denominator in such studies. Size segregation in the ITZ among the binder particles in the fresh state, observed in simulation studies by concurrent algorithm-based SPACE system, additionally governs density as well as physical bonding capacity inside these shell-like zones around aggregate particles. These characteristics have been demonstrated qualitatively pertaining also after maturation of the concrete. Such properties of the ITZs have direct impact on composite properties. Despite experimental approaches revealed effects of aggregate grain shape on different features of material structure (among which density, and as a consequence on mechanical properties, it is still an underrated factor in laboratory studies, probably due to the general feeling that a suitable methodology for shape characterization is not available. A scientific argument hindering progress is the interconnected nature of size and shape. Presently, a practical problem preventing shape effects to be emphasized is the limitation of most computer simulation systems in concrete technology to spherical particles. New developments at Delft University of Technology will make it possible in the near future to generate jammed states, or other high-density fresh particle mixtures of non-spherical particles, which thereupon can be subjected to hydration algorithms. This paper will sketch the outlines of a methodological approach for shape assessment of loose (non-embedded aggregate grains, and demonstrate its use for two types of aggregate, allowing

  10. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly.

  11. Corrosion of steel bars in cracked concrete made with ordinary portland, slag and fly ash cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, T.U.; Yamaji, T.; Hamada, H. [Port and Harbor Research Inst., Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (Japan); Aoyama, T. [PS Corp. (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A study was conducted in which the marine durability of ordinary portland cement, slag and fly ash cement was examined using 15 year old plain and reinforced concrete cylindrical specimens. The performance of these cements was then examined for pre-cracked reinforced concrete prism samples. The process of manufacturing cement emits huge amounts of carbon dioxide into the global atmosphere. Replacing a portion of the cement with by-products from the steel industry and thermal power plants (which are both huge emitters of carbon dioxide) can lower carbon dioxide emissions and also solve the disposal issue of slag and fly ash while increasing the long-term durability of concrete structures. In this study, concrete cylindrical specimens were made of ordinary portland cement, slag and fly ash cements. The specimens were 100 x 100 x 600 mm prisms of different types of cement. Water-to-cement ratios were 0.45 and 0.55. Both tap water and seawater were used as mixing water. The samples were exposed in tidal pools for 15 years to evaluate the compressive strength of the concrete, corrosion of the steel bars, and chloride-ion concentrations in the concrete. It was shown that, with the exception of fly ash cements, the compressive strength of most cements increased after 15 years of exposure compared to its 28 day strength. Type C slag cement demonstrated the best performance against chloride-ion at the surface of concrete made with slag and fly ash. Voids in the steel-concrete interface make it possible for corrosion pits to develop. The use of seawater as mixing water results in earlier strength development at 28 days and does not cause to the strength of the concrete to regress after 15-years of exposure, but it causes more corrosion of steel bars at a lower cover depth. Corrosion of steel bars is not an issue at deeper cover depths. 15 refs., 19 tabs., 13 figs.

  12. Effects of fly ash fineness on the mechanical properties of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Şemsi Yazici; Hasan Şahan Arel

    2012-06-01

    The present study reviews the effects of fly ash fineness on the compressive and splitting tensile strength of the concretes. A fly ash of lignite origin with Blaine fineness of 2351 cm2/g was ground in a ball mill. As a consequence of the grinding process, fly ashes with fineness of 3849 cm2/g and 5239 cm2/g were obtained. Fly ashes with three different fineness were used instead of cement of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% and ten different types of concrete mixture were produced. In the concrete mixtures, the dosage of binder and water/cement ratio were fixed at 350 kg/m3 and 0.50, respectively. Slump values for the concretes were adjusted to be 100 ± 20 mm. Cubic samples were cast with edges of 100 mm. The specimens were cured in water at 20° C. At the end of curing process, compressive and splitting tensile strengths of the concrete samples were determined at 7, 28, 56, 90, 120 and 180 days. It was observed that compressive and splitting tensile strength of the concretes was affected by fineness of fly ash in short-and long-terms. It was found that compressive and tensile strength of the concretes increased as fly ash fineness increased. It was concluded that Blaine fineness value should be above 3849 cm2/g fineness of fly ash to have positive impact on mechanical properties of concrete. The effects of fly ash fineness on the compressive and splitting tensile strength of the concretes were remarkably seen in the fly ash with FAC code with fineness of 5235 cm2/g.

  13. Characterization of concrete from Roman theatre and amphitheater in Emerita Augusta (Mérida, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota-Lopez, Maria Isabel; Fort, Rafael; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Pizzo, Antonio; Maderuelo-Sanz, Ruben; Meneses-Rodríguez, Juan Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The restoration of historical buildings is very important for the history and culture of the cities and their population. It requires an advanced knowledge of the building materials used for the construction of these structures. Previously to any intervention in historical buildings, it is necessary a historic-scientific study of the original material. Historic mortars or concretes can reveal us different composition and the dependence on the geographical location and the time period of its construction. Historical concretes are complex systems that contain aerial or hydraulic binders or a blend of them, with aggregates, not always crystalline, and others elements that interact with the binder. The use of different techniques for microstructural characterization of materials, like optical microscopy, X-ray diffractometry or petrophysical analysis, allows the determination of the composition and some properties of these concretes. However, each technique has its own limits and, in many cases, several characterization techniques must be used to obtain coherent and reliable results. The present study focuses on the compositional characterization of Roman concrete from Roman buildings for public spectacles of Emerita Augusta, Mérida, Spain. An advanced knowledge of the Roman concrete composition is required to get a reliable restoration and preservation of these ancient monuments. Various samples of concrete were extracted from different zones from this archaeological site. The concrete was studied through mineralogical analysis (petrographic microscope and XRD) and petrophysical properties determination (bulk and real density, open porosity, mercury porosimetry intrusion, compressive strength and Ultrasound propagation velocity). The results obtained allow us to know the original composition of the concrete and the provenance of the aggregates used in it. Acknowledgements: Community of Madrid for financing Geomateriales2 program (P2013/MIT2914), to the funding

  14. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of the Influence of Real Cracks on Chloride Ingress in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosdean Corina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical results of a chloride ingress study conducted on samples drilled from different locations of a reinforced concrete slab, previously loaded until failure, are presented. The experimental part was carried on following the NT Build 492 standard for the non-steady state migration test, then a 3D model was developed using the Abaqus/Standard software based on the FEM in order to simulate chloride ingress in both uncracked and cracked concrete.

  15. Freeze/thaw protection of concrete with optimum rubber crumb content

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Alan; Coventry, Kathryn; Ward, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    This research looks at utilising an optimum quantity of rubber crumb as an air entraining ad-mixture in concrete, thus providing maximum freeze-thaw protection and maximum strength. Microscopic and chemical analysis was carried out on the rubber sample to investigate how rubber crumb entrains air and reacts with the surrounding concrete. The work contained two pilot studies that informed the main test methodology. The pilot studies examined the air content/compressive strength relationship (1...

  16. Study of some health physics parameters of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag shielding concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    The Bismuth-ground granulated blastfurnace slang (Bi-GGBFS) concrete samples were prepared. The weight percentage of different elements present inBi-GGBFS Shielding concretewas evaluated by Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDX). The exposure rate and absorbed dose rate characteristics were calculated theoretically for radioactive sources namely 241Am and 137Cs. Our calculations reveal that the Bi-GGBFS concretes are effective in shielding material for gamma radiations.

  17. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity.

  18. Description of Concrete Durability Damage Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yueshun; WEI Jun; ZHAO Xiaolong

    2006-01-01

    Based on the damage mechanics, the concrete damage grade of relative stable environment in measurable spatial is constructed in this paper, and the concrete damage evolving model and corresponding failure rule is constructed based on the damage grade fore-defined. Therefore, the concrete health status and the residual life-span can be assessed according to the measured damage grade. It is propitious to drive the development of concrete durability assessment and life-span forecast. Its feasibility of concrcte damage process description and health assessment is validated with the example in this paper, in which the damage state is described with the ultrasound velocity attenuation, and the freeze-thaw process is regarded as the concrete durability degradation influencing factor to reflect the concrete durability degradation process.

  19. Influence of Concrete Properties on Molten Core-Concrete Interaction: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-yang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a severe nuclear power plant accident, the molten core can be released into the reactor pit and interact with sacrificial concrete. In this paper, a simulation study is presented that aims to address the influence of sacrificial concrete properties on molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI. In particular, based on the MELCOR Code, the ferrosiliceous concrete used in European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR is taken into account with respect to the different ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. Results indicate that the concrete ablation rate as well as the hydrogen generation rate depends much on the concrete ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. In practice, the ablation enthalpy of sacrificial concrete is the higher the better, while the Fe2O3 and H2O content of sacrificial concrete is the lower the better.

  20. DECISION MAKING MODELING OF CONCRETE REQUIREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhartono Irawan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental evaluation between predicted and practice concrete strength. The scope of the evaluation is the optimisation of the cement content for different concrete grades as a result of bringing the target mean value of tests cubes closer to the required characteristic strength value by reducing the standard deviation. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : concrete+mix+design%2C+acceptance+control%2C+optimisation%2C+cement+content.

  1. Progress of Carbonation in Chloride Contaminated Concretes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaocheng; Basheer, P. A.M.; Nanukuttan, S; Bai, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Concretes used in marine environment are generally under the cyclic effect of CO2 and chloride ions (Cl-). To date, the influence of carbonation on ingress of chloride ions in concretes has been widely studied; in comparison, study on the influence of Cl- on the progress of carbonation is limited. During the study, concretes were exposed to independent and combined mechanisms of carbonation and chloride ingress regimes. Profiles of apparent pH and chloride concentration were used to indicate ...

  2. Influence of Additives on Reinforced Concrete Durability

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of the research on carbonation and chloride induced corrosion mechanisms in reinforced concrete structures, based on three commercially available concrete admixtures: Xypex Admix C-1000, Penetron Admix and Elkem Microsilica. Carbonation takes place due to carbon dioxide diffusion, which in the required amount is present in the air. Chlorides penetrate concrete in case of the use of deicing salt or structure exploitation in marine atmosphere. Based on the imple...

  3. Polypropylene Fibers in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Bibliography on Fiber- Reinforced Cement and Concrete," Miscellaneous Paper C-76-6, with supplements 1, 2, 3, and 4 ( 1977 , 1979, 1980, and 1982), US Army... Mindess , S., Bentur, A., Yan, C., and Vondran, G., "Impact Resistance of Concrete Containing Both Conventional Steel Reinforcement and Fibrillated...Roads, Streets, Walks, and Open Storage Areas," TM 5-822-6/AFM 88-7, Chap. 7, Washington, DC, 1977 . 18. __ , "Concrete Floor Slabs on Grade Subjected

  4. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  5. Economic analysis of recycling contaminated concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, A.; Ayers, K.W.; Boren, J.K.; Parker, F.L. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Decontamination and Decommissioning activities in the DOE complex generate large volumes of radioactively contaminated and uncontaminated concrete. Currently, this concrete is usually decontaminated, the contaminated waste is disposed of in a LLW facility and the decontaminated concrete is placed in C&D landfills. A number of alternatives to this practice are available including recycling of the concrete. Cost estimates for six alternatives were developed using a spreadsheet model. The results of this analysis show that recycling alternatives are at least as economical as current practice.

  6. Concrete under severe conditions. Environment and loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the CONSEC Conferences is to focus on concrete infrastructures, either subjected to severe environment or severe loading, or any combination of severe conditions. Experience from the performance of existing concrete structures, and especially under severe environmental conditions, severe accidental loading or extended lifespan, has demonstrated the need for better integration of structural and durability design, new design concepts including reliability-based durability design, performance-based material requirements, structural robustness, and an improved basis for documentation of obtained construction quality and durability properties during concrete construction. An improved basis for operation and preventive maintenance of concrete structures including repairs and retrofitting is also very important. Premature corrosion of reinforcing steel, inadequate structural design for seismic or blast loading, are examples of reduced service life of concrete structures that not only represent technical and economical problems, but also a huge waste of natural resources and hence also, an environmental and ecological problem. Experience of structures effectively submitted to severe conditions represents a unique benchmark for quantifying the actual safety and durability margin of concrete structures. In fact for several reasons, most concrete design codes, job specifications and other requirements for concrete structures have frequently shown to yield insufficient and unsatisfactory results and ability to solve the above problems, as well as issues raised by specific very long-term or very severe requirements for nuclear and industrial waste management, or civil works of strategic relevance. Recently available high to ultra-high performance concrete may find rational and valuable application in such cases. It is very important, therefore, to bring people with different professional backgrounds together to exchange experience and develop multi

  7. Applications and Properties of Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Rai1 ,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In conventional concrete, micro-cracks develop before structure is loaded because of drying shrinkage and other causes of volume change. When the structure is loaded, the micro cracks open up and propagate because of development of such micro-cracks, results in inelastic deformation in concrete. Fibre reinforced concrete (FRC is cementing concrete reinforced mixture with more or less randomly distributed small fibres. In the FRC, a numbers of small fibres are dispersed and distributed randomly in the concrete at the time of mixing, and thus improve concrete properties in all directions. The fibers help to transfer load to the internal micro cracks. FRC is cement based composite material that has been developed in recent years. It has been successfully used in construction with its excellent flexural-tensile strength, resistance to spitting, impact resistance and excellent permeability and frost resistance. It is an effective way to increase toughness, shock resistance and resistance to plastic shrinkage cracking of the mortar. These fibers have many benefits. Steel fibers can improve the structural strength to reduce in the heavy steel reinforcement requirement. Freeze thaw resistance of the concrete is improved. Durability of the concrete is improved to reduce in the crack widths. Polypropylene and Nylon fibers are used to improve the impact resistance. Many developments have been made in the fiber reinforced concrete.

  8. Strength of Concrete Containing Basalt Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the comparative study of effect of basalt fibre on compressive and split tensile strength of M40 grade concrete. The basalt fibre was mixed in concrete by (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) of its total weight of cement in concrete. Results indicated that the strength increases with increase of basalt fibre content up to 1.0% beyond that there is a reduction in strength on increasing basalt fibre. The results show that the concrete specimen with 1.0% of basalt fibre gives be...

  9. Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Bărbuţă

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer concrete is a composite material realized with resin and aggregates. In the present study the epoxy resin was used for binding the aggregates. In the composition were introduced near the fly ash, used as filler, the cellulose fibers. The mechanical characteristics such as compressive strength, flexural strength and split tensile strength of polymer concrete with fibers were investigated. The fiber percentage was constant, the epoxy resin and the filler dosages were varied. The cellulose fiber had not improved the mechanical characteristics of the polymer concrete in comparison to that of polymer concrete without cellulose fibers.

  10. Fine-grained concrete with organomineral additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solovyov Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues concerning the formation of the structure and properties of fine-grained concrete with organomineral additive produced through mechanochemical activation of thermal power plant fly ash together with superplasticizer. The additive is produced in a high-speed activator at the collision particles’ speed of about 80 m/s. The use of the additive in fine-grained concrete in the amounts of 0.5-1% increased the strength by 30-50% and reduced the size and volume of pores. The cement consumption in such concrete is close to the cement consumption in common concrete of equal resistance.

  11. Cementitious barriers partnership concrete mixture characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Protiere, Yannick [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  12. Concrete mixture characterization. Cementitious barriers partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Protiere, Yannick [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  13. Fatigue of concrete under compression: Database and proposal for high strength concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantsoght, E.O.L.

    2014-01-01

    The compressive strength of concrete decreases as an element is subjected to cycles of loading. In a typical fatigue test for the concrete compressive strength, a concrete specimen (typically a cylinder) is loaded between a lower and upper stress limit. These limits are expressed as a fraction of th

  14. Novel approach to make concrete structures self-healing using porous network concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangadji, S.; Schlangen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers proposed self healing mechanism using hollow fibres and or microcapsule containing a modifying agent dispersed in the concrete to prolong its service life and make it more durable. A novel self healing concrete concept is proposed in this paper by using porous network concrete compo

  15. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE GROUTS AND VAULT CONCRETES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, K; John Harbour, J; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-11-25

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone. Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement (dry premix) to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of three types of saltstone and two vault concretes. The saltstone formulations included saltstone premix batched with (1) Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), (2) Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), and (3) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60). The vault concrete formulations tested included the Vault 1/4 concrete and two variations of the Vault 2 concrete (Mix 1 and Mix 2). Wet properties measured for the saltstone formulations included yield stress, plastic viscosity, wet unit weight, bleed water volume, gel time, set time, and heat of hydration. Hydraulic and physical properties measured on the cured saltstone and concrete samples included saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention, compressive strength, porosity, particle density, and dry bulk density. These properties

  16. Kinetics of the degradation of sulfur mustard on ambient and moist concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevett, Carol A S; Sumpter, Kenneth B; Nickol, Robert G

    2009-02-15

    The rate of degradation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, was measured on ambient and moist concrete using (13)C Solid State Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSMAS NMR). Three samples of concrete made by the same formulation, but differing in age and alkalinity were used. The sulfur mustard eventually degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane via the intermediate sulfonium ions CH-TG, H-TG, H-2TG and O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH on all of the concrete samples, and in addition formed 8-31% vinyl moieties on the newer, more alkaline concrete samples. This is the first observation of the formation of O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH on a solid substrate. The addition of 2-chloroethanol to concrete on which mustard had fully degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane resulted in the formation of O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH, thus demonstrating the reversibility of sulfur mustard degradation pathways. The sulfur mustard degradation half-lives on ambient concrete at 22 degrees C ranged from 3.5 to 54 weeks. When the substrates were moistened, the degradation half-lives at 22 degrees C ranged from 75 to 350h. The degradation of sulfur mustard occurred more quickly at elevated temperatures and with added water. The non-volatile toxic sulfonium ions persisted for months to years on concrete at 22 degrees C and weeks to months on concrete at 35 degrees C, before decomposing to the relatively non-toxic compounds thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane.

  17. Kinetics of the degradation of sulfur mustard on ambient and moist concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevett, Carol A.S. [SAIC, Gunpowder Branch, P.O. Box 68, APG, MD 21010-0068 (United States)], E-mail: carol.brevett@us.army.mil; Sumpter, Kenneth B. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, 5183 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5424 (United States); Nickol, Robert G. [SAIC, Gunpowder Branch, P.O. Box 68, APG, MD 21010-0068 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    The rate of degradation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, was measured on ambient and moist concrete using {sup 13}C Solid State Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSMAS NMR). Three samples of concrete made by the same formulation, but differing in age and alkalinity were used. The sulfur mustard eventually degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane via the intermediate sulfonium ions CH-TG, H-TG, H-2TG and O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}S{sup +}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH on all of the concrete samples, and in addition formed 8-31% vinyl moieties on the newer, more alkaline concrete samples. This is the first observation of the formation of O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}S{sup +}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH on a solid substrate. The addition of 2-chloroethanol to concrete on which mustard had fully degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane resulted in the formation of O(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}S{sup +}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH, thus demonstrating the reversibility of sulfur mustard degradation pathways. The sulfur mustard degradation half-lives on ambient concrete at 22 deg. C ranged from 3.5 to 54 weeks. When the substrates were moistened, the degradation half-lives at 22 deg. C ranged from 75 to 350 h. The degradation of sulfur mustard occurred more quickly at elevated temperatures and with added water. The non-volatile toxic sulfonium ions persisted for months to years on concrete at 22 deg. C and weeks to months on concrete at 35 deg. C, before decomposing to the relatively non-toxic compounds thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane.

  18. Strength Behaviour Of Biomass Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Teck Jung

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the compressive strength and flexural strength of biomass fibre-reinforced concrete slab. The main objective of this study is to examine the effect of biomass aggregate and fibre glass on the concrete slab strength. The biomass aggregate is used to replace the natural aggregates. A total of 36 slab samples (250 mm x 600 mm x 50mm thick and 36 numbers of 150 mm cube samples containing 0%, 30%, 60% and 100% biomass aggregate were prepared.  The E-class fibre and Supracoat SP800 were added to increase the strength and to achieve the required workability. All the samples were cured in water with room temperature of around 27oC and tested at the age of 7, 14 and 28 days respectively. The result showed that cube specimens containing 30% biomass aggregate concrete achieved minimum strength of 15 MPa at 28 days. The flexural strength for slab specimens containing 30% biomass aggregate, Supracoat SP 800 and fibre glass gained higher strength compared with control specimens. The 100% biomass aggregate slab achieved 88% of the control specimen strength. The workability was between 150 mm to 170mm slump. The density of the specimens was reduced 20% for cube and 28% for slab compared with control specimens. It can be concluded that the biomass aggregate has good potential as partial aggregate replacement in slab construction when combined with the use of glass fibre and superplasticizer. However, more research needs to be carried out to self-compacting biomass aggregate concrete for sustainable construction

  19. Impact of biofouling on corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, B.T.; Gajendragad, M.R.; Ranganna, G.; Wagh, A.B.; Sudhakaran, T.

    The settlement of marine organisms on reinforced concrete surfaces can affect the durability of concrete structures due to the initiation of corrosion processes. A uniform settlement of biofoulers covering an entire concrete surface can protect...

  20. Damage in Concrete and its Detection by Use of Stress-Volumetric Strain Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerga Ján

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The reliable determination of the damage degree of concrete in the structure is difficult and not seldom short-term compressive strengths are considered as real strengths of concrete. Because the load history of the construction is generally unknown, we do not know, whether there have been reached values in the vicinity of the peak of the stress-strain diagram. The strength at the sustained or repeated loading would be then significantly lower, as obtained from tests performed on intact samples. The diagnostic of concrete damage is impeded by environmental effects, resulting in the anisotropy of the development of micro cracks. The possibility is pointed out to use the characteristics of the stress volumetric strain diagram for the assessment of the condition of the material, with the perspective of the application for the determination of the residual long-term strength of concrete

  1. Experimental Study on the Compressive Strength of Big Mobility Concrete with Nondestructive Testing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Shuai Shang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 big mobility concrete cubes that came from laboratory and construction site was completed. Nondestructive testing (NDT was carried out using impact rebound hammer (IRH techniques to establish a correlation between the compressive strengths and the rebound number. The local curve for measuring strength of the regression method is set up and its superiority is proved. The rebound method presented is simple, quick, and reliable and covers wide ranges of concrete strengths. The rebound method can be easily applied to concrete specimens as well as existing concrete structures. The final results were compared with previous ones from the literature and also with actual results obtained from samples extracted from existing structures.

  2. EVALUATION OF SULFATE ATTACK ON SALTSTONE VAULT CONCRETE AND SALTSTONESIMCO TECHNOLOGIES, INC. PART1 FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C

    2008-08-19

    This report summarizes the preliminary results of a durability analysis performed by SIMCO Technologies Inc. to assess the effects of contacting saltstone Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes with highly alkaline solutions containing high concentrations of dissolved sulfate. The STADIUM{reg_sign} code and data from two surrogate concretes which are similar to the Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes were used in the preliminary durability analysis. Simulation results for these surrogate concrete mixes are provided in this report. The STADIUM{reg_sign} code will be re-run using transport properties measured for the SRS Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concrete samples after SIMCO personnel complete characterization testing on samples of these materials. Simulation results which utilize properties measured for samples of Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes will be provided in Revision 1 of this report after property data become available. The modeling performed to date provided the following information on two concrete mixes that will be used to support the Saltstone PA: (1) Relationship between the rate of advancement of the sulfate front (depth of sulfate ion penetration into the concrete) and the rate of change of the concrete permeability and diffusivity. (2) Relationship between the sulfate ion concentration in the corrosive leachate and the rate of the sulfate front progression. (3) Equation describing the change in hydraulic properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity) as a function of sulfate ion concentration in the corrosive leachate. These results have been incorporated into the current Saltstone PA analysis by G. Flach (Flach, 2008). In addition, samples of the Saltstone Vaults 1/4 and Disposal Unit 2 concretes have been prepared by SIMCO Technologies, Inc. Transport and physical properties for these materials are currently being measured and sulfate exposure testing to three high alkaline, high sulfate leachates provided by SRNL is

  3. INVESTIGATION OF CEMENT CONCRETE CONGLOMERATE SOLIDIFICATION PROCESS BY IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Bandarenka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most prospective directions in preservation  and increase of service live of  road pavements is a construction of  automobile roads with cement concrete surface. Modern tendencies for provision of road construction quality presuppose a necessity to control processes of solidification and subsequent destruction of the material while forming and using cement concrete conglomerate being considered as a basic element of the road surface.  Multiyear practical experience of  automobile road operation using cement concrete pavements reveals an importance for monitoring  such processes as formation and destruction of cement concrete materials. An impedance spectroscopy method has been tried out and proposed as a tool for solution of the given problem.Experimental samples of cement concrete have been prepared for execution of tests, graded silica sand and granite chippings with particle size from 0.63 to 2.5 mm have been used as a fine aggregate in the samples. Dependencies of resistance (impedance on AC-current frequency  have been studied for samples of various nature and granulometric composition. The Gamry  G300 potentiostat has been used for measurement of complex impedance value. A spectrum analysis and calculation of equivalent circuit parameters calculation have been carried out while using EIS Spectrum Analyzer program.Comparison of impedance spectra for the prepared cement concrete samples have made it possible to reveal tendencies in changing spectrum parameters during solidification and subsequent contact with moisture in respect of every type of the sample. An equivalent electrical circuit has been developed that  characterizes physical and chemical processes which are accompanied by charge transfer in cement concrete conglomerate. The paper demonstrates a possibility to use an impedance spectroscopy for solution of a number of actual problems in the field of cement concrete technology problems. Particularly, the problems

  4. The virtual fields method applied to spalling tests on concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierron, F.; Forquin, P.

    2012-08-01

    For one decade spalling techniques based on the use of a metallic Hopkinson bar put in contact with a concrete sample have been widely employed to characterize the dynamic tensile strength of concrete at strain-rates ranging from a few tens to two hundreds of s-1. However, the processing method mainly based on the use of the velocity profile measured on the rear free surface of the sample (Novikov formula) remains quite basic and an identification of the whole softening behaviour of the concrete is out of reach. In the present paper a new processing method is proposed based on the use of the Virtual Fields Method (VFM). First, a digital high speed camera is used to record the pictures of a grid glued on the specimen. Next, full-field measurements are used to obtain the axial displacement field at the surface of the specimen. Finally, a specific virtual field has been defined in the VFM equation to use the acceleration map as an alternative `load cell'. This method applied to three spalling tests allowed to identify Young's modulus during the test. It was shown that this modulus is constant during the initial compressive part of the test and decreases in the tensile part when micro-damage exists. It was also shown that in such a simple inertial test, it was possible to reconstruct average axial stress profiles using only the acceleration data. Then, it was possible to construct local stress-strain curves and derive a tensile strength value.

  5. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi2O3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Zeff) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  6. Investigation of modified asphalt concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimich, Vita

    2016-01-01

    Currently the problem of improving the asphalt quality is very urgent. It is used primarily as topcoats exposed to the greatest relative to the other layers of the road, dynamic load - impact and shear. The number of cars on the road, the speed of their movement, as well as the traffic intensity increase day by day. We have to upgrade motor roads, which entails a huge cost. World experience shows that the issue is urgent not only in Russia, but also in many countries in Europe, USA and Asia. Thus, the subject of research is the resistance of asphalt concrete to water and its influence on the strength of the material at different temperatures, and resistance of pavement to deformation. It is appropriate to search for new modifiers for asphaltic binder and mineral additives for asphalt mix to form in complex the skeleton of the future asphalt concrete, resistant to atmospheric condensation, soil characteristics of the road construction area, as well as the growing road transport load. The important task of the work is searching special modifying additives for bitumen binder and asphalt mixture as a whole, which will improve the quality of highways, increasing the period between repairs. The methods described in the normative-technical documentation were used for the research. The conducted research allowed reducing the frequency of road maintenance for 7 years, increasing it from 17 to 25 years.

  7. Nanomodified magnesian schungite protective concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Ryzhov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is increasing demand for building materials with low permeability to the radioactive gas radon and materials that have protective properties against radiation exposure and non-ionizing radiation. Formulations have been developed and now special building flooring and plaster radiation protective mixtures are commercially available. With the acceleration the pace of development of nuclear energy safe utilization of liquid and solid radioactive waste is a vital task for the survival of humanity.With the use of innovative magnesian barite and magnesian schungite composites opportunities to solidify LRW and solid radioactive waste monolithing are expanded. Magnesium-schungite nanostructured concrete exceed heavy concrete on Portland cement by gamma radiation and strength characteristics reducing multiplicity. Formulations are protected by a patent for an invention.The paper shows a clear advantage of magnesia cement (compared with Portland cement in terms of specific mass energy parameters Em and Wm. The data demonstrates that the magnesia cement is characterized by higher parameters of maximum frequency of oscillation of the atoms ?m, which, apparently, is the key to explaining the increased protection (shielding properties of materials based on magnesia cement mixed with shungite of gamma radiation and exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation the range.Magnesium-schungite radiation-shielding materials are approved by Rospotrebnadzor for use for collective protection to reduce the income of radon in indoor air, gamma and x-ray production, residential, public and administrative buildings, as well as in food, pharmaceutical, medical and child care.

  8. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  9. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  10. An Endochronic Plasticity Theory for Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-20

    Strain Curves for Concrete Under Multiaxial Load His- tories," CEAE Department, Univ. of Colo., Boulder. 18. Stankowski, T., and K. H. Gerstle (1983...T. (1983), "Concrete Under Multiaxial Load Histories," M. S. Thesis, CEAE Department, University of Colorado, Boulder. 31. Valanis, K. C., and C. F

  11. Computational Modelling of Particle Packing in Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, H.

    2010-01-01

    Physical particle packing is becoming a hot topic in concrete technology as more and more types of granular materials are used in concrete either for ecological or for engineering purposes. Although various analytical methods have been developed for optimum mixture design, comprehensive information

  12. Effect of nano materials in geopolymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Naskar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In general, cement based concrete can be replaced by low calcium fly-ash based geopolymer concrete regarding the adverse effect of the manufacture of ordinary Portland cement on environment. Nowadays, nano technology has an important role in the field of construction industries. It has been seen that several properties of cement based concrete are affected by different nano materials. As low calcium fly-ash based geopolymer concrete is an alternate option for cement based concrete, nano materials may also have some influence on it. An experimental program has been taken up on low calcium fly-ash based M25 grade geopolymer concrete having 16 (M concentration of activator liquid. Different percentage of nano materials viz. nano silica, carbon nano tube, titanium di-oxide were also used to investigate the effect of nano materials on geopolymer concrete. Geopolymer concrete with 1% titanium di-oxide shows appreciable improvement in compressive strength although pH remains almost same in all cases.

  13. Properties of concrete containing used engine oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Shafiq

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Since last few years cement replacement materials, industrial by-products and agricultural wastes in concrete production are widely used. It imparts positive environmental effect because the waste materials are not released to the environment. It was reported that the leakage of motor oil onto concrete surfaces in old grinding units increased the resistance such concrete to freezing and thawing, it made to understand that the effect is similar to adding an air-entraining chemical admixture to the concrete. However, the hypothesis is not backed by significant research study and not reported in the available literature. This paper presents results of the experimental study conducted to investigate the effects of used engine oil on properties of fresh and hardened concrete.  With the addition of used engine oil, concrete slump was increased by 18% to 38% and air content by 26% to 58% as compare to the slump of control concrete. Porosity and oxygen permeability of concrete containing used engine oil was also reduced and the compressive strength was obtained approximately same as that of the control mix

  14. Modelling of Deterioration Effects on Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Teplý

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the service life of concrete structures models for deterioration effects are needed. This paper has the form of a survey, listing and describing such analytical models, namely carbonation of concrete, ingress of chlorides, corrosion of reinforcing steel and prestressing tendons. The probabilistic approach is applied.

  15. Techniques for internal water curing of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Pietro, Lura

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of different techniques for incorporation of internal curing water in concrete. Internal curing can be used to mitigate self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage. Some concretes may need 50 kg/m3 of internal curing water for this purpose. The price of the internal...

  16. Recent advances on self healing of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Jonkers, H.M.; Qian, S.; Garcia, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper an overview is given of new developments obtained in research on self healing of cracks in cement based materials and asphalt concrete. At Delft University various projects are running to study self healing mechanisms. The first project that is discussed is Bacterial Concrete, in which

  17. Re-Assessment of Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper two aspects of re-assessment of the reliability of concrete bridges are discussed namely modelling of the corrosion of reinforcement and updating of uncertain variables. The main reason for deterioration of concrete bridges is corrosion of the reinforcement. Therefore, modelling...

  18. Autogenous Deformation and Internal Curing of Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lura, P.

    2003-01-01

    High-performance concrete (HPC) is generally characterized by a low water/binder ratio and by silica-fume addition, which guarantee a low porosity and a discontinuous capillary pore structure of the cement paste. Modern concretes possess some highly advantageous properties compared to traditional co

  19. Self-compacting fibre-reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    The project 'self-compacting fibre-reinforced concrete (SCFRC)' is part of the Dutch STW/PPM program - 'cement-bonded materials' - DCT.4010. Subproject III to which the project ,SCFRC' belongs deals with the development of new high performance concretes. The project 'SCFRC' aims at investigating the

  20. Frost damage of concrete subject to confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2016-01-01

    When internal frost damage is observed in real concrete structures, the usual pattern is cracks with a preferred orientation parallel to the exposed surface. When exposing concrete with poor frost resistance to a standardised freeze/thaw test in the laboratory, the orientations of the resulting...

  1. Durability of hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Polder, R.B.; Borsje, H.

    1998-01-01

    The subject of this study was the performance of hydrophobic treatment to protect concrete against chloride penetration from de-icing salts. Hydrophobic treatment makes a concrete surface absorb less water and less chloride. Several types of tests were carried out to study the performance of hydroph

  2. Durability of hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Polder, R.B.; Borsje, H.

    1998-01-01

    The subject of this study was the performance of hydrophobic treatment to protect concrete against chloride penetration from de-icing salts. Hydrophobic treatment makes a concrete surface absorb less water and less chloride. Test methods and requirements for commercial products were established. In

  3. Strength of Cracked Reinforced Concrete Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with models, based on the theory of plasticity, to be used in strength assessments of reinforced concrete disks suffering from different kinds of cracking. Based on the assumption that the sliding strength of concrete is reduced in sections where cracks are located, solutions...

  4. Bond strength between stell-concrete and between concretes with different ages in structural rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. DORIA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIn inspections of buildings, it is common to find structures that, well before reaching its useful life longer require repairs and reinforcements. This study examined the bond strength between concrete of different ages and between steel and concrete, focusing on the recovery of reinforced concrete structures. To analyze the bond between concrete of different ages, trials with specimens receiving three different types of treatments at the interface between the concrete were performed: brushing; brushing and mortar equal to concrete of substrate and brushing and epoxy layer. Indirect tensile tests and oblique and vertical shear tests at the interface were made . The bond stress between steel and concrete was evaluated by pull out test under the conditions of the bar inserted in the still fresh concrete and when inserted in the hardened concrete with epoxy. Results showed increased bond strength by indirect tensile stress of 15% and 37%; 4% and 12% for the adherence test by oblique shear, and 108% and 178%, for the testing of vertical shear, respectively, for the specimens whose interfaces have received, in addition to brushing, layer of mortar and epoxy bridge, compared to those who received only brushing. Insignificant loss (about 0.52% of bond stress was noticed for pull out test of steel bar when compared with test results of the specimens that had steel bar inserted in the concrete in the hardened state with epoxy adhesion bridge, with those who had inserted steel bar in fresh concrete.

  5. The Dynamic Performance of Concrete under Impact Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of concrete under symmetric impact was experimentally investigated in the case of primary gas gun and was analyzed with Lagrange method. The value-time relations of u, v, e on every lagrange position are gained. The relationship of strain-stress is also obtained. The whole process is numerical simulated by LSDYNA970. It indicate that the damage effect of concrete under impact loading can be described by the function with plasticity strain at constant volume, equivalence plasticity strain and pressure. The manganin pressure gauge is used to measure the pressure-time curves of the samples. The parameters of high-pressure equation are obtained by the numerical simulation. Numerical simulation is a necessary complement to the test. The spall phenomenon is observed by the numerical simulation.

  6. Structural Concrete Prepared with Coarse Recycled Concrete Aggregate: From Investigation to Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Corinaldesi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of mechanical behaviour and elastic properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC is presented. RACs were prepared by using a coarse aggregate fraction made of recycled concrete coming from a recycling plant in which rubble from concrete structure demolition is collected and suitably treated. Several concrete mixtures were prepared by using either the only virgin aggregates (as reference or 30% coarse recycled aggregate replacing gravel and by using two different kinds of cement. Different water-to-cement ratios were adopted ranging from 0.40 to 0.60. Concrete workability was always in the range 190–200 mm. Concrete compressive strength, elastic modulus, and drying shrinkage were evaluated. Results obtained showed that structural concrete up to C32/40 strength class can be manufactured with RAC. Moreover, results obtained from experimentation were discussed in order to obtain useful information for RAC structure design, particularly in terms of elastic modulus and drying shrinkage prediction.

  7. Fly ash for durable concrete construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhir, R.K. [University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1994-12-31

    This is essentially a review paper, bringing together the various studies undertaken at the University of Dundee as well as many others selected from published work. A full range of durability properties have been considered dealing with the effects of fly ash (FA) in concrete. It is shown that the use of FA generally effects improvement in the resistance of concrete to various forms of attack. FA is shown to greatly improve concrete resistance to chloride ingress and to reduce expansion caused by ASR. In the case of sulphate attack the use of FA is recommended. With regard to carbonation, FA can slightly reduce the resistance. It is also shown that FA concrete will benefit more from curing than OPC concrete in developing its resistance to deterioration with age. 78 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Autoclave foam concrete: Structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestnikov, Alexei; Semenov, Semen; Strokova, Valeria; Nelubova, Viktoria

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the technology and properties of autoclaved foam concrete taking into account practical experience and laboratory studies. The results of study of raw materials and analysis of structure and properties of foam-concrete before and after autoclave treatment are basic in this work. Experimental studies of structure and properties of foam concrete are carried out according to up-to-date methods and equipment on the base of the shared knowledge centers. Results of experimental studies give a deep understanding of properties of raw materials, possible changes and new formations in inner layers of porous material providing the improvement of constructional and operational properties of autoclaved foam concrete. Principal directions of technology enhancement as well as developing of production of autoclave foam concretes under cold-weather conditions in Russia climate are justified.

  9. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  10. Transitional Thermal Creep of Early Age Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Anders Boe; Damkilde, Lars; Freiesleben Hansen, Per

    1999-01-01

    Couplings between creep of hardened concrete and temperature/water effects are well-known. Both the level and the gradients in time of temperature or water content influence the creep properties. In early age concrete the internal drying and the heat development due to hydration increase the effect...... of these couplings. The purpose of this work is to set up a mathematical model for creep of concrete which includes the transitional thermal effect. The model govern both early age concrete and hardened concrete. The development of the material properties in the model are assumed to depend on the hydration process...... and the thermal activation of the water in the microstructure. The thermal activation is assumed to be governed by the Arrhenius principle and the activation energy of the viscosity of water is found applicable in the analysis of experimental data. Changes in temperature create an imbalance in the microstructure...

  11. Transitional Thermal Creep of Early Age Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard, A. B.; Damkilde, L.; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1999-01-01

    Couplings between creep of hardened concrete and temperature/water effects are well-known. Both the level and the gradients in time of temperature or water content influence the creep properties. In early age concrete the internal drying and the heat development due to hydration increase the effect...... of these couplings. The purpose of this work is to set up a mathematical model for creep of concrete that includes the transitional thermal effect. The model governs both early age concrete and hardened concrete. The development of the material properties in the model is assumed to depend on the hydration process...... and the thermal activation of water in the microstructure. The thermal activation is assumed to be governed by the Arrhenius principle, and the activation energy of the viscosity of water is found applicable in the analysis of the experimental data. Changes in temperature create an imbalance in the microstructure...

  12. A contactless ultrasonic surface wave approach to characterize distributed cracking damage in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Suyun; Song, Homin; Oelze, Michael L; Popovics, John S

    2017-03-01

    We describe an approach that utilizes ultrasonic surface wave backscatter measurements to characterize the volume content of relatively small distributed defects (microcrack networks) in concrete. A simplified weak scattering model is used to demonstrate that the scattered wave field projected in the direction of the surface wave propagation is relatively insensitive to scatterers that are smaller than the propagating wavelength, while the scattered field projected in the opposite direction is more sensitive to sub-wavelength scatterers. Distributed microcracks in the concrete serve as the small scatterers that interact with a propagating surface wave. Data from a finite element simulation were used to demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach, and also to optimize a testing configuration to collect data. Simulations were validated through experimental measurements of ultrasonic backscattered surface waves from test samples of concrete constructed with different concentrations of fiber filler (0.0, 0.3 and 0.6%) to mimic increasing microcrack volume density and then samples with actual cracking induced by controlled thermal cycles. A surface wave was induced in the concrete samples by a 50kHz ultrasonic source operating 10mm above the surface at an angle of incidence of 9°. Silicon-based miniature MEMS acoustic sensors located a few millimeters above the concrete surface both behind and in front of the sender were used to detect leaky ultrasonic surface waves emanating from concrete. A normalized backscattered energy parameter was calculated from the signals. Statistically significant differences in the normalized backscattered energy were observed between concrete samples with varying levels of simulated and actual cracking damage volume.

  13. Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Bacillus and Sporosarcina Strains Isolated from Concrete and Analysis of the Bacterial Community of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Eom, Hyo Jung; Park, Chulwoo; Jung, Jaejoon; Shin, Bora; Kim, Wook; Chung, Namhyun; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2016-03-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (CCP) is a long-standing but re-emerging environmental engineering process for production of self-healing concrete, bioremediation, and long-term storage of CO2. CCP-capable bacteria, two Bacillus strains (JH3 and JH7) and one Sporosarcina strain (HYO08), were isolated from two samples of concrete and characterized phylogenetically. Calcium carbonate crystals precipitated by the three strains were morphologically distinct according to field emission scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping confirmed biomineralization via extracellular calcium carbonate production. The three strains differed in their physiological characteristics: growth at alkali pH and high NaCl concentrations, and urease activity. Sporosarcina sp. HYO08 and Bacillus sp. JH7 were more alkali- and halotolerant, respectively. Analysis of the community from the same concrete samples using barcoded pyrosequencing revealed that the relative abundance of Bacillus and Sporosarcina species was low, which indicated low culturability of other dominant bacteria. This study suggests that calcium carbonate crystals with different properties can be produced by various CCP-capable strains, and other novel isolates await discovery.

  14. Microscopy study of the interface between concrete and conductive coating used as anode for cathodic protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Schuten, G.

    2003-01-01

    Samples were studied of conductive coatings that had served as anode material in concrete cathodic protection (CP) systems in Norway and The Netherlands for up to about 9 years. Techniques used were light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), carried out on thin section samples of about

  15. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Remec, Igor [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Wall, Dr. James Joseph [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  16. Evaluation of isotropy in wet-mix sprayed concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubero, E.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that there are differences between the fresh mix concrete and the placed concrete sprayed using dry or wet-mix process. Because of that, the characterization of such material is carried out in cores extracted parallel to the spray direction from sample panels. However, in many applications (e.g. tunnel lining, considerable compressive stresses appear along the transversal direction. In this paper different spayed concretes are evaluated. It was observed that the values of compressive strength and modulus of elasticity were different depending on the direction of measurement. These differences are related to a preferential orientation of the coarse aggregate due to the characteristics of the casting process. Rather than applying classic empirical methods, the concrete mixes used in this study were designed according to a new proportioning method based on the difference between the composition of the fresh mix concrete and the placed concrete.Dadas las diferencias entre el hormigón de partida y el colocado, la evaluación de las propiedades de un hormigón proyectado, por vía húmeda o seca, se realiza mediante la extracción de testigos, evaluándose las propiedades mecánicas o deformacionales de forma uniaxial, según la dirección de la proyección. No obstante, son muchas las aplicaciones, como es el caso del sostenimiento en túneles, en las que esta disposición no representa la forma de trabajo principal del hormigón en la estructura. En el presente artículo se ha verificado que pueden existir diferencias en la resistencia a compresión y módulo de elasticidad del hormigón proyectado por vía húmeda, según la dirección de evaluación. Éstas van ligadas a la orientación que sufre el árido grueso como consecuencia de la puesta en obra del hormigón. Asimismo, el hormigón proyectado del estudio se ha dosificado utilizando como procedimiento de dosificación una propuesta metodológica, basada en las diferencias

  17. SA-based concrete seismic stress monitoring: a case study for normal strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, S.; Zhang, H. B.; Ou, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    The stress history of concrete structures that have survived an earthquake can serve as a critical index to evaluate the health of the structure. There are currently few reliable monitoring methods to assess concrete stress after a seismic event. Piezoelectric-based smart aggregate (SA) provides an innovative experimental approach to monitor stress on concrete. The principle of SA-based concrete seismic stress monitoring is based on the assumption that concrete stress can be reliably predicted by the average output voltages of limited SAs with an acceptable margin of error. In this study, the meso-scale randomness of concrete was evaluated throughout the overall stress range of concrete and the influence of different load paths was considered. Four cylindrical specimens of normal strength concrete were embedded with a total of 24 SAs. The SA output sensitivity curve in the paths of loading-unloading with different amplitudes and monotonic loading up to failure was obtained. Monitoring errors were analyzed during pre- and post-peak stages from the experimental results. This research suggests that SA-based concrete seismic stress monitoring for normal strength concrete is reliable.

  18. Ulexite-galena intermediate-weight concrete as a novel design for overcoming space and weight limitations in the construction of efficient shields against neutrons and photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamiri, S M R; Mortazavi, S M J; Razi, Z; Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, M; Rahmani, F; Faeghi, F

    2013-01-01

    Recently, due to space and weight limitations, scientists have tried to design and produce concrete shields with increased attenuation of radiation but not increased mass density. Over the past years, the authors' had focused on the production of heavy concrete for radiation shielding, but this is the first experience of producing intermediate-weight concrete. In this study, ulexite (hydrated sodium calcium borate hydroxide) and galena (lead ore) have been used for the production of a special intermediate-weight concrete. Shielding properties of this intermediate-weight concrete against photons have been investigated by exposing the samples to narrow and broad beams of gamma rays emitted from a ⁶⁰Co radiotherapy unit. Densities of the intermediate-weight concrete samples ranged 3.64-3.90 g cm⁻³, based on the proportion of the ulexite in the mix design. The narrow-beam half-value layer (HVL) of the ulexite-galena concrete samples for 1.25 MeV ⁶⁰Co gamma rays was 2.84 cm, much less than that of ordinary concrete (6.0 cm). The Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNP4C was also used to model the attenuation of ⁶⁰Co gamma-ray photons and Am-Be neutrons of the ulexite-galena concrete with different thicknesses. The ⁶⁰Co HVL calculated by MCNP simulation was 2.87 cm, indicating a good agreement between experimental measurements and MC simulation. Furthermore, MC-calculated results showed that thick ulexite-galena concrete shields (60-cm thickness) had a 7.22 times (722 %) greater neutron attenuation compared with ordinary concrete. The intermediate-weight ulexite-galena concrete manufactured in this study may have many important applications in the construction of radiation shields with weight limitations such as the swing or sliding doors that are currently used for radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  19. Microbially influenced degradation of concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.

    1998-03-01

    Steel reinforced concrete is the most widely used construction material in the world. The economic costs of repair or replacement of environmentally damaged concrete structures is astronomical. For example, half of the concrete bridges in the Federal Department of Transportation highway system are in need of major repairs. Microbially influenced degradation of concrete (MID) is one of the recognized degradative processes known to adversely affect concrete integrity. It is not possible to assign a specific percent of effect to any of these processes. However, MID has been shown to be as aggressive as any of the physical/chemical phenomena. In addition, the possibility exists that there is a synergism which results in cumulative effects from all the processes. Three groups of bacteria are known to promote MID. Of these, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are the most aggressive. Much is known about the nutritional needs of these bacteria. However, there has not been a biological linkage established between the presence of environmental, polluting sulfur sources and the degradation of concrete structures. It has been shown that the environmental pollutants sulfur dioxide and sulfite can be utilized by active SOB for the biological production of sulfuric acid. Therefore, it is not a reach of reality to assume that SOB exposed to these pollutants could have a major impact on the degradation of concrete structures. But, until the environment sulfur loop is closed it will not be possible to calculate how important SOB activity is in initiating and promoting damage.

  20. Controlling chloride ions diffusion in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Song, Runxia

    2013-11-28

    The corrosion of steel in concrete is mainly due to the chemical reaction between the chloride ions and iron ions. Indeed, this is a serious threaten for reinforced concrete structure, especially for the reinforced concrete structure in the sea. So it is urgent and important to protect concrete against chloride ions corrosion. In this work, we report multilayer concrete can cloak chloride ions. We formulated five kinds of concrete A, B, C, D and E, which are made of different proportion of cement, sand and glue, and fabricated six-layer (ABACAD) cylinder diffusion cloak and background media E. The simulation results show that the six-layer mass diffusion cloak can protect concrete against chloride ions penetration, while the experiment results show that the concentration gradients are parallel and equal outside the outer circle in the diffusion flux lines, the iso-concentration lines are parallel outside the outer circle, and the concentration gradients in the inner circle are smaller than those outside the outer circle.

  1. Self-cleaning geopolymer concrete - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsaffirah Zailan, Siti; Mahmed, Norsuria; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Sandu, Andrei Victor

    2016-06-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction materials for building technology. However, cement production releases high amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere that leads to increasing the global warming. Thus, an alternative, environmental friendly construction material such as geopolymer concrete has been developed. Geopolymer concrete applies greener alternative binder, which is an innovative construction material that replaces the Portland cement. This technology introduced nano-particles such as nanoclay into the cement paste in order to improve their mechanical properties. The concrete materials also have been developed to be functioned as self-cleaning construction materials. The self-cleaning properties of the concrete are induced by introducing the photocatalytic materials such as titania (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO). Self-cleaning concrete that contains those photocatalysts will be energized by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and accelerates the decomposition of organic particulates. Thus, the cleanliness of the building surfaces can be maintained and the air surrounding air pollution can be reduced. This paper briefly reviews about self-cleaning concrete.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of thick concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Dwight A.

    2015-03-01

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) due to three primary properties: its low cost, structural strength, and ability to shield radiation. Examples of concrete structures important to the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants include the containment building, spent fuel pool, and cooling towers. Use in these structures has made concrete's long-term performance crucial for the safe operation of commercial NPPs. Extending LWR operating period to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of known forms of degradation. New mechanisms of materials degradation are also possible. This creates the need to be able to nondestructively evaluate the current subsurface concrete condition of aging concrete material in NPP structures. The size and complexity of NPP containment structures and heterogeneity of Portland cement concrete make characterization of the degradation extent a difficult task. Specially designed and fabricated test specimens can provide realistic flaws that are similar to actual flaws in terms of how they interact with a particular nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique. Artificial test blocks allow the isolation of certain testing problems as well as the variation of certain parameters. Representative large heavily reinforced concrete specimens would allow for comparative testing to evaluate the state-of-the-art NDE in this area and to identify additional developments necessary to address the challenges potentially found in NPPs.

  3. Life Cycle Assessment of Completely Recyclable Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke De Schepper

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the construction sector uses 50% of the Earth’s raw materials and produces 50% of its waste, the development of more durable and sustainable building materials is crucial. Today, Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW is mainly used in low level applications, namely as unbound material for foundations, e.g., in road construction. Mineral demolition waste can be recycled as crushed aggregates for concrete, but these reduce the compressive strength and affect the workability due to higher values of water absorption. To advance the use of concrete rubble, Completely Recyclable Concrete (CRC is designed for reincarnation within the cement production, following the Cradle-to-Cradle (C2C principle. By the design, CRC becomes a resource for cement production because the chemical composition of CRC will be similar to that of cement raw materials. If CRC is used on a regular basis, a closed concrete-cement-concrete material cycle will arise, which is completely different from the current life cycle of traditional concrete. Within the research towards this CRC it is important to quantify the benefit for the environment and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA needs to be performed, of which the results are presented in a this paper. It was observed that CRC could significantly reduce the global warming potential of concrete.

  4. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  5. Self Compacting Concrete And Its Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahesh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete (SCC, which flows under its own weight and doesn’t require any external vibration for compaction, has revolutionized concrete placement. Such concrete should have relatively low yield value to ensure high flow ability, a moderate viscosity to resists segregation and bleeding and must maintain its homogeneity during transportation, placing and curing to ensure adequate structural performance and long term durability. Self-compacting concrete (SCC can be defined as a fresh concrete which possesses superior flow ability under maintained stability (i.e. no segregation thus allowing self-compaction that is, material consolidation without addition of energy. Self-compacting concrete is a fluid mixture suitable for placing in structures with Congested reinforcement without vibration and it helps in achieving higher quality of surface finishes. However utilization of high reactive Metakaolin and Flyash asan admixtures as an effective pozzolan which causes great improvement in the porestructure. The relative proportions of key components are considered by volumerather than by mass. self compacting concrete (SCC mix design with 29% of coarse aggregate, replacement of cement with Metakaolin and class F flyash, combinations of both and controlled SCC mix with 0.36 water/cementitious ratio(by weight and388 litre/m3 of cement paste volume. Crushed granite stones of size 16mm and12.5mm are used with a blending 60:40 by percentage weight of total coarse aggregate. Self-compacting concrete compactibility is affected by the characteristics of materials and the mix proportions; it becomes necessary to evolve a procedure formix design of SCC. The properties of different constituent materials used in this investigation and its standard tests procedures for acceptance characteristics of self compacting concrete such as slump flow, V-funnel and L-Box are presented.

  6. Depth Profiling (ICP-MS Study of Toxic Metal Buildup in Concrete Matrices: Potential Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bassioni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential of concrete material to accumulate toxic trace elements using ablative laser technology (ICP-MS. Concrete existing in offshore structures submerged in seawater acts as a sink for hazardous metals, which could be gradually released into the ocean creating pollution and anoxic conditions for marine life. Ablative laser technology is a valuable tool for depth profiling concrete to evaluate the distribution of toxic metals and locate internal areas where such metals accumulate. Upon rapid degradation of concrete these “hotspots” could be suddenly released, thus posing a distinct threat to aquatic life. Our work simulated offshore drilling conditions by immersing concrete blocks in seawater and investigating accumulated toxic trace metals (As, Be, Cd, Hg, Os, Pb in cored samples by laser ablation. The experimental results showed distinct inhomogeneity in metal distribution. The data suggest that conditions within the concrete structure are favorable for random metal accumulation at certain points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage and has considerable scope for extended research including modeling and remedial studies.

  7. Effect Of Crumb Rubber On Compressive Strength Of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi Ahmad Azrem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the effect of different percentage of crumb rubber on compressive strength of fly ash based geopolymer concrete. This research attempted to produce rubberized geopolymer concrete as an environmentally friendly, lightweight and durable product. Crumb rubber with ranged size from 73 μm to 375 μm was used in order to replace fine aggregates in geopolymer concrete. The replacements of crumb rubber were 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% in the fly ash based geopolymer concrete. The ratio of fly ash to alkaline activator was 2.5 and the ratio of Na2SiO3 to NaOH was fixed at 2.0. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 7 and 28. The results show that there is a reduction in all compressive strength for crumb rubber mixture, but still higher than normal rubberized concrete. Rubberized geopolymer concrete is a suitable solution in some non structural applications.

  8. Estimating Strain Changes in Concrete during Curing Using Regression and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Ahangari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the cement hydration heat, concrete deforms during curing. These deformations may lead to cracks in the concrete. Therefore, a method which estimates the strain during curing is very valuable. In this research, two methods of multivariable regression and neural network were studied with the aim of estimating strain changes in concrete. For this purpose, laboratory cylindrical specimens were prepared under controlled situation at first and then vibration wire strain gauges equipped with thermistors were placed inside each sample to measure the deformations. Two different groups of input data were used in which variables included time, environment temperature, concrete temperature, water-to-cement ratio, aggregate content, height, and specimen diameter. CEM I, 42.5 R was utilized in set (I and strain changes have been measured in six concrete specimens. In set (II CEM II, 52.5 R was employed and strain changes were measured in three different specimens in which the diameter was held constant. The best multivariate regression equations calculated the determined coefficients at 0.804 and 0.82 for sets (I and (II, whereas the artificial neural networks predicted the strain with higher of 1 and 0.996. Results show that the neural network method can be utilized as an efficient tool for estimating concrete strain during curing.

  9. Radiological characterization of the concrete biological shield of the APSARA reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Priya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Indian research reactor, APSARA, was utilized for various R&D programmes from 1956 until its shutdown in 2009. The biological shield of the reactor developed residual activity due to neutron irradiation during the operation of the reactor. Dose rate mapping and in-situ gamma spectrometry of the concrete structures of the reactor pool were carried out. Representative concrete samples collected from various locations were subjected to high-resolution gamma spectrometry analysis. 60Co and 152Eu were found to be the dominant gamma-emitting radionuclides in most of the locations. 133Ba was also found in some of the concrete structures. The separation of 3H from concrete was achieved using an acid digestion method and beta activity measured using liquid scintillation counting. The depth profile of radionuclide specific activity in the concrete wall of the shielding corner was also studied. Specific activities of the radionuclides were found to decrease exponentially with depth inside the concrete walls. This study would be helpful in bulk waste management during the decommissioning of the reactor.

  10. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Tomaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: tomaz.zagar@ijs.si; Bozic, Matjaz [Nuklearna elektrarna Krsko, Vrbina 12, 8270 Krsko (Slovenia); Ravnik, Matjaz [Reactor Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived ({gamma} emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. {sup 133}Ba, {sup 41}Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  11. Effect of jute yarn on the mechanical behavior of concrete composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Mohammad; Ahmed, Mashud; Hoque, Md Mozammel; Hannan, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of introducing jute yarn on the mechanical properties of concrete. Jute fibre is produced abundantly in Bangladesh and hence, very cheap. The investigation on the enhancement of mechanical properties of concrete with jute yarn as reinforcement, if enhanced, will not only explore a way to improve the properties of concrete, it will also explore the use of jute and restrict the utilization of polymer which is environmentally detrimental. To accomplish the objective, an experimental investigation of the compressive, flexural and tensile strengths of Jute Yarn Reinforced Concrete composites (JYRCC) has been conducted. Cylinders, prisms and cubes of standard dimensions have been made to introducing jute yarn varying the mix ratio of the ingredients in concrete, water cement ratio, length and volume of yarn to know the effect of parameters as mentioned. Compressive, flexural and tensile strength tests had been conducted on the prepared samples by appropriate testing apparatus following Standards of tests. Mechanical properties of JYRCC were observed to be enhanced for a particular range of lengths of cut (10, 15, 20 and 25 mm) and volume content of jute yarn (0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 %). The maximum increment of compressive, flexural and tensile strengths observed in the investigation are 33, 23 and 38 %, respectively with respect to concrete without jute yarn.

  12. Embodied simulation of emotional valence: Facial muscle responses to abstract and concrete words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künecke, Janina; Sommer, Werner; Schacht, Annekathrin; Palazova, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Semantic knowledge is thought to be at least partially grounded in sensory, motor, and affective information, acquired through experiences in our inner and outer world. The reactivation of experience-related information during meaning access is called simulation. In the affective simulation account, it is assumed that the grounding information depends on the concepts' concreteness. Whereas abstract concepts are thought to be mainly represented through affective experiential information, concrete words rely more on sensory-motor experiential information. To test this hypothesis, we measured facial muscle activity as an indicator of affective simulation during visual word recognition. Words varied on the dimensions of concreteness and valence. Behavioral and electromyographic data were analyzed with linear mixed-effects models with maximal random effect structure to optimize generalization over participants and word samples. Contrary to this hypothesis, we found a valence effect in the m. corrugator supercilii only in response to concrete but not to abstract words. Our data show that affective simulation as measured with facial muscle activity occurs in response to concrete rather than to abstract words. More concrete words are supposed to have higher context availability and richer visual imagery, which might promote affective simulation on the expressive level of facial muscle activity. The results are in line with embodied accounts of semantic representation but speak against its predominant role for representing affective information in abstract concepts.

  13. Characterization of Laboratory Prepared Concrete Pastes Exposed to High Alkaline and High Sodium Salt Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-30

    The objective of this study was to identify potential chemical degradation mechanisms for the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) concretes, which over the performance life of the structures may be exposed to highly alkaline sodium salt solutions containing sulfate, hydroxide, and other potentially corrosive chemicals in salt solution and saltstone flush water, drain water, leachate and / or pore solution. The samples analyzed in this study were cement pastes prepared in the SIMCO Technologies, Inc. concrete laboratory. They were based on the paste fractions of the concretes used to construct the Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs). SDU 1 and 4 concrete pastes were represented by the PV1 test specimens. The paste in the SDU 2, 3, 5, and 6 concrete was represented by the PV2 test specimens. SIMCO Technologies, Inc. selected the chemicals and proportions in the aggressive solutions to approximate proportions in the saltstone pore solution [2, 3, 5, and 6]. These test specimens were cured for 56 days in curing chamber before being immersed in aggressive solutions. After exposure, the samples were frozen to prevent additional chemical transport and reaction. Selected archived (retrieved from the freezer) samples were sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for additional characterization using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Characterization results are summarized in this report. In addition, a correlation between the oxide composition of the pastes and their chemical durability in the alkaline salt solutions is provided.

  14. Residual Compressive Strength of Laterized Concrete Subjected to Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Brooks

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This research presents the results of an experimental program to investigate the strength performance of laterized concrete (LATCON when subjected to elevated temperatures of 200, 400 and 600ºC. Six concrete mixes incorporating 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50% Laterite as a replacement by weight of sand was prepared. After heat pretreatment specimens were cooled using either rapid cooling (water-cooling or natural cooling (air-cooling. An analysis of variance test shows that exposure temperature, cooling regime, and their interaction have a significant influence on the compressive strength of the samples. When subjected to the investigated temperatures specimens experienced strength losses that increased with temperature. This study further reveals that air-cooled concrete specimens maintained higher residual strength values than water-cooled specimens. A comparison of the residual compressive strength data obtained in this study with code provisions in Eurocode and CEB design curve shows that these codes could be applied to LATCON subjected to temperature below 400ºC.

  15. Effect of soil pollution on water for mixing of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, M. Cecilia Soto; Tapia Alvarez, Carolina; Decinti Weiss, Alejandra; Zamorano Vargas, Macarena; Corail Sanchez, Camila; Hurtado Nuñez, Camilo; Guzman Hermosilla, Matías; Pardo Fabregat, Francisco; Vidal, Manuel Miguel Jordan; Borras, Jaume Bech; Roca, Nuria

    2016-04-01

    ISO 12439, in addition to chemical and physical requirements, establishes maximum levels for harmful substances that may be present in the mixing water of concrete, when they come from natural sources from contaminated soils. These harmful substances considered in the ISO are sugars, phosphates (P2O5), nitrate (NO3-), lead (P2+) and zinc (Zn2+). As an alternative to the maximum values, ISO verifies the effect of these substances in water from contaminated soils. This measurement is made on the effect on the mechanical strength of the concrete (compression at 7 and 28 days) and the setting times (start and end setting). This paper presents the results obtained on samples of concrete made with smaller, similar and more content to the maximum levels set by ISO 12439 are presented. The results establish that in the case of nitrate, a substance present in many contaminated soils margins resistance variation or setting times allowed by ISO 12439 are not met. Finally, it is concluded that in case of presence of these pollutants should be performed strength tests and setting times before authorizing the use of water. Keywords: Harmful substances, contaminated soils, water pollution.

  16. Fatigue Performance of Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun, Zhang; Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain basic data of fibre reinforced concrete under fatigue load and to set up a theoretical model based on micromechanics. In this study, the bridging stress in fiber reinforced concrete under cyclic tensile load was investigted in details. The damage...... mechanism of the interface between fiber and matrix was proposed and a rational model given. Finally, the response of a steel fiber reinforced concrete beam under fatigue loading was predicted based on this model and compared with experimental results....

  17. Suitability of rubber concrete for railway sleepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afia S. Hameed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation by replacing 15% by volume fraction of fine aggregate by crumb rubber was conducted to find the fatigue failure load and impact resistance. The design strength of 50 and 55 MPa was achieved. Test result indicated that there was reduction in compressive strength and modulus values. The fatigue failure and impact resistance were high for rubber concrete when compared with ordinary high strength concrete. The impact strength for railway sleeper with crumb rubber replacement showed increase of about 60% when compared to prestressed concrete sleeper.

  18. Fatigue in Breakwater Concrete Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    1985-01-01

    made of unreinforced and steel fibre reinforced flyash concrete are presented. Moreover universal graphs for fatigue in armour units made of conventional unreinforced concrete exposed to impact load and pulsating load are presented. The effect of fibre reinforcement and the implementation of fatigue......The reliability of rubble mound breakwaters depends on the hydraulic stability and the mechanical strength of the armour units. The paper deals with the important aspect of fatigue related to the strength of concrete armour units. Results showing significant fatigue from impact tests with Dolosse...

  19. Influence of Additives on Reinforced Concrete Durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neverkovica Darja

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the research on carbonation and chloride induced corrosion mechanisms in reinforced concrete structures, based on three commercially available concrete admixtures: Xypex Admix C-1000, Penetron Admix and Elkem Microsilica. Carbonation takes place due to carbon dioxide diffusion, which in the required amount is present in the air. Chlorides penetrate concrete in case of the use of deicing salt or structure exploitation in marine atmosphere. Based on the implemented research, Elkem Microsilica is the recommended additive for the use in aggressive environmental conditions. Use of Xypex Admix C-1000 and Penetron Admix have only average resistance to the aggressive environmental impact.

  20. Fibre Optic Protection System for Concrete Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S.Leng; A.Hameed; D.Winter; R.A.Barnes; G.C.Mays; G.F.Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The design concepts, modelling and implementation of various fibre optic sensor protection systems for development in concrete structures were investigated. Design concepts and on-site requirements for surface-mounted and embedded optical fibre sensor in concrete were addressed. Finite element (FE) modelling of selected sensor protection systems in strain-transfer efficiency from the structure to the sensing region was also studied. And experimental validation of specified sensor protection system was reported. Results obtained indicate that the protection system for the sensors performs adequately in concrete environment and there is very good correlation between results obtained by the protected fibre optic sensors and conventional electrical resistance strain gauges.

  1. An ERP study of recognition memory for concrete and abstract pictures in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Olivier; Chouinard-Leclaire, Christine; Muckle, Gina; Westerlund, Alissa; Burden, Matthew J; Jacobson, Sandra W; Jacobson, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Recognition memory for concrete, nameable pictures is typically faster and more accurate than for abstract pictures. A dual-coding account for these findings suggests that concrete pictures are processed into verbal and image codes, whereas abstract pictures are encoded in image codes only. Recognition memory relies on two successive and distinct processes, namely familiarity and recollection. Whether these two processes are similarly or differently affected by stimulus concreteness remains unknown. This study examined the effect of picture concreteness on visual recognition memory processes using event-related potentials (ERPs). In a sample of children involved in a longitudinal study, participants (N=96; mean age=11.3years) were assessed on a continuous visual recognition memory task in which half the pictures were easily nameable, everyday concrete objects, and the other half were three-dimensional abstract, sculpture-like objects. Behavioral performance and ERP correlates of familiarity and recollection (respectively, the FN400 and P600 repetition effects) were measured. Behavioral results indicated faster and more accurate identification of concrete pictures as "new" or "old" (i.e., previously displayed) compared to abstract pictures. ERPs were characterized by a larger repetition effect, on the P600 amplitude, for concrete than for abstract images, suggesting a graded recollection process dependent on the type of material to be recollected. Topographic differences were observed within the FN400 latency interval, especially over anterior-inferior electrodes, with the repetition effect more pronounced and localized over the left hemisphere for concrete stimuli, potentially reflecting different neural processes underlying early processing of verbal/semantic and visual material in memory.

  2. Design of ecological concrete by particle packing optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, S.A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research project on Ecological Concrete was to reduce the CO2-emission of concrete and to reuse secondary materials form concrete production and other industries simultaneously. This also minimizes the use of natural resources and the production costs. To replace cement in concrete

  3. The potentials of porous concrete for ballistic protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.; Roebroeks, G.; Krabbenborg, D.; Agar Ozbek, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    A special porous concrete has been developed by the Delft University in collaboration with TNO. The concrete has a static compressive strength of 45 MPa. It fragments at impact into small size debris relative to reference concrete. The porous concrete was developed at laboratory scale and tested at

  4. 29 CFR 1926.704 - Requirements for precast concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for precast concrete. 1926.704 Section 1926..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete and Masonry Construction § 1926.704 Requirements for precast concrete. (a) Precast concrete wall units, structural...

  5. 76 FR 34890 - Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 213 RIN 2130-AC01 Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties... mandates specific requirements for effective concrete crossties, for rail fastening systems connected to concrete crossties, and for automated inspections of track constructed with concrete crossties. The...

  6. 76 FR 55819 - Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 213 RIN 2130-AC35 Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties... concrete crossties, for rail fastening systems connected to concrete crossties, and for automated inspections of track constructed with concrete crossties. This document amends and clarifies the final...

  7. Performance of Engineered Cementitious Composites for Concrete Repairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and goals of this thesis The concrete repair, rehabilitation and retrofitting industry grows rapidly, driven by deterioration of, damage to and defects in concrete structures. However, it is well known that to achieve durable concrete repairs is very difficult. The failure of concrete rep

  8. Mechanical and physical properties of polyester polymer concrete using recycled aggregates from concrete sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Francisco; Montalbán, Laura; Real, Julia I; Real, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate), and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption) was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%), and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior.

  9. Surface treatment systems for concrete in marine environment: Effect of concrete cover thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique Farias de Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract There are some ways to extend the service life of a reinforced concrete structure. This paper focuses on the extension of the service life by treating the surface of reinforced concrete, specifically on the effect of the concrete cover thickness on the surface treatment system efficacy. Thus, chloride migration tests were performed and diffusion chloride coefficients were calculated. The service life of each case (treated or non-treated concrete was estimated using these data and Fick's second law of diffusion. Results indicated that the thicker the concrete cover is, the greater the efficacy of the concrete surface treatment system will be. The dissemination of this information is important, since it is almost intuitive to think that the effect of a surface treatment system depends only on itself and this study shows the opposite.

  10. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Polyester Polymer Concrete Using Recycled Aggregates from Concrete Sleepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carrión

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate, and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%, and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior.

  11. Behavior of concrete and concrete-filled circular steel tubular stub columns at constant high temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Fa-xing; YU Zhi-wu

    2006-01-01

    Based on reanalyzing test results of uniaxial compressive behavior of concrete at constant high temperatures in China,with the compressive cube strength of concrete from 20 to 80 Mpa, unified formulas for uniaxial compressive strength, elastic modulus, strain at peak uniaxial compression and mathematical expression for unaxial compressive stress-strain relations for the concrete at constant high temperatures were studied. Furthermore, the axial stress-axial strain relations between laterally confined concrete under axial compression and multiaxial stress-strain relations for steel at constant high temperatures were studied. Finally,based on continuum mechanics, the mechanics model for concentric cylinders of circular steel tube with concrete core of entire section loaded at constant high temperatures was established. Applying elasto-plastic analysis method, a FORTRAN program was developed, and the concrete-filled circular steel tubular (CFST) stub columns at constant high temperatures were analyzed. The analysis results are in agreement with the experiment ones from references.

  12. Investigation of photon shielding property changes in curing high density concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Matthew B; Peters, Christopher; Rawluk, Nicholas; Schreiner, L John

    2013-10-01

    High density concrete is usually used for radiation shielding around radiotherapy treatment rooms. Because the concrete is specified differently at the design, construction, and verification stages, the relationship between the intended performance and the actual performance of the shielding material might not be entirely clear. In this study, cylindrical samples of high density shielding concrete were taken as each section of a new radiotherapy bunker was poured. The shielding performance of each sample [measured by beam attenuation and tenth-value layers (TVL)] was evaluated for 15 MV and 6 MV x-ray beams and for the 1.25 MeV monoenergetic gamma beam from a Co source. Transmission curves to 3 TVL were mapped for a representative sample. The samples were also imaged and analyzed using Co Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CoCBCT). Results indicate no significant change in the TVL of high density concrete samples as they cure. The minor fluctuations in shielding properties observed are explained by the heterogeneous structure of the samples as indicated in the CoCBCT images.

  13. An analysis of the abaca natural fiber in reinforcing concrete composites as a construction material in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdamo, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This study analyzed the flexural and splitting tensile strengths and the ductility of abaca fiber-reinforced concrete composites. Abaca fibers are natural fibers of vegetable origin from the abaca plant native to the Philippine Islands. The purpose was to investigate how various volume-fractions of the abaca fiber could affect the mechanical properties of the concrete matrix. A concrete design mix containing a volume ratio of 1.0 part Type I Portland cement and 3.0 parts sand was used in the preparation of laboratory test samples. Abaca fibers were 1 to 1.5 inches long and randomly mixed with the concrete at 0.2% and 0.4% volume fractions. The fibers were not chemically treated and no admixtures were used. Samples were cast into concrete cylinders and flexural beams. Standard ASTM procedures in casting of flexural beams and concrete cylinders and the curing of 28-day concrete samples were followed. The center-point loading method of the flexural test and the splitting tensile test was utilized. Addition of abaca fibers decreased the mean flexural and splitting tensile strengths of the concrete matrices. However, ductility of the matrices increased with the addition of abaca fibers at 0.2% and 0.4% volume-fractions. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs revealed that increasing the fiber volume-fraction influenced the growth rate of dehydration precipitates as CH (calcium hydroxide) crystals. At the 0.2% volume-fraction, smaller density of precipitates grew into large crystals, while at the 0.4% volume-fraction, the dehydration precipitates were much more dense, which were made up of small sized crystals. Abaca fibers in the concrete mix decreased the mean flexural and splitting tensile strengths, increased the modulus of elasticity, improved the ductility, and acted as a medium to slow down and stop the propagation of cracks.

  14. RESEARCH OF ADHESIVE STRENGTH OF NEW CONCRETE LAYER WITH A SURFACE OF OLD CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulgakov Boris Igorevich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a material very commonly used in modern construction, each year over 4 billion m3 of concrete is used around the world. In the recent years high-quality fine grain and other types of concrete allow giving the modern creation city buildings new architectural expressivity, meeting the requirements of the XXI century. The trend of using of these new types of concrete is also applied in the construction of tunnel systems and the subway. The fine-grained high performance concrete obtained by using a mixture of organo-mineral additives and fiber reinforcement, compares fovourably with ordinary fine-grained concrete, namely its bending and tensile strength is higher, it has good resistance to shock impacts and fatigue, as well as crack resistance, water resistance and resistance to erosion. So this type of fine-grained high performance concrete is suitable for the construction of subway tunnels and other special objects. When evaluating the concrete performance in underground rock layers subjected to complex mechanical forces, it is important to take into account the stress of metro upon departure and stopping at the stations. The article presents a new experimental method of determining the adhesion strength of fine-grained high performance concrete layer freshly poured on the surface of old concrete in the process of construction and repair of underground. The result of this method application showed that fine-grained high performance concrete is capable of skid resistance higher than 55 % compared to regular fine-grained concrete without additives.

  15. Use of Recycled Aggregate and Fly Ash in Concrete Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myle N. James

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Recycled materials aggregate from the demolished concrete structures and fly ash from burning coal shows the possible application as structural and non structural components in concrete structures. This research aims to evaluate the feasibility of using concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate and fly ash in concrete pavement. Approach: Two water cement ratio (0.45 and 0.55 the compressive strength, modulus of electricity and flexural strength for concrete with recycled aggregate and fly ash with 0, 25% replacing cement in mass were considered. Results: The material properties of recycled aggregate concrete with fly ash indicate comparable results with that of concrete with natural aggregate and without fly ash. Conclusion/Recommendations: The recycled materials could be used in concrete pavement and it will promote the sustainability of concrete.

  16. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Dong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete’s compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength.

  17. Comparison of the fracture process of the rubberized concrete and plain concrete under bending load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is employed to investigate the damage process of the notched plain concrete and rubberized concrete specimens under 3-point bending load.AE signals in the fracture process of notched specimens are illustrated by analyzing the distribution of amplitude and hit rate of AE signals.AE signals in the rubberized concrete have lower activity and amplitude than in the plain concrete.By AE location analysis,it is found that the high energy events mainly are distributed near the notch tip.According to AE energy,the fracture process zone (FPZ) is determined.By comparing the FPZ of both concretes,it is found that the incorporation of rubber particles in concrete can greatly alleviate the damage process of concrete specimens and the damage zone in the rubberized concrete is much smaller than in the plain concrete.The moment tensor is also used to analyze the type of cracks and it is found that tensile cracks dominate the early period of loading,while shear cracks become dominant with propagation of cracks in late load period.

  18. The Application of Equivalent Age Concept to Sand Concrete Compared to Ordinary Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Bella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research the equivalent age concept was used, in order to simulate strength development of heat treated sand concrete compared with ordinary concrete at different temperature, 35, 55, and 70°C, and validate the simulation results with our experimental results. Sand concrete is a concrete with a lower or without coarse aggregate dosage; it is used to realize thin element as small precast prestressed beams, in injected concrete or in regions where sand is in extra quantity and the coarse aggregate in penury. This concrete is composed by principally sand, filler, superplasticizer, water, and cement. The results show that the simulation of ordinary concrete was acceptable with an error lower than 20%. But the error was considerable for the sand concrete. The error was due to large superplasticizer dosage, which modified the hardening of sand concrete; the most influent parameter in Arrhenius law is apparent energy activation, to search for the value of the activation energy which gives the best simulation; a superposition is used of two curves of different temperature and with superplasticizer dosage 4% and several values of activation energy, 15, 20, 25, and 30 × 10 kcal. The simulation becomes ameliorated with the adequate value of activation energy.

  19. Deformation Monitoring of Retrofitted Short Concrete Columns with Laser Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, E. Ö.; Celik, M. F.; Binbir, E.; Arslan, A. E.; Çokkeçeci, D.; Seker, D. Z.; Pala, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents one of the applications of monitoring mechanical tests carried out in Construction Materials Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. In Turkey, as in many countries, large amount of existing buildings exposed to seismic hazard, therefore various analytical and experimental studies are being conducted to contribute to the solution of the problem. One of the new generation retrofitting techniques is to strength the structural members by using Fiber Reinforcing Polymer (FRP). This study summarize the results of monitoring of deformations short concrete column samples under the incremental compression load. In this study, result of two rectangular short columns are given. One of them was tested as a reference sample, the other sample were tested after strengthening by PET reinforced polymer composite materials. Besides conventional displacement and strain measurement systems, laser scanning method was used to get three dimensional deformed shape of sample at each selected steps.

  20. Quantitative measurements of trace elements with large activation cross section for concrete materials in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, A.; Iida, T.; Moriizumi, J.; Kameyama, T. [Nuclear Engineering, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sakuma, Y. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Takada, J.; Yamasaki, K.; Yoshimoto, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2000-05-01

    It is expected that some nuclear power reactors are decommissioned successively in the near future, since the nuclear power technology matures in Japan. Then, what proportion of the massive concrete waste materials is regarded as radioactive waste materials? It is a serious problem. Suzuki et at., have measured specific activities for concrete materials in Japan. In present study, we have measured quantitatively microelements with large activation cross section in concrete materials, and furnish basic data for the guiding principle of concrete waste materials. We have collected 158 samples of concrete materials in Japan. The samples were ground into pieces of 100 to 200 meshes. The amount of 100 mg in each sample was exposed to neutrons for 1 h in the nuclear reactor of KUR. We have measured radioactive elements of medium life time (La-140, Np-239, etc.) one week later, and radioactive elements of long life time (Co-60, Eu-152, etc.) one month later with Ge detector. Nineteen microelements with large activation cross section were detected. The distribution of Co-60 and Eu-152 concentrations was obtained. The mean concentration of Co-60 is 15.7 ppm, and gabbros, peridotites and basalts have high Co-60 concentrations. The mean value of Eu-152 is 8.8 x 10{sup -1} ppm. Andesites, basalts, sandstones and shales have high Eu-152 concentrations. The activated concentrations for cement depend on the place of the origin. Since the concrete materials with low natural radioactivities as gabbros and peridotites have a tendency to activation, it is necessary to pay attention for concrete materials in nuclear power plant. The natural specific activities included in concrete materials in Japan are 556.2 (16.0-896.0) Bq/kg for K-40, 33.8 (2.96-87.6) Bq/kg for U-238 and 29.1 (2.63-48.4)Bq/kg for Th-232{approx_equal} Ra-228. The quantities of microelements with large activation cross section depend on the species of rocks and the level of the weathering. If we could collect many

  1. Technical Note: Filler and superplasticizer usage on high strength concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sümer, M.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of filler (rock-dust usage on high strength concrete have been investigated through lab experiments and some results have been obtained. The experiments involved three series of concrete with different cement proportions of 375 kg/m3, 400 kg/m3, and 425 kg/m3. For each series of concrete, three different groups of samples have been prepared, the first one being the reference concrete which contained 0% chemical admixture and 0% filler, the second one contained 1.5% chemical admixture and 0% filler and finally the last group contained 1.5% chemical admixture and 5% filler to the weight of cement used. The chemical admixture used was a type of Super plasticizer with a brand name of “DARACEM 190”, and the cement used was Ordinary Portland Cement of target compressive strength 42.5 N/mm2, obtained from Nuh Cement Plant. For each batch, Slump Tests and Unit Weight Tests were performed. For each stage and group, two 15 cm cubic samples have been tested for Compressive Strength after being cured in water at 20 ± 2 °C for ages of 3 days, 7 days, 28 and 60 days. The total number of samples was 72. As a result, filler usage was found to reduce the porosity of Concrete, increase the Unit Weight of Concrete, increase the need for water and improve the Compressive Strength Properties of Concrete.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la utilización de un “filler” (polvo mineral en el comportamiento del hormigón de altas prestaciones. Para ello, se realizan ensayos de laboratorio en los que se emplean tres series de hormigón, cada una con una dosificación de cemento distinta, de 375, 400 y 425 kg/m3. Se preparan tres grupos de probetas de cada serie, el primero o de referencia con 0% de aditivo químico y 0% de “filler”, el segundo con un 1,5% del aditivo químico y 0% de “filler” y el tercero con un 1,5% del aditivo químico y un 5% de “filler” en peso del cemento. Como aditivo se

  2. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek scabbling technology was tested at Florida International University (FIU) and is being evaluated as a baseline technology. This report evaluates it for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek concrete scabbling system consisted of the MOOSE{reg_sign}, SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I, and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross-section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 318 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  3. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface....

  4. Chloride Ingress into Concrete under Water Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou; Sander, Lotte Braad; Grelk, Bent;

    2011-01-01

    The chloride ingress into concrete under water pressures of 100 kPa and 800 kPa have been investigated by experiments. The specimens were exposed to a 10% NaCl solution and water mixture. For the concrete having w/c = 0.35 the experimental results show the chloride diffusion coefficient at 800 k......Pa (~8 atm.) is 12 times greater than at 100 kPa (~1 atm.). For w/c = 0.45 and w/c = 0.55 the chloride diffusion coefficients are 7 and 3 times greater. This means that a change in pressure highly influences the chloride ingress into the concrete and thereby the life length models for concrete structures....

  5. Design Methods for Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The present paper describes the outline of a research project on Fibre Reinforced Concrete (FRC) currently being carried out in Denmark under the supervision of Danish Council of Technology, Danish Technical Research Council and Danish Natural Science Research Counsil....

  6. Concrete "Waffle" Provides Laser Beam Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building Design and Construction, 1978

    1978-01-01

    A massive concrete "waffle," riding on a bed of specially treated gravel and sand inside another building, provides the structural rigidity needed by the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. (Author)

  7. Development of Soda Residue Concrete Expansion Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bao-min; WANG Li-jiu; M F Mohd Zain; F C Lai

    2003-01-01

    A new type of concrete expansion agent has been successfully developed for the first time in the world by utilizing an industrial waste residue-soda residue and an industrial wasteliquor.Adding 3%-6% of the agent into Portland cement enables a shrinkage-compensating concrete to be prepared.Mortar and concrete containing this expansion agent have better shrinkage-compensating and mechanical properties.The raw materials component,production process,technical properties,micro-analysis of mortar made with this expansion agent,mechanism of expansion and research results are described in this article.The experimental results show that the new type of concrete expansion agent accords with the standard and its main mineral component is xCaO-ySO3-zAl2O3.

  8. Modelling Tension Stiffening in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Bo; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1997-01-01

    flexure.In the first model, the yield zone model, it is assumed that the mean crack distance is a descending function of the reinforcement stress in a crack. Furthermore it is assumed that in certain zones between the cracks the concrete is carrying its full effective tensile strength, i.e. the concrete...... with deformations in reinforced concrete disks subjected to pure shear.A physical model for the shear stress-shear strain behaviour of disks, including tension stiffening, is proposed.In the disk model it is assumed that the tensile principal stress in the concrete decreases linearly from the initiation of cracking...... until a certain load level. At any load level the model can predict the shear strains of the disk and the inclination of the crack system. When regarding tension stiffening this latter parameter will be a function of the load level.The model is compared with experimental data, and in the light...

  9. Use of metallic fibers in concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kherbache Souad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a waste (fibers in construction materials, particularly, the concretes is a technique increasingly used, for several reasons, either ecological, or economic, or to improve some properties in a fresh or hardened state. In our work we studied the behavior of the concrete and the mortar containing metallic fibers resulting from the unit BCR which is in Bordj-Menaiel in Algeria (metallic fibers resulting from the rejection at the end of the domestic operation of silvering of the tools and which is stored in plastic bags which are preserved in metal containers. Our work consists to study the behavior of the concretes and the mortars containing these fibers of cement substitution. We noted that the use of these fibers in the concretes in substitution of cement decreases its of compressive strength and flexural strength but to 10% of waste these strength remain acceptable.

  10. Evaluating Deterioration of Concrete by Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Effects of factors such as water to cement ratio, fly ash and silica fume on the resistance of concrete to sulfate attack were investigated by dry-wet cycles and immersion method. The index of the resistance to sulfate attack was used to evaluate the deterioration degree of concrete damaged by sulfate. The relationship between the resistance of concrete to sulfate attack and its permeability/porosity were analyzed as well as its responding mechanism. Results show that the depth of sulfate crystal attack from surface to inner of concrete can be reduced by decreasing w/c and addition of combining fly ash with silica fume. The variation of relative elastic modulus ratio and relative flexural strength ratio of various specimens before and after being subjected to sulfate attack was compared.

  11. PIXE/RBS as a tool to study cementitious materials: Application to the dynamic leaching of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorente, I., E-mail: irene@cenim.csic.e [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avda Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Castellote, M. [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion ' Eduardo Torroja' (IETcc-CSIC), Serrano Galvache, 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Arrabal, R. [Parque Cientifico de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, Einstein 13, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ynsa, M.D.; Munoz-Martin, A. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Viedma, P.G. de; Castillo, A.; Martinez, I.; Andrade, C. [Instituto de Ciencias de la Construccion ' Eduardo Torroja' (IETcc-CSIC), Serrano Galvache, 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Zuloaga, P.; Ordonez, M. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A. (ENRESA), Emilio Vargas, 7, 28043 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    The suitability of the application of Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques such as Particle Induced X-ray Emission spectrometry (PIXE) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) to elemental depth profiling in concrete is analysed, studying hardened samples of concrete prior to and after a dynamic leaching test. A calibration of the data has been done by comparing the results obtained by IBA techniques with those obtained by Chemical and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG/DTA). From PIXE and RBS data relevant information about the migration of minor elements, within the concrete matrix after leaching is obtained.

  12. CALCULATION ALGORITHM FOR CONCRETE LONGEVITY BY GENERALIZED CRITERION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Leonovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes problems pertaining to corrosion theory and forecast of reinforced concrete structure service life. The author considers that application of modern investigation methods on the basis of failure mechanics and analysis concrete porosity will make it possible to develop a general theory of concrete corrosion and calculation of reinforced concrete structure service life. Provision of the required longevity of reinforced concrete structures is not less important than the provision of their strength.

  13. Fiber Concrete under Temperature Drop Load with Stochastic FEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Feng; ZHANG Wen-jin

    2008-01-01

    Plain concrete plate and fiber concrete plate subjected to temperature drop load were analyzed on stochastic finite element method (FEM). It is found that fibers can enhance concrete ability to resist temperature drop load for improving concrete's fracture energy and deferring the crack process. It is found for concrete not to improve apparently its tensile strength and fracture energy is recommended to be its appraisal parameter.

  14. Strength Evaluation of Steel-Nylon Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Maniram Kumar; Er. Ankush Khadwal

    2014-01-01

    When fibres like steel, glass, polypropylene, nylon, carbon, aramid, polyester, jute, etc are mixed with concrete known as fibre reinforced concrete. To overcome the deficiencies of concrete; fibres are added to improve the performance of concrete. In this research hybrid reinforced concrete is made by using steel and nylon 6 fibres. The inclusion of both steel and nylon 6 fibres are used in order to combine the benefits of both fibers; structural improvements provided by stee...

  15. Shaking Table Tests of Reinforced Concrete Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    -varying systems and to verify various methods for damage assessment of reinforced concrete structures from soft motion measurements. In this study the maximum softening concept will be evaluated. In the paper the assessment obtained by this method is compared to visual damage assessment. The structures considered...... vector ARMA model is suitable for modal identification of degrading reinforced concrete structures and the maximum softening damage index calculated from the obtained identification provides a valuable tool for assessment of the damage state of the structure....

  16. Tests on concrete containing cork powder admixtures

    OpenAIRE

    González, B.; Llamas, B; Juan, A.; Guerra, I.

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the physical and mechanical properties of laboratory concrete made with different proportions of cork powder. While the resulting material lacked the mechanical strength characteristic of concrete, its properties may prove to be apt for certain hardscaping and agricultural uses, such as in the manufacture of pavement for playgrounds and parks, or certain kinds of structures used in livestock raising. These findings need to be analyzed and verified.

  17. Microencapsulation of Self-healing Concrete Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    particle board, hardwood plywood and laminating adhesive. Some of the properties of this chemical includes a high surface hardness, volumetric...flexibility to place healing plies in different locations within the laminate in order to tailor the repair to the likely damage. This is an excellent... textile and lumber processing. In concrete applications, this product is used to reduce the concrete porosity. When added, a chemical reaction occurs

  18. Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T. [US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft{sup 3} to 5.0 yd{sup 3}, with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties.

  19. Ductility Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    S. Eswari; P.N. Raghunath; Suguna, K

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a study on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete. The influence of fibre content on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens having different fibre volume fractions was investigated. The parameters of investigation included modulus of rupture, ultimate load, service load, ultimate and service load deflection, crack width, energy ductility and deflection ductility. A total of 27 specimens, 100×100×500 mm, were tested to...

  20. Moisture redistribution in screeded concrete slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Åhs, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    The principal objective for this licentiate thesis is to develop a methodology and evaluation model in order to make the future relative humidity in a screeded concrete slab predictable. Residual moisture in screeded concrete slabs may redistribute to the top screed surface under semi-permeable flooring, thus elevating the relative humidity, RH, and possibly exceed the critical humidity level. Passing the critical humidity level may result in material damages on the flooring and adhesive. ...

  1. Strain rate effects for spallation of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häussler-Combe Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The strain rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property – which can be covered by rate dependent stress strain relations – or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included strain rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to strain rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high strain effects [3].

  2. Behavior of Partially Restrained Reinforced Concrete Slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Takehira, Derecho , and Iqbal [34] followed a similar approach to arrive at recommended design criteria for 1 the Naval Facilities Engineering Command...Datta, T. K., "Ultimate Strength of Reinforced Concrete Slab-Beam Systems: A New Approach," r Indian Concrete Journal, Bombay, India , Vol. 47, 1973, pp...Journal of Solids and Structures, Vol. 1, 1965, pp. 97-111. 34. Takehira, T., Derecho , A.T., and Iqbal, M., "Design Criteria for Deflection Capacity

  3. Concrete as “Green Building” Material

    OpenAIRE

    ESMERALD FILAJ; ALTIN BIDAJ; ENIO DENEKO

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction material. This is due to its low cost, general availability, and of course quite easy and wide applicability. But concrete also is characterized by great environmental cost. The natural materials mined and processed each year, by their sheer volume, are bound to leave a substantial mark on the environment. Most damaging are the enormous amounts of energy required to produce Portland cement as well as the large quantities of CO2 release...

  4. Monitoring water loss form fresh concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2006-01-01

    . This paper concerns in particular a new method for site measurement of evaporation from concrete surfaces in the early hardening phase. Compared to the methods used today for determination of the desiccation process in the early hardening phase, the so-called Curing Meter permits a simple, safe and accurate...... determination of the evaporation loss from hardening concrete and thus better possibility for preventing curing problems, including detrimental crack damage due to plastic shrinkage....

  5. Shock equation of state properties of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.

    1996-03-01

    Unique shock compression experiments have been developed and pursued which provide material equation of state data for dynamic strength, pore crush, shock Hugoniot and adiabatic decompression. Experimental data have been obtained on an aggregate concrete to Hugoniot pressures of 25 GPa. New analytic methods were developed to extract equation-of-state properties from dynamic test data. Unexpected residual strain results are compared with expected thermal expansion and dilatancy properties of concrete.

  6. Utilization of Electronic Waste Plastic in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek S. Damal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In India, bitumen pavements are commonly used for highways. Due to the increasing traffic intensity, distress such as rutting and cracking of pavements are very common in Indian roads. Under varying seasonal temperature, flexible pavements tend to become soft in summer and brittle in winter. Investigations revealed that properties of concrete can be better than bitumen roads. But now a day‟s concrete roads are used commonly because concrete roads have more life span than the bitumen roads. In large cities now a day‟s concrete roads are used because concrete roads are more durable, strengthen and having more life span than bitumen roads. Waste plastics and E-waste (electronic waste both by domestic and industrial sectors can be used in the production of asphalt mix. Waste plastic, mainly used for packing are made up of polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene. Electronic waste, abbreviated as e-waste, consists of discarded old computers, TVs, refrigerators; radios, etc are basically any electrical or electronic appliance that has reached its end of life. An experimental study is made on the utilization of E-waste particles as fine aggregates in concrete with a percentage replacement ranging from 0 % to 21.5% i.e. (7.5%, 15% and 21.5% on the strength criteria of M30 Concrete. Compressive strength Concrete with and without E- waste plastic as aggregates was observed which exhibits a good strength. The feasibility of utilizing E-waste plastic particles as partial replacement of fine aggregate has been presented. In the present study, compressive strength was investigated for Optimum Cement Content and 7.5% E-plastic content in mix yielded stability and very good in compressive strength of 43 grade cement.

  7. Form Filling with Self-Compacting Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a newly started Ph.D. project with the aim of simulating the form filling ability of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) taking into account the form geometry, reinforcement configuration, casting technique, and the rheological properties of the concrete. Comparative studies...... to be taken into account. Furthermore investigations will be carried out to verify and further develop models based on the composite theory describing the effect of mixture composition on the rheological properties and stability of fresh SCC....

  8. Quality control chart for crushed granite concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa E. DESMOND

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A chart for assessing in-situ grade (strength of concrete, has been developed in this study. Four grades of concrete after the Nigerian General Specification for Roads and bridges (NGSRB-C20, C25, C30 and C35, is studied at different water-cement ratios for medium and high slump range. The concrete mixes are made from crushed granite rock as coarse aggregate with river sand as fine aggregate. Compression test on specimens are conducted at curing age of 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 56 days. Results on concrete workability from slump values, and water-cement ratios revealed that specimens with lower water-cement ratio were less workable but had higher strength, compared to mixes with higher water cement ratio. A simple algorithm using nonlinear regression analysis performed on each experimental data set produced Strength-Age (S-A curves which were used to establish a quality control chart. The accuracy of these curves were evaluated by computing average absolute error (AAS, the error of estimate (EoE and the average absolute error of estimate (Abs EoE for each concrete mix. These were done based on the actual average experimental strengths to measure how close the predicted values are to the experimental data set. The absolute average error of estimate (Abs. EoE recorded was less than ±10% tolerance zone for concrete works.

  9. Ultrasonic testing of reactive powder concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washer, Glenn; Fuchs, Paul; Graybeal, Benjamin A; Hartmann, Joseph Lawrence

    2004-02-01

    Concrete is a critical material for the construction of infrastructure facilities throughout the world. Traditional concretes consist of cement paste and aggregates ranging in size from 6 to 25 mm that form a heterogeneous material with substantial compressive strength and a very low tensile strength. Steel reinforcement is used to provide tensile strength for reinforced concrete structures and as a composite the material is useful for structural applications. A new material known as reactive powder concrete (RPC) is becoming available. It differs significantly from traditional concrete; RPC has no large aggregates, and contains small steel fibers that provide additional strength and, in some cases, can replace traditional steel reinforcement. Due to its high density and lack of aggregates, ultrasonic inspections at frequencies 10 to 20 times that of traditional concrete inspections are possible. This paper reports on the initial findings of research conducted to determine the applicability of ultrasonic testing techniques for the condition assessment of RPC. Pulse velocities for shear and longitudinal waves and ultrasonic measurement of the modulus of elasticity for RPC are reported. Ultrasonic crack detection for RPC also is investigated.

  10. Influence of Silica Fume on Normal Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Pradhan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of silica fume into the normal concrete is a routine one in the present days to produce the tailor made high strength and high performance concrete. The design parameters are increasing with the incorporation of silica fume in conventional concrete and the mix proportioning is becoming complex. The main objective of this paper has been made to investigate the different mechanical properties like compressive strength, compacting factor, slump of concrete incorporating silica fume. In this present paper 5 (five mix of concrete incorporating silica fume are cast to perform experiments. These experiments were carried out by replacing cement with different percentages of silica fume at a single constant water-cementitious materials ratio keeping other mix design variables constant. The silica fume was replaced by 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% for water-cementitious materials (w/cm ratio for 0.40. For all mixes compressive strengths were determined at 24 hours, 7 and 28 days for 100 mm and 150 mm cubes. Other properties like compacting factor and slump were also determined for five mixes of concrete.

  11. Chemical Attack of Malaysian Pozzolans Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hilton Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia produces more than 10 million tonne of by-product from industrial sector per year. As the environmental impact concerns, more than half of the by-product can be recycled to be used as construction materials. One of them is pozzolan, a cement replacing material that can be used to enhance the properties of the concrete. This paper studies the chemical attack to local prozzolans concrete. The parameters studied include weight loss, length change, and residual strength of local pozzolans concrete after been exposed to severe environment. The specimen were tested under normal room temperature, exposed to magnesium sulfate, MgSO4. 2H2O where both sulfate attack and acid attack take place. Two series of pozzolans< which is Pulverized fly ash (PFA and Palm oil fuel ash (POFA were identified. Another series of admixture, Quarry Dust (QD from quarry waste that contain high amount of silica content also been carried out. Each series will study the effect of cement replacement percentage of 5%, 10% and 15%. The parameters were compared to conventional ordinary Portland cement (OPC concrete as control mix. Accelerated testing was conducted at 3, 7, 28, 56 and 90 days. The result shows that the local pozzolans concrete were found to be in good resistance against sulfate attack compared to conventional concrete. Compared to all series conducted, series of PFA replacement gave the best resistance followed by POFA and QD replacement series.

  12. Beta Bremsstrahlung dose in concrete shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Chandrika, B. M.; Rudraswamy, B.; Sankarshan, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, beta nuclides are released during nuclear reactions. These betas interact with shielding concrete and produces external Bremsstrahlung (EB) radiation. To estimate Bremsstrahlung dose and shield efficiency in concrete, it is essential to know Bremsstrahlung distribution or spectra. The present work formulated a new method to evaluate the EB spectrum and hence Bremsstrahlung dose of beta nuclides (32P, 89Sr, 90Sr-90Y, 90Y, 91Y, 208Tl, 210Bi, 234Pa and 40K) in concrete. The Bremsstrahlung yield of these beta nuclides in concrete is also estimated. The Bremsstrahlung yield in concrete due to 90Sr-90Y is higher than those of other given nuclides. This estimated spectrum is accurate because it is based on more accurate modified atomic number (Zmod) and Seltzer's data, where an electron-electron interaction is also included. Presented data in concrete provide a quick and convenient reference for radiation protection. The present methodology can be used to calculate the Bremsstrahlung dose in nuclear shielding materials. It can be quickly employed to give a first pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed experimental study.

  13. Monitoring of Concrete Structures Using Ofdr Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henault, J. M.; Salin, J.; Moreau, G.; Delepine-Lesoille, S.; Bertand, J.; Taillade, F.; Quiertant, M.; Benzarti, K.

    2011-06-01

    Structural health monitoring is a key factor in life cycle management of infrastructures. Truly distributed fiber optic sensors are able to provide relevant information on large structures, such as bridges, dikes, nuclear power plants or nuclear waste disposal facilities. The sensing chain includes an optoelectronic unit and a sensing cable made of one or more optical fibers. A new instrument based on Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), enables to perform temperature and strain measurements with a centimeter scale spatial resolution over hundred of meters and with a level of precision equal to 1 μstrain and 0.1 °C. Several sensing cables are designed with different materials targeting to last for decades in a concrete aggressive environment and to ensure an optimal transfer of temperature and strain from the concrete matrix to the optical fiber. Tests were carried out by embedding various sensing cables into plain concrete specimens and representative-scale reinforced concrete structural elements. Measurements were performed with an OFDR instrument; meanwhile, mechanical solicitations were imposed to the concrete element. Preliminary experiments are very promising since measurements performed with distributed sensing system are comparable to values obtained with conventional sensors used in civil engineering and with the Strength of Materials Modelling. Moreover, the distributed sensing system makes it possible to detect and localize cracks appearing in concrete during the mechanical loading.

  14. Investigation of Concrete Distortion with Real-time Holographic Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to find the relationships between the distortion rule of the concrete and its surrounding stress field, a real-time optical holographic setup is used to record the distribution and the variation of the samples, the waveforms of ultrasonic emission stimulated by the micro-cracks are recorded by a transient automatic waveform recorder to determine the time, location and intensity of the actions of micro-cracks. The experiment results are worthy studying. This method provides a useful experimental approach to study the brittleness materials.

  15. TRIAXIAL COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF ULTRA HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslav Sovják

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to describe the strength of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC under triaxial compression. The main goal is to find a trend in the triaxial compressive strength development under various values of confinement pressure. The importance of triaxial tests lies in the spatial loading of the sample, which simulates the real loading of the material in the structure better than conventional uniaxial strength tests. In addition, the authors describe a formulation process for UHPC that has been developed without using heat treatment, pressure or a special mixer. Only ordinary materials available commercially in the Czech Republic were utilized throughout the material design process.

  16. Investigation of the use of Ishiagu Galena Concrete in E-M Radiation Sheilding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Ndubisi EGWUONWU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Galena samples, collected from Ishiagu, south-eastern Nigeria, were used to make concretes for experimental radiation shielding. The concretes were moulded into cylindrical tablets of various densities in order to ascertain their attenuation capability to some electromagnetic radiations. Blue visible light and gamma-ray (455-500 nm sourced from cobolt-60, were transmitted through the concretes and detected with the aid of Op-Amp and digital Geiger-Muller Counter respectively. The absorption coefficients of the samples of thicknesses in the range of 1.00 mm – 5.00 cm were determined. Results obtained show that a typical Ishiagu galena concrete of about 2.80 g/cm3 has the capacity of shielding visible blue light with about 2.51 mm TVL and 0.81 mm HVL. It also shows that the concrete of similar density can optimally shield gamma radiation with about 5.06 cm TVL and 1.53 cm HVL. The results of the investigation however, suggest the shielding and engineering properties of the galena sourced from Ishiagu. A database of shielding strength for the insitu galena was established hence, can serve as suitable platform for quality and quantity control in radiation shielding technology and can be used in high voltage radiotherapy rooms and nuclear reactors.

  17. A mechanism for the production of ultrafine particles from concrete fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Nassib; Rohan Jayaratne, E; Johnson, Graham R; Alroe, Joel; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga; Cravigan, Luke; Faghihi, Ehsan Majd; Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia

    2017-03-01

    While the crushing of concrete gives rise to large quantities of coarse dust, it is not widely recognized that this process also emits significant quantities of ultrafine particles. These particles impact not just the environments within construction activities but those in entire urban areas. The origin of these ultrafine particles is uncertain, as existing theories do not support their production by mechanical processes. We propose a hypothesis for this observation based on the volatilisation of materials at the concrete fracture interface. The results from this study confirm that mechanical methods can produce ultrafine particles (UFP) from concrete, and that the particles are volatile. The ultrafine mode was only observed during concrete fracture, producing particle size distributions with average count median diameters of 27, 39 and 49 nm for the three tested concrete samples. Further volatility measurements found that the particles were highly volatile, showing between 60 and 95% reduction in the volume fraction remaining by 125 °C. An analysis of the volatile fraction remaining found that different volatile material is responsible for the production of particles between the samples.

  18. Polymer Waste Material as Partial Replacement of Fine Aggregate in Concrete Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dahiru

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to assess the quality of concrete produced with polymer waste as partial replacement of fine aggregate with a view to establishing areas where such concrete can be used. It is an experimental research that entails the following steps: First, the polymer waste material, PWM, was collected from dumps and processed; then its melting point determined. A varying proportion of PWM was used as partial replacement of fine aggregate A nominal mix of 1:3:6 was used to prepare 150×150×150 mm concrete cubes specimens with different proportion of 0, 10, 20 and 30%, respectively PWM partial substitution of fine aggregate. Samples were subjected to workability, compressive and tensile strength tests. Results show that PWM content has inverse relationship with the workability, compressive and tensile strengths. For example, an increase of 30% PWM results to about 53 and 73.3% decrease in compressive and tensile strengths, respectively. The compressive strength of the samples is in the range of 22.8-12.3 N/mm2 while the tensile strength ranges from 1.10-0.56 N/mm2. It is recommended that the concrete should not be used for structural work but such concrete has high water retention capacity. As such, the possibility of using it as a nuclear radiation shield should be investigated.

  19. Grinding Properties of Abandoned Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Fang-yu; WANG Li-jiu; LI Qiang

    2007-01-01

    The grinding properties of abandoned concrete, which consists primarily of hardened cement, limestone aggregate and river sand, are studied. Theoretical models of grinding are used to explain the experimental observation. The results show that 1) The principle disintegration mechanism of hardened cement and river sand is volumetric grinding, although at later stages grinding of cement becomes difficult because of its flaked structure; 2) The limestone grinding process can be divided into two steps. First, volumetric grinding, with an obvious component of surface grinding, followed by primarily surface grinding as the micro-particle content increases; 3) Initially, the principle mechanism of grinding limestone and river sand is volumetric grinding, albeit less efficient grinding than if these components were ground separately, and; 4) After 10 to 20 min of grinding the grinding bottleneck phenomenon appears and after 20 min of grinding the content of micro-particles is large and surface grinding is the main mechanism while the particle size of the mixture is smaller than that of separately ground river sand and cement but bigger than that of separately ground limestone.

  20. Fly ash-based geopolymer lightweight concrete using foaming agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity.

  1. Evaluation of Colemanite Waste as Aggregate Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat MOROVA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study usability of waste colemanite which is obtained after cutting block colemanite for giving proper shape to blocks as an aggregate in hot mix asphalt. For this aim asphalt concrete samples were prepared with four different aggregate groups and optimum bitumen content was determined. First of all only limestone was used as an aggregate. After that, only colemanite aggregate was used with same aggregate gradation. Then, the next step of the study, Marshall samples were produced by changing coarse and fine aggregate gradation as limestone and colemanite and Marshall test were conducted. When evaluated the results samples which produced with only limestone aggregate gave the maximum Marshall Stability value. When handled other mixture groups (Only colemanite, colemanite as coarse aggregate-limestone as fine aggregate, colemanite as fine aggregate-limestone as coarse aggregate all groups were verified specification limits. As a result, especially in areas where there is widespread colemanite waste, if transportation costs did not exceed the cost of limestone, colemanite stone waste could be used instead of limestone in asphalt concrete mixtures as fine aggregate

  2. Isolation of iron-oxidizing bacteria from corroded concretes of sewage treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, T; Negishi, A; Komoto, H; Oshima, Y; Kamimura, K; Sugio, T

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-six strains of iron-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from corroded concrete samples obtained at eight sewage treatment plants in Japan. All of the strains isolated grew autotrophically in ferrous sulfate (3.0%), elemental sulfur (1.0%) and FeS (1.0%) media (pH 1.5). Washed intact cells of the 36 isolates had activities to oxidize both ferrous iron and elemental sulfur. Strain SNA-5, a representative of the isolated strains, was a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium (0.5-0.6x0.9-1.5 microm). The mean G+C content of its DNA was 55.9 mol%. The pH and temperature optima for growth were 1.5 and 30 degrees C, and the bacterium had activity to assimilate 14CO2 into the cells when ferrous iron or elemental sulfur was used as a sole source of energy. These results suggest that SNA-5 is Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strain. The pHs and numbers of iron-oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete samples obtained by boring to depths of 0-1, 1-3, and 3-5 cm below the concrete surface were respectively 1.4, 1.7, and 2.0, and 1.2 x 10(8), 5 x 10(7), and 5 x 10(6) cells/g concrete. The degree of corrosion in the sample obtained nearest to the surface was more severe than in the deeper samples. The findings indicated that the levels of acidification and corrosion of the concrete structure corresponded with the number of iron-oxidizing bacteria in a concrete sample. Sulfuric acid produced by the chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus thiooxidansis known to induce concrete corrosion. Since not only T. thiooxidans but also T. ferrooxidans can oxidize reduced sulfur compounds and produce sulfuric acid, the results strongly suggest that T. ferrooxidans as well as T. thiooxidans is involved in concrete corrosion.

  3. Porous Network Concrete: a bio-inspired building component to make concrete structures self-healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangadji, S.

    2015-01-01

    The high energy consumption, its corresponding emission of CO2 and financial losses due to premature failure are the pressing sustainability issues which must be tackled by the concrete infrastructure industry. Enhancement of concrete materials and durability of structures (designing new infrastruct

  4. Void structure of concrete with superabsorbent polymers and its relation to frost resistance of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Laustsen, Sara

    2013-01-01

    the difference between poor and satisfactory frost-resistance. Furthermore, the results indicate that voids created directly by SAP protect concrete against frost deterioration just like other air voids; if the concrete contains enough SAP voids, these alone can provide sufficient frost resistance. © 2013 RILEM....

  5. Analysis Technique on Water Permeability in Concrete with Cold Joint considering Micro Pore Structure and Mineral Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Jin Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold joint in concrete due to delayed concrete placing may cause a reduced shear resistance and increased water permeation. This study presents an analytical model based on the concept of REV (Representative Element Volume to assess the effect of water permeability in cold joint concrete. Here, OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement concrete samples with cold joint are prepared and WPT (Water Permeability Test is performed on the samples cured for 91 days. In order to account for the effect of GGBFS (Granulated Ground Blast Furnace Slag on water permeability, concrete samples with the same W/B (Water to Binder ratio and 40% replacement ratio of GGBFS are tested as well. Utilizing the previous models handling porosity and saturation, the analysis technique for equivalent water permeability with effective cold joint width is proposed. Water permeability in cold joint increases to 140.7% in control case but it decreases to 120.7% through GGBFS replacement. Simulation results agree reasonably well with experimental data gathered for sound and cold joint concrete.

  6. Penetration analysis of projectile with inclined concrete target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents numerical analysis result of projectile penetration with concrete target. We applied dynamic material properties of 4340 steels, aluminium and explosive for projectile body. Dynamic material properties were measured with static tensile testing machine and Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Moreover, we used three concrete damage models included in LS-DYNA 3D, such as SOIL_CONCRETE, CSCM (cap model with smooth interaction and CONCRETE_DAMAGE (K&C concrete models. Strain rate effect for concrete material is important to predict the fracture deformation and shape of concrete, and penetration depth for projectiles. CONCRETE_DAMAGE model with strain rate effect also applied to penetration analysis. Analysis result with CSCM model shows good agreement with penetration experimental data. The projectile trace and fracture shapes of concrete target were compared with experimental data.

  7. Flow modelling of steel fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich

    Concrete is one of the most widely used materials in the world. Ordinary concrete composition makes the material strong in compression yet weak and brittle in tension. Steel reinforced concrete successfully eliminates the weak tensile properties of the ordinary concrete. Steel fibres dispersed...... in concrete can efficiently substitute or supplement conventional steel reinforcement, such as reinforcement bars. Ordinary concrete composition further makes the material stiff and non-flowable. Self-compacting concrete is an alternative material of low yield stress and plastic viscosity that does flow...... and fills the formwork with a little or no effort. Steel fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete is a logical combination of the two types of concrete. The combination nevertheless creates several challenges. It has been observed by many authors that steel fibres orient and distribute according...

  8. The carbonaceous concrete based on sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today there are many requirements for strength, ecology and economy of produced concretes. The authors of the paper study attenuation of electromagnetic radiation of carbonaceous powders in the concrete composition. Carbon black was selected as a carbon powder for addition in concrete composition. Carbon black is a nanomaterial with disoriented structure of particles (average size is about 50 nm. The composition of the carbon black contains at least 90 wt.% amorphous carbon, more than 5 wt. % chemisorbed oxygen and about 4 wt.% of impurities. Materials with the addition of carbon black have electrical conductivity due to the high content of carbon. These materials are able to absorb electromagnetic radiation. For cement composition with addition of carbon black (more than 30 wt. % and water transmission coefficient of electromagnetic radiation is about –10 dB, for cement composition with 20 wt. % of carbon black the reflection coefficient is –8 dB in the frequency range 8–12 GHz. The concretes with a saturated aqueous solution of calcium chloride and 10% of carbon black possess minimal reflection coefficient (–14... –8 dB. Electromagnetic radiation shielding of concrete with the addition of sawdust was investigated. The concrete with sawdust (40 wt. % impregnated with an aqueous solution with carbon black has the reflection coefficient less than –8 dB and transmission coefficient –40 dB in the frequency range 8–12 GHz. These concretes can be used for creation of a shielded room with the technical equipment for information processing to prevent data leakage through the compromising emanations and crosstalk.

  9. The virtual fields method applied to spalling tests on concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available For one decade spalling techniques based on the use of a metallic Hopkinson bar put in contact with a concrete sample have been widely employed to characterize the dynamic tensile strength of concrete at strain-rates ranging from a few tens to two hundreds of s−1. However, the processing method mainly based on the use of the velocity profile measured on the rear free surface of the sample (Novikov formula remains quite basic and an identification of the whole softening behaviour of the concrete is out of reach. In the present paper a new processing method is proposed based on the use of the Virtual Fields Method (VFM. First, a digital high speed camera is used to record the pictures of a grid glued on the specimen. Next, full-field measurements are used to obtain the axial displacement field at the surface of the specimen. Finally, a specific virtual field has been defined in the VFM equation to use the acceleration map as an alternative ‘load cell’. This method applied to three spalling tests allowed to identify Young’s modulus during the test. It was shown that this modulus is constant during the initial compressive part of the test and decreases in the tensile part when micro-damage exists. It was also shown that in such a simple inertial test, it was possible to reconstruct average axial stress profiles using only the acceleration data. Then, it was possible to construct local stress-strain curves and derive a tensile strength value.

  10. The Factorial Analysis of Perceptual and Abstract Reasoning Abilities in Tests of Concrete Operational Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jerry S.; Wiedl, Karl Heinz

    1976-01-01

    Measures of concrete operational thought and the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices were factor analyzed for a sample of primary students. Results indicated that primarily perceptual abilities are required for solution of the Piagetian tests, although abstract reasoning is involved in the solution of matrices and in conservation of substance…

  11. A Comparison of Concrete and Virtual Manipulative Use in Third- and Fourth-Grade Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Barbara A.; Hamm, Ellen M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this classroom experiment was to examine the effectiveness of concrete (hands-on) manipulatives as compared with virtual (computer-based) manipulatives on student review of fraction concepts in third grade and introduction of symmetry concepts in fourth grade. A pretest-posttest design was employed with a sample of 91…

  12. The effect of the composition and production process of concrete on the 222Rn exhalation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, P. de; Dijk, W. van; Hulst, J.G.A. van; Heijningen, R.J.J. van

    1997-01-01

    In a series of 18 concrete samples, the influence of several parameters related to composition and production processes on the radon exhalation rate was studied. The investigated parameters were: amount and type of cement, water-cement ratio, curing conditions and curing time, type of aggregates, co

  13. Dimensional and ice content changes of hardened concrete at different freezing and thawing temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Samples of concrete at different water-to-cement ratios and air contents subjected to freeze/thaw cycles with the lowest temperature at about -80 degrees C are investigated. By adopting a novel technique, a scanning calorimeter is used to obtain data from which the ice contents at different freez...

  14. Application of ground-penetrating radar technique to evaluate the waterfront location in hardened concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Abad, Isabel; Klysz, Gilles; Martínez-Sala, Rosa; Balayssac, Jean Paul; Mené-Aparicio, Jesús

    2016-12-01

    The long-term performance of concrete structures is directly tied to two factors: concrete durability and strength. When assessing the durability of concrete structures, the study of the water penetration is paramount, because almost all reactions like corrosion, alkali-silica, sulfate, etc., which produce their deterioration, require the presence of water. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has shown to be very sensitive to water variations. On this basis, the objective of this experimental study is, firstly, to analyze the correlation between the water penetration depth in concrete samples and the GPR wave parameters. To do this, the samples were immersed into water for different time intervals and the wave parameters were obtained from signals registered when the antenna was placed on the immersed surface of the samples. Secondly, a procedure has been developed to be able to determine, from those signals, the reliability in the detection and location of waterfront depths. The results have revealed that GPR may have an enormous potential in this field, because excellent agreements were found between the correlated variables. In addition, when comparing the waterfront depths calculated from GPR measurements and those visually registered after breaking the samples, we observed that they totally agreed when the waterfront was more than 4 cm depth.

  15. Statistical evaluation of the mechanical properties of high-volume class F fly ash concretes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Seyoon

    2014-03-01

    High-Volume Fly Ash (HVFA) concretes are seen by many as a feasible solution for sustainable, low embodied carbon construction. At the moment, fly ash is classified as a waste by-product, primarily of thermal power stations. In this paper the authors experimentally and statistically investigated the effects of mix-design factors on the mechanical properties of high-volume class F fly ash concretes. A total of 240 and 32 samples were produced and tested in the laboratory to measure compressive strength and Young\\'s modulus respectively. Applicability of the CEB-FIP (Comite Euro-international du Béton - Fédération Internationale de la Précontrainte) and ACI (American Concrete Institute) Building Model Code (Thomas, 2010; ACI Committee 209, 1982) [1,2] to the experimentally-derived mechanical property data for HVFA concretes was established. Furthermore, using multiple linear regression analysis, Mean Squared Residuals (MSRs) were obtained to determine whether a weight- or volume-based mix proportion is better to predict the mechanical properties of HVFA concrete. The significance levels of the design factors, which indicate how significantly the factors affect the HVFA concrete\\'s mechanical properties, were determined using analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests. The results show that a weight-based mix proportion is a slightly better predictor of mechanical properties than volume-based one. The significance level of fly ash substitution rate was higher than that of w/b ratio initially but reduced over time. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of fly ash to self-compactability of pumice aggregate lightweight concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Murat Kurt; Abdulkadir Cüneyt Aydin; Muhammed Said Gül; Rüstem Gül; Türkay Kotan

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the effects of fly ash, different water/(cement + mineral additive) ratios and pumice aggregates to some physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting lightweight aggregate concrete. In this study, pumice had been used as lightweight aggregates. Several properties of self-compacting pumice aggregate lightweight concretes like the unit weight, flow diameter, T50 time, flow diameter after an hour, V-funnel time, and L-box tests, 7, 28, 90 and 180-day compressive strength, 28-day splitting tensile strength, dry unit weight, water absorption, thermal conductivity and ultrasonic pulse velocity tests were investigated. For this purpose, 18 series of concrete samples were prepared in two groups. Pumice aggregate was used as a replacement of natural aggregate, at the levels of 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% by volume. Furthermore, a second series of 100% pumice aggregate was used for the production of self-compacting lightweight aggregate concrete with constant w/(c+m) ratios as 0.35, 0.40, and 0.45 by weight. The flow diameters, T50 times, paste volumes, 28-day compressive strengths, dry unit weights and thermal conductivities of self-compacting lightweight aggregate concrete were obtained in the range of 600–800 mm, 2–8 s, 471–572 lt/m3, 9.2–53.26 MPa, 839–2156 kg/m3 and 0.321–1.508 W/mk, respectively, which satisfies not only the strength requirement of semi-structural lightweight concrete but also the flowing ability requirements and thermal conductivity requirements of self-compacting lightweight aggregate concrete.

  17. The effect of blast furnace slag on the self-compactability of pumice aggregate lightweight concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Murat Kurt; Türkay Kotan; Muhammed Said Gül; Rüstem Gül; Abdulkadir Cüneyt Aydin

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the effects of blast furnace slag, different water/(cement+mineral additive) ratios and pumice aggregates on some physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting lightweight aggregate concrete. In this study, pumice was used as lightweight aggregate. Several properties of self-compacting pumice aggregate lightweight concretes, such as unit weight, flow diameter, T50 time, flow diameter after an hour, V-funnel time, and L-box tests, 7, 28, 90 and 180-day compressive strength, 28-day splitting tensile strength, dry unit weight, water absorption, thermal conductivity and ultrasonic pulse velocity tests, were conducted. For this purpose, 18 series of concrete samples were prepared in two groups. In the first group, pumice aggregate at 100% replacement of natural aggregate was used in the production of self-compacting lightweight aggregate concrete with constant w/(c+m) ratios as 0.35, 0.40, and 0.45 by weight. Furthermore, as a second group, pumice aggregate was used as a replacement of natural aggregate, at the levels of 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% by volume. Flow diameters, T50 times, paste volumes, 28-day compressive strengths, dry unit weights, thermal conductivities and ultrasonic pulse velocity of self-compacting lightweight aggregate concrete were obtained over the range of 600–770 mm, 3–9 s, 435–540 l/m3, 10.6–65.0 MPa, 845–2278 kg/m3, 0.363–1.694 W/mK and 2617–4770 m/s respectively, which satisfies not only the strength requirement of semistructural lightweight concrete but also the flowing ability requirements and thermal conductivity requirements of self-compacting lightweight aggregate concrete.

  18. SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2004-06-01

    The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1

  19. Shear friction capacity of recycled concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiras, J.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the behavior of recycled concrete in response to the phenomenon of shear transfer. To perform it, a conventional control concrete and a concrete with 50% recycled coarse aggregate were designed. An additional goal was to shed light on how this behavior is modified with a pozzolanic addition, silica fume. Therefore, two types of concrete were designed, a conventional and a recycled concrete, both made with 8% of silica fume. In conclusion, a reduction of shear friction capacity was observed in recycled concretes, considerably higher in the case of the specimen without reinforcement. The addition of silica fume improved the behavior of recycled concretes. The results obtained were compared with the formulations of the different authors. In all cases, these were found to be conservative. However, the safety margins offered by recycled concretes are lower than those obtained with conventional concretes.

    En esta investigación se estudió el comportamiento de los hormigones reciclados frente al fenómeno de transmisión de cortante. Para ello se diseñó un hormigón convencional de control y un hormigón con el 50% del árido grueso reciclado. Adicionalmente, para determinar cómo este comportamiento se ve modificado con la incorporación de una adición puzolánica (humo de sílice, se procedió al diseño de un hormigón convencional y su correspondiente reciclado con un 8% de humo de sílice. Los resultados indicaron una disminución de la capacidad frente a este fenómeno en los hormigones reciclados, más acusada en ausencia de armadura pasante. La adición de humo de sílice mejora el comportamiento de este material. Los resultados experimentales obtenidos se compararon con formulaciones teóricas de diversos autores, concluyéndose que éstas son, en todos los casos, conservadoras, aunque reducen el margen de seguridad en los hormigones reciclados.

  20. Concrete/Febex Bentonite Interaction: Results On Short-Term Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, A.; Turrero, M.J.; Torres, E.; Martin, P.L. [CIEMAT, Environmental Department, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Interaction between the alkaline pore fluids from the concrete engineered barriers and the bentonite at the repository conditions may generate products that can diffuse through the porous structure of the bentonite affecting their properties. A comprehensive study based on series of short term experiments is being performed to provide experimental evidences on the physical, chemical and mineralogical changes during the concrete-compacted bentonite interaction. Samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM-EDS and FTIR. Measurements of swelling capacity, specific surface area and chemical analysis for cation exchange capacity and soluble salts analyses were also performed. (authors)

  1. The Heat Transfer Coefficient of Recycled Concrete Bricks Combination with EPS Insulation Board Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Four tectonic forms samples were conducted to test their heat transfer coefficients. By analyzing and comparing the test values and theoretical values of the heat transfer coefficient, a corrected-value calculation method for determining the heat transfer coefficient was proposed; the proposed method was proved to be reasonably correct. The results indicated that the recycled concrete brick wall heat transfer coefficient is higher than that of the clay brick wall, the heat transfer coefficient of recycled concrete brick wall could be effectively reduced when combined with the EPS insulation board, and the sandwich insulation type was better than that of external thermal insulation type.

  2. Research of rheological and physico-mechanical properties of decorative concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергей Григорьевич Гузий

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental researches of rheological and physico-mechanical properties of geocement-based decorative concrete are shown. The optimum composition of the material is defined. It is determined that introduction of the ground limestone in the concrete increases the stabilization time of process viscosity and additives Murasan BWA 21 contributes to the preservation of the geometric dimensions of the samples in the process of pulling out. Bending strength and frost resistance with a significant decrease in water absorption are increased after microwave drying.

  3. Fly ash/Kaolin based geopolymer green concretes and their mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, F N; Durgaprasad, J; Singh, N B

    2015-12-01

    Geopolymer concrete mixes were cast using fly ash, kaolin, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate and aggregates. Portland cement concrete (M30) was used as a reference sample. The effect of silica fume, temperature (40 °C, 60 °C, 80 °C, 100 °C and 120 °C), sodium and potassium hydroxides and different superplasticizers on the compressive strength are reported [1]. Maximum strength was found at 100 °C and 14 M alkali solution [1].

  4. Spalling of concrete: A synthesis of experimental tests on slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taillefer Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the results of many commercial or research tests carried out in CSTB on middle size concrete slabs. They concern 22 concrete slabs, made of normal and high strength concrete, for a rather wide range of thickness and compressive strength classes. Test procedures and a synthesis of main results are presented in order to provide deeper understanding of near-reality conditions of concrete structures. The tests concerned both new and existing tunnels. Results are detailed in relation with main parameters that are identified as impacting spalling in previous studies, such as concrete composition, concrete properties and specimen size.

  5. Review on Potential of Geopolymer for Concrete Repair and Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warid Wazien A.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracking, spalling, surface deterioration, seepage and other concrete damage of the existing infrastructure have raised concern among residents, local authorities and developers. Dealing with concrete infrastructure rehabilitation is an important issue due to most of infrastructures today are concrete based. To simply patch up the spalling concrete as temporary solution and sooner or later, the cracks will return to haunt. This paper reviewed the current research and studies on concrete repair materials, highlighting the properties of geopolymer. It covers geopolymer repair materials which addressed in the field of concrete infrastructure rehabilitation. Geopolymer had good repair characteristics and displays the potential as an excellent repair material.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Layered Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Hai-qing; CHEN Jing-tao; ZHU Ji-dong

    2003-01-01

    To improve the mechanical properties of concrete,Layered Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete (LHFRC) was developed in this paper.Through comparative tests,the effects of layered hybrid fibers on a series of mechanical properties of concrete were discussed.The mechanical properties include compressive strength,tensile strength,flexural strength,compressive stress-strain relationship,flexural toughness and cracking resistance of concrete.The testing results and analysis demonstrate that layered hybrid fibers can significantly improve the flexural strength,toughness and cracking resistance of concrete while the cost of concrete increases slightly.

  7. Analyses of concrete microcosmic structure in multi-media environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫波; 姜安玺; 王幼青; 刘丽艳; 徐桂芹

    2004-01-01

    The structure of concrete generally serves in multi-media environments; various environments act differently on concrete. The compound action of some severe environments will threaten the duration of concrete and decrease the service life of a concrete structure if improperly handled. In this paper the microstructure of concrete is observed by using Scanned Electric Microscope (SEM) through contrasting experiments in media of acid, alkali and salt with that of freezing-thawing in the same medium environment. This study is to supply a certain basis for changing traditional thinking of mechanical design and to combine construction reliability design with durability of concrete design.

  8. Surface assessment and modification of concrete using abrasive blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Lauren R.

    approximate the 3-D concrete surface profiles. The errors were reduced when a weighted average of the four linear profiles approximated the corresponding 3-D parameter. The following chapter considers the parametric and sensitivity of concrete surface topography measurements. The weighted average of the four 2-D profiles consistently resulted in underestimation of the corresponding 3-D parameters: the dispersion of surface elevations (Sq) and the roughness (Sa). Results indicated the 3-D parameter, Sq, had the least sensitivity to data point reduction. The final chapter investigated surface modification using dry ice and sand blasting. The overall objective was to evaluate the change in the 3-D surface roughness (Sa) following blasting as functions of mix design and as induced by freeze-thaw cycling, and to compare the results obtained using dry ice with those obtained using sand as the blasting media. In general, sand blasting produced larger changes in Sa compared to dry ice blasting for the concrete mix designs considered. The primary mechanism responsible for altering the surface topography of the concrete was the scaling of the superficial cement paste layer on the exposed surface, which was due to freeze-thaw cycling. The largest relative change in roughness following blasting occurred in the control samples, which had not undergone freeze-thaw cycling.

  9. Effect of heat on laterised concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe E. Ikponmwosa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of investigation of the effects of temperature variation on the compressive strength of laterised concrete. Cube specimens were cast, cured in water at ambient laboratory temperature and subjected to different temperature regimes before testing. A concrete mix ratio of 2:3:6 (cement: laterite/sand: granite with water/cement ratio of 0.65 was adopted for this investigation. The laterite content in the fine aggregate was varied from 0 to 100% at 25% interval. Specimens cured for 7 and 28 days were subjected to uniaxial compressive loading tests at room and elevated temperatures of 250, 500 and 750oC. The results show that normal concrete cannot withstand appreciable load above 250oC while laterised concrete with 25% laterite in the fine aggregate is able to resist higher load with increase in age and at temperature up to 500oC. It is also observed that there is no appreciable increase in strength at higher temperatures. The peak compressive strength value of 30.44 N/mm2 is recorded for the mix with 25% laterite-75% sand at 500oC. This is an indication that the strength of laterised concrete is generally sufficient for use at elevated temperature not exceeding 500oC.

  10. Concrete as “Green Building” Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ESMERALD FILAJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most widely used construction material. This is due to its low cost, general availability, and of course quite easy and wide applicability. But concrete also is characterized by great environmental cost. The natural materials mined and processed each year, by their sheer volume, are bound to leave a substantial mark on the environment. Most damaging are the enormous amounts of energy required to produce Portland cement as well as the large quantities of CO2 released into the atmosphere in the process. All enlisted herein, is more than verified in Albania, especially in the territories where cement production factories operate. In order to have a future sustainable development, while in the same time trying to reduce the already noticed negative effects, measures need to be taken urgently. Related to this issue ,a very successful measure is considered the use of suitable substitutes for Portland cement, especially with those that are byproducts of industrial processes, like fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag, and silica fume. Suitable recycled materials as substitutes for concrete aggregate are gaining in importance too, such as recycled concrete aggregate, post-consumer glass, tires, etc .This paper summarizes the various efforts underway worldwide, that should be undertaken in Albania also, to improve the environmental friendliness of concrete, to make it suitable as a “Green Building” material.

  11. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

  12. FLEXURAL TOUGHNESS OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehmi ÇİVİCİ

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber concrete is a composite material which has mechanical and physical characteristics unlike plain concrete. One of the important mechanical characteristics of fiber concrete is its energy absorbing capability. This characteristics which is also called toughness, is defined as the total area under the load-deflection curve. A number of composite characteristics such as crack resistance, ductility and impact resistance are related to the energy absorbtion capacity. According to ASTM C 1018 and JSCE SF-4 the calculation of toughness is determined by uniaxial flexural testing. Fiber concrete is often used in plates such as bridge decks, airport pavements, parking areas, subjected to cavitation and erosion. In this paper, toughness has been determined according to ASTM C 1018 and JSCE SF-4 methods by testing beam specimens. Energy absorbing capacities of plain and steel fiber reinforced concrete has been compared by evaluating the results of two methods. Also plain and steel fiber reinforced plate specimens behaviors subjected to biaxial flexure are compared by the loaddeflection curves of each specimen.

  13. Initial rheological description of high performance concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lorenzetti de Castro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is defined as a composite material and, in rheological terms, it can be understood as a concentrated suspension of solid particles (aggregates in a viscous liquid (cement paste. On a macroscopic scale, concrete flows as a liquid. It is known that the rheological behavior of the concrete is close to that of a Bingham fluid and two rheological parameters regarding its description are needed: yield stress and plastic viscosity. The aim of this paper is to present the initial rheological description of high performance concretes using the modified slump test. According to the results, an increase of yield stress was observed over time, while a slight variation in plastic viscosity was noticed. The incorporation of silica fume showed changes in the rheological properties of fresh concrete. The behavior of these materials also varied with the mixing procedure employed in their production. The addition of superplasticizer meant that there was a large reduction in the mixture's yield stress, while plastic viscosity remained practically constant.

  14. Chloride Transport in Undersea Concrete Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on water penetration in unsaturated concrete of underwater tunnel, a diffusion-advection theoretical model of chloride in undersea concrete tunnel was proposed. The basic parameters including porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, chloride diffusion coefficient, initial water saturation, and moisture retention function of concrete specimens with two water-binder ratios were determined through lab-scale experiments. The variation of chloride concentration with pressuring time, location, solution concentration, initial saturation, hydraulic pressure, and water-binder ratio was investigated through chloride transport tests under external water pressure. In addition, the change and distribution of chloride concentration of isothermal horizontal flow were numerically analyzed using TOUGH2 software. The results show that chloride transport in unsaturated concrete under external water pressure is a combined effect of diffusion and advection instead of diffusion. Chloride concentration increased with increasing solution concentration for diffusion and increased with an increase in water pressure and a decrease in initial saturation for advection. The dominant driving force converted with time and saturation. When predicting the service life of undersea concrete tunnel, it is suggested that advection is taken into consideration; otherwise the durability tends to be unsafe.

  15. Micromechanical Modeling of Concrete at Early Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleubekov, Kairat

    The focus of this research is a micromechanical characterization of Portland cement concrete at early age (less than 28 days). Concrete's viscoelastic properties change significantly at early age due to solidification of its matrix component. Bazant's solidification theory models concrete as a material solidifying in time. This approach is generalized to a three-dimensional characterization of a composite material with a solidifying matrix and elastic inclusions. An integral constitutive relationship was obtained using a generalized correspondence principle and homogenization techniques for elastic composite materials. In light of this approach, effective creep properties of composite spherical assemblage with an aging matrix are obtained. In addition, the elastic Hashin-Monteiro model is generalized to account for the effect of the interfacial transition zone properties on concrete creep. An effective computational platform was developed to evaluate operator expressions in order to obtain relaxation and creep functions numerically. Through numerical examples, it is shown that triaxial generalization of Bazant's solidification model enables robust and computationally efficient prediction of creep deformations in Portland cement concrete.

  16. Thermal Response Of An Aerated Concrete Wall With Micro-Encapsulated Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halúzová Dušana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years Phase Change Materials (PCM have attracted attention due to their ability to store large amounts of thermal energy. This property makes them a candidate for the use of passive heat storage. In many applications, they are used to avoid the overheating of the temperature of an indoor environment. This paper describes the behavior of phase change materials that are inbuilt in aerated concrete blocks. Two building samples of an aerated concrete wall were measured in laboratory equipment called “twin-boxes”. The first box consists of a traditional aerated concrete wall; the second one has additional PCM micro-encapsulated in the wall. The heat flux through the wall was measured and compared to simulation results modeled in the ESP-r program. This experimental measurement provides a foundation for a model that can be used to analyze further building constructions.

  17. The Influence of Phase Change Materials on the Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Álvarez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to research new thermally-efficient concrete walls, analyzing the mechanical behavior of a self-compacting concrete to manufacture an uncoated solid structural panel, with the incorporation of a micro-encapsulated phase change material as additive. Different dosages are tested and mechanical properties of the product obtained from the molding of concrete specimens are evaluated, testing mechanical compressive strength, slump flow, and density. The results reveal the optimum percentage of additive in the mixture that enables compliance with the technical specifications required by the product to be manufactured. A test is also performed for measuring the thermal conductivity for the optimal sample obtained and it evidences the reduction thereof.

  18. Stress corrosion failure of large diameter pressure pipelines of prestressed concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente, A. [Universidad Politecnico de Madrid (Spain). Dpto. de Ciencia de Materiales

    2001-07-01

    The failure of a 1.5 m diameter prestressed concrete line for water supply was examined. The water pressure opened a hole of 0.5 m{sup 2} in the pipe wall by breaking the concrete into fragments and by tensile severing of a number of coils of the wire winding. Flexural and tensile testing of samples of the broken materials showed no damage to the concrete, but showed significant losses of strength and ductility in the prestressing steel wire. The SEM analysis of the external and fracture surfaces of the circumferential wires revealed shallow cracking and corroded areas as expected from a stress corrosion cracking process. The failure analysis presented in this paper shows that such a process was able to exhaust the damage tolerance of the affected tube until the pipeline burst under the work pressures. (author)

  19. Testing Silica Fume-Based Concrete Composites under Chemical and Microbiological Sulfate Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estokova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Current design practices based on descriptive approaches to concrete specification may not be appropriate for the management of aggressive environments. In this study, the durability of cement-based materials with and without the addition of silica fume, subjected to conditions that leach calcium and silicon, were investigated. Chemical corrosion was simulated by employing various H2SO4 and MgSO4 solutions, and biological corrosion was simulated using Acidithiobacillus sp. bacterial inoculation, leading to disrupted and damaged surfaces; the samples’ mass changes were studied following both chemical and biological attacks. Different leaching trends were observed via X-ray fluorescence when comparing chemical with biological leaching. Lower leaching rates were found for concrete samples fortified with silica fume than those without silica fume. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy confirmed a massive sulfate precipitate formation on the concrete surface due to bacterial exposure.

  20. Investigation and rehabilitation to extend service life of DSS-13 antenna concrete foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riewe, A. A., Jr.

    1984-08-01

    An investigation to establish the cause and, devise a repair technique to maintain the serviceability of the DSS-13 26 meter antenna is described. Core samples are obtained from the concrete and various laboratory tests conducted. In-place nondestructive type tests are also performed. The tests established that the concrete is deteriorating because of alkali aggregate reactivity. This is a phenomenon wherein certain siliceous constituents present in some aggregates react with alkalies in the portland cement to produce a silica gel which, in turn, imbibes water, swells, and cracks the concrete. The scheme consists of a supplemental steel frame friction pile anchored grade beam encircling the existing foundation. This system provides adequate bracing against base shear and overturning due to seismic loading. Larger cracks are sealed using a pressure injected two-component epoxy.

  1. Improving Non-Destructive Concrete Strength Tests Using Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fan Shih

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive testing (NDT methods are important alternatives when destructive tests are not feasible to examine the in situ concrete properties without damaging the structure. The rebound hammer test and the ultrasonic pulse velocity test are two popular NDT methods to examine the properties of concrete. The rebound of the hammer depends on the hardness of the test specimen and ultrasonic pulse travelling speed is related to density, uniformity, and homogeneity of the specimen. Both of these two methods have been adopted to estimate the concrete compressive strength. Statistical analysis has been implemented to establish the relationship between hammer rebound values/ultrasonic pulse velocities and concrete compressive strength. However, the estimated results can be unreliable. As a result, this research proposes an Artificial Intelligence model using support vector machines (SVMs for the estimation. Data from 95 cylinder concrete samples are collected to develop and validate the model. The results show that combined NDT methods (also known as SonReb method yield better estimations than single NDT methods. The results also show that the SVM model is more accurate than the statistical regression model.

  2. Strength properties of concrete incorporating coal bottom ash and granulated blast furnace slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Omer; Yüksel, Isa; Muratoğlu, Ozgür

    2007-01-01

    Coal bottom ash (CBA) and fly ash (FA) are by-products of thermal power plants. Granulated blast-furnace slag (GBFS) is developed during iron production in iron and steel plants. This research was conducted to evaluate the compressive strength property and some durability characteristics of concrete incorporating FA, CBA, and GBFS. FA is used as an effective partial cement replacement; CBA and GBFS are used as partial replacement for fine aggregate without grinding. Water absorption capacity, unit weight and compressive strengths in 7, 28, and 90-day ages were assessed experimentally. For these experiments, concrete specimens were produced in the laboratory in appropriate shapes. The samples are divided into two main categories: M1, which incorporated CBA and GBFS; and M2, which incorporated FA, CBA, and GBFS. Remarkable decreases are observed in compressive strength and water absorption capacity of the concrete; bulk density of the concrete is also decreased. It can be concluded that if the content of CBA and GBFS is limited to a reasonable amount, the small decreases in strength can be accepted for low strength concrete works.

  3. Anti-strike Capability of Steel-fiber Reactive Powder Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxian Fan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Penetration and contact explosion tests on reactive powder concrete (RPC containing 5 per cent steel-fiber were carried out to investigate the anti-strike capability of steel-fiber reactive powder concrete (SFRPC. The penetration tests consisted of two sample groups corresponding to hit speeds 308 m/s - 582 m/s and 808 m/s - 887 m/s, respectively. The contact explosion tests were carried out in an explosion test pit using TNT with charges in the range 0.5 kg - 3.0 kg. The tests results show that the anti-strike capability of SFRPC targets is much better than ordinary C30 concrete. The penetration depths of the SFRPC targets were less than half those evaluated values of the C30 concrete targets. The areas of the blasting funnels and the explosion cavity radii in the SFRPC plates are also much less than the calculated results in ordinary C30 concrete, being about one quarter of those of the latter.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(4, pp.363-368, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.2407

  4. Thermophysical Properties of Launch Complex 17 of the Cape Canaveral Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.; Flint, Gregory Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

    2013-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of thermophysical properties of concrete is considered extremely important for meaningful models to be developed of scenarios wherein the concrete is rapidly heated. Test of solid propellant burns on samples of concrete from Launch Complex 17 of the Cape Canaveral show spallation and fragmentation. In response to the need for accurate modeling scenarios of these observations, an experimental program to determine the permeability and thermal properties of the concrete was developed. Room temperature gas permeability measurements of Launch Complex 17 of the Cape Canaveral concrete dried at 50°C yield permeability estimates of 0.07mD (mean), and thermal properties (thermal conductivity, diffusivity, and specific heat) were found to vary with temperatures from room temperature to 300°C. Thermal conductivity ranges from 1.7-1.9 W/mK at 50°C to 1.0-1.15 W/mK at 300°C, thermal diffusivity ranges from 0.75-0.96 mm2/s at 50°C to 0.44-0.58 mm2/s at 300°C, and specific heat ranges from 1.76-2.32 /m3K to 2.00-2.50 /m3K at 300°C.

  5. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  6. Strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with various types of non-metallic fiber and rods reinforcement under static loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskii, A. V.; Baldin, I. V.; Kudyakov, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of modern building materials based on non-metallic fibers and their application in concrete structures represent one of the important issues in construction industry. This paper presents results of investigation of several types of raw materials selected: basalt fiber, carbon fiber and composite fiber rods based on glass and carbon. Preliminary testing has shown the possibility of raw materials to be effectively used in compressed concrete elements. Experimental program to define strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with non-metallic fiber reinforcement and rod composite reinforcement included design, manufacture and testing of several types of concrete samples with different types of fiber and longitudinal rod reinforcement. The samples were tested under compressive static load. The results demonstrated that fiber reinforcement of concrete allows increasing carrying capacity of compressed concrete elements and reducing their deformability. Using composite longitudinal reinforcement instead of steel longitudinal reinforcement in compressed concrete elements insignificantly influences bearing capacity. Combined use of composite rod reinforcement and fiber reinforcement in compressed concrete elements enables to achieve maximum strength and minimum deformability.

  7. Marine durability of 15 year old concrete specimens made with ordinary portland, slag, and fly ash cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, T.U.; Yamaji, T.; Hamada, H. [Port and Harbor Research Inst., Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (Japan); Aoyama, T. [PS Corp. (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A study was conducted in which the marine durability of ordinary portland cement, slag and fly ash cement was examined using 15 year old plain and reinforced concrete cylindrical specimens. In addition, the performance of these cements was also examined in another study for pre-cracked reinforced concrete prism samples. The process of manufacturing cement emits huge amounts of carbon dioxide into the global atmosphere. Replacing a portion of the cement with by-products from the steel industry and thermal power plants (which are both huge emitters of carbon dioxide) can lower carbon dioxide emissions and also solve the disposal issue of slag and fly ash while increasing the long-term durability of concrete structures. In this study, concrete cylindrical specimens were made of ordinary portland cement, slag and fly ash cements. Water-to-cement ratios were 0.45 and 0.55 and the compressive strength of the concrete, corrosion of the steel bars, and chloride-ion concentrations in the concrete were evaluated. It was shown that, with the exception of fly ash cements, the compressive strength of most cements increased after 15 years of exposure compared to its 28 day strength. Type C slag cement demonstrated the best performance against chloride-ion at the surface of concrete made with slag and fly ash. Voids in the steel-concrete interface make it possible for corrosion pits to develop. The use of seawater as mixing water results in earlier strength development at 28 days and does not cause to the strength of the concrete to regress after 15-years of exposure, but it causes more corrosion of steel bars at a lower cover depth. Corrosion of steel bars is not an issue at deeper cover depths. 15 refs., 18 tabs., 8 figs.

  8. Formwork pressure exerted by self-consolidating concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Ahmed Fathy

    Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is an emerging technology that utilizes flowable concrete that eliminates the need for consolidation. The advantages of SCC lie in a remarkable reduction of the casting time, facilitating the casting of congested and complex structural elements, possibility to reduce labor demand, elimination of mechanical vibrations and noise, improvement of surface appearance, producing a better and premium concrete product. The research focussed on capturing existing knowledge and making recommendations for current practice. An experimental program was undertaken at the Universite de Sherbrooke to evaluate the lateral pressure developed by SCC mixtures. A portable devise (UofS2 pressure column) for measuring and predicting lateral pressure and its rate of decay of SCC was developed and validated. The UofS2 pressure column is cast with 0.5 m high fresh concrete and air pressure is introduced from the top to simulate casting depth up to 13 m. Then, develop and implement test method for field evaluation of relevant plastic and thixotropic properties of SCC that affect formwork pressure were done. Portable vane (PV) test based on the hand-held vane test method used to determine the undrained shear strength property of clay soil was the first setup as well as the inclined plane (IP) test. The IP device involves slumping a small concrete cylinder on a horizontal plate and then lifting up the plate at different durations of rest until the slumped sample starts to move. Identifying role of material constituents, mix design, concrete placement characteristics (casting rate, waiting periods between lifts, and casting depth), temperature, and formwork characteristics that have major influence on formwork pressure exerted by SCC were evaluated in laboratory and validated by actual field measurements. Relating the maximum lateral pressure and its rate of decay to the plastic properties of SCC were established. In the analytical part of the research

  9. An Elastoplastic Damage Constitutive Model for Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; LIN Gao; ZHONG Hong

    2013-01-01

    An elastoplastic damage constitutive model to simulate nonlinear behavior of concrete is presented.Similar to traditional plastic theory,the irreversible deformation is modeled in effective stress space.In order to better describe different stiffness degradation mechanisms of concrete under tensile and compressive loading conditions,two damage variables,i.e.,tension and compression are introduced,to quantitatively evaluate the degree of deterioration of concrete structure.The rate dependent behavior is taken into account,and this model is derived firmly in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics.Fully implicit backward-Euler algorithm is suggested to perform constitutive integration.Numerical results of the model accord well with the test results for specimens under uniaxial tension and compression,biaxial loading and triaxial loading.Failure processes of double-edge-notched (DEN) specimen are also simulated to further validate the proposed model.

  10. An elastoplastic damage constitutive model for concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lin, Gao; Zhong, Hong

    2013-04-01

    An elastoplastic damage constitutive model to simulate nonlinear behavior of concrete is presented. Similar to traditional plastic theory, the irreversible deformation is modeled in effective stress space. In order to better describe different stiffness degradation mechanisms of concrete under tensile and compressive loading conditions, two damage variables, i.e., tension and compression are introduced, to quantitatively evaluate the degree of deterioration of concrete structure. The rate dependent behavior is taken into account, and this model is derived firmly in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. Fully implicit backward-Euler algorithm is suggested to perform constitutive integration. Numerical results of the model accord well with the test results for specimens under uniaxial tension and compression, biaxial loading and triaxial loading. Failure processes of double-edge-notched (DEN) specimen are also simulated to further validate the proposed model.

  11. Concretes with red mud coarse aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dênio Ramam Carvalho de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Red mud (RM is a mineral waste, residue of the Bayer process used to obtain alumina from bauxite. While the exploration of rolled pebble damages the environment and is much more controlled by the government, the huge RM disposal areas do not stop increasing and polluting soil, rivers and groundwater sources in Amazon. In this work, the material mixtures used to produce coarse aggregates presented up to 80% of RM, 30% of metakaolin and 30% of active silica as recycled waste. Several tests were carried out to determine the aggregates physical properties and to evaluate the mechanical performance of the concretes with the new aggregates, including hydraulic abrasion strength, and the results were compared to the reference ones, i.e. rolled pebble concretes. Additionally, the sintering process neutralizes any toxic substance as occur in some RM products like tiles and bricks, and these results have encouraged an industrial or semi-industrial production of RM aggregates for concretes.

  12. Concrete Slump Classification using GLCM Feature Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andayani, Relly; Madenda, Syarifudin

    2016-05-01

    Digital image processing technologies have been widely applies in analyzing concrete structure because the accuracy and real time result. The aim of this study is to classify concrete slump by using image processing technique. For this purpose, concrete mix design of 30 MPa compression strength designed with slump of 0-10 mm, 10-30 mm, 30-60 mm, and 60-180 mm were analysed. Image acquired by Nikon Camera D-7000 using high resolution was set up. In the first step RGB converted to greyimage than cropped to 1024 x 1024 pixel. With open-source program, cropped images to be analysed to extract GLCM feature. The result shows for the higher slump contrast getting lower, but higher correlation, energy, and homogeneity.

  13. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, V.; Gannon, R. [Textron Defense System, Everett, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Textron Defense Systems (TDS) is developing an electro-hydraulic device that has the potential for faster, safer, and less expensive scabbling of contaminated concrete surfaces. In the device, shock waves and cavitating bubbles are produced in water by the electric pulses, and the direct and reflected shock waves impinging on the concrete surface result in the crushing and cracking of the concrete. Pulse energy, frequency, and traverse speed control the depth of the scabbling action. Performance thus far has demonstrated the capability of a prototype unit to process a swath 24 inches wide, up to 3/4 inch deep at a linear velocity of up to 6 feet per hour, i.e., at a scabbling rate of 12 sq. ft. per hour.

  14. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  15. Increased Durability of Concrete Made with Fine Recycled Concrete Aggregates Using Superplasticizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cartuxo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the influence of two superplasticizers (SP on the durability properties of concrete made with fine recycled concrete aggregate (FRCA. For this purpose, three families of concrete were tested: concrete without SP, concrete made with a regular superplasticizer and concrete made with a high-performance superplasticizer. Five volumetric replacement ratios of natural sand by FRCA were tested: 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 100%. Two natural gravels were used as coarse aggregates. All mixes had the same particle size distribution, cement content and amount of superplasticizer. The w/c ratio was calibrated to obtain similar slump. The results showed that the incorporation of FRCA increased the water absorption by immersion, the water absorption by capillary action, the carbonation depth and the chloride migration coefficient, while the use of superplasticizers highly improved these properties. The incorporation of FRCA jeopardized the SP’s effectiveness. This research demonstrated that, from a durability point of view, the simultaneous incorporation of FRCA and high-performance SP is a viable sustainable solution for structural concrete production.

  16. Reinforced concrete bridges: effects due to corrosion and concrete young modulus variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. C. Mendes

    Full Text Available Most of the Brazilian bridges of federal road network are made of reinforced concrete and are more than 30 years old, with little information about the mechanical properties of their constitutive materials. Along the service life of these bridges much modification occurred on vehicles load and geometry and in design standard. Many of them show signs of concrete and steel deterioration and their stability conditions are unknown. With the aim of contributing to the structural evaluation of reinforced concrete bridges it was decided to analyze the stresses in reinforced concrete bridge sections to verify the effects due to reinforcement corrosion and variation of the concrete Young modulus on the stress distribution regarding several load patterns and cracking effects in a representative bridge of the Brazilian road network with different longitudinal reinforcement taxes and two concrete Young modulus, Ec and 0.5Ec, and with different percentage of reinforcement corrosion. The analysis considered two finite element models: frame and shell elements as well as solid elements. The results indicate that these variation effects are more significant in reinforcement bars than in concrete.

  17. Lightweight concrete with Algerian limestone dust. Part II: study on 50% and 100% replacement to normal aggregate at timely age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kitouni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A control lightweight concrete (LWC mixture made with 50% and 100% of limestone as a replacement of coarse aggregates in weight was prepared. Limestone is used for economical and environmental concern. The concrete samples were cured at 65% relative humidity at 20 ºC. The compressive and flexural tensile strengths, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of hardened concrete were measured. Laboratory compressive and tensile strength tests results showed that LWC can be produced by the use of limestone. The aim of this study is twofold: one is to design a lightweight concrete with the use of limestone that will provide an advantage of reduction in dead weight of a structure; and second is to obtain a more economical LWC mixture with the use of limestone.

  18. Estimating crack growth in temperature damaged concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recalde, Juan Jose

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the structural condition of deteriorated concrete infrastructure and evaluation of new sustainable cementitious materials require an understanding of how the material will respond to applied loads and environmental exposures. A fundamental understanding of how microstructural changes in these materials relate to changes in mechanical properties and changes in fluid penetrability is needed. The ability to provide rapid, inexpensive assessment of material characteristics and relevant engineering properties is valuable for decision making and asset management purposes. In this investigation, the effects of changes in dynamic elastic properties with water content and fluid penetrability properties before and after a 300°C exposure were investigated based on estimates of the crack density parameter from dry and saturated cracked media. The experimental and analytical techniques described in this dissertation allow calculation of a value for the crack density parameter using nondestructive determination of wet and dry dynamic shear modulus of relatively thin disks. The techniques were used to compare a conventional concrete mixture to several mixtures with enhanced sustainability characteristics. The three enhanced sustainable materials investigated were a very high fly ash mixture, a magnesium phosphate cement based mortar, and a magnesium phosphate cement based concrete, and were compared to a conventional concrete mixture. The analysis provided both quantitative assessment of changes with high temperature damage and autogenous healing, and estimates of changes in mean crack trace lengths. The results showed that water interaction, deterioration due to damage, and autogenous healing recovery were different for the magnesium phosphate cement based mixtures than the portland cement based concrete mixtures. A strong correlation was found between log-transformed Air Permeability Index, dynamic shear modulus, and crack density parameter. The findings imply

  19. Effect of heterogeneity on the quantitative determination of trace elements in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weritz, Friederike; Schaurich, Dieter; Taffe, Alexander; Wilsch, Gerd

    2006-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been used for quantitative measurement of trace elements, e.g. sulfur and chlorine, in concrete. Chloride and sulfate ions have a large effect on the durability of concrete structures, and quantitative measurement is important for condition assessment and quality assurance. Concrete is a highly heterogeneous material in composition and grain-size distribution, i.e. the spatial distribution of elements. Calibration plots were determined by use of laboratory-made reference samples consisting of pressings of cement powder, hydrated cement, cement mortar, and concrete, in which the heterogeneity of the material is increasing because of the aggregates. Coarse aggregate and cement paste are distinguishable by the intensity of the Ca spectral lines. More advanced evaluation is necessary to account for the effect of the fine aggregate. The three series of reference samples enable systematic study of the effects of heterogeneity on spectral intensity, signal fluctuation, uncertainty, and limits of detection. Spatially resolved measurements and many spectra enable statistical evaluation of the data. The heterogeneity has an effect on measurement of the sulfur and chlorine content, because both occur mainly in the cement matrix. Critical chloride concentrations are approximately 0.04% (m/m). The chlorine spectral line at 837.6 nm is evaluated. The natural sulfur content of concrete is approximately 0.1% (m/m). The spectral line at 921.3 nm is evaluated. One future application may be simultaneous determination of the amount of damaging trace elements and the cement content of the concrete.

  20. Properties of Concrete Incorporating Bed Ash from Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion and Ground Granulates Blast-furnace Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG An; HSU Hui-Mi; CHAO Sao-Jeng

    2011-01-01

    The properties of concrete incorporating circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) bed ash and ground granulates blast-furnace slag (GGBS) were studied. Compressive strength,drying shrinkage, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of concrete samples containing CFBC bed ash and GGBS were used. This work used initial surface absorption test (ISAT) and rapid chloride penetration test (RCPT) on concrete to measure the absorption and the ability of concrete to resist chloride ion characteristics for different concrete samples containing CFBC bed ash and GGBS. Open circuit potential (OCP), direct current polarization resistance were obtained to evaluate rebar corrosion. The CFBC bed ash was X-ray amorphous and consist of SiO2, A12O3 and CaO compounds. As the replacement of CFBC for sand increases, the rate of initial surface absorption (ISA) increases but compressive strength decreases.When the content of CFBC bed ash replacement for sand maintains constant, the replacement of GGBS for cement increases, compressive strength increases but the rate of ISA decreases. Chloride and corrosion resistance of rebar significantly improve by utilizing a proper amount of CFBC bed ash and GGBS in concrete.

  1. Shear Strength of Partially Bonded Concrete-Rock Interfaces for Application in Dam Stability Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krounis, Alexandra; Johansson, Fredrik; Larsson, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The shear strength of the concrete-rock interface has a substantial influence on the sliding stability of concrete gravity dams founded on rock. While several studies have been done on concrete-rock contacts, there remains uncertainty regarding the peak shear strength of partially bonded interfaces. There exists, in particular, an uncertainty regarding the contribution from surface roughness of the unbonded parts to the peak shear strength of the interface due to the dependency of mobilized strength on shear displacement. In this study, a series of 24 direct shear tests are performed under CNL conditions on concrete-rock samples with different bonding conditions. Tests on samples with fully bonded and unbonded interfaces are conducted to study the strain compatibility of the different contacts, while the results of samples with partially bonded interfaces are evaluated in the context of linking the joint roughness of the unbonded parts to the peak shear strength of the interface. The results indicate that a significant part of the surface roughness of the unbonded parts is mobilized prior to degradation of bond strength, in particular for interfaces with low bonding percentages. It is recommended that further research should be conducted to understand how the contribution from roughness change with an increase in scale and degree of matedness.

  2. Experimental and Empirical Time to Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures under Different Curing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abouhussien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures, especially those in marine environments, are commonly subjected to high concentrations of chlorides, which eventually leads to corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel. The total time to corrosion of such structures may be divided into three stages: corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods. This paper evaluates, both empirically and experimentally, the expected time to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures. The tested reinforced concrete samples were subjected to ten alternative curing techniques, including hot, cold, and normal temperatures, prior to testing. The corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods in this investigation were experimentally monitored by an accelerated corrosion test performed on reinforced concrete samples. Alternatively, the corrosion initiation time for counterpart samples was empirically predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion for comparison. The results showed that the corrosion initiation periods obtained experimentally were comparable to those obtained empirically. The corrosion initiation was found to occur at the first jump of the current measurement in the accelerated corrosion test which matched the half-cell potential reading of around −350 mV.

  3. Numerical modelling of elastic behaviour of concrete reinforced with steel short fibres in plane stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Lamus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a numerical model of fibre reinforced concrete elastic behaviour implemented using the finite elements method (Hughes, 2000. In structures made of this material, each point is formed by steel fibres embedded into a simple concrete matrix. The reinforced concrete is represented inside a finite element as an orthotropic material having random material direction based on the vanishing diameter fibre model (Dvorak and Bahei-el-Din, 1982 and the mixing theory modified for short length reinforcement (Oller, 2003. Statistical analysis consisted of repeating the problem’s numerical simulation where the direction of fibres was modified by a random function to set up a sampling database from the results and measure their variability. A sensitivity study of finite element size and the number of sampling data was then carried out in terms of total strain energy. Finite element size and sampling data are recommended. The average structural response of a reinforced concrete beam with different quantities of steel fibres where minimum data dispersion was observed is given as an example of applying the above.

  4. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, B. V.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970's, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/sq in mix and a 4.5 kip/sq in mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/sq in. In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F.

  5. Evaluation of concrete recycling system efficiency for ready-mix concrete plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Luiz de Brito Prado; Figueiredo, Antonio Domingues de

    2016-10-01

    The volume of waste generated annually in concrete plants is quite large and has important environmental and economic consequences. The use of fresh concrete recyclers is an interesting way for the reuse of aggregates and water in new concrete production. This paper presents a study carried out for over one year by one of the largest ready-mix concrete producers in Brazil. This study focused on the evaluation of two recyclers with distinct material separation systems, herein referred to as drum-type and rotary sieve-type equipment. They were evaluated through characterization and monitoring test programs to verify the behaviour of recovered materials (aggregates, water, and slurry). The applicability of the recovered materials (water and aggregates) was also evaluated in the laboratory and at an industrial scale. The results obtained with the two types of recyclers used were equivalent and showed no significant differences. The only exception was in terms of workability. The drum-type recycler generated fewer cases that required increased pumping pressure. The analysis concluded that the use of untreated slurry is unfeasible because of its intense negative effects on the strength and workability of concrete. The reclaimed water, pre-treated to ensure that its density is less than 1.03g/cm(3), can be used on an industrial scale without causing any harm to the concrete. The use of recovered aggregates consequently induces an increase in water demand and cement consumption to ensure the workability conditions of concrete that is proportional to the concrete strength level. Therefore, the viability of their use is restricted to concretes with characteristic strengths lower than 25MPa.

  6. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorla, Alain B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  7. Optimal Planning of Maintenance of Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Engelund, S.

    1997-01-01

    Chloride ingress and progress of the carbonation front into concrete are considered. Probabilistic models are formulated and it is shown how the parameters in the models can be estimated on the basis of measurements using Bayesian statistics. The stochastic model is used to estimate the probability...... of initiation of cerrosion in reinforced concrete structures as function of time. Further clifferent strategies for maintenance and repairs are formulated and it is shown how the probabilistic models can be used to estimate the expected costs for different strategies and how to select the optimal strategy....

  8. Chloride Ingress into Concrete under Water Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mia Schou; Sander, Lotte Braad; Grelk, Bent; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    The chloride ingress into concrete under water pressures of 100 kPa and 800 kPa have been investigated by experiments. The specimens were exposed to a 10% NaCl solution and water mixture. For the concrete having w/c = 0.35 the experimental results show the chloride diffusion coefficient at 800 kPa (~8 atm.) is 12 times greater than at 100 kPa (~1 atm.). For w/c = 0.45 and w/c = 0.55 the chloride diffusion coefficients are 7 and 3 times greater. This means that a change in pressure highly infl...

  9. Composite timber-concrete road bridge structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojić Dragoslav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents preliminary design of the road bridge made of laminated timber. The supporting system of the main bearing elements is made of the laminated timber in the system of arch with three joints; the bridge slab is designed as continuous slab, made of nine equal fields; each pair is made as composite timber-concrete beam, where the road slab is made of concrete and the needle pieces are made of timber. Fundament is based on HW piles. All the elements are designed to Eurocode.

  10. A Study of Concrete Made with Fine and Coarse Aggregates Recycled from Fresh Concrete Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamery Sérifou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the possibility of using fresh concrete waste as recycled aggregates in concrete. An experimental program based on two variables (proportion of fine aggregates replacement and proportion of coarse aggregates replacement was implemented. The proportions of replacement were 0%, 50%, and 100% by mass of aggregates. Several mechanical properties were tested as compressive and tensile strengths. The results show a good correlation between aggregates replacement percentage and concrete properties. Concerning mechanical properties, a gradual decrease in compressive, splitting, and flexural strengthn with the increase in recycled aggregate percentage is shown.

  11. Study on the electrical properties of young concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金贤玉; 金南国; 李宗津

    2002-01-01

    The process of hydration and solidification of young concrete has significant effect on the long term strength and durability of concrete. The electrical property of concrete provides a direct and practical method for monitoring and investigating the hydration process of young concrete. This study developed an advanced system for measurement of electrical parameters, used to study the electrical properties of young concrete. The test results provided the electric parameters for concretes with different water binder ratios and different mineral admixture incorporations. The variations and characteristics of the measured electrical parameters were closely related to the physical and chemical properties of young concrete. These parameters were used to analyze and study the hydration process of young concrete.

  12. The issues and discussion of modern concrete science

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Wenke

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to two primary objectives. The first is to present the errors, inadaptability, and mistakes arising when the current theory on concrete is applied to explaining practical construction of concrete; the second is to put forward viewpoints in modern concrete science. Taking a number of engineering cases as examples, we experimentally studied and theoretically analyzed the errors, inadaptability, and mistakes when the current theory on concrete is applied to explaining practical construction of concrete. Moreover, we investigated the use of mixing ratios, aggregates, cement, high-performance concrete and fibers, as well as the frost resistance, cracking behavior, durability, dry shrinkage and autogenous healing to address and remedy the shortcomings in today’s concrete science, put forward new proposals, and make a number of innovative achievements in the field, particularly in modern theory on concrete science. The results and topics which will be of particular interest to engineers and re...

  13. The issues and discussion of modern concrete science

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Wenke

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to two primary objectives. The first is to present the errors, inadaptability, and mistakes arising when the current theory on concrete is applied to explaining practical construction of concrete; the second is to put forward viewpoints in modern concrete science. Taking a number of engineering cases as examples, we experimentally studied and theoretically analyzed the errors, inadaptability, and mistakes when the current theory on concrete is applied to explaining practical construction of concrete. Moreover, we investigated the use of mixing ratios, aggregates, cement, high-performance concrete and fibers, as well as the frost resistance, cracking behavior, durability, dry shrinkage and autogenous healing to address and remedy the shortcomings in today’s concrete science, put forward new proposals, and make a number of innovative achievements in the field, particularly in modern theory on concrete science. The results and topics which will be of particular interest to engineers and...

  14. Interaction of clay and concrete plugs - Plugging of 5 m deep hole KA1621G01 at Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Drawrite AB, Lund (Sweden); Luleaa Technical Univ., Luleaa (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Sealing of deep boreholes in repository rock is planned to be made by installing dense smectite clay plugs where the rock is low-permeable and casting concrete where the holes intersect water-bearing fracture zones. Such zones have to be stabilized before sealing starts because fragments of rock can otherwise fall off and make it difficult to bring equipment for concrete casting and clay plug units down. These parts of the holes are filled with concrete and clay plugs are then inserted up to the nearest fracture zone where concrete is filled to the required level etc. The role of the concrete in the hole and in the closest part of the surrounding fracture zone is to provide stable parts that are sufficiently fine-porous to prevent clay particles from contacting clay plugs to migrate into the fractures and be lost by erosion. While the larger parts of long clay plugs are believed to stay largely intact chemically for hundreds of thousands of years, the parts adjacent to concrete plugs may undergo changes and so can the concrete plugs themselves. The objective of the presently reported project was to identify the detailed processes and quantify associated changes in physical properties by investigating samples of clay and concrete from a 2.5 m long plug of clay over which an equally long concrete plug had been cast and left to rest for 3 years. The outcome of the investigations was that significant chemically induced changes in mineralogy and physical performance had occurred within a few centimetres distance from the clay/concrete contact but that virtually no changes had taken place at larger distance. A comprehensive laboratory study including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) on the sample material was performed including also dual beam (combined ion and electron) microscopy. It was found that the clay had infiltrated the contacting concrete plug after filling of the borehole since clay was detected both

  15. Impact sound insulation improvement of wooden floors on concrete slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Hoffmeyer, Dan; Hansen, Rói

    2014-01-01

    Improvement of impact sound insulation is one of the major challenges, when renovating housing. In Denmark, building regulations for impact sound in new-build were strengthened 5 dB in 2008, implying a main requirement L’n,w ≤ 53 dB between dwellings. The same value should also be a goal, when...... insulation in the Danish housing stock and investigation of improvement possibilities, a pilot laboratory study of wooden floors on concrete was carried out. The laboratory study included impact sound improvement measurements of full-scale samples (10 m2) fulfilling the conditions in EN ISO 10140....... The measurements indicated up to about 8 dB improvement potential compared to floor constructions typical before the latest change of regulations, namely wooden floors on joists on PE wedges or similar. In addition, tests of small-scale samples (1 m2) – unsuitable for type testing – were performed to provide...

  16. Surface Chloride Concentration of Concrete under Shallow Immersion Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Liu; Kaifeng Tang; Dong Pan; Zongru Lei; Weilun Wang; Feng Xing

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of chloride ions in the surface layer of concrete is investigated in this study. In real concrete structure, chloride ions from the service environment can penetrate into concrete and deposit in the surface layer, to form the boundary condition for further diffusion towards the interior. The deposit amount of chloride ions in the surface layer is normally a function of time, rather than a constant. In the experimental investigation, concrete specimens with different mix proportions...

  17. Edge Detection of Concrete Mesostructure Based on DIS Operator

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Bin; Xu, Zicheng; Xia, Jin; Jin, Shijie; Jin, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    Aggregate edge detection is the basis of creating concrete mesoscale model, which is applied to analyze concrete mesoscale characteristics. A concrete digital image edge detection method using DIS operator is presented in this paper. Mean filter, multi-scale filter, and Gaussian filter are compared on the effect of concrete image noise reduction. Based on the result, Gaussian filter is the most optimum method to reduce image noise and remain aggregate edge distinct. Sobel operator, Laplacian ...

  18. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF CONCRETE PERFORMANCE USING FINITE ELEMENT APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Parjoko, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to understand the effect of applying several parameters: different axle load configuration, concrete properties, subgrade properties, slab thickness, joint characteristics, shoulder construction, bounded HMA overlay on concrete pavement, and bounded and unbounded CTB foundation over subgrade on the fatigue and erosion related distresses in concrete pavements. KENSLAB, an elaborate finite element program is used to determine the concrete pavement responses: stresses and deflect...

  19. Application of Neural Network for Concrete Carbonation Depth Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Daming; Niu, Ditao; Dong, Zhenping

    2014-01-01

    Concrete carbonation is one of the most significant causes of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures in atmospheric environment. However, current models based on the laboratory tests cannot predict carbonation depth accurately. In this paper, the BP neural network is optimized by the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to establish the model of the length of the partial carbonation zone for concrete. After simulation training, the improved model is applied to a concrete bridg...

  20. Nonlinear analysis of massive concrete at successive construction

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The presented doctoral thesis deals with numerical analysis of fresh mass concrete, that is concrete whose temperature rise due to heat of cement hydration must be controlled. The thesis consists of two parts. In the first part, a numerical model which solves a fully coupled problem of water, moist air, and heat transfer in fresh concrete and mechanical analysis is presented. Basic equations are deduced from the model of the porous body, which describes concrete as a material, composed of ...